BY NANCY SPENCER

nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Each year,
the Canal Days Committee
doles out the proceeds from
the festival. This year, $6,000
was earmarked for something
a little different — a 9-hole
disc golf course at Leisure
Park.
According to Canal Days
Coordinator Diane Sterling,
disc golf is very popular with
6,600 courses in the U.S.
“Disc golf is very popu-
lar right now,” Sterling said.
“We play several places and
now we can play right here.”
Sterling said Leisure Park
provided the perfect setting
for a course.
“You need about 3/4 of
a mile walking path and the
park has just over that,” she
said. “It was like that space
was just waiting for us.”
Disc golf is a flying disc
game in which individual
players throw a flying disc at
a target.
“The object of the game
is to traverse a course from
beginning to end in the fewest
number of throws of the disc.”
according to the Professional
Disc Golf Association.
The number of disc golf
courses has more than dou-
bled in 8 years from 2000 to
2008.The game is played in
about 40 countries around the
world.
Signage at each teeing
area notes how many throws
or “par” the hole is and the
location of the basket or hole.
Courses are usually laid out
in wooded areas with diverse
terrain that are part of the
course.
An official rules board
is posted at the entrance of
Leisure Park.
Monday, December 17, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
‘Hobbit’ tops box office, p8

NFL roundup, p7
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Announcements 8
Classifieds 9
TV 10
World News 11-12
Index
M o s t l y
cloudy Tuesday
morning then
b e c o m i n g
partly cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 40s. Lows in the lower
30s. See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
The Delphos Optimist
Christmas Eve Santa
Visitation program is accept-
ing letters asking Santa to
visit area children ages 0-9.
Letters must include name,
age, gender and address
where gifts should be deliv-
ered as well as a phone num-
ber. If a certain time (after
5:30 p.m. ) is requested,
please note in letter. Letters
can be sent to P.O. Box
192, Delphos OH 45833
and should be postmarked
no later than Wednesday.
Santa will begin his
route at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 24.
Santa Visitation
taking letters
St. Peter’s
offers‘Longest
Night Service’
The “Longest Night
Service” at St. Peter
Lutheran Church is set for
7 p.m. on Wednesday.
St. Peter Lutheran Church
realizes the Christmas season
may not be a joyous time for
everyone. Circumstances like
grief, illness, aging, stress,
loneliness, unemployment
and financial worry can seem
magnified during the holidays.
The “Longest Night
Service” is open to the com-
munity. Feel free to extend an
invitation to someone who may
be hurting this time of year.
Cage ticket sales
The St. John’s Athletic
Department is selling pre-sale
tickets ($4 for students, $6
for adults) for road games
Friday at Continental (6
p.m. JV start) and Dec. 29
at Van Wert and Saturday at
home vs. Celina until 1:30
p.m. Thursday and from
7:30-10:30 a.m. Friday in
the high school office.
Jefferson is also sell-
ing pre-sale tickets ($ for
students, $5 for adults) for
its boys games: at Ottoville
(7 p.m. Tuesday) and at
home Friday (Coldwater);
its girls game at Ada
(Thursday) and Van Wert
(Saturday); and Dec. 28-29
at the Parkway Holiday
Tournament (both teams);
during normal/holiday office
hours at all four City School
District buildings and the
Administrative Building.
All tix at the gates
are $6 for both.
TODAY
Girls Basketball (6 p.m.):
St. John’s at Shawnee;
Crestview at Fort Jennings;
Wayne Trace at Lincolnview.
Swimming and Diving:
Elida at Bath Quad, 9/10 a.m.
TUESDAY
Boys Basketball (6
p.m.): Fort Jennings at
Crestview; Van Wert at
Paulding; Jefferson at
Ottoville, 7 p.m. (V only)
Girls Basketball (6
p.m.): New Knoxville at
Spencerville; Columbus
Grove at Kalida (PCL).
Thrift Shop
joins cyberworld
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The
Interfaith Thrift Shop has
now gone global.
When the Thrift Shop mem-
bers reached out to Jefferson
High School’s Computer
Applications instructor Melissa
McClurg for assistance with
creating a website, McClurg
asked for volunteers for the
project. Makayla Binkley, a
junior, took on the challenge
and put her creative skills to
the test. She was determined to
design and promote the site as
a way to reach out and help the
community.
“The process — catalog-
ing the thrift store’s website
needs, taking photos of the
actual store, and completing
the design — took about two
weeks,” Binkley detailed. “I
developed the theme of what
the Thrift Shop stands for.”
Binkley presented the web-
site to Social Service Director
Becky Strayer and Board
President Carol Cunningham,
along with other organiza-
tion members. It was unani-
mous, the site was approved
by each member of the group.
In addition to designing the
site, Binkley taught Strayer
how to maintain the site; set
up the domain, update the
site with blog, sale, commu-
nity outreach information and
upload photos.
“I am very impressed,”
Strayer exlained. “She
[Makayla] has done a mar-
velous job.”
“It helps us reach out to
everyone through the web-
site,” Cunningham elatedly
added.
Binkley and McClurg
elaborated on the software
the students use to create
their own digital portfolios,
as well as the site for the
Thrift Shop.
“The free web design
software is from a compa-
ny called Weebly,” Binkley
detailed the design process.
“It’s a drop-and-drag website
builder that allows you to cre-
ate and place contact forms,
links to satellite maps and
email accounts on a site.”
“The digital portfolios
provide students a way to
showcase their achievements
and creativity in school that
they can share with friends,
family and the community,”
McClurg conveyed the pride
she has in her students.
Makayla Binkley interacts with the program, Weebly,
used to design the Thrift Shop website. (Delphos Herald/
Stephanie Groves)
Newtown plans
burials; school’s
future uncertain
By MATT APUZZO
and PAT EATON-ROBB
The Associated Press
NEWTOWN, Conn. — A
grieving Connecticut town
braced itself today to bury the
first two of the 20 small vic-
tims of an elementary school
gunman and debated when
classes could resume — and
where, given the carnage in
the building and the chil-
dren’s associations with it.
The people of Newtown
weren’t yet ready to address
the question just three days
after the shooting at Sandy
Hook Elementary School,
and a day after President
Barack Obama pledged to
seek change in memory of
the children and six adults
ruthlessly slain by a gunman
packing a high-powered rifle.
“We’re just now getting
ready to talk to our son about
who was killed,” said Robert
Licata, the father of a student
who escaped harm during
the shooting. “He’s not even
there yet.”
Newtown officials couldn’t
say whether Sandy Hook
Elementary, where authori-
ties said all the victims were
shot at least twice, would ever
reopen. Today, classes were
canceled, and the district was
making plans to send surviv-
ing Sandy Hook students to
a former school building in a
neighboring town.
The gunman, 20-year-old
Adam Lanza, was carrying
an arsenal of hundreds of
rounds of especially deadly
ammunition, authorities said
Sunday — enough to kill just
about every student in the
school if given enough time,
raising the chilling possibility
that the bloodbath could have
been even worse.
The shooter decided to kill
himself when he heard police
closing in about 10 minutes
into Friday’s attack, Gov.
Dannel P. Malloy said on
ABC’s “This Week.”
At the interfaith service
in Newtown on Sunday eve-
ning, Obama said he would
use “whatever power this
office holds” to engage with
law enforcement, mental
health professionals, parents
and educators in an effort to
The Kiwanis K-Kids visited the residents of Vancrest Healthcare Center Friday
afternoon to bring presents and Christmas cheer. The K-Kids, led by Diane Wiltsie,
left, sang Jingle Bells, Deck the Halls and Joy to the World, inviting the residents to
join in. (Delphos Herald/Stacy Taff)
K-Kids visit Vancrest Healthcare Center
The K-Kids spent some time getting to know the residents before they sang
Christmas carols. Vera Loetz, left, tells K-Kids Hannah Welker, second from left,
Tyrayna Olmeda and Abby German about her family.
Canal Days proceeds hit
‘hole in one’ at Leisure Park
Jim Vaske, left, and Dana Sterling place the signage for
the sixth disc golf “hole” at Leisure Park.
Diane Sterling takes aim at a disc golf basket. See related
photo on page 12. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
See BURIAL, page 11
2
3610 Elida Road
Lima, Ohio 45807
Ph.: 419-228-1125
Fax: 419-222-7330
Website: RentLima.com
Everything you need for a job well done!
•RENTAL
•SALES
•Construction
Equipment
•Party supplies
& much more
ASAP
SELF
STORAGE
2466 N. Cable Rd.
Lima, OH 45807
419-225-9333
THE ELIDA
FLEA MARKET
“Inside & Open Year Round”
LOCALLY OWNED
Antiques, Collectibles,
Furniture & A Lot
More “STUFF”
Open:
Thur., Fri. & Sat. 9-6;
Sun. 11-6
216 S. Greenlawn, Elida
(419) 339-2225
The Hodge Podge Store
This is a 98 family
consignment garage sale
220 S. Greenlawn Ave. Elida, Ohio
Open Year Round
Thursday, Friday & Saturday/
9:00-5:00
Residential / Commercial
3626 Allentown Rd., Lima, Ohio 45807
CARPET - VINYL - CERAMIC - FLOOR TILE - ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS
Ph. (419) 331-4372 Fax (419) 331-8243
www.tdinteriorsinc.com
Stop by and see our new showroom!
419-339-6800
705 E. Main St., Elida
(St. Rt. 309)
(just west of Speedway)
✦Mulch
✦TopSoil
✦PetFood
Supplies
✦PurinaFeeds
The Therapeutic Touch II
113 E. Kiracofe Ave. Elida
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE
419-235-2106
Lisa Edelbrock Ricker, LMT
Walk-ins welcome
Bring in / or mention this ad and get $5 off
These businesses are proud of their
community and ask you to visit them in
ELIDA.
2 – The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 134
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or villag-
es where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
$1.48 per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Feb. 16, 1977-Dec. 15, 2012
Audrey Lynne Moore,
35, of Payne, went home to
be with her Lord and Savior
at 11:25 a.m. Saturday, at
Van Wert Inpatient Hospice
Center, after bravely fighting
a lengthy battle with cancer.
She was born on Feb.
16, 1977, in Paulding to
Nancy (Thompson) and Tony
Burkley, who survive in
Payne,
On Aug. 26, 2000, she
married Chad Moore, who
also survives in Payne.
Survivors also include a
son, Dane at home; a daugh-
ter, Mallory at home; and
a sister, Alison Burkley of
Hilton Head Island, S.C.
She is preceded in death
by her paternal grandparents,
Marion and Bonita Burkley;
and maternal grandparents,
Virgil and Helen Thompson.
Mrs. Moore was the direc-
tor of student life at IPFW
and enjoyed providing the
orientation program for stu-
dents and parents and instill-
ing leadership skills in her
students to provide a more
fulfilling college experience.
She also attended Woodburn
Missionary Church and
graduated from Paulding
High School in 1995 and
received a bachelor’s degree
from Bowling Green State
University in 1999. She
obtained a master’s degree
in education from Indiana
University at IPFW in 2004.
Funeral services will
begin at 10 a.m. Wednesday
at Woodburn Missionary
Church, 5108 Bull Rapids
Road, Woodburn, Ind., the
Rev. Joel DeSelm officiat-
ing. She will be laid to rest at
Lehman Cemetery, Payne.
Friends may call from 3-9
p.m. Tuesday and 9-10 a.m.
Wednesday at Woodburn
Missionary Church.
To honor Audrey’s
request, the family asks that
in lieu of flowers, throws or
other tributes, donations be
made to one of the follow-
ing memorials: Woodburn
Missionary Church Youth
Group; Community Health
Professionals (Hospice);
Audrey Moore Memorial
for Leadership Development
Fund or the Moore Children’s
Education Fund.
Arrangements are by
Dooley Funeral Homes of
Antwerp & Payne.
Condolences and fond
memories may be shared at
www.dooleyfuneralhome.
com
Feb. 4, 1925-Dec. 15, 2012
Ruth E. Schindler, 87, of
Fort Jennings, died at 11:30
a.m. Saturday at St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
She was born Feb. 4, 1925,
in Rimer to Charles and
Mirna (Magill) Beamand,
who preceded her in death.
On Sept. 3, 1947, she
married Carlyle Schindler,
who died on May 28, 1997.
Survivors include a two
sons, Gerald (Jan) Schindler
of Marion, Iowa, and Jack
Schindler of Fort Jennings;
two daughters, Vicki (David)
Wilkins of Fort Jennings
and Doris (John) Stephens
of Harrod; 11 grandchil-
dren, Rachel Clayton and
Randy Schindler, Jennifer
Bush, Jaime Burns,
Jonathon Schindler, Leanne
Bockey, Brian Wilkins,
John Stephens, Birdella
Stephens, Christie Stephens
and Rachel Able; and 12
great-grandchildren.
She was also preceded in
death by a daughter, Lisa
Schindler; a daughter-in-
law, Jan Schindler; and a
grandson, Jay Stephen.
Mrs. Schindler was a
homemaker and farm wife.
She attended Ottawa River
Church. She enjoyed gar-
dening, sewing and fishing
at Marble Lake. She loved
spending time with her fam-
ily and animals and loved
entering contests. In 1999,
she won a new Ford pickup
truck.
Funeral services will
begin at 11 a.m. Tuesday at
Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, the Rev. Mark Walls
officiating. Burial will be in
Ottawa River Cemetery.
Friends may call from
2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. today
at the funeral home.
Preferred memorials are
to the family.
May 24, 1916-Dec. 14, 2012
Lorene Elizabeth Fuerst,
96, of Columbus Grove, died
at 11:05 p.m. Friday at The
Meadows of Kalida.
She was born May 24,
1916, in Ottoville, to Bernard
and Lucy (Martin) Schulte,
who preceded her in death.
On April 23, 1940, she
married Norbert Fuerst, who
died May 28, 1994.
Survivors include five
children, Patricia (Karl)
Schnipke of Toledo, James
(Bonnie) Fuerst and Richard
(Phyllis) Fuerst of Columbus
Grove, Jane (Henry) Kaufman
of Ottawa and Magdalen
(Donald) Wehri of Kalida;
a sister, Dolores VanOss
of Ottoville; two sisters-in-
law, Mary Lou Schulte of
Delphos and Martha Fuerst of
Columbus Grove; 22 grand-
children, Denise (Schnipke)
Stark, Krista Schnipke, Arlene
(Louth) Cress, Dean Louth,
Sonya (Fuerst) Selhorst,
James Fuerst, Steven Fuerst,
Laura (Fuerst) Schumacher,
Renae (Fuerst) Olivo, Nora
(Fuerst) Altenburg, Teresa
(Fuerst) Briggs, Julie
(Fuerst) Schroeder, Mary
(Fuerst) Cartwright, Melissa
(Fuerst)Hughes, Michelle
(Kaufman) Giesswein, Regina
(Kaufman) Taylor, Bryan
Kaufman, Sarah (Kaufman)
Stechschulte, Kathryn
(Wehri) Karhoff, Jennifer
(Wehri) Salvina, Andrew
Wehri, and Jillian Wehri; 48
great-grandchildren, Tyler
and Tiffany Fligor, Andrew
and Alyssa Stark, Andrew,
Victoria and Alex Cress,
Abigail, Elizabeth and Emily
Louth, Will, Anna and Grace
Selhorst, Owen, Zach, Lauren
and Wyatt Fuerst, Brady,
Breann and Ben Fuerst, Lydia
and Jackson Schumacher,
Anthony, Abigail and
Elizabeth Stringfield,
Sophia Olivo, Madison and
Natalie Altenburg, Morgan
Auchmuty, Miranda and
Cayden Briggs, Landen,
Levi, Zaine and Wynn
Schroeder, Nathan, Hannah
and Emma Cartwright,
Karlie Hughes, Chandler
and Dylan Giesswein, Ava
and Parker Taylor, Grant
Kaufman, Lillian and Easton
Stechschulte, Grayson
Karhoff and Lucas Salvina;
and three stepgreatgrandchil-
dren, Marcos Olivo; Victoria
and Breanna Briggs.
She was also preceded in
death by a sister, Loretta Smith;
a brother, Henry Schulte; and
a grandson, Bernard Fuerst.
As a child, Lorene attend-
ed the Jackson Township
One-Room School, in Putnam
County. A homemaker, she
worked on the family farm
with the love of her life,
Norbert. She would gather
eggs, sometimes as many as
four to five thousand a day.
She was a member of the St.
Anthony Church, Columbus
Grove, and its Altar Rosary
Society. She loved working
outdoors and was an avid
flower gardener. Her other
interest included, crocheting,
baking, making homemade
noodles, but nothing was
more foremost than her faith
and her family.
Mass of Christian burial
will begin at 10 a.m. Tuesday
at St. Anthony’s Catholic
Church, the Rev. Tom Extejt
officiating. Burial will be in
the church cemetery.
Friends may call 2-8
p.m. today at Hartman Sons
Funeral Home, Columbus
Grove, where a rosary will
begin at 8 p.m.
Preferred memorials
are to St. Anthony School
Endowment Fund or St.
Anthony Church.
ST. RITA’S
A girl was born Dec. 14 to
Samantha and John Steiner of
Elida.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Cloudy.
Chance of rain show-
ers through midnight, then
chance of snow after mid-
night. Lows in the lower 30s.
North winds 5 to 10 mph
shifting to the northwest after
midnight. Chance of measur-
able precipitation 50 percent.
TUESDAY: Mostly
cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs
in the mid 40s. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. Lows in the
lower 30s. Southwest winds
5 to 10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Partly
cloudy in the morning then
becoming mostly cloudy.
Highs in the upper 40s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph shifting
to the southeast in the after-
noon.
Corn $7.37
Wheat $7.79
Soybeans $14.95
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12 M
Pick 3 Evening
8-8-7
Pick 3 Midday
3-4-0
Pick 4 Evening
0-6-3-8
Pick 4 Midday
1-6-4-9
Pick 5 Evening
7-3-0-7-9
Pick 5 Midday
9-0-5-5-2
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $50 M
Rolling Cash 5
03-05-07-09-26
Estimated jackpot: $100,000
Ruth E. Schindler
Lorene Elizabeth
Fuerst
Audrey Lynne
Moore
Delphos weather
Electronics taken
from vehicle
Woman cited for
driving under
suspension
Bicycle missing
from residence
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 58 degrees,
low was 44. Weekend rainfall
was recorded at .03 inch. High
a year ago today was 32, low
was 30. Record high for today
is 59, set in 1984. Record low
is -8, set in 1989.
At 4:39 p.m. on Sunday,
Delphos Police were called to
the 500 block of West Third
Street in reference to a theft
complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated someone had
gained entry into the victim’s
vehicle and had taken a lap-
top computer and an iPhone
charger.
At 4:51 p.m. on Thursday,
while on routine patrol,
Delphos Police came into
contact with Robin Hamilton,
46, of Delphos, at which time
it was found that Hamilton
was operating a motor vehicle
while having her driving priv-
ileges suspended.
Hamilton was cited into
Lima Municipal Court on the
charge.
At 12:55 p.m. on
Wednesday, Delphos Police
were called to the 400 block
of South Canal Street in refer-
ence to a theft complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival, they
met with the victim, who advised
someone had taken a bicycle
from outside of the residence.
Lima man
found in
Arizona
A Lima man missing since
Nov. 30 has been located.
Dominic Fricano, 55, owner
of Viva Maria Pizzeria in the
Lima Mall, left his business to
run an errand and wasn’t heard
from again until Saturday
when he contacted his wife on
his cell phone from a Walmart
parking lot in Cottonwood,
Ariz. Fricano was disoriented
and dehydrated according to
reports after he was located by
Cottonwood authorities.
His wife, Susan Fricano,
flew to Arizona to be with
him.
Officials from the Allen
County Sheriff’s Office are
anxious to speak with Fricano
about his whereabouts over
the last 15 days and how he
came to be in Arizona and
why he hadn’t contacted any-
one.
The first state to recognize
Christmas as an official
holiday was Alabama in
1836.
1
John Odenweller’s
Lion Clothing
Formalwear Headquarters
Phone 419-692-9981
Open Daily 9 AM to 5:30; Mon. & Fri. til 8
SILK SCREENING & EMBROIDERY
206 N. Main St.
Twas the week before Christmas & all through
the store the boss was in an uproar ...
Prices are slashed so you don’t have to spend
your whole stash!
Sweaters
30
%

Winter Coats,
Top Coats
30
%

Slacks
30
%

Jeans
Levi & Lee
30
%

Sport &
Dress Shirts
25
%

OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Look behind any of the familiar faces at our
four outpatient therapy centers and you’ll nd
a talented professional who is ready to help
you get better.
Jill lives in Ottoville and works as physical
therapist at the Delphos Ambulatory Care
Center. She is a licensed physical therapist.
Learn more at stritas.org.
Outpatient Therapy
Delphos Ambulatory Care Center • 1800 E. Fifth Street • Delphos, Ohio 45833
Leading you to better health
Jill Wenzlick
Physical Therapist
Delphos
Ambulatory
Care Center
Care you can trust,
people you know.
Jill specializes in
• Orthopedics
• Headache treatment
• Spine care
• Vestibular rehab
KOSTA’S
Topp Chalet
Restaurant and Lounge
FAMILY FRIENDLY
ATMOSPHERE
WITH A
EUROPEAN TWIST
•PIZZA
•GREEK
SALADS
•GYROS
•STEAKS
•SEAFOOD
Open T-W-Th-Sat. at 4 p.m.
Fri. & Sun. at 11 a.m.
229 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, Ohio
CALLFORWEEKENDSPECIALS!
419-692-8888 or 419-692-8751
Holiday SPECial
$
2
00
OFF
15”or18”PIZZA
(specialty pizza not included)
$
1
00
OFF an order
of Cheesy Breadsticks
Banquet Room
for Christmas
Parties
(seats up to 50)
Make your
reservations today
Make your
New Year’s Eve
Reservations
now!
NOW
ACCEPTING
CREDIT
CARDS!
Lehmann’s
FURNITURE
Great Deals During Our
Sign up to win a
LA-Z-BOY
Recliner!
Lehmann’s
FURNITURE • FLOORING
Comfort. It’s what we do.
TM
130 N. Main, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-0861
Open: M-Fri.- 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.;
Sat. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun. - 12 to 4 p.m.
Christmas Eve: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Closed Christmas Day!
LA-Z-BOY
Leather Recliners
Starting at
$
499
00
(in Stock Only....Reg. Sale price $709
00
)
Early inventory Clearance
with Additional Mark Downs
on All Discontinued Items!
❄FREE DELIVERY❄
WITHIN 50 MILES
6-MONTH FINANCING!
Lana Marie
Salazar
June 8, 2005 - Dec. 17, 2006
You are our angel,
our darling, our star...
and our love will
fnd you, wherever you are.
Sadly missed,
Michael, Jennifer, Lena,
Luke, Lane, & Lila
Grandma & Grandpa
Monday, December 17, 2012 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS Student loans defaulters
face credit problems
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Many of those contributing
to the growing default rate for
federal student loans include
people who want to pay but
can’t and who end up facing
a lifetime of credit problems,
The Columbus Dispatch
reported Sunday.
While millions default-
ing on loans have chosen to
ignore them — costing tax-
payers millions of dollars.
— some borrowers can’t pay
because of financial trouble
due to illness or other prob-
lems beyond their control,
the newspaper said in a series
on credit-reporting prob-
lems. The system doesn’t
distinguish between types of
defaulters, and both are treat-
ed as financial deadbeats.
Low credit scores for those
who dont pay — despite the
reason — prevent them from
buying cars, renting apart-
ments and even getting jobs
in some cases.
“The system is extremely
unforgiving,” said Deanne
Loonin, a National Consumer
Law Center attorney who
directs the Student Loan
Borrower Assistance Project
for the Boston-based nonprof-
it agency. “We’ve chosen, as
a public policy, very punitive
collection. From a taxpayer-
return point of view, it makes
more sense to help them suc-
ceed.”
The student-loan default
rate keeps growing. More
than 37 million borrowers
owe more than $1 trillion
in student loans — with the
majority government loans
— and more than 5 million
people are in default, the
newspaper reported.
The U.S. Department of
Education tracks student
loans for the first three years
of repayment, and the most
recent data show that 13.4
percent of borrowers who
were to begin repayment in
2009 defaulted by the end of
2011, defined as not making
payments for nine consecu-
tive months.
The Dispatch analyzed a
random sample of the near-
ly 16,000 lawsuits the U.S.
government has filed against
defaulted student-loan debt-
ors since 2007. Of 394 cases,
more than 73 percent were
filed a decade after borrowers
fell into default and nearly a
third were filed 20 years after
default.
Because of compounding
interest and debt-collection
fees, defendants owe a
median debt of $8,100 —
nearly twice what they bor-
rowed. More than 40 per-
cent owe double what they
borrowed.
Terri Crothers of Gallipolis,
in southern Ohio, paid on her
student loans for nine years
until she was hit by medical
bills after a car crash. With
collection fees and interest,
the middle-school teacher
now owes nearly double what
she originally borrowed and
pays $500 a month.
“I couldn’t help that I got
hurt,” she said. “It’s not right
that I owe so much more than
I borrowed, even after paying
them off faithfully.”
The federal government
can garnish paychecks, seize
income-tax returns and take
Social Security benefits from
borrowers who defaulted.
There is no statute of limita-
tions covering federal loans,
and it’s virtually impossible
to get rid of the debt through
bankruptcy, according to the
newspaper.
The Education Department
has said borrowers can get
rid of default and its nega-
tive effect on credit scores
through loan consolidation or
on-time payments. But bor-
rowers rarely escape federal
student loans and the credit
problems that result from not
paying.
The Education Department
responded to the newspaper’s
findings:
“We want to make sure
we are doing everything we
can to strike the right bal-
ance between helping bor-
rowers who have hit hard
times and honoring our
responsibility to be good
stewards of taxpayer dol-
lars,” an email statement
said. “Federal student loans
are not like other forms of
private credit. The American
taxpayer lends money to stu-
dents without any credit or
collateral requirements and
provides numerous repay-
ment options and benefits.”
U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, a
Democrat from Ohio, said the
federal government and uni-
versities aren’t doing enough
to make college affordable
or helping students avoid the
student-loan trap.
“We say on one hand that
you need to go to school, and
then too many people are in a
worse-off financial situation
after they leave college,” he
said.
Kent State graduate
Melissa Babe consolidated
her $17,000 student-loan debt
with her husband’s $100,000
in loans, but he stopped
making payments when
they divorced. Babe, living
in Irvine, Calif., now owes
$290,000.
“I’ve spent many nights
crying my eyes out, begging
them to work with me, but
the answer is always no,”
Babe said.
“The system is
extremely unfor-
giving. We’ve
chosen, as a public
policy, very puni-
tive collection.
From a taxpayer-
return point of
view, it makes
more sense to help
them succeed.”
— Deanne Loonin,
a National Consumer
Law Center attorney
Merchants take to the
road to peddle wares
By KEVIN JOY
The Columbus Dispatch
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Several years ago, Josh
Harden made an impulse buy
via Craigslist: a battered 1968
Avion trailer with a worn interi-
or featuring shag carpeting and
needing an aroma fix.
“I literally got it down by
the river in Cincinnati,” said
Harden, of Columbus, who paid
$3,000 for it.
He drove the silver behe-
moth cross-country for seven
months, acquiring thousands
of thrift-store T-shirts on the
cheap, then flipping the retro
finds for a tidy profit on eBay to
cover food and fuel costs.
The positive response (and
income) in 2010 led to an online
clothing-resale business, Ghetto
Vintage, that Harden runs full
time from a warehouse.
During the summer, he went
mobile — maintaining Web
sales but using the trailer, which
hed refurbished, as a secondary
tool to move extra Ts and attract
new customers. Despite limited
hours and exposure, he said, his
business has been good.
“Were just showing up, and
people are finding us,” said
Harden, who sets up mostly at
flea markets and farmers mar-
kets.
As the enduring wave of
food trucks has proved both in
central Ohio and nationwide,
spontaneity has its share of mys-
tique that can prove profitable.
Judge to consider
Ohio killer’s
obesity claim
COLUMBUS (AP) — A
judge is ready to hear arguments
in the case of a condemned Ohio
inmate who weighs around 450
pounds and says he’s too fat to
be executed humanely.
Killer Ronald Post claims
he could suffer a “torturous and
lingering death” because execu-
tioners will have a hard time
finding a vein for the lethal
chemical used by Ohio or if an
untried backup method is used
that injects chemicals directly
into muscle.
Federal judge Gregory Frost
planned a hearing Monday in
Columbus where evidence will
be presented by Post’s attorneys
and also from state lawyers,
who oppose Post’s request.
A Cleveland federal judge
has already rejected Post’s
argument.
The state parole board on
Friday recommended Post be
spared because of questions
about his legal representation
30 years ago.
Social media
postings cause
alarm at schools
SPRINGFIELD (AP) — At
least three Ohio schools are on
alert after apparent threats in the
wake of the Connecticut school
shooting.
In Hamilton County, in
southwest Ohio, an 18-year-old
man was charged with inducing
panic Sunday after a Facebook
post said he was sick of the
comments about the shooting,
and that they made him want to
shoot kids himself.
In Springfield, sheriff’s
deputies planned to provide
extra security at Shawnee High
School Monday after a stu-
dent posted on Facebook that
he could “do better” than the
Friday shooting that left 28 peo-
ple dead. Deputies questioned
him, but he was not charged.
Officials in Willoughby, in
northeast Ohio, notified parents
of Twitter postings saying a gun
and bomb would be brought to
a middle school. No evidence
was found to substantiate it.
Gas prices
continue to fall
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Ohio motorists have plenty to
be happy about this holiday
season, as gas prices are con-
tinuing to fall throughout the
month.
The average price for a
gallon of regular gas in Ohio
was $3.14 in today’s survey
from auto club AAA, the Oil
Price Information Service and
Wright Express. That’s 21
cents lower than a week ago,
and down 35 cents from this
time last month.
Some areas of Ohio saw
prices fall below the $3 mark
over the weekend.
“Democracy is not an easy form of government, because it is never final; it is a living,
changing organism, with a continuous shifting and adjusting of balance between individual
freedom and general order.” — Ilka Chase, American author, actress, humorist (1905-1978)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
By JULIE PACE
and JIM KUHNHENN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama is
vowing to use “whatever
power this office holds” to
safeguard the nation’s chil-
dren, raising the prospect that
he will pursue policy changes
to stem gun violence in the
wake of an elementary school
massacre.
“Because what choice do
we have?” a somber Obama
said at a Sunday evening vigil
in the grieving community of
Newtown, Conn. “We can’t
accept events like this as rou-
tine. Are we really prepared
to say that we’re powerless in
the face of such carnage? That
the politics are too hard?”
The newly re-elected
president offered few specif-
ics about how he planned to
proceed, saying only that he
will engage with law enforce-
ment, mental health profes-
sionals, parents and educators
in the coming weeks. Just
days after the shooting at an
elementary school, Obama is
already facing pressure from
fellow Democrats and New
York City Mayor Michael
Bloomberg to tackle gun con-
trol legislation, a contentious
issue he avoided as he sought
a second term.
But Friday’s shooting,
which left 20 children and
eight adults dead, appears
to have spurred some soul-
searching by Obama, who
told Connecticut’s governor
that Friday was the most dif-
ficult day of his presidency.
Speaking to families of the
victims and first responders,
Obama said Sunday that he
had been reflecting on wheth-
er the country was doing
enough to give its children
“the chance they deserve to
live out their lives in happi-
ness and with purpose.”
“And if we’re honest with
ourselves, the answer is no.
We’re not doing enough,
and we will have to change,”
Obama said.
Sunday marked the fourth
time in Obama’s presiden-
cy that he has traveled to a
community shaken by a mass
shooting. Just this summer,
he made a similar visit to
Aurora, Colo., where a dozen
people were killed in a movie
theater attack.
Drawing on his past expe-
riences, Obama said he was
mindful that mere words
would not be enough to heal
the depths of Newtown’s sor-
row.
“I can only hope that it
helps for you to know that
you are not alone in your
grief,” Obama said during the
vigil, which followed his pri-
vate meeting with families of
the victims.
The president closed his
remarks by reading the first
names of the kids, slowly, in
the most wrenching moment
of the night. Cries and sobs
filled the room.
Said Obama of the girls
and boys who died: “God
has called them all home. For
those of us who remain, let us
find the strength to carry on
and make our country worthy
of their memory.”
Inside the room, children
held stuffed teddy bears and
dogs. The smallest kids sat on
their parents’ laps.
There were tears and hugs,
but also smiles and squeezed
arms. Mixed with disbelief
was a sense of a commu-
nity reacquainting itself all
at once.
One man said it was less
mournful, more familial.
Some kids chatted easily
with their friends. The adults
embraced each other in sup-
port.
“We’re halfway between
grief and hope,” said Curt
Brantl, whose daughter was
in the library of the elemen-
tary school when the shoot-
ings occurred. She was not
harmed.
Police and firefighters got
hugs and standing ovations
when they entered. So did
Obama.
“We needed this,” said the
Rev. Matt Crebbin, senior
minister of the Newtown
Congregational Church.
“We needed to be together
to show that we are together
and united.” The shootings
have restarted a debate in
Washington about what poli-
ticians can to do help — gun
control or otherwise. Obama
has called for “meaningful
action” to prevent killings.
Obama signals action
following school shooting
By JIM KUHNHENN
and ANDREW TAYLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
White House and congres-
sional Republicans are a long
way from agreeing on a plan
to deal with the “fiscal cliff.”
But it seems like some prog-
ress is being made.
House Speaker John
Boehner is offering $1 tril-
lion in higher tax revenue
over 10 years and an increase
in the top tax rate on people
making more than $1 million
a year. He’s also offering
a large enough extension in
the government’s borrowing
cap to fund the government
for one year before the issue
must be revisited — condi-
tioned on President Barack
Obama agreeing to the $1
trillion in cuts.
The offer, made Friday
after a long impasse between
Boehner, R-Ohio, and Obama,
calls for about $450 billion
in revenue from increasing
the top rate on million-dollar-
plus income from 35 percent
to the Clinton-era rate of 39.6
percent.
The additional revenue
required to meet the $1 tril-
lion target would be collected
through a rewrite of the tax
code next year and by slow-
ing the inflation adjustments
made to tax brackets.
In return, Boehner is ask-
ing for $1 trillion in spending
cuts from government ben-
efit programs like Medicare.
Those cuts would defer most
of a painful set of across-
the-board spending cuts set
to slash many domestic pro-
grams and the Pentagon bud-
get by 8-9 percent, starting in
January.
Boehner’s proposal was
described Sunday by offi-
cials familiar with it. They
required anonymity because
of the sensitivity of the talks.
Boehner also continues
to press for a less gener-
ous inflation adjustment for
Social Security benefits,
a move endorsed by many
budget hawks. Obama and
Democrats on last year’s
deficit “supercommittee”
endorsed the idea in offers
made last year, but they’re
more reluctant now.
The new inflation adjust-
ment would also raise about
$70 billion over a decade in
new revenues because tax
brackets would rise more
slowly for inflation, driving
people more quickly into
higher tax brackets.
The increased optimism
come as time is running out
before the adjournment of
Congress. Tax rates on all
workers go up in January, and
$109 billion worth of across-
the-board spending cuts begin
to take effect then as well.
Taken together with the expi-
ration of extended jobless
benefits and a 2-percentage-
point break in Social Security
payroll taxes, the combina-
tion of austerity steps threat-
ens to send the economy back
into recession.
The burst of optimism is
tempered by the caution that
the remaining steps to reach-
ing a deal — particularly
how much to cut Medicare
and whether to impose the
new, less generous inflation
adjustment to Social Security
— are difficult. Then comes
the job of selling it to a polar-
ized Congress, where GOP
conservatives have been rail-
ing against higher tax rates
for months as sure to cost
jobs and hurt small business,
and Democrats have taken a
harder line against cost curbs
to Medicare.
But it appears clear there
is momentum as White
House and congressional
aides worked through the
weekend.
The movement comes
as an increasing number of
Republicans have called for
a tactical retreat that would
hand Obama a victory on
his longstanding campaign
promise to raise taxes on
households making more
than $250,000 a year. That
increase, combined with an
increase in the tax rate on
investment income from 15
percent to 20 percent, would
raise about $800 billion in tax
revenue over a decade.
Movement seen in ‘fiscal cliff’ talks
By DONNA CASSATA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Democratic Sen. John Kerry
stands tall as President Barack
Obama’s good soldier.
The Massachusetts lawmak-
er has flown to Afghanistan
and Pakistan numerous times
to tamp down diplomatic dis-
putes, spending hours drink-
ing tea and taking walks with
Afghan President Hamid
Karzai or engaging in delicate
negotiations in Islamabad.
It’s a highly unusual role
for a Senate Foreign Relations
Committee chairman: envoy
with a special but undefined
portfolio.
Kerry has pushed the
White House’s national secu-
rity agenda in the Senate with
mixed results. He successfully
ensured ratification of a nuclear
arms reduction treaty in 2010
and most recently failed to per-
suade Republicans to back a
U.N. pact on the rights of the
disabled.
Throughout this past elec-
tion year, he skewered Obama’s
Republican rival, Mitt Romney,
at nearly every opportunity and
was a vocal booster for the
president’s re-election. Kerry
memorably told delegates
at the Democratic National
Convention in August: “Ask
Osama bin Laden if he’s better
off now than he was four years
ago.”
Obama seems likely to
reward all that work by nomi-
nating the 69-year-old Kerry,
perhaps in the coming days,
to succeed Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton as
the nation’s top diplomat. The
prospects for the five-term
senator soared last week when
U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice,
a top contender for the post,
withdrew from consideration
to avoid a fierce fight with
Senate Republicans.
A Kerry nomination has
been discussed with congres-
sional leaders, and consulta-
tions between the White House
and congressional Democrats
have centered on the fate of
his Senate seat, according to
officials familiar with the situ-
ation who were not authorized
to publicly discuss the talks. If
the seat were in play, it could
boost the prospects for recently
defeated Republican Sen. Scott
Brown to win back a job in
Washington.
At the same time, Obama
is considering one of Kerry’s
former Senate colleagues,
Republican Chuck Hagel of
Nebraska, for the Pentagon’s
top job.
The selection of Kerry
would close a political circle
with Obama. In 2004, it was
White House hopeful Kerry
who asked a largely unknown
Illinois state senator to deliv-
er the keynote address at the
Democratic convention in
Boston, handing the national
stage to Obama. Kerry lost that
election to President George
W. Bush. Four years later,
Obama was the White House
hopeful who succeeded where
Kerry had failed.
Senate colleagues in both
parties say Kerry’s confirma-
tion would be swift and near
certain, another remarkable
turnaround. Eight years ago,
the GOP ridiculed Kerry as
a wind-surfing, flip-flopper as
he tried and failed to unseat
Bush.
“If he is nominated, he
comes into the position with
a world of knowledge. He’s
someone who certainly under-
stands how the legislative
process works and I think he
will be someone that Congress
will want to work with in a
very positive way,” said Sen.
Bob Corker of Tennessee, who
is poised to become the top
Republican on the Foreign
Relations Committee next
year.
On foreign policy, Kerry is Obama’s good soldier
By JENNIFER C. KERR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
pomp surrounding the inaugu-
ration of the president of the
United States can carry a hefty
price tag, from the glitzy galas
to all those inaugural balls.
Think of it this way: It can
cost about the same as 150
Bentley cars, several dozen
yachts or some $20 million
shy of the cash needed for a
Boeing 737.
But taxpayers aren’t on the
hook for the fun stuff — the
balls and other celebratory
events — and this inaugura-
tion won’t be as big as the
last one for President Barack
Obama.
A solid chunk of the tab
for the 57th inauguration next
month will be picked up by
loyal supporters and other pri-
vate donors, as it has been for
years. In 2009, Obama raised
$53 million in private money
for his inauguration, when
a record 1.8 million people
braved the winter chill to see
him take his place in his-
tory as America’s first black
president.
Previous inaugural com-
mittees have raised big cash,
too, though not as much as
Obama. President George
W. Bush had about $40 mil-
lion raised for each of his
inaugurals. For President Bill
Clinton, it was about $30 mil-
lion in 1997.
But this time around, with
the economy still sputtering
out of the worst downturn
since the Great Depression,
Obama is scaling back the
celebrations a bit.
The official activities will
span three days, starting with
a National Day of Service on
Jan. 19 and culminating on
Jan. 21 with the swearing-
in, the parade and the balls.
Last time, it was four days of
events.
As for those inaugural
balls, there won’t be as many.
There were 10 official balls
four years ago, but this time
around a source close to the
inaugural planning says there
will be fewer balls, though no
final number has been decided
yet.
In 2009, there also was
a huge rock concert on the
National Mall with U2, Bruce
Springsteen, Beyonce and
many others. No repeat this
time. The planning for the
2013 inaugural doesn’t include
a mall concert.
Another big change is the
way Obama will raise his
inaugural funds.
Unlike four years ago, he
now is accepting money from
corporations to help pay for
the festivities, and there are
no limits on those donations.
In 2009, the presidential inau-
gural committee capped indi-
vidual donations at $50,000.
Lobbyists and political action
committees will still be banned
from making donations.
Besides the balls and the
traditional parade, private
money also would pay for
items such as giant TV screens
on the mall for the swearing-
in and thousands of portable
toilets.
The other gigantic part
of the tab is all the security.
That’s picked up by taxpay-
ers, but it’s harder to put a
complete dollar figure on
security.
Big price for
inaugural
pomp; much
private money
One Year Ago
• Volunteers with the Delphos Community Christmas
Project are busy filling the needs of local children for
Christmas. Local businesses and organizations are lending a
hand. Brad Hohenbrink of Hohenbrink TV presented a check
for $1,300 to project volunteer Deb Rostorfer. Hohenbrink,
his brother, Kent Hohenbrink, and Bill Hurley also refur-
bished six Christmas trees to be distributed.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Elida Future Farmers of America donated eight cases
of tangelos to Bob Shelmadine, 81, of Gomer for use in the
Gomer Christmas Project. Shelmadine has been known as the
Gomer Santa Claus for 57 years. He distributes the fruit at
local hospitals, nursing homes and schools.
• A Christmas party was held in the Ottoville Veterans of
Foreign Wars social rooms for the Senior Citizens. Favors
were small wreaths made by Frances Hoehn and committee
Josephine Bockrath, Mary Louise Schimmoeller and Matilda
Eickholt. Guests were Rev. Sylvan Obergefell, President
Albert Wieging, Vice President Valeria Siefker, Secretary
Rosa Deitering and Katherine Gordon, Putnam County
Outstanding Woman of the Year.
• Two Delphos players who are contributing to the early
success of the Lima Campus Lady Barons basketball program
are sophomore Nora Fought, a Jefferson graduate and fresh-
man Elaine Pohlman, a St. John’s graduate. The Barons have
defeated Wright State-Lake 75-47, Bluffton College junior
varsity 71-61 and conference foe Ohio University-Chillicothe
106-62.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• Members of Delphos Junior Court Catholic Daughters
of America will go Christmas caroling Wednesday evening
and bring baskets of fruit, candy and nuts to shut-ins. On
Dec. 27 the girls will hold a Christmas party with 50 cent gift
exchange in the Little Theater.
• Mrs. Robert Turner has announced that Edna Jane Sadler
has been appointed assistant hostess for Welcome Wagon and
will serve in that capacity with Mrs. R. B. Rozelle, who has
been an assistant hostess for some time.
• Mrs. Carl Greulich entertained the Once-A-Month
Pinochle Club in her home in Ottoville Wednesday evening
with first award going to Mrs. Joseph Perrin, second to Mrs.
Hubert Altenburger and low and traveling to Mrs. Jerome
Altenburger. Mrs. Robert Fortener will entertain the club in
January.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• The annual Recognition Service for new members of
the Jefferson High School Girl Reserve organization was
held Wednesday evening at the Presbyterian Church. The
officers of the organization are: President, Luella Miller;
vice president, Margaret Fosnaught; secretary, Alma Sanders;
treasurer, Mary Alice Feathers; program chairman, Dorothy
Jones; special chairman, Betty Rinehart; pianist, Helen Fettig
and song leader, Janice Powell.
• The Wardens defeated the Lecturers two games out of
three in the regular weekly Knights of Columbus bowling
league session held at the Delphos Recreation Alleys. The
total score was 1908 to 1728. John Shenk of the Wardens was
high in both game score and totals. He cracked the maples for
a 222 count in the second game of the evening for the high
game and was high in the totals with 470.
• An interesting meeting of the W. M. I. Club was conduct-
ed Wednesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Frank Currey,
North Moening Street. Mrs. Currey discussed “Two Pre-
Historic Ohio Villages.” A resume of the book, “Yourself,
Inc.,” was given by Mrs. Dane Ridenour. On Saturday eve-
ning the club will enjoy a Christmas party at the home of Mrs.
O. M. Arnold, West First Street.
1
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant: fnancial indepen-
dence and providing for family. Striking a balance between saving
for goals, such as education and retirement, and allocating
money for daily expenses can be challenging. But you can do it.
Learn how you can redefne your savings approach
toward education and retirement. Call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

Few things are as stressful as worrying about work. Because
it’s easy to feel like things are out of control, it’s essential to
consider any fnancial decision carefully. This is especially true
when it comes to your retirement savings.
Edward Jones can help. We’ll start by getting to know your
goals. Then we’ll sort through your current situation and work
with you face to face to develop a strategy that can help you
keep your retirement on track.
Keep Your Retirement
on Solid Ground –
Even If Things at Work Are
Up in the Air.
To make sense of your retirement savings alternatives,
call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Prices good 8am Monday, December 17 through midnight Wednesday, December 19, 2012 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.
$
1
99
$
1
69 4/$
11
$
1
99
$
7
99 $
5
95 $
6
99
Extra Large
Red Seedless
Grapes
Save up to $1.00 per lb.
Folgers
Coffee
Selected Varieties,
22.6-33.9 oz.
Save up to $4.70
Charmin
Bath
Tissue
Ultra Soft or Ultra Strong,
16 Double Rolls
Save $4.00 on 2
Bounty Basic
Paper
Towels
8 Rolls
Save $4.00 on 2
Superior’s Easy Carve
Boneless, Whole
Smoked Ham
Limit 1, Additional $15 Purchase Required
Save up to $1.10 per lb.
Pepsi
Soft Drinks
Selected varieties, 12 pk, 12 oz. or 8 pk.
7.5 oz. slim cans, 6 pk., 24 oz. or 8 pk. 12 oz. bottles
Must purchase 4. More or less 4/$13.
Save up to $8.96 on 4
Super Chill
Spring Water
Limit 2, Additional - $2.99
Additional $15 Purchase Required
Save $6.00 on 2
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com | www.facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket
Marie Callender’s
Pies
Selected Varieties, 28-45 oz.
EXCLUDES CHERRY
Save $1.89
Birds Eye Freshlike
Vegetables
Selected Varieties, 16-18 oz.
Save $4.90 on 10
FROZEN BAKERY DELI
SEAFOOD DAIRY GROCERY
MEAT
$
4
99
FREE
BUY 1 GET 1
Special Recipe
Cookies
Selected Varieties; 12 ct.
Save up to 50¢
Special Recipe
Cookie Tray
Selected Varieties; 24 ct.
Save up to $2.00
Kretschmar
Off the Bone Ham
Save up to $2.00 per lb.
CenSea
Cooked Shrimp
41-50 count; 16 oz.
Save up to $2.30
Kraft Philadelphia
Cream Cheese
Regular or 1/3 Less Fat; 8 oz.
Save $2.79 on 3
Frito Lay Lay’s
Potato Chips
Selected Varieties, 10-10.5 oz.
Save $4.29
FreshMarket
Classic Potato Salad
Save up to $1.00 per lb.
$
3
99
$
7
99
$
5
99
$
5
99
3/$
5
$
2
99
lb.
lb.
Certified Ground Daily
80% Lean
Ground Beef
Save up to 60¢ lb.
VALUE PACK
$
2
99
lb.
ns
The gift
EVERYONE
can use!
Make a
CUSTOM
basket!
GIVE THE GIFT
OF GREAT FOOD.
HEALTHY HOLIDAY
FRUIT BASKETS.
S
a
v
i
n
g
s
CELEBRATE
with
s
g
s
n
g
s
g
s
a
USDA Choice Beef
Easy Carve
Prime Rib Roast
Save up to $5.00 per lb.
Chief Spiral Sliced
Smoked
Half Ham
Save up to 30¢ per lb.
$
6
99
$
3
99
lb.
lb.
lb.
24 pk.
16.9 oz. bottles
Local Favorite
Stock Up!
lb.
Limit 1, Additional - $8.98,
Additional $15 Purchase Required
Limit 2, Additional - $9.99,
Additional $15 Purchase Required
Limit 2, Additional - $7.99,
Additional $15 Purchase Required
Arps
Milk
Whole, 2%, 1%, or Skim
half gallon
Monday, December 17, 2012 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
Fort Jennings
Historical Marker
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
7 p.m. — Washington
Township Trustees meet at
the township house.
Delphos City Council meets
at the Delphos Municipal
Building, 608 N. Canal St.
7:30 p.m. — Jefferson
Athletic Boosters meet at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
Spencerville village council
meets at the mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Area
Visiting Nurses offer free
blood pressure checks at
Delphos Discount Drugs.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
7:30 p.m. — Elida School
Board meets at the high school
office.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
DEC. 18
Brian Grothouse
Nicki Geise
LaDonna Eggeman
DEC. 19
Cheryl Lehmkuhle
Sis Roehm
Joan Culp
Scott Buescher
Eric Buescher
Ryan Wiechart
Amanda Metcalfe
Peyton Stabler
Jonah Stemen
Hannah Grote
Coaches address Optimists
The two Delphos schools’ boys varsity basketball coaches were the guest speakers
at a recent Delphos Optimist Club meeting. Jefferson coach, Marc Smith, left, begin-
ning his eighth season as head coach, and Aaron Elwer, right, beginning his sixth
season as head coach, presented their outlook on this year’s teams. Optimist Jay
Metzner thanked them for attending the meeting. (Photo submitted)
Blood drive surpasses goal with 59 units collected
The Knights of Columbus American Red
Cross Blood Drive held Dec. 12 was a great
success. The goal was surpassed with 59 units
given.
Those receiving milestone pins were: Jim
Mesker, two gallons; Eugene Siefker, five
gallons; Jerry Lewis, Lisa Menke and Carol
Hoersten, seven gallons; Louie Jettinghoff
and Dan Altman, 10 gallons; and Ron Rode,
13 gallons.
Many donors who gave blood wrote a note
to servicemen serving our country. The Red
Cross will forward them to the appropriate
place.
6 – The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By BOB WEBER
The Delphos Herald
btzweber@bright.net
SPENCERVILLE —
Saturday night, the Spencerville
Bearcats welcomed the Big
Green of Ottoville for a non-
league boys basketball game.
Veteran Bearcat
head coach Kevin
Sensabaugh, after
becoming the all-
time leading boys
basketball coach in
school history Friday
night with 129 wins, extended
that record to 130 with a deci-
sive 55-32 win over the Big
Green.
The Bearcats came into
the game on a 2-game win-
ning streak after a very tough
beginning to their season with
losses to St. Henry, Minster
and Elida.
The Big Green, on the other
hand, came into the contest on
a 4-game losing streak at the
hands of Van Wert, Columbus
Grove, St. John’s and Fort
Jennings.
The first quarter saw both
teams struggle offensively
with the Bearcats going only
1-for-5 beyond the arc and
narrowly coming away with a
9-7 lead at the break. The Big
Green could only come away
with one 3-pointer but were
4-of-4 from the stripe for their
seven points.
The Bearcats extended
their lead throughout the
second quarter of play that
included a lot of interesting
developments. Both teams
were called for several fouls
during the eight minutes but
after the third Big Green foul
was whistled on senior guard
Ryan Honigford, head coach
Todd Turnwald questioned the
call and while the Bearcats
were at the line, Turnwald was
assessed a technical at the 1:33
mark. The Bearcats made three
of the four shots from the line
and also got possession back
which they ultimately scored
on.
If the quarter wasn’t strange
enough with the events on the
court, the final 17 sec-
onds required three sepa-
rate attempts of the Big
Green bringing the ball
in because the clock mal-
functioned and froze up,
not allowing the timer to
start the clock to resume play.
Finally, play was resumed and
the Bearcats outscored the Big
Green 15-6 to take a command-
ing 24-13 lead into halftime.
The third quarter saw the
Big Green try to battle back on
the road behind Honigford’s
two deep 3-pointers and the
nice all-around game of soph-
omore Brandt Landin (Big
Green leading scorer with 11
points for the game) in outscor-
ing the Bearcats 12-11; how-
ever, they still trailed for the
game 35-25.
The second half — and
especially the final period
of play — saw the Bearcats
get big contributions out of
6-0 starting freshman guard
Zach Goecke (21 points on
the evening) and off the bench
from 6-4 senior center Greg
Miller with six points. Senior
Derek Goecke also chipped in
10 markers on the night but
was sidelined throughout most
of the second half with foul
trouble.
The Big Green only came
away with seven points in the
final stanza as the Bearcats’
experience and depth took over
the game and preserved the
23-point win over the visitors.
The Big Green continued
its season offensive woes with
going 26 percent (7-27) from
2-point land, 43 percent (3-7)
from 3-point land, and 75 per-
cent (9-12) from the stripe.
Sensabaugh began the year
knowing that after a solid 2011-
12 season that saw his team get
to the districts, he had
a nice nucleus com-
ing back for this year’s
campaign: “We have a
lot of guys back from
last season. They are a
great group of young
men and I love working
with them. We have a
lot of guys back that gained
valuable big-game experience
last year.”
That experience was on
display this night with contri-
butions from all of his start-
ers and getting much needed
help from his bench. However,
the night belonged to a fresh-
man as Zach Goecke lit up
the scoreboard using several
breakaway and driving layups
on the Big Green defense, two
deep 3-pointers and 3-of-6
from the stripe.
The Bearcats (3-3) will try
to extend their winning streak
Friday night as they host Allen
East with a 6 p.m. JV start.
The Big Green (1-5) were
led by Landin’s 11 points.
Landin, who had lost his start-
ing position for a couple of
games this season, had a nice
game on both ends of the court
for the Big Green.
The Big Green will
play Tuesday night as
they host the Jefferson
Wildcats for a 7 p.m.
varsity-only start.
The JV game once
again had to be can-
celled due to an injured
player on Ottoville’s squad,
only leaving 10 players for the
Big Green.
VARSITY
Ottoville (32)
Derek Schimmoeller 1-0-4-6, Ryan
Honigford 0-2-0-6, Luke Schimmoeller
1-0-2-4, Cory Fischer 0-0-0-0, Brandt
Landin 4-0-3-11, Tyler Roby 0-0-0-
0, Austin Honigford 1-1-0-5, Brendon
Schnipke 0-0-0-0. Totals 7-3-9-32.
Spencerville (55)
Ben Bowers 0-2-0-6, Devon Cook
0-2-0-6, Zach Goecke 6-2-3-21,
Coleman McCormick 1-0-0-2, Derek
Goecke 4-0-2-10, Evan Crites 1-0-0-
2, Greg Miller 2-0-2-6, Hunter Patton
0-0-2-2. Totals 14-6-9-55.
Score by Quarters:
Ottoville 7- 6-12- 7 — 32
Spencerville 9-15-11-20 — 55
Freshman leads Bearcats past Big Green
Sophomore Brooke Culp led Jefferson in scoring versus
New Bremen Saturday afternoon, using drives such as this
through and over Lady Cardinals Amber Paul and Karli
Jones. Her 18 points weren’t enough as the Cardinals
grabbed a 4-point road win in Delphos. (Delphos Herald/
Tom Morris)
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — An experi-
enced New Bremen girls bas-
ketball team rode the 19-point
effort of senior Haley Moeller,
a dominating third period and
some clutch foul shooting
down the stretch to hold off the
still-inexperienced Jefferson
crew 47-43 in a non-league
clash Saturday afternoon at
Jefferson High School.
“That is a very tough bas-
ketball team. Their record
doesn’t show it because they’ve
played teams like Celina and
Versailles,” Jefferson men-
tor Dave Hoffman explained.
“They are experienced and
senior-dominated, so they
played like it. They are physi-
cal and very difficult to defend
because they go inside-out.”
Bremen coach Chris Burden
credits that experience for his
team’s win.
“We had a simple game
plan each time out: rebound
and play good defense. We
strive to limit our opponents
to one shot each time and
generally we did that today,”
he explained. “We do like
to get out and run, so you
have to rebound to do so. We
also got a lot of second shots
today, which is another goal
of ours.”
Jefferson (3-4) led 26-23
entering the third period and the
teams traded baskets to keep
the margin at three. Moeller,
who had 10 points at halftime,
maintained her efforts, scoring
eight in the period. A sec-
ond-chance basket by senior
Hannah Holdren (one of 7 for
the Lady Cardinals to 0 for the
Lady Wildcats) at 4:55 gave
Bremen the lead for good.
They used a 6-0 run to get the
lead. A free toss by Jefferson
junior Gabby Pimpas (8 points)
at 3:16 broke the streak tem-
porarily before the Cardinals
(4-4) closed with a 7-0 span in
the final 2:05, capped by a put-
back by Moeller with 30 ticks
left, for a 38-29 edge.
Jefferson sophomore
Brooke Culp (team-high 18
points, 6 boards) was held to
two points in the period after
dropping in 12 the first half.
The Wildcats had an early
reply in the fourth canto:
eight straight: 4 free throws
by Pimpas, a reverse layin
by junior Brooke Hesseling
and two more tosses by junior
Rileigh Stockwell at 4:52; to
get within 38-37. However,
they committed two miscues
the next two times down court
(21 for the game versus 13 for
their foe) and couldn’t get any
closer. They were forced to
foul as New Bremen began to
run their flex offense to perfec-
tion, taking time off the clock.
In the final 3:27, they canned
7-of-10 singles (9-of-16 over-
all for 56.3% versus 21-of-27
for Delphos for 77.8%). Two
tosses by Holdren (10 points, 6
boards, 3 assists) with 1.2 ticks
on the board accounted for the
final margin.
It was a tussle from start
to finish. There were five
lead changes in the first peri-
od alone. Once Moeller hit a
transition basket at 2:50, the
Cardinals led 7-6. They built
that lead to 13-8 on her 10-foot
baseliner at 47.6 seconds but a
trifecta by Pimpas from right
of the key to beat the horn
made it 13-11.
Culp came alive in the sec-
ond period, scoring 10 points.
Stockwell’s basket at 5:45 gave
Jefferson their largest lead of
the game at 20-15 and Culp —
fouled in the act of shooting
a last-chance 28-footer at the
horn — hit three free throws
with no time on the clock for
that 26-23 halftime spread.
In sum, New Bremen hit
18-of-49 shots (2-of-12 beyond
the arc) for 36.7 percent;
seized 32 boards (14 offen-
sive) as Moeller added six;
and 20 fouls. Moeller added
five steals and Kyla Otting 10
counters. They visit Jackson
Center Tuesday.
Jefferson totaled 10-of-
32 shooting (2-of-5 3-balls)
for 31.3 percent; 28 caroms
(7 offensive) as Stockwell
led with eight; and 16 fouls.
Pimpas had three assists.
Jefferson visits Ada 6 p.m.
Thursday.
“I was proud of our efforts
today against an experienced
team. We played them tough,
as well as we could,” Hoffman
added. “The third period has
been a problem for us all sea-
son; for some reason, we don’t
come out with the needed
intensity. We were up three
against Crestview Thursday at
the half and they outscored
us 20-4; today it was 15-3.
We had a couple of unforced
turnovers that cost us. We also
gave up way too many second
shots but that is as much them
being more physical than us.
We made more progress today
and we just need to keep work-
ing and making strides as we
gain experience. We’re start-
ing to reach a more comfort-
able level with our younger
girls, which we need.”
In junior varsity action,
New Bremen grabbed a 30-20
victory.
Devon Heitkamp led the
Cardinals with nine, while
sophomore Heather Pohlman
countered with nine for the
Lady ’Cats (2-5).
Veteran Cards hold off Lady ‘Cats
VARSITY
NEW BREMEN (47)
Meagan Brandt 1-0-3, Kyla Otting
3-3-10, Hannah Holdren 4-2-10, Sam
Luedeke 0-0-0, Amber Paul 0-2-2,
Haley Moeller 9-1-19, Karli Jones 0-0-
0, Melissa Thieman 1-1-3. Totals 16-2-
9/16-47.
JEFFERSON (43)
Brooke Culp 5-7-18, Katie Goergens
1-0-2, Rileigh Stockwell 1-0-2, Hannah
Sensibaugh 0-5-5, Gabby Pimpas
1-5-8, Makayla Binkley 1-2-4, Brooke
Hesseling 1-2-4, Jasmine McDougall
0-0-0. Totals 8-2-21/27-43.
Score By Quarters:
New Bremen 13 10 15 9 – 47
Jefferson 11 15 3 14 – 43
Three-point goals: New Bremen,
Brandt, Otting; Jefferson, Culp,
Pimpas.
------
JUNIOR VARSITY
NEW BREMEN (30)
Ashley Berning 1-0-2, Alyse Clune
2-1-5, Devon Heitkamp 2-5-9, Kaitlyn
Ahrns 0-1-1, Sarah Steineman 0-0-0,
Debbie Paul 2-0-4, Ali Howell 0-0-0,
Janelle Elking 0-2-2, Kim Brown 3-1-7.
Totals 10-0-10/22-30.
JEFFERSON (20)
Taylor Stroh 0-0-0, Heather
Pohlman 4-1-9, Lindsay Deuel 1-1-3,
Brooke Gallmeier 0-0-0, Shelby Koenig
0-0-0, Tori Black 1-0-2, Jessica Pimpas
1-0-2, Bailey Gorman 2-0-4. Totals
9-0-2/9-20.
Score by Quarters:
New Bremen 8 3 8 11 - 30
Jefferson 2 8 8 2 - 20
Three-point goals: New Bremen,
none; Jefferson, none.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
KALIDA — Jefferson
head boys basketball coach
Marc Smith fully expected
what Kalida’s defensive game
plan would be come Saturday
night in their non-conference
tussle at the Wildcat Den;
use a variety of zones to shut
down junior forward
Ross Thompson inside
and force his Wildcats
to shoot from the
perimeter.
Knowing what to
expect and executing
against it are two different
things as the Red and White
found out in faltering 38-29.
The story: 9-of-35 shoot-
ing from the floor, includ-
ing 4-of-22 downtown, for
25.7 percent. Freshman Trey
Smith led the offense with
nine points and senior
Zach Ricker added
eight, while Thompson
was limited to four (10
boards).
“I have coached here
for eight years and it’s
what we see when we go
against Kalida. They take
their chances that you won’t
hit a lot of outside shots;
they play the percentages and
it works for them,” Coach
Smith explained. “We just
couldn’t make shots. Pretty
much anyone we have out
there has a green light and
I know they are capable of
shooting well form the perim-
eter. As the game wore on,
the confidence went down,
too, as you’d expect from
young kids; we even tried to
attack the basket and get to
the line but that wasn’t very
successful, either. We kept
preaching at every dead ball
and timeout to keep shoot-
ing with confidence. We tried
inside-out and penetrate-and-
kick and we simply couldn’t
knock down shots.”
It wasn’t as if the home
Wildcats (3-2) were hot from
the floor; they canned 14-of-
36 (2-of-12 long range) for
38.9 percent, with senior
Austin Horstman notching
10 and sophomore Devin
Kortokrax adding nine.
“We’re a work in progress.
We try to build form the defen-
sive end anyway because we
aren’t a good offensive team
right now,” long-time Kalida
coach Dick Kortokrax said.
“We’re thankful for any win
right now and that’s no slight
to Jefferson; they play awful-
ly hard and Coach Smith does
a great job with them but they
are going through the same
things as we are as far as hav-
ing young and inexperienced
teams. We can compete well
with teams going through the
same situation as we are, like
Perry.”
Smith scored the first five
points of the night: a 3-ball
and two free throws; in the
first minute before Horstman
got the hosts on the board
to jump-start an 8-0 run to
give Kalida the lead for good
on a jumper from the left
elbow by Kortokrax at the
4:04 mark. Kortokrax drove
for a deuce at 1:58 for a 10-7
edge before Smith hit an off-
balance runner at 1:40 for a
10-9 Jefferson deficit.
Kalida used a mix of 1-2-2
and 2-3 zones and a 2-2-1 nui-
sance press most of the way,
while Delphos employed a
man-to-man scheme. Both
teams ended up needing to
run a deliberate offense as
very few shots were uncon-
tested.
However, that only led to
a Jeffcat drought that lasted
5:44. By the time they scored
again on a free throw by Smith
at 3:56, Kalida’s lead was
16-10. When junior Randy
Zeller hit a third-chance put-
back at the 3-minute mark,
the Maroon and White’s lead
was 18-10. However, junior
Austin Jettinghoff hit a tri-
fecta at 2:32 and Thompson a
putback with 2.1 ticks on the
board to get within 18-15.
Kalida slowly — very
slowly — built up a 24-15
lead in the third canto as the
Jeffcats missed all eight shots
they took in the period and
turned it over three times (10
for the game versus Kalida’s
8). Kalida started to get into
a bit of foul trouble as three
starters picked up their third
fouls during the span and
also struggled shooting the
ball against the Delphos man
“D”, hitting 2-of-8.
Jefferson’s only point
in the stanza was a
free toss by Ricker at
1:11 to account for the
24-16 scoreboard as the
game went to the fourth
period.
The visitors tried to rally
and began to heat up some
in the finale. They hit three
of their first five shots:
Jettinghoff triple, Ricker
8-footer and Ricker 3-ball; to
get within 27-24 at the 4:22
mark. However, they
could get no closer. A
key 4-0 mini-spurt: bas-
kets by Horstman and
senior Cody Mathew;
put Jefferson behind
33-24 and, having been
assessed only three fouls the
second half to that point (9
for the game versus 15), were
forced to foul to extend the
game and get Kalida into the
1-and-1. Kalida notched 5-of-
6 in the last 1:36 (9-of-10
for the game for 90% ver-
sus 7-of-13 for Jefferson for
53.8%).
Jefferson (1-4) totaled 24
caroms (8 offensive) as soph-
omore Nick Fitch added six.
They will visit Ottoville for a
varsity-only contest starting 7
p.m. Tuesday.
“Defensively, our effort
was outstanding after hav-
ing a terrible effort against
Crestview last night. Our
defense gave us a chance to
win this game despite our
struggles offensively,” Coach
Smith added. “We did a nice
job on Horstman inside. We
handled the ball fairly well
and we rebounded with them.
We did a lot of good things
tonight except for shooting
and the effort was outstand-
ing.”
Kalida secured 27 boards
(6 offensive) as Horstman
grabbed six and junior Adam
Langhals five. Kalida visits
Lincolnview Friday.
“Once we started to get to
the line, we hit them. We were
16-of-20 against Pandora-
Gilboa the other night,
another team in a rebuild-
ing mode,” Coach Kortokrax
added. “We play awfully hard
— that can’t be questioned on
either team’s part — but for
us, we need to play smarter.
Again, that is part of the pro-
cess we are going through
right now.”
In junior varsity action,
Kalida’s moved to 5-0 with a
54-37 conquest.
Freshman Trent Gerding
led the victors with 11.
For the Jeffcats (1-4),
freshman Dalton Hicks net-
ted 11.
Kalida ‘D’ stymies Jefferson
VARSITY
JEFFERSON (29)
Austin Jettinghoff 2-0-6, Zach
Ricker 3-1-8, Jordon Williams 0-0-0,
Ross Thompson 2-0-4, Trey Smith 2-4-
9, Seth Wollenhaupt 0-0-0, Tyler Mox
0-0-0, Nick Fitch 0-2-2. Totals 5-4-
7/13-29.
KALIDA (38)

Cody Mathew 2-0-4, Adam
Langhals 1-0-2, Devin Kortokrax 2-5-
9, Randy Zeller 2-2-7, Andrew Krouse
0-0-0, Cole Miller 1-2-4, Joe Gerdeman
1-0-2, Austin Horstman 5-0-10. Totals
13-1-9/10-38.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 9 6 1 13 - 29
Kalida 10 8 6 14 - 38
Three-point goals: Jefferson,
Jettinghoff 2, Ricker, Smith; Kalida,
Zeller.
-----
JUNIOR VARSITY
JEFFERSON (37)
Ryan Goergens 1-0-2, Kurt
Wollenhaupt 1-4-7, Josh Teman 0-3-
3, Alex Neubert 1-0-2, Justin Stewart
1-0-2, Zavier Buzard 1-0-2, Jordan
Herron 0-0-0, Dalton Hicks 4-3-11,
Grant Wallace 0-1-1, Carter Mox 1-1-3,
Tyler Rice 2-0-4. Totals 11-1-12/25-37.
KALIDA (54)
Grant Unverferth 0-0-0, Austin
Swift 2-3-7, Trent Gerding 5-1-11,
Trevor Holtkamp 2-0-6, Maag 1-0-2,
Zach Erhart 3-0-8, Logan Roebke 3-0-
7, Colton Farrell 2-2-6, Brent Hovest
1-1-3, Verhoff 0-0-0, O. Hovest 0-0-
0, Myers 2-0-4, Laudick 0-0-0, Devin
Kortokrax 0-0-0. Totals 16-5-7/10-54.
Score by Quarters:
Jefferson 7 9 11 10 - 37
Kalida 9 17 14 14 - 54
Three-point goals: Jefferson,
Wollenhaupt; Kalida, Holtkamp 2,
Erhart 2, Roebke.
Bearcats top local
wrestling teams at AC meet
HARROD —
Spencerville’s wres-
tling crew finished
third to lead the four
Tri-County teams at
the ninth annual Allen
County Wrestling
Tournament held Saturday at
Allen East High School.
St. John’s was fourth,
Jefferson sixth and Elida sev-
enth out of 10 teams.
Elida is in the Celina
Super-Tri Thursday (6
p.m.), while St. John’s is in
the Marion Harding Classic
Dec. 28 and Jefferson
and Spencerville are
in the LCC Holiday
Invitational Dec. 29.
2012 Allen County
Invitational Scores: Shawnee
297, Bath 253, Spencerville
206, St. John’s 199, Lima
C.C. 188, Jefferson 176, Elida 171,
Lima Senior 168, Allen East 163,
Bluffton 125.5.
Most Valuable Wrestler: Zach
Wilson (BL) - 160# Champion (4-time
Allen Co. Champion).
LOCAL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 7
2
ANDY NORTH
1122 Elida Ave.
(East Towne Plaza)
DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
Bus. (419) 695-0660
1-800-335-7799
Call or stop by today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
419-692-0055
www.raabeford.com
Jeff Dawson
Manager
Office: (419) 399-4549
Cell Phone: (419) 796-0868
Fax: (419) 399-2291
1099 N Williams St
Paulding, OH 45879
E-Mail:
jeffrey.dawson@mortonbuildings.com
mortonbuildings.com
A listing of GC Licenses available at
mortonbuildings.com/licenses.aspx
Monday, December 17, 2012 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
Jefferson senior Geoff Ketcham maneuvers St. John’s
junior Nate Schroeder into a pinning combination to win
the final match of the Allen County Wrestling Tournament
to win the 285-pound title Saturday. (Photo submitted)
The Associated Press
The Green Bay Packers and
Houston Texans clinched their
divisions, while the Baltimore
Ravens earned a playoff spot
despite another lousy loss.
The jumbled NFC East?
Well, that will come down to
the final week of the season.
The New York Giants
were humiliated 34-0 by the
Atlanta Falcons on
Sunday, falling into a
first-place tie with the
Dallas Cowboys and
Washington Redskins,
who both won to
improve to 8-6.
The Redskins did it
without Robert Griffin
III, who sat out with a
sprained right knee and wasn’t
happy about having to stand
on the sideline and watch. But
fellow rookie Kirk Cousins
stepped in and threw for 329
yards and two touchdowns,
leading Washington to its fifth
straight win, 38-21 over the
Cleveland Browns.
Cousins connected with
Leonard Hankerson for both
TDs in his first career start and
the Redskins barely missed a
beat without the talented and
multi-dimensional RG3. Last
week, Cousins came off the
bench after Griffin got hurt
and delivered a performance
in this one that extended
Washington’s longest winning
streak since 2007.
Rookie Trent Richardson
had a pair of TD runs for the
Browns (5-9).
At Arlington, Texas, Dallas’
Brandon Carr intercepted a
pass by Ben Roethlisberger in
overtime, returning it 36 yards
to the 1, and Dan Bailey kicked
a 21-yard field goal for a 27-24
win over Pittsburgh.
Bailey’s kick — 1:24 into
OT — won a game for the sec-
ond straight week since Dallas
practice squad linebacker Jerry
Brown was killed in a 1-car
accident that led to manslaughter
charges against teammate Josh
Brent. After Carr’s interception,
Tony Romo took a 2-yard loss
to put the kicker in better posi-
tion for the Cowboys.
The Steelers (7-7) lost for
the fourth time in five games
and trail AFC North rival
Cincinnati by a game for the
conference’s second wild-card
spot. They host the Bengals
next week. Roethlisberger is
0-2 since returning from a
three-game absence with shoul-
der and rib injuries.
At Atlanta, Matt Ryan
threw three touchdowns passes
in a 34-0 win and the Falcons’
defense handed the Giants their
first regular-season shutout
since 1996.
Falcons cornerback Asante
Samuel had the first of two
interceptions against Eli
Manning. Julio Jones caught
a couple of scoring throws
from Ryan, who broke his own
franchise records for
completions and pass-
ing yards in a season.
He finished 23-of-28
for 270 yards.
Falcons (12-2), who
have already clinched
the NFC South,
moved a step closer
to home-field advan-
tage throughout the conference
playoffs.
Manning had his lowest-
rated game since 2007 for New
York (8-6), who went 0-for-3
on fourth down and missed a
short field goal.
PACKERS 21, BEARS 13
At Chicago, the Packers clinched
their second straight NFC North title with
a win over archrival Chicago Bears.
James Jones caught all three
touchdown passes thrown by the
Packers’ Aaron Rodgers. Green Bay
has now won six straight in the NFL’s
oldest — and fiercest — rivalry. The
Packers (10-4) have won 12 straight
against NFC North opponents, the lon-
gest streak in the NFL.
Brandon Marshall had a 15-yard
TD catch for the Bears (8-6), who
have lost 5-of-6 and are in danger of
missing the playoffs after beginning
the year 7-1.
TEXANS 29, COLTS 17
At Houston, Andre Johnson had
151 yards receiving and a touchdown,
Bryan Braman scored on a blocked
punt and Shayne Graham kicked five
field goals to clinch the AFC South for
the second straight year.
J.J. Watt had three sacks for the
Texans (12-2) as Houston’s defense
got back on track a week after a 42-14
loss to New England.
The Colts (9-5) had won three
straight and needed a win to clinch a
playoff berth a year after going 2-14.
BRONCOS 34, RAVENS 17
At Baltimore, Chris Harris returned
an interception 98 yards for a momen-
tum-turning touchdown and Denver
won its ninth straight.
Peyton Manning threw for 204
yards and a score in his ninth consecu-
tive win against Baltimore, the first with
the Broncos (11-3).
Ravens (9-5) were playing their first
game under offensive coordinator Jim
Caldwell, who replaced the fired Cam
Cameron. Baltimore clinched a playoff
spot by virtue of Pittsburgh’s loss.
49ERS 41, PATRIOTS 34
At Foxborough, Mass., San
Francisco earned a playoff berth by
withstanding a stunning comeback by
Tom Brady and New England from a
28-point deficit to beat the Patriots.
Michael Crabtree took a short pass
from Colin Kaepernick and sped around
cornerback Kyle Arrington for a 38-yard
touchdown with 6:25 to go, then David
Akers made a 28-yard field goal to
clinch it. San Francisco (10-3-1) owns
at least a wild-card spot and plays at
Seattle next week with a chance to win
the NFC West.
AFC East champion New England
(10-4), which had won seven in a row,
trailed 31-3 at one point and lost for the
first time at home in December in 21
games. The Patriots also had won 21 in
a row in the second half of the sched-
ule before San Francisco somehow
regrouped late in a game it seemingly
had clinched long before.
VIKINGS 36, RAMS 22
At St. Louis, Adrian Peterson ran
for a season-best 212 yards, including
an 82-yard touchdown.
Peterson has 1,812 yards rush-
ing for the Vikings (8-6), leaving him
294 shy of breaking the NFL’s sin-
gle-season record of 2,105 by Eric
Dickerson of the Los Angeles Rams
in 1984. Peterson, less than a year
removed from a serious knee injury,
has two games left — at Houston and
home against Green Bay — to top
Dickerson.
The Rams fell to 6-7-1.
SEAHAWKS 50, BILLS 17
At Toronto, Seattle rookie quar-
terback Russell Wilson ran for three
touchdowns and threw for another in
leading the Seahawks to their second
straight rout.
Wilson scored on runs of 14, 25
and 4 yards and then hit Zach Miller for
a 4-yard TD in helping the Seahawks
(9-5) score 31 points on their first five
possessions. The defense forced three
consecutive turnovers to start the sec-
ond half, including Earl Thomas scoring
on a 57-yard interception return.
The Bills (5-9) were knocked out of
playoff contention for a 13th consecu-
tive season.
CARDINALS 31, LIONS 10
At Glendale, Ariz., Greg Toler
returned an interception 102 yards for
a fourth-quarter touchdown as Arizona
ended a 9-game losing streak.
The Cardinals (5-9) intercepted
Matthew Stafford three times, returning
two for touchdowns and setting up a
TD with the other.
The Lions (4-10) lost their sixth straight.
Rashad Johnson brought back a pick 53
yards for a TD to cap Arizona’s 21-point
second quarter. Patrick Peterson’s inter-
ception set up another score.
Detroit’s Calvin Johnson became
the first player in NFL history with con-
secutive 1,600-yard receiving seasons
and tied an NFL record with his seventh
straight 100-yard receiving game.
PANTHERS 31, CHARGERS 7
At San Diego, Mike Tolbert scored
twice against his former team and
DeAngelo Williams turned a tipped
pass from Cam Newton into a 45-yard
touchdown reception.
Carolina (5-9) won consecutive
games for the first time since last
December. The loss knocked the
Chargers (5-9) out of playoff contention
for the third straight year and clinched
their first losing season since 2003,
when they were an NFL-worse 4-12.
SAINTS 41, BUCCANEERS 0
At New Orleans, Drew Brees
passed for 307 yards and four touch-
downs and New Orleans posted its first
shutout since 1995.
Brees connected on his scoring
passes with tight end David Thomas,
running back Darren Sproles and receiv-
ers Lance Moore and Joe Morgan.
Mark Ingram added an 11-yard touch-
down run for the Saints (6-8).
Josh Freeman endured one of his
worst outings of the season for Tampa
Bay (6-8), throwing four interceptions
and losing a fumble.
DOLPHINS 24, JAGUARS 3
At Miami, the Dolphins (6-8) kept
former teammate Chad Henne out of
the end zone, made three fourth-down
stops deep in its own territory and ben-
efited from an odd penalty.
The Dolphins turned back three
scoring threats and a go-ahead touch-
down for the Jaguars (2-12) came
off the board because of an illegal-
substitution penalty.
RAIDERS 15, CHIEFS 0
At Oakland, Calif., Sebastian
Janikowski kicked five field goals and
Darren McFadden rushed for 110 yards.
The Raiders (4-10) overwhelmed
the Chiefs (2-12) to snap a 6-game
losing streak.
NFL CAPSULES
Roundup
(Continued from Page 6)
Placers
Round Robin
106: 1. Lucas (SH); 2. Blaine
Hunter (E); 3. Dues (A); 4. Stahl
(BA); 5. Moore
(LS).
113: 1. Moore
(LS); 2. Kehres
(SH); 3. Ashley
King (SV).
126: 1.
Plaugher (SH); 2.
Derrick Smith (SV);
3. Russel (LS); 4.
Luke (BL); 5. Garrett Bell (E).
Two Pools
120: 1. Tyler Baker (A), 3:08;
2. Holbrook (LS); 3. Henon (SH),
0:59; 4. Freeman (BL); 5. Evan
Mohler (SJ), 1:45; 6. Dakota Rolfe
(E); 7. Blake Kimmet (DJ), bye.
132: 1. Nick Pauff (E) md 14-4;
2. Jared Davis (BA); 3. Kuhlman
(SH), 0:30; 4. Trevor
Bockey (SV); 5.
Hahn (LC), 4:51; 6.
Dylan Hicks (DJ); 7.
Askins (SH), 0:07;
8. Wilcutt (LS).
138: 1. Cory
Binkley (SV) md 15-7; 2. Arthur
(SH); 3. Eley (LC), 2:21; 4. Alex
Haunhorst (SJ); 5. Proby (LS)
12-10; 6. Stonehill (BA); 7. Christain
McCarthy (E), 2:29; 8. Robby King
(SV).
145: 1. Brandon McCormick
(LC) md 14-4; 2. Garrett (BA); 3.
Austin Martin (SJ) md 17-9; 4. Cole
Bellows (SV); 5. Kohlhorst (SH)
3-2; 6. Garmatter (BL); 7. Eisele
(LC), 3:55; 8. Knuckles (LS).
152: 1. Wes Buettner (SJ), 3:13;
2. Lowe (BA); 3. Tremoulis (LC),
1:34; 4. Chris Truesdale (DJ); 5.
Cox (SH), 1:40; 6. Emerick (A); 7.
Zach Brown (SV), forfeit; 8. Brown
(LS).
160: 1. Wilson (BL) tf 21-6; 2.
Wise (BA); 3. Aaron Deffenbaugh
(SJ), 1:24; 4. R. King (A); 5. Williams
(LS), 0:54; 6. Kyle Sawmiller (SV);
7. Flynn (SH) 7-5; 8. Issac Nichols
(E).
170: 1. Hefner (SH) 5-2; 2.
McAdoo (A); 3. Will Buettner (SJ),
2:52; 4. Wick (LS); 5. Garcia (LC),
1:24; 6. Ebbeskotte (BA); 7. Bracy
(BL), 0:25; 8. Lane Bennett (DJ).
182: 1. Tyler Smith (E) 16-11;
2. Sunderhaus (LC); 3. Criblez
(A) 3-1; 4. Conley (BL); 5. Luke
Wrasman (SJ), 4:43; 6. Tyler Foust
(DJ); 7. Collin Poling (E), 1:28; 8.
Fike (LS).
195: 1. Colin McConnahea
(DJ), 3:15; 2. Huffman (LC); 3.
Nickoli Sackinger (E) md 12-3; 4.
LaMarr (BA); 5. Lucas Shumate
(SV), 2:46; 6. Cox (A); 7. Evan
Barnett (SV), 1:29;
8. Alec Lindeman
(DJ).
220: 1. Quinten
Wessell (DJ), 1:52;
2. Tyler Dues
(SV); 3. Lhamon
(BA), 2:28; 4. Jacob Yahl (SV); 5.
Lucas Krouskop (SV) md 15-7; 6.
Allison (SH); 7. Wise (SH) 7-4; 8.
Sampson (BL).
285: 1. Geoff Ketcham (DJ),
4:28; 2. Nate Schroeder (SJ); 3.
Neal (BA), 1:46; 4. Jake Bellows
(SV); 5. Hughes (SH), default; 6.
Howell (SH); 7. McKinley (LC),
bye.
Local wrestlers records
Five Rounds - Two Pools
120: Evan Mohler (SJ) 2-2;
Dakota Rolfe (E) 2-2; Blake Kimmet
(DJ) 1-3.
132: Nick Pauff (E) 4-0; Trevor
Bockey (SV) 3-1; Dylan Hicks (DJ)
2-2; Alexyss LeGrande (SV) 0-4.
138: Cory Binkley (SV) 4-0;
Alex Haunhorst (SJ) 3-1; Christain
McCarthy (E) 2-2; Robby King (SV)
1-3.
145: Austin Martin (SJ) 3-1;
Cole Bellows (SV) 3-1.
152: Wes Buettner (SJ) 4-0;
Chris Truesdale (DJ) 2-2; Zach
Brown (SV) 1-3; Micah Hartman
(E) 0-4.
160: Aaron Deffenbaugh (SJ)
3-1; Kyle Sawmiller (SV) 2-2; Issac
Nichols (E) 1-3; Noah Illig (DJ)
0-4.
170: Will Buettner (SJ) 3-1;
Lane Bennett (DJ) 1-3; Reid
Corzine (DJ) 0-4.
182: Tyler Smith (E) 4-0; Luke
Wrasman (SJ) 2-2; Tyler Foust
(DJ) 2-2; Collin Poling (E) 1-3.
195: Colin McConnahea (DJ)
4-0; Nickoli Sackinger (E) 3-1;
Lucas Shumate (SV) 2-2; Alec
Lindeman (DJ) 1-3; Evan Barnett
(SV) 1-3; Bryan Holliway (SV) 0-4.
220: Quinten Wessell (DJ) 4-0;
Jacob Yahl (SV) 3-1; Tyler Dues
(SV) 3-1; Lucas Krouskop (SV)
2-2; Dustin McConnahea (DJ) 0-4;
Jordan Rothermal (E) 0-4.
285: Geoff Ketcham (DJ) 4-0;
Nate Schroeder (SJ) 4-0; Jake
Bellows (SV) 3-1.
Five Rounds - Round Robin
106: Blaine Hunter (E) 4-1.
113: Ashley King (SV) 3-2.
126: Derrick Smith (SV) 4-1;
Garrett Bell (E) 1-4.
-------
LadyCats dominate
2nd half versus
Musketeers in PCL
FORT JENNINGS —
Whatever Kalida head coach
Adam Huber and his staff
told his LadyCats during
halftime Saturday afternoon
at The Fort
worked.
They domi-
nated the sec-
ond half 28-8
— includ-
ing an 11-1 spread in the
third period — and rolled
up a 50-27 Putnam County
League triumph over home-
standing Fort Jennings at The
Fort.
The LadyCats (5-1, 1-0
PCL) received 15 markers
from Jackie Gardner and
seven each from Nicole
Recker and Amy
Smith.
The Lady
Musketeers (3-4,
0-2 PCL) were
led by the nine
markers of Macy Schroeder
and eight from Gabbi
German.
The Lady Musketeers
host Crestview tonight, while
Kalida entertains Columbus
Grove Tuesday.
Score by Quarters:
Kalida 12 10 11 17 - 50
Ft. Jennings 13 6 1 7 - 27
KALIDA (50)
Jackie Gardner 6-1-0-15, Nicole
Recker 1-0-5-7, Summer Holtkamp
2-0-0-4, Nicole Reindel 0-0-0-
0, Kiersten Recker 0-0-0-0, Kylie
Siebeneck 1-0-0-2, Amy Smith 1-0-
5-7, Elizabeth Turnwald 2-0-0-4,
Kristi Honigfort 1-1-0-5, Kennedy
Hoffman 0-0-0-0, Makenna Vorst
0-0-0-0, Kylie Osterhage 0-1-3-6.
Totals 14/27-3/7-13/22-50.
FORT JENNINGS (27)
Macy Schroeder 1-2-1-9, Gabbi
German 3-0-2-8, Cassie Lindeman
2-0-0-4, Hannah Clay 2-0-0-4, Emily
Kehres 1-0-0-2, Erin Osting 0-0-
0-0, Ashley Gable 0-0-0-0, Alyssa
Schimmoeller 0-0-0-0. Totals 9/36-
2/12-3/9-27.
Rebounds: Kalida 34/12 offen-
sive, Fort Jennings, 18/14 offen-
sive.
Turnovers: Kalida 27, Fort
Jennings 24.
JV SCORE: Kalida, 37-23.
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA —
Kobe Bryant scored 34
points, Metta World Peace
added 19 points and a career-
high 16 rebounds and the Los
Angeles Lakers won con-
secutive games for the first
time in nearly a month with
a 111-98 victory over
the Philadelphia 76ers
on Sunday.
Dwight Howard
had 17 points and
11 rebounds for the
Lakers, who led 60-50
at halftime. Darius
Morris had a career-
high 15 points, all in
the first half, and Chris
Duhon scored 14.
The Lakers (11-14),
who beat Washington
102-96 on Friday night, won
two in a row for the first time
since a 3-game streak from
Nov. 16-20.
Even without injured stars
Steve Nash and Pau Gasol,
the Lakers hardly resembled
the team which entered the
night four games below .500.
Nick Young paced the
reeling Sixers (12-12) with 30
points, while Spencer Hawes
and Evan Turner added 16
apiece. Thaddeus Young had
14 points for Philadelphia,
which dropped a third straight
game for the first time this
season.
RAPTORS 103,
ROCKETS 96
TORONTO — Jose
Calderon had 18 points, 14
assists and 10 rebounds,and
Toronto won consecutive
games for the first time in
eight months with a victory
over Houston.
Alan Anderson had 24
points and DeMar DeRozan
added 19 for the Raptors
(6-19), who hadn’t won con-
secutive games since April
13 and 15 of last season.
James Harden scored 28
points for the Rockets and
Marcus Morris added 19.
Former Raptors sharp-shooter
Carlos Delfino drained two baskets
in the final 1:04 to pull the Rockets
within two points but Calderon sunk
two free throws to put Toronto back
up by four.
The teams traded free throws for
most of the final minute.
NUGGETS 122, KINGS 97
SACRAMENTO, Calif. —
Reserve JaVale McGee scored 19
points, Danilo Gallinari had 18 and
Denver built a big lead in the first half
to cruise past Sacramento.
The Nuggets scored 16 straight
points to snap a first-quarter tie
and take control. Denver has won
seven in a row against the Kings.
Sacramento has lost four straight
overall.
Isaiah Thomas had 20 points and
DeMarcus Cousins had 19 points
and 11 rebounds for the Kings.
Sacramento’s Aaron Brooks
committed a hard foul against Andre
Miller late in the first quarter and
a mild altercation ensued involving
Cousins and Kenneth Faried of the
Nuggets. All four players were given
technical fouls.
TRAIL BLAZERS 95, HORNETS
94
PORTLAND, Ore. — Rookie
Damian Lillard hit a 3-pointer with
0.3 seconds left as Portland handed
New Orleans its sixth straight loss.
After trailing by as many as 16,
Austin Rivers hit a 3-pointer for the
Hornets to tie it at 92 with 50.9 sec-
onds left to set up Lillard’s winner.
Lance Thomas made a layup for the
Hornets as time ran out for the final
margin.
J.J. Hickson had a season-high
24 points and added 16 rebounds
for the Trail Blazers, who have won
three straight. Hickson has five
straight double-doubles and 13 over-
all this season.
Ryan Anderson had 26 points,
including seven 3-pointers, for New
Orleans.
NBA CAPSULES
Notre Dame coach Knute Rockne survived
a car crash, train derailment, sinking ship,
house fire and a tornado before perishing in
a plane crash.
1
KERNS
LIMA
4147 Elida Rd.
419-224-4656
CELINA
5217 Tama Rd.
419-363-2230
visit us
on the web
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
LARGEST SELECTION AvALIAbLE
$
299
ELECTRIC
FIREPLACES...
$
249
Only
Starting at
When Donna learned she would soon be the proud grandmother of four
new grandchildren, she was overjoyed. She was also determined not
to let her tumor keep her from her family. That’s when she turned to us
for help.
Our surgeons offer more robotically enhanced procedures than other
regional facilities, so Donna recovered faster with less pain and
scarring. That meant she could spend less time as a patient and more
time being a grandmother to her new grandchildren.
Learn more about robotic general surgery at stritas.org.
Robotic Surgery Center
Leading you to better health.
Turn recovery time
into family time.
Donna Ellinger
Robot-Assisted
Surgery Patient
Robotic general
surgery:
• Gall bladder
disease
• Colon cancer
• Gastric reflux
2
F
A
S
T
Facial Weakness
Arm and Leg Weakness
Speech Problems
Time is Critical
StrokeCareNow.com
Know the signs of
STROKE and act
FAST!
VanWertHospital.org
Springbrook Gardens
Reception Hall & Banquet Center
Call to reserve our hall for your special occasion!
4240 N. West Street, Lima, OH
419-233-1530
419-235-1261
New Year’s Eve Party
December 31 • doors open at 8 p.m.
BAND “BLAME IT ON SHORTY”
to play from 10-1
Doors open 7 p.m.
$7 Adults
$3 Children 12 & under
REFRESHMENTS
PROVIDED
Wednesday Jan. 9, 2013
Delphos & Van Wert
$10 casino play & $10 dining
FREE slot tournament
Call for reservations 877-864-9608
BUCKEYE CHARTER
Casino Trips
$
30
Bob Baines spends three days a week getting
the lifesaving dialysis his body needs. It’s a time-
consuming process, but there’s no place he’d
rather do it than here. With some of the area’s
most experienced caregivers, exible hours, and
great accommodations during treatment, our
dedicated staff ensures patients like Bob get the
best possible care at each of our three convenient
locations in Lima, Putnam and Mercer counties.
With the area’s only Renal Care Coordinator, you
can take comfort knowing that a trusted advocate
is always looking after your long-term wellbeing.
Ask your doctor for a referral or call 419-227-0918.
Leading you to better health
Bob Baines
Dialysis Patient
“The staff is
wonderful.
I can’t say
enough.”
Expert dialysis,
close to home
8 – The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Anniversary
Pastor and Mrs. Dan Eaton
Pastor Dan and Janie Eaton of Delphos First Assembly
of God enjoyed their 45th wedding anniversary on Nov.
25.
They celebrated the special occasion by spending it
with their family, their church family, and a getaway
at The Victorian Lady, a bed and breakfast located in
Norwalk.
They are the parents of three children, Michael Eaton
of St. Marys, John (Hope) Eaton of Fort Wayne and
Chrissy (and Brian) Latstetter of Flushing, Mich.
They also have seven grandchildren and one great-
grandchild.
By JAKE COYLE
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Peter
Jackson’s “The Hobbit” led
the box office with a haul
of $84.8 million, a record-
setting opening better than
the three previous “Lord of
the Rings” films.
The Warner Bros. Middle
Earth epic was the biggest
December opening ever,
surpassing Will Smith’s “I
Am Legend,” which opened
with $77.2 million in 2007,
according to studio esti-
mates Sunday. “The Hobbit:
An Unexpected Journey”
also passed the December
opening of “Avatar,” which
opened with $77 million.
Internationally, “The Hobbit”
also added $138.2 million, for
an impressive global debut of
$223 million.
Despite weak reviews, the
3-D adaptation of J. R. R.
Tolkien’s first novel in the
fantasy series was an even
bigger draw than the last
“Lord of the Rings” movie,
“The Return of the King.”
That film opened with $72.6
million. “The Hobbit” is the
first of another planned tril-
ogy, with two more films to
be squeezed out of Tolkien’s
book.
While Jackson’s “Rings”
movies drew many acco-
lades — “The Return of the
King” won best picture from
the Academy Awards — the
path for “The Hobbit” has
been rockier. It received no
Golden Globes nominations
on Thursday, though all three
“Rings” films were nominat-
ed by the Hollywood Foreign
Press Association for best
picture.
Particularly criticized has
been the film’s 48-frames-
per-second (double the usual
rate), a hyper-detailed look
that some have found jarring.
Most moviegoers didn’t see
“The Hobbit” in that version,
though, as the new technolo-
gy was rolled out in only 461
of the 4,045 theaters playing
the film.
Regardless of any misgiv-
ings over “The Hobbit,” the
film was a hit with audiences.
They graded the film with an
“A” CinemaScore.
“What’s really important,
what makes this special is
the CinemaScore,” said Dan
Fellman, president of domes-
tic distribution for Warner
Bros. “All these things point
to a great word of mouth. We
haven’t even made it to the
Christmas holidays yet. Kids
are still in school this week.”
The strong opening cul-
minated a long journey for
“The Hobbit,” which was ini-
tially delayed when a lawsuit
dragged on between Jackson
and “Rings” producer New
Line Cinema over merchan-
dizing revenue. At one point,
Guillermo del Toro was to
direct the film with Jackson
producing. But eventually
the filmmaker opted to direct
the movie himself, originally
envisioning two “Hobbit”
films. The production also
went through the bankruptcy
of distribution partner MGM
and a labor dispute in New
Zealand, where the film was
shot.
The long delay for “The
Hobbit,” nearly a decade
after the last “Lord of the
Rings” film, made it “one of
those movies that had every-
one scratching their heads
as to how it would open,”
said Paul Dergarabedian, an
analyst for box-office tracker
Hollywood.com.
“It’s been a decade since
the ‘Lord of the Rings’
trilogy concluded,” said
Dergarabedian. “There’s been
so much anticipation for this
film and having Peter Jackson
back at the helm just made it
irresistible both to fans and
the non-initiated alike.”
“The Hobbit” was far and
away the biggest draw in the-
aters, with no other new wide
release. Paramount’s “Rise
of the Guardians” continued
to draw the family crowd,
with $7.4 million, bringing
its cumulative total to $71.4
million. The Oscar contender
“Lincoln” from Walt Disney
crossed the $100 million
mark, adding another $7.2
million to bring its six-week
total to $107.9 million. And
Sony’s James Bond film
“Skyfall,” with another $7
million domestically, drew
closer to a global take of $1
billion.
The box office continued
to be on the upswing and
with anticipated releases like
“Les Miserables,” “Django
Unchained” and “The Guilt
Trip” approaching in the
holiday moviegoing season.
Dergarabedian expects the
year to break the 2009 record
of $10.6 billion. With some
$10.2 billion in revenue thus
far, he said, “We’re on track
to be in that realm.”
Estimated ticket sales for
Friday through Sunday at
U.S. and Canadian theaters,
according to Hollywood.
com. Where available, lat-
est international numbers are
also included. Final domes-
tic figures will be released
today.
1. “The Hobbit: An
Unexpected Journey,” $84.8
million.
2. “Rise of the Guardians,”
$7.4 million.
3. “Lincoln,” $7.2 mil-
lion.
4. “Skyfall,” $7 million.
5. “Life of Pi,” $5.4 mil-
lion.
6. “The Twilight Saga:
Breaking Dawn, Part 2,” $5.2
million.
7. “Wreck-It Ralph,”
$3.3million.
8. “Playing for Keeps,”
$3.2 million.
9. “Red Dawn,” $2.4 mil-
lion.
10. “Silver Linings
Playbook,” $2 million.
‘Hobbit’ bests ‘Rings’ with
$84.8 million opening
By GREG RISLING
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES — Long
before Christopher Chaney
made headlines by hacking
into the email accounts of such
stars as Scarlett Johansson
and Christina Aguilera, two
other women say he harassed
and stalked them online.
The women, who both
knew Chaney, say their lives
have been irreparably dam-
aged by his actions. One has
anxiety and panic attacks; the
other is depressed and para-
noid. Both say Chaney was
calculated, cruel and creepy:
he sent nude photos they had
taken of themselves to their
family members.
Their accounts as cyber-
victims serve as a cautionary
tale for those, even major
celebrities, who snap person-
al, and sometimes revealing
photos.
Chaney, 35, of
Jacksonville, Fla., is set to
be sentenced today and could
face up to 60 years in pris-
on after pleading guilty to
nine felony counts, including
wiretapping and unauthor-
ized access to a computer, for
hacking into email accounts
of Aguilera, Johansson and
Mila Kunis.
Aguilera said in a state-
ment that although she knows
that she’s often in the lime-
light, Chaney took from her
some of the private moments
she shares with friends.
“That feeling of security
can never be given back and
there is no compensation that
can restore the feeling one
has from such a large inva-
sion of privacy,” Aguilera
said.
Prosecutors said Chaney
illegally accessed the email
accounts of more than 50 peo-
ple in the entertainment indus-
try between November 2010
and October 2011. Aguilera,
Kunis and Johansson agreed
to have their identities made
public with the hopes that
the exposure about the case
would provide awareness
about online intrusion.
The biggest spectacle
in the case was the revela-
tion that nude photos taken
by Johansson herself and
meant for her then-husband
Ryan Reynolds were taken
by Chaney and put on the
Internet. The “Avengers”
actress is not expected to
attend the hearing, but she
has videotaped a statement
that may be shown in court.
Some of Aguilera’s photos
appeared online after Chaney
sent an email from the
account of her stylist, Simone
Harouche, to Aguilera ask-
ing the singer for scantily
clad photographs, prosecu-
tors said.
Chaney forwarded many
of the photographs to two
gossip websites and another
hacker, but there wasn’t evi-
dence he profited from his
scheme, authorities said.
For the two women, who
were only identified in court
papers by their initials, their
encounters with Chaney went
from friendly to frightening.
One of the women, identi-
fied by the initials T.B., said
she first met Chaney online
in 1999 when she was 13
years old. She began talking
with a girl named “Jessica”
that later turned out to actu-
ally be Chaney.
Chaney figured out his
victims’ email passwords and
security questions and set a
feature to forward a copy of
every email they received to
an account he controlled.
Hollywood hacker honed his skills for years
Monday, December 17, 2012 The Herald – 9 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
AMISH
CARPENTERS
All types of construction
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Miscellaneous
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
Repairs
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
Tree Service
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Ammonia / PSM Specialist
This position operates and maintains Facility Refrigera-
tion and HVAC Systems. Plans and maintains PSM Pro-
gram in conjunction with Safety Manager.
Principal Duties and Responsibilities
• Operates Plant Refrigeration Systems.
• Performs maintenance and repairs of Refrigeration
Systems.
• Conducts routine inspections of all refrigeration
machines.
• Ensures refrigeration systems are in compliance with
OSHA and IIAR guidelines.
Job Specifications
• At least 5 years of experience operating and repairing
ammonia and glycol refrigeration systems.
• High School Diploma or equivalent is required.
Technical Degree is preferred.
• Commercial Refrigeration Certificate is preferred.
• Knowledge of Vilter Compressors is preferred.
Interested candidates apply:
Email: patti.eilerman@resers.com
Fax: 419-692-1944
Mail: 1600 Gressel Dr.
Delphos OH 45833
If you like meeting people and
want a challenge, dhi media has
an opportunity for you as a
MARKETING
CONSULTANT
The selected individual will sell print,
on-line and specialty publications to a
diverse group of businesses in a
defned geographical territory.
Prior sales experience is a plus,
but not required.
Position is part-time,
with a hourly rate of pay, commission,
bonus and mileage reimbursement.
Interested applicants should send
cover letter with resume to
Don Hemple
Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
dhi
MEDIA
PRE-OWNED VEHICLES - REDUCED
CHEVROLET • BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
2013 Chevy Captiva LT, leather ............................... $22,500
2012 Chevy Captiva 2 LS, red ................................. $20,900
2011 Hyundai Santa Fe 2 to choose ..................... $17,700
2011 Buick Enclave premier, loaded ........................ $36,900
2010 Chevy Equinox 1 LT, great MPG .................... $18,900
2010 Chevy Silverado LTZ, loaded ........................ $27,900
2010 Chevy Avalanche LTZ, everything ................ $36,500
2009 Chrysler Town N Country loaded ........ $16,500
2007 Chevy Colorado Crew, 4 WD, Z71 ................ $13,900
2006 Chevy Trail Blazer LS, 4 WD, S-roof ........... $11,500
2005 GMC Yukon XL SLT, everything ...................... $15,500
2005 Merc. Mariner Premium, leather .......................... $8,995
2004 Chevy Silverado W/T, 4 WD, local ................ $12,700
2003 Chevy Trail Blazer LS 4 WD ........................... $7,995
2003 Chevy S-10 Crew, 4 WD, local ............................... $6,495
2000 Honda Odyssey LT, leather ............................... $4,595
2008 Nissan Quest 3.55 DVD, loaded ...................... $11,500
2012 GMC Acadia SLT, leather, 7 pass. ..................... $29,995
2012 Chevy Malibu 1 LT, mocha ............................... $15,900
2012 Chevy Impala LTZ, S-roof................................. $18,900
2012 Chevy Impala LS “Reduced” ......................... $14,900
2012 Dodge Avenger SE Black ............................ $13,950
2011 Chevy Malibu 1 LT, silver .................................. $14,500
2011 Buick Regal CXL Leather .............................. $19,900
2011 Chevy Impala 1 LT, 4 to choose ........................ $13,900
2011 VW Jetta Sedan 2 to choose .......................... $14,500
2011 Ford Focus SES red, S/roof ........................... $15,500
2011 Honda Civic full power, loaded........................... $15,500
2011 Dodge Avenger Main Street, loaded ............... $14,900
2010 Chevy Impala 1 LT, local trade ......................... $14,700
2009 Pontiac G6 full power, AM/FM/CD....................... $13,700
2009 Ford Focus Blue, 6 disc changer........................ $13,500
2009 Chevy HHR LS, blue, only 14,000 miles ............. $13,200
2009 Chrysler PT Cruiser Local, 44K mi. .............. $9,450
2008 Pontiac G6 full power, 31K mi. ............................ $13,400
2008 Chevy HHR LS gold, SAVE ................................ $9,995
2008 Buick LaCrosse CXL, leather, 37K miles....... $18,900
2006 Chevy Impala LTZ, S-roof, leather....................... $9,995
2006 Chevy Impala 1 LT, full power ............................. $7,995
2005 Buick LaCrosse CXL, leather, SR, local ........... $9,995
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It’s easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you. No
other classified ad buy is
simpler or more cost effec-
tive. Call 419-695-0015
ext. 138
240 Healthcare
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for an
outgoing, energetic and
caring LPN to join our
team at our long-term
care facility. Second
shift, part time position
available. Stop by and
fill out an application.
For details visit
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
240 Healthcare
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facil-
ity providing skilled
rehabilitation services,
assisted living, post
acute medical care and
more. We are looking
for caring, outgoing,
energetic STNA’s to
join our team. We cur-
rently have part time
position available for
skilled STNA’s. Nurse
Aide Classes will be
offered in January for
those who wish to be-
gin a rewarding career
as an STNA. Class size
will be limited. Please
stop by our Delphos
location and fill out an
application.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$425/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951
525
Computer/
Electronics
GARMIN G.P.S. Works
good. $40. Cal l
567-242-8175
560
Home
Furnishings
ELECTRIC LIFT chair
with battery backup for tall
person. Like new. Call
419-695-2751
577 Miscellaneous
LIMITED TIME $29.99/mo
Unlimited Talk & Text,
Free Activation, 2 months
free with additional lines.
Van Wert Wireless the
Alltel Store. 1198 West-
wood Drive, Suite B, Van
Wert, OH 419-238-3101
590
Tool and
Machinery
GOOD USED Sears
Craftsman 12” bandsaw
on stand with instruction
manual. New cost today
$395. Will sell for $185.
ALSO, good used 18”
Delta variable speed scroll
saw on stand with instruc-
tion manual. Paid $499 for
it. Will sell for $195. Would
make good Christmas pre-
sents! Ph: 419-695-2887
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
605 Auction
Christmas
Auction
Every Week 4 p.m.
19326 Co. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
419-587-3511
LARGE VARIETY OF
MERCHANDISE
Porter Auction
Everyone Welcome
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist in
the investigation of these
businesses. (This notice
provided as a customer
service by The Delphos
Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
820
Miscellaneous
For Sale
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
WANTED: SCRAP/JUNK
to clean up and haul away
FREE OF CHARGE. We
take appliances, batteries,
lawn mowers, grills, old
farm machinery, grain
bins, electronics, motors,
tv's, fencing, vehicles, bi-
cycles, etc. We will re -
move from house, barn,
even unsightly piles in
your woods. WANTING
275 FUEL OIL TANKS,
will remove from base -
ment. 419-795-3035 or
567-644-3016
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
CARRIERS WANTED
DELPHOS ROUTES
AVAILABLE IN JANUARY
Route 12
N. Canal St. & W. 6th St.
Route 18
N. West St. & Westbrook
Route 19
W. 5th St.
Route 23
W. 1st St.
Route 40
N. Jefferson St.
No Collecting
Call the Delphos Herald
Circulation Department at
419-695-0015 ext. 126
080 Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS is
looking for a dependable
Class-A CDL driver for
dedicated home daily
runs, Part-ti me runs,
Team drivers and Re -
gional runs. Regional
driver home weekends
and throughout the week.
Great pay and benefits
like Vision, Dental Major
Medical Insurance, Paid
vacation, Driver bonus
program and flexible dis-
patching. Just give us a
call and be on the road
with a family that cares
and knows your name.
1- 888- 465- 6001 or
419-692-1435, ask for
Shawn. You can also just
stop in at 900 Gressel Dr.,
Delphos, OH.
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
Benefits available. 99% no
touch freight! We will treat
you with respect! PLEASE
CALL 419-222-1630
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends, & most nights.
Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
IS YOUR
AD
HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
Place A Help
Wanted Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily Herald
419 695-0015
Dear Annie: I have been
close friends with “Luke” for
more than a year. We have a
strong bond, but it’s strictly
platonic. However, all that
changed when he started dating
“Lacey,” who, at age 20, is 10
years younger than Luke.
Naturally, when I first met
Lacey, I was friendly. But there
was something about her that
put me off. Almost
as soon as Luke
started seeing her,
she got him into
partying all night
and doing hard drugs
and began alienating
him from his friends
and family. Despite
our efforts to tell
him that he was
heading down a
dark path, he ended
up getting fired.
Then he stopped
contacting me.
After I hadn’t heard from
him for two months, Luke
called and said he missed our
friendship and wanted to talk
things out. He sounded like
a broken man. I was thrilled
that he was coming around.
But shortly after he called, I
got a nasty text from Lacey
demanding that I stop speaking
to Luke and saying he’s her
man and she doesn’t want any
other woman around him. I
was startled and angered by her
rudeness and told her that Luke
is my friend and I have every
right to talk to him. I told her to
calm down and grow up.
I haven’t heard from Luke
since, and I am worried. I tried
calling, but his cellphone number
has been disconnected. A mutual
friend said that Luke’s email
account was also cancelled.
I have a feeling that Lacey is
forcing him to cut ties with us
and be totally dependent on her.
It’s out of character for him
to abandon all the people who
mean so much to him. He reads
your column, and I can only
hope that he can get away from
this woman and know we are
still here for him. — Worried
Friend in Canada
Dear Canada:
Lacey is isolating
Luke from friends
and family, which
is descriptive of an
abusive relationship,
and it doesn’t help that
he is using drugs. The
sad part, however, is
that there’s not much
you can do if he is
unwilling to seek help.
Do you know where he
lives? Is he in touch
with any family members? If
you can reach him, please give
him the number of the National
Domestic Violence Hotline
(thehotline.org) at 1-800-799-
SAFE.
Dear Annie: I was taught
the bride and groom had one
year to send a handwritten
thank-you note following a
wedding. Shower gifts are to
be acknowledged within two
weeks of the bridal shower.
In the past two years,
however, the closest I’ve gotten
is a postcard with a wedding
picture of the bride and groom
on one side and “Thanks for
everything” on the other. If
a handwritten, proper thank-
you note is too difficult, I
would much prefer an email
acknowledging my specific gift
than a bulk mail postcard. —
Appalled in Georgia
Dear Georgia: There is
no excuse for not decently
thanking those who have taken
the time and effort to purchase a
gift. It’s sheer laziness and lack
of consideration.
However, we’d like to correct
a common misperception:
Guests have a year in which
to give the bridal couple a gift,
but thank-you notes should
be written immediately, and
certainly within three months.
Dear Annie: “Devastated
Daughter” said her father died
suddenly in an accident and she
isn’t sure about leaving Mom
alone to attend college out of
state.
If she chooses to defer
admission, I would advise her
to wait a full year and start
school in the fall so she can
“learn the ropes” with the rest
of her classmates. I enrolled
in the second semester, and it
was so much harder because
my classmates were ahead of
me in every way. And when I
graduated in December, it was
difficult to find a job. — Winter
Graduate
Annie’s Mailbox
Thank-you notes should
be written immediately
SQUIER FENDER P
Bass guitar & Hartke
VX 410 Bass Amp 400
WATTS ($350). 2 large
dog kennels ($30 each).
CALL 419-204-4538.
Answer to puzzle
ACROSS
1 Stickerstat
4 Horrorfilmstreet
7 Morningglory
11 Paydirt
12 Violentanger
13 Seaweedderivative
14 Width
16 “PrimalFear”star
17 Jellyflavor
18 Wheyopposite
19 Departedquickly
20 “--Sera,Sera”
21 Volcanicoutput
24 Fenced
27 Tofubase
28 Quartetminusone
30 Montandofthe
movies
32 Familyman
34 Cattlestall
36 Beveryfrugal
37 Applicant’shandout
39 Usefulthing
41 Currentmeas.
42 Pencontents
43 Rainprotector
45 Yucatancivilization
48 Doozy
49 Relocate
52 Footnoteabbr.(2
wds.)
53 OldChevy
54 LouisX,e.g.
55 Melody
56 Steinfiller
57 Lennon’swife
DOWN
1 Stylish
2 Fuddy-duddy
3 Backpackcontents
4 Consumed
5 Sizeabovemed.
6 Debussysubject
7 Sortof
8 DisneyCEOBob--
9 Ancientointment
10 Priorto
12 Banquet
15 Foalparent
18 Prompter’shint
20 Jenesais--
21 Deadlysnake
22 Glidelikeaneagle
23 Adspiel
24 Morethanserious
25 ArdenandCurie
26 Hockeyfeint
29 Mounties
31 Becomesolid
33 Generally(3wds.)
35 Cerealtopper
38 Foulballcaller
40 The--thelimit!
42 Reflection
43 Ballerina’sattire
44 Sen.--Cranston
46 Frizzycoif
47 Flashysign
48 Endorse
49 Ruralelec.provider
50 Auntorbro.
51 Sugarloaflocale
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening December 18, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Charlie Brown Happy Apt. 23 Private Practice Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS NCIS NCIS: Los Angeles Vegas Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC The Voice The Voice Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Raising Ben-Kate New Girl Mindy Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint Flashpoint
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol
ANIM Frontier Earth Blue Planet: Seas Blue Planet: Seas Frontier Earth Blue Planet: Seas
BET The Last Fall Vindicate Soul Man Vindicate Soul Man Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Start-Ups Shahs of Sunset Decorators Decorators Start-Ups
CMT Reba Reba Rumor Has It... Grumpier Old Men
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Work. Key Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daily Colbert Tosh.0 Key
DISC World End? Apocalypse 2012 Zombie Apocalypse Apocalypse 2012 Zombie Apocalypse
DISN Dog Good Luck Jessie ANT Farm Good Luck Phineas Jessie ANT Farm Wizards Wizards
E! When Women Kill Infamous Hollywood E! Investigates Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN Wm. Basketball NBA Coast to Coast SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball SportsNation NFL Live
FAM Home Alone The Polar Express Willy Wonka
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Chopped Chopped Restaurant Stakeout
FX Deck the Halls Deck the Halls Maid in Manhattan
HGTV Love It or List It Property Property Hunters Hunt Intl Income Income Property Property
HIST Mankind The Story Mankind The Story Invention Invention Mankind The Story
LIFE Dear Santa 12 Men of Christmas Dear Santa
MTV Jersey Shore Teen Mom 2 Catfish: The TV Show Catfish: The TV Show True Life
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Steve Niles' Remains Dawn of the Dead Steve Niles' Remains
SPIKE Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master Ink Master
TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan The Office
TCM In Summertime Meet Me in St. Louis On Moonlight Bay
TLC William and Kate: A Little People Big Wo My Three Wives Little People Big Wo My Three Wives
TNT Rizzoli & Isles Rizzoli & Isles Leverage Rizzoli & Isles Leverage
TOON Level Up Adventure King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Bizarre Foods Dangerous Grounds NFL Man, Food NFL NFL Dangerous Grounds
TV LAND Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA WWE Super SmackDown! Fast & Furious Law & Order: SVU
VH1 T.I.-Tiny Marry Basketball Wives LA Basketball Wives LA Love & Hip Hop Tiny Tonight
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO The Change-Up REAL Sports Gumbel Mel Brooks Boxing
MAX Extremely Loud The Grudge Life-Top Strike Back
SHOW Real Steel Homeland Dexter Scream 4
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Monday Evening December 17, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Extreme Makeover Extreme Makeover Castle Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS How I Met/Mother 2 Broke G Mike Hawaii Five-0 Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC The Voice 1600 Penn Take It All Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Dragons Ice Age Happiness Is Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
Cable Channels
A & E Hoarders Hoarders Intervention Intervention Hoarders
AMC A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol
ANIM Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot Wildman Wildman Rattlesnake Republic Finding Bigfoot
BET Madea's Family Vindicate Apollo Live Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Real Housewives Real Housewives Real Housewives Real Housewives Housewives/Atl.
CMT Reba Reba Deliverance Smokey and the Bandit
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Merry F... Christmas Daily Colbert South Pk South Pk
DISC American Chopper American Chopper Amish Mafia American Chopper Amish Mafia
DISN Beethoven-Adv Dog Good Luck Phineas Good Luck Jessie Wizards Wizards
E! Studio E! Ice-Coco Sweet Home Alabama Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN Countdown NFL Football SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball World/Poker World/Poker SportCtr Football NBA NFL Films
FAM Dr. Seuss' How-Grinch Dr. Seuss' The Mistle-Tones
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Diners Diners Mystery D Health Restaurant Stakeout
FX The Karate Kid The Karate Kid
HGTV Love It or List It Love It or List It Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It Love It or List It
HIST Pawn Pawn American Pickers Pawn Pawn 1880's Pawn Pawn Pawn
LIFE Road-Christmas Holly's Holiday Road-Christmas
MTV Jersey Shore Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Catfish: The TV Show Teen Mom 2
NICK Nick News Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Pirates-Worlds Riverworld
SPIKE Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo Tattoo
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Conan Office Office
TCM Destination Tokyo Battleground
TLC Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss Cake Boss Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss Cake Boss
TNT The Mentalist The Mentalist The Mentalist CSI: NY CSI: NY
TOON Regular Annoying King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV The Layover The Layover Hotel Impossible Hotel Impossible The Layover
TV LAND Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA WWE Monday Night RAW CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene
VH1 Basketball Wives LA T.I.-Tiny Marry Tiny Tonight Basketball Wives LA T.I.-Tiny Marry
WGN Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO New Year's Eve Pic Paris Les Miser Red Tails
MAX X-Men Something to Talk About Hanna
SHOW Untold History Homeland Dexter Homeland Dexter
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
10 – The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012
There is a good chance that in
the year ahead you will make several
important alliances that could become
extremely beneficial. Two of them
are likely to be with older people, but
one might be with someone younger
and more adventurous than you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- For reasons over which they’ll
have no control, the people whom
you depend on might fail you. Your
objective might be harder to reach on
your own, but you’ll handle it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- You might have to guard against
doing things in half measures, but
once you realize the stakes at play,
hesitation won’t be a problem.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- If you’re not careful, you
might be a trifle extravagant with
your resources. This is acceptable,
provided you aren’t equally as
generous with someone else’s money.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
There is nothing wrong with having
some fun and enjoying yourself,
as long as you don’t treat serious
matters lightly, especially those
pertaining to your career.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Be careful about what you tell others,
because if you reveal the wrong
things to the wrong person, instead
of unburdening yourself, you might
create more trouble.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Be positive and build up your
hopes, but also be realistic, because
if you aren’t, all you’ll do is make
more misery for yourself. Don’t use
your imagination as an instrument of
disappointment.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Something you thought to be shoo-in
could prove far more difficult to pull
off than anticipated. This can be an
extremely rewarding day for you if
you don’t take anything for granted
and put in the work.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- You don’t want to hurt anybody’s
feelings, naturally, but it might be
far kinder to be forthright instead of
painting a rosy picture that leads to
false expectations.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Certain commercial matters could
prove to be far more complicated
than they appear, so be prepared
for anything. If you’re cautions and
prudent, you should do just fine.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
you start seeking an easy out, you
might find only difficulty. By trying
to duck challenges, you might only
create more.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Usually, you’re the type of person
who likes to think a few steps
ahead of the game. Keep it up, as
careful forethought will be vital to a
successful day.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Your reasoning regarding a joint
matter is likely to be a shade sounder
than that of your counterpart. Listen
to his or her views, because one
could be good, but don’t discount
your judgment.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19,
2012
In the year ahead, it looks like
you’ll finally get to enjoy greater
prestige and status in an area where
you’ve never previously been
acknowledged. Along with the
recognition come copious career
improvements.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- It could be the fateful time
when some of your past efforts will
be coming home to roost. You’ll
quickly discover all that hard work
you’ve done will not have been in
vain.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Although you might have to
once again deal with a matter that has
given you much trouble, this time
experience and wisdom are on your
side. You’ll come out ahead.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Resurrecting an old enterprise that
you were once quite enthusiastic
about might be a good idea. You’ll be
glad you didn’t scrap it, because you
now possess the missing pieces.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- You’re likely to do much better
working with some trusted and
competent intermediaries than
handling a ticklish problem all on
your own. It’s smart to use all of your
resources.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- This might be the best day of the
week to spend some time on one of
your more meaningful objectives, so
try to do so. You might not have the
luxury for long.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Someone you like and whom you’ve
known for a while is much fonder of
you than you have reason to believe.
He or she might supply evidence of
this soon.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Don’t place a lot of significance
on some early, discomforting
developments, even if they appear to
be pretty harsh. Luck will be on your
side as the day progresses.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
A close associate will make a tough
decision that will have reverberations
in your life. After the dust settles,
you’ll realize its benefits.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- This
could be a very profitable time if
you’re both practical and prudent
in involvements of a financial or
material nature. You’ll be smart
when both buying and selling.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- If you’re prepared to take a
calculated risk, an endeavor in which
you’re presently involved could be
substantially advanced. Be sure to
think things out fully if you expect
success.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Trying to quietly go about doing
good deeds without drawing any
attention to it is a laudable goal.
However, once word gets out, and
it will, everyone will know of your
kindness.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Something you’ve wanted to
accomplish isn’t a lock, but it’s not
as complex as you’ve led yourself to
believe, either. You’ll quickly find
this out once you tackle it.

COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
1
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
Quality. Reliability. Service.
All in the family.
From lawn and garden
tractors to compact
tractors, excavators
and gasoline and
diesel utility vehicles.
Kubota delivers the
highest standards for
quality and service.
So, climb aboard the
Kubota of your choice
and join the family.
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
CgS^[fkDW^[ST[^[fkEWdh[UW
3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
8da_^Si`S`VYSdVW`
fdSUfadefaUa_bSUf
fdSUfadeWjUShSfade
S`VYSea^[`WS`V
V[WeW^gf[^[fkhWZ[U^We
=gTafSVW^[hWdefZW
Z[YZWefefS`VSdVeXad
cgS^[fkS`VeWdh[UW
EaU^[_TSTaSdVfZW
=gTafSaXkagdUZa[UW
S`V\a[`fZWXS_[^k
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
CgS^[fkDW^[ST[^[fkEWdh[UW
3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
8da_^Si`S`VYSdVW`
fdSUfadefaUa_bSUf
fdSUfadeWjUShSfade
S`VYSea^[`WS`V
V[WeW^gf[^[fkhWZ[U^We
=gTafSVW^[hWdefZW
Z[YZWefefS`VSdVeXad
cgS^[fkS`VeWdh[UW
EaU^[_TSTaSdVfZW
=gTafSaXkagdUZa[UW
S`V\a[`fZWXS_[^k
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
CLEARANCE Up to 75% OFF
Scratch & Dent Floor Models
& One-of-a-Kind
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
CgS^[fkDW^[ST[^[fkEWdh[UW
3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
8da_^Si`S`VYSdVW`
fdSUfadefaUa_bSUf
fdSUfadeWjUShSfade
S`VYSea^[`WS`V
V[WeW^gf[^[fkhWZ[U^We
=gTafSVW^[hWdefZW
Z[YZWefefS`VSdVeXad
cgS^[fkS`VeWdh[UW
EaU^[_TSTaSdVfZW
=gTafSaXkagdUZa[UW
S`V\a[`fZWXS_[^k
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
Available in Gas • Wood
• Electric • Pellet • Corn
GIVE THE GIFT
OF PLASMA
AND RECEIVE A
HOLIDAY BONUS
FROM BIOLIFE!
(WE THINK YOU
CAN DO BOTH!)
THEY SAY IT’S
BETTER TO GIVE
THAN RECEIVE.
419.224.0117
4299 ELIDA RD
LIMA, OH 45807
BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM
OUR GIFT TO YOU
Must present this coupon prior to the initial
donation to receive a total of $20 on your frst
and a total of $80 on your second successful
donation. Initial donation must be completed
by 1.1.13 and second donation within 30 days.
Coupon redeemable only upon
completing successful
donations. May not be
combined with any other offer.
Only at participating locations.
NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T
DONATED IN SIX MONTHS OR MORE,
PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE $100
IN JUST TWO DONATIONS.
$100
FREE SUPERVISED PLAYROOM!
• Twin Set starting at $179
• Full Sets starting at $199
• Queen Sets starting at $299
• King Sets starting at $449
• Queen Visco Elastic Memory Foam
Starting at $699
• Queen Latex from $699
• Queen Pillow Tops starting at $399
• Split Queen Box Springs $159
MATTRESS SETS
A+ Rating with
Better Business Bureau
WELLCARE
SERTA
ENGLANDER
LADY AMERICANA
Locally Owned and Operated
SAME DAY DELIVERY
Over 30 models on display
(FREE Delivery • FREE Setup
• FREE Removal $599 & up)
419-224-7117
or 1-877-502-2788
Open 7 Days a Week
2151 Elida Rd., Lima (across from Toys-R-Us)
DISCOVER YOUR
DREAMS THIS YEAR!
These
businesses
are proud
of their
community
of
Elida
and
ask you to
visit them.
They invite
you to check
them out
for the best
in personal
service,
value and
price!
Our Town...ELIDA
Monday, December 17, 2012 The Herald — 11
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
Odysseus had been away more than 19 years
when he returned home from the Trojan War accord-
ing to Homer’s Odyssey.
The Yugo was voted “the worst car of the millen-
nium” by listeners of National Public Radio’s popu-
lar Car Talk show. The mechanically-challenged
1980s Yugoslavian subcompact, jokingly referred to
the No-go, sold for $3,990 in the U.S.
Today’s questions:
A nude photo of what U.S. actress was pulled
from a Pop Life exhibit at London’s Tate Modern
museum in 2009 to avoid violating obscenity laws?
When it comes to military jargon, what’s an NBC
suit?
Answers in Wednesday’s Herald.
Burial
(Continued from page 1)
prevent more tragedies like
Newtown.
“What choice do we
have?” Obama said on a stark
stage that held only a small
table covered with a black
cloth, candles and the presi-
dential podium. “Are we real-
ly prepared to say that we’re
powerless in the face of such
carnage, that the politics are
too hard?”
The president first met
privately with families of
the victims and with the
emergency personnel who
responded to the shooting.
Police and firefighters got
hugs and standing ovations
when they entered for the
public vigil, as did Obama.
“We needed this,” said the
Rev. Matt Crebbin, senior
minister of the Newtown
Congregational Church. “We
need to be together here in
this room. ... We needed to be
together to show that we are
together and united.”
As Obama read some of
the names of victims early
in his remarks, sobs reso-
nated throughout the hall. He
closed by slowly reading the
first names of each of the 20
children.
“God has called them all
home,” he said. “For those of
us who remain, let us find the
strength to carry on and make
our country worthy of their
memory.”
The first funerals were
planned today for Jack Pinto,
a 6-year-old New York Giants
fan who might be buried in
wide receiver Victor Cruz’s
jersey, and Noah Pozner, a
boy of the same age who
liked to figure out how things
worked mechanically.
“He was just a real-
ly lively, smart kid,” said
Noah’s uncle Alexis Haller,
of Woodinville, Wash. “He
would have become a great
man, I think. He would have
grown up to be a great dad.”
With more funerals
planned this week, the road
ahead for Newtown — which
had already started purging
itself of Christmas decora-
tions in a joyful season turned
mournful — was clouded.
“I feel like we have to get
back to normal, but I don’t
know if there is normal any-
more,” said Kim Camputo,
mother of two children, ages
5 and 10, who attend a dif-
ferent school. “I’ll definitely
be dropping them off and
picking them up myself for
a while.”
Jim Agostine, superin-
tendent of schools in nearby
Monroe, said plans were
being made for students from
Sandy Hook to attend classes
in his town this week.
Newtown police Lt.
George Sinko said he “would
find it very difficult” for stu-
dents to return to the same
school where they came so
close to death. But, he added,
“We want to keep these kids
together. They need to sup-
port each other.”
2
Christmas Eve
MONDAY, December 24
Children’s Mass – 4:30 p.m.
Pageant and music begins at 4:00
Christmas Eve Mass - 7:30 p.m.
Music by the Contemporary Group at 7:00
Midnight Mass – 12 Midnight
Music begins at 11:30 p.m.
by the Adult Choir
New Year’s Eve
MONDAY,
December 31
Mass: 4:30 p.m.
New Year’s Day
TUESDAY, January 1, 2013
Mass at 9:00 a.m.
Christmas Day
TUESDAY, December 25
Mass of the Day at 9:00 a.m.
Music begins at 8:30
with Heather Schuck
Dear Friend,
The Catholic
community of
Delphos invites you
to join us for worship
during this Christmas
Season. We welcome
you to celebrate with us
in this time of great joy,
and hope that we might
serve you throughout
the new year. May the
feast of Christmas bring
us all close to God
through his Son Jesus
Christ, in the joy of the
Holy Spirit.
The People of
St. John the Evangelist
Church
Christmas - New Year’s Schedule of Services
ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST CATHOLIC CHURCH
Franklin and Second Streets, Delphos, Ohio Phone 419-695-4050
Glory
to God
In The
Highest
The True Christmas Story
Read: Luke 2:1-20
The events leading up to the birth of Christ weren’t
coincidental, but were put in place by God, so that the
prophecies of old would be fulfilled.
Everything that happened, from the time the census was
ordered, to everyone returning to their own city to be
registered, and then the birth of Jesus while Joseph &
Mary were in Bethlehem, was orchestrated by God.
Out of Bethlehem, a small town in the City of David,
came the Messiah.
This event was the beginning of something so
incredible. Jesus Christ left His throne in glory and
took on human form just to bring us reconciliation to
our Father God. He came into the world, miraculously
conceived, and then born as all humans are. He was first
a baby, then became a toddler, then grew into a child and
went through adolescence before becoming an adult. He
experienced humanity at all levels. He truly can identify
with all people at all stages of life.
This very first Christmas, God gave the greatest gift ever.
His Son! And His Son gave the gift of His life - which
was why He came. Because of this, we can have relation-
ship with God as His children. Through Jesus Christ, we
are Sons and Daughters of the Most High God.
So this Christmas, Bear in mind the ‘True’ Christmas
story, which led to the ‘True’ Easter story. Let us give
thanks and praise to our heavenly Father for these
events, which have changed our lives forever.
No matter how ‘secular’ the world is becoming,
disregarding the truth of Christmas, let us boldly
proclaim the truth about the birth of Jesus
as the reason for the season
Would you join us this Christmas season at the
Delphos Christian Union Church
Located at 470 S. Franklin St., Delphos
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service at 10:30 a.m.
Christmas Services
Sunday, December 23 -
Children's Christmas program in
the Worship Service at 10:30am
Monday, December 24 -
Communion Service 6:30-8:00pm
Delphos Christian Union ChUrCh
470 S. Franklin • Delphos, Ohio
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
310 West Second St., Delphos 419-692-5737
Pastor: Harry Tolhurst
Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 7:00 p.m.
Worship & Communion
St. Peter Lutheran
O COme, Let uS adOre him!
the LOngeSt night, Wed., deC. 19 at 7 P.m.
ChriStmaS eve: 4 P.m. and 11 P.m.
422 N. Pierce St., DelPhoS 419-695-2616
www.StPeterDelPhoS.org
•Christmas Eve, 7:30 p.m. at Trinity
Family Candlelight Communion Service (Live Broadcast on WDOH)
•Christmas Eve, 11:00 p.m.
at Trinity-Traditional Candlelight Communion Service
Trinity United Methodist Church
Ridge United Methodist Church
St. Paul United Methodist Church
Zion United Methodist Church
12 – The Herald Monday, December 17, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Share in the joy of the
season through
worship during this
holiday time!
Signage at Leisure Park notes the rules and cour-
tesy tips for the newly-installed disc golf course. The
course was installed using proceeds from the 2012
Canal Days celebration.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful