www.smdailyjournal.

com
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 105
FISCAL FLEXIBILITY
NATION PAGE 19
FERNANDEZ IN
THE SPOTLIGHT
SPORTS PAGE 11
HOW TO TALK TO YOUR
KIDS ABOUT TRAGEDY
HEALTH PAGE 18
OBAMA, BOEHNER MAKE PROGRESS IN TALKS
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The restaurant at Pete’s Harbor, as
much a staple of the Redwood City
marina as the live-aboard tenants,
will soon close after nearly 40 years
of serving meals, hosting celebra-
tions and giving many in the com-
munity their first job.
The Waterfront Restaurant, for-
merly known as the Harbor House,
will reportedly close Sunday, Dec.
23. The restaurant is closed for busi-
ness Monday and owners Pepe and
Dunia Rodriguez could not be
reached to confirm the actual clo-
sure date. However, the restaurant is
serving out its last days regardless
as part of the overall plan by Pete’s
Harbor owner Paula Uccelli to sell
the land for development into water-
front residences. A majority of the
boat tenants have already left and
any remaining will be evicted in
January. Opponents of the develop-
ment plan are appealing the
Planning Commission’s permit
approval but, regardless of the Jan.
28 decision by the City Council, the
evictions and the restaurant closure
will stand.
The restaurant has operated under
its current name since April 2002
when the Rodriguezes bought it
from Pete and Paula Uccelli. But the
restaurant itself dates back nearly
40 years. Pete Uccelli opened the
21-acre privately owned harbor on
former swamp land in 1958 and
decided he needed a place for his
tenants and visitors to eat. He first
opened a tiny dockside hamburger
stand followed in 1973 with the
Harbor House Restaurant.
Uccelli and several workmen built
the restaurant themselves, a true
“labor of love,” Paula Uccelli said.
Without as many restaurants in
downtown Redwood City as now,
the Harbor House became a destina-
tion point and hangout for the com-
munity, she said.
Pete’s Harbor restaurant ready for last meal
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Three members of the Coastside
Fire Protection District will face a
recall election April 9, 2013, San
Mateo County Elections Manager
David Tom told the Daily Journal
yesterday.
President Doug Mackintosh,
Director Mike Alifano and Director
Gary Riddell are facing recall for
their efforts to re-establish a stand-
alone fire department on the coast
and ditch its contract with the
California Department of Forestry
and Fire Protection.
The board voted at its Dec. 12
meeting 3-2 to hold the election in
April with directors Gary Burke and
Ginny McShane voting to hold the
election sooner as the fire district’s
contract with Cal Fire expires June
30, 2013.
In the recall election, voters will
likely be asked: “Do you want to
recall Alifano, and if so, who should
replace him.”
Alifano plans to campaign vigor-
ously to keep his seat, he previously
told the Daily Journal.
Cal Fire proponents say a stand-
alone fire department will be too
costly and short-staffed and are
emboldened by a San Mateo County
Civil Grand Jury report that indicat-
ed Cal Fire serves the coast well.
A stand-alone fire department
Election day
set for fire
board recall
Coastside voters to decide future of
stand-alone fire department April 9
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As the public process begins in
earnest tonight to settle the fate of a
just opened 7-Eleven store, residents
in the San Mateo Heights neighbor-
hood demonstrated in front of the
convenience store yesterday evening
to protest its presence in the predomi-
nately residential neighborhood.
The 7-Eleven secured the final
approvals from San Mateo two weeks
ago and is now open in a spot once
occupied by the Stangelini’s Italian
Deli & Hilltop Market on land that is
technically zoned residential.
Tonight, the Planning Commission
will start a public hearing process to
determine whether permits issued to
the developer of the property were
done so in error. Ultimately, the City
Council will take up the topic.
Fred and Kathy Furrer, who live
around the corner from the 7-Eleven,
were joined by about a dozen others
last night to protest the store.
The Furrers are concerned about
traffic and safety in the area since
large delivery trucks park on San
Mateo Drive and block the views of
oncoming traffic.
And although the store does not
currently sell beer and wine, it will
eventually, Fred Furrer said.
Voluntarily closing its doors from 2
a.m. to 5 a.m. also does little to satis-
fy the neighborhood’s concerns, he
said.
San Mateo resident John Chiappe
was also protesting in front of the
store last night.
“Someone fell asleep at City Hall to
let this happen,” Chiappe said. “Or
they fell asleep on purpose, but that is
conjecture.”
Stangelini’s was considered a legal
non-conforming use for the land and
the city is now set on a process to
determine whether the 7-Eleven is
also a legal non-conforming use for
the property. Since the former deli
went out of business in 2010, the city
determined six months later, based on
city code, that the market use had
been discontinued and that housing
was an appropriate use for the proper-
ty at 501 N. San Mateo Drive, near the
Burlingame border and a few blocks
from San Mateo High School.
Competing legal opinions, howev-
er, from within the San Mateo City
Attorney’s Office were enough for
city planners to issue building permits
Neighbors protest 7-Eleven
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A group of San Mateo Heights residents demonstrated in front of a 7-Eleven store last night to protest its
presence in the neighborhood.
Public process starts tonight to determine convenience store’s fate
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Facebook threats prompted the
search of a Burlingame High School
student’s home Sunday but police
and school officials say the campus
is safe.
On Sunday, Burlingame High
School parents were notified by an
automated call that threats by a stu-
dent were made on Facebook,
Principal Chris Holleran said in the
message. Burlingame police made
contact with the student and his par-
ent and searched the home, said
Burlingame police Capt. Mike
Online threat prompts
school, police response
See PETE’S, Page 20
See RECALL, Page 20
See THREAT, Page 20 See PROTEST, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Director Steven
Spielberg is 66.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1912
The Piltdown Man made its public
debut as fossil collector Charles
Dawson reported to the Geological
Society of London his discovery of sup-
posedly fragmented early human
remains at a gravel pit in Piltdown.
(More than four decades later, the
Piltdown Man was exposed as a hoax.)
“When you make a world
tolerable for yourself, you make
a world tolerable for others.”
— Anais Nin, French-born author (1903-1977)
Rocker Keith
Richards is 69.
Actor Brad Pitt is
49.
In other news ...
Birthdays
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Patrons stand in line at the Millbrae Post Office Monday, during what postal officials described as the busiest mailing day of
the year. An expected 655 million cards, letters and packages will be processed nationwide, the U.S. Postal Service said.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 30s to lower 40s. Northwest winds 10
to 15 mph decreasing to around 5 mph after
midnight.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 50s. South winds around
5 mph in the morning...Becoming light.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of rain
after midnight. Lows in the upper 30s to mid 40s. South winds
5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 20 percent.
Thursday: Breezy. Rain likely. Highs in the upper 50s.
Thursday night: Rain. Lows in the mid 40s to lower 50s.
Friday: Rain likely. Highs in the upper 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 07 Eureka
in first place; No.03 Hot Shot in second place;and
No. 10 Solid Gold in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:42.79.
(Answers tomorrow)
ALBUM AGONY MUTATE VOYAGE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: Even though it was cold and dry outside,
inside the coffee shop it was — MUGGY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SHECS
WOLAL
TILEVO
TANWUL
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
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b
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k

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t
t
p
:
/
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f
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Print your answer here:
3 7 5
11 28 33 41 43 41
Mega number
Dec. 14 Mega Millions
1 20 25 28 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 3 8 1
Daily Four
2 3 9
Daily three evening
In 1787, New Jersey became the third state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1865, the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slav-
ery, was declared in effect by Secretary of State William H.
Seward.
In 1892, Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker” publicly pre-
miered in St. Petersburg, Russia.
In 1915, President Woodrow Wilson, widowed the year before,
married Edith Bolling Galt at her Washington home.
In 1940, Adolf Hitler ordered secret preparations for Nazi
Germany to invade the Soviet Union. (Operation Barbarossa was
launched in June 1941.)
In 1944, in a pair of rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the
wartime relocation of Japanese-Americans, but also said undeni-
ably loyal Americans of Japanese ancestry could not continue to
be detained.
In 1958, the world’s first communications satellite, SCORE
(Signal Communication by Orbiting Relay Equipment), nick-
named “Chatterbox,” was launched by the United States aboard an
Atlas rocket.
In 1962, “Mister Magoo’s Christmas Carol,” an animated musical
adaptation of the Charles Dickens story, first aired on NBC-TV.
In 1971, the Rev. Jesse Jackson announced in Chicago the found-
ing of Operation PUSH (People United to Save Humanity).
In 1972, the United States began heavy bombing of North
Vietnamese targets during the Vietnam War. (The bombardment
ended 11 days later.)
Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark is 85. Actor-pro-
ducer Roger Smith is 80. Blues musician Lonnie Brooks is 79.
Movie reviewer Leonard Maltin is 62. Rock musician Elliot
Easton is 59. Comedian Ron White is 56. Professional wrestler-
turned-actor “Stone Cold” Steve Austin is 48. Actor Shawn
Christian is 47. Actress Rachel Griffiths is 44. Singer Alejandro
Sanz is 44. Rapper DMX is 42. Country/rap singer Cowboy Troy
is 42. International Tennis Hall of Famer Arantxa Sanchez
Vicario is 41. DJ Lethal (Limp Bizkit) is 40. Actor Josh Dallas is
34. Actress Katie Holmes is 34. Singer Christina Aguilera is 32.
Christian rock musician Dave Luetkenhoelter (Kutless) is 30.
NASA names moon crash
site in honor of Sally Ride
PASADENA — A pair of NASA space-
craft were deliberately crashed into a
mountain near the moon’s north pole on
Monday, ending a mission that peered into
the lunar interior.
Engineers commanded the twin space-
craft, Ebb and Flow, to fire their engines
and burn their remaining fuel. Ebb
plunged first followed by Flow about 30
seconds later.
Afterward, NASA said it had dedicated
the impact site in honor of mission team
member, Sally Ride, the first American
woman in space who died earlier this year.
By design, the spot was far away from the
Apollo landings and other historical sites.
Ride’s sister, who huddled in the NASA
control room for the finale, said it might be
time to dust off Ride’s first telescope to
view the newly named site.
“We can look at the moon with a new
appreciation and a smile in the evening
when we see it knowing that a little corner
of the moon is named after Sally,” the Rev.
Bear Ride said in an interview.
Since the crash occurred in the dark, it
was not visible from Earth. The Lunar
Reconnaissance Orbiter circling the moon
will pass over the mountain and attempt to
photograph the skid marks left by the
washing machine sized-spacecraft as they
hit the surface at 3,800 mph.
After rocketing off the launch pad in
September 2011, Ebb and Flow took a
roundabout journey to the moon, arriving
over the New Year’s holiday on a gravity-
mapping mission.
Hollywood hacker
sentenced to 10 years in prison
LOS ANGELES — A federal judge sen-
tenced a hacker to 10 years in prison on
Monday after he broke into the personal
online accounts of Scarlett Johansson,
Christina Aguilera and other women and
posted revealing photos and other material
on the Internet.
U.S. District Judge S. James Otero sen-
tenced Christopher Chaney after hearing
from a tearful Johansson in a videotaped
statement.
The case included the revelation that nude
photos taken by Johansson of herself and
meant for her then-husband Ryan Reynolds
were leaked online.
“I have been truly humiliated and embar-
rassed,” Johansson said. “I find Christopher
Chaney’s actions to be perverted and repre-
hensible.”
Prosecutors said Chaney, 35, of
Jacksonville, Fla., also targeted two women
he knew, sending nude pictures of one for-
mer co-worker to her father. The judge noted
the damage to the women was in some ways
worse than what Chaney’s celebrity victims
endured.
The women, identified in court filings
only by initials, wrote in letters to Otero that
their lives have been irreparably damaged
by Chaney’s actions. One has anxiety and
panic attacks; the other is depressed and
paranoid. Both said Chaney was calculated,
cruel and creepy.
“It’s hard to fathom the mindset of a per-
son who would accomplish all of this,”
Otero said. “These types of crimes are as
pernicious and serious as physical stalking.”
Prosecutors were seeking six years
imprisonment, but Otero said he was con-
cerned that Chaney would not be able to
control his behavior and had shown a “cal-
lous disregard” for his actions.
Electronic thief gets 20 years
FORT WORTH, Texas — A judge in Fort
Worth has sentenced a man identified as a
member of a California-based gang of elec-
tronic thieves to 20 years in prison for put-
ting devices inside gasoline pumps to steal
customers’ debit and credit card informa-
tion.
Aleksandr Goukasian was convicted in
June of several charges, including unlawful
use of electronic communications and pos-
sessing an intercept device.
Tarrant County prosecutors say the 53-
year-old was among several from a
Glendale, Calif., ring who placed their
“skimmers” in pumps in Mojave, Calif., Las
Vegas, Dallas, Houston and Fort Worth to
amass 38,000 card numbers and passwords.
Customers were bilked of $280,000.
Goukasian’s sentence, imposed Monday,
runs concurrently with a six-month federal
sentence for a related conviction. He
becomes parole eligible in seven years.
Two partners are awaiting trial in
Houston.
11 15 24 26 28 10
Mega number
Dec. 15 Super Lotto Plus
3
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
HALF MOON BAY
Disturbance. A man and woman were both
found too intoxicated to care for themselves
and transported to San Mateo County Jail
from the 100 block of San Mateo Road before
4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 11.
Disturbance. A woman was found to be too
intoxicated to care for herself and transported
to San Mateo County Hospital from the 100
block of San Mateo Road before 4:02 p.m. on
Tuesday, Dec. 11.
Burglary. Someone reported the theft of a lap-
top, two video mixers and a video camera
from a church van on the 1100 block of Main
Street before Sunday, Dec. 9.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Theft. Mail was stolen on the 200 block of
North Delaware Street before 4:32 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 6.
Suspicious person. A person with a gun was
seen on the 900 block of Ocean View Avenue
before 3:06 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 6.
Burglary. There was a burglary on the 100
block of Woodbridge Circle before 12:39 p.m.
on Thursday, Dec. 6.
Robbery. Chase Bank was robbed on the 1700
block of South El Camino Real before 10:57
a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 6.
Burglary. There was a burglary on the 700
block of Indian Avenue before 9:41 a.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 6.
Police reports
Can he handle a leaf blower?
A 3-year-old child was seen riding on a
lawn mover on Marine View Avenue and
Yorkshire Way in Belmont before 11:26
a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 6.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Extending and possibly increasing two parcel
taxes that support the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District could be on a future
ballot as officials consider studying their
options.
Currently, Belmont-Redwood Shores has two
parcel taxes. Measure G, a $96 a year parcel tax
for 10 years, passed in 2004. It generates about
$1.2 million annually. In 2008, voters passed
Measure U, a seven-year $78 annual tax that
brings in about $950,000 per year. Both will end
by the 2015-16 school year. On Thursday, the
board will continue discussions about extending
and/or increasing those measures. If the board
wants to go forward, it can also vote Thursday to
enter into contracts to study the possibilities.
Moving forward could mean approving a
$26,600 contract with Godbe Research to con-
duct focus groups about a possible parcel tax
measure. Also, the board will consider a contract
up to $36,000 with TBWB Strategies for con-
sulting services to assist in completing a voter
opinion research project.
The district began talking about the possibili-
ty of a new measure in 2011. A poll completed
late last year showed a moderate base of voter
support for a parcel tax measure. However, with-
out support strong enough to pass such a meas-
ure, the polling companies suggested the district
initiate a public outreach effort before consider-
ing placing something on the ballot — a goal
which the district has been pursuing since.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20 at
the District Office, 2960 Hallmark Drive,
Belmont.
Belmont-Redwood Shores considers new tax
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Pacifica man accused of stabbing and beating his friend with a ham-
mer more than 50 times at his father’s home pleaded not guilty to mur-
der and two weapons charges.
Marc Anthony Furlan, 24, appeared in court to enter a plea in the death
of 24-year-old Keith Coffey. He will schedule a
preliminary hearing at the end of next month.
Furlan and Coffey were acquaintances and
reportedly argued before Coffey’s Oct. 17 death.
Prosecutors say Furlan killed Coffey in the Dell
Road house and dragged the body outside before
trying to clean the scene. Two tenants fled the scene
and contacted police who found Coffey in front of
the home around 5:15 a.m. Furlan was reportedly
trying to dispose of the body when police arrived
and had left a wide swath of blood from the house
to outside.
Furlan’s father was not home at the time of the incident. Furlan
remains in custody without bail.
Accused killer
pleads not guilty
Marc Furlan
Woman’s death investigated
A 35-year-old woman’s death in
Redwood City Sunday night is being
investigated by police since there was
“no obvious cause of death,” police Lt.
Sean Hart told the Daily Journal last
night.
Police and paramedics responded to
a home on the 1100 block of Second
Avenue Sunday at about 11 p.m. on
reports of an unconscious female,
according to Redwood City police.
When first responders arrived on
scene they located the unconscious
female inside of an apartment and
attempted to resuscitate her but were
unsuccessful, according to police. The
victim was pronounced dead at 11:31
p.m. Redwood City detectives are
investigating the circumstances sur-
rounding the death. The cause of death
is unknown at this time and an autopsy
is pending, according to police.
San Mateo police warn of
downtown auto break-ins
Police in San Mateo are telling resi-
dents to secure their vehicles after a
series of recent auto burglaries were
reported in the downtown area.
At least four auto burglaries took
place since last weekend in which bur-
glars smashed car windows to gain
access to valuables that were visible
from, police said.
Auto break-ins increase around the
holiday season when people are out
shopping, police said.
Police are advising all residents to
make sure vehicles are locked, and also
to keep valuables out of cars or stowed
out of plain sight.
To stay on top of potential crimes, the
police department recommends pro-
gramming their dispatch telephone
number into cellphones.
San Mateo police dispatch can be
reached at (650) 522-7700.
Local briefs
4
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Men seriously injured after
truck crashes into tree off 280
Two men were seriously injured when their small truck went off
the road on southbound Interstate 280 in Millbrae Monday morn-
ing, according to a California Highway Patrol officer.
The crash was reported around 10 a.m. when the truck went off
the right-hand shoulder near Larkspur Drive and hit a call box,
CHP Officer Art Montiel said.
The truck then went about 20 feet down an embankment where
it hit a tree before coming to a rest, Montiel said.
The truck cabin then caught fire, trapping the two men inside.
The men, both in their 40s, suffered major burns and other
injuries. They were transported to a hospital.
A Sig-alert was issued at 10:33 a.m. when two lanes were
blocked by the accident. Around noon the lanes reopened,
Montiel said.
Man out on bail for meth allegedly caught
with meth after gas station coin theft
A man was arrested after stealing coins from a San Carlos
gas station register early Monday morning was released on bail
for possession of methamphetamine just three hours before,
according to the San Carlos Bureau of the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
At approximately 12:40 a.m. Monday, the man, identified as
Charles Patrick Bell, 47, of Foster City, allegedly entered the
convenience store at Holly Gas & Diesel Station at 907 Holly
St. in San Carlos and asked for a pack of cigarettes. When the
clerk turned his back, Bell allegedly reached over the counter
and grabbed some coins from the register and walked out of
the store, according to police.
Deputies responded to the scene within 40 seconds of the
initial call and detained Bell. He had a usable amount of
methamphetamine and a glass smoking pipe on him, according
to police.
The gas station clerk declined to press charges, according to
police.
Bell had been arrested the previous day by sheriff's deputies
Dec. 16 for possession of methamphetamine. He had been
released on bail from the Maguire Correctional Facility only
three hours prior to committing this crime. Bell was subse-
quently arrested and booked back into the Maguire
Correctional Facility, this time for possession of methamphet-
amine, possession of drug paraphernalia and committing a
felony while on bail, according to police.
Man found shot dead between cars
A 45-year-old man was fatally shot in East Palo Alto on Sunday
evening, police said.
East Palo Alto police responded to a ShotSpotter activation in
the 1500 block of Bay Road at 9:55 p.m. and found Rodolfo
Navarro Balderas lying between two parked cars. He had been
shot multiple times.
The East Palo Alto man was pronounced dead at the scene,
police said.
No motive or suspects have been identified.
Police continue to investigate the shooting and anyone with
information is encouraged to call (650) 321-1112, or to leave
information anonymously, contact (650) 409-6792.
DUI checkpoint planned in Millbrae
San Mateo County’s “Avoid the 23” DUI enforcement program
will include a checkpoint today on El Camino Real near Taylor
Boulevard in Millbrae.
Various police agencies will staff a DUI/driver’s license check-
point Tuesday, Dec. 18 in Millbrae. It will be held in conjunction
with other special DUI enforcement patrols throughout the coun-
ty, according to a press release from the Daly City Police
Department.
Funding for the program was provided by a grant from the
California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration.
Local briefs
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
In the wake of the massacre at an elementary school in
Connecticut, police in Oakland and San Francisco were
overwhelmed with people handing over firearms at gun buy-
back events this weekend, San Francisco police Chief Greg
Suhr said Monday.
Nearly 300 guns were brought to the event on Saturday at
the Omega Boys Club in San Francisco on Saturday while
about 300 more were brought to Saint Benedict’s Church in
Oakland, Suhr said.
“We far exceeded whatever we thought we could get ...
based on all the other gun buybacks,” he said.
Residents who turned in a working, unloaded gun received
$200 per gun on up to three guns, but because of the high
volume of guns handed over, roughly half of the people had
to be given vouchers for the money and organizers are cur-
rently looking for funding sources to pay them, Suhr said.
The chief said the high numbers were likely attributed to
the shooting that left more than two dozen students and staff
dead at an elementary school a day earlier, a case Suhr called
“unimaginable.”
He said, “We’re doing everything we can make sure that
those things don't happen ever again anywhere.”
Gun buyback events
overwhelmed cities
5
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/BAY AREA/STATE
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Elizabeth O’Connell Wilson
Elizabeth O’Connell Wilson, Born Sept.
11,1918 to Frances Margaret O’Keefe and
Frederick Joseph O’Connell.
Betty married William G Wilson in 1942, in
Brownwood, Texas. She is survived by chil-
dren: Frances (Taylor) Bowen, Susan
Keddington, Thomas M (Tina)Wilson and
Elizabeth De Marchis, 11
grandchildren and nine
great grandchildren.
She was predeceased by
her husband Bill in 1999,
after 58 years of marriage,
and her son William Jr. in
2010.
Betty was a lifelong
California resident and
San Francisco native, born
and raised in the Richmond District. Schools
included Star of the Sea Elementary School,
Presidio Junior High and St. Rose Academy.
Betty valued people and relationships recon-
necting with many of those friends over the
years.
Betty was happiest when surrounded by
family and friends: children, nieces, nephews
and neighbors. She began a second career at
age 58, spending 30 years as office manager
of a children’s dental practice.
Vigil service is 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18,
Crippen and Flynn Carlmont Chapel, 1111
Alameda, Belmont. Funeral mass is noon
Wednesday, Dec. 19, Immaculate Heart of
Mary Church, Belmont.
In lieu of flowers the family suggests
memorials to Sutter Care at Home or another
hospice of your choice. Sign the guestbook at
www.crippenflynn.com.
Obituary
Elizabeth
O’Connell Wilson
CITY GOVERNMENT
• Half Moon Bay offi-
cials will host a meeting
to discuss the future of
the Main Street Bridge
Wednesday. Topics of
discussion include the
various construction
impacts, mitigation
measures and other issues related to the proj-
ect. The meeting is 8:30 a.m., Wednesday,
Dec. 19, 537 Kelly Ave., Half Moon Bay.
EDUCATION
• On Thursday, the South San Francisco
Unified School District Board of Trustees
held its annual rotation. Philip Weise is pres-
ident and Liza Normandy is vice president.
• Last week, the Burlingame Elementary
School District Board of Trustees held its
annual rotation. Davina Drabkin is now pres-
ident and Greg Land is vice president.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A convicted sex offender once
committed to a state hospital as a
violent predator will stand trial for
allegedly exposing himself to a 6-
year-old girl at a Christmas tree lot
in Colma.
Allan Wayne Meaney, 67, has
pleaded not guilty to felony charges
of indecent
exposure and
child annoyance
along with a
mi s demeanor
charge of hit-
and-run for
allegedly crash-
ing his car while
fleeing the
child’s scream-
ing mother. He
was held to answer on all counts and
comes back to court Sept. 2 to enter
a Superior Court plea and possibly
set a trial date.
Colma police arrested Meaney, of
South San Francisco, Dec. 1 at his
home after he left the tree lot. A
mother looking at trees with her
daughter reported seeing Meaney
standing a few feet from them and
grabbing his genitals through the
open zipper of his pants. When the
mother yelled at Meaney and
grabbed at his jacket to hold him for
authorities, he pulled away and ran
to his car with the woman in pursuit
screaming for help, according to
prosecutors.
Meaney allegedly got into his car
but crashed into another vehicle,
giving a clerk at the tree lot the
opportunity to write down his
license plate number.
Meaney has several prior convic-
tions for sexual abuse against chil-
dren and was once detained at a
state facility as a mentally disor-
dered sex offender, a term now
replaced with the label sexually vio-
lent predator. The determination
allows the court to order a convict
held beyond his or her prison term if
they meet certain criteria and are
considered to remain a danger.
Meaney remains in custody on
$100,000 bail.
Sex offender to trial
for tree lot exposure
Allan Meaney
Missing 77-year-old’s
body found in Richmond
VALLEJO — The body of a miss-
ing 77-year-old man believed to
have fallen into the waters off Mare
Island has washed ashore.
Police say a hiker came across
Philip Mattingly’s body at the Point
Pinole Regional Shoreline park in
Richmond on Sunday. He was posi-
tively identified at the Contra Costa
County Coroner’s Office.
An autopsy determined the cause
of death to be drowning. Vallejo
police say there were no signs of
foul play.
Mattingly, a retired mechanical
engineer, had been helping clean
debris from a World War II warship
docked on Mare Island when his son
reported him missing on Dec. 9.
Authorities deployed dive teams and
patrol boats, but were unable to
locate Mattingly.
Santa Clara supes to
consider credit card rules
SAN JOSE — Santa Clara
County officials are set to consider
new rules for county-issued credit
cards in the wake of allegations that
a supervisor used his for personal
expenses.
The San Jose Mercury News
reports (http://bit.ly/U7CvmS) that
the proposals are scheduled to go
before county supervisors on
Tuesday. Among other changes,
they would strip supervisors of their
credit cards if they failed to file
itemized receipts and require credit
card expense reports to be submitted
to an open session board of supervi-
sors meeting.
Audits have accused Supervisor
George Shirakawa of billing taxpay-
ers for golf fees, casino stays and
upgraded rental cars and allowing
his staff to charge thousands of dol-
lars in donations to a county-issued
credit card.
Shirakawa has agreed to reim-
burse some of the disputed funds,
but is challenging others.
He has said he is the victim of a
personal attack.
Bay Area briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWPORT BEACH — A man
who fired about 50 shots in the park-
ing lot of a crowded Southern
California shopping mall, sending
shoppers sprinting for safety, was
cooperative when officers took him
into custody, authorities said
Sunday.
Witnesses said people ran,
screaming and ducking for cover,
when 42-year-old Marcos Gurrola
fired into the air and onto the ground
Saturday afternoon near the Macy’s
department store at the open-air
Fashion Island mall in Newport
Beach.
He paused to reload several times,
police said.
Then Gurrola put the gun down
and offered no resistance when
bicycle officers arrested him, said
Lt. John Lewis.
“He just gave up,” Lewis said.
As investigators worked to deter-
mine a motive, the police chief of
this upscale Orange County city
said he believed Gurrola fired shots
as a “way of venting his life prob-
lems.”
Beach Police Chief David McGill
told the Los Angeles Times that the
gunman was “unhappy about a lot in
Man cooperative after firing shots at mall
6
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
eoffrey’s Diamonds and Goldsmith was founded
in 1984 and has served the the Peninsula for
28 years. This year, we entered our second
generation with new ownership under Nikko Kandhari,
who has helped manage Geoffrey’s for a number of
years. Nikko and his team are passionate about fine
jewelry and extraordinary customer service. This
passion is the central philosophy of how we conduct
our business. the central precept of this passion is our
strong commitment to excellence in all aspects of our
business.
Our team includes certified GIA Gemologists, a
Jeweler, a diverse and deeply knowledgeable staff
and one fashionable Chihuahua named Robin.
We are authorized dealers of the top bridal
designers brands, including Art Carved, Coast, Diana,
Henri Daussi, Jeff Cooper, Kirk Kara, Martin Flyer,
Simone G. and Vatche.
We are members of GIA Gemological Institute of
America, AGS American Gem Society, Jewelers of
America, California Jeweler, JVC Jewelers Vigilance
Committee and the Better Business Bureau. Please
check out our Yelp page to see how our customers
rate us and our Facebook page to see what our
friends say.
We stand behind our products to provide the
ultimate in customer satisfaction We look forward to
the opportunity to serve you!
Located in San Carlos @ 626 Walnut Street Suite 212
www.gaoffraysd|amonds.com º ô50-591-0301
Nine years ago,
San Mateo
Credit Union
began collecting
backpacks and fill-
ing them with
school supplies for
local students.
This effort was the
work of credit
union staff, man-
agement and
members, all of
whom dedicated
their time to help
brighten the lives of the area’s school-aged children.
As the result of the 2012 Back2School Backpack Drive, a total
of 103 backpacks were donated, setting a new record for all previ-
ous drives. The fully stocked backpacks— representing the hottest
kids’ design trends and loaded with a variety of classroom essen-
tials—were given to students at Fair Oaks , Hoover and Garfield
elementary schools.
***
On Saturday, Sept. 29, Mercy High School Burlingame’s
Mercy Club had their Saturday of Service with Saint Vincent de
Paul’s Catherine’s Center women, a restoriative justice program
designed to comprehensively support women leaving incarcera-
tion. The students provided a night of food and games for the
women as they all got to know one another. Everyone had a great
time and look forward to their next event. The love, understanding
and support given by these young women to the women who are
courageously facing their struggles and hoping to transform their
lives is a true blessing.
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SUTTER CREEK — The gold miners
who made California famous were the
rugged loners trying to shake nuggets
loose from streams or hillsides. The ones
who made the state rich were those who
worked for big mining companies that
blasted gold from an underground world of
dust and darkness.
The last of the state’s great mines closed
because mining gold proved unprofitable
after World War II. But with the price of
the metal near historic highs, hovering
around $1,700 an ounce, the first large-
scale hard rock gold mining operation in a
half-century is coming back to life.
Miners are digging again where their
forebears once unearthed riches from eight
historic mines that honeycomb Sutter Gold
Mining Co.’s holdings about 50 miles
southeast of Sacramento. Last week, mill
superintendent Paul Skinner poured the
first thin stream of glowing molten gold
into a mold.
“Nothing quite like it,” murmured
Skinner, who has been mining for 65
years.
It was just four ounces, culled from
more than eight tons of ore, but it signaled
the end of $20 million worth of construc-
tion and the pending start of production.
The company announced the ceremonial
first pour before financial markets opened
Monday, marking the mine’s official rein-
carnation.
By spring, the company’s 110 employ-
ees expect to be removing 150 tons of ore
a day from a site immediately north of the
old Lincoln Mine, enough to produce near-
ly 2,000 ounces of gold each month.
The company projects reserves of more
than 682,000 ounces of gold worth more
than $1 billion at today’s prices. Company
officials say they are confident there is far
more in their historically rich section of the
120-mile-long Mother Lode region of the
Sierra Nevada foothills.
Reopening the mine has been anything
but a gold rush, however.
It took three decades for the mine’s oper-
ators to obtain more than 40 environmental
permits. By contrast, the old Wild West
miners wreaked such devastation that they
prompted some of the nation’s first conser-
vation efforts nearly 130 years ago.
“We’ve gone from no regulation to prob-
ably the other extreme,” said Bob
Hutmacher, the company’s chief financial
officer.
In recent decades, most of California’s
gold has come from the state’s desert
regions. However, high gold prices recent-
ly spurred what authorities say was a rogue
surface gold mine in El Dorado County,
east of Sacramento. The owners now face
criminal charges.
Farther north, several mines have started
the process to reopen. Most of these kinds
of hard rock mines have recently been
known more as tourist destinations, includ-
ing the Empire Mine, which was once the
state’s largest hard rock mine. It became a
state historic site after it closed in 1956.
Molten gold signals Mother Lode’s revival
Judge considers sex
offenders’ social media
SAN FRANCISCO — Even child sex
offenders have free speech rights.
The question for a federal judge
Monday was whether those rights can be
limited by a voter-approved requirement
that registered sex offenders turn over
vital online information such as social
media passwords, usernames and
Internet service providers to law-
enforcement officials.
U.S. District Judge Thelton
Henderson didn’t say much during the
nearly three-hour hearing in San
Francisco, giving no indication of how
he will rule in the coming weeks.
Henderson earlier put that provision of
Proposition 35 on hold pending the out-
come of a lawsuit filed by two convicted
sex offenders represented by the
American Civil Liberties Union and the
Electronic Frontier Foundation.
The ACLU and EFF argue the rule
violates their clients’ free speech rights
because it prevents them from express-
ing their views anonymously like other
Web surfers. The lawyers also argue that
the requirement will “chill” — or dis-
suade — sex offenders who have served
their sentence from exercising their free
speech rights online.
State brief
STATE/NATION 7
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
advertisement
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWTOWN, Conn. — Opening a long and
almost unbearable procession of grief, Newtown
began burying its dead Monday, laying to rest
two 6-year-old boys — one who was crazy about
the New York Giants and one whose twin sister
survived the rampage.
Two funeral homes filled with mourners for
Noah Pozner and Jack Pinto, the first of the 20
children killed in last week’s school massacre to
receive funerals. The gunman also killed six
adults at Sandy Hook Elementary, and his moth-
er in her home, before committing suicide.
A rabbi presided at Noah’s service, and in
keeping with Jewish tradition, the boy was laid
to rest in a simple brown wooden casket with a
Star of David on it.
“If Noah had not been taken from us, he
would have become a great man. He would been
a wonderful husband and a loving father,”
Noah’s uncle, Alexis Haller, told mourners,
according to remarks he provided to The
Associated Press. Both services were closed to
the news media.
Noah’s twin, Arielle, who was assigned to a
different classroom, survived the killing frenzy
by 20-year-old Adam Lanza, an attack so horri-
fying that authorities could not say three days
later whether the school would ever reopen.
Newtown, a community of 27,000 people,
will face many more funerals over the next few
days, just as other towns are getting ready for the
holidays.
“I feel like we have to get back to normal, but
I don’t know if there is normal anymore,” said
Kim Camputo, mother of two children, 5 and 10,
who attend a different school. “I’ll definitely be
dropping them off and picking them up myself
for a while.”
Beyond Newtown, parents nervously sent
their children back to class in a country deeply
shaken by the attack, and in a measure of how
the tragedy has put people on edge, schools were
locked down in at least four places.
As investigators worked to figure out what
drove Lanza to lash out with such fury — and
why he singled out the school — federal agents
said he had fired guns at shooting ranges over the
past several years but there was no evidence he
did so recently as practice for the rampage.
At Jack’s Christian service, hymns rang out
from inside the funeral home, where the boy lay
in an open casket. Jack was among the youngest
members of a youth wrestling association in
Newtown, and dozens of little boys turned up at
the service in gray Newtown Wrestling T-shirts.
Ten-year-old Luke Wellman remembered a
boy who loved football and wrestling and wor-
shipped Victor Cruz, the star wide receiver for
the Giants. Cruz played in Sunday’s game with
“Jack Pinto ‘My Hero”’ written on one of his
cleats.
Luke said: “I’m here to support my teammate
and friend.”
A mourner, Gwendolyn Glover, said the serv-
ice carried a message of comfort and protection,
particularly for other children. “The message
was: You’re secure now. The worst is over,” she
said.
At Noah’s funeral, the boy was described a
smart, funny and mischievous child who loved
animals, Mario Brothers video games and tacos.
“I will miss your forceful and purposeful little
steps stomping through our house. I will miss
your perpetual smile, the twinkle in your dark
blue eyes, framed by eyelashes that would be the
envy of any lady in this room,” his mother,
Veronique Pozner, told mourners, according to
Haller.
“Most of all, I will miss your visions of your
future. You wanted to be a doctor, a soldier, a
taco factory manager. It was your favorite food,
and no doubt you wanted to ensure that the
world kept producing tacos,” she said, evoking
laughter from the crowd.
Connecticut funerals begin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The White House
says curbing gun violence is a complex
problem that will require a “comprehensive
solution” including addressing gun control
measures.
Still, spokesman Jay Carney says gun
control is not the only solution to stopping
shootings like the horrific attack at a
Connecticut elementary school Friday. He
says no single piece of legislation or single
action will fully address the problem.
Obama has said he is going to use the
“power” of his office to tackle gun violence.
Carney says the president will engage the
American people and lawmakers on this
issue in the coming weeks, as well as meet
with law enforcement officials and mental
health professionals.
Carney did not offer any specific policy
proposals or timeline for tackling gun vio-
lence.
White House:
Gun violence a
complex issue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — A California
lawmaker said Monday that he will
introduce gun control legislation aimed
at strengthening the state’s restrictions
in the wake of the mass shooting at an
elementary school in Connecticut.
Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco,
said he is considering broader changes
to state law on everything from the
b a c k g r o u n d
checks required
to purchase
weapons to stor-
age regulations.
Yee, who is a
child psycholo-
gist, said he hopes
the mass shooting
at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Newtown,
Conn., which killed 20 young children,
will lead to greater support for closing
what he called loopholes in existing
state law.
“We must reinstate the federal assault
weapon ban and close the bullet button
loophole that has severely weakened
California’s assault weapon ban,” Yee
said in a statement.
The so-called bullet button loophole
allows gun manufacturers to sell
weapons in California with magazines
that can be removed and replaced
quickly using a simple tool known as a
“bullet button.” The buttons get around
the state’s ban on detachable magazines
that can be used to swiftly reload a rifle
or shotgun.
A second lawmaker, Sen. Ted Lieu,
D-Torrance, announced plans Monday
to reintroduce legislation aimed at forc-
ing schools to be better prepared for
emergency situations such as a gunman
on the loose. Lieu said data from 2009
showed that more than half of public
middle schools in Los Angeles either
had no safety plan, had an outdated
plan, or had failed to review the plans
with school staff.
Yee promises action on gun control
Leland Yee
8
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
OPINION 9
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Chip Huggins
J
ust as they did following the Aurora,
Colo. and Virginia Tech shootings,
debates on the access to firearms will
once again come to the forefront of the
national dialogue.
Obfuscating the real issue
contributing to these
tragedies, including the
horrific one last week,
can no longer be accept-
ed. We need to deal with
the lack of adequate men-
tal health care in our
country.
Individuals who com-
mit spree killings are mentally disturbed,
but they also carefully plan their strategy
over time — time during which friends, fam-
ily and colleagues very often note signs of
distress, delusion or isolation. Had there
been the necessary help available, such tragic
occurrences could very well have been
avoided. But help, as these individuals and
their families have found, is becoming
increasingly hard to find and access.
Between 2009 and 2012, there has been
$4.35 billion cut from public mental health
spending. Because of these drastic cuts, there
are fewer and fewer options available for
people with severe mental illness, or their
families. This is especially true in situations
such as our recent tragedies where mental ill-
ness services have been cut.
With proper care and treatment, recovery
happens. There is a dire need for funding for
programs that can provide the services that
can make the difference between recovery
and tragedy. As a country, we cannot afford
to let one more person fall through the
cracks. Grieving parents, families and friends
of those innocent victims deserve our efforts.
Let’s start by talking about mental health
and eliminating the stigma. Stigma makes it
too easy to deny this most critical social
issue. And let’s bring the need for more men-
tal health funding to the forefront of the
national dialogue. It’s not just about the
guns. It’s about the health and future of
America.
Chip Huggins is the CEO of Caminar for
Mental Health in San Mateo. He lives in
Redwood City.
Recent shooting tragedy
Editor,
In the wake of Friday’s tragic shooting many
people are quick to push their gun control
agenda. I believe adding more laws will not
make a difference, we need to quit focusing on
the tool that is being used and instead focus on
the person using the tool.
This tragedy again points out there are many
people who need healing in our world; we do
not need more laws, we need more focus on
healing people physically, mentally, emotion-
ally and spiritually. Many people are very ill,
we need to put our money where our mouth is
and invest in healing people to have a healthy
and functioning society.
I contend this will do far more to reduce these
acts of violence that all of the laws in the entire
world
George Wooster
Redwood City
Modernize the Second Amendment
Editor,
It is time to have gun owners carry liability in-
surance and a yearly taxation on the weapons
they own or have in their possession. In addi-
tion, assault weapons should not be available
to anyone, but this is unlikely to occur so the
liability insurance and yearly taxation should
be increased accordingly. Gun safety courses
should be attended and reviewed yearly with
an emphasis on securing weapons and proof
that weapons are secured in a gun safe that is
not easily carted away.
It’s time to write the president and governors,
Congress and local statewide legislators, with
some laws that limits the number of weapons
one has and to increase taxation and liability
for anyone having more than one weapon. The
U.S. Supreme Court suggested recently we can
have some measure of control without elimi-
nating the Second Amendment. That court’s
suggestion was not defined, but conservative
justices indicated that the Second Amendment
was not sacrosanct. In addition, our Founding
Fathers were not able to see into the future the
country that differed so much from the current
history to that date.
Jack Kirkpatrick
Redwood City
The Second Amendment
Editor,
In response to Patrick Field’s letter in Satur-
day’s Daily Journal about guns, does he realize
that the other side of gun possession has saved
as many folks and property because the in-
tended victim had access to that gun? But
you’ll never see or read about it because it
doesn’t “sell papers.”
Only tragedies sell papers. I can name dozens
from Chicopee, Mass. and Kenosha Wisc. , to
Durant, Okla. Forming one’s opinion or ideol-
ogy from one source is a fool’s journey. The
citizenry must never surrender their firearms,
that’s the only way to keep the tyrant or dicta-
tor at bay. The founders knew that and that’s
the reason it is part of the Second Amendment.
His “in today’s world things have changed
and the right to bear arms is no longer appro-
priate.” Things have changed, and not for the
better. But in his own statement he included
“right to bear arms.” That’s my right you are
trying to surrender. I’ve a better way, Mr.
Field, get all that garbage off of television, the
school ground for our kids. But you’ll defend
your First Amendment but you want to elimi-
nate my Second Amendment. Shame on you,
Field.
Joseph Locasto
San Mateo
Board betrayal
Editor,
We feel betrayed by the board, we helped you
when you needed us. Translation, we feel be-
trayed by Don Horsley, Adrienne Tissier and
Carole Groom. I’m leaving Rose Jacobs Gib-
son out because she is a non-issue and I’m
leaving out Dave Pine out because he just got
slapped by Don Horsley Nov. 20 when he tried
to make a simple presentation on the whistle-
blower plan the civil grand jury recommended
10 years ago. Thank you Rebecca Nassare for
taking the time to show up and say those words
at the Dec. 11 Board of Supervisors meeting.
Your statement is accurate you have been be-
trayed by these supervisors, but this is not the
first time, it is the third time.
1). Sheriffs deputies 3 percent increase;
2). Controller 11 percent increase; and
3). Manager 11 percent increase.
I would also note that both controller and
manager were completely unnecessary. I
would also suggest that you and all union
members were also betrayed by Shelley
Kessler and Bill Nack who did not show up
and made no public statement on the outra-
geous and unnecessary salary increase.
Michael G. Stogner
San Carlos
Mental health care in our country
Beyond why
T
here are never any right words. After
every mass shooting, after every sig-
nificant violent event really, we try to
find the proper way to sum up the anguish and
explain the unexplainable. But no message ever
feels fitting and no turn of phrase brings any
measurable comfort.
Yet, despite knowing the insurmountable
task, I and other writers try wrangling the sense
of helplessness and outrage into the written
form for those without such a public forum.
When Christmas trees remain filled with gifts
never to be opened and the holiday season is
forever blackened, fluffy pieces about orna-
ments and snarky
commentary about
the fiscal cliff feel
inappropriate. The
expressions may
not come anywhere
near doing justice to
the unthinkable sit-
uation but it feels
like that is the only
topic that should —
that can — be
addressed.
Unfortunately,
history continues
providing ample opportunity to try over and
over again. During my tenure as a Daily
Journal columnist, this space has included
thoughts about the tragedies of Virginia Tech,
Columbine and Cleveland Elementary School
in my hometown of Stockton. Peppered in
between these events were mentions of com-
munities whose senseless gun violence may
have faded a bit from immediate recollection
with the passing of each year — the school
shootings of Cazenovia, Wis., Pearl, Miss.,
Jonesboro, Ariz. and Bailey, Colo. Then there
was the Amish school shooting of Nickel
Mines. Jared Loughner’s rampage at Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords meet-and-greet in Tucscon,
Ariz. The Dark Knight theater massacre in
Aurora, Colo. And now, Sandy Hook
Elementary in Newton, Conn.
If there is any common theme to each new
piece about a shooting, it is the plea that each
column on such violence be the last and the
suggestion we all hold our loved ones a little
tighter. There’s frankly not much more to say
because the only word on anybody’s tongue is
the question, “Why?” Every sentence beyond
that point is little more than a feeble explana-
tion that there is no immediate answer and may
never be one that provides any rationale or sol-
ace.
This isn’t to say the world remains mum. In
the absence of the right words, the public fills
the void of information with finger pointing
and hypothesis, demands and calls to action.
Leaders ask for patience and understanding but
the knee-jerk reactions are a given. The shooter
was mentally ill. The mother stockpiled guns.
The nation needs stricter gun laws. The county
must do better by its mentally ill. Teachers
should have guns. Nobody should have guns.
Schools should have locks.
Long-simmering debates flare up. Political
lines dig in deeper. Emotions run the gamut
and the only thing on which the majority agrees
is that something must finally be done. The
challenge is determining what exactly that
something should be.
I don’t profess having the insight to add my
two cents to that conversation. All I know right
now is that there conversations to eventually be
had across a wide spectrum of issues. Let’s just
hope those discussions, difficult and lengthy as
they will be, actually occur rather than falling
victim to time and whim as really they have so
many previous times. It would be naive to
believe there will never be another mass shoot-
ing to shake our faith and bruise our humanity.
But it’s not beyond hope to think we should try.
“Why?” will always be the most common
word after a day like that at Sandy Hook. The
word we need to immediately say next is
“enough.”
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached
by email: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by
phone (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you
think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:
letters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,235.39 +0.76% 10-Yr Bond 1.763 +3.22%
Nasdaq3,010.60 +1.32% Oil (per barrel) 87.46
S&P 500 1,430.36 +1.19% Gold 1,698.10
Good time for pickup
buyers as GM sweetens deals
DETROIT — General Motors is offering
generous deals on Chevy Silverado and GMC
Sierra pickup trucks after they piled up on
dealer lots.
GM is matching or beating discounts from
rivals Ford and Chrysler this month. It miscal-
culated in November when it reduced incen-
tives and truck buyers went looking elsewhere
for sweeter deals.
The three Detroit automakers have been
vying for new truck business all year as the
market continues a slow rebound from the
Great Recession. Experts say buyers can now
get discounts of $4,500 or more on some of
the best-selling vehicles in the country. Throw
in low interest rates, sweet lease deals and
abundant financing and it’s a good time for
people who are in the market for a truck.
GM is offering up to $9,000 off remaining
2012 models pickups and close to $4,500 off
2013s, while the other automakers have either
held steady or raised incentives on certain
models. Dealers say Chrysler’s average incen-
tive is around $5,000, while Ford’s is less,
around $4,000.
That means good deals on Ford’s F-Series
pickup, the top-selling vehicle in America, as
well as the Silverado, which ranks second.
Together, the Detroit Three control 83 percent
of the U.S. full-size pickup truck market.
Apple sells 2M iPhone 5s
in China in first three days
NEW YORK — Apple said Monday that it
sold more than 2 million iPhone 5s in China in
their first three days of availability, setting a
record for that market.
IPhone 5, which launched in China on
Friday, will be available in more than 100
countries by the end of December.
The phone first went on sale on Sept. 21 in
the U.S., Germany, France, Japan and five
other countries, with more than 5 million of
the phones sold in the first three days.
That sales tally also set a record, but only
beat last year’s iPhone 4S launch by a small
margin, falling short of some analysts’ expec-
tations. Apple shares hit an all-time high of
$705.07 that day, but in the months since the
stock has plunged about 26 percent.
Bangladesh probe: Fire
sabotage, owner negligent
DHAKA, Bangladesh — A Bangladesh
government committee investigating the gar-
ment factory fire that killed 112 people last
month said in its findings Monday that the
blaze was sabotage, probably by someone
who worked there.
But the panel said that no matter who set the
fire, the owner of the factory also should be
punished for the deaths because he neglected
worker safety.
“If someone is responsible for such a huge
number of deaths, that’s him. He has failed to
ensure safety,” committee head Mainuddin
Khandaker said of factory owner Delwar
Hossain.
Some government and garment industry
officials had alleged soon after the Nov. 24 fire
that it was an act of sabotage, though a fire
official said casualties would have been great-
ly reduced if the factory had followed safety
rules.
The factory lacked emergency exits and
Hossain has said only three floors of the eight-
story building were legally built. Surviving
employees said gates had been locked and
managers had told them to go back to work
after the fire alarm went off.
Business briefs
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks rose on Wall
Street as investors were encouraged by
signs of progress in budget talks in
Washington. Just two weeks remain
before tax increases and government
spending cuts take effect if no deal is
reached.
On the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange, stock traders paused for a
minute of silence at 9:15 a.m. EST to
remember the 20 children and seven
adults killed Friday in a gunman’s ram-
page through a Connecticut elementary
school.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
100.38 points to 13,235.39, its biggest
gain this month. The Standard & Poor’s
500 index climbed 16.78 points to
1,430.36 and the Nasdaq composite
index rose 39.27 points to 3,010.60.
Marc Chaikin, CEO of the
Philadelphia-based market research firm
Chaikin Analytics, said investors became
more hopeful for a resolution in the budg-
et talks after House Speaker John
Boehner made an offer to increase tax
rates on high-income Americans.
“The fiscal cliff is obviously foremost
on everyone’s mind,” Chaikin said.
Banks were among the best-perform-
ing stocks. Citigroup gained $1.55, 4.1
percent, to $39.15 after Raymond James
raised its target price on the stock to $52
from $44. In a note to clients, the broker-
age reaffirmed its “Strong Buy” rating,
citing the “improving fundamental out-
look.” Bank of America also gained 42
cents, or 4 percent, to $11.
Investors are currently favoring finan-
cial stocks over technology stocks, said
Ben Schwarz, chief market strategist at
Lightspeed Financial.
“The banks are ripping today,”
Schwarz said. “People are looking for
stability and the tech sector hasn’t given
them any.”
Financial companies make up the best
performing industry group in the S&P
500 this year, according to FactSet data.
The group, which includes banks such as
Wells Fargo & Co. and insurers such as
Travelers, has gained 25 percent this year.
Apple rose $9.04, or 1.8 percent, to
$518.83 after the company said it sold
more than 2 million iPhone 5s in China in
their first three days of availability, set-
ting a record for that market. The tech-
nology giant’s stock has fallen 26 percent
since it closed at a record $702.10 in
September and is trading close to its low-
est since February.
Fiscal talks help push stocks up
Wall Street
NEW YORK — Stocks that moved substantially
or traded heavily Wednesday on the New York
Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Tenet Healthcare Corp., up 55 cents at $31.18
An analyst at Deutsche Bank upgraded the
hospital operator’s stock to a “Buy,”saying that
Tenet’s business is improving.
Capital One Financial Corp., up $1.18 at $58.01
A Janney Capital Markets analyst reiterated his
“Buy” rating on the bank saying that recent
credit losses were due to seasonality.
Nasdaq
Clearwire Corp., down 46 cents at $2.91
Sprint Nextel Corp., the cellphone company,
raised its offer price for wireless network
operator Clearwire to about $2.2 billion.
Caribou Coffee Co. Inc., up $3.78 at $16.10
The coffee chain is being taken private by
German holding company Joh. A Benckiser
Group GmbH in a deal worth about $340
million.
Compuware Corp., up $1.23 at $10.76
Elliott Management, the investment firm, is
offering to buy the software company for
about $2.35 billion, or $11 per share.
Francesca’s Holdings Corp., up $1.28 at $25.94
A Jefferies analyst upgraded shares of the
women’s accessories and clothing store chain
to a “Buy,”citing growth potential.
Velti PLC, up 71 cents at $4.55
The mobile marketing company announced
that it is hiring Jeff Ross to become the
company’s new chief financial officer.
Conns Inc., up $1.31 at $29.76
A Stifel Nicolaus analyst upgraded the
electronics and household retailer’s stock with
a “Buy”rating, citing the company’s growth.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Morgan Stanley, the
lead underwriter for Facebook’s trou-
bled public stock offering, has agreed
to pay $5 million to Massachusetts’
securities regulators after they
accused it of disclosing a revenue
shortfall only to certain analysts and
not the general public.
According to state regulators, a
Morgan Stanley banker organized
phone calls between Facebook’s
treasurer and the analysts of major
underwriters to relay revenue figures
that weren’t included in revised doc-
uments Facebook Inc. filed with U.S.
securities authorities on May 9,
about a week before the initial public
offering of stock.
The numbers were lower than what
many analysts had expected and
caused them to revise their annual
revenue estimates down about 3 per-
cent below the $5 billion that
Facebook had earlier forecast for
2012, according to Massachusetts
officials.
The renewed estimates were
available to investment banks but
not individual investors who
bought into one of the most highly
anticipated initial public offerings
of stock in history.
“Main Street investors were put at
a significant disadvantage to Wall
Street,” Massachusetts’ Secretary of
the Commonwealth, William Galvin,
said in a press release Monday.
Facebook shares were priced at
$38, the top of a projected range, but
finished the first day of exuberant
trading barely above its initial public
offering price, at $38.23. Since then,
shares have failed to return to that
lofty valuation. On Monday, they
closed down 3 cents at $26.78, about
30 percent below the IPO price.
Morgan Stanley didn’t admit guilt
but agreed to be censured and pay the
fine. Spokesman Wesley McDade
said in a statement that the company
was pleased “to have put this matter
behind us.”
“Morgan Stanley is committed to
robust compliance with both the let-
ter and the spirit of all applicable reg-
ulations and laws,” he said.
In October, Massachusetts’ Galvin
also slapped Citigroup with a $2 mil-
lion fine after one of its analysts
leaked information to a popular tech-
nology blog that was supposed to be
private until 40 days after Facebook’s
IPO. The employee was fired.
Morgan Stanley to
pay $5M in fines
Economic growth
predicted for 2013
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Business economists
believe the country will see modest growth in
2013 with strength coming from a further
rebound in housing which will help offset weak-
ness in business investment.
In its latest survey of top forecasters, the
National Association for Business Economics
says it is looking for the economy to grow in
2013 by 2.1 percent after 2.2 percent growth in
2012. That would continue the same tepid
growth the country has seen since the Great
Recession ended in mid-2009.
Growth at that pace is not strong enough to
make a significant improvement in unemploy-
ment. The NABE economists believe unemploy-
ment will average 7.7 percent for all of next year,
right at the level it reached in November.
The 48 NABE economists on the survey panel
had essentially the same outlook as their previ-
ous forecast in October. While they have modest
expectations for 2013, they do see growth slow-
ly improving as the year progresses.
The economists forecast growth in the gross
domestic product, the economy’s total output of
goods and services, at 1.6 percent in the current
October-December quarter, down from 2.7 per-
cent growth in the July-September period. Part of
that slowdown, the economists believe, will
reflect the disruptions caused by Superstorm
Sandy, which slammed into the Northeast on
Oct. 29.
<< Niners with great momentum, page 13
• Cal women win at Northwestern, page 15
Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012
CONSISTENCY IS THE WORD: RAIDERS LOOKING TO BUILD FROM SUNDAY’S 15-0 SHUTOUT >>> PAGE 13
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Even those who follow Peninsula Athletic
League basketball regularly have started the
2012-2013 season by glancing at Westmoor
High School box scores and scratching their
heads a bit.
Who is this Fernandez kid?
And to be perfectly honest, Errol Fernandez, a
senior guard, would take no offense if you didn’t
know who he was.
But consider the start of this basketball season
as a bit of an education. The man who had to sit
through his junior season because of an ACL
injury, and therefore began this campaign off
everyone’s rader, has arrived and began his sen-
ior year on an absolute tear.
“He’s very, very hungry as a fourth-year guy
not getting to play his junior year — just being a
leader,” said Westmoor head coach Herb
Yaptinchay. “He’s gone out there and focused,
which has really shown with his performances.
He’s been a big reason why we’re doing so well
this year.”
The Rams are off to a 7-1 start including a 3-
0 stretch last week when Fernandez stepped up
and out onto the PAL’s center stage. The ques-
tion mark that was Fernandez’s game prior to the
start of the 2012 campaign is dissolving into an
exclamation point with every one of his per-
formances. In those three wins, Fernandez
scored almost 23 points per game.
For his efforts, Fernandez is the Daily Journal
Athlete of the Week.
Caragher introduced as SJSU Spartans coach
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Bay Area native Ron
Caragher is back home.
Caragher, who was introduced as the new
football coach at San Jose State on Monday,
still has family in nearby Morgan Hill and
plans to be in the area before boarding a plane
to watch the Spartans play at the Military
Bowl in Washington, D.C. two days later.
“This is a homecoming for me,” Caragher
said. “I used to attend
Spartan camps in the
summer and as a high
school player I watched
games and played in
games at Spartan
Stadium.”
Caragher, who spent
the past six years at San
Diego, replaces Mike
MacIntyre to become the
28th coach at the school. He signed a five-year
contract a week after MacIntyre left to take
the head job at Colorado. The Spartans fin-
ished the regular season 10-2.
“Things were up in the air when we didn’t
know much,” Spartans quarterback David
Fales said. “We finally have a coach again and
we can get back to work.”
Caragher replaced Jim Harbaugh, who is
coaching the San Francisco 49ers, at San
Diego, where he compiled a 44-22 record
with three conference championships. He’s
also been an assistant coach at UCLA,
Kentucky.
Harbaugh learned Monday afternoon that
San Jose State had hired Caragher, and called
him a “wonderful, wonderful, wonderful guy
and coach.”
“I would stop back down there when I was
in San Diego. Talked on the phone many
times and just through players who were still
there at USD,” Harbaugh said. “Like I said
when I’d be recruiting in San Diego I’d
See SJSU, Page 14
Bears’ swimming
pool to have new
look come spring
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The waters at Menlo-Atherton High School
will have a different look starting with the
upcoming spring swim season.
The Menlo-Atherton athletic department
hired a pair of new coaches last week with
Giovanni Napolitano taking over in boys’
water and Lori Heisick Stenstrom becoming
the new boys’ and girls’ swimming coach in
2013.
“I’m really excited to be a part of the coach-
ing family,” Stenstrom said. “I’ve lived in
Menlo Park since 1999 and it’s been really
exciting to be in the position to pour back into
this community — the community that I
love.”
Stenstrom comes to M-A with an extensive
background in competitive swimming.
Stenstrom was a 17-time All-American and
NCAA Champion at Stanford University. She
was also a member of the USA National Team
for seven years, medaling for the United
States in the Pan Pacific, Pan American and
World University Games. Stenstrom was a
USA Olympic Team Alternate, placing third
in the U.S. Olympic Trials in the 100 Meter
Breaststroke. She also had the distinct honor
of being a member of four American record
See BEARS, Page 16
See AOTW, Page 14
See ROLL, Page 16
Winter season is
picking up steam
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Sure it’s been cold outside, but the winter
season in high school prep sports is heating
up.
On the boys’ soccer pitch, none is hotter
than Sacred Heart Prep’s Robert Hellman.
The man with the golden foot is coming off
a seven-goal week.
First, Sacred Heart Prep’s Brendan Spillane
had a great overall game for the Gators in a 3-
1 win over Archbishop Riordan as well —
having a hand in all three SHP goals. His
penalty kick opened up the scoring and he fol-
lowed that up with a pair of assists.
But Hellman is definitely in another zone
right now. He scored twice against Riordan
and two days before that, put up a four-spot
on King’s Academy.
The Gators went up 3-0 in the first half
behind a pair of Spillane goals in the TKA
game. Then Hellman exploded for his four —
Ron Caragher
12
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Jamaal Charles
had nowhere to run, Brady Quinn
was under pressure all day and the
Oakland Raiders defense posted its
most statistically dominating per-
formance in decades.
Coach Dennis Allen said that kind
of game proves what the Raiders are
capable of defensively when they
play to their ability. The key now is
doing that more often.
“We’ve proven that we can do it at
times, but we’ve got to be more con-
sistent at it,” Allen said Monday.
“That will be our challenge moving
forward.”
So far the Raiders (4-10) haven’t
proved much more than they can
shut down the lowly Chiefs (2-12)
and Jaguars (2-12). In three wins
against the NFL’s two worst teams,
Oakland has allowed 13 points and
209 yards allowed per game.
Against the rest of the NFL, the
Raiders have given up 33 points and
414.9 yards per game.
But Allen is less worried about the
quality of opponent than the gaudy
numbers his defense delivered. The
Raiders held Charles to 10 yards
rushing on nine carries, sacked
Quinn four times and allowed just
119 yards of total offense — the
fewest for the team since 1975.
It all added up to Oakland’s first
shutout since the 2002 regular season
finale.
“I think it’s important any time
you get that opportunity. It’s tough to
shut anybody out in this league,”
Allen said. “To get the shutout, to
hold the team to 10 yards rushing
which is a franchise record, a team
that was a top-five rushing team in
the NFL this year. I think that was
huge for our defense. I think that was
a good confidence builder. Now we
have to continue to build on that.”
The Raiders have two more
chances to duplicate that kind of per-
formance as they end the season with
trips to Carolina and San Diego.
Oakland also hopes that its run-
ning game can build on one of its
best performances after rushing for a
season-high 203 yards against the
Chiefs. The Raiders had 45 carries in
the game — their most in more than
two years — with Darren McFadden
running for 110 yards on 30 carries
and Mike Goodson getting 89 on 13
runs.
That’s the formula Allen wants the
Raiders to follow each week.
“I think we all saw that when we
execute that game plan the way that
we feel like we’re capable of execut-
ing it, we have a chance to win
games,” he said. “I thought our
defense played outstanding yester-
day and I thought we were able to
run the ball effectively against them.
So that will be a key for us moving
forward.”
The game also marked the season
debut for third quarterback Terrelle
Pryor. The former Ohio State star
had been on the field just once in his
first two seasons, committing a false
start before the snap on his only
other chance last season.
Raiders seek consistency on D
A’s agree to sign SS Nakajima
OAKLAND — Two people with
knowledge of the negotiations say
the Oakland Athletics have agreed
to sign shortstop Hiroyuki
Nakajima of Japan’s Seibu Lions.
The people spoke on condition of
anonymity Monday because there
had yet to be a formal announce-
ment. The AL West champion A’s
called a news conference for
Tuesday afternoon described as a
“major announcement.”
Nakajima agreed to a $6.5 mil-
lion, two-year contract. The deal
also includes a $5.5 million option
for a third season, one of the people
said.
Nakajima, a seven-time Pacific
League All-Star, has a .302 batting
average with 149 home runs, 664
RBIs and 134 stolen bases over 11
seasons with Seibu.
Sports brief
49ers have late momentum after Patriots win
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Jim
Harbaugh’s San Francisco 49ers
hung tough late in the game to stun
Tom Brady and the New England
Patriots on the road and in the rain
to clinch a playoff berth when few
expected them to win at
Foxborough.
Now, after a long trip home fol-
lowing their 41-34 victory, the
Niners (10-3-1) must play a second
straight game on the Sunday night
prime-time stage when they visit
Seattle trying to wrap up a second
consecutive NFC West crown.
“This is a huge win for us,” left
tackle Joe Staley said. “With Seattle
winning, we had to win this game. It
felt like a playoff game.”
The Seahawks (9-5) have scored
108 points in their last two games
— a 50-17 win at Buffalo on
Sunday after a 58-0 rout of Arizona
a week earlier — so everybody
knows it will be another important
test for San Francisco’s stingy
defense.
The 49ers certainly have some
momentum coming down the
stretch in late December as they
gear up for another postseason run,
one they hope goes one step further
than their overtime loss to the even-
tual champion Giants in last
January’s NFC title game.
Beating Brady and Co. didn’t hurt
as San Francisco prepares for the
games that matter most.
“It is real big
and it says a lot
about this team
to travel across
the country and
play a late
game, and in
their environ-
ment with cold
and rain,” said
c o r n e r b a c k
Carlos Rogers, who intercepted a
pass by Brady midway through the
first quarter and ran it back 53 yards
to the Patriots 5. “I am pretty sure
everybody picked us to lose. It just
seems every time we get on
Thursday night, Sunday night, or
Monday night, we show up and that
is what we did. We stuck with our
plan and we knew it was going to be
tough coming in. We just had to stay
poised, stay fighting and play phys-
ical. ... Offense put up the points
and we got the win.”
Several of the 49ers said Sunday’s
Carlos Rogers
See 49ers, Page 16
SPORTS 14
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State &Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be acting in vio-
lation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name &photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal,
Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions
of any kind whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week SIXTEEN
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 12/22/12
Atlanta Detroit
Tennessee Green Bay
New Orleans Dallas
Indianapolis Kansas City
New England Jacksonville
Minnesota Houston
Cincinnati Pittsburgh
Buffalo Miami
St. Louis Tampa Bay
San Diego NY Jets
Oakland Carolina
Washington Philadelphia
Cleveland Denver
Chicago Arizona
NY Giants Baltimore
San Francisco Seattle
TIEBREAKER: San Francisco @ Seattle __________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest
is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
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Yaptinchay said of his guard heading into
this season. “Obviously, when you play as
freshman on the varsity team, no matter what
school you’re at, you have a lot of expecta-
tions and a lot of hope that you’ll develop by
your senior year and be the kind of player that
he is. But we weren’t sure, coming back from
an ACL injury. You don’t know how you’ll
react. But fortunately, he’s done a good job.”
Yaptinchay attributes part of Fernandez’s
injury to a schedule saturated with basketball.
Being hurt forced Fernandez to take a step
back and reevaluate his future as a basketball
player. After a full recovery, and a focused
objective, Fernandez has hit the court running.
“A lot of it is focus,” Yaptinchay said. “He’s
probably the most focused player we have on
the team. He has a lot of confidence. And I
think having a year off, watching his team per-
form — last year, we struggled as a team ... so
when he’s sitting on the sideline and saying. ‘I
should be out there, helping my teammates
out,’ I think it’s kind of realized how important
this year is for him.
“With Errol, having been injured last year, I
think he really realizes, ‘Hey, I really have to
focus in, I have to compete because this could
be my last game.’ A lot of seniors don’t realize
that until the last half, last third, of the season.
I think that’s the biggest contributor.”
Fernandez contributed 19 points in a win
against Capuchino High School in the week’s
first game. He then went off for 28 in a win
against Balboa of San Francisco. The cherry
on top was a 21 point output against Burton-
San Francisco on Saturday.
“He has a knack of making his team’s better
not just by the performance on the court, but
his leadership quality,” Yaptinchay said. “He
keeps them emotionally and mentally
engaged. When they (young players on the
team) look at who they want to aspire to be,
they look up to Errol and Wai Min (the Rams
other leader). When they look at Westmoor
basketball, that’s who they look to be. And
that comes directly from one of our sopho-
mores. That’s what you hope for, that every
player becomes a Errol.”
The Rams thrive off Fernandez’s desire and
competitive nature. And on a team that cur-
rently has zero players over 6-feet tall on the
roster, running an all-guard rotation, it’s the
size of their collective heart that has fueled a
7-1 start.
“He’s a huge part of our team now,”
Yaptinchay said. “He’s going to have to be a
huge part of our team if we’re going to be
successful the remaining months of the sea-
son. He’s going to have to do everything he’s
doing now and maybe a bit more. What I
mean by more, when he came in, I don’t think
any one realized who he was. He wasn’t a
known commodity. Now, everyone is going to
be scouted us, they’re going to know, they’re
going to be like, ‘Who is this guy?’ He’s
going to get a lot more attention. So, he’s
going to have to learn not only how to pro-
duce offensively and defensively, but also
take it to the next level and say, ‘I have to
make others better.’”
Continued from page 11
AOTW
Mets trade Cy Young
winner Dickey to Blue Jays
NEW YORK — R.A. Dickey tweeted his
own trade Monday, with the NL Cy Young
winner thanking New York Mets fans for their
backing and saying he was all set to pitch for
the Toronto Blue Jays.
“Now that its official, I want to say that I
don’t have the words to express how grateful I
am to you for the steadfast support,” Dickey
posted on Twitter. “Thank you for making me
feel wanted.”
“Looking forward to a new chapter with the
Jays,” he wrote.
Toronto acquired the 38-year-old knuckle-
baller and catchers Josh Thole and Mike
Nickeas. The Mets got top catching prospect
Travis d’Arnaud and catcher John Buck, plus
minor league right-hander Noah Syndergaard
and outfielder Wuilmer Becerra.
Sports brief
always stop by the trailer and see if anybody
was there. Rons been up here recruiting in the
Bay Area when I was over at Stanford. We’d
run into each other. Great guy. Great guy,
great family. My son will be disappointed.
He’s friends with Ron’s son. They go to the
same high school. But that’s great. Great hire
by San Jose State.”
“He talked to us a team,” Fales said of
Caragher. “From everything I’ve heard he’s a
down-to-earth person who really cares about
his players.”
Caragher attended Bellarmine Prep in San
Jose before going on to UCLA, where he
spent four years as a backup quarterback.
“Being at San Diego, we would recruit the
Bay Area,” Caragher said. “I’ve always come
up every December and I had a trip planned
this year. Northern California has been very
good to us and I hope it can continue to be
good.”
San Jose State athletic director Gene
Bleymaier said Caragher was always an
option as a potential candidate.
“I have followed Coach Caragher’s career
for some time,” said Bleymaier, who came to
San Jose State from Boise State. “I’ve always
hoped I would have the opportunity to hire
him here at some point. Little did I know it
would be so soon.”
Bleymaier said the selection committee vet-
ted about 10 candidates and brought in five
for formal interviews.
“What impressed me about Ron was every-
thing,” Bleymaier said. “From his reputation,
his background, his local roots, it was a total
package.”
Caragher has been nominated for the Eddie
Robinson Coach of the Year, which recog-
nizes the top coach in the Football
Championship Subdivision.
Continued from page 11
SJSU
SPORTS 15
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EVANSTON, Ill. — Brittany
Boyd and Talia Caldwell helped No.
8 Cal overcome a noisy gym and
some lousy shooting.
Boyd scored 18 points and
Caldwell added 16 to help beat
Northwestern 71-65 Monday, send-
ing the Wildcats to their fourth
straight loss.
“This was a game we can take a
lot away from,” Cal coach Lindsay
Gottlieb said. “I really credit
Northwestern coming off some
injuries and some rough games.
Their spirit was up, they executed,
they played well and the crowd was
phenomenal.”
The game, which started at 11 in
the morning, was played in front of
4,958 fans, largely from Chicago
area schools, and the vocal crowd
made it difficult at times for the
Golden Bears.
“This is exactly why you schedule
games like this,” Gottlieb said. “To
be on the road in a tournament-like
atmosphere and have to respond to
adversity.”
Gennifer Brandon’s three-point
play with 3:04 left put Cal (8-1)
ahead for good. The Golden Bears
made 26 for 64 (39.1 percent) from
the field.
Brandon had 11 points and 10
rebounds and Layshia Clarendon
scored 11 for Cal.
“We had so many opportunities to
win this game and Cal made some
big plays in the last three minutes,”
Wildcats coach Joe McKeown said.
“I just loved our effort and intensity
but we had a few breakdowns here
and there that they exposed.
Karly Roser scored 16 points and
Dannielle Diamant had 15 points
and 12 rebounds for Northwestern
(6-4). Lauren Douglas added 14 for
the Wildcats in their fourth straight
loss.
“I don’t think that the early start
affected us at all,” Gottlieb said. “I
thought our energy level was great.”
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315
N.Y. Jets 6 7 0 .462 245 306
Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280
Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358
Tennessee 4 9 0 .308 271 386
Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383
North
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307
Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293
Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291
Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274
San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402
Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 8 6 0 .571 381 350
Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338
N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304
Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259
New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379
Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349
Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292
Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240
Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-San Francisco 10 3 1 .750 357 218
Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219
St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315
Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Saturday, Dec. 22
Atlanta at Detroit, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 23
Tennessee at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
New England at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 18 6 .750—
Brooklyn 13 10 .5654 1/2
Boston 12 11 .5225 1/2
Philadelphia 12 12 .5006
Toronto 6 19 .24012 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 15 6 .714 —
Atlanta 14 7 .667 1
Orlando 11 13 .458 5 1/2
Charlotte 7 16 .304 9
Washington 3 18 .143 12
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 13 10 .565 —
Milwaukee 12 10 .545 1/2
Indiana 13 11 .542 1/2
Detroit 7 20 .259 8
Cleveland 5 20 .200 9
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 19 7 .731 —
Memphis 16 6 .727 1
Houston 12 12 .500 6
Dallas 11 13 .458 7
New Orleans 5 18 .217 12 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 20 4 .833 —
Minnesota 12 10 .545 7
Denver 13 12 .520 7 1/2
Utah 13 12 .520 7 1/2
Portland 11 12 .478 8 1/2
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 18 6 .750 —
Golden State 16 8 .667 2
L.A. Lakers 11 14 .440 7 1/2
Phoenix 9 15 .375 9
Sacramento 7 16 .304 10 1/2
Monday’sGames
Orlando 102, Minnesota 93
Houston 109, New York 96
L.A. Clippers 88, Detroit 76
Memphis 80, Chicago 71
Oklahoma City 107, San Antonio 93
Sacramento at Phoenix,late
Tuesday’sGames
Toronto at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m.
Utah at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Chicago 5 p.m.
Indiana at Milwaukee, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 6 p.m.
New Orleans at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
@Kings
7p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/19
@Seattle
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/23
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/30
vs.Hornets
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/18
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/22
vs. Bobcats
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/21
vs. Celtics
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/29
vs.76ers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/28
@Jazz
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/26
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
12/23
@Chargers
1p.m.
CBS
12/30
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’SOFFICE— Suspended Tampa
Bay minor league OF Cody Rogers 50 games for re-
fusing to take an offseason drug test.
AmericanLeague
DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Anibal Sanchez on a five-year contract.
HOUSTONASTROS — Agreed to terms with DH
Carlos Pena on a one-year contract.
TORONTOBLUE JAYS — Traded C John Buck, C
Travis d’Arnaud, RHP Noah Syndergaard and OF
Wuilmer BecceratotheN.Y.Metsfor RHPR.A.Dickey,
C Josh Thole and C Mike Nickeas. Agreed to terms
with Dickey on a three-year contract.
National League
CHICAGOCUBS — Agreed to terms with 3B Ian
Stewart on a one-year contract. Designated LHP
Jeff Beliveau for assignment.Agreed to terms with
RHP Chang-Yong Lim on a minor league contract.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with
INF Donnie Murphy on a minor league contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA—PromotedMikeBasstoexecutivevicepres-
ident, communications.
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Assigned G Josh Selby
to Reno (NBADL). Recalled G Tony Wroten from
Reno.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL—SuspendedWashingtonTJordanBlackfour
games for violating the league’s policy on per-
formance enhancing substances.
ARIZONACARDINALS— Re-signed OL Mike Gib-
son. Released DT Ricky Lumpkin.
CHICAGO BEARS — Placed DT Matt Toeaina on
injured reserve. Signed T Cory Brandon from the
practice squad.
CLEVELANDBROWNS—ReleasedDBDimitri Pat-
terson.
CanadianFootball League
HAMILTONTIGER-CATS — Named Kent Austin
coach.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
DALLAS STARS — Reassigned D Hubert Labrie
from Idaho (ECHL) to Texas (AHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS — Reassigned D Gleason
Fournier and F Andrej Nestrasil from Toledo (ECHL)
to Grand Rapids (AHL).
SOCCER
Major LeagueSoccer
NEWYORKREDBULLS — Signed M Juninho.
COLLEGE
CINCINNATI — Announced QB Brendon Kay has
been granted an extra year of eligibility by the
NCAA.
SAN JOSE STATE — Named Ron Caragher foot-
ball coach.
TEMPLE — Named Matt Rhule football coach.
UCDAVIS — Named Ron Gould football coach.
WESTVIRGINIA— Announced WR Stedman Bai-
ley will enter the NFL draft.
TRANSACTIONS
No. 8 Cal women beat
Northwestern 71-65
16
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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medley relays. While at Stanford, Stenstrom
was coached by the legendary USA
Swimming Hall of Fame coach Richard
Quick. Stenstrom originates from Edina,
Minn. where she was also a four-year high
school All-American and U.S. National High
School record holder.
“High school [athletes are] one of my
favorite groups of people,” Stenstrom said. “I
think they’re such great years of change and I
look forward to the opportunity of mentoring
these kids and helping them navigate through
their high schools years because to me, I’m so
passionate with swimming but it’s so much
more than just swimming to me — it’s about
helping these kids grow as people and help
shape them into the people they will become.”
Stenstrom coaching career began locally at
Palo Alto Stanford Aquatics (PASA), the
fourth ranked USA swim team in the country.
At PASA, she worked with swimmers ranging
from novice all the way up to junior national
level.
“I’ve gotten nothing but positive feedback
from the community and the kids so far,”
Stenstrom said. “I know a lot of the kids per-
sonally from living in the community and their
parents. So, it’s fun to touch base with those I
do already know. But, I’ve been overwhelmed
with the positive response that M-A, and me
personally, has gotten from taking this job. It’s
been a really good opportunity.
“I think with any new experience come its
own challenges,” she said. “I don’t foresee
anything that is insurmountable. I’ve coached
a full range of ability and a diverse group as
well. That’s what makes a school like M-A so
fun. You have both ends of the spectrum as far
as I can see and everything in between. And
that’s exciting.”
On the water polo front, Napolitano takes
over following the retirement of legendary
coach Dante Dettamanti, who led the Bears to
the 2012 Peninsula Athletic League title and a
Division I runner-up position in the Central
Coast Section playoffs.
Napolitano grew up playing water polo in
Italy and played professionally for many
years. Among his many accomplishments as a
professional player are winning titles in the
European League and the European Comen
Cup and he was a Most Valuable Player of the
Italian League.
Napolitano began his coaching career with
C.C.Ortigia in Italy in 1994 and led his 14-
under squad to five straight Italian National
Championships.
In the United States, he coached locally at
Woodside and Palo Alto High Schools before
re-joining the M-A staff in 2012 as the head
junior varsity coach and assistant varsity
coach.
Spillane assisting on one of those.
Hellman wasn’t quite done. In a Saturday.
5-2 win over Harbor High School, he added
another plus a pair of assists.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
The Westmoor boys continue to impress
during the non-league portion of the
Peninsula Athletic League schedule. In beat-
ing Capuchino, Errol Fernandez scored 19
points and Wai Min added 15. Capuchino got
solid efforts from Zach Khotz, who scored 12,
and Magni who added 12.
The Rams then followed that victory with a
68-48 thrashing of Balboa-San Francisco.
Fernandez blew up again, scoring 28 point
in the win.
Fernandez and the Rams weren’t done yet.
In a 74-64 win over Woodside, Fernandez
score 21 points. Min had 17.
The Rams are now 7-1.
Woodside’s Mitchell Hickman scored 30
points in the loss.
Henry Caruso scored 23 in Serra High
School’s 72-26 win over Menlo-Atherton at
the Merv Harris Classic. His effort followed a
17-point night against Burlingame High
School in the annual rivalry game. Jaqui
Biggins added 19 including five 3-pointers at
the Merv.
Sacred Heart Prep got a double-digit effort
from Corbin Koch in a 62-50 loss to St.
Ignatius-San Francisco. And in a big test
against St. Mary-Berkeley, Koch had another
solid scoring effort with 10 points, albeit in a
60-50 loss. Ricky Galliani led the way with 14
points.
The Carlmont High School boys’ basketball
defense was on point in a 43-22 drubbing of
Burton-San Francisco and a 61-41 victory
over Yerba Buena.
They shutout Burton in the first quarter and
held them to single-digit quarters the rest of
the game. Yash Malik paced the Scots with
nine points.
And against Yerba Buena, a five-point
clamp-down in the second quarter propelled
the Scots to a win.
Malik led Carlmont in scoring again with
12 points.
Hillsdale moved to 5-2 last week with a 54-
52 win over Overfelt High School and a 57-47
victory over South City. The Knights got great
scoring efforts from Stevie Hasegawa (15
points), Chris Arshad (22 points) and Angelo
Bautista (31 points) during that stretch of
baskeball.
Dominic Tanouye-Wolf, who was absent
from the Overfelt score sheet, scored 12
points in the win against SSF.
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
San Mateo High School’s Alana Simon is
off to a quick start. The San Mateo superstar
scored 28 points in the Bearcats’ 55-47 win
over Mercy-San Francisco and a day later,
scored 39 points in a thrilling, double-over-
time loss to Sacred Heart Prep. Caroline
Cummings scored 12 points in that game to
pace the Gators.
Becca Grigg of Notre Dame-Belmont
scored 10 points in the Tigers’ 36-33 loss to
Terra Nova. Megan Smith added six points
and eight steals.
Riley Hemm and Melissa Holland were a
lethal 1-2 punch for the Gators in a 62-55 win
over Evergreen High School. Hemm led SHP
with 14 points while Holland scored 13.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
Menlo School and Palo Alto High School
played to a 2-2 tie. It was a game of two very
different halves as Menlo controlled the first
half with a strong team effort and Paly took
charge in the second half.
Menlo created many scoring opportunities
early on and then jumped on top in the 10th
minute on a curling 20 yard beautiful shot just
inside the far post by Priya Medberry. In the
24th minute, Alexandra Walker sent in a cross
that Elena Gray knocked in from10 yards out.
Menlo led 2-0 at halftime.
Menlo goalkeeper Julia Dressel played well
in the first half finishing with 4 saves.
Jessica Parque scored a pair of goals, both
assisted by Michaela Brady, in leading Notre-
Dame Belmont over King’s Academy. Both
scored came in the first half before the 13th
minute.
She then scored the Tigers lone goal in a 5-
1 loss to St. Francis to kick off West Catholic
Athletic League play.
Alex Bourdillon scored the game-winning
goal in Sacred Heart Prep’s 1-0 win over
Sequoia. Her score game in the 16th minute.
The Gators followed that win with a 2-0
victory over Castilleja. SHP got goals from
Wheeler and Jager for the Gators’ second
shutout of the week.
Continued from page 11
ROLL
Continued from page 11
BEARS
game felt like a preview of the playoffs —
with Brady and the high-flying Patriots’
offense against San Francisco’s opportunistic
defense.
And this week should be no different when
the Niners play in what is largely considered
the loudest road venue in the NFL — against
a team fighting to secure a playoff spot.
Harbaugh is all for his team being tested late
in the season.
“I think that could be a positive,” the coach
said Monday. “I think the thing that the play-
ers were feeling and probably anybody that
was watching it was feeling was that they’re
two teams that — two very good teams, two
hard-hitting teams — have a lot of pride in
how they play, really came out to see who’s
better, and wanted to be better and wanted to
win that game. And it showed. This game will
be the same, I really believe that. We need to
prepare.”
San Francisco turns its focus to slowing
down a surging Seattle team led by rookie
quarterback Russell Wilson while also keep-
ing hold of the NFC’s No. 2 seed in an effort
to secure a first-round playoff bye. Atlanta
holds the top spot at 12-2, while Green Bay is
right behind the Niners at 10-4.
Running back Frank Gore considered the
game at New England a must-win, and will
treat this week the same way.
“Yeah, we had to, we had to,” Gore said.
“We put ourselves in a situation where we had
to win out and we knew that it was going to be
tough coming down here and getting a win
against a great team, especially a team that
had a great game last week.”
Harbaugh was quick to credit his coaching
staff Monday for using the cross-country
flight home not to sleep or watch a movie but
rather study game film, from Sunday night
and also some preliminary work on the
Seahawks. San Francisco beat Seattle 13-6 in
the 49ers’ division opener on Oct. 18.
Harbaugh watched Sunday’s game again,
noting that the Niners had chances to get off
the field during the Patriots’ stretch scoring 28
unanswered points.
“Watched the entire game, offense, defense
and special teams and work on Seattle,”
Harbaugh said. “It’s a pretty impressive thing.
I’ve never been associated with a team like
this, where the coaching staff is — it’s like a
work station in the back part of the plane. The
computers are on, nobody is watching movies
and not a lot of sleeping going on. Really
impressed with our guys the way they do that.
And the players too, they had laptops and
were watching the game in groups and then
eventually fell off to sleep.”
Defensive tackle Justin Smith underwent an
MRI exam on his injured arm, which forced
him to miss the fourth quarter Sunday night.
“It’s really going to be how he is today,
tomorrow, Wednesday, before we know any-
thing,” Harbaugh said.
Continued from page 13
49ERS
HEALTH 17
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Hrovje Hranjski
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MANILA, Philippines —
Philippine legislators passed a land-
mark bill Monday that would pro-
vide government funding for contra-
ceptives and sexuality classes in
schools despite strong opposition by
the dominant Roman Catholic
Church and its followers, some of
whom threatened to ask the Supreme
Court to block the legislation.
The Senate and the House of
Representatives passed different ver-
sions of the bill, which languished in
Congress for more than a decade as
legislators avoided colliding with the
influential church. The two versions
will have to be
r e c o n c i l e d
before President
Benigno Aquino
III has an oppor-
tunity to sign the
legislation.
In a scene con-
sidered unusual
just a few years
ago, lawmakers
openly defied
the church’s stand during the plena-
ry voting, which was shown live on
nationwide TV.
“The Catholic church has stead-
fastly opposed the (reproductive
health) bill for 13 years,” said Sen.
Miriam Defensor-Santiago, a key
proponent. “But I humbly submit
this afternoon that there is no force
more powerful than an idea whose
time has come.”
Aquino, who certified the bill as
urgent, considers it a major step
toward reducing maternal deaths and
promoting family planning in the
impoverished country, which has
one of Asia’s fastest-growing popu-
lations. Church leaders said in a pas-
toral letter Sunday that if passed, the
bill would put the moral fiber of the
nation at risk.
Archbishop Socrates Villegas,
vice president of the Philippines’
Bishops Conference, said that “the
wide and free accessibility of contra-
ceptives will result in the destruction
of family life.”
“Money for contraceptives can be
better used for education and
authentic health care,” he said,
adding that “those who corrupt the
minds of children will invoke divine
wrath on themselves.”
The long delay in the bill’s pas-
sage has been attributed to politi-
cians’ fear of upsetting conservative
Catholic bishops, who helped mobi-
lize popular support for the 1986
“people power” revolt that toppled
dictator Ferdinand Marcos and the
2001 overthrow of another presi-
dent, Joseph Estrada.
But in a sign of changing times
and attitudes, particularly across
generations, reformist civil society
groups and Aquino threw their
weight behind the bill despite the
threat of a backlash.
An independent survey in June
last year found that 68 percent of
respondents agreed that the govern-
ment should fund all means of fami-
ly planning. An October survey of
600 teenagers in Manila, the capital,
Philippines OKs divisive contraceptives bill
Benigno
Aquino III
“The wide and free accessibility of contraceptives will
result in the destruction of family life.”
— Archbishop Socrates Villegas,VP of the Philippines’ Bishops Conference
See BILL, Page 19
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — The fight against
malaria is slowing down amid a dra-
matic drop in efforts to reverse the
epidemic, even as health officials
insist they will try to meet their ide-
alistic target of virtually eliminating
deaths from the parasitic illness by
the end of 2015.
Malaria causes symptoms includ-
ing fever, chills, and vomiting and
can kill if not treated early. It main-
ly strikes children under 5, mostly
in Africa.
In 2010, about 145 million bed
nets were given out across Africa to
protect people against the mosqui-
toes that spread the killer disease.
Last year, that fell to about 66 mil-
lion. The number of homes in Africa
sprayed with pesticides has also
stalled, as have attempts to treat
pregnant women, one of the high-
risk groups.
While the malaria death rate has
fallen by a quarter since 2000, offi-
cials say further improvements are
in jeopardy.
“We must act with urgency and
determination to keep this tremen-
dous progress from slipping out of
our grasp,” Dr. Margaret Chan,
WHO’s director-general, wrote in a
report released Monday. WHO
blamed falling donations and said
the $2.3 billion invested in malaria
programs in 2011 was less than half
of what was needed.
The agency estimated there were
about 219 million malaria cases and
660,000 deaths in 2010. But there
were only solid data from countries
representing just 15 percent of cases
worldwide; the remaining cases and
deaths were largely based on esti-
mates and modeling. There was no
solid information on countries with
the biggest outbreaks, including the
Democratic Republic of Congo and
Nigeria, which account for about 40
percent of global malaria deaths.
WHO acknowledged there was “a
large degree of uncertainty” about
its figures.
“There are a lot of blind spots in
surveillance,” said Jorgen Stassijns,
a malaria adviser at Doctors
Without Borders who was not con-
nected to the report. He thought
efforts against malaria might be
sluggish because of the financial cri-
sis or donors prioritizing other
health campaigns.
“In a lot of our work in the field,
we don’t see malaria going down,”
Stassijns said, citing clinics in
Congo, Niger and Sierra Leone.
Some said the stalled progress
wasn’t unexpected.
Africa’s malaria fight losing steam
18
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle R. Smith
THE ASSOCIATE PRESS
The killings at a Connecticut elementary school
left parents struggling to figure out what to tell
their children.
President Barack Obama said he and his wife,
Michelle, would tell their daughters that they love
them and hug them a little tighter. Experts say
that’s a good example to follow. Parents also
should allow children to talk about their feelings in
the coming days while sheltering them from the
24/7 media coverage of the event, they say.
A man gunned down more than two dozen peo-
ple Friday, most of them kids at a Newtown,
Conn., elementary school. The shooter was
among the 28 people left dead, apparently from a
self-inflicted wound.
The international organization Save the
Children, headquartered only 20 miles from where
the killings occurred in Newtown, opened up a
“child friendly space” in the community to give
local children a place to play while their parents
seek counseling and support.
The group said parents and other adults should
listen to children carefully, reassure them, give
them extra time and attention, be a model for them
of sensitivity to others, and help them return to
their normal routine.
Clergy members had similar advice for those
who turned to them for help. Added Rev. Linda L.
Grenz on the Episcopal Rhode Island Diocesan
News website: “...if your child doesn’t want to talk
about the events at all, they may not need to talk
and you might just take a walk with them or read
them a book or give them a hug to let them know
you care.”
Whitney Finucane wasn’t sure how and when
she would talk with her son, Nico, about the shoot-
ing. She kissed and hugged him when he came out
from kindergarten at Dr. Martin Luther King
Elementary in Providence, R.I., on Friday.
“I don’t know how to explain insanity and evil
to a 5-year-old,” she said. “I don’t know that he
can really grasp it.”
Even the youngest schoolchildren are likely to
hear about it, said Glenn Saxe, chairman of the
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at
NYU Langone Medical Center.
“It’s really important, especially at this time, for
parents to check in with their kids, to be attuned to
how they’re feeling, how they’re doing, and to
answer questions honestly and straightforwardly,”
he said. “For any other kid in school, this has
meaning. Parents need to understand that even in
surprising ways, this can affect their kids.”
Parents can start by asking their children what
they’ve already heard and what questions they
have, said Dr. David Schonfeld, a pediatrician and
director of the National Center for School Crisis
and Bereavement at Cincinnati Children’s
Hospital Medical Center. If they ask why someone
would do something like this, it’s OK to say you
don’t know.
“I wouldn’t provide false reassurance or dismiss
legitimate concerns,” he said. “We don’t help chil-
dren by telling them they shouldn’t be afraid of
things that are frightening.”
Parents can tell their kids, “What is most impor-
tant is that you’re safe and you’re going to be safe,”
said Dr. Louis Kraus, chief of child and adolescent
psychiatry at Rush University Medical Center in
Chicago.
Above all, parents need to try to help their chil-
dren feel safe, he said. Helping kids return to or
maintain normal routines can help minimize their
anxiety, Kraus said.
Some children may ask the same questions over
and over as a way to seek reassurance, and parents
shouldn’t dismiss them, said Dr. David Fassler, a
child and adolescent psychiatrist in Burlington, Vt.
“Acknowledge and validate the child’s thoughts,
feelings, and reactions. Let them know that you
think their questions and concerns are important
and appropriate,” he said.
Parents of young children should keep their
children from hearing reports on TV, radio, and
social media and to closely monitor exposure to
media for all children, several experts said.
Children who show persistent signs of anxiety and
stress, including recurring nightmares or sleep
problems and fears about leaving home, should
see their pediatrician or a mental health expert,
Kraus said.
While parents might feel the need to teach their
children what do in such an emergency, the next
few days is not the time to develop or bring up
your family’s disaster preparedness or to teach
your young children to dial 911, Saxe said.
“Right now, kids’ sense of safety and security is
shattered,” Saxe said. “It’s very good parenting
practice, in general, to have a kid know what to do
in times of emergency, but it undermines the
immediate message that you’re trying to convey.”
Schonfeld said if children bring it up them-
selves, you can talk about what’s being done to
keep them safe.
As students head back to their classrooms on
Monday, parents and children should know that
school shootings are rare and schools still are
among the safest places, said William Lassiter of
the Center for the Prevention of School Violence.
Parents can ask their principal or parent-teacher
group for a copy of their school crisis plan.
Notice whether schools stick to their own secu-
rity plans, he said. Do people have to check in at
the door and sign in at the front office, for exam-
ple?
“A lot of times, the parents are the ones who
need to remind the school,” he said.
Schools should have an emergency plan that is
available to parents that explains what the school
will do in various emergencies, such as a fire, haz-
ardous materials spill, lockdown or evacuation. It
should also say how the school will communicate
with the parents — for example, on its Twitter
feed, Facebook page, website, or by email or auto-
mated phone call, said Kitty Porterfield, a spokes-
woman for the American Association of School
Administrators.
From the moment a child starts school, they are
learning safety procedures such as lining up and
following the teacher, she said. School districts in
most major metropolitan areas also hold drills in
which teachers and administrators practice what to
do in a shooting or similar emergency. Most don’t
involve children so that they aren’t upset, but some
do, she said.
It’s natural for parents at a time like this to want
to react to Friday’s shooting with action,
Schonfeld said, but giving a young child a cell-
phone or keeping them out of school probably will
not help.
How to talk to your kids about Newtown tragedy
REUTERS
Children and parents are seen leaving Newtown Youth Academy,where they were able to meet
with friends and participate in activities.Experts say parents should allow children to express
their feelings and not bombard them with 24/7 media coverage.
HEALTH/NATION/WORLD 19
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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also carried out by the Social Weather Stations institute, found
that 87 percent believed the government should provide repro-
ductive health services to the poor.
The United Nations said early this year that the bill would
help reduce an alarming number of pregnancy-related deaths,
prevent life-threatening abortions and slow the spread of AIDS.
The U.N. Population Fund says 3.4 million pregnancies
occur in the Philippines every year. Half are unintended and a
third are aborted, often in clandestine, unsafe and unsanitary
procedures. The fund says 11 women in the country die of preg-
nancy-related causes every day. Nearly 70 percent of women
use no contraception at all.
Reproductive health programs are patchy and often unavail-
able to the poor. Some local governments have passed ordi-
nances banning the sale of condoms and their distribution in
health clinics.
“Many Filipino women have faced difficulties and sometimes
death because of the absence of a comprehensive and consistent
reproductive health policy. This law can change that,” said
Carlos Conde, Asia researcher at New York-based Human
Rights Watch.
Former Manila Mayor Lito Atienza, who opposes the bill,
said pro-church groups were considering asking the Supreme
Court to declare the bill unconstitutional. “You cannot legislate
anything that is contrary to one’s faith,” he told reporters.
Continued from page 17
BILL
Israel pushes on with
east Jerusalem building plan
JERUSALEM — Israel on Monday said it
was pushing forward with plans to build hun-
dreds of homes in a Jewish settlement of east
Jerusalem, risking renewed tensions with the
Palestinians and its Western allies over the con-
tentious project.
The announcement was part of a new Israeli
settlement push announced earlier this month as
retaliation for the Palestinians’ success in win-
ning U.N. recognition for a state at the United
Nations. Israel was widely criticized internation-
ally for the settlement plans, though actual con-
struction would be far in the future.
An Interior Ministry committee on Monday
approved an intermediate stage of planning for
the construction of 1,500 apartments in the
Ramat Shlomo neighborhood, a part of the city
Palestinians claim for a future capital. The plan
had been in the pipeline since it was first
announced in 2010 during a visit to Israel by
Vice President Joe Biden, causing a major diplo-
matic rift with Washington that took months to
mend.
Ministry spokeswoman Efrat Orbach said the
project still must go through several additional
planning stages, and it could be years before
final approval and construction.
Nabil Abu Rdeneh, a spokesman for
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, con-
demned the move, calling it a “stark challenge to
the entire international community.”
There was no immediate American reaction.
Low turnout in Egypt’s
vote raises questions
CAIRO — Just under a third of voters turned
out for the first stage of the referendum on a con-
stitution meant to be a historic milestone in set-
ting Egypt’s future — a showing critics say
deepens doubts over the legitimacy of a charter
that has already polarized the country.
The dismal showing also raises the question
whether Egyptians have been turned off by the
turmoil that has characterized the country’s pol-
itics throughout the nearly two years since the
ouster of Hosni Mubarak’s autocratic regime.
The turnout was the second lowest of the
relentless series of five nationwide elections that
Egyptians have been called to in the 22 months
since Mubarak’s fall in last year’s popular upris-
ing. The highest was nearly 60 percent in the
election of parliament’s lawmaking lower cham-
ber. The lowest was an embarrassing 8 percent
for the vote for the upper chamber, a largely
toothless body that the public cares little about.
World briefs
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Republican
House Speaker John Boehner is
offering to let taxes rise on wealthy
Americans’ investment income and
dividends as part of a deal to avert
the “fiscal cliff,” officials said
Monday amid signs that President
Barack Obama is ready to make a
key concession of his own in urgent,
high-level negotiations.
On a day the two men met for
about 45 minutes at the White
House, officials said they detected a
receptiveness by the administration
side to proposals to slow the growth
of annual cost-of-living benefits
paid to recipients of Social Security
and other government retirement
programs.
If so, it would show Obama’s
willingness to move toward
Boehner in the
secretive talks
that are unfold-
ing against a
year-end dead-
line. Without
legislation to the
contrary, tax
rates will rise for
nearly all wage
earners and
spending cuts will begin at the
Pentagon and in domestic programs
across government.
Economists inside and outside the
government have warned that the
combination of the two could send
the economy into recession.
Other major issues are part of the
negotiations. Without action by
Congress, for example, long-term
unemployment benefits will expire
for millions at the end of the year,
and doctors will face a cut in the
payments they receive for treating
Medicare patients.
Democrat Obama has also called
for assistance for hard-pressed
homeowners as well as fresh econo-
mist stimulus measures, and some
Democrats want to include a size-
able amount of disaster aid in any
legislation to offset the cost of
Superstorm Sandy.
Officials who disclosed develop-
ments in the cliff talks insisted on
anonymity because they were not
authorized to publicly describe the
secret negotiations.
At the White House, spokesman
Jay Carney sidestepped when asked
about curbing cost-of-living
increases for benefit programs. The
president “is prepared to make
tough choices. He also understands
that his bill will not, as written, like-
ly be what the final compromise, if
there is one, looks like,” he said.
Obama showing some flexibility
Barack Obama
Sen. Daniel Inouye
of Hawaii dead at 88
WASHINGTON — Sen. Daniel
Inouye of Hawaii, the influential
Democrat who broke racial barriers on
Capitol Hill died Monday. He was 88.
Inouye, a senator since January
1963, was currently the longest serving
senator. His office said Monday that he
died of respiratory complications at a
Washington-area hospital.
Inouye was a World War II hero and
Medal of Honor winner. He became the
first Japanese-American to serve in
Congress, when he was elected to the
House in 1959, the year Hawaii
became a state.
Rep. Tim Scott picked to
replace DeMint in Senate
COLUMBIA, S.C. — Gov. Nikki
Haley appointed Rep. Tim Scott to the
U.S. Senate on Monday, making him
the South’s first black Republican sen-
ator since Reconstruction in a state
whose politics is steeped in the history
of slavery and Civil War.
He’ll become only the fourth black
Republican in Senate history and the
only black Republican in Congress,
after Rep. Allen West of Florida lost his
re-election bid last month.
Unisex Easy-Bake
oven on the way
PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Hasbro says
it will soon reveal a gender-neutral
Easy-Bake Oven after meeting with
13-year-old McKenna Pope of
Garfield, N.J., who started a campaign
calling on the toy maker to make one
that appeals to all kids.
She got more than 40,000 signatures
on her online petition at Change.org to
make a gender-neutral oven and to
include boys in the ads.
She was prompted to start the peti-
tion after shopping for an Easy-Bake as
a Christmas present for her 4-year-old
brother and finding them only in purple
and pink.
Nation briefs
DATEBOOK 20
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
TUESDAY, DEC. 18
SanMateoCountyNewcomers Club
Luncheon. Noon.WedgewoodBanquet
Center at Crystal Springs Golf Course,
6650 Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Guitar sing-along. Checks must have
been sent in by Dec. 12 in order to
attend. For more information call 286-
0688.
TasteforModernism: DocentLecture.
7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. This docent
presentation will review selections from
the William S. Paley Collection at the
Museum of Modern Art in New York on
exhibit at the deYoung Museum. Free.
For more information go to smcl.org.
BethlehemA.D.6p.m.to9:30p.m.1305
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. 2012
marks the 20th year of Bethlehem A.D.,
a South Bay Christmas tradition for the
entire family. There will be costumed
actors, music and more. Free. For more
information go to
http://www.BethlehemAD.com.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 19
Medical Center andSantatoDeliver
Toys to Kids at Local Shelter. 2 p.m.
First Step for Families Shelter, 325 Villa
Terrace, San Mateo. Santa and the San
Mateo Medical Center’s Mobile Dental
Clinic will deliver toys donated by the
Golden Gate Harley Owners Group and
San Mateo Medical Center staff. For
more information go to
www.sanmateomedicalcenter.org.
SanMateoPublicLibraryPresentsLas
Posadas. 6 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, First Floor, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo.This Library Program celebrates
a Latin American cultural tradition for
thewholefamily,includingacandlelight
procession,music,refreshments,stories
and crafts. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Terry Hiatt and Friends. 7 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5.
For more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, DEC. 20
Annual Christmas Dinner. 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Little House, 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. $9. For more information
and to register call 326-2025.
FRIDAY, DEC. 21
Holidayparty. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Dancing with
the Swing Shift band and a ham lunch.
For more information or tickets call 616-
7150.
BethlehemAD. 6 p.m.to 9:30 p.m.1305
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Walk
through a village of costumed
characters and animals and experience
ancient Bethlehem. Free. For more
information call 368-3821 or go to
www.BethlehemAD.com.
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha
Cha Cha. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway,Redwood City.$10.For more
informationgotowww.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, DEC. 22
‘BigRiver’atTheatreworks.2 p.m.and
8 p.m.This Tony Award-winning musical
brings Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures.Ticket prices
start at $27. For more information and
to order tickets call 463-1960.
Bruce Steivel’s ‘Nutcracker’ with
Peninsula Ballet Theatre. 4 p.m. Fox
Theatre,2223 Broadway,Redwood City.
Followingthefinale,audiencemembers
are invited on-stage to meet the
dancers. Doors open one hour prior to
performance.Tickets range from $20 to
$50 based on age and seating area. For
more information visit
bev@peninsulaballet.org.
Elvin Bishop. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway,Redwood City.$25.For more
informationgotowww.clubfoxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, DEC. 23
Bruce Steivel’s ‘Nutcracker’ with
Peninsula Ballet Theatre. 2 p.m. Fox
Theatre,2223 Broadway,Redwood City.
Followingthefinale,audiencemembers
are invited on-stage to meet the
dancers. Doors open one hour prior to
performance.Tickets range from $20 to
$50 based on age and seating area. For
more information visit
bev@peninsulaballet.org.
‘BigRiver’atTheatreworks. 2 p.m.and
7 p.m.This Tony Award-winning musical
brings Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures.Ticket prices
start at $27. For more information and
to order tickets call 463-1960.
SolsticeSingsfortheHolidays:Church
of theEpiphany,SanCarlos.3p.m.to4:30
p.m. Church of the Epiphany, 1839
Arryoyo Ave., San Carlos. Hear Solstice’s
live performance of their just-released,
first holiday recording,“Winter Solstice.”
Donations accepted at the door. For
more information call 415-450-8437.
MONDAY, DEC. 24
WorshipServices. Noon, 4:30 p.m.and
10 p.m. First Presbyterian Church of
Burlingame, 1500 Easton Drive,
Burlingame. Communion Worship
Service at noon,Family Worship Service
at 4:30 p.m., Candlelight Communion
WorshipServiceat 10p.m.Free.For more
information call 342-0875 or go to
www.burlpress.org.
‘BigRiver’atTheatreworks. 7:30 p.m.
ThisTonyAward-winningmusical brings
Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures.Ticket prices
start at $27. For more information and
to order tickets call 463-1960.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 26
TheVolkerStriflerBand.ClubFox,2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
informationgotowww.clubfoxrwc.com.
‘BigRiver’atTheatreworks. 7:30 p.m.
ThisTonyAward-winningmusical brings
Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures.Ticket prices
start at $27. For more information and
to order tickets call 463-1960.
THURSDAY, DEC. 27
Senior Lunch Talk: Coping with the
Holidays. Noon. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. This
month’s health talk will explore the
holiday blues, its origins and possible
solutions.The presentation will be given
by Rev. Tom Harshman, the director of
spiritual care and mission integration at
Sequoia Hospital. Lunch will be served.
Free. For more information go to
smcl.org.
Calendar
Big companies like Hewlett-Packard threw parties. Service
clubs met. A lot of engagements and receptions were held. One
actual wedding was even held on the deck.
The restaurant had theme nights — Sundays were Mexican
Night, Uccelli remembered — and multiple generations held
jobs. At its peak, the restaurant had 102 employees and its
alumni include many in the community, such as former mayor
Dani Gasparini.
“It was a real family affair,” Uccelli said. “And it was a lot of
fun.”
Uccelli herself served worked in the office but filled in as a
waitress when needed. Her husband was also a jack-of-all-
trades as necessary, serving as busboy or host.
But the restaurant business is from sunrise to sunset and
Uccelli said after a long run Pete wanted to do other things
which is what led to its sale.
Uccelli, 84, died in September 2005, leaving the land to
Paula. Her effort to make good on what she and others say was
his long dream to develop the area is what has now pitted the
tenants against her and Redwood City officials. The Planning
Commission on Oct. 30 granted a planned development permit
and parking exception for the proposal by developer Pauls
Corporation to build 411 multi-family housing units in build-
ings between three and five stories, a community pool and
approximately 263 slips in a private marina. All existing com-
mercial operations at the marina will cease and any future boat
mooring limited to apartment tenants.
Opponents of the idea argue the plan is moving too fast with-
out public input, does away with precious affordable housing
and eliminates a historical and cultural resource of Redwood
City. The groups more recently have said Uccelli owes the
state 28 years of back rent and the area should be included in
the Inner Harbor Precise Plan. Uccelli attorney, Ted Hannig,
said the state never accepted her money which was then placed
into a bank account. They are now trying to resolve the state’s
request for interest and penalties with the California State
Lands Commission.
But while Uccelli looks to settling the present situation and
seeing through her husband’s plan for the future of his harbor,
she certainly has fond memories of the past including the icon-
ic restaurant.
“If the walls could talk,” she said.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email: michelle@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
PETE’S
rely on unbudgeted overtime and will cost at least $1.4 million
per year more than Cal Fire over the next five years, recall pro-
ponents said.
But Mackintosh, Alifano and Riddell contend Cal Fire is not
responsive to the needs of the coast and would be better served
by having a fire chief who answers directly to the board.
The recall election in the county will be the first in Tom’s 10-
year history of working in the elections office, he told the Daily
Journal.
The last time any recall election was held in the county was
in 2003 when Gray Davis, the state’s former governor, was
ousted from office, Tom said.
“In my time in the county, I have not been involved in a
recall election,” Tom said.
The Coastside Fire Protection District serves Half Moon
Bay, the unincorporated areas of Half Moon Bay and the unin-
corporated communities of Miramar, El Granada, Princeton-
by-the-Sea, Moss Beach and Montara.
Previously, the Half Moon Bay Fire Protection District and
Point Montara Fire Protection District provided service on the
coast but the two consolidated in 2007 to form the Coastside
Fire Protection District.
Marshall Ketchum, who heads the recall effort, wants to stay
with Cal Fire and turned in nearly 10,000 signatures in October
to the County Elections Office to have the three directors oust-
ed after they voted in July to form a stand-alone fire depart-
ment and to start searching for a new fire chief.
Prior to Cal Fire’s arrival, fire departments on the coast were
a costly mess resulting in more than $1.2 million in lawsuit set-
tlements and legal fees as well as high turnover and poor
morale, Moss Beach resident Mike Gaynes previously told the
Daily Journal. Gaynes was one of the early supporters of the
recall effort along with Ketchum.
Previously, the Half Moon Bay Fire Protection District and
Point Montara Fire Protection District provided service on the
coast but the two consolidated in 2007 to form the Coastside
Fire Protection District.
Prior to the consolidation, the Half Moon Bay Fire
Protection District was beset with operational, labor manage-
ment, morale and legal issues, according to the civil grand jury
report released in April.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silverfarb@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
RECALL
for the property earlier this year since it was determined that the
use may have been discontinued but not intentionally abandoned.
Residents in the area want the store gone because they say it
will attract crime, increase traffic and be a danger to children.
They are also upset with the abrupt end of a public process start-
ed in February when Portfolio Development Partners sought a
zoning code amendment to keep the market use in place.
The competing legal opinion ended that process, however, and
the 7-Eleven opened rather quickly after building permits were
issued.
Mayor David Lim started a process to terminate the legal non-
conforming use of the property but that would have given 7-
Eleven at least two years to operate on the site.
The process the city is undertaking now will determine whether
7-Eleven is indeed a legal non-conforming use of the land such as
Stangelini’s was. If it is not, the store will have to close sooner.
Councilman Jack Matthews will have to recuse himself from
the public hearing process since his architectural firm did some
work for Portfolio for the 7-Eleven site.
The San Mateo Planning Commission meets 7:30 p.m., tonight,
City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silverfarb@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
PROTEST
Matteucci. The student was then put on a 72-hour hold, he said.
“We feel fairly confident that he does not have access to
weapons,” said Matteucci, who advised parents and kids to
remain vigilant when it comes to possible threats.
Holleran’s message said the student will be under supervi-
sion and increased security was at the school on Monday. After
the voicemail went out, several parents called Burlingame
police Sunday with safety concerns.
This isn’t the first time Burlingame High has dealt with a
threat from a student.
Christine Nicole Azzolino sent a threatening email at 2 p.m.
Feb. 10 from a fellow student’s email account. The boy whose
account the email originated from had his possessions
searched. Police ultimately figured out that Azzolino actually
sent the message from the boy’s account. It was determined
there was no actual intent to follow through on the threat.
In September, Azzolino, then 19, was sentenced to 15 days
jail, 32 hours of community service and probation for making
false explosives reports. Last month, she was ordered to pay
nearly $5,000 for the cost of the emergency response.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email: heather@smdailyjour-
nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
THREAT
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- For reasons over
which they’ll have no control, the people whom you
depend on might fail you. Your objective might be
harder to reach on your own, but you’ll handle it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You might have
to guard against doing things in half measures, but
once you realize the stakes at play, hesitation won’t
be a problem.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you’re not
careful, you might be a trife extravagant with your
resources. This is acceptable, provided you aren’t
equally as generous with someone else’s money.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There is nothing
wrong with having some fun and enjoying yourself,
as long as you don’t treat serious matters lightly,
especially those pertaining to your career.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Be careful about what
you tell others, because if you reveal the wrong
things to the wrong person, instead of unburdening
yourself, you might create more trouble.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Be positive and build
up your hopes, but also be realistic, because if you
aren’t, all you’ll do is make more misery for yourself.
Don’t use your imagination as an instrument of
disappointment.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Something you thought
to be shoo-in could prove far more diffcult to pull
off than anticipated. This can be an extremely
rewarding day for you if you don’t take anything for
granted and put in the work.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You don’t want to
hurt anybody’s feelings, naturally, but it might be
far kinder to be forthright instead of painting a rosy
picture that leads to false expectations.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Certain commercial
matters could prove to be far more complicated than
they appear, so be prepared for anything. If you’re
cautions and prudent, you should do just fne.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you start seeking an
easy out, you might fnd only diffculty. By trying to
duck challenges, you might only create more.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Usually, you’re the type
of person who likes to think a few steps ahead of the
game. Keep it up, as careful forethought will be vital
to a successful day.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your reasoning
regarding a joint matter is likely to be a shade
sounder than that of your counterpart. Listen to his
or her views, because one could be good, but don’t
discount your judgment.

COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-18-12
MONDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Daddy Warbucks’ servant
4 Hayseed
8 Throng
12 Regret
13 In a frenzy
14 Adams or Brickell
15 Memento
17 Ali of literature
18 Pancake topper
19 Huge volumes
20 Caustic
22 Salary limit
23 Tampa Bay 11
26 “Da” opposite
28 Acquired
31 Helm position
32 Brash songster
33 Tooth-puller’s org.
34 MSNBC rival
35 Night hunter
36 Burglar’s “key”
37 Derby, e.g.
38 Sushi bar soup
39 Cheers for matadors
40 -- -Tiki
41 Wassail alternative
43 Down mood
46 Spring fragrance
50 Arizona city
51 Fragile
54 Shower
55 Prof’s place
56 Encyclo-pedia bk.
57 Clothing
58 -- noire
59 Invoice no.
DOwN
1 Places of refuge
2 Chop --
3 One’s equal
4 Hoarse
5 Emma in “The Avengers”
6 -- choy
7 Scratch out a living
8 Kind of jazz
9 Wax-coated cheese
10 Intuition
11 Some votes
16 Nurse’s concern
19 Make lace like granny
21 Urge or prohibit
22 Sri Lanka, formerly
23 Fugue master
24 Arm bone
25 Dollar fraction
27 Swerves
28 Liverpool poky
29 Comics pooch
30 Tiny amounts
36 Mr. Spock’s forte
38 Calendar divs.
40 Mongol rulers
42 Martini extra
43 Polar explorer
44 Kauai feast
45 Surrounded by
47 Volcanic rock
48 Basic bit
49 Early Irishman
51 Copy a cassette
52 Vane dir.
53 Found a perch
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Tuesday• Dec. 18, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PLUMBING -
GUARANTEED INTERVIEW
We need ENTRY LEVEL and SKILLED employees!!!
No experience? Looking for a career? Have you considered the plumbing industry?
Get paid while you train!!!!!
Already a Skilled Plumber or Drain Tech? We’re looking for you, too! We’re more
than just a rooter company.
• Uniforms, Tools, and Vehicle provided
• Top Techs can earn 60K to 80K per year
• Paid time off
• Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Apply in person at 1100
Trousdale Dr., Burlingame.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ENGINEER
Company: KMS Service Inc.
Location: Foster City, CA
Position Type: Full-time
Experience: Unspecified
Education: Bachelor’s
\Mail to: Network Sys/App Servers/Net-
work Modeling, etc. Job #KMSKH02,
KMS Service, 1065 E. Hillsdale Blvd,
#301, Foster City, CA 94404
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
PIZZA DELIVERY DRIVER All shifts
available. Apply in person at Windy City
Pizza, 35 Bovet Rd. San Mateo, CA
94402. Must speak English, Good
Driving Record.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SECURITY OFFICERS -
Traditional Security Officers
(San Carlos)
G4S Secure Solutions seeks
officers that are at least18
years or older with proof of
high school diploma or equiva-
lent. Must be able to pass a
background check. Drug test-
ing required. CA Guard Card
required.
Please visit the local office
or fill out our online
application at
www.usajobs.g4s.com
Walk-ins are welcome
M-F, 8:30am-5pm
100 Century Center Court,
Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95112
408.453.4133
EOE • MFDV • DFWP
110 Employment
SOFTWARE -
Systems Engineer. Asurion,
LLC, San Mateo, CA. Respon-
sible for the configuration, in-
stallation and day-to-day admin-
istration of various portions of
Mobile Applications Team's
global production Network. Will
function as part of an implemen-
tation team on large projects,
and may provide service and
support for smaller projects. Will
also serve as an internal esca-
lation point to support and trou-
bleshoot network problems for
various departments Bachelor's
degree in any science field, or
foreign equivalent, plus 2 years
Cisco networking experience, to
include 2 years Linux/Unix sys-
tem administration experience;
Excellent knowledge and ap-
plied experience in network se-
curity including firewall, authen-
tication services and VPN; Ex-
cellent Communications Skills
both written and verbal; Exten-
sive knowledge and experience
with data center network infra-
structure. Send resume: Kent
DeVinney, 1400 Fashion Island
Blvd., Suite 450,San Mateo, CA
94404
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 518133
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Rinaldo JosephTrofem
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Rinaldo Joseph Trofem filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Rinaldo Joseph Trofem
Proposed name: Rinaldo Joseph Labate
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 25,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 12/13/2012
/s/ Beth Larson Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 11/26/2012
(Published, 12/18/12, 12/25/12,
01/01/13, 01/08/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253245
The following person is doing business
as: Learningtech.org, 252 Devonshire
Blvd., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is here-
by registered by the following owner: The
Miller Institute for Learning with Technol-
ogy, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
4/11/2000.
/s/ Mark L. Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/12, 12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252979
The following person is doing business
as: Fog City Optical, 901 Campus Drive,
Suite 109, DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Peninsula Ophthalmology Group, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Kenneth C. Chern /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/12, 12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253052
The following person is doing business
as: Mishimi, 611 Miller Ave., PACIFICA,
CA 94044 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Michelle A. Likens, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Michelle Likens /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/27/12, 12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253268
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Slant Collections, 2)Clay Art, 389
Oyster Point Blvd., Ste. 6, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Formation
Brands LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/12/2012.
/s/ Mark Towery /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253253
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Tripmavens, 322 28th Avenue,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Emily
Sena, same address and Angela Kalay-
jian, 164 Winding Way, San Carlos, CA
94070. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 11/06/2012.
/s/ Angela Kalayjian /
/s/ Emily Sena /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253241
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Elegant Beauty Center, 2)Elegant
Beauty Hair Salon, 16 Hillcrest Blvd.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Elsa
Cheung, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Elsa Cheung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12).
23 Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253173
The following person is doing business
as: Del Motors, 308 7th Avenue, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mike Del Rosar-
io, 1440 Lodi Avenue, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Mike Del Rosario /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253427
The following person is doing business
as: Red Coconut, 1088A Shell Blvd.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Chula
Thai Cuisine, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Compa-
ny. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Piyawaj Naarvom /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/04/12, 12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253522
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Crystal Springs Apartments
West, 27 Crystal Springs Road, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Jeff Tateosian,
466 Cumberland Rd., Burlingame, CA
94010 and Joni Amaroli, 80 Country Club
Dr., Hillsborough, CA 94010. The busi-
ness is conducted by Co-Partners. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 11/04/2012.
/s/ Jeff Tateosian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/11/12, 12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253543
The following person is doing business
as: Breath of Life Center for Healing &
Tranformation, 311 Lakeview Way,
EMERALD HILLS, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mary
S. Smith, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Mary S. Smith /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253621
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Reflex Engineering, 2) Reflex Con-
struction, 1308 Rollins Road, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Reflex Engineer-
ing, Inc., CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/18/2011.
/s/ Syed Husain /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253285
The following person is doing business
as: Point & Shoot Photography, 850
Edgehill Drive, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Jonalene Chan, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jonalene Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253624
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Chem Dry, 101 Industrial
Road, #9, BELMONT, CA 94002 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Mi-
chael H. Goff, 1860 Ogden Dr., #204,
Burlingame, CA 94010. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Michael H. Goff /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253352
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Kprox, 423 Broadway Ave.,
Suite 411, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Norman I. Kontorovsky & Miliarist V.
Kontorovsky, 932 Peninsula Ave., #207,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The business is
conducted by Husband & Wife. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/02/2005.
/s/ Norman I. Kontorovsky /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253629
The following person is doing business
as: Miss Bess Hair & Nails, 84 3rd Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Van T.
Dang, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Van T. Dang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/18/12, 12/25/12, 01/01/12, 01/08/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Sheldon W. Abrams
Case Number PRO122917
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Sheldon W. Abrams. A
Petition for Probate has been filed by
Steven J. Blackwell in the Superior Court
of California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that Steven
J. Blackwell be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
203 Public Notices
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: January 7, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. If you object to the granting of
the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Kenneth E. Mitchell, Esq., SBN 54150
Mitchell & Courts, LLP
1001 Marina Village Parkway,Ste.400
Alameda, CA 94501
(510)523-5272
Dated: December 6, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 11, 18, 25, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND CHIHUAHUA mix Terrier tan
male near West Lake shopping Center in
Daly City (415)254-5975
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Gold rim glasses, between 12th
& 14th Ave. in San Mateo on 12/9/12,
(650)867-1122
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST SET of keys. Down town San Ma-
teo. 8 to 10 keys on Key chain including
Lincoln car key, kodatrue@gmail.com
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., (650)342-8436
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., (650)342-8436
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $50 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. SOLD!
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE “Off to the
Moon”, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, SOLD!
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
298 Collectibles
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
303 Electronics
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34”W, 22”D, 16”H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$99 (650)315-5902
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
24
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Butts (into)
5 Zodiac transition
point
9 Ambition
14 “On the
Waterfront”
director Kazan
15 “A Death in the
Family” author
James
16 Big name in real
estate
17 “Syndrome” that
causes
smartphone
typos
19 Dangerous
bacteria
20 Unbroken
21 “What’s the __?”:
“Same thing”
23 Trying to break
an NFL tie
24 Dorothy clicked
their heels to
return to Kansas
27 “Understood!”
30 “Milk’s favorite
cookie”
31 Vittles
32 Setting for many
King novels
35 Big Pharma
regulator
38 Big gun lobby:
Abbr.
39 Word that can
follow the first
words of 17-, 24-,
50- and 62-
Across
41 Casual greetings
42 Devious
43 “Tomorrow”
musical
44 Tries to win
45 Math subj.
47 Temporary visit
50 Biker jacket
material
54 Campus military
prog.
55 PC key
56 Tyrant
60 First of 12
62 Evil genius’s foe
64 Range
65 Boy or girl lead-in
66 Agenda unit
67 He’s coming to
town soon
68 Four quarters
69 Overtake
DOWN
1 Loan
adjustment, for
short
2 Arkin of “Argo”
3 Baseball glove
4 Jungle
adventures
5 “Impossible!”
6 Sheepskin boots
trademark
7 Garden plantings
8 Danger
9 Dr. of rap
10 Cooking
instructions
11 Politician’s “We
have the same
goals”
12 Bravery
13 Departures
18 Critical hosp.
areas
22 Apple on iTunes?
25 Oman neighbor
26 Game to go after
27 Hankerings
28 British peer
29 Time off spent at
home
33 “Just __ figured!”
34 Latin clarifier
36 Departure point
37 Homeowners’
gp., e.g.
39 Discuss it
40 Mom’s brother
44 Church activity
46 Receive
willingly
48 “Mercy me!”
49 Heckle
50 Military bigwigs
51 “Bodas de
Sangre”
playwright
García __
52 College
application part
53 Like some angles
57 Anti-fur org.
58 Loads from lodes
59 Alley prowlers
61 The Red or the
Black
63 Mom-and-pop gp.
By Ki Lee
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/18/12
12/18/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 10x30”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
306 Housewares
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , SOLD!
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor $99 (650)315-5902
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, Best Offer,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOOD DEHYDRATOR made by
Damark, 5 trays, works good. $30.00
(650)367-8146
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT - Book ti-
tled “Fire Mountain”, reasonable, 380
pages, wine country story, adventure,
love & life, $2.00 each, (650)583-2595
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KENNEL - small size, good for small
size dog or cat, 23" long 14" wide &
141/2" high, $25. FIRM (650)871-7200
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, $60.obo, (650)589-
8348
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 (650)341-1728
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WHEELCHAIR - Used indoors only, 4
months old, $99., (650)345-5446
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$60., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
UPRIGHT BASS 3/4 size, SHEN SB100
with bag and stand and DBL Bass bug-
gie, all new $2000, OBO
wilbil94204@yahoo.com
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
312 Pets & Animals
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
25 Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
312 Pets & Animals
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
316 Clothes
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
FLOOR BASEBOARDS - Professionally
walnut finished, 6 room house, longest
13’- 3/8” x 1 3/8”, SOLD!
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
CALLAWAY GOLF Clubs Hawkeye
Irons, Graphite Shafts, # 4 thru P/W
Excellent Condition $79 SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
YOGA VIDEOS (2) - Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES &
PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
2000 CHEVY camaro standard transmis-
sion $2000 call dave at (650)344-9462
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$1950. obo, (650)465-6056
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
orSOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
670 Auto Parts
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
MERCEDES TOOL KIT - 1974, 10
piece, original, like new condition, SOLD!
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
THE COLLEGE
of SAN MATEO
OFFERS
EVENING SOCIAL BALLROOM &
SWING DANCE CLASSES at the
BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE
LEVELS
Starting Jan. 14, 2013
• fees average $4.70 per class
• go to http://collegeofsanmateo.edu
• or call
(650) 574-6420
or Email
waltonj@smccd.edu for more info
26
Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 •
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
HVAC
HRAC HEATING & APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153 (408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
27 Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
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Tuesday • Dec. 18, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL