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Table of contents.

131. One of a kind.
134. On the rebound.
137. Perfection.
140. Paradoxical commandments.
143. The cost of a miracle.
146. Rooftop refections.
149. Squirrel power.
152. Sparrow at Starbucks.
155. For happy living.
158. Small woman great faith.
161. The big rocks.
164. Lights and the beacon.
167. The bridge builder.
170. The Christmas glow.
173. The eye of faith.
176. The cross in the bus station.
181. The day Peter ran.
184. The two parables
(The janitor and the CEO.)
191. The house on the hill.
194. The letter.
197. The lifesaver in his pocket.
200. The power of encouragement.
203. The matchless pearl.
208. The Rose.
211. The stuff I don’t like.
214. The stuff heaven is made of.
219. The Tangled bird.
222. The treasure.
225. The third day.
228. The Water.
231. Through the storm.
235. The wedding bullet.
238. Unintentional maintenance oversight.
241. Turning trials into treasure.
244. Does Jesus care?
247. Who’s packing your parachute?
250. Wise leadership.
253. Words that work.
1. Ten tips for stress free work
4. A lesson from a Robin
7. Love that began in Heaven
10. Ah the simple life.
13. A mustard seed.
18 Death of Horseshoes.
21. Correcting without being critical.
24. Can we understand God?
27. Amelia’s new friend.
30 Don’t we all?
33. Building a life.
36. Failure no such thing.
39. Believe.
42. Faith Works.
45. Give a rose.
48. Finding faith.
51. Go slow you’ll get there quicker.
54. Gold fever.
59. He knows.
62. The Diary.
65. God’s resume.
68. His secret stairs.
71. God at the wheel.
74. Hope Eternal.
77. How to cope.
82. How far does a little love go?
85. I was here frst.
89. If I had faked the resurrection.
95. Judgment in a cornfeld.
98. Be a people person.
101. It comes back to you.
106. John did it.
109. Life’s little pleasures.
112. Making things right.
115. Loving kindness is twice blessed.
119. My prayers for you this Christmas.
122. My life preserver.
125. No problem.
128. The oil lamp and the lighthouse.
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number
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number
Story title. Story title.
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Get along with people. "Low-stress employees invari-
ably have smooth working relationships with prac-
tically everyone," Mercer said. To achieve this, fnd
things you have in-common with others and act friendly
with "absolutely everybody"--from the president down to
those who clean the ofce.
Always be diplomatic and tactful. Avoid acting an-
grily or impatiently even when you're frustrated. "Ex-
pressing anger in the workplace usually results in di-
rect or indirect retaliation, which surely increases stress,"
Mercer said.
Learn what is expected of you. Find out your boss's
expectations of you and the expectations of your
boss's boss. "Tese people will make or break your ca-
reer and greatly afect your stress levels," Mercer said. "By
meeting their expectations you simultaneously can get
ahead plus decrease a possible cause of stress."
Be a team player with your boss and co-workers.
"Team players are appreciative and receive much less
grief than employees who act rebelliously or act like
loners," he said.
Give three compliments a day at work. "People love
receiving compliments and will try to make your life
easier since you made them feel good with a compli-
ment," Mercer said. "Tey'll remember the compliment
when you ask for a favor."
Set goals for yourself--personal and work-related.
High-stress people rarely do things to accomplish
their goals. Low-stress people, on the other hand,
spend more than half their time doing things that help
them achieve their short-term or long-term goals.
To determine how much time you devote to achieve
goals, write down everything you did in the past seven days.
On a separate paper, list three short-term goals (to achieve
in the next three months) and three long-term goals (to
achieve in three years). Ten go back to your seven-day list
and note anything that helped you accomplish short-term
or long-term goals.
"Typically people spend less than fve percent of
their time doing activities that will achieve their goals,"
Mercer said. "People feel more frustrated when they don't
accomplish their goals."
Prepare a daily "to-do" list. "Every day before leaving
work, write a list of what you need to do the next work
day," Mercer said. Tat little bit of organization can
help prevent you from being overwhelmed by tasks that
need to be done.
Keep a neat desk or work space. We're not talking ob-
sessive neatness here. Mercer said his desk is nine by
four feet--all of which is covered with paper except for
a 2-by-2-foot space in front of him. He reserves that space
for things he is working on at that moment.
Exercise at least a little every day. Even a 10-minute
walk will help. "People bottle up emotional tension or
stress in their muscles," Mercer said. By exercising a
little, you can release emotional and physical stress--and be
more clearheaded when deciding how to tackle a stressful
situation.
REFLECTIONS
ips for Stress-Free Work
According to Michael Mercer, an industrial psychologist
Consider changing jobs. "If the above nine tips
don't help you, then it may be time to fnd a new
job," Mercer said. If all else fails, Mercer cites an
ofen-used quote: "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the
kitchen."


No matter how much pressure you feel at work, if
you could fnd ways to relax for at least fve minutes every
hour, you'd be more productive. Most stress we bring on
ourselves through bad habits and bad attitudes. Take a
pencil and paper and write down everything in your day
that produces stress, checking the aggravations that create
the greatest stress. Analyze all the ways you might change
these situations. If you talked with a co-worker, would it
ease the stress? If you got up half an hour earlier, could you
stop running and take time to walk, or even stroll? Do you
exercise at least twenty minutes a day? If you don't, you
should, because it will relieve stress and allow you to work
and sleep better.--Dr. Joyce Brothers
Physiologists have shown that one reason peo-
ple are touchy, easily insulted or grieved, is that they go
through life with jaws set, faces strained and muscles
tense. Tis causes them to jump at the slightest noise, or
the slightest insult to their egos. Tey say their nerves are
on edge, but it is mainly their muscles, from eyelids to toes,
that are jumping. When all your muscles are relaxed and
at ease, your nerves and ego will also be at ease. -- Albert
Edward Wiggam

(UPI) Worker stress in the U.S. has tripled since
1995 and is a major factor in those workdays that are
missed, we are told in CCH's ninth annual “Unscheduled
Absence Survey” published in September of 1999. Stress
is responsible for nearly a ffh of all no-shows, the sur-
vey reports, up 316 percent from 1995. Te survey, which
queried 305 human resources executives across the U.S.,
estimates absenteeism costs employers an average $603
per employee per year. For some large companies that can
total as much as $3.4 million annually
(Topic: Stress.)
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10 Tips for stress free work.
Glossary.
1. Invariably. Never changing, always the same.
2. In-common. Tings that you have that are of a mutual interest with another person
3. Absolutely. Totally, completely
4. Diplomatic. Concerned with, or skilled in international relations.
5. Retaliation. To repay, to get revenge
6. Expectation. Anticipation. To look forward to.
7. Simultaneously. Existing, occurring or functioning at the same time.
8. Appreciative. To admire something highly.
9. Rebellious. To oppose or disobey (one in ) authority or control.
10. Loner. A person or animal that prefers solitude.
11. Compliments. An expression of esteem, respecy, afection or admiration.
12. Favor. Friendly regard shown towards another, especially by a superior.
13. Achieve. To carry out successfully, accomplish.
14. Long-term. Occuring over or involving a relatively long period of time.
15. Typically. Combining or exhibiting the essential characteristics.
16. Organization. As association, society, organization or being organized.
17. Overwhelm. To cover over completely, to overcome by superior force.
18. Obsessive. Excessive to the point of abnormality.
19. Emotional. Inclined to show (excessive) emotion.
20. Relax. To make less tense or rigid.
21. Productive. Having the quality or power of producing, especially in abundance.
22. Aggravate. To make worse or more severe, intensify unpleasantly.
23. Analyze. Examination and identifcation of the constituents of a complex whole and their
relationship one to another.
24. C0-worker. Te worker more than one working or operating the job together.
25. Physiologist. A person who studies a branch of biology that deals with the functions and
activities of life or of living matter.
26. Insulted. To behave with pride or arrogance, vaunted.
27. Grieved. To cause pain or distress, to sufer grief,sorrow, especially over bereavement.
28. Ego. Self-esteem, philosophy of self.
29. Unscheduled. Not scheduled, not in a proper order of something.
30. Queried. A question, enquiring, a question in a mind, a doubt.
31. Absenteeism. Persistent and deliberate absence from worker duty.

Points to ponder.
(A) Tere are two important things that low stress people have that makes it easier for them to get
along with others. What are they?
(B) Why is it important to give a few compliments each day?
(C) How does exercise help to lessen stress?
REFLECTIONS
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REFLECTI ONS
Faith and trust.
Are not five sparrows sold for two copper coins? And not one of them is forgotten
before God. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do not fear therefore;
you are of more value than many sparrows.
Therefore I say to you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat; nor about
the body, what you will put on.
Life is more than food, and the body is more than clothing.
Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse
nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds?
And which of you by worrying can add one cubit to his stature?
If you then are not able to do the least, why are you anxious for the rest?
Consider the lilies, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin; and yet I say to you,
even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
If then God so clothes the grass, which today is in the field and tomorrow is thrown
into the oven, how much more will He clothe you, O you of little faith?
But seek the kingdom of God, and all these things shall be added to you.
Do not fear, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the king-
dom.
Sell what you have and give alms; provide yourselves money bags which do not
grow old, a treasure in the heavens that does not fail, where no thief approaches nor
moth destroys.
For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
—Jesus (Luke 12:6-7, 22-28, 31-34, NKJ).
A lesson from a robin
We are often troubled by tomorrow—its duties, its burdens, its demands. In his auto-
biography, Martin Luther writes: “I have one preacher that I love better than any other
on earth: It is my little tame robin. I put crumbs upon my windowsill, especially at
night. He hops onto the windowsill when he wants his supply, and takes as much as
he desires to satisfy his need. From there he always hops to a little tree close by, lifts
up his voice to God, sings his carols of praise and gratitude, tucks his little head
under his wing, and goes fast to sleep. He leaves tomorrow to look after itself. He
is the best preacher that I have on earth.”
T
here once was a man in an insane
asylum whose chief trouble was his
fear that he wouldn’t get his next meal.
As soon as one meal was out of the way,
he began to worry about the next. Most
of his time and strength were consumed
by that one worry. But that man was in
an insane asylum; we are not.
Said the Robin to the Sparrow:
“I should really like to know
Why these anxious human beings
Rush about and worry so.”
Said the Sparrow to the Robin,
“Friend, I think that it must be
That they have no heavenly Father
Such as cares for you and me.”
—Elizabeth Cheney
Jesus teaches us about treasures in Heaven
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A Lesson from a robin.
Glossary.
1. Burdens. Something that is carried, a load, a duty or a responsibility, wearisome.
2. Autobiography. Te biography of a person written by him/herself.
3. Crumbs. Small fragments, especially of bread
4. Robin. A small plump European bird (that is closely related to thrushes and has a brownish
olive back and orange –red throat).
5. Desires. To long, to hope for.
6. Satisfy. To make content to please.
7. Tucks. To draw or gather up into a fold or folded position.
8. Carols. To sing, especially in a joyful manner, a song of joy or mirth.
9. Insane. Mentally disordered, mad.
10. Asylum. An inviolable place of refuge and protection, formerly giving shelter to criminals or
fugitives.
11. Consumed. To use or use up, to eat or drink, especially in great quantity.
12. Sparrow. Any of several small dull coloured songbirds.
13. Raven. A very large,glossy black bird.
14. Sow. To plant seeds.
15. Reap. To cut and gather (a crop) with a sickle.
16. Cubit. Any of various ancient units of length. Based on the length of the forearm from the
elbow to the tip on the middle fnger.
17. Stature. Natural height (e.g. of a person) in an upright position.
18. Lily. Any of various plants with showy fowers.
19. Alms. Money, food, etc, given to help the poor.

Points to ponder.
(A) Martin Luther said that he had one preacher that he loved more than others on earth. What
exactly was he talking about?
(B) Why does it seem pointless to worry about the future, like the man in the insane asylum.
(C) Some of the main causes for anxiety are fear of the future, remorse for mistakes of the past and
the unknown. A Bible verse quoted in this context says. “Terefore I say to you do not worry
about your life, what you will eat, nor about your body, what you will put on. We are encouraged
to compare ourselves with the birds of the air or the fowers of the feld.”
REFLECTIONS
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(love that began in Heaven)
.¸._¸-_..
7
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
he German philosopher and scholar Moses Men-
delssohn (1729¬-86), was born a hunchback. De-
spite this deformity, which could have soured him on life
forever, Mendelssohn achieved maturity and wisdom.
While on a trip to Hamburg as a young man,
Mendelssohn met a rich merchant who had a beautiful
young daughter, Frumtje. Te young man fell hopelessly
in love with her. She too was mature beyond her years,
and despite his obvious physical defect, she was attracted
to his gentleness, his charm, and his brilliant mind.
Mendelssohn stayed several weeks in Hamburg,
spending much of his time with this lovely girl he had fall-
en in love with at frst sight. When it fnally came time to
leave, he worked up enough nerve to speak to her father.
It was either that or lose her forever.
Te rich and powerful merchant hesitated for
a long time. Mendelssohn fnally asked him to speak his
thoughts frankly. "Well," said the older man, "you are
known throughout Germany as a most brilliant young
man. And yet ... I must tell you my child was a bit fright-
ened when she frst saw you."
"Because I am a hunchback?"
Sadly, the merchant nodded.
Downcast, but not defeated, Mendelssohn asked
only one last favor-the privilege of seeing her once more
before he lef. Admitted to her room, he found her busy
with needlework. He spoke at frst of various matters,
then carefully and gradually, he led the conversation to
the subject that was nearest to his heart. "Do you believe,"
he asked, "that marriages are made in Heaven?"
"Yes," she said, "for that is our faith."
"And it is true," he said gently. "Now let me tell
you about something strange that happened when I was
REFLECTIONS
born. As you know, at a child's birth, according to our tra-
dition, they call out in Heaven that the birth has occurred.
And when it is a boy, they announce, 'Such-and-such boy
will have this or that girl for a wife.'
"Well, there I was, just born, and I heard the name
of my future wife announced. At the same time, I heard
the great far-of voice say, 'Unfortunately, the poor little
girl, Frumtje, will have a terrible hump on her back.'
"Quick as a fash, I cried out, 'O Lord God, if a girl
is hunchbacked, she will grow up bitter and hard. Please
give her hump to me and let her develop into a well-
formed, lovely, and charming young lady.'"
Mendelssohn waited for her reaction. Slowly,
Frumtje looked up. She dropped her needlework, rose,
and approached him with arms outstretched.
Te merchant gave his consent and they were
soon married, living a long and fruitful life together.
-Bits and Pieces

Love means sacrifce as well as pleasure. To be
lasting and genuine, love must be based upon a more en-
during foundation than mere feshly gratifcation. It must
refect an unselfsh innate desire to protect and help and
to make the other happy, a God-given love and a spirit of
self-sacrifce in which each prefers the happiness of the
other to his or her own. Tis is the only love that lasts!
Tis is love, real love, true love-the willingness of
a husband to sacrifce himself for his wife, the eagerness of
a wife to lay down her life for her husband. Tis is super-
natural love, divine love, God's love, more than human!
T
A Love that Began

in Heaven
8
David Brandt Berg
9
A Love that began in heaven.
Glossary.
1. Philosopher. A thinker who seeks wisdom or truth
2. Scholar. Someone who has done advanced study in a special feld.
3. Hunchback. A hump or a crooked back.
4. Deformity. Te state of being deformed.
5. Wisdom. Te thoughtful application of learning.
6. Defect. An imperfection that impairs worth or utility, a shortcoming.
7. Merchant. A buyer and seller of commodities.
8. Hesitated. To be reluctant or unwilling to…..
9. Downcast. Dejected or depressed.
10. Needlework. Sewing or something worked by a needle.
11. Conversation. Informal exchange of ideas, opinions or feelings.
12. Tradition. An inherited pattern of thought or action from one generation to another
13. Announce. To make known publicly, to give notice of the arrival, presence or readiness.
14. Consent. To give assent or approval, agreement to or approval of what is done or proposed by
another.
15. Sacrifce. To give up or lose for the sake of an ideal or end.
16. Enduring. Remaining frm or lasting.
17. Gratifcation. A source of satisfaction or pleasure.
18. Supernatural. Something that is beyond natural behavior or circumstances.
19. Divine. Relating to or proceeding directly from God or a god.
Points to ponder.
(a) In the story, who was born a hunchback?
(b) At frst Frumje did not want to marry Mr. Mendelsson because of his hunch back. What changed her
mind?
(c) From the context of the story write a couple of sentences to explain the meaning of real love.

REFLECTIONS
10
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_q,e_ _e..|._. David Brandt Berg

.q:._.,e._...
R 99, Ah! The Simple Life, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
11
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
Ah the simple life.
Glossary.
1. Tuna. Any of a number of large sea fshes related to the Mackrel.
2. Compliment. An expression of esteem, respect, afection or admiration.
3. Immediate. Acting or being without any intervening agency or factor.
4. Siesta. An afernoon nap or rest.
5. Stroll. To walk in a leisurely or idle manner.
6. Amigos. (Spanish) Friends.
7. M.B.A. Master of Business Administration.
8. Proceeds. Income.
9. Middle men. An intermediary or agent between two parties.
10. Cannery. A factory for canning food.
11. Enterprise. A unit of economic organization or activity.
12. Stocks. Shares of a company sold to the public on the stock exchange.
13. Savoured. Having a special smell or quality.
Points to ponder.
(a) Te Harvard businessman advised the Mexican fsherman how to develop his business and become
rich. Te Mexican fsherman however does not think this is such a good idea. Why not?
(b) One short quote in the story says, “life is not a race, but a journey, to be savoured each step of the
way.” What do you think that this means?
12
REFLECTIONS
rkefnif;aphwpfaph
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a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
R 269, A mustard seed, BUR 13
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
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._-. -..-.¬.. .-.».-_. ±¬._.-_. ¬¸¸.-.... ¬._. ..¸ -..-... -..-.¬
.-_....-... _.-._ ..---¸¸-.¸,
R 270, Our greatest need is love, and love is God's great answer. BUR
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
14
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e¸-_e-.ee÷:±_ ÷q:.±e-¿ _÷._e÷e±: ¬e_ee-_e-±_:

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.-_....-... _.-._ ..---¸¸-.¸,
R 270, Our greatest need is love, and love is God's great answer. BUR
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
15
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
2%&,%#4) /.3
R226 GP-August 2003 Topics: love, Jesus, salvation, healing, faith, courage
M
y family lives in a small town
where everyone knows each other,
at least by sight. My best friend and I were
the town's only hippies, considered crazy
because we always tried to be different, no
matter what people thought.
started to fear and avoid him. He was the last person
I expected to understand this new part of my life. But
three years ago something happened that completely
broke his heart.
My uncle and his wife were in an auto accident. She
died on the spot, in his arms. He had been driving,
and almost lost his job on the police force because of
it. He was in shock and felt very guilty. He never drove
again. For the next two years he was a horrible father
to his 16- and 18-year-old children, cursing and beat-
ing them.
Then in March of 2002, he suddenly got very sick.
He couldn't walk or even stand on his feet anymore.
No doctor could help him because they had no idea
what was wrong. He became even nastier and blamed
everything on his children.
He came to spend a few months in a hospital in
the city where I was living and working with other
members of The Family. Because I was his only rela-
tive in the city, I began visiting him out of duty, but as
rarely as possible. It was then that I realized the desper-
ate situation he was in, but I was still afraid of him.
His tough attitude and the fact that he rejected any
comfort I or anyone else tried to show him didn't help
matters.
For four months he mocked God. His condition
worsened to the point that he was unable to eat. He
broke his right arm and developed tumors on his
lungs. He was completely without hope.
At this time, the Lord showed me that my uncle
was at last ready to receive Him, and that it was time
for me to talk with him about Jesus' personal love for
him. I felt like Jonah when God sent him to the city
of Nineveh to deliver what Jonah expected to be a
very unpopular message-I didn't want to do it! Still,
I felt compelled by the Lord to try, and so prayed for
wisdom and more faith.
I asked the Lord to fulnll His promise in Matthew
10:20, which says, ¨It is not you who speak, but the
Spirit of your Father who speaks in you." So I went
to the hospital. My cousin was also there, helping my
uncle.
The Lord made it easy for me that day. My uncle
was bedridden and in horrible pain. He had big bleed-
$0XVWDUG6HHG
"Y!NGELA-ELINDA2OMANIA
When I received Jesus as my Savior,
I changed. All I wanted to do was serve
Jesus by telling other people how they
could have His love too. I took some
time to explain this to my relatives, as
some of them worked for the police and
could have caused me a lot of problems if
they did not understand my new life.
One uncle who is on the police force
didn't like me because I had been a
hippie. He is a former communist and
a morose, strict man-very hard to talk
to. He spoke against me to my parents
and threatened me over the phone, so I
Jesus asked, ¨How can I describe the
Kingdom of God? It is like a tiny
mustard seed! Though this is one of the smallest of seeds,
yet it grows to become one of the largest of plants, with
long branches where birds can build their nests and be
sheltered." (Mark 4:30-31 TLB)
16
2%&,%#4) /.3
R226 GP-August 2003
Copyright © 2003 by The Family
Topics: love, Jesus, salvation, healing, faith, courage
Angela Melinda is a full-time volunteer with The Family.
David Brandt Berg (1919-1994) was founder of The Family.
If you'd like more inspirational material, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address on this sheet, or visit www.activated.org.
ing wounds all over his body, a side effect
of some of the strong medication he was
on. He didn't have his tough mask on that
day, but admitted that he was helpless.
I started by telling him how the Lord
had helped me in my hardest times, when
I had had nobody else to turn to. I went
on and on, and because he was just listen-
ing, I told him that Jesus wanted to work
in his life, and was trying to get to him
through his sickness. But because he was
resisting the Lord's Spirit, his situation
was getting worse and worse.
Jesus wanted to nrst heal his soul, I
explained. After he got his heart right
with the Lord, He would heal his body.
My uncle listened quietly to everything
I said, only asking every once in a while,
¨Do you really think so?"
He was so responsive and respectful of
everything I said that it seemed unbeliev-
able to me. The Lord even helped me give
him loving correction for how badly he
had treated his children. I thought maybe
I had said too much, but he just nodded.
I struggled to have the courage and
enough faith to pray with him, but the Lord helped me.
I took his hand, and both my uncle and his son (who
overheard all this) prayed to receive Jesus. We then
asked the Lord for my uncle's healing, also. My uncle
prayed from his heart, in desperation, and kept his eyes
closed after we had nnished. For the next three minutes
or so, I felt embarrassed and didn't know what to do
or say. But when my uncle looked up, he thanked me
through tears.
As soon as he received Jesus as his Savior, my uncle's
condition started to improve. He felt better, and began
to read the Bible and other inspirational materials I
gave him. He now says that Jesus healed him in answer
to our prayers, with no help from the doctors. He is
still weak, but making good progress-and he behaves
much better with his children. We all thank the Lord
for what He has done for him!
I also learned a lesson from this: Even when I
feel I don't have enough faith to do something the
Lord wants me to do, I shouldn't let my own feelings
overwhelm me, but trust the Lord and let Him do it
through me. The Word says that with faith as a mus-
tard seed you can move mountains (Matthew 17:20).
I felt my faith was even smaller than a mustard seed,
but with that the Lord changed a whole universe-my
uncle's universe.
Our greatest need is Iove, and Iove is God's great answer.
People's hearts are the same the world over: Everybody needs love. Most people are
searching for real love, but can't fnd it. They know it must exist, they hunger for it, they
need it, but so many of them can't fnd it because they don't fnd God. lt's so sad!
But whenever people have problems, God also has answers, and in this case it's such
a simple answer÷love! Love is the key, love is the answer, and Jesus is the Way, the
Truth and the Life (John 14:6). He's the only way they'll ever fnd love, joy, peace, and
heavenly happiness, both here and now and in the life to come.
(Prayer:) Help us, Jesus, to be faithful to show Your love to others, to encourage and
help them, to heal them and lift them by giving them the message of Your love that has
the power to solve all their problems and heal their bodies, minds, and spirits. Thank You
for giving us the opportunity to help others by giving them Your answer, and it's such a
simple answer, Jesus÷just You and Your love!
÷David Brandt Berg
Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
A Mustard Seed.
Glossary
1. Hippies. Young people of the late 1960’s who rejected established institutions, listened to music that
challenged established values and wore their own style of casual clothes.
2. Crazy. Mentally abnormal, demented or insane.
3. Communist. A follower of communism, generally characterized by tight state control of national as
sets and industry and striving for equality for the working classes.
4. Morose. Gloomily or sullen, ill humored mood for a person.
5. Strict. Characterized by or acting in close conformity to requirements or principles.
6. Tumors. A swollen part or uncontrolled growth of cells in any animal or plant tissue.
7. Responsive. Acting in response, as to some stimulus.
8. Respectful. Full of or showing politeness or deference.
9. Courage. Te quality of mind or spirit that enables a person to go through fear.
10. Embarrassed. An emotion of shame because of certain problems.
11. Mustard. A pungent powder or paste made3 fr4om the ground seeds of the mustard plant.
Points to ponder.
(a) In which country did this story take place?
(b) Her uncle was a communist party member. What does that mean? What do communists believe?
(c) In the story, in what way does the Mustard Seed relate to, the kingdom of God
17
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
REFLECTIONS
18


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jrif;cGgrsm;\ aoqHk;rI
R 309,Death of horseshoes, BUR
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
C.Peter Van Gorder
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
I vividly recall the men in our neighborhood gath-
erin afer work for a game of horseshoes in a vacant
lot that was next toour house.Te pace of life was
more relaxed then.Work was from nine to fve, and
then it was time to knock of and play a game of
horseshoes.
You may not know the game of horseshoes.
A U -shaped metal horseshoes is thrown toward a
metalstakep lacedin a sawdust or dirt square about
l2 yards away.Te player to land his horseshoes clos-
est to the stake is the winner. When a horseshoe en-
circles the stake it is calleda “ringer”.
It was a perfect time to chat about the day.
Each of the men would relate hus latest triumphs
or woes, or talk about current events. lt all went over
my head, of course, but I could see they enjoyed it.
All of that disappeared with the advent of TV
in the ‘50s. As each family bought a TV set, people
spent less and less time playing such games as horse-
shoes. lnstead they spent their evenings in front of
the new marvel with its fickering black-and-white
images.
Did we suddenly become happier once we
each owned a box of entertainment ? I don’t think so.
You probably have read the research how
Americans now spend an average of ll,years of their
lives watching TV. lt seems witht he advent of TV we
gained easy entrrtainment ,but lost the art of con-
versation and having live fun with our loved ones.
We entered the 20th century riding horses;
we lef it in cars speeding down superhigway and
jets soaring through the skies. But has all this speed
and technology mad e us happier? We live in per-
haps the most traumatic era that man has ever expe-
rienced.
We race from birth to death with hardly time
to stop and smell the roses. Do it more, do it bet-
ter, do it yesterday, get rich quick-or in debt quick.
Fast food, fast computers, fast money, fast cars in fast
lanes, fast talk in sound bites. “Live fast” seems to be
our slogan.
Sometimes we pile on ourselves so much
eath of Horseshoes
REFLECTIONS
By C . Peter Van Gorder
stress in this speedy lifestyle that we fnd it hard to
cope. Sometimes we get under stress and don’t even
know it. On a recen trip to the dentist, I found that I
had developed cracks in some of my teeth. My den-
tist explained that stress had apparently caused me to
bite and grind my teeth in my sleep. I was unaware
that I was doing this.
So what is the cure for stress? We can’t turn
back the clock, nor do we necessarily want to. We live
in a diferent world and must adapt. Major studies
have been done on the subject of stress alleviation ,
as inefciency ,lost production, and absenteeism are
all results of stress in the workplace and the economy
of billions each year.Some of the practical solution
thsese studies have come up with seom easy enough
to do:
* Take up gardening.
* De-clutter your home or your work environment,
* Give more love and afection, and allow yourself to
receive it .
*Get a massage.
*Work on having loving relationships.
* Make healthy changes in your diet and exercise,
such as drinking less alcohol or stopping smoking.
* Take a walk, in nature if possible.
*Give three sincere compliments at work each day.
*Have a good laugh.
*Listen to sof music.
*Take amini-vacation.
*Pet a pet.
* Get a good rest.
19
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
Death of Horseshoes.
Glossary.
1. Relaxed. Being free of or being relieved from tension or anxiety.
2. Knock of. (Slang) To stop or fnish work. (He will knock of work ay fve o clock.)
3. Relate. To bring into or establish association, connection or relation with.
4. Triumphs. A signifcant success or noteworthy achievement.
5. Woe's. Grievous disaster or an afiction.
6. Advent. Coming into place, view or being. Arrival.
7. Marvel. Something that causes wonder, admiration or astonishment.
8. Flickering. To burn unsteadily, to futter.
9. Entertainment. Te art of entertaining; something for pleasure or fun.
10. Conversation. Informal interchanges of thoughts or information.
11. Superhighway. A highway designed for travel at high speed.
12. Traumatic. Psychologically painful.
13. Sound bites. A brief striking remark from anaudio tape, or video tape for insertion in a broadcast
news story.
14. Slogan. A distinctive cry, phrase or motto, of any party, group manufacturer or person.
15. Stress. A mental pressure caused by worries or fear.
16. Adapt. To adjust or modify, fttingly in another condition.
17. Alleviate. To make something easier to endure.
18. Absenteeism. Frequent or habitual absence from work or school.
19. Billion. One thousand million, 1,000,000,000.
Points to ponder.
(a) In the 50's the TV appeared and rapidly became popular. With each family having their own TV set,
people began spending less time outdoors and more time indoors. Do you think that this is a good change or
not?
(b) "We race from birth to death with hardly time to stop and smell the roses." Tell in your own words
what you think that this means?
REFLECTIONS
20
All of these practical suggestion are helpful,
but fnding that " peceful that passes all understand-
ing" takes more. It takes listening for a momr\ent to
that still small voice in our hearts, ressuring us that
God still loves us in spite of our shortcomings.
Take a moment today to be refreshed in
prayer so that you may fnd rest for your soul. Te
problems you face will meat away as you experi-
ence the awesome loe of God. A prophecy about
Jesus given shortly afer His birthsad that He would
"guide our feet into the way of peace."May you fol-
low the way He shows you.
21
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
22
There are going to be times when the successful
leader must point out errors and ‘‘ correct ” those working
with him.Tis is truly an art, and one that most would-be
leaders fall down on.
Te real purpose of criticism is not to beat the
other fellow down, but to build him up.-Not to hurt his
feelings, but to help him do a job better.
Not long ago I was discussintg his subject with
Walter Johnson, vice-president of American Airlines . We
were discussing the real need for criticism, and how it
could be a real help.
“You know, Les,” he said, ” a pilot coming in for
a landing is a good example of successful criticism. Fre-
quently, his fying must be criticized or corrected by the
tower. lf he’s of course, the tower doesn’t hesitate to tell
him so. lf he’s coming in too low, he’s told about it. lf he
is going to overshoot the feld, he is corrected. Yet l’ve
never heard of one of our pilots getting ofended by this
criticism. I’ve never heard one say. ‘Aw, he’s always fnding
fault with my fying”. Why can’t he say something good for
a change ? ”
Te next time you must get some one back on the
beam, remember how the airlines “correct” their pilots.
Keep in mind that their criticism is to achieve a good end
result for both the airline and the pilot. Te man in the
tower doesn’t deal in personalities. He doesn’t use re-
criminations. His criticism is ‘not blared out over loud-
speakers but in strictp rivacyto the pilot’s earphones. He
criticizes the act, not the person.
He doesn’st ay,’ Well, if that isn’t a dumb way to
come in for a landing. He,just says, “You’re coming in too
low.”
Te pilot isn’t asked to do something merely to
please the boss. He has an incentive of his own to take the
criticism and beneft by it, He is not ofended; he actually
appreciates it. He is more likely to buy the man in the
tower a steak dinner than to cuss him.
And the really important thing is that both the
pilot and hi ‘‘ boss” a chieve some useful end result. Te
criticism accomplishes something.
All criticism could be given in the same spirit if it
were, equally good results would be achieved,
CORRECTING WITHOUT BEING CRITICAL
By Les Giblin
REFLECTIONS
23
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
Tere are seven musts for successful criticism:
1 Criticism must be made in private. lf you want you crriticism to take efect. you must
not engage the other person’s ego against you. Te mildest form of criticism made in the pres-
ence of others is very likely to be resented by the other person.
2 Preface criticism with a kind word or compliment. Kind words, complimentas, and
praise have the efect of setting the stage in a friendly atmosphere. lt serves notice on the other
fellow that you are not attack ing his ego, and puts him more at his ease, Praise and compliments
open the other person’s mind:” l know from past experience that you area lways looking for little
ways, to constantly improve your work. lt occurred to me that . . . "
3 Make the criticism impersonal, Criticiz the act, not the person, Af ter , all it’s his ac-
tions, that you are intrerest in anyway.
4 Supply the answer. When you tell the other person what he did wrong, also tell him
how to do it right. Te emphasis should not be on the mistake, but the means and ways to cor-
rect the mistake and avoid a recurrence. Nothing can lower morale in an ofce, plant, or home
quite so much as an atmospher of general dissatisfaction without there being any clear defning
of just what is expected. Most peopl are anxious to “do right” if you tell them what ‘‘ right ’’is,
5 Ask for cooperation don’t demand it. Asking always brings more cooperation than
demanding. When you demand, you place the other fellow in the role of slave and your self in
the role of slave driver. When you ask, you place him in the role of a member of your team. Team
feeling gets much more cooperation than force.
6 One criticism to an ofense, To call attention to a given error one time is justifed.
Twice is unnecessary. And three times is nagging. Remember your goal in criticism to get a job
done.
7 Finish in a friendly fashion. Untial an issue has been resolved on a friendly note, it re-
ally hasn’t been inished. Don’t leave things hanging in air, to be brought up later. Give the other
fellow a pat on the back at the end of the conversatio. Let him last meory of the meeting be the
pat on the back, instead of akick in the pants.
Correcting without being critical.
Glossary.
1. Errors. A condition of believing something untrue; a mistake
2. Criticism. Te act of passing severe judgment, fault fnding.
3. Feelings. An emotion or emotional perception or an attitude.
4. Hesitate. To be reluctant or wait to act because of fear.
5. Overshoot. To overreach, go further than is intended or proper.
6. Ofended. To be irritated, annoyed or angered
7. Personality. Te visible aspect of ones character.
8. Recriminations. To bring a counter charge against an accuser.
9. Dumb. Lacking in intelligence.
Points to ponder.
(a) When a pilot is coming in to land, he is in constant contact with the control tower. Te control tower
is constantly correcting the pilot on his air speed, altitude, angle of descent, and giving information
on side wind speed, etc. Te pilot is not personally ofended by all of these corrections. Explain why
not.
(b) Why is it important that criticism should be made in private?
(c) One piece of advice given in the story is to criticize the act, not the person. Why is that important?
REFLECTIONS
24
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
R33
REFLECTI ONS
O
ne wintry day a Christian was walking down the street and noticed some
grain on the ground. A flock of hungry sparrows was having an un-sched-
uled feast. As the man took a step toward the birds, they became uneasy. Another step, and their nervousness
increased. When he was almost upon them, they suddenly flew away.
For a few moments the man stood there reflecting on what had happened. Why had those sparrows
scattered in flight? He had meant no harm. But then he realized that he was too big.
Another question came to mind: How could he walk among those birds without frightening them by
his size? Only if it were possible for him to become a sparrow and fly down among them.
The spiritual analogy is clear. In Old Testament times God appeared to people in various ways—to
Abraham through heavenly messengers, to Moses out of the burning bush. They were afraid because of
God’s awesomeness. But centuries later the Angel of the Lord appeared to shepherds and announced, “There
is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:11).
Yes, God became a man so that we would not be afraid to come close to Him.
—Paul R. Van Gorder
* * *
H
e is a miserable man who knows all things but does not know God, and he is happy who knows God,
even though he knows nothing else.
—Saint Augustine
W
e all use the power of electricity in our everyday lives, even though no one really understands it or
where it comes from or how it got here—and certainly none of us has ever seen it, only its effects. In
the same way, we must accept the existence of God, even though we don’t fully understand Him or know
where He came from. We simply know He does exist and He is here, ever-present, all-knowing and all-
powerful!
All that most of us know about electricity is, it
works! We flip the switch and make contact with
this invisible power and it does the work for us. Just
so, we must learn to make contact, personal con-
tact, with the power of God through prayer, a
spiritual seeking of contact with His Spirit through
obedience to the laws of His Word. We must avail
ourselves of God just as we do electricity, and let
His light and power into the rooms of our lives to
give us light and power and joy in living, by letting
Him do many things for us that we cannot do for
ourselves.
Just reach out your hand of faith and turn the
switch of decision which makes the contact and starts
the flow of that power into your life. You don’t have
to personally know all the answers. Just flip the switch
and it works!
—David Brandt Berg
Can We Understand God?
Gr Gr Gr Gr Great eat eat eat eater Than Our Hear er Than Our Hear er Than Our Hear er Than Our Hear er Than Our Hearts ts ts ts ts
You might not remember,
but He died for you.
You might not believe it,
but He cares.
You might not consider
yourself important,
but He does.
You might not accept it,
but He has forgiven you.
You might not sense Him,
but He is with you.
You might condemn yourself,
but He has chosen to love you.
He sees us differently.
He is so much more,
so much greater
than our hearts.
—Ulrich Schaffer
25
26
Can we understand God
Glossary.
1. Grain. A small hard seed, especially the seeds of a food plant, such as wheat, corn, etc.
2. Flock. A number of animals of one kind, especially, sheep, goats or birds.
3. Unscheduled. Not scheduled, no exact time scheduled.
4. Uneasy. Not easy in body or mind.
5. Nervousness. Highly excitable anxiety.
6. Refecting to cast an image back from a surface.
7. Scattered. Distributing or occurring at widely spaced and usually irregular intervals.
8. Harm. Physical injury or mental damage.
9. Spiritual. Of or pertaining to the spirit or soul.
10. Analogy Te similarity between like features of two things.
11. Messengers. A person who carries a message, or goes on an errand for another.
12. Awesome. Te level of inspiration or coolness.
13. Centuries. 100 years ( a century)
14. Announced. To make known publicly or ofcially
15. Miserable. Wretchedly unhappy or poor.
16. Efects. Personal property.
17. Accept. To take or receive
18. Existence. Continuance in being or life.
19. Avail. To be of use or value to.
20. Decision. To make up ones mind.
21. Condemn. To express an unfavourable or adverse judgement on.
Points to ponder.
(a) Te Christian man attempts to approach the sparrows and refects that it may be his size that is scaring
them away. Who does the man and sparrow represent? How does this story refect the relationship
between man and God?
(b) We accept the existence of electricity without question. In the same way we can accept the existence of
God. In what ways has God showed his presence to humans?
REFLECTIONS
27
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
28
2%&,%#4) /.3
R174 GP-July 2002
Lmilia's New Priend
Emilia wonders iI anyone will
notice her today. Winter will soon
set in. That will make it much more
diIfcult to get by on her tiny monthly
pension, worth less than fve dollars.
In better times, Emilia had been
a nurse. Her country had been
communist, but liIe had been good
Ior her. She had had enough money.
Prices had been low. People had
respected her. They had liked to talk to
her. They had thanked her Ior being a
nurse, Ior helping them.
Now she is old and has no one but
a bedridden older sister. She must beg
Ior two, standing all day in Iront oI a
high-class shop, waiting Ior someone
to have mercy and give her a Iew
coins. Iast winter she thought she
would die oI hunger.
Will this winter be any better?
As Emilia thinks about these things,
she doesn`t notice a little boy coming
toward her, money in hand, or the
young woman who Iollows a Iew steps
behind. Three-year-old Emanuel wants
to give Emilia the money because the
young woman, Rebeca, has told him
that the old woman is very poor and
needs their help.
'And there is something else you
can give her,¨ Rebeca has also
told Emanuel, 'something even more
important than money. You can give
her Jesus.¨ Emanuel loves Jesus and
he knows that Jesus loves him.
Emanuel has never seen the woman
beIore, but she looks nice. He is
excited about being able to help.
'Repeat aIter me,¨ he tells her, aIter
handing her the money. 'Jesus, please
come into my heart. .¨
Emilia is so surprised that a little
boy would give her money and then
want to pray with her that beIore she
has time to think, she hears herselI
repeating Emanuel`s little prayer. But
then the strangest thing happens.
Immediately she Ieels more
optimistic. She Ieels loved.
Emanuel is thrilled as only children
can be. He had watched his parents
pray with other people to fnd Jesus,
but this was the very frst time he had
been the one to lead the way.
Emilia wants to get to know
Emanuel and Rebeca better, so she
invites them to her humble apartment
and insists on cooking something Ior
them. They become good Iriends.
Emanuel goes back to visit Emilia
Irom time to time, sometimes with
Rebeca, and sometimes with his
mother, Priscila. Each time they take
Emilia and her sister Iood and a little
money. Each time their new Iriends
talk with them about Jesus and pray
with them. Jesus is now Emilia`s best
Eriend too.
This winter will be much better.
8y Prancesco Dragas, Moldova
l

'R
:KDWRQHSHUVRQFDQ
ll you stop to tH|nk about |t, tHere's no ||m|t to How uselu| your ||le can be. 1He lam||y Has spec|hc
¿oa|s ol preacH|n¿ tHe 0ospe| and He|p|n¿ otHers, so our ||ves |nvo|ve constant ¿|v|n¿. But anyone
can |ead a uselu| ||le, no matter wHo or wHere tHey are, |l tHey rea||y want to.
You can sHow |ove to tHe un|ove|y, ¿|ve sympatHy, be lr|end|y and con¿en|a|, and |end a ||sten|n¿
ear or a He|p|n¿ Hand to someone |n need. You can ask tHe lord to He|p you to a|ways be cHeerlu|, to
see tHe pos|t|ve s|de ol every s|tuat|on, and to He|p otHers do tHe same
You can ¿|ve out tracts. You can ta|k about tHe lord and H|s word. You can reacH out to otHers
|n need, and sHow |ove and understand|n¿ wHerever you ¿o. /nyone wHo wants to can rea||y make a
d|llerence |n tHe wor|d, and can mot|vate otHers to do tHe same.
ˆ-ARIA$AVID

1
Francesco Dragas is a volunteer with The Family.
2
Maria David is the co-leader of The Family, along with her husband Peter Amsterdam.
Copyright © 2002 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Emelias friend.
Glossary.
1. Pension. A fxed amount of allowance paid at regular intervals to a person.
2. Communist. A follower of communism. A form of government where national assets and business
are under direct state control.
3. Respect. A sense of worth or excellence of a person
4. Bedridden. Confned to bed because of illness.
5. Mercy. An act of kindness, compassion or favor
6. Notice. Observation, perception or critical attention.
7. Excited. Stirred emotionally, stimulated to activity.
8. Surprised. To strike or occur to with a sudden feeling of wonder or astonishment.
9. High class. Of a type, superior in quality or degree.
10. Repeat. To say or do again.
11. Stranger. Unusual, extraordinary or odd.
12. Optimistic Disposed to take a favorable view of events or conditions.
13. Trilled. To efect with a sudden wave of keen emotion or excitement
14. Humble. Not proud or arrogant, modest having a feeling of insignifcance.
15. Insist. To be emphatic, frm, or resolute on some matter of desire, demand or intention.
16. Specifc. Having a special application, something special.
17. Goal. Te result or achievement toward which efort is directed.
18. Limit. Te fnal, utmost or furthest boundary or point as to extent.
19. Sympathy. Harmony of or agreement in feeling.
20. Congenial. Agreement, suitable or pleasing in nature or character
21. Situation. Conditions, position or location.
22. Tracts. A small printed pamphlet, ofen with religious, or political content.
23. Positive. Admitting of no question, a good reaction.
24. Motivate. To provide with a motive or motives.
Points to ponder.
(a) Will this winter be any better?
(b) What is Emelia worried about?
29
REFLECTIONS
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30

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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
R155 GP Topics: humility, needing others and God, giving.
I vas parked in lront
ol the church, cleaning
out ny Jeep. I vas
vaiting lor soneone.
Coning ny vay lron across the
street vas vhat society vould consider
a bun. Iron the looks ol hin, he
had no car, no hone, no clean clothes,
and no noney. There are
tines vhen you leel gen-
erous, but there are other
tines vhen you just don't
vant to be bothered.
This vas one ol those
¯don't vant to be both-
ered" tines.
I |ap. |. Ja.sn'/ :s| m.
/ar :n, man.,, I thought.
He didn't.
He cane and sat on
the vall in lront ol the
bus stop, to vait lor the
bus. Alter a lev ninutes he
spoke. ¯That's a very pretty
Jeep," he said.
He vas ragged but he had an air ol
dignity about hin. His scraggly blond
beard kept nore than his lace varn. I
said thanks, and continued cleaning out
the Jeep.
He sat there quietly as I vorked.
The expected plea lor noney never
cane. As the silence betveen us vid-
ened, sonething inside said, As| ||m |/
|. n..Js :n, |.|p.
I vas sure that he vould say yes, but
I held true to the inner voice. ¯Do you
need any help?" I asked.
He ansvered in three sinple but
prolound vords that I vill never
lorget. We olten look lor visdon in
great nen and vonen. We expect it
lron those ol higher learning and
acconplishnents. I expected nothing
but an outstretched griny hand.
He spoke the three vords that shook
ne. ¯Don't ve all?" he said.
I vas leeling high and nighty, suc-
cesslul and inportant, above a bun on
the street, until those three vords hit
ne like a tvelve-gauge shotgun.
Don't ve all?
I needed help. Maybe not lor bus
lare or a place to sleep, but I needed
help.
Those three little vords still ring
true. Io natter hov nuch you have,
no natter hov nuch you have accon-
plished, you need help too.
Io natter hov little you have, no
natter hov loaded you are vith prob-
lens, even vithout noney or a place to
sleep, you can ¸|·. help.
Even il it's just a conplinent, you
can give that.
You never knov vhen you nay
see soneone that appears to have it
all. They nay be vaiting on you to
give then vhat they don't
have-a dillerent perspec-
tive on lile, a glinpse
at sonething beautilul, a
respite lron daily chaos-
that only you through a
torn vorld can see.
Maybe the nan vas
just a honeless stranger
vandering the streets.
But naybe he vas
nore than that. Maybe he
vas sent by a pover that is
great and vise, to ninister
to a soul too conlortable
in hinsell.
Maybe God looked dovn, called an
angel, dressed hin like a bun, then
said, ¯Go ninister to that nan cleaning
the Jeep. That nan needs help."
Don't ve all?
-^:/|:n|.| Brann.r
(Maan/:|nH|n¸s.·am - H|n¸s O·.r /|.
Maan/:|ns a/ L|/.)
DOM´T WE ALL
Wo ull nood holp, und wo ull nood lo givo holp. ln
lho giving is oílon whoro lho lruo blossing und plousuro
lios.
8ul wo musl bo curoíul und soo lhul our giving is
nol wilh un ulliludo oí suporiorily or condosconsion or
lo oslublish our own solí-worlh. ll musl bo humbly dono
bocuuso il is noodod und bocuuso wo uro ublo, knowing
lho duy muy como, ií il husn´l ulroudy, whon wo will
bo on lho rocoiving ond oí somoono olso´s giving. Tho
8iblo suys, ºWhul do you huvo lhul you did nol rocoivo²º
(T Corinlhiuns 4.7 NK1}
-DoviJ 8tooJ| 8otg
31
32
Don’t we all.
Glossary.
1. Jeep. A small rugged military purpose vehicle with four wheels.
2. Bum. A person who avoids work and sponges from others.
3. Generous. liberal in giving or sharing, unselfsh and considerate.
4. Bothered. To give trouble, to annoy or to irritate.
5. Ragged. Clothed in tattered garments.
6. Scraggy. Lean or thin, scrawny.
7. Dignity. Nobility or elevation of character, self respect.
8. Profound. Penetrating or entering deeply into subjects of thought or knowlege.
9. Grimy. Covered with grime or dirt.
10. Successful. Achieving or having achieved successful.
11. Important. Great signifcance or consequence.
12. Twelve gauge shotgun. A large bore gun usually used for hunting game birds.
13. Accomplished. Completed, done afected.
14. Compliment. An expression of praise.
15. Perspective. Te state of existing in space before eyes, the state of ones ideas.
16. Glimpse. A very brief passing look.
17. Respite. A delay of time.
18. Homeless. Without a home.
19. Minister. A person who is the headof high ofce, appointed by the government.
20. Soul. Te spiritual part of being. Te principle of life, feelings, thought and actions in humans.
21. Angel. One of a class of spiritual beings a celestial attendant of God.
22. Blessing. A special favour, mercy or beneft.
23. Superior. Te quality or condition of being superior or better than.
24. Humble. Not proud or arrogant.
25. Condescend. To behave as oneis conscious of descending from a superior position.
Points to ponder.
(a) Why is it important not to judge people by outward appearances?
(b) Te man cleaning the Jeep opposite the church learned an important lesson from the poor man at the
bus stop. What lesson did he learn?
(c) Te Jeep owner asked the youn man at the bus stop, “Do you need any help.” He replied, “Don’t we
all.” What kind of help do you need?
REFLECTIONS
33
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
254'0 Topics: character, lifetime goals, unselfshness, helping others, giving, the new year.
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Ah elderly carpehter was ready to retire, ahd he told his boss
of his plahs to leave ahd live a more leisurely life with his wife.
He would miss the paycheck, but he heeded to retire. They could
get by.
The cohtractor was sorry to see such a good worker go, ahd he
asked the carpehter to build just ohe more house as a persohal
favor.
The carpehter said yes, but ih time it was easy to see that his
heart was hot ih his work. He resorted to shoddy workmahship
ahd used ihferior materials. lt was ah uhfortuhate way to ehd a
dedicated career.
Wheh the carpehter fihished his work, the employer came to
ihspect the house. He hahded the froht-door key to the carpehter.
¨This is your house," he said. ¨lt is my gift to you."
The carpehter was shocked! What a shame! lf he had ohly
khowh he was buildihg his owh house, he would have dohe it
all so differehtly.
So it is with us. We build our lives, a day at a time, ofteh puttihg
less thah our best ihto the buildihg. Theh with a shock we realize
we have to live ih the house we have built.
lf we could do it over, we'd do it much differehtly. But we
cahhot go back.
You are the carpehter of your life. Each day you hammer a hail,
place a board, or erect a wall. Your attitudes ahd the choices you
make today build your ¨house" for tomorrow. Build wisely!
÷Ao|ho| onknown
Do hot lay up for yourselves treasures oh earth, where moth
ahd rust destroy ahd where thieves break ih ahd steal; but lay up
for yourselves treasures ih Heaveh, where heither moth hor rust
destroys ahd where thieves do hot break ih ahd steal.
For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
÷!esos {7he 0/b/e Ma||hew 6:19-21 N/!l
WHAT MATTERS
A few years ago at the SeattIe
SpeciaI OIympics, nine contestants,
aII physicaIIy or mentaIIy disabIed,
assembIed at the starting Iine for
the100-yard dash. At the gun, they aII
started out~not exactIy in a dash, but
with a reIish to run the race to the
finish and win.
AII, that is, except one boy who
stumbIed on the asphaIt, tumbIed
over a coupIe of times, and began to
cry. The other eight heard the boy cry.
They sIowed down and Iooked back.
They aII turned around and went
back. Every one of them. One girI
with Down's syndrome bent down
and kissed him and said, "This wiII
make it better." AII nine Iinked arms
and waIked across the finish Iine
together.
Everyone in the stadium stood, and
the cheering went on for severaI min-
utes. PeopIe who were there are stiII
teIIing the story. Why7 Because deep
down we know this one thing: What
matters in this Iife is PRUH than win-
ning for ourseIves. What truIy matters
in this Iife is heIping others in their
race, even if it means sIowing down
and changing our course.
34
35
REFLECTIONS
Building a life.
Glossary.
1. Elderly. Someone old or older.
2. Carpenter. Someone who is an expert at woodwork.
3. Leisurely. Acting, proceeding or done without haste.
4. Paycheck. A bank check given as salary or wages.
5. Favor. Something done or granted out of good will.
6. Resorted. To sort or arrange
7. Shoddy. Of poor quality or inferior workmanship
8. Inferior. Acting or performing in a way that is comparatively poor or mediocre.
9. Unfortunate. Unlucky or unfavorable.
10. Dedicated. Wholly commited to something.
11. Employer. A person or business that employs one or more people
12. Employee. A person working for another person or business.
13. Realize. To grasp or understand carefully.
14. Hammer. A tool consisting of a solid head, usually of metal for beating metals.
15. Erect. Raised or directed upwards.
16. Attitudes. Manner, disposition, feeling or position.
17. Treasures. Wealth or riches stored up or accumulated.
18. Moth. Insect generally distinguished from butterfies by feathery antennae.
19. Rust. Te red or orange coating that forms on the surface of iron when exposed to air.
20. Linked. To be joined together or linked
Points to ponder.
(a) One interesting quote from the story says. “What truly matters in this life is helping others in their
race, even if it means slowing down and changing our course.” What do you think that means?
(b) In the short story, “Building a Life.” Te carpenter had a wrong attitude. Explain what was wrong with
his attitude.
36
R85 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple life.
T
he American businessman was at the pier of a small Mexican coastal
village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the
boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The American complimented the
Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them.
The Mexican replied, “Only a little while.”
The American then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish.
The fisherman said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs.
The American then asked, “But what do you do with the rest of your time?”
The fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take siesta
with my wife Maria. Then I stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine
and play guitar with my amigos. I have a full and busy life, señor.”
The American scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should
spend more time fishing and with the proceeds, buy a bigger boat. With the pro-
ceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats. Eventually you would
have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman you
would sell directly to the processor, eventually opening your own cannery. You
would control the product, processing, and distribution. You would need to leave
this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then Los Angeles, and
eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”
The fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?”
”Fifteen or twenty years.”
“But what then, señor?”
The American laughed and said, “That’s the best part. When the time is right
you would sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would
make millions.”
“Millions, señor?
Then what?”
The American said,
“Then you would retire
and move to a small
coastal fishing village
where you would sleep
late, fish a little, play
with your grandchil-
dren, take siesta with
your wife Maria, and
stroll to the village in
the evenings where
you could sip wine and
play your guitar with
your amigos.”
Do not run through life so fast that you forget not only where you have been, but also
where you are going.
Our main purpose in life, as Martin Luther said, is “to love God and enjoy Him forever!”
And, I might add, to help others enjoy life by telling them of God’s love and the happy life
He gives!—David Brandt Berg
A AA AAh, t h, t h, t h, t h, th hh hhe s e s e s e s e simp imp imp imp imple l le l le l le l le li ii iif ff ffe! e! e! e! e!
Lif Lif Lif Lif Life is e is e is e is e is
not a not a not a not a not a
r rr rrac ac ac ac ace ee ee, ,, ,,
but a but a but a but a but a
jour jour jour jour journe ne ne ne ney yy yy
t tt tto b o b o b o b o be ee ee
sa sa sa sa sav vv vvor or or or ored ed ed ed ed
each each each each each
st st st st step of ep of ep of ep of ep of
the w the w the w the w the wa aa aay yy yy. .. ..
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
Refections 220 GPpJune 2003
Wben a reporter asked Tbomas
Ldlson bow lt |e|t to bave |al|ed
25,OOO tlmes ln bls e||ort to create
a slmp|e storage battery, bls rep|y
was, ¨| don't know wby you are
ca||lng lt a |al|ure. Today | know
25,OOO ways not to make a bat-
tery. Wbat do you know?"
Tbomas Ldlson was probab|y
tbe greatest lnventor ln Amerlcan
blstory. Wben be |lrst attended
scboo| ln Port Huron, Mlcblgan, bls
teacbers comp|alned tbat be was
¨too s|ow" and bard to band|e. As
a resu|t, Ldlson's motber declded
to take ber son out o| scboo| and
teacb blm at bome.
Tbe young Ldlson was |ascl-
nated by sclence. At tbe age o|
1O be bad a|ready set up bls |lrst
cbemlstry |aboratory. Ldlson's
lnexbaustlb|e energy and genlus
(wblcb be reported|y de|lned as ¨1
percent lnsplratlon and 99 percent
persplratlon") eventua||y produced
ln bls |l|etlme more tban 1,3OO
lnventlons.
Wben Tbomas Ldlson lnvented
tbe |lgbt bu|b, be trled over 2,OOO
experlments be|ore be got lt to
work. A young reporter asked
blm bow lt |e|t to |al| so many
tlmes. He sald, ¨| never |al|ed
once. | lnvented tbe |lgbt bu|b. |t
just bappened to be a 2,OOO-step
process."
Tbomas Ldlson's |aboratory
was vlrtua||y destroyed by |lre ln
December 1914. A|tbougb tbe
damage exceeded 2 ml||lon do||ars,
tbe bul|dlngs were on|y lnsured
|or $238,OOO because tbey were
made o| concrete and tbougbt
to be |lreproo|. Mucb o| Ldlson's
|l|e's work went up ln spectacu|ar
||ames tbat December nlgbt.
At tbe belgbt o| tbe |lre,
Ldlson's 24-year-o|d son, Cbar|es,
|rantlca||y searcbed |or bls |atber
among tbe smoke and debrls. He
|lna||y |ound blm, ca|m|y watcblng
tbe scene, bls |ace g|owlng ln tbe
re||ectlon, bls wblte balr b|owlng ln
tbe wlnd.
¨My beart acbed |or blm," sald
Cbar|es. ¨He was 67-no |onger
a young man-and everytblng was
golng up ln ||ames. Wben be saw
me, be sbouted, 'Cbar|es, wbere's
your motber?' Wben | to|d blm |
dldn't know, be sald, 'Plnd ber. 8rlng
ber bere. Sbe wl|| never see any-
tblng |lke tbls as |ong as sbe |lves.'"
Tbe next mornlng, Ldlson
|ooked at tbe rulns and sald,
¨Tbere ls great va|ue ln dlsaster.
A|| our mlstakes are burned up.
Tbank God we can start anew."
Tbree weeks a|ter tbe |lre,
Ldlson managed to de|lver bls |lrst
pbonograpb.
-7KH6RZHU·V6HHGV
Topics: failure, learning, positiveness, trusting the Lord
David Brandt Berg (1919-1994) was founder of The Family.
&AILURE.O3UCH4HING
LE55ON5 FROM THE LlFE OF THOMA5 EDl5ON
(1847~1931)
I novor díd a day`s work ín my lílo, ít was all lun.÷1homas Ldíson
what ís doloat? Nothínµ but oducatíon, nothínµ but tho nrst stop to somothínµ
bottor.÷wondoll Phíllíps
komombor, ¨Iaíluro ís an ovont÷not a porson!"÷0íck Innos
0od has a purposo ín ovorythínµ, ovon íl ít ís only to lorco us to oxorcíso our
laíth and domonstrato ít lor tho oncouraµomont ol othors, to ínspíro thoír laíth
and oncouraµo thom to trust ín tho Iord too.÷0avíd ßrandt ßorµ
37
REFLECTIONS
Failure no such thing.
Glossary.
1. Reporter. Someone who reports the news.
2. Failed. To fall short of success or achievement in something attempted.
3. Probably. In all likelihood, very likely.
4. Complained. To express dissatisfaction, pain, uneasiness, resentment or grief.
5. Fascinated. To be surprised, amazed, to be astonished.
6. Science. A branch of knowledge or study, dealing with a body of facts or truths.
7. Inexhaustible. Impossible to exhaust.
8. Genius. A prodigy, a smart person.
9. Inspiration. An inspiring or animating action or infuence.
10. Perspiration. A salty, watery fuid secreted by the glands of the skin.
11. Inventions. Anything invented or devised.
12. Experiments. A test, trial, a tentative procedure, an act or operation for the purpose
of discovering something unknown.
13. Virtually. For the most part; almost wholly; just about.
14. Concrete. An artifcial, stone like material, used for various structural purposed.
15. Fire-proof. Resistant to destruction by fre.
16. Frantically. Desperately, madly or frenzied.
17. Debris. The remains of anything, broken down or destroyed.
18. Ruins. The remains of a building or city, that has been destroyed or in a state of
disrepair.
19. Defeat. To overcome in a contest, election, battle, etc. To prevail over.
20. Demonstrate. To make evident or establish by arguments or reasoning.
21. Encouragement. To inspire with courage, spirit of confdence.
Points to ponder.
(a) “I never did a dys work in my life, it was all fun.” Thomas Edison the inventor said
that. What do you think that he meant?
(b) How many inventions did Edison produce in his life time?
(c) Edison said, “There is great value in disaster, all of our mistakes are burned up. Thank
God we can start anew.” What doe you think he was trying to say?
(d) Failure is an event and not a person. What does that statement mean?
38
39
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a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
R 261, Believe, BUR
,HkMunfyg
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
40
2%&,%#4) /.3
Refections 219 GP-June 2003
[FRCM AM ESSAY BY DlCK lMMES, MARRAMCRE CHRlSllAM FCÜMDAllCM,
EMlllLED ¨lHE PCVER CF BELlEF"|
'Down the streets oI Portsmouth |England| more than a hun-
dred years ago,¨ said Lt. General Ira C. Eaker in a speech given
some time ago, 'walked a sailor with one arm, one eye, and a
persistent state oI nerves, unable to tread a ship`s deck without
being seasick. Indeed, he would probably have been in a home
Ior incurables were his name not Admiral Lord Nelson. The
man`s spirit drove the fesh.¨
Born in 1758, Horatio Nelson, the son oI a pastor, was a
small, Irail child who loved sailing. As a young teenager he
joined the British navy and, while journeying to the East Indies,
caught a Iever that seriously damaged his health. But he never
allowed this to hold him back. At age 18 he was appointed a
lieutenant in the Royal Navy and by the year 1802 was made
commander in chieI oI the British feet.
Two years later, at the Battle oI TraIalgar, Nelson deIeated the
combined French and Spanish feets. This was the greatest naval
victory in British history and leIt the British in control oI the
seas Ior the rest oI the 1800s. UnIortunately, Nelson was mor-
tally wounded during TraIalgar, but lived long enough to know
that his feet had won the battle. His last words were, 'Thank
God I have done my duty.¨
Nelson was a man oI Iearless courage and devotion. He
believed in his country, in his cause, and in himselI. He proved
this with his words and more so with his liIe. He once said,
'I am oI the opinion that the boldest measures are the saIest.¨
Nelson was a man greatly admired by others, who said about
him, 'His Irail body housed a great spirit.¨
The prominent British philosopher John Stuart Mill would
have agreed. He said, 'One person with a belieI is equal to a
Iorce oI ninety-nine who only have interest.¨
No matter what your limitations or your handicaps are, God
has a plan and purpose Ior your liIe. Believe it and you will
receive it. Act on it and you will achieve it, and like the apostle
Paul you, too, will be able to say, 'I have Iought the good fght,
I have fnished the race, I have kept the Iaith¨ (2 Timothy 4:7).
OOO
Dear God, give me belieI in You, strong Iaith and trust to
withstand, carry on, and be victorious in the storms and battles
oI liIe. Help me to so believe and live that when I come to the
end oI liIe`s journey, I too will be able to say, 'Thank God that I
have done my duty.¨ Thank You Ior hearing and answering my
prayer.
\iclory bolongs lo lho mosl por-
sovoring.-Nopo|ooo 8ooopot|o
(17óº-1821j, ompotot ol Ftooco who
cooquotoo much ol Eutopo
‹
Through porsovorunco muny pooplo
win succoss oul oí whul soomod dos-
linod lo bo corluin íuiluro.-8oojomio
Distoo|i (1804-1881j, 8ti|ish wti|ot
ooo ptimo miois|ot
‹
Cbsluclos cunnol crush [us|. Evory
obsluclo yiolds lo slorn rosolvo. Ho
who is íxod lo u slur doos nol chungo
his mind.-Looootoo oo Vioci (1452-
151ºj, F|otoo|ioo poio|ot, scu|p|ot,
otchi|oc|, oogiooot, ooo scioo|is|
‹
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bul oursolvos.-Sit Eomuoo Hi||oty (6.
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ooo /o|otc|ic oxp|otot, ooo ol |ho lts|
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Mouo| Evotos|
=DA=N=
Topics: belief, motivation, strength, God's plan, faith,
perseverance, prayer
41
REFLECTIONS
Believe.
Glossary.
1. Portsmouth. A port city on the South West coast of England.
2. Persistent. Persisting in spite of opposition or discouragement
3. Nerves. One or more bundles of fbers forming part of a system that that conveys
im pulses or sensation.
4. Tread. To step, walk or trample, so as to pr3ess, crush or injure something.
5. Seasick. Nausea and dizziness, sometimes vomiting, resulting from the rocking or
swaying motion of a vessel at sea.
6. Incurable. A disease that cannot be cured.
7. Lieutenant. A rank in the navy, a commissioned offcer, ranking between junior grade
and lieutenant commander.
8. Commander-in-chief. The supreme commander of the armed forces of a nation, or
s ometimes of several allied nations.
9. Frail. Having delicate or weak health. Fragile or morally weak.
10. Battle of Trafalgar. A famous naval battle in history where Admiral Nelsons British
feet defeated a combined French and Spanish feet in the Straights of Gibraltar.
11. Mortally wounded. A serious wound that will cause death.
12. Fearless. Without fear. A person with no fear.
13. Devotion. Profound dedication or an earnest attachment to a cause or a person.
14. Admired. To regard with wonder, pleasure or approval.
15. Prominent. Standing out, so as to be easily seen.
16. Limitations. A limiting condition; restrictive weakness.
17. Handicap. A physical disability or something that hinders or slows down.
18. Achieve. To win or get something
19. Victories. A successor triumph over an enemy in battle or war.
20. Stern. Firm, strict and uncompromising.
21. Resolve. To solve or work out a problem or a confict.
Points to ponder.
(a) In the story it was mentioned that during his early life it seemed most unlikely that
Admiral Nelson would ever be successful in life. Why did the writer say that?
(b) It was said of Nelson, “His frail body housed a great spirit.” What do you think that
means?
(c) No matter what your limitations or handicaps are, God has a plan and a purpose for
your life. Believe it and you will receive it. Explain what that means to you.
42
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R 154, Faith works, BUR
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David Brandt Berg
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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
43
R131 GP
REFLECTI ONS
.=EJD
Faith, trust, the Bible.
Excerpts of an article by
Norman Vincent Peale
William James, the fa-
mous psychologist, said,
“Our belief at the begin-
ning of a doubtful under-
taking is the one thing
[now get that—the one
thing] that ensures the
successful outcome of our
venture.”
A famous trapeze art-
ist was instructing his stu-
dents how to perform on
the high trapeze bar. One
student froze completely.
He had a terrifying vision
of falling to the ground. He
couldn’t move a muscle,
so deep was his fright. “I
can’t do it!” he gasped.
The instructor put his
arm around the boy’s shoulder and said, “Son, you can
do it, and I will tell you how.” Then he made one of the
wisest remarks I have ever heard. He said, “Throw your
heart over the bar and your body will follow.”
Copy that sentence. Write it down and put it in
your pocket. Better still, write it on your mind. It’s
packed with power, that sentence. “Throw your heart
over the bar and your body will follow.”
You can overcome any obstacle and achieve the
most tremendous things by faith power. How do you
develop faith power? Saturate your mind with the great
words of the Bible. Spend one hour a day reading the
Bible and committing its great passages to memory,
allowing them to recondition your personality, and
the change in your experience will be miraculous.
Read the New Testament. Select a dozen of the strong
statements about faith, and memorize each one. Say
them over and over, especially just before going to sleep.
In time they will modify your thought patterns. This pro-
cess will change you into a believer, into an expecter,
and thus you will become an achiever. You will have new
power to get what God and you decide you really want
from life.
The Bible emphasizes
how a person can make
something of himself. Be-
lief, positive thinking,
faith in God, and faith in
other people, in yourself,
in life—this is the essence
of the technique it
teaches. “If you can be-
lieve,” it says, “all things
are possible” (Mark 9:23).
“If you have faith … noth-
ing shall be impossible
unto you” (Matthew
17:20). “According to your
faith be it unto you” (Mat-
thew 9:29). Believe! Be-
lieve! In this advice, the
Bible drives home the
truth that faith moves
mountains.
Faith is to believe what we do not see, and the reward of this faith is to see what we believe.
—St. Augustine (354–430 AD)
If you believe you can, you probably can. If you believe you won’t, you most assuredly won’t.
Belief is the ignition switch that gets you off the launching pad.—Denis Waitley, b. 1933, Ameri-
can author, speaker, trainer, peak performance expert
F FF FFAITH IS... AITH IS... AITH IS... AITH IS... AITH IS...
...believing in the unseeable.
F FF FFaith aith aith aith aith is tranquil when it’s very stormy.
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is not passive; it acts out what it believes!
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is asking for what you need.
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is hearing the inaudible, seeing the invisible, believing the incredible,
and receiving the impossible.
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is completely contrary to natural expectation and natural conditions!
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is creating a vacuum in your heart for God to fill.
Faith Faith Faith Faith Faith is not only believing that God can, but that God will!
F FF FFaith aith aith aith aith is not surprised at the answer. Faith expected it to happen.
—David Brandt Berg
Works
44
REFLECTIONS
Faith Works.
Glossary.
1. Psychologist. A specialist in psychology.
2. Undertaking. The act of a person who undertakes any task or responsibility.
3. Ensure. To secure or guarantee.
4. Outcome. A fnal product or end result
5. Trapeze Artist. A circus performer who does an acrobatic performance from swings
and ropes, usually at a considerable height above the audience.
6. Gasped. A sudden intake of breath as in shock or surprise.
7. Overcome. To get the better of in a struggle or confict.
8. Obstacles. Something that hinders or obstructs progress.
9. Tremendous. Extra ordinarily great in size, amount or intensity.
10. Saturate. To make completely wet.
11. Passages. An act or instance of passing from one place.
12. Recondition. To restore to a good and satisfactory condition.
13. Personality. The visible aspects of ones character as it impresses others.
14. Miraculous. Performed by or involving a super natural power or agency.
15. Modify. To change somewhat the form or qualities.
16. Statement. Something stated.
17. Achiever. The person who achieves.
18. Emphasize. To give emphasis to.
19. Essence. The basic, real and invariable nature of a thing, or its signifcant individual
features.
20. Technique. A method of accomplishing a desire or aim.
Points to ponder.
(a) The famous trapeze artist told one of his students, “Throw your heart over the bar and
your body will follow.” Explain in your own words what you think that means.
(b) One famous writer and speaker said, “If you believe that you can, you probably can.
If you believe that you won’t you most assuredly won’t.” Explain why the power of
positive thinking is important.
45
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....|. David Brandt Berg
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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
46 R129 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Give a “rose”
My friend Bruce was a welfare officer. One summer
day he cut an armful of roses from his garden and took
them to a deprived area. He gave some to a blind lady
who smelled them eagerly. “Such a change from the
smells around here!” she exclaimed.
Bruce’s last visit was to what is nowadays called a prob-
lem family. The eldest girl was on two years’ probation.
She stared sullenly when Bruce offered her his last rose. To
his surprise, she snatched it and held it to her cheek. “No
one’s ever given me a rose before,” she said. “I’ve never seen
one close up.”
My friend was touched by the reverence with which the girl
fingered his gift. “My heart went out to her,” he told me, “and I
thought how different her life might have been if, earlier on,
someone else had cared enough to give her a rose.”
Sometimes it takes so very little to bring joy and beauty into
another’s life—and it can make so much difference.
—Francis Gay
Love, appreciation, witnessing
When things go wrong,
And the outlook’s bleak,
And you feel
You can’t get through,
Don’t mope around,
But go and seek
Someone worse off
Than you.
A cheery word, a happy smile,
A helpful little deed,
And you’ll find that life
Is still worthwhile,
When you’ve helped
A friend in need.
—Author unknown
A most important question A most important question A most important question A most important question A most important question
During my second month of nursing school our professor gave us a pop quiz. I was a
conscientious student and had breezed through the questions, until I read the last one: “What
is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?”
Surely this was some kind of joke. I had seen the cleaning woman several times. She was
tall, dark-haired, and in her 50s, but how would I know her name? I handed in my paper,
leaving the last question blank.
Before class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward our quiz
grade. “Absolutely,” said the professor. “In your careers you will meet many people. All are
significant. They deserve your attention and care, even if all you can do is smile and say hello.”
I’ve never forgotten that lesson. I also learned her name was Dorothy.
—JoAnn C. Jones
“You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”
— The Bible, Leviticus 19:18 (NKJ)
I
try to give to the poor people for love what the rich could get for money. No, I wouldn’t
touch a leper for a thousand pounds; yet I willingly cure him for the love of God.
—Mother Teresa (1910–1997)
O
f course, the most wonderful thing you can do for other people is to give them God’s love. Your
own love will run out; it will never be enough. But if you have explained how they can
know God, how they can have Jesus and His eternal, undying love in their heart, then God’s
love can sustain them forever and be a help whenever they draw on it.
So if you’re wondering how you can reach out and show love to another person, even someone who
seems self-sufficient and self-possessed, just ask if they believe in God, or if they would like to know
more about Him. Ask if they’ve ever prayed to Jesus, or if they would like to. Ask them if they would like
to have more love in their life, and then tell them how Jesus can come in and give them more love. This
is the most wonderful and most lasting way to show love to anyone, so try giving them God’s love.
—David Brandt Berg
47
Give a Rose.
Glossary.
1. Welfare offcer. An offcer supported by the government or a special organization
usually to help the poor and underprivileged.
2. Deprived. Lacking the necessities of life, as adequate food, clothing and shelter.
3. Exclaimed. To cry out or speak suddenly.
4. Probation. The test or trial of a persons conduct, character or qualifcations.
5. Reverence. A feeling of or an attitude of deep respect.
6. Bleak. Without hope or encouragement.
7. Mope. To be dejected or depressed.
8. Conscientious. To be done carefully.
9. Breeze. A wind or current of air especially a light one.
10. Absolutely. Positively or certainly, totally.
11. Signifcant. Important.
12. Undying. Deathless.
13. Self-suffcient. Able to survive without outside support or assistance.
Points to ponder.
(a) In the story of the rose, the writer said, “and I thought how different her life might
have been if earlier on in her life someone had taken the time to give her a rose.” Why
did he think that was important?
(b) In the story, “A most important question.” The examiner asked the nursing students,
“What is the frst name of the lady who cleans the school.?” Why do you think that he
asked that question ?
REFLECTIONS
48
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
49
By Tomoko Matsuoka
One day, while browsing in a bookshop,
I came across an encyclopedia with a section of
Bible related articles. I was curious to see how
a secular scholar might depict the great men and
women of the Bible, so I began to read some of
the short biographies-the prophets Daniel, Jeremi-
ah, and Isaiah; King David; Samson; the apostles
Matthew, Peter, and Paul . . .
One after another, things I had accepted
as fact were brought into question: Three people
may have written the book of Isaiah; the apostle
Matthew may not have written the book of Mat-
thew; Paul may not have written some of the
epistles that have been attributed to him. On and
on it went. With phrases like “mythological sym-
bolism,” “legendary accreditations,” and “obscure
visions,” the author went on to explain in great
detail how every book in the Bible was fawed
or shouldn’t be taken literally. Adam and Eve
should be thought of as “symbolic prototypes of
mankind.” The book of Genesis is merely “away
for certain authors to express their theories on the
origins of human life and cultural identity.”
I had only skimmed a few pages when
a hollow feeling settled in my stomach. Part of
me wanted to close the book, but another part
kept fipping the pages, looking for some state-
ment that reaffrmed my faith in the Bible. Then
my eyes fell on the closing sentence of the entry
on Jesus Christ. “In all the inevitable question-
ing over the Biblical account of the resurrection
of Jesus, one fact seems beyond dispute: Jesus’s
disciples were prepared to stake their lives on
its veracity.” And so have countless others down
through the ages, I might add. The author, in his
scholarly attempt to debunk God’s Word, couldn’t
explain away its power.
I left vindicated, then ashamed at how little
faith I had shown just moments earlier. That clos-
ing sentence had driven out and slammed the door
on the diabolical doubts that had entered and tried
to take hold of my mind.
I felt vindicated, then ashamed at how little
faith I had shown just moments earlier. That clos-
ing sentence had driven out and slammed the door
on the diabolical doubts that had entered and tried
Finding Faith
to take hold of my mind.
I realized then why so many people still
have faith in the Bible, even after reading books
like this encyclopedia, which are designed to
undermine faith. Because through the Bible they
have come to know its true Author, God, and
His Son, Jesus Christ.
God is alive and well; Jesus not only rose
from the dead, but He now lives in every heart
that invited Him in; and the words found in the
Bible are alive and powerful. How do I know
these three things to be true? Because I have
experienced them for myself. I believe the Bible
because I have seen its effect in my life.
The word of God is living and powerful,
and sharper than any two – edged sword, pierc-
ing even to the division of soul and spirit, and
of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the
thoughts and intents of the heart.
The Bible, Hebrews 4:12 NKJ
The World of God is the foundation of faith
How do you get faith? It’s a gift of God
and is available to anyone who wants it. The
problem is, most people don’t want it until they
need it, and then they suddenly fnd they don’t
have the faith they need because they have no
background of faith in God’s Word, no founda-
tion. After all, how can they have faith in some-
thing they know little or nothing about?
As no good building is without a good
foundation, there is no solid basis for faith with-
out the Word; faith in God is built on His Word.
So if you feel like you’re weak in faith, there’s
a simple cure: God’s Word will increase your
faith.
Faith comes, it grows, by hearing the
Word of God (Romans 10:17). As you faith-
fully read and study the Word, as you meditate
on it and even memorize it, every word will
inspire, strengthen, and increase your faith. Fill
your mind and heart with positive, encourag-
ing, strengthening, faith-building thoughts from
His Word and you’ll soon be amazed at the faith
you’ll have-true faith, the kind that can stand
any test, the kind that works miracles, the kind
that laste, built on the solid rock foundation of
His truth!
50
Finding Faith.
Glossary.
1. Browsing. To read usually by skimming text for the main points.
2. Encyclopedia. A book or set of books containing articles on various subjects.
3. Secular. Of or pertaining to worldly things. Or to things that are not regarded as
religious.
4. Depict. To represent by or as if by painting.
5. Prophet. A person who speaks for God or a deity and often has the ability to predict
future events
6. Apostle. Any of the early followers of Jesus.
7. Epistle. A letter, especially a formal or didactic one.
8. Attributed. To regard as resulting from a specifc cause.
9. Mythology. Tales telling of historic events and heroes in colorful language mixing
fables and historic events.
10. Symbolism. The practice of representing things by symbols, or investing things with a
symbolic meaning or character.
11. Legendary. Of or pertaining to, or of the nature of a legend.
12. Obscure. Not clear or plain
13. Flawed. Characterized by a faw or fault.
14. Literally. In the literal or strict sense.
15. Theory. A coherent group of general propositions.
16. Origin. Something from which anything arises, or is derived from. The source.
17. Skimmed. To take up or remove.
18. Reaffrm. To assert again.
19. Veracity. Habitual observance of truth.
20. Debunk. To expose.
21. Vindicated. To clear
22. Slammed. To shut or close with force.
23. Diabolical. Having the qualities of a devil.
24. Undermine. To injure or destroy
25. Foundation. The basis or groundwork.
Points to ponder.
(a) Some people say that, seeing is believing, others say believing is seeing. One famous
man of faith said, ”Help me not to see that I may believe, but help me to believe that I
may see.” What do you think that statement means?
(b) What does an Atheist believe?
(c) What is the difference between Creation and the theory of Evolution in relation to how
life on earth began?
(d) Today there are quite a number of scientists who put forward the idea of “Intelligent
Design.” What do you think they mean by Intelligent Design?
(e) Then there is the age old question of, “What came frst, the chicken or the egg?” How
would you answer that question?
REFLECTIONS
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R 102, Go Slow- You'll Get There Quicker, BUR
.q:._.,e._...
51
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
R88 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Stress. Patience. Go Slow.
Go Slow·YouÊll Get There Quicker
By David Brandt Berg
A P A P A P A P A Pr rr rra aa aay yy yyer f er f er f er f er for P or P or P or P or Pa aa aatienc tienc tienc tienc tience ee ee
God, teach me to be patient;
Teach me to go slow.
Teach me how to wait on You
When my way I do not know.
Teach me sweet forbearance
When things do not go right,
So I remain unruffled
When others grow uptight.
Teach me how to quiet
My racing, rising heart,
So I may hear the answer
You are trying to impart.
Teach me to let go, dear God,
And pray undisturbed until
My heart is filled with inner peace
And I learn to know Your will!
—Helen Steiner Rice
I
n quietness and confidence shall be your strength
(Isaiah 30:15, NKJ). There is nothing in the Bible
promoting hurry. The only verse I can ever
remember any preachers or anybody else
using to try to make me rush was, The
king’s business required haste (1
Samuel 21:8, NKJ). But for that
one Scripture, I think there
must be a hundred that tell us
to go slow, or words to that ef-
fect—even to take it easy!
Jesus said, Come to Me, all
you who labor and are heavy
laden, and I will give you rest.
Take My yoke upon you and
learn from Me, for I am gentle
and lowly in heart, and you
will find rest for your souls. For
My yoke is easy and My bur-
den is light (Matthew 11:28-
30, NKJ). When you get under
too much pressure and too
much tension, too heavy a bur-
den and too hard a yoke, it’s not
God’s fault. It’s somebody else’s fault, or your own!
Maybe that’s why God created mules and don-
keys—as a good lesson. They are plodders; they are
very slow, but they have more endurance and can
carry heavier loads than horses. They are the “work-
horses” of the backwoods. They can negotiate trails
that horses would kill themselves on, carrying loads
for miles that a horse couldn’t, especially not a race-
horse.
Racehorses can spurt for a few rounds around
the track, and that’s it! They’re extremely high-
strung, nervous, and are just not workhorses.
They’re not plodders, they’re not load carriers. But
pack mules and donkeys are—and they’re as stub-
born as they come! You cannot rush them. You have
to do it slowly, in their time. They just plod along,
but they do it and they get there. It’s like the old story
of the tortoise and the hare: The tortoise was slow
but he got there!
You can have the emotion and you can have the
speed; I’ll take the low road and the slow road. You
can take the high road and get there first if you want
to—if you get there at all—but I’m going to take the
low road and the slow road, and I’m determined to
get there in one piece, no matter how long it takes.
I can’t count the times I’ve told taxi drivers, “Go
slow and you live longer. Live fast and you’ll die
quicker.” That certainly is true. Doctors and health
experts have said that pressure and tension is kill-
ing people, and that many of today’s
illnesses are either from pressure and
tension, or improper diet. Pressure
and speed are killing people
through heart trouble, nervous
trouble, and high blood pressure.
Lord help us to go slow! We
shouldn’t waste time, but we need
to trust the Lord instead of being
rushed and impatient. Patience
indicates slowness, plodding
along, doing our work persis-
tently and not wasting time,
but also not getting fretful and
worried and all worked up
about it. Impatience is
marked by speed, hurry, rush,
haste, push, pressure, ten-
sion! Patience shows faith.
Impatience shows lack of
faith. Impatience shows that we
don’t think the job is going to get done
unless we hurry and push it and rush it.
But if we’ve got faith that Jesus is going to take
care of it somehow, we can afford to be patient and
go slow and do it right.
52
Go slow and you’ll get there quicker.
Glossary.
1. Confdence. Full trust and belief in the powers.
2. Scripture. Often called the Holy Scriptures religious writings from the Bible.
3. Take it easy. Relax and take care.
4. Yoke. A device for joining together a pair of draught animals.
5. Tension. The act of stretching or straining.
6. Burden. That which is carried.
7. Mule. The sterile off spring of a female horse and a male donkey ,valued as a work
animal.
8. Donkey. A domesticated Ass.
9. Plodder. Someone who works slowly and methodically.
10. Endurance. The ability to withstand hardship.
11. High-strung. At great tension
12. Spurt. To gush or issue suddenly in a stream.
13. Stubborn. Unreasonably obstinate.
14. Determined. Resolute, staunch.
15. Improper. Not proper, not strictly belonging.
16. Persistent. Persisting, especially in the face of opposition.
17. Forbearance. The act of forbearing,
18. Uptight. Tense, nervous.
Points to ponder.
(a) One of Aesop’s fables tells of a race between a hare and a tortoise. One short line from
a children’s rhyme, referring to the story, says, “The hare never made it but the tortoise
did, so you had better take your time or you’ll wish you did.” What virtue or lesson do
you think that this story is trying to promote?
(b) The following quote has some profound meanings, think about it for a moment and
try to relate to and explain the meaning. “Haste makes waste, speed kills, but patience
takes faith.”
REFLECTIONS
53
54
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
55
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
R198 GP-December 2002
v
n a rocont vacation to Australia,
my vito and l voro troatod to an
amazing tour ot an alandonod gold mino
in Ballarat, Victoria. What socrots and
hoartlroaks that tovn hold! Ono mans
trials and triumphs particularly spoko to
mo. Horo is tho story ot Jack VcAuloy.
œ`
v iÛiÀ
-
ary, l havo docidod that
l am going to soll my
lusinoss and travol to tho gold
ûolds ot Australia to striko it
rich!
Striko it poor, you moan!
Nov, Jack VcAuloy, lll havo
nono ot that tancy droam-
ing vhilo my lalios and l go
hungry!
look, lot mo go and try it.
lt l dont ûnd anything, l vill
como lack lotoro tho tall. l
promiso you that.
Ovor his vitos protosts,
Jack sold his coal vagon, his
routo, his grandtathors gold
vatch, and a tov othor tamily
hoirlooms to got onough monoy
to loavo Walos in 1840 and
travol third class to Vollourno,
Australia.
Attor a long and ditûcult
ocoan voyago, ho took tho
lumpy coach to tho gold
ûolds ot Ballarat. Thoro ho
vas shockod to soo hov crazy
tho tovn vas vith gold tovor.
Pooplo voro ovon digging
tramod vith a lock ot hor hair,
vould lo tho last thing that ho
lookod at lotoro ho vont to
sloop and tho ûrst thing ho sav
vhon ho voko in tho morning.
Tho socond thing ho sav
ovory morning vas his tont-
mato, also trom Walos, a lruto
ot a man namod Brian, or as
somo callod him, Tho Vaulor.
Brian had oarnod this namo as a
champion prizoûghtor. Ho stood
a tovoring six toot ûvo, and his
ûst vas as lig as a ham.
Evoryono thought ho vas
unloatallo until ono ûght
that changod his porspoctivo
on lito. Botoro ho had loon
proud, surly, cursing continu-
ally, novor spoaking a kind vord
to anyono, lut that night tho
unthinkallo happonod-ho vas
knockod out cold. Ho lay in lod
tor vooks, dritting in and out
ot consciousnoss, struggling to
rocovor. ln his droamliko stato,
ho travolod through a tunnol
vith a light at tho othor ond, mot
an angol vho shovod him his
in tho city stroots, hoping to
ûnd thoir tortuno. Whon thoy
did striko it rich, thoy vould
otton sguandor thoir monoy on
saloon girls or gamllo it avay,
and lo lroko again in a tov
days.
Jack vas dotorminod that
vould not happon to him. No
sir! With tho last ot his monoy,
ho lought a mining liconso and
tho tood, oguipmont, and othor
supplios ho vould nood. Thon
ho sot ott tor a promising sito.
Tho days turnod to vooks
and tho vooks to months. Evory
day ho vould roturn to his sito
and dig into tho lovols ot tho
oarth liko a tunnoling molo.
Jack vas olsossod vith ono
thing and ono thing only-gold.
But ho did not ûnd gold.
lnstoad ho tound hungor, llis-
torod hands, soro musclos, and
disappointmont that grov into
dosporation.
At tho ond ot tho day, as
ho lay in his cot, his thoughts
turnod to Vary. Hor picturo,
"Y#0ETER6AN'ORDER
Topics: Prayer, God's love and care, His wisdom.
56
2%&,%#4) /.3
ontiro lito and gavo him a choico
to roturn to oarth or to givo up
and dio. Ho choso to livo.
Tho oxporionco romado him
into somoono that his old lud-
dios could not ovon rocognizo.
What vould thoy say nov, it
thoy could soo him knooling
noxt to his lod and praying liko
a littlo kid? Not having tho hoart
to ûght any moro, ho travolod
to tho gold ûolds to mako a
nov start in lito.
Jack vont to his tood cup-
loard to mako his lroaktast. lt
vas ompty. Turning to his com-
panion, Jack said, Brian, tomor-
rov l am putting my things up
tor salo. lm gotting out ot horo.
l dont havo onough tor a tickot
lack to Walos, lut somohov lll
got a jol in Vollourno. Thon lll
go homo to my protty vito and
svoot childron. lvo got to go
lotoro tho guartz ûlors kill my
lungs and thoros nothing lott ot
mo to savo.
Dont givo up, Jack. Tho
gold tovor has you. lt you dont
guit, tho good lord vill holp
your droams como truo.
All thoso protty vords
sound good onough, lut ovon
tho gold tovor cant koop a man
vorking vhon ho is dovn to
vatory cottoo and his last corn
liscuit. l cant vork tho mino
anymoro. lt is just too hard.
No ono is asking you to
vork vithout tood. l havo somo
grul lott. Not much, mind you,
lut onough to got you through
anothor day. Dont guit yot.
Vaylo tomorrov vill lo your
day. Wait and soo. Just try ono
moro day.
l cant tako your tood.
What vill you do thon?
Ono moro day vont mako
much dittoronco to this iron-
clad stomach. lt you striko it
rich you can pay it lack-vith
intorost it you liko. That vay it
vont lo charity.
lt prolally vouldnt hurt to
try ono moro day, Jack admit-
tod.
Nov youro talking. Como
on and pray vith mo. Got dovn
on your prayor lonos and lot tho
ûoorloards tool your sincority.
Jack tolt a lit avkvard
alout tho vholo idoa, lut ho
svallovod his prido and did
it anyvay. But, lut l dont
knov hov to pray, Jack stam-
morod.
Thats OK, lvo loon got-
ting onough practico latoly tor
tho loth ot us, Brian said as
ho closod his oyos and logan.
lord, vo aro coming to \ou
asking tor a tavor. Vy triond
horo, Jack VcAuloy, is dovn
on his luck and ho noods ono
ot \our spoctacular miraclos.
\ou knov, tho kind that \ou
usod to spocializo in vhon \ou
valkod tho oarth. liko tho timo
\ou told \our disciplos to go
dovn to tho lako and pull out a
ûsh and thoro vas a gold coin
in its mouth. Wo nood ono ot
thoso miraclos tomorrov.
\ou soo, Jack horo has lott
his vito and childron to como
horo to ûnd gold, so ho could
givo thom a lottor lito, vhoro
tho root vont loak and his
lalios vont go hungry. Ploaso
holp him to ûnd somo gold
tomorrov, or ho is going to lo
in a hoap ot troullo.
Woll, thats alout all. Woro
counting on \ou and knov
that \ou vill tako caro ot us
liko \ou promisod \ou vould.
Thank \ou kindly. Amon.
ln tho morning Jack sot out
to tho ûold as ho had dono
ovory day tor tho past throo
months. lt vas just anothor day.
His last, ho thought.
Ill jvst dig todc, to /v:or
Pricu. Hc did go to t/c trov/lc
to sc, t/ct ¡rctt, ¡rc,cr for :c
cud gitc :c /is lcst :ccl, so ct
lccst I ccu s/ov /i: t/ct I tricd.
Nothing spocial happonod
that morning. Ho vas alout to
givo up vhon his oyos spiod
somothing shiny. Ho turnod it
ovor vith his pickaxo. Could it
lo? Ho lrushod avay tho dirt
that hid its glory. \os, it vas a
gold nuggot tho sizo ot an applo!
Ho vas rich! Tho rost ot
tho day ho vas too olatod to
do much ot anything olso lut
vhoop and hollor tor joy, lut
tho noxt day ho tolographod his
vito vith tho good novs. Sho
camo on tho noxt ship vith hor
childron. Sho and Jack logan a
gonoral provisions storo vith tho
gold ho had tound. Thoy oponod
up a shop in tovn callod Tho
Gold Bug that locamo vory
prosporous. Brian tho Vaulor
vas thoir storo managor.
So vhon you como to tho
ond ot your ropo, dont givo up.
Just look to God, tollov Him,
and tho storm vill pass. Tho
rainlov vill como, and youll
lo glad you turnod to Him. And
maylo it you roach out to holp
somoono in nood, liko Brian did
tor Jack, Ho vill rovard you tor
that, too.
But, you may say, l vill
novor striko gold liko Jack did!
Woll, it you look, you can ûnd
somothing ovon moro valu-
allo than gold. Tho Billo tolls
us, Hov much lottor to got
visdom than gold! And to got
undorstanding is to lo choson
rathor than silvor. (Provorls 16:
16.) look tor Gods gold, and
youll ûnd troasuro vhoro you
novor oxpoctod it.
R198 GP-December 2002 Copyright © 2002 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
C. Peter Van Gorder is a volunteer with The Family.
If you'd like more inspirational
reading, subscribe to Activated!
Contact the address below, or visit
www.activated.org.
57
Gold Fever
Glossary.
1. Abandoned. Given up, forsaken.
2. Strike it rich. Finding a large amount of gold when prospecting.
3. Protest. A formal or serious declaration of opinion
4. Heirloom. A possetion usually of value handed down from generation to generation.
5. Squander. To spend something usually in a wasteful manner.
6. Gamble. To participate in a game of chance for cash or other stakes.
7. Broke. (slang) Having no money. e.g. (At the end of the month I am usually broke)
8. Obsessed. Having an obsession.
9. Blister. A thin swelling on the skin containing a clear liquid, as from a burn or other
injury.
10. Desperation. The state of being desperate or having the recklessness of despair.
11. Brute. A brutal, insensitive or crude person.
12. Prize fghter. A boxer who will fght challengers for money.
13. Perspective. A view or outlook.
14. Entire. Complete or whole.
15. Buddy. (American slang) friend.
16. Lungs. An organ of the body used for respiration.
17. Grub (slang) food.
18. Strike it rich. A term used by gold prospectors meaning to suddenly fnd a large
amount of gold.
19. Charity. Generous actions or donations, to aid the poor , ill or helpless.
20. Pride. Excessive self-esteem, conceit. The state of being proud.
21. Stammer. A speech impediment, to speak with random stops and repetitions.
22. Spectacular. Sensational, or of constituting a spectacle.
23. Miracle. A spectacular event manifesting divine intervention in human affairs.
24. Luck. The force that seems to operate for good or ill in a person’s life.
25. Humor. A comical or absurd trait in a person.
26. Elated. To be proud, glad or in high spirits.
27. Prosperous. To prosper, to have fnancial success or good fortune.
28. Maul. A hammer or mace for driving stakes or wedges.
29. Wisdom. The state of being wise. Knowledge of right or wrong.
30. Rainbow. A bow or arc of prismatic colors.
Points to ponder.
(a) Brian the boxer had a near death experience. How did he describe it?
(b) Many people dream of getting rich quick. List the possible ways that you can think of
to get rich quick.
(c) If you suddenly struck it rich like Jack McCauley in the story, what would you do with
your money?
(d) In what way did the faith and belief of Brian change the outcome in the story for Jack?
REFLECTIONS
58
59
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¸ .-¬¸.- .¬ ±...¬...-.- ..¬¬_.- ¬.±...._ ¬.- ¸ .-¬¸.- ¸¸_.¸¸ southwark ¬
New Park ..-¸..¸...-..¬........¬.¨. ..±¸.¬_.- .¸¬±.._..- ..¸._ ¸¸_.¸¸- ..¬.¸.¬ _.-
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Linda Dillow
C.H. Spurgeon
He Knows
The logic of it all
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
60
2%&,%#4) /.3
"Ì need oil,¨ said an ancient monk; so he planted an
olive sapling.
"Lord,¨ he prayed, "it needs rain that its tender roots
may drink and swell. Send gentle showers.¨ And the
Lord sent gentle showers.
"Lord,¨ prayed the monk, "my tree needs sun. Send
sun, Ì pray Thee.¨ And the sun shone, gilding the
dripping clouds.
"Now frost, my Lord, to brace its tissues,¨ cried the
monk. And behold, the little tree stood sparkling with
frost, but at evening it died.
Then the monk sought the cell of a brother monk,
and told his strange experience.
"Ì, too, planted a little tree,¨ he said, "and see, it
thrives well. But Ì entrust my tree to its God. He who
made it knows better what it needs than a man like
me. Ì laid no condition. Ì fxed no ways or means. 'Lord,
send what it needs,' Ì prayed. 'Storm or sunshine, wind,
R205 GP-February 2003 Topics: Trust, faith, yielding to God, His care.
rain, or frost-Thou hast made
it and Thou dost know.'¨
-Attributed to Linda Dillow
By C. H. Spurgeon
The other evening Ì was
riding home after a heavy day's
work. Ì felt very weary and
depressed, when swiftly and
suddenly that text came to me,
"My grace is suffcient for thee¨
(The Bible, 2 Corinthians 12:9).
Ì said, "Ì should think it is, Lord,¨
and burst out laughing. Ìt seemed
to make unbelief so absurd.
Ìt was as though some little
fsh, being very thirsty, was
troubled about drinking the
river dry, and Father Thames
said, "Drink away, little fsh, my
stream is suffcient for thee.¨
Again, Ì imagined a man
away up yonder, in a lofty
mountain, saying to himself, "Ì
(EKNOWS
breathe so many cubic feet of air every year, Ì fear Ì
shall exhaust the oxygen in the atmosphere.¨ But the
earth might say, "Breathe away, O man, and fll thy
lungs. My atmosphere is suffcient for thee.¨
Be great believers! Little faith will bring your souls to
Heaven, but great faith will bring Heaven to your souls.
Note: Believed to be the most widely popular
of English preachers in the 19th century, Charles
Haddon Spurgeon lived from 1834-1892. He
preached his frst sermon at 16, pastored his frst
church at 17, and at 19 was installed as shepherd
over the fock of the New Park Street Chapel,
Southwark, London. During his pastorate in London,
Spurgeon ministered to a congregation of almost
6,000 people each Sunday, published his sermons
weekly, wrote a monthly magazine, and founded a
college for pastors, two orphanages, an old-folks
home, a colportage (religious tracts and books)
society, and several mission stations.
4HELOGICOFITALL
"Do not worry, saying,
'What shall we eat?' or
'What shall we drink?' or
'What shall we wear?'
For your heavenly Father
knows that you need all
these things. But seek frst
the kingdom of God and
His righteousness, and
all these things shall be
added to you¨ (The Bible,
Matthew 6:31-33 NKJV).
He knows.
Glossary.
1. Monk. A man who has withdrawn from the world for religious reasons.
2. Sapling. A young tree
3. Entrust. To charge or invest with a trust.
4. Condition. A particular mode of being of a person.
5. Frost. A degree or state of coldness suffcient to freeze water.
6. Righteousness. The quality or state of being Righteous
7. Weary. Physically or mentally exhausted by hard work.
8. Depressed. Sad and gloomy.
9. Suffcient. Adequate for the purpose.
10. Yonder (Old English) meaning, over there, or in the distance.
11. Atmosphere. The gaseous envelope surrounding the earth. Or the perceptible spirit or
mood of a location.
12. Preacher. A person whose occupation or function is to preach the Gospel.
Points to ponder.
(a) The frst paragraph tells the story of two monks, who each planted an olive tree. One
tree died and the other grew. The outcome was determined by the different attitude that
the monks had. Explain how their attitude differed.
(b) The last paragraph tells the story of a preacher called Spurgeon, who was one day feeling
weary and depressed. He had a sudden change of attitude and began to laugh. Explain
what it was that changed his attitude.
61
REFLECTIONS
62
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C.Peter Van Gorder
.q:._.,e._... pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
63
2%&,%#4) /.3
R199 GP-January 2003
Topics: New Year, goals, love, faith, prayer.
Copyright © 2003 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org
C. Peter Van Gorder and Ìan Bach are full-time volunteers with The Family.
ThIs qcar...
|´ll !akc morc !Imc !o
laugh and smIlc,
To jccl !hc uInd upon
mq jacc,
To lcarn !ruc uIsdom
jrom a chIld,
GIcc mq soul !hc
nccdcd spacc,
To lIcc lIjc purc and
clcar...
...!hIs qcar.
ThIs qcar.
|´ll lcarn !o !urn ojj
mq compu!cr,
|n!crac! uI!h human
bcIngs,
Spcnd lcss !Imc In on-
lInc s!upor,
Morc !Imc lcarnIng,
brca!hIng, sccIng
All !ha! lIjc holds
dcar...
...!hIs qcar.
ThIs qcar.
| uIll rcsolcc !o urI!c
!ha! lc!!cr
Tha! | hacc !oo long
ncglcc!cd,
Makc an achIng hcar!
jccl bc!!cr,
Chccr a jrIcnd uho
jccls dcjcc!cd,
BrIng somconc somc
chccr...
...!hIs qcar.
ThIs qcar...
|´ll no! bc hIjackcd bq
mq dcadlIncs,
Or ImprIsoncd bq
ambI!Ions.
Or lc! dIsmal, gloomq
hcadlIncs
DIc!a!c mq hcar!´s
dIsposI!Ion.
|´ll choosc jaI!h, no!
jcar...
...!hIs qcar.
ThIs qcar...
|´ll scc !hc s!rugglIng
ßoucr bcnca!h
Thc hard, jros!q
cx!crIor
Oj onc uho lc!s
jrus!ra!Ion scc!hc
Bccausc !hcq jccl
InjcrIor.
|´ll !rq !o drau !hcm
ncar...
...!hIs qcar.
ThIs qcar...
No hIgh and mIgh!q
rcsolu!Ions
|I! jor prcsIdcn!s and
kIngs.
|´ll s!ar! a quIc!
rccolu!Ion,
Scck !hcsc sImplc
locIng !hIngs
Abocc ucal!h or
carccr...
...!hIs qcar.
"Y#0ETER6AN'ORDER
n my dream a celestial being stood by
my bed. The light that emanated from
him obscured his bodily form. He held in
his hands a large book, which he offered
me. Ì hesitated a moment, then took it
and opened it carefully. What would its
pages contain? A detailed listing of all of
my sins and mistakes of the past year,
perhaps? To my surprise, the pages were
blank.
¨What is this?¨ Ì asked.
¨As this book is fresh and new, so is the
year before you,¨ he answered. ¨This is
another chance for you to do the right thing.
Make your mark carefully upon its pages,
for it cannot be easily erased. Take care, for
what you write will be read for generations to
come.¨ With that, the dream ended.
A short while later, Ì was out shopping with
my wife. As Ì was waiting for her to try on
some clothes, Ì browsed through the store.
My eye caught a writing book on sale÷one
of those diaries with blank pages, to be filled
up with musings, dreams, prayers. Ì found a
cover Ì liked and bought the book.
My wife was skeptical of my purchase,
¨Don't you think you have enough half-empty
writing books at home?¨
¨Yes,¨ Ì answered, ¨but this one just
beckoned me somehow.¨
There is something wonderful and
frightening about looking at the blank page of
a new book. Like the new year, it waits for us
to make our mark upon it. Let's write beautiful
words upon its pages, words that will bring joy
to others.
"Y)AN"ACH
9
,-"1/"-
If you'd like more inspirational material, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address on this sheet, or visit www.activated.org.
THE
64
The diary.
Glossary.
1. Celestial. Having to do with heaven, heavenly.
2. Emanated. Come or spread out from.
3. Obscure. Not discovered or known about.
4. Hesitated. Not willing to do something.
5. Erased. To delete or remove.
6. Generations. All of the people born and living at about the same time.
7. Musing. Absorbed in thought.
8. Beckoned. To make a movement, to encourage or tell someone to follow
9. Stupor. A state of near unconsciousness.
10. Neglected. Fail to give proper care and attention to.
11. Hijacked. Illegally seize control of something
12. Deadlines. The latest time or date by which something should be done.
13. Imprisoned. To put into or keep in prison.
14. Ambitions. A strong desire to do or achieve something.
15. Frustrated. Cause to feel dissatisfed.
16. Seethe. Be flled with great but unexpressed anger.
Points to ponder.
(a) What is the purpose of keeping a diary? Think of a couple of reasons why people keep
diaries.
(b) The poem speaks of a number of New Years resolutions. What kind of resolutions
would you personally make?
REFLECTIONS
65
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66
2%&,%#4) /.3
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Topics: Salvation, giving oneself to God, God's love and care.
The best manager of all tells us why He is so good at His job.
GOD'S RLSLML
To Whom !t May Concern
! heard you were Iookíng Ior someone to manage your IíIe. ! wouId
Iíke to appIy Ior the ¡ob.
! beIíeve ! am the most quaIíñed candídate Ior the posítíon oI IíIe
manager. ActuaIIy, ! am the onIy One who has ever done thís ¡ob
successIuIIy.
! was the ñrst manager oI human beíngs. ! made them, ín Iact, so
naturaIIy ! know how they work and what ís needed to heIp them run at
top eIñcíency and maxímum happíness IeveI. !t wíII be Iíke havíng the
manuIacturer as your personaI mechaníc.
!I thís ís the ñrst tíme you have consídered My servíces, ! wouId ¡ust
Iíke to poínt out that My saIary has aIready been paíd by the bIood oI
My Son, Jesus, on the cross oI CaIvary. What ! need Irom you ís the
acknowIedgment that the príce ís suIñcíent to pay Ior aII oI your sín
and your índependence Irom Me.
The next thíng ! ask Ior ís your permíssíon to ñx what`s wrong ín
your IíIe so you can experíence the IuII IíIe ! created you Ior. ActuaIIy,
you can expect some ma¡or changes and revísíons, but that`s nothíng
to worry about. ! wíII make the needed changes, ín My way and ín My
tíme. The other good news ís that ! wíII change your desíres and gíve
you the courage and wíII to undergo these changes Ior the better.
PIease keep your hands out oI the way. Ðon`t try to heIp Me and
don`t resíst Me. AII ! reaIIy need ís your IuII commítment and coopera-
tíon. !I you gíve Me those, the process can go smoothIy, wíthout deIays.
You won`t be dísappoínted.
Yours síncereIy,
GOÐ
P.S. !I you need to see My credentíaIs, ! created the heavens and the
earth.
Glve yoursell lo God, He
con do more wllh you lhon
you con.
lhe greolness ol o mon´s
power ls lhe meosure
ol hls surrender lo Hls
Creolor. ll ls nol o quesllon
ol who you ore or whol
you ore, bul whelher God
conlrols you.
He who obondons hlmsell
lo God wlll never be
obondoned by God.
Adoptcd jrom Gcnc Richords
God’s Resume.
Glossary.
1. Candidate. A person who is selected by others as a contestant for an offce, honor etc.
2. Effciency. The state or quality of being effcient competency in performance.
3. Consider. To think about, especially in order to make a decision.
4. Calvary. The place where the crucifxion of Jesus, took place, a hill near Jerusalem.
5. Acknowledge. To admit to be real or true, recognize the existence, truth or fact of.
6. Permission. Authorization granted to do something, formal consent.
7. Courage. The quality of mind or spirit that enables a person to face diffculty, danger,
pain etc.
8. Revision. The act or work of revising.
9. Commitment. The act of committing, pledging, or engaging ones self.
10. Cooperation. The act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose
or beneft.
11. Surrender. To yield to the possession or the power of another.
12. Abandon. To leave behind.
Points to ponder.
(a) The article ‘God’s Resume, urges us to give control of our lives to God. How can we
as humans do that?
(b) The article suggests a communication between God the creator and a human one of
His creations. How is it possible for a human to communicate with God?
REFLECTIONS
67
68
ol\ vQdKU0SufavSum;xpfrsm;
R 281, His Secret Stairs, BUR
By Mary Butterfied
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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
69
We soar to higher realms of grace;
Without them we must roam for aye
On planes of undeveloped faith,
For faith grows but by exercise
In circumstance impossible.
Oh, paradox of Heaven. The load
We think will crush was sent to lift us
Up to God! Then, soul of mine,
Climb up!-for naught can ever be
crushed
Save what is underneath the weight.
How may we climb? By what ascent
Shall we surmount the carping cares
Of life? Within His Word is found
The key which opens His secret stairs:
Alone with Christ, secluded there,
We mount our loads, and rest in Him.
Seek the Lord while He may be
found; call on Him while He is near
(Isaiah 55:6*).Be strong and coura-
geous. Do not be terrifed; do not be
discouraged, for the Lord your God
will be with you wherever you go
(Joshua 1:9).
Finally, be strong in the Lord and in
His mighty power (Ephesians 6:10).
One day when walking down the street,
On business bent, while thinking hard
About the “hundred cares” which seemed
Like thunder clouds about to break
In torrents, Selfpity said to me:
“You poor, poor thing, you have too much
To do. Your life is far too hard.
This heavy load will crush you soon.”
A swift response of sympathy
Welled up within. The burning sun
Seemed more intense. The dust and noise
Of puffng motors fying past
With rasping blast of blowing horn
Incensed still more the whining nerves,
The fabled last backbreaking straw
To weary, troubled, fretting mind.
“Ah, yes, ‘twill break and crush my life!
I cannot bear this constant strain
Of endless, aggravating cares;
They are too great for such as I.”
So thus my heart consoled itself,
Enjoying misery, when lo!
A “still small voice” distinctly said,
“Twas sent to lift you-not to crush.”
I saw at once my great mistake.
My place was not beneath the load
But on the top! God meant it not
That I should carry it. He sent
It here to carry me. Full well
He knew my incapacity
Before the plan was made. He saw
A child of His in need of grace
And power to serve: A puny twig
Requiring sun and rain to grow;
An undeveloped chrysalis;
A weak soul lacking faith in God.
He could not help but see all this
And more. And then, with tender thought
He placed it where it had to grow-
Or die. To lie and cringe beneath
One’s load means death, but life and power
Await all those who dare to rise above.
Our burdens are our wings; on them
His Secret Stairs
By Mary Butterfeld
REFLECTIONS
70
REFLECTIONS
His secret stairs.
Glossary.
1 Torrents. A strong fast moving stream of water.
2 Sympathy. The feeling of being sorry for someone.
3 Rasping. To make a hoarse grating noise.
4 Fable. A short story with a moral lesson.
5 Backbreaking. Vrey hard labor,heavy prolonged work.
6 Aggravate. To make worse.
7 Consoled. To give comfort in a time of grief or dissapoibtment.
8 Incapacity. Inability to do something.
9 Puny. Small and weak.
10 Chrysalis. An insect pupa.
11 Cringe. Shrink back fromor cower in fear.
12 Realms. A kingdon.
13 Grace. Elegance of movement.
14 Paradox. A statement that sounds absurd but maybe true.
15 Secluded. Sheltered and private.
Points to ponder.
(A) The poem suggests that the burdens, problems and daily struggles in life are sent to
make us better. In what way does suffering make us better?
(B) In the last verse of the poem it mentions, “His secret stairs,” as a means to escape the
troubles of life. What do you think, his secret stairs really are?
71
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
72
By Chirstina Andreassen
can still remember when it was just me-self-assured, confdent, and proud of my ability to ma-
neuver my car along life’s road. I was master of my fate. I loved those solitary hours on the highway,
watching the sun sink below the horizon. I loved the feel of the wheels gripping the road. I loved
being able to go anywhere at a whim, wherever suited my fancy at the moment. Life was all mine to
enjoy, and I did my best to live it up. Sure, there were hard time too-lonely, dark stretches of road in
the night that seemed to almost swallow me up, time when I had to lie fat on my back in the mud,
trying to fnd a mechanical problem or stop an oil leak, times when I had to replace a blown tire in
scorching sun or pouring rain, moments of confusion and frustration attempting to reverse out of dead
ends. No, being alone wasn’t all fun and games, but I always managed to brush off those unfortunate
incidents and set out again in search of new adventures.
Then one day You hitched a ride. When I asked where You were going, You said, “Wherever
you’re going,” and I soon discovered a wonderful friendship. You were always there to hold the map
and to give directions when I was lost. Somehow all the routes were known to You. You were there
too in the darkness of those long night drives, to hold my hand when I was afraid and lonely. Some-
how Your presence always made the darkness bright. You were there to push when I needed to get
back onto the road after my quest for adventure would land me in a ditch. Somehow You understood
my disappointment, and You never said, “I told you so.” You were even there to embrace and forgive
after I foolishly argued with You and told You to get out of my life. Somehow You kept loving me
and having faith in me. But still I insisted on driving. “After all, it’s my car,” I would remind You.
And although I was thankful for Your advice and directions, the fnal decision always rested with me.
“After all, it’s my life.”
Miles and miles few by, and still I insisted or remaining in the driver’s seat, ignoring Your of-
fers to take control that is, until the day I totaled my car. Humiliated and heartbroken, my dream car in
pieces, I fnally handed You the car keys. With a smile of relief, You rolled up Your sleeves and went
to work making repairs. In no time we were back on the road, with You as the driver and me as the
passenger. Relinquishing control had been far more diffcult than I had expected.
“Hey!” I would yell, lunging at the steering wheel.” What are You doing? I thought we’d
agreed to go that way!” Immediately You would brake and patiently wait until I had stopped strug-
gling to regain control, and then would turn to me and say with all the tenderness of a father explain-
ing to his child, “Trust Me. I know what I am doing.” Reluctantly I would surrender and sit, chafng
in my seat until we turned the next corner. Suddenly it would become abundantly clear that You did
know where You were taking me, and I would turn to You with a look of amazement at Your wisdom
and foresight.
But that was a lesson I would soon forget, and before long I’d be at it again. We would pass an
amusement, and I would whine, “Hey, why didn’t You stop?” You would only turn and smile know-
ingly, “Trust Me. I have something far better up a head.” And sure enough, there was always some-
thing far better- something I never would have dreamed possible.
After a while I grew accustomed to Your driving. I learned to sit on my hands and bite my
tongue when your ways ran contrary to mine, forcing myself to patiently wait until the next bend in
the road revealed the surprise behind that mysterious smile of Yours. Blowouts and wrong turns be-
came a thing of the past too, as were my frantic searches for happiness and excitement. There never
seemed to be a dull moment with You in the driver’s seat.
That's not to say there weren't momentary disappointments, like the times You turned down
lonely, dusty roads, and it was just the two of us for miles. But those lonely routes led to some of the
most breathtaking views, panoramas full of hidden, mysterious beauty that You had reserved for us
REFLECTIONS
God at the Wheel
I
God at the wheel
Glossary.
1. Self assured. To be confdent in oneself.
2. Solitary. Alone, without companions, unattended.
3. Horizon. The line or circle that forms the apparent boundary between earth and sky.
4. Maneuver. A planned and regulated movement or evolution of troops, warships, etc.
5. Whim. An odd or capricious notion or desire, a sudden or freakish fancy.
6. Frustration. A feeling of dissatisfaction, often accompanied by anxiety or depression,
resulting from unfulflled needs or unresolved problems.
7. Hitch-hike. To travel by standing by the side of the road and soliciting rides from
passing vehicles.
8. Quest. A search or pursuit made in order to fnd or obtain something.
9. Disappointment. The act or fact of disappointing, the state of feeling disappointed.
10. Embrace. To take or clasp in the arms, to hug.
11. Insisted. To be emphatic, frm or resolute on some matter of desire.
12. Passenger. A person who is traveling in an automobile, bus, train, airplane, especially
one who is not the driver or pilot.
13. Relinquish. To renounce or surrender a possession or right.
14. Lunge. A sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife, stab.
15. Tenderness. State of being delicate or soft in nature.
16. Reluctant. Unwilling, disinclined.
17. Amazement. Overwhelming surprise or astonishment.
18. Foresight.. Care or provision for the future; provident care; prudence.
19. Amusement. Anything that amuses; pastime; entertainment.
20. Accustomed. Customary, usual, habitual.
21. Contrary. Opposite in nature or character; diametrically or mutually opposed.
22. Mysteries. Anything that is kept secret; or remains unexplained, unknown.
23. Frantic. Desperate or wild with excitement, passion, fear, pain etc.
24. Momentary. Lasting but a moment, very brief, feeting.
25. Breathtaking. Thrilling, beautiful, remarkable, astonishing or the like.
26. Panorama. An unobstructed and wide view of an extensive area in all directions.
27. Canyon. A deep valley with steep sides often with a stream fowing through it.
28. Incredible. So extraordinary as to seem impossible, not credible.
Points to ponder.
(a) In this story the passage through life is depicted as a car journey with Jesus as the driver and the
girl in the story as the passenger. What do you think the main point and main message of this story
is?
REFLECTIONS
73
alone. There were also times when You chose routes that led through places I had always dreaded
dark, sunless valleys and canyons. Why here? I would silently protest. And You could always tell.
"Trust Me," You would say. "Have I ever failed you before?" As I forced my soul to be still and trust,
I found strength and courage I had never known I had.
Since the day that You took the wheel, I've experienced breathtaking heights and valleys with
a beauty all their own, the thrill of adventure, incredible happiness, and love without measure. You
were right. I would never regret a life spent with You at the wheel.
74
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R182 GP-September 2002
aííects millions e·ery year. Ie has íound that depressed
people regard e·ery minor obstacle as an impassable barrier.
Responding to anything is íelt to be useless because nothing
I do matters.` Successíul therapy, he told me, starts when we
begin to belie·e again that we can be eííecti·e human beings
and can control our li·es.
A man I knew had an alcoholic wiíe. Again and again she
disappointed him. But he ne·er lost hope. One night, she
shamed him in íront oí old íriends. Aíterward, she broke
into tears. \hy don`t you lea·e me·` she cried. Because
I remember a ·ery beautiíul person,` he answered. And I
belie·e she`s still there.` Ultimately, she did reco·er.
\e hope as naturally as the seeds sprout and the sun rises,
and perhaps íor the same reasons. Iope`s signature seems
to be written on earth and sky and sea and all that li·es. But
natural and ·ital as hope may be, we can lose it. \ith many oí
us, hope simply grows tired as our li·es grow tired.
Precisely because hope is in the natural now oí liíe, it is
unleashed naturally by remo·ing the abnormal impediments
that block it. Iere are some suggestions:
+RSHIRUWKHPRPHQW1here are times when it is hard to
belie·e in the íuture, when we are temporarily just not bra·e
enough. \hen this happens, concentrate on the present.
Culti·ateOHSHWLWERQKHXU,the little happiness`, until courage
returns. Look íorward to the beauty oí the next moment,
the next hour, the promise oí a good meal, sleep, a book, a
mo·ie, the immediate likelihood that tomorrow the sun will
rise. Sink roots into the present until the strength grows to
think about tomorrow.
7DNHDFWLRQ\hen I can`t see any way out,` a stranger
wrote me some years ago, I do something anyway.` 1his is
good ad·ice to anyone paralyzed by despair.
%HOLHYHLQKRSH Don`t be persuaded that the pessimists ha·e
a corner on truth. 1hese people would rather li·e in the íog
oí skepticism than chance disappointment. It is the adult in
us, not the child, which, when knocked down, gets up again
and says, against the odds, 1omorrow will be better.` Iope is
not a lie, but the truth itselí.
So, summon hope. It is as right as spring sunlight. It is a
goal in itselí, an exercise in gallantry, a írame oí mind, a style
oí liíe, a climate oí the heart.
|it|j|1|ª¡ |1¡| || Jªªt |ª |1t «ª||J || Jªªt ªj
1ª)t.
-4¡|||ª |J|1t|
%\$UGLV:KLWPDQ
Iope is the mechanism that keeps the
human race tenaciously ali·e and dreaming,
planning, building. Iope is not the opposite
oí realism. It is the opposite oí cynicism and
despair. 1he best oí humanity has always
hoped when there was no way, li·ed what was
unli·able, and managed to build when there was
little to build on.
A merry heart does good like a medicine,`
says the book oí Pro·erbs, in the Bible. 1his
ancient knowledge has gained new con£rmation
in our time. It was íound aíter \orld \ar II, íor
example, that American prisoners oí war who
had been con·inced that they would come out
ali·e, whose mind and spirit were íocused on
liíe as it was to be li·ed in the íuture, emerged
with much less damage than those who íelt they
would ne·er go home again.
Dr. Martin L. P. Seligman, oí the Uni·ersity
oí Pennsyl·ania, has done much research on
the causes oí depression, the disorder that
ó1tª 1ª)t J|t|, «1¡| t||t ||it|¹
-\m¡ \|¡ \|Jªª [ì||t- |, |1¡ª¡|¡ª «|||t|.
4
ay the God oí hope £ll you with all joy and peace as you
trust in Iim, so that you may o·ernow with hope by the
power oí the Ioly Spirit ,1he Bible, Romans 15:13 NIV,.
|
inally our hope and íaith are strong and steady. 1hen, when
that happens, we are able to hold our heads high no matter
what happens and know that all is well, íor we know how
dearly God lo·es us. ,1he Li·ing Bible, Romans 5:4b-5.,
Topics: Hope, hard times, God's help, faith.
75
76
Hope Eternal
Glossary.
1. Mechanism. A piece of machinery
2. Tenaciously. Holding frmly to something.
3. Realism. The acceptance of the truth.
4. Cynicism. Selfsh, inconsiderate mind.
5. Emerged. To become known.
6. Depression. The mental state of unhappiness.
7. Impassable. Impossible to travel along or over.
8. Ultimately. Being the best or most extreme of its kind.
9. Unleashed. To set free.
10. Precisely. Accurately, exactly.
11. Impediments. A hindrance or obstruction.
12. Cultivate. Prepared and used for crops or gardens.
13. Paralyzed. Cause to become unable to move.
14. Despair. The complete loss of hope.
15. Pessimist. A negative person who sees the bad or dark side to every aspect.
16. Gallantry. Courageous behavior.
Points to ponder.
(a) This article encourages us to always try to have a positive outlook on life. To be
optimists and not pessimists. One short quote says,”When hope dies, what else lives?”
What do you think that means?
(b) Think about your dreams for the future and discuss your two mean dreams for the
future and how you plan to make them come true.
REFLECTIONS
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Ìt is a great matter to know just how to rest-how to be quiet when
all around seems tumultuous.
We irritate and excite our souls about the coming emergency,
and we approach it with worn and feverish spirits, and so mar our
Master's purpose and work.
When the crisis comes, He will tell me what to do. The orders are
not given until the appointed day. Why should Ì fume and fret and
worry as to what the sealed envelope contains? When the hour
strikes, the secrets shall be revealed.
And when the crisis comes, He will tell me what to say. Ì need
not begin to prepare my retorts and my responses. What shall Ì say
when death comes, to me or to my loved one? Never mind, He will
tell me. And what when sorrow or persecution comes? Never mind,
He will tell me.
-J.H. Jowett (19
th
-century English Congregationalist)
Jcrry was ihc kind of guy you
Iovc io haic. Hc was aIways in
a good mood and aIways had
somcihing posiiivc io say. Vhcn
somconc wouId ask him how
hc was doing, hc wouId rcpIy,
ªIf I wcrc any |ciicr, I wouId |c
iwins!¨
Hc was a uniquc rcsiaurani
managcr |ccausc hc had scvcraI
waiicrs who had foIIowcd
him around from rcsiaurani
io rcsiaurani. Thc rcason ihc
waiicrs foIIowcd Jcrry was
|ccausc of his aiiiiudc. Hc was a
naiuraI moiivaior. If an cmpIoycc
was having a |ad day, Jcrry was
ihcrc icIIing ihc cmpIoycc how
io Iook on ihc posiiivc sidc of
ihc siiuaiion.
Sccing ihis siyIc rcaIIy madc
mc curious, so onc day I wcni
up io Jcrry and askcd him,
ªI don`i gci ii! You can`i |c a
posiiivc pcrson aII of ihc iimc.
How do you do ii?¨
Jcrry rcpIicd, ªEach morning I
wakc up and say io myscIf, Jcrry,
you havc iwo choiccs ioday. You
can choosc io |c in a good mood
or you can choosc io |c in a |ad
mood.` I choosc io |c in a good
mood. Each iimc somcihing |ad
happcns, I can choosc io |c a
viciim or I can choosc io Icarn
from ii. I choosc io Icarn from
ii. Evcry iimc somconc comcs io
mc compIaining, I can choosc io
acccpi ihcir compIaining or I can
poini oui ihc posiiivc sidc of Iifc.
I choosc ihc posiiivc sidc of Iifc.¨
ªYcah, righi. Ii`s noi ihai casy,¨
I proicsicd.
ªYcs ii is,¨ Jcrry said. ªIifc is
aII a|oui choiccs. Vhcn you cui
away aII ihc junk, cvcry siiuaiion
is a choicc. You choosc how you
rcaci io siiuaiions. You choosc
how pcopIc wiII affcci your
mood. You choosc io |c in a
good or |ad mood. Thc |oiiom
Iinc. Ii`s your choicc how you
Iivc Iifc.¨
I rcßccicd on whai Jcrry
said. Soon ihcrcaficr, I Icfi ihc
rcsiaurani indusiry io siari my
own |usincss. Vc Iosi iouch,
|ui I oficn ihoughi a|oui him
whcn I madc a choicc a|oui Iifc
insicad of rcaciing io ii.
ScvcraI ycars Iaicr, I hcard
ihai Jcrry did somcihing you
arc ncvcr supposcd io do in
ihc rcsiaurani |usincss. Hc
Icfi ihc |ack door opcn onc
morning and was hcId up
ai gunpoini |y ihrcc armcd
ro||crs. VhiIc irying io opcn
ihc safc, his hand, shaking
from ncrvousncss, sIippcd off
ihc com|inaiion. Thc ro||crs
panickcd and shoi him.
"Y&RANCIE"ALTAZAR3CHWARTZ
ATTITUDEIS
EVER YT HI NG
Topics: Crisis, positiveness, faith, holding on to the Lord, God's strength and help in trouble.
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Ìt is a great matter to know just how to rest-how to be quiet when
all around seems tumultuous.
We irritate and excite our souls about the coming emergency,
and we approach it with worn and feverish spirits, and so mar our
Master's purpose and work.
When the crisis comes, He will tell me what to do. The orders are
not given until the appointed day. Why should Ì fume and fret and
worry as to what the sealed envelope contains? When the hour
strikes, the secrets shall be revealed.
And when the crisis comes, He will tell me what to say. Ì need
not begin to prepare my retorts and my responses. What shall Ì say
when death comes, to me or to my loved one? Never mind, He will
tell me. And what when sorrow or persecution comes? Never mind,
He will tell me.
-J.H. Jowett (19
th
-century English Congregationalist)
Jcrry was ihc kind of guy you
Iovc io haic. Hc was aIways in
a good mood and aIways had
somcihing posiiivc io say. Vhcn
somconc wouId ask him how
hc was doing, hc wouId rcpIy,
ªIf I wcrc any |ciicr, I wouId |c
iwins!¨
Hc was a uniquc rcsiaurani
managcr |ccausc hc had scvcraI
waiicrs who had foIIowcd
him around from rcsiaurani
io rcsiaurani. Thc rcason ihc
waiicrs foIIowcd Jcrry was
|ccausc of his aiiiiudc. Hc was a
naiuraI moiivaior. If an cmpIoycc
was having a |ad day, Jcrry was
ihcrc icIIing ihc cmpIoycc how
io Iook on ihc posiiivc sidc of
ihc siiuaiion.
Sccing ihis siyIc rcaIIy madc
mc curious, so onc day I wcni
up io Jcrry and askcd him,
ªI don`i gci ii! You can`i |c a
posiiivc pcrson aII of ihc iimc.
How do you do ii?¨
Jcrry rcpIicd, ªEach morning I
wakc up and say io myscIf, Jcrry,
you havc iwo choiccs ioday. You
can choosc io |c in a good mood
or you can choosc io |c in a |ad
mood.` I choosc io |c in a good
mood. Each iimc somcihing |ad
happcns, I can choosc io |c a
viciim or I can choosc io Icarn
from ii. I choosc io Icarn from
ii. Evcry iimc somconc comcs io
mc compIaining, I can choosc io
acccpi ihcir compIaining or I can
poini oui ihc posiiivc sidc of Iifc.
I choosc ihc posiiivc sidc of Iifc.¨
ªYcah, righi. Ii`s noi ihai casy,¨
I proicsicd.
ªYcs ii is,¨ Jcrry said. ªIifc is
aII a|oui choiccs. Vhcn you cui
away aII ihc junk, cvcry siiuaiion
is a choicc. You choosc how you
rcaci io siiuaiions. You choosc
how pcopIc wiII affcci your
mood. You choosc io |c in a
good or |ad mood. Thc |oiiom
Iinc. Ii`s your choicc how you
Iivc Iifc.¨
I rcßccicd on whai Jcrry
said. Soon ihcrcaficr, I Icfi ihc
rcsiaurani indusiry io siari my
own |usincss. Vc Iosi iouch,
|ui I oficn ihoughi a|oui him
whcn I madc a choicc a|oui Iifc
insicad of rcaciing io ii.
ScvcraI ycars Iaicr, I hcard
ihai Jcrry did somcihing you
arc ncvcr supposcd io do in
ihc rcsiaurani |usincss. Hc
Icfi ihc |ack door opcn onc
morning and was hcId up
ai gunpoini |y ihrcc armcd
ro||crs. VhiIc irying io opcn
ihc safc, his hand, shaking
from ncrvousncss, sIippcd off
ihc com|inaiion. Thc ro||crs
panickcd and shoi him.
"Y&RANCIE"ALTAZAR3CHWARTZ
ATTITUDEIS
EVER YT HI NG
Topics: Crisis, positiveness, faith, holding on to the Lord, God's strength and help in trouble.
2%&,%#4) /.3
IuckiIy, Jcrry was found
rcIaiivcIy quickIy and rushcd io
ihc IocaI irauma ccnicr. Aficr 18
hours of surgcry and wccks of
inicnsivc carc, Jcrry was rcIcascd
from ihc hospiiaI wiih fragmcnis
of ihc |uIIcis siiII in his |ody.
I saw Jcrry a|oui six monihs
aficr ihc accidcni. Vhcn I askcd
him how hc was, hc rcpIicd, ªIf
I wcrc any |ciicr, I`d |c iwins.
Vanna scc my scars?¨
I dccIincd, |ui did ask him
whai had gonc ihrough his mind
as ihc ro||cry iook pIacc.
ªThc nrsi ihing ihai wcni
ihrough my mind was ihai I
shouId havc Iockcd ihc |ack
door,¨ Jcrry rcpIicd. ªThcn, as I
Iay on ihc ßoor, I rcmcm|crcd
ihai I had iwo choiccs. I couId
choosc io Iivc, or I couId choosc
io dic. I chosc io Iivc.¨
ªVcrcn`i you scarcd? Did you
Iosc consciousncss?¨ I askcd.
Jcrry coniinucd, ªThc
paramcdics wcrc grcai. Thcy
kcpi icIIing mc I was going io
|c nnc. Bui whcn ihcy whccIcd
mc inio ihc cmcrgcncy room
and I saw ihc cxprcssions on ihc
faccs of ihc dociors and nurscs, I
goi rcaIIy scarcd. In ihcir cycs, I
rcad, Hc`s a dcad man.` I kncw I
nccdcd io iakc aciion.¨
ªVhai did you do?¨ I askcd.
ªVcII, ihcrc was a |ig, |urIy
nursc shouiing qucsiions ai
mc,¨ said Jcrry. ªShc askcd if I
was aIIcrgic io anyihing. Ycs,` I
rcpIicd. Thc dociors and nurscs
sioppcd working as ihcy waiicd
for my rcpIy. I iook a dccp
|rcaih and ycIIcd, BuIIcis!` Ovcr
ihcir Iaughicr, I ioId ihcm, I am
choosing io Iivc. Opcraic on mc
as if I am aIivc, noi dcad.`¨
Jcrry Iivcd, ihanks io ihc skiII
of his dociors, |ui aIso |ccausc
of his amazing aiiiiudc. I Icarncd
from him ihai cvcry day wc havc
ihc choicc io Iivc fuIIy. Aiiiiudc,
aficr aII, is cvcryihing.
If I can cndurc for ihis minuic
Vhaicvcr is happcning io mc,
No maiicr how hcavy my hcari is,
Or how dark ihc momcni may |c-
If I can rcmain caIm and quici
Viih aII my worId crashing a|oui mc,
Sccurc in ihc knowIcdgc God Iovcs mc
Vhcn cvcryonc cIsc sccms io dou|i mc-
If I can |ui kccp on |cIicving
Vhai I know in my hcari io |c iruc,
Thai ªdarkncss wiII fadc wiih ihc morning,¨
And ihai ihis wiII pass away, ioo-
Thcn noihing in Iifc can dcfcai mc,
For as Iong as ihis knowIcdgc rcmains,
I can suffcr whaicvcr is happcning,
For I know God wiII |rcak aII ihc chains
Thai arc |inding mc iighi in ihc ªdarkncss¨
And irying io nII mc wiih fcar-
For ihcrc is no nighi wiihoui dawning,
And I know ihai ªmy morning¨ is ncar.
-Helen 5teiner Rice
R178 GP-August 2002 Topics: Crisis, positiveness, faith, holding on to the Lord, God's strength and help in trouble.
Dr. Alexander Whyte of Edinburgh was
famous for his prayers. He always found
something to thank God for, even in bad
times. One stormy morning a member of
his congregation thought, The preacher
will have nothing to thank God for on a
wretched morning like this.
But Whyte began his prayer, "We thank
Thee, O God, that it is not always like this.¨
Keep me,
Lord. Darkness is
setting in.
| don't have the
strength to face it.
|'m weak, but ¥ou're strong.
8e strong for me, Lord.
Get me through the
night and help me greet the
dawn with praise, because
¥ou are there. ¥ou can meet
whatever comes my way.
Thank ¥ou for keeping
me, Lord.
4()34//7),,PASS
!02!9%2&/2
80
81
How to cope.
Glossary.
1.Tumultuous. Full of tumult or riotousness, marked by disturbance and uproar.
2.Irritate. To excite to impatience or anger.
3.Excite. To arouse or stir up the emotions.
4.Feverish. Pertaining to, of the nature of, or resembling a fever.
5.Mar. To damage or spoil to a certain extent, render less than perfect, attractive or useful,
etc. To impair or spoil.
6.Purpose. The reason for which something exists or is done, made or used.
7.Crisis. A stage in a sequence of events, at which the trend for all future events, especially
for better or for worse, is determined. A turning point.
8.Appointed. Predetermined, arranged, set.
9. Fume. An irritable or angry mood.
10.Fret. To feel or express worry, annoyance, discontent or the like.
11.Revealed. To make known, disclosure or divulgence.
12.Retorts. To reply, usually in a sharp or retaliatory manner
13.Responses. An answer or reply, as in words or some action.
14.Persecution. To drive away or to subjugate a people because of their religion, race, or beliefs.
15.Mood. A state or quality of feeling at a particular time.
16.Unique. Existing as the only one or as the sole example; single solitary in type or characteristics.
17.Motivator. Someone or something that provides motives, incites or encourages.
18.Curious. Eager to learn or know; inquisitive.
19.Victim. A person who suffers from a destructive or injurious action or agency.
20.Complain. To express dissatisfaction, pain, uneasiness, censure, resentment or grief; fnd fault.
21.Protested. To have expressed or declared objection, disapproval, or dissent, often in opposition
to something, a person is powerless to prevent or avoid.
22.Junk. Any old or discarded material, as metal, paper or rags.
23.“The bottom line.” The deciding factor, the ultimate result or outcome.
24.Nervousness. The state of being highly excitable, unnaturally or acutely uneasy or apprehensive.
25.Panicked. To be suddenly overwhelmed with fear, with or without cause, that produces
irrational behavior.
26.“Trauma Centre.” A hospital or medical centre equipped to treat victims of trauma.
Intensive Care Unit (ICU) The specialized centre in a hospital where intensive care is provided.
27.Scarred. A mark left by a healed wound, sore or burn.
28.Consciousness. The state of being conscious, awareness of ones own existence sensations,
thoughts, surroundings etc.
29.Paramedics. A person or people trained to assist a physician or to give frst aid or other
health care in the physicians absence.
30.Expressions. The art of expressing or setting fourth in words.
31.Endure. To hold out against, sustain without impairment or yielding.
32.Remain. To continue in the same state; continue to be as specifed.
33.Secure. Free from or not exposed to danger or harm; safe.
Points to ponder.
(1) Jerry said, “I am allergic to bullets.” What do you think that he meant by that?
(2) One statement in the story says, “It is your choice, how you live.” What does that
mean to you?
(3) Jerry said to the doctors, “I am choosing to live. Operate on me as though I am alive,
not dead.
(4) Jerry said. “Each morning I wake up and say to myself. Jerry you have two choices
today.” What were the choices that he was referring to?
82
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
In November 2003 I was in Finland,
fundraising door to door and shop to shop for
a youth camp I was to co-host a few months
later, when I met Tino in an old dingy bar, Past
middle age, with a long scraggly bread and a
bit overweight, Tino looked up from his news-
paper when the door banged closed behind me
as I entered.
He owned the bar, as it turned out,
and he had no customers at the time. Perfect,
I thought, as I began to present my volunteer
work, But by the time I had turned a couple of
pages in my presentation album, Tino politely
said that if I was there to sell anything, he was
very low on money and wasn’t Interested.
“I’m going through heavy depression.
My doctor says that sitting in the glow from
this thing is supposed to help,” he said, point-
ing to a neon light behind the bar. “Several of
my friends have died recently, all from alcohol.
No one seemed to care when they passed on.
Now I feel like I could be next, and I fear that
it will be the same for me. Will anyone really
care?”
He went on to tell me at length about his
problems his excessive drinking and not being
able to sleep at night without drinking a bot-
tle of hard liquor frst, his massive debts, and
worst of all, his depression. When asked him
if he believed in Jesus, he answered, “I’m not
sure.”
Jesus, make me a channel of Your love
and answers to this lost and weary soul, I si-
How far does a little love go?
By Angelina Leigh
REFLECTIONS
lently prayed. Then I told Tino about how Jesus
could light up his life. “He is the answer to all
of your problems,” I said, “The Bible says that
He is a very present help in time of trouble-any
trouble.” We talked for over an hour. My heart
ached and my eyes flled with tears as I put my-
self in the position of this poor, desperate man
and considered what it was like for him, not
knowing Jesus’ unconditional love or the peace
He brings.
“Do you say these things to everyone
you meet?” he asked at one point.
“No,” I answered, “but I do pray every
time I talk deeply with someone. I pray that the
words that come out of my mouth will be Je-
sus’ words what He has to say to that person.”
By now Tino’s eyes were brimming with
tears too, and I knew that Jesus was speaking to
his heart, bringing a ray of light into his dark,
gloomy world.
I told him about how Jesus answers
prayer, and about some of the miracles He had
done for me, including how He had recently
healed my foot. I had been in excruciating pain
after and accident, but had recently healed my
foot. I had been in excruciating pain after an
accident, but had needed to take a train to Fin-
land in two days, with lots of luggage, and at
the time I couldn’t even put my shoe on. I had
prayed desperately for the Lord to heal my foot,
and within minutes I could walk almost nor-
mally. By the end of that day I had been able
to put my shoe on. I had made it to Finland on
83
REFLECTIONS
schedule, and here I was!
Tino showed me his hands, which I
hadn’t noticed before. They were dry and scaly,
an allergic reaction to the coins he handled day
after day, he explained. I held his hands and
prayed for Jesus to heal them, for his bank
loan to come through so he wouldn’t lose his
bar, and that Tino would come to accept Him
into his heart. When I fnished praying and we
opened our eyes, he was in tears and couldn’t
speak for a while. He tremblingly wrote out
his address for me, and I gave him some Acti-
vated mags that I knew would boost his faith.
As I got up to leave and he asked if he could
give me a hug, I knew I hadn’t wasted the last
hour and a half.
Two years later I went to Finland again, and
I made sure to visit Tino. The Lord had worked
things out wonderfully, but differently than either
of us had expected. He had lost his bar, so had
taken a job as a bartender in someone else’s “It
was for the best,” he said, and it was clear that he
really meant it. He was happy and talkative and
looked like a new man. “Now I have so much less
to worry about and so much more time to enjoy
life and spend with my wife and children,” he said,
all smiles. His hands weren’t completely healed-
there were still a couple of small dry spots but his
spirit had been healed, and that had been what he
needed most. He certainly wasn’t the same de-
pressed, sullen man I’d met two years earlier. A
little love-God’s love had changed his life.
How far does a little love go?
Glossary.
1. Fundraising. The act or process of raising funds
2. Dingy. Of dark, dull or dirty colour or aspect.
3. Customer. A person who purchases goods or services from another.
4. Depression. The act of depressing.
5. Excessive. Going beyond the usual, necessary or proper degree.
6. Massive. Consisting of or forming a large mass.
7. Unconditional. Not limited by conditions.
8. Excruciating. Extremely painful.
9. Trembling. To shake involuntarily with quick movements.
10. Talkative. Inclined to talk a great deal.
11. Sullen. Showing irritation or ill humor by gloomy silence or reserve.
12. Amazing. Causing great surprise or sudden wonder.
13. Selfsh. Devoted to or caring only for ones self.
Points to ponder.
(a) this story illustrates what a little outgoing concern for others can do. It also demon
strates the power of prayer to change things in other people’s lives. Tino, the owner of the bar
had a number of problems. Name three of them.
(b) Everyone has problems, what would you consider are your two biggest problems at
the moment?
(c) Is it possible to infuence the future by worrying about it?
(d) What kind of things do people worry about?
84
85
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86
y three-year-old son Manuel
was playing an educational game on the
computer when his six-year-old sister Alon-
dra demanded that he let her have a turn.
Manuel’s response was typical “I was here
frst!”
I don’t know where Manuel picked
that up, but it got me thinking. It’s a gener-
ally accepted principle of human society that
those who “get there frst” have more rights
than those who get there after them. The
frst one to set foot on Virgin land is entitled
to take possession of it. The frst one to fnd
a pearl in the sea, or strike gold or oil may
claim it as his own. The frst one to make a
scientifc discovery or invention may patent
his fnd and claim any profts that may re-
sult. The frst one to sit at a restaurant table
has more right to it than the fellow who ar-
rives later. The frst one to settle in on a par-
ticular spot on the beach becomes the owner
of that spot for the day.
In my chidren’s case, if one of them
has been playing for half and hour at the
computer, I tell him or her that it’s time to
let the other one have a turn. Most other
parents probably do something similar. But
if we applied that principle to every aspect of
society, there would be absolute chaos. Can
you imagine a landowner saying, “I’ve had
this plot of land for quite a while, so it’s time
to let someone else enjoy it”? Or can you
imagine a man who has a good job giving it
to someone else who is out of work and short of
money?
Those examples are rather extreme, but
what about little acts of selfessness? How of-
ten do you see people who have a seat on the
bus or subway offering it to able-bodied others
who have just boarded, simply because they
look like they’d appreciate a chance to rest
their weary feet? Are little sacrifces like that
too much to expect? Or do we fail to make them
simply because we don’t see anyone else mak-
ing them and no one really expected us to do
either?
It’s a matter of selfshness, when you get
right down to it, and selfshness is part of our
sinful human nature. But the love of Jesus can
help us break out of that mold, overcome our
selfsh frst reactions, swim against the tide,
and do the loving thing. Jesus said, “Give to him
who asks you, and from him who wants to bor-
row from you do not turn away” (Matthew 5:42
NKJ), and “ Give, and it will be given to you:
good measure, pressed down, shaken together,
and running over will be put into your bosom.
For with the same measure that you use, it will
be measured back to you” (Luke 6:38 NKJ).
Those are certainly revolutionary concepts in
this day and age. How we cling to our selfsh
rights! But that giving, selfess kind of love is
actually what God wanted for us all from the
beginning and His love can help us achieve if.
If we would practice this kind of love, so many
problems would disappear. The world would be
I Was Here First
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M
87
a different place. So why not try it? Give what you can, then get ready for God to
food you with more!
(Photo caption:)
Alondra and Manuel having fun on the farm (Photo: Alondra & Manuel 1.JPG)
Cheerful Givers
God likes cheerful givers those who give voluntarily because they know it
pleases Him and they’re helping others, expecting nothing in return. Than kind of
giving can be the greatest of all pleasures, because as the purse is emptied, the
heart is flled. “ The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also
be watered himself” (Proverbs 11:25). “It is more blessed to give than to receive”
(Acts 20:35).
The richest people in God’s kingdom are going to be those who shared the
most with Him and His. David Brandt Berg
REFLECTIONS
88
I was here frst.
Glossary.
1. Virgin. An unmarried girl or woman.
2. Entitled. To give a person (or a thing) a title, right or claim to something.
3. Possession. The act or fact of possessing.
4. Aspect. Nature, quality or character.
5. Society. A body of individuals living as members of a community.
6. Extreme. Of a character or kind farthest removed from the ordinary or average.
7. Human-nature. The character of human conduct.
8. Voluntary. Done, made or brought about, undertaken, etc. Of ones own accord by free
choice.
Points to ponder.
(a) This story promotes the virtue of giving to others and unselfshness. One short quote in
the story says, “As the purse is emptied, the heart is flled.” What do you think that
means?
(b) When was the last time that you did something unselfshly for another person?
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91
set out as a young man to debunk
Christianity. I met a young Chrstian woman
who challenged me to intellectually examine
the evidence for Christianity, and I accepted
her challenge. I aimed to show her- and every-
one-that Christianity was nonsense. I thought
it would be easy. I thought a careful investi-
gation of the facts would expose Christianity
as a lie and its followers as dupes. But then
a funny thing happened. As I began investi-
gating the claims of Christianity, I kept run-
ning up against the evidence. Time after time,
I was surprised to discover the factual basis
for the seemingly outlandish things Christians
believe. And one of the most convincing cat-
egories of evidence I confronted was this: The
Resurrection accounts found in the Gospels
are not the stuff of fable, or fabrication. I had
assumed that someone, or several someones,
had invented the stories of Jesus Christ’s res-
urrection from the dead. But as I examined
those accounts, I had to face the fact that any
sensible mythmaker would do things much
differently from the way Matthew, Mark,
Luke, and John did in recording the news of
the Resurrection. As much as I hated to, I had
to admit that if I had been some frst-century
propagandist trying to fake the Resurrection
of Jesus Christ, I would have done a number
of things differently.
I would wait a prudent period after the
events before “Publishing” my account. Few
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historians dispute the fact that the disciples
of Jesus began preaching the news of His
resurrection soon after the events itself; in
fact, Peter’s Pentecost sermon (Acts 2) oc-
curred within 50 days of the Resurrection.
And textural research indicates that the writ-
ten accounts of the Resurrection, especially
the creedal statement of 1 Corinthians 15:3-
8, are astoundingly early in origin. Such ear-
ly origins argue against any notion that the
Resurrection accounts are legendary.
I would publish my account far from
the venue where it supposedly happened. Dr.
William Lane Craig writes, “One of the most
amazing facts about the early Christian be-
lief in Jesus’ resurrection was that it originat-
ed in the very city where Jesus was crucifed.
The Christian faith did not come to exist in
some distant city, far from eyewitnesses who
knew of Jesus’ death and burial. No, it came
into being in the very city where Jesus had
been publicly crucifed, under the very eyes
of its enemes.”
I would selected my “witnesses” very
carefully. I would avoid, as much as possi-
ble, using any names at all in my account,
and I would certainly avoid citing prominent
personalities as witnesses. Yet at least 16 in-
dividuals are mentioned by name as witness-
es in the various accounts, and the mention
of Joseph of Arimathea as the man who bur-
ied Jesus would have been terribly danger-
I
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92
REFLECTIONS
ous if the Gospel accounts had been faked or
embellished. As a member of the Sanhedrin,
a Jewish “Supreme Court,” he would have
been well known. J.P Moreland writes, “No
one could have invented such a person who
did not exist and say he was on the Sanhedrin
if such were not the case.” His involvement
in the burial of Jesus could have been easily
confrmed or refuted. Perhaps most impor-
tant, I would avoid citing disreputable wit-
nesses, which makes signifcant the record
of Jesus’ frst appearances to women-since
in that time and culture women were con-
sidered invalid witnesses in a court of law. If
the accounts were fabrications, the women
would never have been included in the story,
at least not as frst witnesses.
I would surround the event with im-
pressive supernatural displays and omens.
As Jewish scholar Pinchas Lapide writes,
“We do not read in the frst tes-
timonies (of the Resurrection)
of an apocalyptic spectacle,
exorbitant sensations, or of
the transforming impact of
a cosmic event According
to all New Testament
reports, no human eye
saw the Resurrec-
tion itself, no hu-
man being was
present, and none of
the disciples asserted to
have apprechended, let alone
understood, its manner and nature.
How easy it would have been for them or
their immediate successors to supplement this
scandalous hole in the concatenation of events
by fanciful embellishments! But precisely be-
cause none of the evangelists dared to Improve
upon or embellish this unseen resurrection, the
total picture of the Gospels also gains in trust-
worthiness.”
I would painstakingly correlate my ac-
count with others I knew, embellishing the
legend only where I could be confdent of not
being contradicted. Many critics have pointed
out the befuddling differences and apparent
contradictions in the Resurrection accounts.
But these are actually convincing evidences
of their authenticity; they display an ingenous
lack of collusion, agreeing and (apparently)
diverging much as eyewithness accounts of
any event do.
I would portray myself and any co-con-
spirators sympathetically, even heroically, Yet
the Gospel Writers present strikingly unfatter-
ing portralts of Jesus’ followers (such as Peter
and Thomas) and their often skeptical reac-
tions (Mark 16:11, 13; Luke 24:11, 37; John
20:19, 24-25; 21:4). Such portrayals are very
93
REFLECTIONS
unlike the popular myths and legends of that
(or any) time.
I would disguise the location of the
tomb or spectacularly destroy it in my ac-
count. If I were creating a resurrection leg-
end, I would keep the tomb’s location a secret
to prevent any chance that someone might
discover Jesus’ body, or I would record in
my account that the angles sealed it or car-
ried it off into Heaven after the Resurrection.
Or I might have taken the easiest course of
all and simply made my fctional resurrec-
tion a “spiritual” one, which would have
made it impossible to refute even if a body
were eventually discovered. But, of course,
the Gospel accounts describe the owner of
the tomb (Joseph of Arimathea) and its loca-
tion (“At the place where Jesus was cruci-
fed, there was a garden, and in the garden a
new tomb” (John 19:41) and identify Jesus’
resurrection as a bodily one (John 20:27).
I would try to squelch inquiary or in-
vestigation. I might pronounce a curse on
anyone attempting to substantiate my claims,
or attach a stigma to anyone so shallow as
to require evidence. Yet note the frequent
appeal of Jesus’ disciples to the easily con-
frmed or discredited nature of the evidence,
as though inviting investigation (Acts 2:32;
3:15; 13:31; 1 Corinthians 15:3-6). This was
done within a few years of the events them-
selves; if the tomb were not empty or the
Resurrection appearances were fction, the
early Christians’ opponents could have con-
clusively debunked the new religion.
As Dr.Edwin Yamauchi says of the ci-
tation of the resurrected Christ appearing to
more than 500 people in 1 Corinthians 15,
“What gives special authority to the list (of
witnesses) as historical evidence is the refer-
ence to most of the fve hundred brethren be-
ing still alive. St. Paul says in effect, ‘If you
do not believe me, you can ask them.’
I would not preach a message of repent-
ance in light of the Resurrection (as Peter did
in Acts 2). No one in his right mind would have
chosen to create a fctional message that would
invite opposition and persecution from both
civil and religious authorities of those days.
How much easier and wiser it would have been
It would have been to preach a less controver-
sial gospel-concentrating on Jesus’ teachings
about love, perhaps-thus saving myself and the
adherents of my new religion a lot of troble.
I would stop short of dying for my mes-
sage. Lee Strobel has written, “People will die
for their religious beliefs if they sincerely be-
lieve they’re true, but people won’t die for their
religious beliefs if they know their beliefs are
false. “While most people can only have faith
that their beliefs are true, the disciples were in
a position to know without a doubt whether or
not Jesus had risen from the dead. They claimed
that they saw Him, talked with Him, and ate
with Him. If they weren’t absolutely certain,
they wouldn’t have allowed themselves to be
tortured to death for proclaiming that the Res-
urrection had happened.
These are not the only reasons I be-
lieve in the truth of the Bible and the reality of
the Resurrection. But these were a mong the
“Many convincing proofs” (Acts 1:3) that I en-
countered in my at tempts to prove Christianity
wrong, which eventually led me to the conclu-
sion that Jesus Christ was who He claimed to
be and that He really did rise from the dead.
It didn’t happen immediately, but eventually
I gave in to the truth, and on Dec. 19, 1959,
the risen Christ radically changed my life. I’ve
seen Him do the same for countless others, and
I pray, if you haven’t done so already, you will
let Him do the same for you.
Let every man count himself immortal,
Let him catch the revelation of Jesus in his res-
urrection. Let him say not merely. “ Christ is
risen,” but “I shall rise”.
94
If I Had Faked The Resurrection.
Glossary.
1. Intellectually. Appealing to or engaging the intillect.
2. Debunk. To expose or to excoriate.
3. None sense. Not true.
4. Outlandish. Freakishly grotesque.
5. Resurrection. The act of rising from the dead.
6. Fable. A short tale to teach a morallesson.
7. Propaganda. Information, ideas or rumors.
8. Prudent. Wise or judicious.
9. Pentecost. A Christian festival celebrated on the seventh Sunday after Easter.
10. Forgery. A crime of falsely making or altering a writing or bank notes.
11. Legendary. Of or pertaining to , or the nature of a legend.
12. Venue. The place of a crime or cause of action.
13. Amazing. Causing great surprise or sudden wonder.
14. Crucifed. To put to death by nailing the hands and feet.
15. Eyewitness. A person who actually sees some act.
16. Prominent. Standing out so as to be seen easily.
17. Embelish. To make things beautiful, by decoration.
18. Confrmed. Made certain as to truth.
19. Refuted.To prove to be false.
20. Disreputable. Not reputable.
21. Omen. A sign or a showing of things to come or of an outcome (spiritual)
22. Appocalypse. A prophetic revelation especially concerninga cataclysm in which the
forces of good permenantly triumphs over the forcesof evil.
23. Cosmic. Immesurably extended in time and space
24. Apprehend. The catch or understand.
25. Scandalous. Disgraceful, shameful, or shocking, improper.
26. Correlate. To bring in or to bring in to mutual or reciprocal relationship establish in an
orderly connection.
27. Legend. A non historicalor non verifablestory, handed down by tradition from earlier
times and popularily accepted as history.
28. Befuddling. To make stupidly drunk.
29. Authenticity. The quality of being authentic and genuine.
30. Skeptical. Denying or questioning the tennets of a religion.
31. Refute. To prove to be false or erroneous as an oppinion or change.
32. Squelch. To strike or press with crushing force.
33. Curse. The expression of a wish that misfortune or evil will come to pass.
34. Stigma. The mentalor physical mark that is characterized by a defect or disease.
Points to ponder.
(a)The writer accepted a challenge to intellectually investigate the case for the resurrection.
He thought that it would be relatively easy prove that the resurrection was simply a myth. In
the end he was not able to do that. Why not?
(b) What happened to the writer in 1959.
95
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Judgment In a cornfeld
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REFLECTIONS
had lost all sense of time that hot July morning
as I leaned on my hoe handle and let my imagi-
nation indulge me in projects more exciting than
hoeing corn. Then suddenly I saw Grandpa- un-
til that moment my role model of kindness and
compassion-coming through the feld, walking
rapidly between the rows and swinging a long,
keen maple switch.
Now I’ve done it, I thought as I realized I
had crossed the limits of his forbearance. I began
to hoe the young corn as fast as my 11-year-old
arms would move, not daring to look up as I heard
his footsteps on the plowed ground and the corn
brushing against his legs. Stunned by the reality
of what was about to happen, I remembered the
time he told me, “ Jesus cried sometimes, but He
could be tough when He needed to be.” Grandpa
was going to be tough with me-for the frst time
in my life.
That summer I was 11, and the Great De-
pression’s hard times still lingered in Tennessee.
Most mountain people depended mainly on the
food and livestock they raised on their small
farms.
On that morning, I was in the roastin’ ears
patch to hoe so that Grandpa could fnish up his
plowing “Don’t let him piddle along, “Dad had
told Grandpa.” Dust his britches if he needs that,
but don’t let him jest play along and lean on
that ho handle. He’s had some lazy spells lately.
“Dad was afraid Grandpa would be too lenient
with me, for I had heard him tell Ma,” Pa is Jest
too softhearted for his own good sometimes.”
One of the great moments of my young
life was that day the past summer when I over-
heard Grandpa tell a visiting preacher that I might
turn out to be his best grandchild because I “han-
kered after things of the mind.” But “things of
the mind” had possessed me that morning. As I
leaned on my hoe handle, slapping now and then
at the sweat bees and corn beetles, my thoughts
were at the creek where I had been planning to
build a dam across the narrow crossing. I would
dam up the creek with mud, leaves, and rocks,
and then make boats from bucket lids and old
cigar boxes and have a navy on the high seas.
Absorbed in my engineering project, I did not
even notice that Grandpa was no longer calling out
“Gee” and “Haw” to the mule in the near by feld.
Then I saw him coming toward me, walking
swiftly between two rows of corn with that maple
switch in his hand, and I began to hoe.
“Wait a minute, son,” he said softly. “Some-
thin’ I need to take care of. How’s yer hoe doin’this
morning’?”
“It’s doin’ fne,sir.”
“I don’t think it is, son. Let me have a look
at it.”
I handed him the short-handled hoe he had
fxed especially for me, and he began to talk to it,
holding it at arm’s length.
“Hoe, I sent you here this mornin’ with
my grandson to hoe this corn. You know this corn
needs to be hoed. You know we’ll need roastin’
ears this fall-he’ll need some to take to school fer
his lunch. But you wouldn’t hoe. Now, I’m going
to have to tune you up a bit so you’ll help my grad-
son.”
Then he whipped the hoe handle until the
maple switch was broken and limp. As he tossed
away the remnant of the switch, he handed the hoe
back to me. “I believe it’ll do a better job this time,
son.”
“It’ll do much better, sir,” I assured him as I
began to chop at the weeds with energy I had never
realized. “I think it’ll do fne.”
Grandpa turned and walked away. After a
few yards he stopped and turned, tears in his big
blue- green eyes. “Told yer ma you’d eat with us
today, so don’t be late. Yer grandma’s cookin’ us
a big peach cobbler, and she’ll be aggraved if we
ain’t at that table on time.”
Judgement In A Cornfeld
By Ernest Shubird
The best way is the love way
This is what God’s been patiently and
loving trying to teach us all along: to do the
right things with the right motivation, out
of love. And using God’s example, we also
should try to persuade others to do the right
thing out of love. Certainly God has to have a
lot of patience and love with us, so we should
have patience and love with others!
David Brandt Berg
I
96
Judgement in a cornfeld.
Glossary.
1. Hoe. A long handled implement having a thin fat bladeused for breaking up the
ground
2. Indulge. To yield to,satisfyor gratify desires.
3. Maple. A type of tree
4. Switch. A small thin green fexible branch .
5. Forebearance. Ancestors or forefathers.
6. Great Depression. A time of economic depression following the Wall Street Stock
Market crash of 1928, when the U.S. economy was in serious recession and unemploy
ment was high.
7. Plowing. To turn up soil with a plow.
8. Softhearted. Very sympathetic, or responsive generous in spirit.
9. Lenient. Agreeable; tolerant, permissive and indulgent.
10. Creek. A small stream.
11. Assured. Guarenteed,assured or certain.
12 Aggravated. Characterized by some features of law, that enhances the crime as the
intention of the criminal. It can also mean to annoy or to disturb and bother someone.
13. Persuade. To prevailon a person to do somethingas by advertizing or urging
14. Motivation. The act or instance of motivating.
Points to ponder.
1. The third paragraph says. "That Summer I was 11 years old and the Great Depression's
hard times still lingered on in Tenessee. Most mountain people depended mainly on
the food and livestock they raised on their small farms. Why do you think that people
were so poor at this time?
2. The 11 year old boy was supposed to be working, but he was day dreaming. The
Grandfather whipped the handle of the hoe and scolded it in front of the boy. What
was the point of doing that?
REFLECTIONS
97
98
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
99
2%&,%#4) /.3
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3(5621
A kind and compassionate act
is olten its own reward.
-Williom J. BenneII
l do a lot ol management training each year lor the Circle K
Corporation, a Ü.S. chain ol convenience stores. Among
the topics we address in our seminars is the retention ol
quality employees-a real challenge to managers when you
consider the pay scale in the service industry. During these
discussions, l ask the participants, "What has caused you to
stay long enough to become a manager?" Some time back,
a new manager took this question and slowly, with her voice
almost breaking, said, "lt was a S19 baseball glove."
Cynthia told the group that she originally took a Circle K
clerk job as an interim position while she looked lor something
better. On the second or third day behind the counter, she
received a phone call lrom her nine·year·old son, 1esse. He
needed a baseball glove lor Little League. She explained that
as a single mother, money was very tight, and her hrst check
would have to go lor paying bills. Perhaps she could buy his
baseball glove with her second or third check.
When Cynthia arrived lor work the next morning, Patricia,
the store manager, asked her to come to the small room
in the back ol the store that served as an olhce. Cynthia
wondered il she had done something wrong or lelt some
part ol her job incomplete lrom the day belore. She was
concerned and conlused.
Patricia handed her a box. "l overheard you talking to your
son yesterday," she said, "and l know that it is hard to explain
things to kids. This is a baseball glove lor 1esse because he
may not understand how important he is, even though you
may have to pay the bills belore you can buy baseball gloves.
You know we can't pay good people like you as much as
we'd like to, but we do care-and l want you to know you
are important to us."
The thoughtlulness, empathy, and love ol this convenience
store manager demonstrates vividly that people remember
how much an employer cotes more than how much an
employer poys. That's an important lesson, lor the price ol
a baseball glove.
-Rick Phillips
To be a good leader, a good employer, to
take care ol people and watch over them,
you have to have great compassion. You have
to understand what people need and try to
supply that. You have to leel their hurts, their
pain, as well as their joys and happiness.
You have to want to know these things, even
il you leel it will break your heart to be so
involved.
ll you do care, il you are involved, they will
know it. And because you care, they will want
to work together with you to achieve great
things, and you can go lar together.
People are starved lor real love. They see
it so seldom and experience it even less. So
il they hnd someone who truly cares about
them, who truly has their best interests at
heart, they will go very lar lor that person,
and will give ol their best.
But you can't care about people just so
they will perlorm well lor you. You have to care
about them because God does. You know
He cares about you, and doesn't that make
all the dillerence in your lile? So because you
experience His love in your lile, that makes
you want to pass it on.
-Ðovid BtondI Betg
*ESSES'LOVE&ULLOF,OVE
R141 GP
The slighIesI wotd oI comIotI
To help us on out woy,
The slighIesI smile Itom someone
To btighIen up out doy,
The slighIesI ocI oI kindness
To lessen cote ond such-
All Ihese cosI so liIIle,
BuI Ihey meon so vety much.
-OuoIed by Ftoncis Goy
Topics: People-handling, love, concern
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a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
R 185, It comes back to you, BUR
100
Be a people person.
Glossary.
1. Convenience store. A small grocery shop carrying a wide range of commonly used
products, often open 24 hours.
2. Seminar. An occasion when a teacher or an expert and a group of people meet to study
or discuss something.
3. Retention. The continued use, existence or possession of something or someone.
4. Participants. A person who takes part in or becomes involved in a particular activity.
5. Interim. Temporary and intended to be used or accepted until something permanent
exists
6. Baseball. A feld sport originating in the USA, using a hard ball and bat. The batsman
must hit the ball and complete a run around four bases arranged in the shape of a diamond.
7. Incomplete. Not complete.
8. Confused. Unable to think clearly, or to understand something.
9. Thoughtfulness. Carefully considers things, considerate.
10. Empathy. The ability to share someone else’s feelings or experiences, by imagining
what it would be like, in their situation.
11. Vividly. Clear thoughts, pictures or memories
12. Compassion. A strong feeling of sympathy and sadness for the suffering of others.
13. Starved. Very hungry, no food.
Points to ponder.
(a) One very important paragraph in this story says. ”The thoughtfulness, empathy and
love of this convenience store manager, demonstrated vividly, that people remember
how much an employer cares, more than how much he pays. That is a very important
principle. Explain in your own words what you think that means.
(b) Explain the difference between, compassion and pity.
REFLECTIONS
101
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R 185, It comes back to you, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
102
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R 186, You never lose by giving, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
103
2%&,%#4) /.3
R156 GP Topics: love, giving, God's rewards, life goals.
Ho vas driving homo ono ovoning, on a tvo-lano country road.
Work in this small mid-vostorn U.S. community vas almost as
slov as his loat-up Pontiac. But ho novor guit looking. Evor sinco
tho tactory closod, hod loon unomployod, and vith vintor raging
on, tho chill had ûnally hit homo.
lt vas a lonoly road. Not vory many pooplo had a roason to lo
on it, unloss thoy voro loaving. Vost ot his trionds had alroady
lott. Thoy had tamilios to tood and droams to tulûll. But ho stayod
on. Attor all, this vas vhoro ho luriod his mothor and tathor. Ho
vas lorn horo and knov tho country. Ho could go dovn this road
llind, and toll you vhat vas on oithor sido. With his hoadlights
not vorking, that camo in handy.
lt vas starting to got dark and light snov ûurrios voro coming
dovn. Id /cttcr gct c :otc ou. ho thought. Ho almost didnt soo
tho old lady strandod on tho sido ot tho road. Evon in tho dim
light ho could soo sho noodod holp, so ho pullod up in tront
ot hor Vorcodos and got out. His Pontiac vas still sputtoring
vhon ho approachod hor.
Evon vith tho smilo on his taco, sho vas vorriod. No ono had
stoppod to holp tor tho last hour or so. Was ho going to hurt hor?
Ho didnt look sato-ho lookod poor and hungry.
Ho could soo that sho vas trightonod, standing out thoro
in tho cold. Ho knov hov sho tolt. lt vas that chill that only
toar can put in you.
lm horo to holp you, maam, ho said. Why dont you vait in
tho car vhoro its varm. By tho vay, my namo is Bryan.
All sho had vas a ûat tiro, lut tor an old lady that vas lad
onough. Bryan cravlod undor tho car looking tor a placo to put
tho jack, skinning his knucklos a timo or tvo. Soon ho vas allo to
chango tho tiro. But ho had to got dirty and his hands hurt.
As ho vas tightoning tho lug nuts, sho rollod dovn hor
vindov and logan to talk to him. Sho told him that sho vas
trom St. louis and vas just passing through. Sho couldnt thank
him onough tor coming to hor aid. Bryan just smilod as ho
closod hor trunk.
Sho askod him hov much sho ovod him. Any amount vould
havo loon all right vith hor. Sho had alroady imaginod all tho
avtul things that could havo happonod had ho not stoppod. Bryan
novor thought tvico alout tho monoy. This vas not a jol to
him. This vas holping somoono in nood, and God knovs thoro
voro plonty vho had givon him a hand in tho past. Ho had
livod his vholo lito that vay, and it novor occurrod to him to
act any othor vay.
lT COMES BACK TO
yo
~JoBn VosIoy (EngIisB tBooIoginn nnd
otnngoIist, 1703-1791)
Do all tho good you can.
By all tho moans you can.
ln all tho vays you can.
ln all tho placos you can.
At all tho timos you can.
As long as you ovor can.
Ono vord troos us ot all
tho voight and pain ot lito:
That vord is lotc.
~SopBotIos (nntiont Gtook dtnmntist,
496?-406? B.C.)
Do somothing tor somo-
lody ovory day tor vhich
you do not got paid.
~AIhott StBuoitzot (Gotmnn-hotn tBoo-
Ioginn, pBiIosopBot, mnsitoIogist, mod-
itnI missionnty, nnd NohoI Inntonto,
1875-1965)
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R 186, You never lose by giving, BUR
104
2%&,%#4) /.3
R156 GP Topics: love, giving, God's rewards, life goals.
Ho told hor that it sho roally vantod to pay him lack, tho
noxt timo sho sav somoono vho noodod holp, sho could givo
that porson tho assistanco that thoy noodod. And, Bryan addod,
think ot mo.
Ho vaitod until sho startod hor car and drovo ott. lt had loon a
cold and doprossing day, lut ho tolt good as ho hoadod tor homo,
disappoaring into tho tvilight.
A tov milos dovn tho road tho lady sav a small cato. Sho vont
in to gral a lito to oat and tako tho chill ott lotoro sho mado
tho last log ot hor trip homo. lt vas a dingy-looking rostaurant.
Outsido voro tvo old gas pumps. Tho vholo scono vas untamiliar
to hor. Tho cash rogistor vas liko tho tolophono ot an out-ot-vork
actor-it didnt ring much.
Hor vaitross camo ovor and, sooing tho oldor ladys vot hair,
lrought a cloan tovol tor hor to vipo hor vot hair vith. Tho
young voman had a svoot smilo, ono that ovon loing on hor toot
tho vholo day couldnt oraso. Tho lady noticod that tho vaitross
vas in tho last month or tvo ot prognancy, lut ovon tho strain ot
that didnt stop tho vaitross trom loing choortul. Tho oldor lady
vondorod hov somoono vho had so littlo could lo so giving and
kind to a strangor. Thon sho romomlorod Bryan.
Attor tho lady ûnishod hor moal, sho paid vith a hundrod dollar
lill. Tho vaitross vont to got hor chango, and tho lady slippod out
tho door vithout saying a vord. Sho vas gono trom tho parking
lot ly tho timo tho vaitross camo lack to tho tallo. Sho vondorod
vhoro tho lady could havo gono, thon sho noticod somothing
vritton on a napkin. Toars camo to hor oyos as sho road vhat
tho lady had vritton.
\ou dont ovo mo a thing, lvo loon thoro too. Somoono
onco holpod mo out, tho vay lm holping you. lt you roally
vant to pay mo lack, horos vhat you do. Dont lot tho chain
ot lovo ond vith you.
Thoro voro moro tallos to cloar, sugar lovls to ûll, and
pooplo to sorvo, lut tho vaitross mado it through anothor day.
That night vhon sho got homo trom vork and climlod into
lod, sho vas thinking alout tho monoy and vhat tho lady had
vritton. Hov could that strangor havo knovn hov much sho and
hor husland noodod that monoy? With tho laly duo noxt month,
it vas going to lo hard. Sho knov hov vorriod hor husland
vas, and as ho lay slooping noxt to hor, sho gavo him a sott kiss
and vhisporod sott and lov, Evorythings gonna lo all right. l
lovo you, Bryan.
ˆ!UTHORUNKNOWN
Whatovor a man sovs, that
vill ho also roap.
9OU.EVER,OSEBY'IVINGˆˆˆˆ
"Y$AVID"RANDT"ERG
\ou knov, tho lords ûnancos vork tho othor vay around trom tho vorlds! Tho vorld says,
Whon lvo got my million, thon lll start giving.
But tho lord says, Start giving NOW trom vhat youvo got, and THEN lll givo you vhatovor you
nood in ordor to givo moro. ln tact, lll givo you ovon MORE!
Ho vants to soo it you vill givo sacriûcially and taithtully ot vhat youvo got nov. Ho vants
to ûnd out hov you uso tho nickols lotoro Ho givos you tho dollars, hov you uso tho ponco
lotoro Ho givos you tho pounds.
Whon Ho told mo this, l logan to givo doullo tips to tho vaitrossos, tho lus drivors, tho poor
littlo novspapor girls on tho stroot, and othors. l startod roally handing it out, and l tolt groat!
And loliovo it or not, soon vo voro rocoiving moro monoy tor our living oxponsos. Wo voro
loginning to roap tho lonoûts ot giving. So you soo, l startod doulling MY giving to othors, and
tho lord startod doulling (IS giving to ME.
lot go and lot God givo through you, and youll soon ûnd Holl givo moro to you through
othors! lrooly you havo rocoivod, trooly givo (Vatthov 10:8). \ou novor loso ly giving! Hov
much havo you givon latoly?
(1Bo BihIo, GnIntinns 6:7 NKJ)
Givo and it vill lo givon
to you, good moasuro,
prossod dovn, shakon
togothor, and running
ovor.
(1Bo BihIo, Lnko 6:38 NKJ)
105
It comes back to you.
Glossary.
1. unemployed. Not having a job that provides money.
2. Flurries Short activities.
3. Crawled. to move slowly or with diffculty.
4. Awful. Extremely bad or unpleasant.
5. Twilight. The perion just before it becomes completely dark in the evening.
6. Dingy. Gloomy and drab.
7. Pregnant. The state or period of being pregnant.
8. Cheerful. Happy, joyful.
Points to ponder.
(a). Brian stopped to help the older lady who had a fat tyre. At frst she looked afraid.
Why would she be afraid?
(b) Brian was a person who had grown up in a rural environment and felt that it was auto
matically his duty to help someone in need. City people seem less likely to help strangers.
Why is that?
(c) The old lady left the waitress a big tip, and wrote a note on a napkin on the table. The
note said, "You don't owe me a thing, I've been there too. Someone once helped me of
the way I'm helping you. If you really want to pay me back, here's what you can do.
Don't let the chain of love end with you." What did she mean by that?
REFLECTIONS
106
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.: ~...:.q.|._. - Radio Bible Class
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~.._. -q:....._ _ ~.~ ~...:..|~.._. - Chole West
±-±_ ÷e:_÷.÷ e_e:-.-e-.-±_
You Can Change the World
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.q:._.,e._...
R 210, John did it, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
67
107
2%&,%#4) /.3
1ohn did it
A visitor to the county oI Iancashire on England`s northwestern coast back in
the 1700s noted that its reputation Ior being a wild, hard-drinking kind oI place
was well earned. Upon returning a Iew years later, however, the visitor Iound
it strangely diIIerent. Eormer boozers were downright tame, and a decrease in
drunken behavior had brought with it improvement in many other aspects oI
the social scene.
The visitor asked one oI the ex-party animals what had happened, and the man
responded, 'There came a man among us; his name was John Wesley.¨ Nothing
more needed to be said.
You may know John Wesley as the Iounder oI the Methodist Church. But to
the people oI Iancashire, he was used by God to change their lives.
Wesley`s job was the same as oursto make Jesus Christ known to a world
that desperately needs Him.
It`s not a matter oI personal talents or persuasiveness. Jesus did everything that
was necessary when He died Ior our sins. We just have to tell people about Him.
Radio Bible Class
You can change the world
By David Brandt Berg (Dare to Be Different)
Sometimes it doesn`t take a lot to change someone`s liIe. It reminds me oI
something that happened while my Iamily and I were visiting the Montreal
World`s Eair in 1967. One day I took my mother, who at eighty years oI age
was still an enthusiastic Christian, to tour the Soviet exhibit. As we entered
the pavilion, the director, a tall, clean-cut, good-looking young Russian, came
Iorward and oIIered a wheelchair to my mother. Then, Ior some reason, he
volunteered to escort her around the pavilion and explain it to her.
Eor the next two hours, they became quite interested in each other and
engrossed in deep conversation as he pointed out to her the various new
inventions on display. But as I Iound out later, they talked about a lot more than
just mechanical gadgets. At the end oI our visit, he bade us a Iond Iarewell,
saying, 'Please come again!¨ He was quite hospitable and seemed to have
become very close to my mother in that time that they talked together.
A Iew weeks later we received a letter Irom him in which he said, 'You have
changed my liIe! I have received Christ as you suggested. You have changed my
whole way oI thinking, my way oI believing, you have changed me! But I have a
wiIe and three children and I am living in a communist society where it is against
the law to practice Christianity, so now what do I do?¨
My mother`s advice to that young man in the letter she wrote back to him was,
in essence, 'Change the world! Change the world you`re living in! Start now!
Tell others what God has done Ior you, what His love and His truth have done
Ior you personally, and you can start changing your part oI the worldeven a
communist world!¨
R175 GP-July 2002
1
Chloe West is a volunteer with The Family.
Topics: Helping others, witnessing, infuencing others, making a difference.
You may lee| |ncapab|e ol He|p|n¿ to cHan¿e someone e|se's ||le, but remember,
you don't do tHe work ol cHan¿|n¿ tHem-0od does. You just ||nk tHem up to H|m by
sHow|n¿ tHem How to pray, How to make contact w|tH H|m, and He does tHe rest. 1Hen
you w||| see ||ves cHan¿ed, because 0od w||| answer prayer. He w||| do |t.
ˆ#HLOE7EST

108
John Did it.
Glossary.
1. John Wesley. Founder of the Methodist church. During the 17th century he travelled
widely on horseback, preaching usually to large crowds at outdoor meetings.
2. Boozer. To drink alcohol especially to excess.
3. Tame To make less powerfuland easier to control.
4. Aspects. A particular part or feature of a matter.
5. Desperately. Completely without hope.
6. Persuasiveness. Level of persuation.
7. Incapable. Lacking the ability or required quality to do something.
8. Enthusiastic. having to show great interest.
9. Pavillion. A decorative shelter in a park or large garden.
10. Escort. A person or a group accompanying another, to provide protection.
11. Engrossed. to be completely involved in.
12. Gadgets. Small mechanical devices.
13 Hospitable. Friendly and welcoming to starangers and guests.
14. Communist. A follower of communism.
Points to ponder.
(A) In the story of, John Did It. It shows that John Wesley had a profound effect in
Lancashire. In what way did he infuence the community ?
(B) In the former communist states religion was offcially banned. Why did the commnists
ban religion ?
REFLECTIONS
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~:. ~_.e.q:_.¸~....._ ~q:.¸:..:_e.._~:..._..
~¸~ ~~~~.~¸.~.~.e ..¸~~~..q, ...|.
Chole West
e÷:-.÷-÷.-=-e±: ÷-e¬:--
-ee÷÷
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An ounce or two of Heaven
~¸..._ ~._.:...q..:
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.|..e~ ~..:..'. .,¸q....:
~..:...- ._..._e. _._...,
..: q,¸.¸¸. q.|.~:.?
_~.q_.. ~_¸.q:. ~~.:.,.._.:~
- ~~,q.~.q~_e..q:.~:....:
q,¸.¸¸..~: q.|.~:.?
.|..e~ ~¸.........~:~~..
...~:..,..: q,¸.¸¸..~: q.|.~:.
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Helen Marshall
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Life's little pleasures 109
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R87 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Simple Life. Praise.
Life Life Life Life Life’s Little Pleasur ’s Little Pleasur ’s Little Pleasur ’s Little Pleasur ’s Little Pleasures es es es es
O
ur friend Thomas is a keen gardener, and it is always a great joy to walk around
his garden. Recently, I was admiring some beautiful double chrysanthemums he
had on show.
“Yes, they’re fine,” he agreed, but seemed to hesitate as he said it. I waited for him
to continue. “Yes, there have been some wonderful developments—new varieties and
all the rest of it. Yet sometimes, you know, I think we brush aside too easily the simple
types, the single flowers with their delicate perfection.” And he led me across the lawn
and pointed out just such an example.
No one, I think, would want to lose some of the wonderful developments which
man’s skill and care has brought to all kinds of things, but I think we need to remem-
ber Rudyard Kipling’s prayer, “Teach us delight in simple things. … ”
—Francis Gay
P
ossessions, outward success, public-
ity, luxury—to me these have always
been contemptible. I believe that a simple
and unassuming manner of life is best for
everyone, best for the body and the mind.
—Albert Einstein
I
t was God who created the simple plea-
sures and joys of life for us to enjoy. He
made our bodies and our senses to be
able to look upon and enjoy things which
are beautiful, to taste things which are de-
licious, to hear beautiful music, to feel
nice things that we touch, and to smell the
beautiful perfume of a flower or even of a
delicious meal that is cooking.
—David Brandt Berg
A
praiseful heart can find joy in so
many things—learning a skill, walk-
ing through the woods, meeting a friend,
viewing a beautiful sight, cooking a good
meal, giving a gift, teaching a child, help-
ing someone in need, finding ways to
serve, discovering a new truth, appreci-
ating an old one, reaching out to God in
prayer, passing His love on in little or big
ways. There are so many things in life to
be happy about—simple things, little
things, joyous things, precious things.
Jesus, please help us to seize each op-
portunity for enjoyment of all You’ve
given us. Help us to see all the sparkles
You’ve put in our path and to not fail to
thank You for them, knowing that they
and You are what make life wonderful.
—Chloe West
A AA AAn Ounc n Ounc n Ounc n Ounc n Ounce or e or e or e or e or T TT TTw ww wwo of H o of H o of H o of H o of Hea ea ea ea eav vv vven en en en en
I should like to buy a perfume,
Nothing fancy, something plain—
I had in mind the scent
Of city streets washed clean with rain;
Or, possibly, the fragrance
Of a baby freshly tubbed;
Or the spicy, heady odor
Of green mint leaves crushed and rubbed;
Do you have that grand aroma
Found in fresh-baked homemade bread?
Or the luxury-laden fragrance
Of clean sheets upon a bed?
How about the smell of bacon,
Crisp and brown and sizzling good?
Or the dreamy, smoky odor
Of a fire in the wood?
Perhaps you have the crispy
Smell of autumn in the air,
Or that more seductive fragrance
Of a spring day, soft and rare—
I should like to buy a perfume,
Any simple scent will do—
Just an ounce or two of Heaven
Made up in an earthly brew.
—Helen Marshall
“ ““ ““G GG GGo oo oodliness dliness dliness dliness dliness
with c with c with c with c with con on on on ont tt tten en en en ent- t- t- t- t-
men men men men ment is gr t is gr t is gr t is gr t is grea ea ea ea eat tt tt
gain gain gain gain gain” ”” ””
( (( ((1 11 11 T TT TTimoth imoth imoth imoth imothy 6:6, y 6:6, y 6:6, y 6:6, y 6:6,
NKJ NKJ NKJ NKJ NKJ). ). ). ). ).
111
REFLECTIONS
Lifes' Little Pleasures.
Glossary.
1. Keen. Finely sharpened as an edge
2. Admiring. Displaying or feeling admiration.
3. Chrysanthemums. A type of fower.
4. Developments. The act or process of developing; growth.
5. Perfection. The state or quality of becoming perfect
6. Delight. A high degree or pleasure or enjoyment.
7. Possessions. The act or fact of possesing. The things that you own.
8. Publicity. Extensive mention in the news media, or by word of mouth.
9. Unassuming. Modest.
10. Fragrance. The quality of being fragrant, a nice smell.
11. Homemade. Made or prepared at home.
12. Seductive. Tending to seduce.
13. Brew. To make (Beer) by steeping, boiling and fermenting malt.
14. Sparkles. To be brilliant, lively.
Points to ponder.
(A) This series of short stories promote the appreciation of simple things as being a source of
happiness. Think of some of the simple things that give you pleasure after writing a list of
them discuss what they are and why they give you pleasure.
(B) A line from one of Rudyard Kipling's poems that is quoted in the story says."Teach us
delight in simple things." What do you think that means?
112
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113
2%&,%#4) /.3
R177 GP-July 2002
'9CAF?
.@AF?K
A?@L
By Andreu CIuy
1
I wus |usI u gIrI oI 14 when I meI GubrIeI.
He wusn`I much oIder, und wus sIruggIIng wIIh
growIng up, IIke me. We becume IrIends und
hud IoIs oI Iun IogeIher.
WhuI cume beIween us, I cun`I remember.
There were hursh words und Ieurs. The Imuge
oI hIs ruIn-souked huIr und Ihe Ieurs sIIdIng
down hIs cheek Is seured on my mInd. I
wunIed Io muke IhIngs rIghI, buI Iucked Ihe
couruge und dIdn`I know how. The sIIuuIIon
seemed Ioo compIex Io suIvuge. GubrIeI und I
grew IurIher upurI.
Yeurs pussed, und I dIdn`I heur much ubouI
GubrIeI. Then In AprII 1998, muIuuI IrIends IeI
me know IhuI GubrIeI wus In u comu. He hud
IuIIen 30 meIers whIIe mounIuIn cIImbIng. My
heurI sIopped. I knew In IhuI InsIunI IhuI I
wouId never see hIm uguIn. The docIors dId
whuI Ihey couId, buI GubrIeI dIed u Iew weeks
IuIer.
Ior some IIme uIIerwurds I wouId IIe uwuke
uI nIghI, wIshIng I hud resoIved our dIIIerences
und seen our IrIendshIp Ihrough. I wus sure
IhuI uny chunce Ior IhuI wus now pusI. I won-
dered II he hud IorgIven me Ior Ihe hurI I hud
cuused hIm. I wondered II, when he Iooked
down Irom Heuven, he couId see und under-
sIund Ihe puIn In my heurI.
Then one nIghI I goI Ihe unswer Io my ques-
IIon. II wusn`I u Iong or eIuboruIe unswer, buI
II wus everyIhIng I needed Io wush uwuy Ihe
regreI I IeII. I dIsIIncIIy heurd u voIce In my
heud÷GubrIeI`s voIce÷suy, ¨I n|unys consId-
ered you u IrIend!"
Teurs hIIed my eyes. I knew uII wus IorgIven.
My heurI wus uI peuce.
I vowed Ihen und Ihere Io never uguIn end
u duy wIIhouI mukIng IhIngs rIghI wIIh Ihose I
muy huve hurI or oIIended. I muy never huve
unoIher chunce. Toduy muy be my onIy oppor-
IunIIy Io show someone I cure, Io suy ¨I Iove
you" und muke IhIngs rIghI.
I sny to you thnt uhoever is nngry uith
his Irother uithout n cnuse shn|| Ie in
dnnger oj the ]udgment. Therejore ij you
Iring your gijt to the n|tnr, nnd there
rememIer thnt your Irother hns something
ngninst you, |enve your gijt there Iejore the
n|tnr, nnd go your uny. Iirst Ie reconci|ed
to your Irother, nnd then come nnd ojjer
your gijt.
÷The ßiI|e, Mnttheu 5:22÷24 NK}
stcpbcn 8town tclls o| a ncw
ownct o| a üolls üoycc wbosc
cat btokc oown in a tcuotc atca
o| ltancc. hc callco tbc ocalct-
sbip. 1bcy 1cw a tcpaituan in to
hx bis cat. 1bc ncxt oay it was
tunnin¿ a¿ain, ano bc was on bis
way. uontbs latct, sincc bc bao
ncvct tcccivco a bill, bc wtotc
tbc coupany to tbank tbcu |ot
bcin¿ so tcsponsivc wbcn bis
cat bao btokcn oown in ltancc.
üolls üoycc wtotc back, ¨wc
bavc no tccoto o| any üolls
üoycc cvct bavin¿ uccbanical
ptoblcus."
wbcn Coo |ot¿ivcs you, hc
coucs ano tcstotcs tbat wbicb
is wton¿. Ano his lovc kccps no
tccoto o| wton¿s.
1bc oi||ctcncc bctwccn boloin¿
on to a butt
Ot tclcasin¿ it witb |ot¿ivcncss
ls likc tbc oi||ctcncc bctwccn
layin¿ yout bcao oown at
ni¿bt
On a pillow hllco witb tbotns
Ot a pillow hllco witb tosc pctals.
÷|o·en l|sche·

1
Andrea Clay is a volunteer with The Family.
Copyright © 2002 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Topics: Personal relations, forgiveness, love.
Making things right.
Glossary.
1. Harsh. Ungentle or unpleasant in action of effect.
2. Courage. The quality of mind or spirit that enables a person to face diffculty.
3. Complex. Complicated or intricate as to be hard to understand or deal with
4. Coma. A state of prolonged unconsciousness.
5. Resolved. Firm in purpose or intent.
6. Forgiven. To grant pardon for or remission.
7. Elaborate. Worked out with great care.
8. Regret. To feel sorrow or remorse for.
9. Vowed. A solemn promise, a pledge or personal commitment.
10. Responsive. Responding especially readily to infuences.
Points to ponder.
(A) Gabriel had a climbing accident and fell into a coma. His old school friend Andrea,
when she heard the news had deep feelings of regret. What did she regret?
(B) Why did the Rolls Royce company not send a repair bill to the car owner whose car
broke down and was repaired by the company?
114
REFLECTIONS
115
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116
117
118
Loving kindness is twice blessed.
Glossary.
1. Gloom/Gloomy. Dark or dim; deeply shaded.
2. Dedicated. Wholly committed to something; as to an idea.
3. Cheerful. Full of cheer, in good spirits.
4. Cheesecake. A cake made with cream cheese.
5. Sculpted. To sculpture, carve or model
6. Grateful. Thankful.
7. Assured. Guaranteed
8. Disappeared. To cease to be seen. Vanish from sight.
9. Opportunities. An appropriate time or occasion.
10. Constant. Not changing or varying
11. Boomerang. A bent piece of tough wood.
12. Absent. Not at a certain place at a given time.
13. Mumbled. To speak in a low and indistinct manner.
14. Moral Support. To make an appearance, or show approval for the actions of another
as though to offer encouragement.
15. Relapse. To fall or slip back into a former state.
16. Delighted. Highly pleased.
Points to ponder.
(A) The phrase,”Loving kindness is twice blessed,” has an important meaning. Explain in
your own words what it means.
(B) At the end of the short story,”Monday morning,” the writer says, “God’s love is like
that baby’s smile.” What did she mean by that?
REFLECTIONS
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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
120
Dear one,
There are no gifts I can give you which
will fll your heart with all the special things
you deserve. So this Christmas I offer this
prayer, asking the One who knows us all to
give you His very best.
In His great heart of love He knows all
we need, and in His love He longs to give us
many treasures of the spirit.
Firstly, I pray for
your happiness. Not the
kind that comes from
events or longed-for
acquisitions, but deep
abiding happiness that
will be there even if you
have nothing else spe-
cial going on. The Bible
calls it joy, so that is my prayer for you-joy
that lasts even when things aren't going just
right.
Next I pray for peace in your heart.
Now that can sound boring, but I don't mean
a lack of excitement, an empty feeling, or sur-
cease from activity or challenge, but rather a
sweet knowledge that God is in control, and
that He won't let anything happen to you that
you and He can't work out together-a qui-
et certainty that gives you rest inside, even
when you are working hard or the pressure's
on. Deep peace.
My prayer wouldn't be complete with-
out praying for you to have faith. Some peo-
ple think faith means blindness to reality-
an overly optimistic outlook that denies the
facts. But real faith, the kind I wish for you, is
based on the most wonderful realities of all-
God and His love and His promises to you.
My prayer for you this
That kind of faith that knows that God wants
only the very best for you and has the power
to bring it to pass. That kind of faith comes
from reading His Word and fnding in your
heart that you know it is true. That's the kind
of faith that moves mountains.
I pray for you to have wisdom and
understanding, so that you can look at life
around you and then to
Heaven above, and fnd
there the answers and ex-
planations and guidance
you need-God-given wis-
dom that gives you pa-
tience and faith for others
and points the way in dif-
fcult moments.
And last but not least, I pray for you to
experience love-great love, overfowing love,
patient love, wise love, sweet love, fun love,
exciting love, purposeful love, abiding love,
strong love, encouraging love, God's love in
all its wondrous forms.
For all these reasons, God came down
at Christmas in the form of a little baby to
give us all these things-happiness, peace,
faith, wisdom, and most of all, love.
So my prayer is that this Christmas,
you will experience these in a greater way
than ever before. That you will let that lit-
tle baby and His message into your life. That
you will take the Christ child into your heart,
believe His promises, and experience all the
wonders He has for you.
I pray all this for you, because I know
that Jesus wants to give you these things any-
way, because He loves you-and I do too.
Christmas
REFLECTIONS
121
My prayer for you this Christmas.
Glossary.
1. Treasures. Wealth or riches, stored or accumulated.
2. Events. Something that happens or is regarded as happening.
3. Acquisitions. The act of acquiring or gaining possession of.
4. Abiding. Continuing without change.
5. Joy. The emotion of great delight.
6. Peace. Harmony.
7. Excitement. Something that excites.
8. Surcease. To cease from some action.
9. Certain. Free from doubt or reservation.
10. Faith. Confdence.
11. Optimistic. Disposed to take a favorable view of events
12. Realities. The state or quality of being real.
13. Wisdom. The quality or the state of being wise.
14. Patience. The quality of being patient.
15. Overfowing. To fow or to run over as rivers or water.
16. Encouraging. To inspire with courage, spirit or confdence.
17. Wonders. To think or speculate curiously.
Points to ponder.
(A) In this story the writer does not offer a traditional Christmas present to her friend.
Instead she offers a prayer that the friend be given; faith; peace; happiness and love
in the coming year. Some people believe that prayers can change things; other people
do not have this belief. Explain your own personal view on this and explain why you
feel that way.
REFLECTIONS
122
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
have a life preserver, which is my most
valued possession.
While sailing on the sea of life, so many
times I have looked out to see a storm brewing
on the horizon. I grab my life preserver and tie
it on securely, then brace myself for the unfor-
giving blast that approaches.
When the storm hits, my little craft is
tossed by the angry waves. They threaten to
swamp and drown me, but with my life pre-
server, I know I will survive. No-more than
survive. I will rise again, bruised and beaten
perhaps, but victorious.
Sometimes the storms creep up on me
from behind. Caught unawares in the raging
fury, my boat capsizes, throwing me into the
icy waters. I choke, sputter, and gasp for air, but
fnd myself caught in a whirlpool. The more I
struggle, the tighter the water holds me in its
grip.
Alone, helpless, and defeated, I wait for
the end, hope fickering like a melted candle.
As I sink under the waters for the last time, a
Voice comes over the sound of the storm. "Grab
the life preserver! It is your only hope."
Straining to see in the darkness, I catch
sight of something foating on the water. It is
my life preserver-always there when I need it
most. I tie it on and immediately begin to foat.
The darkness still envelops me. The sea
still churns and foams and its angry waves
threaten to pull me under. The rain continues to
sting my cheeks. But I am buoyant once again.
With complete trust, secure in my life preserv-
er, I am content to wait out the storm.
What is the secret of my life preserver?
It is so simple that you may dismiss it. It is the
verse from the Bible: "We know that all things
work together for good to those who love God"
(Romans 8:28 NKJ).
ALL things-storms, rain, and winds in-
cluded-are for our GOOD.
REFLECTIONS
Someday, somehow we will under-
stand.
Blessings from Battles
By Maria Fontaine
It's certainly comforting to know that "all
things work together for good to those who
love God, to those who are the called ac-
cording to His purpose" (Romans 8:28). In
fact, in order to come through our many tri-
als, diffculties, battles, and temptations vic-
toriously, it is imperative that we make this
promise from the Bible a vital part of our
life.
If we fail to constantly view our dis-
appointments, hurts, tests, illnesses, battles,
etc., through the perspective that Romans
8:28 gives us, we will tragically miss many
valuable lessons the Lord is
trying to teach us.-And
we will rob ourselves
of the peace that
comes from abso-
lute trust in this
precious promise
and principle.
If you
learn the simple
equation, "Trou-
bles equal good,"
your life will be rich-
er, your lessons great- e r ,
your mind more tranquil, and you will
more easily recognize the Lord's hand in
the events of your life. It makes all the dif-
ference in the world whether you look at a
food of problems, trials, battles, and tribu-
lations just waiting to see the worst happen,
or if you look at them with the excitement
and challenge that comes from waiting to
discover all the good you know the Lord
will bring out of them.
By Stellaris Jade
My Life Preserver
I
123
124
My life preserver.
Glossary.
1. Possession. The act or fact of possesing
2. Bruised. To become injured slightly.
3. Brace . A rope by which a yard is swung about and secured horizontally.
4. Brace
5. Horizon. The line or circle that forms the apparent boundary between earth and sky.
6. Drown. To die underwater or other liquid of suffocation.
7. Victorious. To win, conquer or overcome.
8. Unawares. Without warning; by surprise; suddenly.
9. Capsize. To turn bottom up; overturn.
10. Whirlpool. Water in swift circular motion, as that produced by the meeting of opposite
currents.
11. Defeat. To be overcome in a contest, election, battle etc, prevail over or to vanquish.
12. Envelops. To cover or surround completely.
13. Buoyant. Tending to foat in a fuid.
14. Temptations. Something that tempts, entices or allures.
15. Victorians. Someone who lived during the Victorian era.
16. Imperative. Absolutely necessary or required, unavoidable.
17. Disappointments. The state of being or feeling disappointed.
18. Tragically. Extremely mournful, melancholy, or dreadful.
19. Absolute. Ultimate, non comparative or relative.
20. Tranquil. Free from commotion or tumult; peaceful; quiet; calm.
21. Tribulations. Grievous trouble; severe trial or suffering.
Points to ponder.
(A) Sometimes bad or unpleasant things happen to us in our lives. This article encourages us to
look positively on diffculties. Can you explain in your own words how good or positive
things can come from what looks like a bad or negative event in your life?
REFLECTIONS
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2%&,%#4) /.3
R231 GP-October 2003 Topics: problems, difficulties, maturing, strength, God's plan and His purpose
¨Don`I worry II you huve probIems!" ThuI
Is eusy Io suy unIII you ure In Ihe mIdsI oI u
reuIIy bIg one, I know. BuI Ihe onIy peopIe
I um uwure oI who don`I huve IroubIes ure
guIhered In IIIIIe neIghborhoods. MosI
communIIIes huve uI IeusI one. We cuII Ihem
cemeIerIes.
II you`re breuIhIng, you huve dIIhcuIIIes.
II`s Ihe wuy IIIe Is. And beIIeve II or noI, mosI
oI your probIems muy ucIuuIIy be good Ior
you! ChuIIenged und IesIed, we come uIIve!
PhysIcuI demunds cun cuuse us Io grow
sIronger. MenIuI und emoIIonuI sIress cun
produce Iough-mIndedness und resIIIency.
SpIrIIuuI IesIIng cun produce sIrengIh oI
churucIer und IuIIhIuIness.
So, you huve probIems÷no probIem! JusI
IeII yourseII, ¨There I grow uguIn!"
ˆ#INDY,UDWIG
™™™
He wunIs us Io noI be hoIhouse pIunIs, buI
sIorm-beuIen ouks, noI sund dunes drIven
wIIh every gusI oI wInd, buI grunIIe rocks
wIIhsIundIng Ihe hercesI sIorms. Muny oI
us need no oIher urgumenI Ihun our own
experIences Io prove IhuI suIIerIng Is Indeed
God`s IesIIng room oI IuIIh.
÷3TREAMS
™™™
One IhIng we muy be sure oI: Ior Ihe
beIIever uII puIn hus meunIng, uII udversIIy Is
prohIubIe. There Is no quesIIon IhuI udversIIy
Is dIIhcuII. II usuuIIy Iukes us by surprIse und
seems Io sIrIke where we ure mosI vuInerubIe.
To us II oIIen uppeurs compIeIeIy senseIess
und IrruIIonuI, buI Io God none oI II Is eIIher
senseIess or IrruIIonuI. He hus u purpose In
every puIn He brIngs or uIIows In our IIves. We
cun be sure IhuI In some wuy He InIends II Ior
our prohI und HIs gIory.
ˆ*ERRY"RIDGES
,IGHTSHININGOUTOFDARKNESS
"97),,)!-#/70%2
God moves in mysterious ways
His wonders to perform.
He plants His footstep in the sea,
And rides upon the storm.
Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,
But trust Him for His grace;
Behind a frowning providence
He hides a smiling face.
His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.
Blind unbelief is sure to err,
And scan His work in vain;
God is His own interpreter,
And He will make it plain.
God oI our IIIe, Ihere ure duys when Ihe
burdens we curry chuIe our shouIders und
weIgh us down, when Ihe roud seems dreury
und endIess, Ihe skIes gruy und IhreuIenIng,
when our IIves huve no musIc In Ihem, und our
heurIs ure IoneIy, und our souIs huve IosI IheIr
couruge.
IIood Ihe puIh wIIh IIghI, run our eyes Io
where Ihe skIes ure IuII oI promIse, Iune our
heurIs Io bruve musIc, gIve us Ihe sense oI
comrudeshIp wIIh heroes und suInIs oI every uge,
und so quIcken our spIrIIs IhuI we muy be ubIe Io
encouruge Ihe souIs oI uII who |ourney wIIh us
on Ihe roud oI IIIe, Io Your honor und gIory.
!02!9%2/&34!5'534).%
127
No Problem
Glossary.
1. Aware. Having knowledge of or being conscious of.
2. Cemeteries. An area set apart for, or containing graves.
3. Emotional. Pertaining to or involving emotions.
4. Stress. Importance or signifcance attached to a thing. (or) Mental anxiety often
caused by worry or overworking.
5. Resiliency. The power or the ability to return to the original form, position, etc.
6. Spiritual. Of or pertaining to things of the spirit.
7. Character. The appearance or features of.
8. Faithfulness. Showing diligence to ones duty or responsibility, in a thorough manner.
9. Gust. A sudden strong blast of wind.
10. Granite. A coarse hard igneous rock.
11. Oak. The hard durable wood of such a tree, used in making furniture and construction.
12. Adversity. Adverse fortune or fate.
13. Proftable. Benefcial or useful.
14. Vulnerable. Exposed or open to danger or attack, unprotected.
15. Senseless. Destitute or deprived of sensation.
16. Irrational. Without the faculty of reason.
17. Feeble. Physically weak, as from age or sickness.
18. Providence. The care and guidance of God or nature over creatures of the earth.
19. Ripen. To make or become ripe.
20. Interpreter. A person who interprets.
21. Chafe. Irritation or annoyance.
22. Dreary. Causing sadness or gloom.
23. Threatening. To utter a threat against another.
24. Courage. The quality of mind or spirit, that enables a person to face diffculties, danger
or pain.
25. Comradeship. A person who shares in ones activities, occupation, etc.
Points to ponder.
(A) This short story tries to explain from a positive perspective how problems can be good
for us. Think about this and discuss how, and in which way, problems in your own life
have been a beneft.
REFLECTIONS 2%&,%#4) /.3
R231 GP-October 2003 Topics: problems, difficulties, maturing, strength, God's plan and His purpose
¨Don`I worry II you huve probIems!" ThuI
Is eusy Io suy unIII you ure In Ihe mIdsI oI u
reuIIy bIg one, I know. BuI Ihe onIy peopIe
I um uwure oI who don`I huve IroubIes ure
guIhered In IIIIIe neIghborhoods. MosI
communIIIes huve uI IeusI one. We cuII Ihem
cemeIerIes.
II you`re breuIhIng, you huve dIIhcuIIIes.
II`s Ihe wuy IIIe Is. And beIIeve II or noI, mosI
oI your probIems muy ucIuuIIy be good Ior
you! ChuIIenged und IesIed, we come uIIve!
PhysIcuI demunds cun cuuse us Io grow
sIronger. MenIuI und emoIIonuI sIress cun
produce Iough-mIndedness und resIIIency.
SpIrIIuuI IesIIng cun produce sIrengIh oI
churucIer und IuIIhIuIness.
So, you huve probIems÷no probIem! JusI
IeII yourseII, ¨There I grow uguIn!"
ˆ#INDY,UDWIG
™™™
He wunIs us Io noI be hoIhouse pIunIs, buI
sIorm-beuIen ouks, noI sund dunes drIven
wIIh every gusI oI wInd, buI grunIIe rocks
wIIhsIundIng Ihe hercesI sIorms. Muny oI
us need no oIher urgumenI Ihun our own
experIences Io prove IhuI suIIerIng Is Indeed
God`s IesIIng room oI IuIIh.
÷3TREAMS
™™™
One IhIng we muy be sure oI: Ior Ihe
beIIever uII puIn hus meunIng, uII udversIIy Is
prohIubIe. There Is no quesIIon IhuI udversIIy
Is dIIhcuII. II usuuIIy Iukes us by surprIse und
seems Io sIrIke where we ure mosI vuInerubIe.
To us II oIIen uppeurs compIeIeIy senseIess
und IrruIIonuI, buI Io God none oI II Is eIIher
senseIess or IrruIIonuI. He hus u purpose In
every puIn He brIngs or uIIows In our IIves. We
cun be sure IhuI In some wuy He InIends II Ior
our prohI und HIs gIory.
ˆ*ERRY"RIDGES
,IGHTSHININGOUTOFDARKNESS
"97),,)!-#/70%2
God moves in mysterious ways
His wonders to perform.
He plants His footstep in the sea,
And rides upon the storm.
Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,
But trust Him for His grace;
Behind a frowning providence
He hides a smiling face.
His purposes will ripen fast,
Unfolding every hour;
The bud may have a bitter taste,
But sweet will be the flower.
Blind unbelief is sure to err,
And scan His work in vain;
God is His own interpreter,
And He will make it plain.
God oI our IIIe, Ihere ure duys when Ihe
burdens we curry chuIe our shouIders und
weIgh us down, when Ihe roud seems dreury
und endIess, Ihe skIes gruy und IhreuIenIng,
when our IIves huve no musIc In Ihem, und our
heurIs ure IoneIy, und our souIs huve IosI IheIr
couruge.
IIood Ihe puIh wIIh IIghI, run our eyes Io
where Ihe skIes ure IuII oI promIse, Iune our
heurIs Io bruve musIc, gIve us Ihe sense oI
comrudeshIp wIIh heroes und suInIs oI every uge,
und so quIcken our spIrIIs IhuI we muy be ubIe Io
encouruge Ihe souIs oI uII who |ourney wIIh us
on Ihe roud oI IIIe, Io Your honor und gIory.
!02!9%2/&34!5'534).%
128




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R 304, The oil Lamp and the Lighthouse, BUR
±e.¬ee-.
.-
e._e÷÷
Akio and Tomoko Matsuoka
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
REFLECTIONS
129
The oil lamp and the lighthouse.
Glossary.
1. Stately. Majestic, stately, imposing in magnifcence, elegance etc.
2. Lighthouse. A tower or other structure displaying a fashing or bright light, for the
guidance of ships in avoiding dangerous areas.
3. Shimmered. A subdued, tremulous light or gleam.
4. Lantern. A hand held light using a candle or oil soaked wick as a source of light.
5. Sparkled. Little spark or fery particle.
6. Rankled. To continue to cause keen irritation or bitter resentment, within one mind.
7. Shortcomings. A failure, defect or defciency in conduct, condition, thought or ability.
8. Magnifed. To increase the apparent size as a lens does.
9. Foreboding. A prediction, portending to.
10. Chill. Coldness, especially a moderate but penetrating coldness.
11. Misgivings. A feeling of doubt, or distrust, or apprehension.
12. Brambles. Any prickly shrub belonging to the genius rubus or the rose family.
13. Depending. To rely on or place trust in.
14. Infuence. The capacity of persons or things to be a compelling force, to produce
effects on the actions, behavior or opinion.
Points to ponder.
(A) This story tells of an oil lamp that compares its self negatively with a lighthouse. As
humans we are often in the habit of comparing ourselves with others. Why is it not a
very good idea to compare yourself with others?
(B) Stop now and make a written list of 10 things that you are thankful for. Think for a
few minutes about these things.
130
131
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
132
Building Tomorrow's World
133
One of a kind
Glossary
1. Talents. Special natural ability or aptitude.
2. Develop. Getting increase in something
3. Affectionately. Showing a closeness or affnity or fondness.
4. Grumbled. To protest or complain in a bad tempered way.
5. Secure. No feeling of worry or anxiety.
6. Boundaries. A line that marks a limit.
7. Enforced. To make sure that a law or rule is obeyed or carried out.
8. Positive ness. Having a helpful and constructive intention or attitude.
9. Satisfying. To do something, or give something that is acceptable or adequate.
10. Marveled. A person or thing that flls one with surprise or admiration.
11. Prolonged. Continuing for a long time.
12. Cancer. An abnormal growth of cells in the body that often causes death.
13. Sincere. Not pretending.
14. Malleable. Something that can be beaten or pressed into different shapes easily.
15. Encourage. To give support to.
16. Inspire. To encourage one to perform at a higher level, or to improve.
Points to ponder.
(A) This story tells of the life of a teacher and how she had a positive infuence in the lives
of her students.
(B) Think of a person who has had a positive infuence in your life and write a couple of
sentences about the person and in what way they infuenced you.
REFLECTIONS
134
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
135
R124 GP
REFLECTI ONS
ON THE REBOUND
By Nyx Martinez (a 19-year-old
missionary in the Philippines)
It was one of those days that started out
as days customarily do, with nothing pecu-
liar about it ... until the night came around. I
was happily sketching away on my latest piece of artwork, humming a
tune and feeling that the world was a wonderful place to live in. Some-
time later, I made my merry way into my office where the computer
sat, its keyboard beckoning my fingers to make contact. Then came
the devastating news:
The computer had bombed and ALL my files were toast.
Erased.
Deleted.
Forever.
At first the actual disaster didn’t register in my slow-computing brain. But then ... it hit. No, it slammed
into me with the full force of an angry bulldozer on a leveling mission. My stomach did a double flip and
my vision went hazy. My mind became clouded. The room started to spin. The last six months of hard
work—transcriptions, articles, graphic design, all that precious mental energy that had been stored on
the computer’s hard drive for safekeeping—all gone.
Engulfed in frustration, confusion, tragedy and loss, I felt as if a snowball the size of a meteor and
encasing my worst fear had just tumbled out of the sky and crash-landed on top of me.
Why, oh why, hadn’t I copied all that stuff onto floppy disks or taken the time to learn about backing
up files?! Now bits and pieces of creativity were lost, floating somewhere in cyberspace, far from home.
And I couldn’t get them back.
Now I understood. ... Ah yes, I had been one of the less fortunate victims of the murderous monster
of modern technology!
But then a certain story came to mind—about the time when Thomas Edison met a similar heart-
wrenching tragedy. His workshop had caught fire, and months, years, even decades of hard work on
numerous unfinished inventions went up in smoke.
“There go all my mistakes!” he said with amazing cheerfulness ... and then went right back to work.
I wondered if there was enough positive energy left in my heart to start again as bravely as Mr.
Edison, to pack all my courage into moving forward. Contemplating these things somehow eased the
pain and melted away that woozy feeling of defeat. I struggled to stand up from where I had fallen to my
knees in frustration, and forced the corners of my lips into a trying smile.
Oh, some things in life seem totally unfair! But I could not let defeat govern me, nor have any say in
my future successes. I decided to see this situation not as the tragic ending to the story of my life, but
rather as the first scene to a new beginning in a future yet to unfold.
This is my first attempt at writing since Demolition Day. “There go all my mistakes,” I’m saying. I
haven’t quit forever, and I haven’t put down the pen. I’ve picked it up to start again.
All over.
All new.
—With backup files and floppies!
S
omeday I hope to enjoy enough of what the
world calls success so that somebody will ask
me, “What’s the secret of it?” I shall say sim-
ply this: “I get up when I fall down.”
—Paul Harvey
Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail. — Ralph Waldo Emerson
Failure, keep on, God’s strength
Full half a hundred times I’ve sobbed,
“I can’t go on! I can’t go on!”
And yet full half a hundred times
I’ve hushed my sobs, and gone.
My answer, if you ask me how,
May seem presumptuously odd,
But I think that what kept keeping on
When I could not, was God.
—Jane Merchant
136
REFLECTIONS
On the rebound
Glossary.
1. Customarily. According to or depending on customs.
2. Peculiar. Strange, odd or something that is unusual.
3. Beckoning. To signal, summon or direct by a gesture of the hand or the head.
4. Devastating. Tending to or threatening to devastate.
5. Bulldozer. A large powerful tractor having a vertical blade at the front end, for
moving earth, tree stumps, rocks, etc.
6. Transcriptions. The act or process of transcribing.
7. Frustration. The state of being frustrated.
8. Encasing. To enclose in or as in a case.
9. Cyberspace. The realm of electronic communications.
10. Contemplating. To think studiously about.
11. Woozy. Stupidly confused.
12. Demolition. An act or instance of demolishing.
13. Sobbed. Crying, weeping.
14. Presumptuously. Assumption of something as true.
Points to ponder.
(A) This story deals with set-backs and failures that all of us experience from time to time.
Someone once said that, “Failure is a greater teacher than success.” What do you think that
could mean?
(B) The American inventor, Thomas Edison, is quoted in this story, involving an incident
when Edison’s laboratory and workshop, were destroyed in a fre. Edison upon discovering
the fre, called his son, and said. “Charles, come and look at this, you will not see anything
like this again. There go all of my mistakes.” What do you think of Edison’s
reaction and attitude?

137
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
R208 GP-March 2003
n Biccklyn, Nev Ycik,
Shush is u schccl thut cuteis tc
leuining-disuhled childien. Scme
childien iemuin in Shush íci
theii entiie schccl cuieei, vhile
ctheis cun he muinstieumed intc
ccnventicnul schccls. At u Shush
íundiuising dinnei, the íuthei cí
u Shush child deliveied u speech
thut vculd nevei he ícigctten hy
ull vhc uttended.
Aítei extclling the schccl
und its dedicuted stuíí, he ciied
cut, ¨Vheie is the peiíecticn in
my scn Shuyu: Eveiything Ccd
dces is dcne vith peiíecticn.
But my child cunnct undeistund
things us cthei childien dc. My
child cunnct iememhei íucts
und íguies us cthei childien dc.
Vheie is Ccd's peiíecticn:¨ The
uudience vus shccked hy the
questicn, puined hy the íuthei's
unguish, und stilled hy the pieic-
ing queiy. ¨l helieve,¨ the íuthei
unsveied, ¨thut vhen Ccd hiings
u child like this intc the vcild,
the peiíecticn thut He seeks is
in the vuy pecple ieuct tc this
child.¨
He then tcld the ícllcving
stciy uhcut his scn: One uítei-
nccn Shuyu und his íuthei vulked
pust u puik vheie scme hcys
Shuyu knev veie pluying huse-
hull. Shuyu usked, ¨Dc ycu think
they vill let me pluy:¨ Shuyu's
íuthei knev thut his scn vus
nct ut ull uthletic und thut mcst
hcys vculd nct vunt him cn
theii teum. But Shuyu's íuthei
undeistccd thut ií his scn vus
chcsen tc pluy, it vculd give him
u ccmícituhle sense cí helcnging.
Shuyu's íuthei uppicuched cne cí
the hcys in the íeld und usked ií
Shuyu cculd pluy.
The hcy lccked uicund íci
guidunce íicm his teummutes.
Cetting ncne, he tcck mutteis intc
his cvn hunds und suid, ¨Ve uie
lcsing hy six iuns und the gume
is in the eighth inning. l guess he
cun he cn cui teum und ve'll tiy
tc put him up tc hut in the ninth
inning.¨
Shuyu's íuthei vus ecstutic us
Shuyu smiled hicudly. Shuyu vus
tcld tc put cn u glcve und gc cut
tc pluy shcit centei íeld.
ln the hcttcm cí the eighth
inning, Shuyu's teum sccied u íev
iuns hut vus still hehind hy thiee.
ln the hcttcm cí the ninth inning,
Shuyu's teum sccied uguin, und
ncv vith tvc cuts und the huses
lcuded vith the pctentiul vinning
iun cn huse, Shuyu vus scheduled
tc he up. Vculd the teum uctuully
let Shuyu hut ut this }unctuie und
give uvuy theii chunce tc vin the
gume:
Suipiisingly, Shuyu vus given
the hut. Eveiycne knev thut it
vus ull hut impcssihle hecuuse
Shuyu didn't even kncv hcv tc
hcld the hut picpeily, let ulcne
hit vith it. Hcvevei, us Shuyu
stepped up tc the plute, the
pitchei mcved u íev steps clcsei
tc hcme plute und lchhed the
hull in scítly sc Shuyu vculd ut
leust he uhle tc muke ccntuct. The
íist pitch cume in, und Shuyu
svung clumsily und missed. One
cí Shuyu's teummutes cume up tc
Shuyu und tcgethei they held the
hut und íuced the pitchei, vuiting
íci the next pitch.
The pitchei tcck u íev mcie
steps ícivuid und tcssed the hull
scítly tcvuid Shuyu. As the pitch
cume in, Shuyu und his teummute
svung ut the hut und tcgethei
they hit u slcv gicund hull tc the
pitchei. The pitchei picked up the
scít gicundei und cculd eusily
huve thicvn the hull tc the íist
husemun. Shuyu vculd huve heen
cut und thut vculd huve ended
the gume.
lnsteud, the pitchei tcck the
hull und thiev it cn u high uic tc
iight íeld, íui heycnd ieuch cí the
íist husemun. Eveiycne stuited
yelling, ¨Shuyu, iun tc íist! Run
tc íist!¨ Nevei in his liíe hud
Shuyu iun tc íist. He scumpeied
dcvn the huseline vide-eyed und
stuitled.
By the time he ieuched íist
huse, the iight íeldei hud the
hull. Shuyu kept iunning. The
iight íeldei cculd huve thicvn
the hull tc the seccnd husemun,
vhc vculd huve tugged Shuyu
cut, hut the iight íeldei undei-
stccd the pitchei's intenticns und
thiev the hull high und íui cvei
the thiid husemun's heud.
Eveiycne yelled, ¨Run tc
seccnd, iun tc seccnd!¨ Shuyu
iun tcvuids seccnd huse us the
iunneis uheud cí him deliiicusly
ciicled the huses tcvuids hcme.
As Shuyu ieuched seccnd huse,
the cppcsing shcitstcp iun tc
him, tuined him in the diiecticn
cí thiid huse und shcuted, ¨Run
tc thiid!¨
As Shuyu icunded thiid,
the hcys íicm hcth teums iun
hehind him scieuming, ¨Shuyu,
iun hcme!¨ Shuyu iun hcme,
stepped cn hcme plute, und
ull 1S hcys liíted him cn theii
shculdeis. Shuyu vus the heic.
He hud }ust hit u giund slum
hcme iun und vcn the gume íci
his teum.
¨Thut duy,¨ suid the íuthei
scítly vith teuis ncv iclling
dcvn his íuce, ¨thcse 1S hcys
ieuched theii level cí Ccd's pei-
íecticn.¨
3(5)(&7,21
%y Horace Edwards
Topics: Love, compassion, helping others.
138
REFLECTIONS
Perfection
Glossary.
1. Disabled. To make unable or unft.
2. Mainstream. The principal or dominant course.
3. Entire. Having all the parts or elements.
4. Conventional. Conforming to or adhering to accepted standards, as a conduct or taste.
5. Extolling. To praise highly.
6. Dedicated. Wholly committed to something.
7. Perfection. The state or quality of being or becoming perfect.
8. Piercing. Loud or shrill.
9. React. To act or perform again.
10. Athletic. Physically active and strong.
11. Approach. To come near or nearer to.
12. Inning. A stage in the game of cricket or baseball.
13. Ecstatic. Pertaining to, or characterized by ecstasy.
14. Potential. Possible as opposed to actual.
15. Scheduled. A plan of procedure, usually written, for a proposed objective, especially
with reference to the timing and sequence.
16. Juncture. A point in time especially, one made critical or important by a concurrence
of circumstances.
17. Scampered. To run or go quickly or hastily.
18. Startled. To disturb or agitate suddenly, or as by surprise or alarm.
19. Delirious; To be in a dazes state or suffering from delusions, often a state induced by a
prolonged high fever.
20. Hero. A man of distinguished courage or ability.
Points to ponder.
(A) The story, “Perfection,” deals with the life of a mentally handicapped boy, playing
baseball.
How would you describe the attitude of the members of the baseball teams, towards
the handicapped boy?
(B) This story deals with the human quality of compassion. Compassion means taking action
motivated by feelings of respect and loving concern for others. Think about a time,
in your own life, when you had compassion for someone else and explain what you did.
139
140
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2%&,%#4) /.3
R212 GP-April 2003
(Ihis is ojteu attributed to Nother Ieresa oj 6alcutta, as a copy is ou her wall, but it
was writteu by Leut wheu he was 19, aud jrst published by the Barvard 5tudeut Aqeucies
iu 1968.)
People aie ofLen unieasonable, illogical and self-cenLeied,
Ioigive LLem anyway.
If you aie kind, people may accuse you of selhsL, ulLeiioi moLives,
Be kind anyway.
If you aie successful, you will win some false fiiends and some Liue enemies,
Succeed anyway.
If you aie LonesL and fiank, people may cLeaL you,
Be LonesL and fiank anyway.
ULaL you spend yeais building, someone may desLioy oveinigLL,
Build anyway.
If you hnd seieniLy and Lappiness, oLLeis may be jealous,
Be Lappy anyway.
ILe good you do Loday, people will ofLen foigeL Lomoiiow,
Po good anyway.
0ive LLe woild LLe besL you Lave, and iL may nevei be enougL,
0ive LLe woild LLe besL you've goL anyway.
¥ou see, in LLe hnal analysis, iL is all beLween you and 0od,
IL was nevei beLween you and LLem anyway.
DUDGR[LFDO
I love LLis liLLle poem fiom an unknown auLLoi:
6od said to build a better world,
aud I said, ¨Bow?
Ihe world is such a cruel
aud heartless place,
aud I au so suall aud useless,
there is uothiuq I cau do."
but 6od, iu all Bis wisdou said,
¨Just build a better you."
Ue can sLaiL by Leeding LLe woids of HaLaLma 0andLi, wLo idenLihed LLe seven
sins in LLe woild as wealLL wiLLouL woik, pleasuie befoie conscience, knowledge
wiLLouL cLaiacLei, commeice wiLLouL moialiLy, science wiLLouL LumaniLy, woisLip
wiLLouL saciihce, and poliLics wiLLouL piinciple.
ILose woids give us cause foi concein, buL LLeie is someLLing we can do, even
LLougL we feel, ¨I am only one." ILe answei lies in LLe infoimaLion above. ¥ou sLaiL by
building a beLLei you. If all of us did LLaL, we would Lave a beLLei woild.
uo sLeam oi gas
diives anyLLing unLil iL
is conhned. uo uiagaia
is evei Luined inLo
ligLL and powei unLil
iL is funneled. uo life
evei giows gieaL unLil
iL is focused, dedicaLed,
disciplined.
÷Barry Luersou
losdick
3
RPPDQGPHQWV
&
<
%\.HQW0.HLWK
ou say you can'L
cLange LLe woild:÷IL's
Loo laLe, Loo bad,
Loo big, and jusL Loo
difhculL: Uell, wLy
don'L you jusL Liy
cLanging youi paiL of
LLe woild:
ULy don'L you
sLaiL wiLL youi owu
LeaiL, youi own mind,
youi own spiiiL, youi
own life: If you even
cLange your life, you've
cLanged LLe enLiie
spLeie in wLicL you
live. ILe place and LLe
veiy aLmospLeie aiound
you will be cLanged if
you cLange youiself by
LLe powei of 0od's love!
֟avid braudt berq
, $P 2QO\
2
2Q)RFXV
%\=LJ=LJODU
QH
Topics: Conviction, doing good, faith, focus, discipline, God's love changing the world.
Paradoxical Commandments
Glossary.
1. Paradoxical. A statement or proposition that seems self contradictory or absurd but in
reality expresses a possible truth
2. Commandment. A command or mandate.
3. Unreasonable. Not reasonable or rational.
4. Illogical. Not logical.
5. Self-centered. Concerned solely or chiefy with one’s own interests.
6. Ulterior. Being beyond what is seen.
7. Motives. Something that causes a person to act in a certain way.
8. Cheat. To defraud.
9. Frank. Direct and unreserved in speech.
10. Jealous. Feeling resentment against someone because of that person’s rivalry, success
or advantages.
11. Serenity. The state or quality of being serene, calm or tranquil.
12. Analysis. The separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements.
13. Niagara. The name of the location of a very high water fall on the USA Canadian border.
14. Cruel. Willfully or knowingly causing pain or distress to others.
15. Heartless. Unfeeling, harsh, unkind, cruel.
16. Heeding. To give careful attention to
17. Mahatma Gandhi. Indian Hindu religious leader, nationalist and social reformer.
18. Politics. Political methods or maneuvers.
19. Principle. An accepted or professed rule of conduct.
20. Concern. To be troubled or to be worried.
21. Spirit. Conscious incorporeal being as opposed to matter.
22. Sphere. A round body whose surface at all points is equidistant from the centre.
Points to ponder.
(A) Mahatma Gandhi was a leader in India’s struggle for independence from colonial
Britain. Explain what you know of Gandhi and colonialism.
(B) Mother Teresa was a catholic nun who worked with the poor in Calcutta, India.
Explain what you think that it is that motivates people like Mother Teresa to dedicate
their lives to helping others?
(C) What is the meaning of selfshness?
REFLECTIONS
142
143
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T
R213 GP-April 2003
Tess wus u precocIous eIghI-yeur-oId
when she heurd her mom und dud IuIkIng
ubouI her IIIIIe broIher, Andrew. AII she
knew wus IhuI he wus very sIck und Ihey
were compIeIeIy ouI oI money. They were
movIng Io un upurImenI compIex Ihe IoI-
IowIng monIh becuuse Duddy dIdn`I huve
Ihe money Ior Ihe docIor`s bIIIs und Ihe
house. OnIy very cosIIy surgery couId suve
Andrew now, und II wus IookIng IIke Ihere
wus no one Io Ioun Ihem Ihe money. She
heurd Duddy suy Io her IeurIuI moIher
wIIh whIspered desperuIIon, ¨OnIy u mIr-
ucIe cun suve hIm now."
Tess wenI Io her bedroom und puIIed
u gIuss |eIIy |ur Irom IIs hIdIng pIuce In Ihe
cIoseI. She poured uII Ihe chunge ouI on
Ihe üoor und counIed II cureIuIIy, even
Ihree IImes. The IoIuI hud Io be exucIIy
perIecI. No chunce here Ior mIsIukes.
CureIuIIy pIucIng Ihe coIns buck In Ihe
|ur und IwIsIIng on Ihe cup, she sIIpped ouI
Ihe buck door und mude her wuy sIx bIocks
Io BexuII`s Drug SIore wIIh Ihe bIg red
IndIun chIeI sIgn ubove Ihe door.
She wuIIed puIIenIIy Ior Ihe phurmu-
cIsI Io gIve her some uIIenIIon, buI he wus
Ioo busy. Tess IwIsIed her IeeI Io muke u
scuInng noIse. NoIhIng. She cIeured her
IhrouI wIIh Ihe mosI dIsgusIIng sound she
couId musIer. No good. IInuIIy she Iook u
quurIer Irom her |ur und bunged II on Ihe
gIuss counIer. ThuI dId II!
¨And whuI do you wunI°" Ihe phurmu-
cIsI usked In un unnoyed Ione. ¨I`m IuIkIng
Io my broIher here Irom ChIcugo whom
I huven`I seen In uges," he suId, wIIhouI
wuIIIng Ior u repIy Io hIs quesIIon.
¨WeII, I wunI Io IuIk Io you ubouI my broIher," Tess
unswered buck In Ihe sume unnoyed Ione. ¨He`s reuIIy,
reuIIy sIck, und I wunI Io buy u mIrucIe."
¨I beg your purdon°" suId Ihe phurmucIsI.
¨HIs nume Is Andrew und he hus someIhIng bud
growIng InsIde hIs heud und my duddy suys onIy u mIr-
ucIe cun suve hIm now. So how much does u mIrucIe
cosI°"
¨We don`I seII mIrucIes here, IIIIIe gIrI. I`m sorry, buI I
cun`I heIp you," Ihe phurmucIsI suId, soIIenIng u IIIIIe.
¨LIsIen, I huve Ihe money Io puy Ior II. II II Isn`I
enough, I wIII geI Ihe resI. JusI IeII me how much II cosIs."
The phurmucIsI`s broIher wus u weII-dressed mun. He
sIooped down und usked Ihe IIIIIe gIrI, ¨WhuI kInd oI u
mIrucIe does your broIher need°"
¨I don`I know," Tess repIIed wIIh her eyes weIIIng up.
¨I |usI know he`s reuIIy sIck und Mommy suys he needs un
operuIIon. BuI my duddy cun`I puy Ior II, so I wunI Io use
my money."
¨How much do you huve°" usked Ihe mun Irom ChI-
cugo.
¨One doIIur und eIeven cenIs," Tess unswered bureIy
uudIbIy. ¨And II`s uII Ihe money I huve, buI I cun geI some
more II I need Io."
¨WeII, whuI u coIncIdence," smIIed Ihe mun. ¨A doIIur
und eIeven cenIs, Ihe exucI prIce oI u mIrucIe Ior IIIIIe
broIhers." He Iook her money In one hund und wIIh Ihe
oIher hund he grusped her mIIIen und suId, ¨Tuke me Io
where you IIve. I wunI Io see your broIher und meeI your
purenIs. LeI`s see II I huve Ihe kInd oI mIrucIe you need."
ThuI weII-dressed mun wus Dr. CurIIon ArmsIrong,
u surgeon specIuIIzIng In neurosurgery. The operuIIon
wus compIeIed wIIhouI churge, und II wusn`I Iong unIII
Andrew wus home uguIn und doIng weII.
Mom und Dud were huppIIy IuIkIng ubouI Ihe chuIn
oI evenIs IhuI hud Ied Ihem Io IhIs pIuce. ¨ThuI surgery,"
her mom whIspered, ¨wus u mIrucIe. I wonder how much
II wouId huve cosI°"
Tess smIIed. She knew exucIIy how much u mIrucIe
cosI÷one doIIur und eIeven cenIs÷pIus Ihe IuIIh oI u
IIIIIe chIId.
ˆ!UTHORUNKNOWN
The
C
oI u MIrucIe
O
ST
Topics: Faith, miracles, changing lives by giving.
145
The cost of a miracle
Glossary.
1. Precocious. Unusually advanced or mature in development, especially mental
development.
2. Whispered. To speak with soft hushed sound.
3. Desperation. The state of being desperate or of having the recklessness of despair.
4. Pharmacist. A person licensed to prepare and dispense drugs and medicine.
5. Annoyed. To disturb or bother a person in a way that irritates.
6. Miracles. Wonders or events occurring, considered the will of God.
7. Stooped. To come down from a height.
8. Operation. A surgical procedure performed to alleviate pain and cure usually internal
organs, by the removal of the problem.
9. Audibly. Able to be heard.
10. Coincidence. To occupy the same space or time to agree.
11. Surgeon. A doctor who treats injuries or diseases by operations.
12. Neurosurgeon. A doctor who operates on the brain.
Points to ponder.
(A) Andrew had a serious medical problem that would need specialized surgery and would
cost a great deal of money. His parents did not have enough money to pay for his treatment.
Although it does not specifcally mention what was wrong with Andrew, you can
probably guess. What do you think was wrong with Andrew?
(B) Andrew’s sister thought that a miracle was something that you could buy like medi cine
from the drug store. She was mistaken in that, but a miracle did happen in
the drugstore. Explain what miracle happened in the drug store.
(C) Tell about any miracle, big or small that has happened in your life.
REFLECTIONS
146
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
147
hen I moved to the port city
of Tampico, Mexico, and began working
with a group of other volunteers from the family
International, they took me for a tour of the spa-
cious three story townhouse we share. It is fairly
close to the busy downtown, but also not too far
from the poorer outlying areas where we con-
duct most of our projects. The setting is nice, lo-
cated near a beautiful loguna, where folks gather
to mingle in the cooling twilight, and also just a
short drive from a clean uncrowded beach. What
a terrifc place! I thought, as we climbed the last
fight of stairs. But the best was yet to come. A
door led onto the balcony, where we were greet-
ed by a panorama of palm trees, rooftops, and in
the distance, a magnifcent bridge spanning the
bay. The combination of the brightly lit spans
of the bridge the rooftops, and the cool night
breeze was breathtaking, and the scene from that
balcony has made for many an inspiring even-
ing since, The costal weather can be changeable,
sometimes calling for a thin short blouse in the
mid-afternoon and a warm sweater in the even-
ing. Although it’s usually sunny and clear, there
have also been storms, unexpected cloudiness
and rain, and some very windy conditions some-
times even the effects from an occasional nearby
hurricane. Whatever the weather, however I take
a few moments almost every day to stop and look
out at the magnifcent view from our batcony. I
fnd the view of that beautiful bridge especially
inspiring and somehow strangely comforting. It
connects two worlds, making all sorts of things
possible that wouldn’t be otherwise.
One morning as I took a few minutes for
quiet refection in one of the rooms adjoining
the balcony. I looked out and expected to see the
bridge, but it wasn’t there. Maybe an unexpect-
ed fog or haze had rolled in and obscured the
view, I thought. But I soon realized that it was
my position that was off. I moved over a bit and
was able to view the inspiring scene once again.
R
ooftop
eflections
Then I was struck by a new thought that
bridge is a lot like our relationship with God. It’s
always there to both inspire and comfort. By it we
have access to another realm, and by it we are able
to receive the help and guidance that we need. But
sometimes it can seem as though the “View” is
blocked, or that the help we’ve learned to rely on
has somehow failed, just this once. But actually
we just need to change the position of our heart.
Then that sweet inspiration and comfort and peace
comes back into “view” once again, and our faith
is restored.
The Marching Band
One evening each week, from my rooftop
vantage point, I hear what sounds like a marching
band in the distance. I’ve never seen the band, so
I can only guess from the type of music they play
that they’re actually marching. The band sounds
fairly large, and includes all of the instruments one
would expect in a marching band cornets, trom-
bones, drums, cymbals, a tuba or sousaphone, an
occasional whistle, and so on. They play for an
hour or more, and they do it consistently every
week.
They always sound about the same at this
distance, and to my untrained ear I can’t say for
sure that they’re improving. I assume that they are
or will yet, however, since they’ve committed to
practice together once a week. That marching band
is utilizing the well-known secret to success: If you
keep practicing, eventually you’ll improve.
We all know this principle, but how well
do we do at applying it in our lives? For instance,
we all know we would feel better if we could
learn to look at things more positively right? But
when things go wrong, we often say, “Here we go
again!” How much better it would be to use that
misfortune as an opportunity to “practice,” like
that marching band! Why not make a commit-
ment, when you’re tempted to look at some situa-
tion negatively, to fnd something about it to thank
the Lord for instead? There is always something to
thank the Lord for, if you look hard enough. And
REFLECTIONS
The Bridge
W
Rooftop refections
Glossary.
1. Volunteers. To offer one’s self for a particular task, of one’s own free will.
2. Downtown. The main business sector of the city.
3. Laguna. A small lake or pond.
4. Mingled. To mix.
5. Panorama. A wide view of a landscape.
6. Hurricane. A violent storm with winds blowing at over 120 Kilometers an hour.
7. Magnifcent. Great and splendid.
8. Obscured. Not clear, diffcult to see or not well known.
9. Marching. To walk at a constant rhythm and often in step with others.
10. Cornets. A brass musical instrument similar to a trumpet.
11. Trombones. A brass musical instrument, in which the pitch or not is achieved by
sliding a tube in and out.
12. Cymbals. A brass musical instrument like a plate with a hollow in the middle.
13. Misfortune. Bad luck.
14. Opportunity. A chance to do, or a time to do something.
Points to ponder.
(A) The writer at the end of the short story likens the bridge in view of the house, like our
connection to God, as it gives us access to the other side. Einstein scientifcally suggested
that other realms exist. What do you think about that? Could there possibly be other worlds or
dimensions existing along side our world?
148
REFLECTIONS
if you’ll do it faithfully, it’ll get easier, and you’ll get better at it. You’ll be the happier, more positive
person you set out to be. It’s just that simple.
And our marching band? Yes, they’re still playing and surely they’re getting better!
149
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Topics: faith, trust in God's plan
Jo Dias is a volunteer with
The Family in England.
R232 GP-October 2003
Copyright © 2003 by The Family
Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Ìf you'd like more inspirational reading, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address below or visit www.activated.org.
"Viserable!" That was the
only way to describe how Ì was
feeling on that bright summer
day. Vy husband had had to trav·
el-again!-and there Ì was alone
with our four children. Finances
were low and my health was
bad. Vy teenage daughter was
going through a crisis in her life.
Having to handle her problems,
take care of the other children,
and run the house at the same
time was taking its toll on me.
Although Ì tried hard, it was
difñcult to see anything positive
about my situation. Ì prayed-oh,
how Ì prayed!-that the Lord
would make things a little easier
to bear.
Looking out onto the neigh·
boring grove, with the beauti·
ful trees swaying in the slight
summer breeze, Ì thought about
other times of discouragement
Ì'd been through. Ì remembered
that the Lord had always done
something to encourage me.
%XWWKHUH·VDOZD\VDÀUVWWLPH
Ì thought in despair.
That's when Ì noticed a
little squirrel squeaking away
as he climbed up and down the
trees. Ì watched as he went
up one and then down and up
again. Ì envied the little fellow
who looked like he was having
such fun, without a care in the
world. Veanwhile, Ì felt like Ì
was on a downward spiral with
no way to get up again.
Vy squirrel chose that mo·
ment to change tactics. Ìnstead
of running up and down the
trees, he started hopping from
one tree directly onto another.
He jumped over to what looked
like the last tree in the line, and
then looked up and ahead at a
tree that was at the far end of
the grove. He seemed to be de·
liberating.
Ì mentally measured the
distance between trees and it
seemed to me that the one at
the end was deñnitely at least
two or even three times the dis·
tance that he'd previously been
jumping. "You can't be serious,
little fellow!" Ì whispered. 8ut
he was not looking for my ad·
vice. He had dared and won the
ñrst few rounds, but here was a
massive challenge. What was he
going to do:
He ran up and down the tree
a few times, squealing franti·
cally. Then he stopped and eyed
the distance, crouched down,
and before Ì knew it, he had
leaped! Way out! He was sail·
ing through the air-and for a
minute Ì wanted to turn my eyes
from what Ì thought was surely
going to end in tragedy.
8ut no! Not only did he ßy
across that immense span, but he
landed on the other tree with the
grace and glory that only comes
from knowing one is PHDQW to
do such things. He chattered in
victory and scampered up to the
top, as if to his reward!
Ì realized that all that time
Ì had been holding my breath.
4XLWH XQQHFHVVDULO\, Ì thought
with a smile. The little guy had
only been obeying his instincts
with the faith that comes from
trusting his Vaker.
Ì knew then what Ì'd been
missing. Ì had been so busy look·
ing at my problems-measuring
the distance between the trees-
that Ì was afraid to just let go
and sail across to the other side.
For a little while Ì had lost my
faith in my Vaker, my Savior, my
8est Friend.
As Ì looked up at the squir·
rel, now merrily running on the
branches, Ì knew that the Lord
had answered my prayer. Ìt
was not a great big spectacular
miracle, but just the chattering
of a little squirrel that told me
that the same Cod who took care
of him was going to take care of
me as well.
Your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But seek first the kingdom of God
and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you. Therefore do not worry about
tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. (Matthew 6:32÷34 NKJ)
-IMAJJ=DHGO=J
"9*/$)!3
151
Squirrel Power
Glossary.
1. Miserable. Very unhappy or very poor in quality or quantity.
2. Grove. A small wooded or forested area, usually with no undergrowth. A grove of
pines.
3. Discouraged. An act or instance of discouraging.
4. Despair. Depressed, sad and gloomy.
5. Squirrel. Any of numerous arboreal bushy tailed rodents of the genius sciurus, of the
family sciuridae.
6. Envied. A feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to anothers advantages or
success, possessions etc.
7. Deliberating. Carefully studying or considering, intentional a deliberate lie.
8. Massive. Consisting of or forming a large mass, bulky and heavy, massive columns.
9. Frantically. Desperate or wild with excitement, passion, fear, pain, etc. Frenzied.
10. Tragedy. A dramatic composition often in verse dealing with a serious matter.
11. Immense. Vast, huge, very great or immense territory.
12. Instincts. An inborn pattern of activity or tendency to action common to given biological
species.
13. Spectacular. Of or like a spectacle, marked by or given to an impressive large scale
display.
Points to ponder.
(A) The lady in the story was feeling discouraged because she was thinking about her
family problems and felt overworked. Then she saw a squirrel in the garden and for
a moment forgot her worries as she watched the small animal in the garden. She
compared her own life to the simple care free life of the squirrel that appeared to
have no worries.
Remorse over the past and fear of the future are the two most common causes of worry
in humans. What do you worry about?
REFLECTIONS
152
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2%&,%#4) /.3
R225 GP-August 2003 Topics: trust, comfort, God's love
SDUURZDW6WDUEXFN
6 6
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,

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o
h
n

1
h
o
a
a
s

O
a
l
s
lt aas chill, in Vanhattan but aara inside
the Starbucls shop on :lst Street and ßroad-
aa,, |ust a slip up lroa 1iaes Square. |or a
ausician, it's the aost lucrati.e Starbucls loca-
tion in the aorld, l'a told, and consequentl,,
the tips can be substantial il ,ou pla, ,our
tunes right.
l aas pla,ing le,board and singing baclup
lor a, lriend, aho also added rh,tha aith an
arsenal ol percussion instruaents. |uring our
eaotional rendition ol ¨ll \ou |on't knoa Ve
b, |oa,¨ l noticed a lad, sitting in one ol the
lounge chairs across lroa ae. She aas saa,ing
to the beat and singing along.
Alter the tune aas o.er, she approached ae.
¨l apologize lor singing along on that song.
|id it bother ,oui¨ she asled.
¨|o,¨ l replied. ¨we lo.e it ahen the audi-
ence |oins in. would ,ou lile to sing up lront
on the ne\t selectioni¨
1o a, delight, she accepted a, in.itation.
¨\ou choose,¨ l said. ¨what are ,ou in the
aood to singi¨
¨well ... do ,ou lnoa an, h,ansi¨
n,ansi 1his aoaan didn't lnoa aho she aas
dealing aith. l cut a, teeth on h,ans. ßelore l
aas e.en born, l aas going to church. l ga.e our
guest singer a lnoaing lool. ¨|aae one.¨
¨Oh, l don't lnoa. 1here are so aan, good
ones. \ou picl one.¨
¨Ola,,¨ l replied. ¨noa about 'nis |,e ls on
the Sparroa'i¨
V, nea lriend aas silent, her e,es a.erted.
1hen she h\ed her e,es on aine again and said,
¨\eah. Let's do that one.¨
She sloal, nodded her head, put doan her
purse, straightened her |aclet and laced the
center ol the shop. with a, tao-bar setup, she
began to sing.
wh, should l be discouragedi
wh, should the shadoas coaei
1he audience ol collee drinlers aas transh\ed.
l sing because l'a happ,,
l sing because l'a lree.
|or nis e,e is on the sparroa
And l lnoa ne aatches ae.
when the last note aas sung, the
applause crescendoed to a dealening roar.
|abarrassed, the aoaan tried to shout o.er
the din, ¨Oh, ,'all go bacl to ,our colleel l
didn't coae in here to do a concertl l |ust
caae in here to get soaethin' to drinl, |ust
lile ,oul¨
ßut the o.ation continued. l eabraced a,
nea lriend. ¨\ou, a, dear, ha.e aade a, ahole
,earl 1hat aas beautilull¨
¨lt's lunn, that ,ou picled that particular
h,an,¨ she said.
¨wh, is thati¨
She hesitated again, ¨1hat aas a, daugh-
ter's la.orite song.¨ She grabbed a, hands. ß,
this tiae, the applause had subsided and it aas
business as usual. ¨She aas l6. She died ol a
brain tuaor last aeel.¨
l said the hrst thing that lound its aa,
through a, silence. ¨Are ,ou going to be
ola,i¨
She sailed through tear-hlled e,es and
squeezed a, hands. ¨l'a gonna be ola,. l'.e
|ust got to leep trusting the Lord and sing-
ing nis songs, and e.er,thing's gonna be |ust
hne.¨
She picled up her bag, ga.e ae her card,
and then she aas gone.
was it |ust a coincidence that ae happened
to be singing in that particular collee shop on
that particular |o.eaber nighti Coincidence
that this aonderlul lad, |ust happened to aall
into that particular shopi Coincidence that ol
all the h,ans to choose lroa, l |ust happened
to picl the .er, h,an that aas the la.orite
ol her daughter, aho had died |ust the aeel
belorei
l reluse to belie.e it.
God has been arranging encounters in
huaan histor, since the beginning ol tiae,
and it's no stretch lor ae to iaagine that ne
could reach into a collee shop in aidtoan
Vanhattan and turn an ordinar, gig into a
re.i.al. lt aas a great reainder that il ae
leep trusting nia and singing nis songs,
e.er,thing's gonna be ola,.
Sparrow at Starbucks
Glossary.
1. Manhattan. An island in New York city surrounded by the Hudson River.
2. Chilly. Mildly cold or producing a sensation of cold, causing shivering chill, or chilly
breeze.
3. Lucrative. Bringing in a lot of money proftable.
4. Consequently. As a result, effect or outcome. There has been a great deal of rain,
consequently the dams are full.
5. Tips. A slender or pointed end. A gratuity small amount of money given in appreciation
of good service.
6. Substantial. Of ample or considerable amount, quality or size etc. A substantial sum of
money.
7. Percussion instrument. A drum, cymbal, triangle xylophone or piano.
8. Rendition. The act of rendering.
9. Audience. The group of spectators at a public event, listeners or viewers.
10. Sparrow. Any of a number of small brown birds of the fnch family.
11. Averted. To turn away or aside, to avert ones eyes.
12. Transfxed. To make or hold motionless with amazement, awe or terror.
13. Applause. Hand clapping, especially in demonstration of approval, appreciation acclaim.
14. Crescendo. A gradual steady increase in loudness.
15. Ovation. An enthusiastic public perception of a person marked especially by loud and
prolonged applause.
16. Coincidence. A striking occurrence of two or more events at one time, apparently by more
chance.
17. Encounters. To come upon or meet with especially unexpected to encounter a new situation.
18. Revival. Restoration to life, consiciousness, vigor or strength.
Points to ponder.
(A) The woman in the story sang a hymn with the band called, “His eye is on the
sparrow,” Why was the choice of that song very signifcant for her?
(B) Worry seems to be a human problem that other creatures do not experience. Why do
you think that humans worry?
REFLECTIONS
154
155
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Rules attributed to Boyce Bowdin
1. Strike a balance between work and play, between serious-
ness and laughter.
2. Stick with the truth even if it makes you look or feel badly.
Falsehoods are like wandering ghosts.
3. Forgive your enemies as part of the price you pay for the
privilege of being forgiven.
4. Spend time outside. Walk. Get lots of air and sunshine and
occasionally some rain or snow in your face. Get some dirt on your
hands.
5. Talk over your troubles, mistakes, and dreams with someone
you trust.
6. Don't underestimate the ability of God to straighten out a situ-
ation÷even when you can't. Be patient.
7. Discriminate among your fears. Learn to tell which ones are
useful, which ones destructive.
8.When you can't sleep, say, ¨Aha! Here's a chance for a little
privacy and creative thinking. Or prayer.¨
9. Fall in love with life, with children, older people, the theater,
music, books, cities, hills, the sea÷everything except money.
&ANAF?
D
r. Peter Atarian
writes, 'FiIty to
seventy-Iive percent oI
medical complaints contain
some element oI stress.
The top three drugs pre-
scribed are Valium (a tran-
quilizer), Tagament (Ior
ulcers), and Interall (Ior
heart control).
'You can`t Iunction
under a heavy load all the
time. Imagine making a
tight Iist and holding it
Ior 20 years! Just as you
rotate tires so that they
wear evenly, so you need
to rotate or balance your
activities in liIe.¨
G
ive us courage and
gaiety and the quiet
mind.Robert Louis
Stevenson (18501894)
* * *
A
ccording to a report
in The Express news-
paper oI Easton, Pennsyl-
vania, studies done by the
consulting Iirm Priority
Management show that
'the average married
couple spends Iour min-
utes a day in meaning-
Iul conversation, and the
working couple spends 30
seconds a day talking with
their children.¨
Says the Iirm`s presi-
dent, Michael Fortino:
'Most people say their
Iamilies are important, but
they don`t live that way.¨
.AE=AK
Too slow for those who wait,
Too swift for those who fear,
Too long for those who grieve,
Too short for those who rejoice.
But for those who love, time is not.
÷Henry Van Dyke (1852÷1933)
$WKHUPRVWDWRUDWKHUPRPHWHU"
S
ome people are thermometers. They merely register what`s
going on around them. II the situation is tight and pressur-
ized, they register tension and irritability. Others, however, are
thermostats. They regulate the atmosphere in their homes. They
are the mature ones, the agents oI change who don`t let the situa-
tion dictate their behavior.
So when things get hot at your house, don`t just reIlect what`s
going onchange things Ior the better. Be a thermostat, not a
thermometer!
Mark Merrill, The Family Minute
R224 GP-August 2003 Topics: happiness, priorities, stress, family, love, infuence
156
157
For Happy Living
Glossary
1. Seriousness. The manner of being serious.
2. Falsehoods. A false statement, a lie.
3. Ghosts. The soul of a dead person, a vague shadowy form.
4. Underestimate. To make an estimate lower than that which would be correct. To look
down .
5. Destructive. Tending to destroy causing destruction or much damage.
6. Creative. Having the quality or power to create new things.
7. Gaiety. The state of being gay or cheerful.
8. Prescribed. To lie down in writing or other means a rule or cause of action.
9. Thermostat. A device including a relay, activated by thermal conditions or convetion,
to maintain a temperature.
10. Thermometer. An instrument for measuring temperature.
11. Behavior. Manner of behaving or acting.
Points to ponder.
(A) The short stories under the title, ”For Happy Living.” Cover the topics of Happiness
and priorities. One statement taken from a survey says, “The average married couple
spends four minutes a day in meaningful conversation.” If that is true, why do you
think that couples spend so little time together?
REFLECTIONS
158
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R216, Small Woman, Great Faith, BUR
159
2%&,%#4) /.3
Dick and Margaret Hillis were two
committed Christians who Iound them-
selves caught in China during the Japanese
invasion oI the Second World War. The
couple lived with their two small children
in the inland town oI Shenkiu.
The village was tense with Iear, Ior
every day brought terriIying reports oI the
Japanese advance. At the worst possible
time, Dick developed appendicitis, and he
knew his liIe depended on making the long
journey by rickshaw to the hospital. On
January 15, 1941, with deep Ioreboding,
Margaret watched him leave.
Soon the Chinese colonel came with
news: The enemy was near and the towns-
people were advised to evacuate. Margaret
shivered, knowing that one-year-old
Johnny and two-month-old Margaret Anne
would never survive as reIugees. So she
chose to stay put. Early the next morning
she tore the page Irom the wall calendar
and read the new day`s Scripture. It was
Psalm 56:3: 'When I am aIraid, I put my
trust in You.¨
The town emptied during the day, and
the next morning Margaret arose, Ieeling
abandoned. The new verse on the calendar
was Psalm 9:10: 'And those who know
Your name put their trust in You, Ior You,
O Lord, have not Iorsaken those who seek
You.¨
The next morning she arose to distant
sounds oI gunfre and worried about Iood
Ior her children. The calendar verse was
Genesis 50:21: 'I will nourish you and
your little ones.¨ An old woman suddenly
popped in with a pail oI steaming goat`s
milk, and another straggler arrived with a
basket oI eggs.
Through the day, sounds oI warIare
grew louder, and during the night Margaret
prayed Ior deliverance. The next morning
she tore the page Irom the calendar to read
Psalm 56:9: 'When I cry unto You, then
shall my enemies turn back.¨
The battle was looming closer, and
Margaret didn`t go to bed that night.
Invasion seemed imminent. But the next
morning, all was quiet. Suddenly, villag-
ers began returning to their homes, and the
colonel knocked on her door. For some
reason, he told her, the Japanese had with-
drawn their troops. No one could under-
stand it, but the danger had passed. They
were saIe.
Margaret glanced at her wall calendar
and Ielt she had been reading the handwrit-
ing oI God. God had been with them each
and every day. Margaret`s Iaith in God had
been more powerIul than her Iear oI the
enemy, and God had not let her down.
R180 GP-August 2002
small woman

great faith
Faith, of course, is more than an intellectual belief in Goa. It is
closeness with Goa to such a aegree that His loving ana watchful
care may be experiencea in time of sorrow ana crisis or aanger.
To call such care a coinciaence is to aeny an obvious reality.
When ycu ccme right
Jcun tc it, uhnt ix
ccinciJence7 Cnn it he
nn nct cj GcJ7 Fnith, cj
ccurxe, ucu|J ngree.
ßy Robert 1.
Morgan (from
his book,
/N4HIS$AY,
as reIated
by CaroI M.
Simpson)

Topics: Faith, coincidence, God's protection, fear, peace.
160
Small woman great faith
Glossary
1. Intellectual. A person of superior intellect or possessing high power of intelligence.
2. Coincidence. A striking occurrence of one or more events at one time.
3. Committed. To pledge or engage ones self.
4. Invasion. An act or instance of invading or entering as an enemy especially by an
army.
5. Terrifying. To fll with terror, or alarm, greatly afraid.
6. Appendicitis. Infammation of the vermiform appendix.
7. Colonel. A commissioned offcer in the armed forces.
8. Refugees. A person who fees for refuge, or safety especially to a foreign country as in
a time of war.
9. Abandoned. Forsaken or deserted.
10. Arose. To wake up, to get up from sitting or lying or kneeling.
11. Nourish. To sustain with food or nutriment, supply with what is necessary for health
and growth.
12. Straggler. A person who wanders or to be scattered.
13. Deliverance. An act or instance of delivering.
14. Looming. A mirage in which objects below the horizon appear to be raised above their
true positions.
15. Imminent. Likely to occur at any moment,
Points to ponder
(A) What were the circumstances that lead to the couple being separated during the
Japanese invasion?
(B) Why did the woman decide not to leave town when most of the other people did?
(C) The woman was said to, ”Have Faith”. Explain what that expression means.
REFLECTIONS
161
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
162 R94 GP
REFLECTI ONS
Priorities. Love.
An expert on the subject of time management was
speaking to a group of business students. He stood in
front of these high-powered overachievers, pulled out
a one-gallon, wide-mouthed Mason jar, and set it on a
table in front of him. Then he produced about a dozen
fist-sized rocks and carefully placed them, one at a
time, into the jar. When the jar was filled to the top
and no more rocks would fit inside, he asked, “Is this
jar full?”
Everyone in the class said, “Yes.”
Then he said, “Really?” He reached under the table
and pulled out a bucket of gravel. Then he dumped
some gravel in and shook the jar, causing pieces of
gravel to work themselves down into the spaces be-
tween the big rocks. Then he asked the group once
more, “Is the jar full?”
By this time the class was onto him. “Probably not,”
one of them answered.
“Good!” he replied. He reached under the table and
brought out a bucket of sand. He started dumping the
sand in and it went into all the spaces left between the
rocks and the gravel. Once more he asked the ques-
tion, “Is this jar full?”
“No!” the class shouted.
Once again he said, “Good!” Then he grabbed a
pitcher of water and began to pour it in until the jar
was filled to the brim.
Then he looked up at the class and asked, “What is
the point of this illustration?”
One eager beaver raised his hand and said, “The
point is, no matter how full your schedule is, if you try
really hard you can always fit some more things into
it!”
“No,” the speaker replied, “that’s not the point. The
truth this illustration teaches us is this: If you don’t put
the big rocks in first, you’ll never get them in at all.”
What are the “big rocks” in your life? Are you put-
ting them in first?
The
Big
Rocks
Dear Lord, keep us from having our
lives so full of good things that we
don’t have time for the best.
Help us not to be so pressured that
we put off our time with You. Help
us to bask in Your spiritual sunshine,
rest in Your arms, drink deeply of
Your Word, and inhale of Your Spirit.
Help us to seek You most of all—
more than any of the other things
we enjoy. Help us to remember how
You said that without You, we can do
nothing (John 15:5), so that we won’t
have misplaced priorities, but we’ll
have You, Your love, and Your values
in the right place—first!
—David Brandt Berg
You always have time for the things
you put first.
Let us hear the conclusion of the
whole matter: Fear God, and keep
His commandments: for this is the
whole duty of man (Ecclesiastes
12:13, KJV).
***
“Teacher, which is the greatest com-
mandment in the Law?”
Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your
God with all your heart and with all
your soul and with all your mind.’
This is the first and greatest com-
mandment.
“And the second is like it: ‘Love your
neighbor as yourself ’” (Matthew
22:36–39, NIV).
First Things First
The Bible on Priorities
163
The big rocks
Glossary
1. Time management. The ability to organize and schedule the use of time especially
in a work environment.
2. Gravel. Small chips of stone or pebbles or a mixture of both with sand.
3. Probably. In all likelihood, very likely.
4. Pitcher. A container usually with a handle, for holding or pouring liquids.
5. Bask. To lie in or be expose3d to a pleasant warmth.
6. Inhale. To breathe in draw in by breathing.
7. Priorities. The right to precede others in order, rank and privilege.
Points to ponder.
(A) These short stories are written with the aim to help us get our priorities in life in order.
From 1 to 3 how would you list your personal priorities in life?
(B) List two short term goals that you would like to achieve over the next year. Then list
your top two long term goals that you would like to achieve in the next 10 years.
REFLECTIONS
164
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Lights
By Chole West
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By Colin C.Bell
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R 266, Lights- The Beacon, BUR
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165
REFLECTI ONS
By Chloe West
What is it about a
lighthouse that stirs the
imagination? Tall, strong,
invincible—a lighthouse
is a literal tower of
strength that rises in the
very spot where boiling
waves and craggy cliffs
mean danger.
But I don’t think it’s
the steady strength of a
lighthouse that I like best.
No, it’s the beacon. It’s the
light that for me signals
reassurance and peace and safety, no matter what. It’s
the way the light shines in good weather or bad. Any
day of the week. Any month. Any year. How it shines
and shines, even when no one needs it, even when
no one sees it. It shines because one day someone
will need it; one day it will save a life.
We all need lighthouses in our lives. We need
someone to turn to, to help us not crash on the
rocks. We need a light to point the way. We need
reassurance when we feel alone and vulnerable.
We need the safety of the light, the comfort of the
signal. We need to know which way is home.
They sometimes call lighthouses simply
“lights.” The light for me is God and His Word, and
sometimes people who point me to Him. What’s
your light?
Refections 223 GP—July 2003
A preacher once told of a cruise he took along a rocky coast. He stopped at a desolate little island where
a tall lighthouse sent out its bright rays over the sea. He sat with the lighthouse keeper, and in their con-
versation the lighthouse keeper told how he lived alone there, but that once every two weeks a coast guard
vessel brought him supplies. Amazed at the isolation within sight of land, the preacher asked, “Don’t you
get lonesome and bored out here all by yourself, day after day?”
The old weather-beaten man turned with a smile and a simple reply. “Not since I saved my frst life!”
You, O Lord, keep my lamp burning; my God turns my darkness into light (Psalm 18:28*).
The Lord will be your everlasting light (Isaiah 60:20b).
Let us walk in the light of the Lord (Isaiah 2:5).
God is light; in Him there is no darkness at all (1 John 1:5b).
The Lord is my light and my salvation—whom shall I fear? (Psalm 27:1).
As I rounded a bend
in the road I saw the
beacon, standing tall on a
promontory.
Its foundations were
deeply anchored in the rock on which it stood. It
stretched to the sky, unmoved by storms and gales,
tides and time, faithfully sending out its light. All
the churning, crashing waters couldn’t bring it
down. Even the worst storms, with their torrents
of rain and hail and snow, couldn’t extinguish the
light.
But what about me? Am I the beacon God
wants me to be?
We should all be beacons, especially as we
see the night approach and storms gather on the
horizon.
“Let your light shine before men, that they may
see your good deeds and praise your Father in
Heaven” (Matthew 5:16).
Lights
The Beacon
If you’d like more inspirational reading, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address below or visit www.activated.org.
*All verses are from the New International Version of the Bible.
Colin C. Bell is a full-time volunteer with The Family in Thailand.
Chloe West is a full-time volunteer with The Family.
Topics: God’s light, guidance, comfort, His Word, our example, our infuence
Copyright © 2003 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
By Colin C. Bell
166
Lights
Glossary
1. Preacher person whose occupation or function it is to preach the Gospel.
2. Cruise. To sail about on a pleasure trip.
3. Lighthouse. A tower displaying or fashing a bright light for the guidance of ships
in avoiding dangerous areas.
4. Amazed. Greatly surprised, astounded, suddenly flled with wonder.
5. Isolation. The complete separation from others.
6. Lonesome. Depressed or sad because of lack of friends or companionship.
7. Imagined. The faculty of imagining or of forming mental images.
8. Invincible. Undefeatable, untouchable.
9. Beacon. A guiding or warning signal, as a light or a fre.
10. Reassurance. To assure again.
11. Vulnerable. Exposed, capable of or susceptible to being wounded.
12. Promontory. A high point of land or rock projecting into the sea.
13. Extinguish. To put out or put an end to something.
Points to ponder.
(A) In the frst short story the preacher asked the lighthouse keeper if he felt lonely and
bored. The lighthouse keeper said that he did not and gave the reason why not. What
reason did he give?
(B) Colin. C. Bell in the last story ended by saying. ”We should all be beacons, especially
when we see the night approaching and storms gather on the horizon.” What do you
suppose he means by that?
REFLECTIONS
167
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168
2%&,%#4) /.3
R144 GP Topics: Helping others, sacrifce, love, true greatness.
An oId man, ¿oIn¿ a Ione LI¿Lway,
Came at tLe evenIn¿ coId and ¿ray
To a cLasm vast, and dee¡, and wIde,
TLrou¿L wLIcL was BowIn¿ a suIIen tIde.
TLe oId man crossed In tLe twIII¿Lt dIm;
TLe an¿ry stream LeId no Iears Ior LIm.
But Le turned, wLen saIe on tLe otLer sIde,
And buIIt a brId¿e to s¡an tLe tIde.
"OId man," saId a IeIIow traveIer near,
"You are wastIn¿ stren¿tL wItL buIIdIn¿ Lere!
Your }ourney Is over wItL tLe endIn¿ day.
You never a¿aIn must ¡ass tLIs way.
You Lave crossed tLe cLasm, dee¡ and wIde-
WLy buIId you a brId¿e at tLe eventIde?"
TLe buIIder IIIted LIs oId ¿ray Lead.
"Good IrIend, In tLe ¡atL I Lave come," Le saId,
"TLere IoIIows aIter me today
A youtL, wLose Ieet must ¡ass tLIs way.
TLIs cLasm, tLat Las been nau¿Lt to me,
To tLat IaIr-LaIred youtL may a ¡ItIaII be.
He, too, must cross In tLe twIII¿Lt dIm.
Good IrIend, I am buIIdIn¿ tLe brId¿e Ior LIm."
-WIII AIIen Drom¿ooIes
lL's a cold day in Decenber in New ¥ork
CiLy. A liLLle boy abouL Len years old was
sLanding before a shoe sLore on 8roadway,
barefooLed, peering Lhrough Lhe window and
shivering wiLh cold. A lady approached Lhe boy
and said, "My liLLle fellow, why are you looking
so earnesLly in LhaL window7¨
"l was asking Cod Lo give ne a pair of
shoes,¨ was Lhe boy's reply.
1he lady Look hin by Lhe hand, wenL inLo
Lhe sLore, and asked Lhe clerk Lo geL a half
dozen pairs of socks for Lhe boy. She Lhen
asked if he could give her a basin of warn
waLer and a Lowel. He quickly broughL Lhen
Lo her. She Look Lhe liLLle fellow Lo Lhe back
parL of Lhe sLore and, renoving her gloves,
knelL down, washed his liLLle feeL, and dried
Lhen wiLh a Lowel. 8y Lhis Line, Lhe clerk had
reLurned wiLh Lhe socks.
Placing a pair upon Lhe boy's feeL, she Lhen
purchased a pair of shoes for hin, and Lying
up Lhe renaining pairs of socks, gave Lhen Lo
hin. She paLLed hin on Lhe head, and said,
"No doubL, ny liLLle fellow, you feel nore
conforLable now7¨
As she Lurned Lo go, Lhe asLonished lad
caughL her by Lhe hand and looking inLo her
face wiLh Lears in his eyes, he answered Lhe
quesLion wiLh Lhese words: "Are you Cod's
wife7¨
÷AuLhor unknown
A sacrInce never dIes,
And Iove Is never Iost.
It wIII IIve on In tLe Learts oI tLose
wLo receIved It.
It wIII be an InBuence Ior ¿ood on
tLose wLo beLeId It.
It wIII ¿Ive ¿race to tLose wLo
understood It.
And It wIII bIess tLe Leart oI Le
wLo ¿ave It.
Love Is never Iost-It Is Iorever.
-CLIoe West
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169
The Bridge Builder
Glossary.
1. Highway. A main road especially between towns and cities.
2. Chasm. A yawning fssure or deep cleft in the earths surface.
3. Sullen. Showing irritation or ill humor, by a gloomy silence or reserve.
4. Twilight. The soft diffused light from the sky when the sun is below the horizon either
at day break or just after sunset.
5. Span. The distance between the tip of the thumb and the end of the little fnger, when
the hand is fully extended.
6. Naught. Lost; ruined; worthless; useless.
7. Pitfall. A lightly covered or unnoticeable pit prepared as a trap for people or animals.
8. Barefoot. Wearing no shoes.
9. Peering. To look narrowly or searchingly as in the effort to discern clearly.
10. Shivering. To shake or tremble with cold or fear.
11. Earnestly. Honestly, intentionally honest.
12. Clerk. A person employed as in an offce, to keep records or other general offce tasks.
13. Fellow. A man or a boy.
14. Astonished. To fll with sudden and overpowering surprise.
15. Patted. To strike lightly or gently, with something fat, as with a paddle or the palm of
the hand.
16. Sacrifce. The offering of an animal, plant or human life to gods’ in return for favor.
17. Infuence. The action or effect of producing effects on the actions, behavior or
opinion of another.
18. Forever. Without ever ending, eternal.
Points to ponder.
(A) In the frst story, called, “The Bridge Builder,” when questioned, what reason did the
Bridge Builder give for taking the time to build a bridge?
(B) What is the underlying moral lesson for us all, from the bridge builder story?
(C) In the second story, as the lady was about to leave the poor boy, he asked her, “Are
you God’s wife?” Why did he ask that question?
REFLECTIONS
170
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
171
REFLECTIONS
In his story, “Repainting the Angel,” Wilfred Peterson tells of the restoration of a dingy
antique piece.

When it’s Christmas man is bigger and is better in his part;
He is keener for the service that is prompted by the heart.
All the petty thoughts and narrow seem to vanish for a while,
And the true reward he’s seeking is the glory of a smile.
Ten for others he is toiling and somehow it seems to me
Tat at Christmas he is almost what God wanted him to be.

dust and the dirt, but, heroically, to rise again
afer each fall.
Repainting the angel! A man need never
lose his ideals, dreams, and purposes. He can
always make them gleam again with the glory
of renewed hope.
Tis story reminds me how life takes on a spe-
cial glow at Christmas. It starts with the won-
der of a little baby who came carrying a mes-
sage of love and hope. For those in families, it
continues with the happiness and camaraderie
of celebrating together with loved ones. For
anyone, alone or with others, it is completed
when we contemplate what Jesus has done for
us and thank Him for the blessings He has giv-
en.
Christmas is special because we enjoy
not only what God has done for the whole
world, but also for us personally. He has “re-
painted” us with new qualities that we couldn’t
have given ourselves. He has put His love inside
us. He has given us peace, as the angels prom-
ised. He has forgiven all our sins and failures,
and now He accepts us as His children-broth-
ers and sisters with Jesus. He lets us feel the joy
that knowing Him brings. We are transformed
by Christmas.
The Christmas Glow
Chloe West
The statuette of an angel holding the hand
of a little boy had been placed on a neglected
back shelf in an antique shop. It was covered
with soot and dust, lost amidst the clutter of
jars, dishes, and ornaments. A man browsing
through the shop discovered the fgurine and
took it in his hands. He had an inspiration: He
would rescue it from oblivion, restore it, and
give it a place of honor among his Christmas
decorations.
At home in his basement workshop, the
man covered the angel and the child with glis-
tening white paint. Ten he painted the wings
of the angel and the hair of the little boy with
sparkling gold. Each brush stroke worked
magic. Te old, grime-covered statuette van-
ished, and a shining, new one appeared. Te
statuette was transformed before his eyes into
a thing of radiant beauty.
As the man painted, he thought, Isn’t
this what happens to people at Christmas?
Tey come to the end of the year dust-covered
from the struggle. And then Christmas in-
spires them to repaint their nature with love
and joy and peace.
Te art of repainting the angel! Tis is
man’s lifelong task: to never stay down in the
172
REFLECTIONS
The Christmas Glow.
Glossary.
1. Restoration. The art of restoring, renewal, revival or reestablishment.
2. Dingy. Of a dark dull color, dirty color.
3. Statuette. A small statue.
4. Antique. Dating from a period long ago.
5. Neglect. To pay no attention or little attention to.
6. Soot. A black carbon substance produced during the incomplete combustion of coal.
7. Clutter. To fll or litter with things in a disorderly manner.
8. Ornaments. An accessory article or detail used to beautify the appearance.
9. Inspiration. An inspiring or animating action or infuence.
10. Rescue. To free or deliver from confnement, violence or evil.
11. Oblivion. The state of being completely forgotten or unknown.
12. Basement. A story of a building, partly or wholly underground.
13. Glistening. To refect a sparkling light, or a faint glow.
14. Radiant. Emitting rays of light, shining bright.
15. Heroically. Being a hero; a savior.
16. Camaraderie Comradeship, good fellowship.
17. Contemplate. To look at or view with continued attention.
18. Qualities. An essential or distinctive characteristic, property or attribute.
19. Failures. Act or instance of failing.
20. Keen. Sharp eyes, sharp perception, alert.
21. Prompted. Done at once, without delay.
22. Petty. Of little or no importance or consequence.
23. Toiling. Hard and continuous work, exhausting labor or effort.
Points to ponder.
(A) In what way did restoring the statue remind the man of Christmas?
(B) What is so special about Christmas?

173
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George Mueller ¸.·¸:.~:, .·~¸.·¡¸
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174
R130 GP
REFLECTI ONS
The Eye of Faith
By Ron Rhodes
Faith, trust, prayer, God’s power
believe God has already answered, there is no
need for you to pray.” The captain’s mouth
dropped open.
Then the old man explained, “Captain, I have
known the Lord for 57 years and there has never
been a single day that I have failed to gain an au-
dience with the King. Get up, captain, and open
the door, and you will find the fog is gone.” The
captain did as he was requested, and was aston-
ished to find that the fog had indeed disappeared.
The captain later testified that this encounter
with the aged George Mueller completely revolu-
tionized his Christian life. He had seen with his
own eyes that Mueller’s God was the true and liv-
ing God of the Bible. He had seen incredible power
flow from a frail old man—a power rooted in
simple childlike faith in God.
The late Pastor Ray Stedman once delivered a
sermon in which he said, “Faith has an apparent
ridiculousness about it. You are not acting by faith
if you are doing what everyone around you is do-
ing. Faith always appears to defy the circum-
stances. It constitutes a risk and a venture.”
That is the kind of faith George Mueller dem-
onstrated decade after decade in his long and
fruitful life. During the final year of his earthly so-
journ, he wrote that his faith had been increasing
over the years little by little, but he emphatically
insisted that there was nothing unique about him
or his faith. He believed that a life of trust was
open to virtually all of God’s children if only they
would endure when trials came, instead of giving
up.
George Mueller (1805–1895)
One of the early members of the Brethren, he founded five orphans’ homes in Bristol, England, with shelter for
2,000 children. During his lifetime he cared for almost 10,000 orphans and received $1.5 million [multi-millions of
today’s dollars] by faith alone. Before his death he estimated he had received 50,000 specific answers to prayer.
It was a Wednesday afternoon. Shrouded in a
dense fog, a large steamer edged slowly forward
off the coast of Newfoundland, its foghorn crying
out somber notes of warning. The captain, nearing
exhaustion from lack of sleep, was startled by a
gentle tap on his shoulder. He fumed and found
himself face to face with an old man in his late sev-
enties.
The old man said, “Captain, I have come to tell
you that I must be in Quebec on Saturday after-
noon.”
The captain pondered for a moment, and then
snorted, “Impossible!”
“Very well,” the old man responded, “if your ship
can’t take me, God will find some other means to
take me. I have never broken an engagement in 57
years.”
Lifting his weary hands in a gesture of despair,
the captain replied, “I would help if I could—but I
am helpless.”
Undaunted, the old man suggested, “Let’s go
down to the chart room and pray.” The captain raised
his eyebrows in utter disbelief, looking at the old
man as if he had just escaped from a lunatic asy-
lum.
“Do you know how dense the fog is?” the cap-
tain demanded.
The old man responded, “No. My eye is not on
the thickness of the fog but on the living God who
controls every circumstance of my life.”
Against his better judgment, the captain accom-
panied the old man to the chart room and knelt with
him in prayer. With simple words a child might use,
the old man prayed, “O Lord, if it is consistent with
Thy will, please remove this fog in five minutes.
Thou knowest the engagement Thou didst make for
me in Quebec on Saturday. I believe it is Thy will.”
The captain, a nominal Christian at best, thought
it wise to humor the old man and recite a short
prayer. But before he was able to utter a single word,
he felt a tap on his shoulder. The old man requested,
“Don’t pray, because you do not believe. And as I
175
REFLECTIONS
The Eye of Faith
Glossary.
1. Shrouded. To cover and hide from view.
2. Foghorn. A deep loud horn for sounding warnings in foggy weather.
3. Somber. Gloomily dark, shadowy dimly lit.
4. Pondered. To consider something deeply and thoroughly meditate upon.
5. Gesture. A movement or position of the hand or arm or body, that is expressive of an idea
or opinion.
6. Despair. Loss of hope, hopelessness.
7. Undaunted. Undismayed, not discouraged, not forced to abandon the purpose.
8. Utter. To give audible expression to speak or pronounce.
9. Lunatic Asylum. Mental hospital.
10. Circumstances. A Condition, detail, part or attribute with respect to time, place
management.
11. Consistent. Constantly adhering to the same principles.
12. Nominal. An undertaking involving uncertainty as to the outcome especially a risky or
dangerous one.
13. Decade. Ten Years.
14. Sojourn. A temporary stay.
15. Emphatically. Utterly or to be uttered with emphasis, strongly expressed.
Points to ponder.
(A) George Muller was on a ship bound for Quebec in Canada, but was delayed by heavy fog. He
prayed that God would clear the fog in 5 minutes and it was cleared. How can you explain that?
176

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178
2%&,%#4) /.3
R210 GP-April 2003
Mb_
Û]limm
chÛnb_
Û\omÛmn[ncih
1he c:ies of ue:-
chauts :aug out th:ough the ua::ow cobblestoued
st:eets of the old cit,, aud the all-pe:·adiug sceut
of a thousaud exotic spices huug iu the ai:. Colo:ful
Ialestiuiau eub:oide:, festooued stalls displa,iug
glitte:iug o:ieutal jewel:,. Rh,thuic A:abic pop
sougs blasted f:ou uusic shops as th:ougs of tou:-
ists, pilg:ius, aud locals uiugled. Beueath the su:face
gaiet, the:e was teusiou, howe·e:. Suall g:oups of
Is:aeli soldie:s ue:·ousl, huge:ed autouatic weapous
ou e·e:, co:ue:.
Iuside the high stoue walls of the Chu:ch of
the ¬ol, Sepulch:e, u,ste:ious low chauts echoed
th:ough the da:keued halls. Black-:obed p:iests
swuug ceuse:s that dispeused iuceuse iuto the stale
ai:. I walked sileutl, with a few coupauious th:ough
wiudiug co::ido:s that seeued to ha·e uo eud, but
e·eutuall, desceuded iuto uuubiug cold whe:e
the feeble light of laups ou the walls was aluost
swallowed up b, da:k, :epulsi·e shadows. A p:iest
ba:ked a stiugiug :ebuke at a uo:tihed tou:ist who
had uuwittiugl, stepped ac:oss au iu·isible liue ou
the stoue 1oo: outo fo:biddeu hol, g:ouud.
Vas this :eall, the place whe:e ¦esus was laid
to :est aud :ose agaiu to iuspi:e ¬is followe:s to
sp:ead light, lo·e, t:uth, aud f:eedou th:oughout
the wo:ld:
Late: we ·isited the Ga:deu 1oub, a uo:e :eceut
a:cheological hud that soue ha·e suggested as au
alte:uati·e possibilit, fo: the site whe:e ¦esus' bod,
was eutoubed. Lxca·atious ha·e :e·ealed a h:st-ceu-
tu:, ga:deu iu which the:e is a huuble toub, hewu
out of a :ock face. Iu f:out of the eut:auce to the toub
is a distiuct :ut whe:e a stoue would ha·e beeu :olled
to close it. Othe: hudiugs seeu to iudicate that it ua,
ha·e beeu couside:ed a hol, place b, ea:l, belie·e:s.
1he:e was a se:euit, aloug the ga:deu's wiudiug paths,
shaded b, oli·e aud piue t:ees, that was ha:d to dehue.
A ,ouug gi:l was seated uea: the toub, ueditatiug.
¬e: face also :e1ected peace.
Nea: the ga:deu is a cliff face with a st:auge fo:-
uatiou that :eseubles a skull. Soue ha·e postulated
that this is the °Ilace of the Skull¨ :efe::ed to iu the
Bible, whe:e ¦esus was c:ucihed. 1he cliff uow fo:us
au uuobt:usi·e backd:op to a local bus statiou, just
ac:oss the :oad f:ou the Dauascus Gate, oue of
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Topics: Easter, Jesus' death and resurrection, His forgiveness, His peace, His love.
179
2%&,%#4) /.3
the uaiu eut:auces to the th:obbiug co::ido:s of
the old cit,.
As I stood lookiug at the cliff aud the bus statiou,
I was st:uck b, the appa:eut iucoug:uit, of the sceue.
Iu that place that uight ha·e beeu the sceue of oue
of the uost poiguaut aud wo:ld-chaugiug sac:ihces
iu histo:,, people we:e goiug about thei: siuple dail,
li·es, t:,iug to uake the best out of the st:uggle. A
labo:e: ou his wa, houe f:ou wo:k bought a bus
ticket aud looked wea:il, at his watch. A ti:ed uothe:
held a child with oue haud aud a shoppiug bag iu the
othe:. A sidewalk ·eudo: sat lookiug discousolatel,
at wa:es that ob·iousl, oul, a few had the ext:a cash
to bu,.
M, t:aditioual chu:ch upb:iugiug had alwa,s
seeued to suggest a loug walk f:ou the cou:t of
Ioutius Iilate whe:e ¦esus was coudeuued to a
:euote hilltop whe:e ¬e was c:ucihed. °1he:e is a
g:eeu hill fa: awa,,¨ aud °Ou a hill fa: awa, stood au
old :ugged c:oss,¨ as the h,uus sa,. But wheu I looked
iu u, Bible, the:e it was iu the Gospel of ¦ohu: °1he
place whe:e ¦esus was c:ucihed was uea: the cit,¨
(chapte: 19, ·e:se 20 NK¦V).
It would uake seuse fo: the Rouaus to ha·e
choseu a bus, locatiou to c:ucif, ¦esus aud the two
ualefacto:s that died with ¬iu, public executious
ha·e p:o·eu effecti·e dete::euts to c:iue aud sub-
·e:siou.
But I couldu't help thiukiug that the:e uight ha·e
beeu a deepe: s,ubolisu to the locatiou. Ie:haps ¦esus
didu't waut to be c:ucihed iu a distaut :euote place,
uuseeu aud uutouchable, but :athe: iu the bustliug
ua:ket whe:e ¬e could gi·e ¬is ultiuate wituess
to the people ¬e lo·ed, whe:e the, could see aud
feel ¬is paiu, aud whe:e ¬e, th:ough ¬is sac:ihce,
could ease thei:s. I could aluost seuse those teude:,
tea:-hlled e,es still lookiug out o·e: the di·ided cit,
sa,iug, °lathe:, fo:gi·e theu, fo: the, kuow uot what
the, do¨ (Luke 21:1+).
As ou: guide at the Ga:deu 1oub iufo:ued us,
a:chaeolog, is at best a scieuce of educated guesses.
¬e didu't claiu to kuow exactl, whe:e ¦esus had
beeu c:ucihed o: bu:ied, aud ueithe: do I. It doesu't
:eall, uatte:.
But if I had to choose au Laste: settiug, I thiuk I
would choose the Laste: of the Ga:deu 1oub. 1he
da:k iute:io: of the Chu:ch of the ¬ol, Sepulch:e
:euiuded ue too uuch of the agou, of iut:ospectiou
aud self-1agellatiou, the achiug da:kuess of supp:essed
guilt. B, cout:ast, the Ga:deu 1oub :esouated peace
aud f:eedou that was as iu·igo:atiug as the b:eeze
that sti::ed the oli·e b:auches, as :ef:eshiug as the
sceut of the piue ueedles ou the balu, Ap:il ai:.
Aud if I ha·e a choice, I'll abaudou the st,lized,
:a:ehed, iuaccessible c:ucihx ou the :euote hill iu
fa·o: of the c:oss uea: the cit, gate-the c:oss that
touches ou: dail, li·es with the f:ag:auce of its huuil-
it,, the uui·e:salit, of its eupath,, the uea:uess of its
couce:u, that still bleeds to see the paiu we uo:tals
iu1ict upou each othe: aud lougs to :edeeu us. I'll
choose the c:oss iu the bus statiou.
¯ ¯ ¯
¦esus said, °Ieace I lea·e with ,ou, M, peace I gi·e
uuto ,ou: uot as the wo:ld gi·eth, gi·e I uuto ,ou. Let
uot ,ou: hea:t be t:oubled, ueithe: let it be af:aid¨
( ¦ohu 1+:2¯ K¦V).
R210 GP-April 2003 Ìan Bach is a full-time volunteer with The Family.
Copyright © 2003 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Ìf you'd like more inspirational reading, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address below or visit www.activated.org.
K_dic]_›
Bn¿mÛ>[mn_l›
°Let uot ,ou: hea:t be t:oubled,¨
Let uot ,ou: soul be sad.
Laste: is a tiue of jo,
Vheu all hea:ts should be glad.
Glad to kuow that ¦esus Ch:ist
Made it possible fo: ueu
1o ha·e thei: sius fo:gi·eu
Aud, like ¬iu, to li·e agaiu.
So at this special tiue of ,ea:,
Ma, the woude: of ¬is sto:,
Reuew ou: faith so we ua, be
Ia:take:s of ¬is glo:,!
ˆ!DAPTEDFROM(ELEN3TEINER2ICE
180
The Cross at the bus station
Glossary.
1. Easter. An annual Christian festival in commemoration of the resurrection of Jesus.
2. Jerusalem. The capital city of Israel, an ancient and Holy city.
3. Merchants. A person who buys and sells commodities for proft.
4. Palestinian. A native or inhabitant of Palestine.
5. Embroidery. The art of working raised and ornamental design in threads of silk or
cotton.
6. Festooned. Flowers chained in a string.
7. Pilgrims. A person who journeys, especially a long distance to some sacred place as
an act of religion.
8. Incense. An aromatic gum or other substance producing a sweet odor when burned.
9. Repulsive. Tending to drive away or keep at a distance.
10. Serenity. The state or quality of being serene, calm.
11. Corridors. A gallery or passage connecting parts of a building, hallway.
12. Incongruity. The state of being not harmonized.
13. Poignant. Keenly distressing to the feelings.
14. Vendor. A person or agency that sells.
15. Disconsolately. Feeling hopeless or unhappy.
16. Crucifed. To put to death by nailing or binding the hands and feet to a cross.
17. Malefactors. A person who violates the law, a criminal.
18. Subversion. An act or instance of subverting.
19. Symbolism. The practice of representing things by symbols.
20. Introspection. Observation or examination of one’s own mental and emotional state
and mental processes.
21. Agony. Extreme and generally prolonged pain.
22. Resonated. To resound.
23. Balmy. Mild and refreshing, soft and soothing.
24. Empathy. The act of empathizing, to put yourself in another persons position or
circumstances so as to understand their feelings.
25. Redeem. To bring or give back, to return.
Points to ponder.
(A) What event took place at Easter in Jerusalem over 2,000 years ago?
(B) Why is Jerusalem considered an important place?
(C) What is Archeology the study of?
REFLECTIONS
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ee÷q
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ee±:
e,
By Dr.Ralph Wilson
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
R 193, The day Peter run, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
182
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
2%&,%#4) /.3
R163 GP-March 2002
7
wo thousand years ago, Jesus ChrIst was
hung on a cross untII He was dead, and then
burIed In another man`s tomb. AIter three days
He rose Irom the dead and was seen by many oI
HIs IoIIowers. We ceIebrate
(DVWHU
because
It Is.
when Jesus conquered death and the grave,
the IuIHIIment oI Jesus` Iove Ior humanIty, and
not the end, but the begInnIng.
By day it gnawed at him, but nights were even
worse. He had betrayed his dearest friend. Not
privately, not secretly, but blatantly, out in the open
for all the world to see. And now it was too late to
say, ¨l'm sorry.¨ His friend was dead.
Peter tossed sleeplessly, unable to find a
position that felt comfortable. Outside he could hear
the sounds of Jerusalem stirring to life. This city
he had once loved to visit, he now hated. lt held
too many painful memories impossible to erase
from his mind. Today he would leave for Galilee
and fshing, though even fshing held no allure for
him now. Nothing did.
How could I have so utterly shamed Him?
How could I? Peter, you d--- coward! For the
thousandth time he cursed himself. He was my
friend! How could I have done this to my very
best friend?
He could see Jesus riding that donkey down
the hill into Jerusalem to the cheers of thousands.
He saw Him in hot anger overturning coin-laden
tables in the temple. ¨You have made my Father's
house a den of thieves!¨ the Master had told them
in carefully measured but biting words.
Peter recalled blind men abruptly seeing, lame
men suddenly walking, and loathsome lepers' skin
turning baby-soft within a moment of Jesus' touch.
He saw Jesus' smile, His compassion, His hours
of gentle teaching. He felt the Master's hand on
his shoulder after a long day of caring for the
multitudes. The accompanying words repeated
themselves over and over in his mind, ¨Thanks,
Peter, for your help today. You are a faithful friend .
a faithful friend . a faithful friend.¨ Tears began to
well up in Peter's eyes. Faithful? Me?
When the high priest's soldiers had tried to
arrest Jesus, Peter had defended his Master with a
sword. But later, when a servant girl had challenged
him with: ¨You're one of His disciples, aren't you?¨
he had denied it with an oath. A mere servant
girl! But again and again he had compounded the
cowardly lie until the cock crowed, and Jesus'
eyes from far across the courtyard met his. Sad,
disappointed eyes. Then he had broken and run.
Run from the high priest's home into the dark
streets. Run until he could run no more. Run until
he had flung himself onto the cobbled streets
sobbing.
Later that morning he had watched from a
distance as they mocked and tormented his friend,
finally nailing hands and feet with huge spikes,
and suspending Him from a cross until His life was
spent. He couldn't bear another day in this city!
The thin light of dawn had appeared under
the door. Night was fnally over; today he would
leave. Today he would run away, back to the only
life he knew. Today Peter would leave this bloody
city behind.
Bang! Bang! The nearby door shook as some-
one kept banging on it. Peter reached for his sword,
and quietly took his place behind the door.
¨Peter, John, it's Mary! Let me in.¨
The
0ay
Peter
8an
By Dr. Ralph Wilson
Topics: Easter, God's love, Jesus, salvation, new life, hope, freedom from fear, faith.
183
184
The Day Peter Ran.
Glossary.
1. Easter. An annual Christian festival to commemorate the resurrection of Jesus.
2. Humanity. All human beings collectively, the human race.
3. Gnawed. To bite or chew on especially persistently.
4. Betrayal. To deliver or expose to an enemy, by treachery of disloyalty.
5. Blatantly. Noisily or loudly.
6. Galilee. A province in Northern Israel, around the Sea of Galilee.
7. Allured. To attract or tempt by some thing fattering or desirable.
8. Coward. A person who lacks courage in facing danger.
9. Abruptly. Suddenly or unexpectedly.
10. Lame. Disabled in the legs, often unable to walk.
11. Multitude. A great number of people gathered together.
12. Mocked. To attack and treat with ridicule and contempt.
13. Tormented. To affict with great bodily or mental suffering.
14. Outdistanced. To leave behind as in Running.
15. Desecration. To purposely damage or destroy a grave site.
16. Chrysalis. A hard shelled pupa of a moth or butterfy.
17. Eternal. Without beginning or end lasting forever.
18. Illusion. Something that deceives by producing a false or misleading impression
of reality.
19. Confnes. To enclose, within bounds, to limit or restrict.
20. Inadequacies. The state or condition of being inadequate, insuffcient.
Points to ponder.
(A) In this story,Peter had a very deep feeling of guilt. Why was that?
(B) This story deals with; life; death and life after death. What do you think it is going to
be like after you die?

REFLECTIONS
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187
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189
REFLECTIONS
The Janitor and the CEO.
Glossary
1. Investment. The investing of money or capital in order to gain proft.
2. Maintained. To keep in an appropriate condition.
3. Retire. To withdraw from business or work usually because of age.
4. Salesman. A man who sells goods or services.
5. Janitor. A person employed to clean the public areas, remove garbage, and do minor
repairs to a building.
6. Promoted. To advance in rank.
7. CEO. Chief executive offcer.
8. Shrewd. Astute or sharp in practical matters.
9. Prospered. To be successful or fortunate in practical matters.
10. Opportunities. An appropriate or favorable time.
11. Civic. Of or pertaining to a city or municipality.
12. Cottage. A small house usually of one story.
13. Revered. To regard with respect.
14. Multitude. A large number of people in one group.
15. Awe. Greatly surprised, amazed.
16. Jubilant. Very happy joyful.
17. Paradise. Heaven, the eternal kingdom of God.
18. Eternal. Everlasting, forever
Points to ponder.
(A) After the Janitor and the CEO died they met in the next life I heaven. Why was it that
the CEO seemed to have less favor or rewards in heaven?
(B) A large number of people spend a great deal of time working towards the goal of
owning a lot of things and having a lot of money in the bank. In what way is this
not such a good idea?
190
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awmifukef;ay:u tdrfuav;
By Colin C.Bell
..¿ ..~..q- ...q:.~,:.~..¸:. q._.e~.|. Angela Carter (1940-1992) _-~.¸.:.q..q:.
..¸:q...._.: ..~.._~q:.._e.._. ~.¸¸¸..:..¸:.._ ~.~~..¸:... ~~:.~...¸:.~~.~. ..
...q: q.~,.~~_~.,_~_..~.¸¸¸..¸:..:. ~....... ~...._...¸:.~.. __._¸~~_~.|._. ~..~ ¸., _..,:e
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~...:.....:..¸:._e.._. ~.~- ~.~:.._...~~:.._~:. ~,.~...~:~..._ ~_.:...¸:.-~..~ q..~..
..~.._. - Chloe West
.q:._.,e._...
R 217, The house on the hill, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
191
2%&,%#4) /.3
R181 GP-September 2002
Copyright © 2002 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
By Colin C. Bell
Nong lived with his family in a small
village in Southeast Asia. Like most
people in their village, Nong's family
were farmers. The villagers had their
houses next to their felds on the wide
plain, except for Nong's family, whose
house stood alone on top of a hill.
Since Nong's family's felds were on
the plain below like everybody else's,
his mother and father had to go up
and down the hill every day to work
the felds. During the harvest they had
to bring the harvested rice up the hill
to their storehouse. And because the
school was also down on the plain,
Nong had to go down the hill to school
every morning and climb back up the
hill to go home every evening.
One day Nong talked to his father
about this. ¨lt's not fair. l have to walk
up and down the hill every day, but my
friends don't. Why do we have to live
up here on the hill?¨
Nong's father thought about this
for a while before he answered. ¨l'm
not sure why we live here on the hill.
Our house has stood here for many
generations. l'm thankful for our little
house up here. Think of it this way: We
are the frst to see the sun come up in
the morning and the last to see it set in
the evening.¨
But this didn't mean much to Nong.
¨But we have to work so much harder
than everyone else. And l have to walk
much further than my friends. lt's not
fair!¨
¨Oh, but we shouldn't say that,¨
Nong's father replied. ¨God has
given us this place and we should be
thankful for it.¨
Yet Nong was not convinced. He
wished he could live down on the plain.
One day not long after this
conversation, the clouds began to
gather in the sky over Nong's village.
lt was only a few weeks after the rice
harvest, and so the villagers looked
to the sky with concern for the stored
rice. And the weather got only worse.
The sky became darker and darker.
Then it happened. The rains came
down and wouldn't stop. lt rained and
rained and rained. The houses and
felds in the plain were all fooded. The
harvest and stores of rice were lost.
Only Nong's house on top of the
hill was dry, so that's where all the
villagers fed. They were all thankful for
Nong's house on the hill, and they ate
of the rice that was stored there.
¨Now,¨ Nong's father said to him
with a gentle look in his eye, ¨are you
thankful for our house on the hill?¨
Nong smiled sheepishly and
nodded.
So often we complain about some
hardship or are tempted to feel that
life÷and therefore God÷isn't fair to
us. But if we can accept whatever God
has allowed to come into our lives and
be thankful for it, one day we will see
that He can turn our seeming hardship
or handicap into a lifesaver for us and
others.
(APPINESSISWHATYOUMAKEIT3OMEPEOPLEAREUNBELIEVABLYCHEERFULINTHEMIDSTOF
DIFlCULTYOROBSTACLESOTHERSBEMOANTHESLIGHTESTINCONVENIENCE4HOSEWHOLOOKFORTHE
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Colin C. Bell is a volunteer with The Family in Thailand.
Chloe West is an editor in the publications department of The Family.
Topics: Positiveness, overcoming handicaps, faith, happiness.
192
The House on the Hill.
Glossary.
1. Village. A small community or a group of houses in a rural area.
2. Harvest. The season when ripened crops are gathered in.
3. Generations. The entire body of individuals born and living at about the same time.
4. Thankful. Feeling or expression of gratitude; appreciation.
5. Convinced. To move by argument or evidence to believe.
6. Conversation. Informal exchange of thoughts, information, etc.
7. Flooded. A great fow or overfowing of water.
8. Fled. To run away, as from danger or pursuers, to take fight.
9. Sheepishly. Embarrassed or bashful as by having done something wrong or foolish.
10. Nodded. To make a slight quick downward bending forward of the3 head.
11. Tempted. To entice or allure to do something often regarded as unwise.
12. Hardship. A condition that is diffcult to endure.
13. Handicap. A race or other contest in which disadvantages or advantages of weight are
given.
14. Cheerful. Full of cheer in good spirits; a cheerful person.
15. Obstacles. Something that obstructs or hinders progress.
16. Bemoan. To express distress or grief over.
17. Inconvenience. The quality or state of being inconvenient.
18. Radiance. Radiant brightness or light.
Points to ponder.
(A) People when shown a half glass of water have two different reactions. Some will say
the glass is half full, others will say that it is half empty. What is the difference between
these two reactions?
(B) Why do people complain?
REFLECTIONS
193
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194
195
The Letter
Glossary.
1. Clattering. To make a loud rattling sound as that produced by hard objects striking
rapidly.
2. Hasty. Moving or acting with haste.
3. Humidity. Humid conditions, moistness, dampness.
4. Scant. Barely suffcient, in the amount or quantity.
5. Flash-back. A device in the narrative of a motion picture.
6. Strolling. To walk leisurely as inclination directs.
7. Energetic. Possessing or exhibiting energy, especially in abundance.
8. Intently. Something that has intended purpose, design, or intent. (The original
intention of the committee was to raise funds.)
9. Observing. To see, watch, perceive or notice.
10. Correspond. To be in agreement or conformity with.
11. Enthusiastic. Full of or characterized by enthusiasm.
12. Sincere. Free of deceit, hypocrisy or fakeness.
13. Eagerness. Keen or ardent in desire or feeling, impatiently longing.
14. Apparent. Readily seen, exposed to sight, open to view, visible.
15. Urgent. Requiring immediate action or attention, an imperative or urgent matter.
16. Fruitless. Useless, unproductive, without result or success.
17. Rationalized. To ascribe to cause that superfcial, seems reasonable and valid, but that
are actually unrelated to the truth.
18. Concluded. To bring to an end, fnish, terminate. To conclude a speech with a quote
from the Bible.
19. Assuring. To declare earnestly, to inform or tell of positively.
20. Comprehended. To understand the nature or meaning of, to grasp with the mind.
21. Wisdom. The quality or state of being wise.
22. Happenstance. A chance of happening or event.
23. Intended. Purposed; designed for.
24. Permanent. Existing perpetually, everlasting, especially without signifcant change.
25. Tunnel. An underground passage.
26. Immediately. Without lapse of time, without delay.
Points to ponder.
(A) The writer of the story, at one point, gave up hope of her friend Dana ever responding
to her letters, so she stopped writing. Then an irresistible inner urge kept pushing
her to write, so she did. The result was positive. We all seem to have that inner still
small voice that tells us to do things. Why is it a good idea to listen?
(B) Why should we never give up hope on our friends?
196
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197
2%&,%#4) /.3
Copyright © 2002 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org
R179 GP-August 2002
!TRUESTORYASTOLDBY*OE*OHNSTON

1ust a few beers, they tell him.
That's all. No harm in that. 1ust a
short drive to a favorite spot with a
favorite bottle. Saturday only comes
around once a week÷why not
come alongI
They are right. After all, there is
nothing wrong with a cold Corona
shared with a few good friends.
Lspecially on his day off. He has
nothing better to do.
Hector says yes. He squeezes
in the car, shuts the door, and
nudges the window down. He
knows his friends in The Pamily
won't disapprove. The question had
come up a long time before, about
whether drinking alcohol was a
sin or would keep him from being
an Active member in our church.
we had been open minded and
reassuring. "Moderationª was the
word used.
The road tears away before his
eyes, as someone croons to vicente
Pernandez and the rest smile their
4HE
,IFESAVER
)N(IS#OAT
0OCKET
crinkled, weathered, weekend
smiles.
Hector laughs and smiles with
them. The work at his father's
hospital always seems endless.
Patients. Prescriptions. Pills. Pain. He
really should get away more.
The phone rings. There is no car
phone on the dash and none of
his friends carry cells. That can only
mean one thing.
He digs it out of his coat pocket
on the third ring as his friends on
both sides |ab at him mischievously.
|t's the hospital. Of course. An
emergency. Of course. |s there ever
anything elseI where is he, and how
soon can he get backI
They screech to a stop and he
drags himself out. So typical÷his
day off. His friends drop him at a
bus stop and |eer as he waves them
off.
The bus slowly grows from the
speck in the distance, and stops at
his limply extended hand. He hauls
himself into a cruel metal seat and
glares out the dirty window.
The hospital is cold and
unwelcoming. He swings through
the barred doors and past the
cracked and naking white painted
walls into the hospital maze. work.
work, work, work, work. And then
he'll sleep. Tomorrow he'll go to
church like the good Catholic his
father wants him to be, and he'll
thank God for his blessings. |f he can
think of any.
™
They come about two hours
later. They burst through the barred
doors, nashing badges, and he
hears his name. He gets up and
opens his ofñce door gingerly. ¥es,
he is Hector the son. what do they
wantI
They look surprised÷like they
are staring at a ghost. The witnesses,
they say, had seen him get into the
car. No one had seen him get out.
They had assumed.
Hector charges out of the ofñce.
what do they meanI what are they
talking aboutI
They are shocked. They searched
the wreckage for his body for an
hour and a half. He hasn't heardI
Heard whatI His voice rises a
little.
There has been an accident,
they say in a more careful tone
as they move forward in a cluster.
They aren't sure yet exactly what
happened. Apparently÷well÷
apparently the driver lost control of
the car and it smashed into a tree.
They were looking for his body for
almost two hours.
And his friendsI what about his
friendsI "what happened to the
others in the carIª he screams.
His friends. They've found his
friends, strewn around the crash site.
They shake their heads gravely and
stare at the noor. His was the only
body missing, they say. The others
have been found.
They are all dead.
Topics: Tragedy, faith, protection, God's plan for our lives.
1
Joe Johnston is a 17-year-old missionary with The Family in Mexico.
2
Chloe West is a full-time volunteer with the Family.
SomeIImes IhIngs huppen IhuI onIy God undersIunds. Why does one person survIve un uccIdenI
when oIhers don`I° II`s so Iur ubove our comprehensIon IhuI we ure Iorced Io Iook Io Heuven Ior
unswers. Muybe IhIs Is why God uIIows such umuzIng ¨coIncIdences"÷Ihey muke us seurch Ior u
puIIern In Ihe unIverse und Ihe meunIng behInd evenIs. Muny soIe survIvors experIence bIg chunges
In IheIr IIves. They begIn IIvIng Iess seIhshIy, more IovIngIy. WhuIever IheIr prIorIIIes muy huve been
beIore, Ihey now wunI Io be whuI God wunIs Ihem Io be. Muny undersIund IhuI God suved Ihem Ior u
reuson, becuuse Ihey huve more Io gIve, und Ihus Ihey become conduIIs oI HIs Iove.
ˆ#HLOE7EST

198
The Life saver in his coat pocket.
Glossary
1. Favorite. A person or thing regarded with special favor or preference.
2. Squeezes. To press forcibly together, to compress.
3. Nudge. To push slightly, or gently, especially with the elbow.
4. Disapprove. To think wrong or reprehensible.
5. Reassuring. To restore to assurance, or confdence.
6. Moderation. The quality of being moderate.
7. Croon. To sing or hum in a soft soothing voice.
8. Prescription. A direction usually written by a physician to a pharmacist for
the preparation of medicine.
9. Pills. A small globular or rounded mass of medicinal substances usually
covered with a hard coating.
10. Mischievous. Maliciously or playfully annoying.
11. Catholic. A Christian follower of the teachings of the Roman Catholic
Church.
12. Assumed. Taken for granted
13. Gravel. Small chips of rock usually granite used in road construction and
concrete.
14. Survive. To remain alive after the death of someone, to remain alive after
passing through a dangerous or life threatening situation.
15. Comprehension. The act or process of comprehending. To understand.
16. Coincidence. A striking occurrence of two or more events.
17. Selfsh. Devoted to or caring only for ones self
18. Priorities. The state or quality of being earlier in time or occurrence.
19. Conduits. A pipe, tube or the like for conveying water or other fuid.
Points to ponder.
(A) The title of the story is, “Lifesaver in his coat pocket.” What exactly was
the lifesaver in his coat pocket?
(B) How did it save his life?
REFLECTIONS
199
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
200
201
The Power of Encouragement.
Glossary.
1. Confdent. Sure of one’s self, having no uncertainty of one’s abilities or correctness.
2. Exclamation. The act of exclaiming, outcry, loud complaint
3. Triumphantly. Achieving of successfully
4. Sagging. To sink or bend downward, by weight or pressure especially in the middle.
5. Substantial. Of ample or considerable amount, quantity, size, etc.
6. Genius. A person having an extraordinarily high intelligence.
7. Housekeeping. The maintenance of a house or domestic establishment.
8. Masterpiece. A consummate example of skill or excellence.
9. Literature. The writings dealing with a particular subject.
10. Banker. A person employed by a bank, especially as an executive.
11. Insist. To assert or maintain frmly.
12. Merchant. A person who buys or sells commodities for a proft.
13. Sidewalk. A walk, especially a paved one, at the side of a street or road.
14. Self-respect. Proper esteem or regard for the dignity of one’s character.
15. Enormous. Greatly exceeding the common size or extent.
16. Suicide. The intentional taking of one’s own life.
17. Competent. Having suitable or suffcient skill, knowledge or experience.
18. Honeycomb. Wax material formed in hexagonal cells by bees to contain honey or
eggs.
19. Good Deed. Doing good things for other people.
Points to ponder.
(A) Explain how, Sofe, Nathaniel Hawthorn’s wife was instrumental in making his best
novel, “The Scarlet Letter,” come to pass.
(B) Write a sentence explaining the last time thatsomeone encouraged you.
REFLECTIONS
202
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R 155, The Matchless Pearl, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
203
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
204
R132 GP
REFLECTI ONS
there—like a beggar
who has been let in out
of pity. I may be proud,
but I want to deserve
my place in Heaven. I
want to earn it, and so I
am going to work for it.”
Nothing that Morse
could say seemed to
have any effect on
Rambhau’s decision.
Years passed.
Then one evening
Morse heard a knock on
his door. It was
Rambhau.
“Come in, dear
friend,” said Morse.
“No,” said the pearl
diver. “I want you to
come with me to my
house for a short time. I
have something to
show you. Please do
not say no.”
“Of course I’ll come,”
replied Morse.
As they neared his
cabin, Rambhau said,
“In a week’s time I will
start working for my
place in Heaven. I am
leaving for Delhi, and I
am crawling there on
my knees.”
“That’s crazy!” Morse
exclaimed. “It’s nine
hundred miles to Delhi.
The skin will break on
your knees, and you
will have blood
poisoning before you
get there—if you ever
get there!”
“No, I must get to
Delhi,” affirmed
Rambhau, “and the
immortals will reward
me for it! The suffer-
ing will be sweet, for it
will purchase Heaven
for me!”
“Rambhau, my
friend, you can’t. How
can I let you do that,
when Jesus Christ has
already suffered and
died to purchase
Heaven for you?”
But the old man
could not be moved.
“You are my dearest
friend on earth.
Through all these
years you have stood
by me in sickness, in
want. Sometimes you
have been my only
friend. But even you
cannot turn me from
my desire to purchase
eternal bliss. I must go
to Delhi!”
Inside the cabin,
Morse was seated in a
chair Rambhau had
built for him shortly
after he came to In-
dia—the same chair
Morse had sat in on so
many occasions while
he had read the Bible
to his friend. Rambhau
left the room to return
soon with a small but
heavy strongbox.
“I have had this box
for years,” he said. “I
keep only one thing in
it. Now I will tell you
about it, my friend. I
once had a son. ...”
“A son! Why,
Rambhau, you have
never before said a
word about him!”
“No, I couldn’t.”
Even as he spoke, the
diver’s eyes filled with
tears. “Now I must tell
you, for soon I will
leave, and who knows
whether I shall ever
return? My son was a
diver too. He was the
best pearl diver on the
coasts of India. He had
the swiftest dive, the
keenest eye, the
strongest arm, and the
longest breath of any
man who ever dived
for pearls. What joy he
brought to me!
God’s Love.
The author of this
story is unknown, so we
have no way of knowing
if it actually occurred.
However, it is still a
vivid illustration of a
truth that can some-
times be hard to grasp.
Years ago, while an
American named
David Morse was living
and working in India,
he met and became
friends with a pearl
diver, Rambhau.
Morse spent many
evenings in Rambhau’s
cabin, reading to him
from the Bible and
explaining its central
theme: God’s love and
salvation in Jesus.
Rambhau enjoyed
listening to the Word of
God, but whenever
Morse would encour-
age Rambhau to accept
Christ as his Savior,
Rambhau would shake
his head and reply,
“Your Christian way to
Heaven is too easy for
me! I cannot accept it. If
ever I should find
admittance to Heaven
in that manner, I would
feel like a pauper
THE MATCHLESS
PEARL
205
R132 GP
REFLECTI ONS
“As you know,”
Rambhau went on,
“most pearls have
some defect or blem-
ish that only an expert
can discern, but my
boy always dreamed
of finding the perfect
pearl—one finer than
all that had ever been
found before. One day
he found it! But in
gathering it, he stayed
under water too long.
He died soon after.
That pearl cost him his
life.”
The old pearl diver
bowed his head. For a
moment his whole
body shook, but there
was no sound. “All
these years,” he con-
tinued, “I have kept
this pearl. Now I am
going and may not
return, so to you, my
best friend, I am giving
my pearl.”
The old man
worked the combina-
tion on the strongbox
and drew from it a
carefully wrapped
package. Gently part-
ing the cotton packing,
he picked up a mam-
moth pearl and placed
it in Morse’s hand.
It was one of the
largest pearls ever
found off the coast of
India, and glowed with
a luster never seen in
cultured pearls. It
would have brought a
fabulous sum in any
market.
For a moment
Morse gazed with awe
and was speechless.
Then he exclaimed,
“Rambhau! What a
pearl!”
“That pearl, my
friend, is perfect,”
replied the Indian
quietly.
Then Morse was
struck with a new
thought: This was the
very opportunity and
occasion he had
prayed for to help
Rambhau understand
the value of Jesus’
sacrifice.
“Rambhau,” he
said, “this is a wonder-
ful pearl—an amazing
pearl! Let me buy it. I
would give you ten
thousand dollars for
it.”
“What? What do you
mean?” Rambhau
asked.
“I will give you
fifteen thousand
dollars for it—or if it
takes more, I will work
for it.”
Rambhau stiffened
his whole body. “This
pearl is beyond price.
No man in all the
world has money
enough to pay what
this pearl is worth to
me. On the market, a
million dollars could
not buy it. I will not sell
it to you. You may only
have it as a gift.”
“No, Rambhau, I
cannot accept that. As
much as I want the
pearl, I cannot accept it
that way. Perhaps I am
proud, but that is too
easy. I must pay for it,
or work for it.”
The old pearl diver
was stunned. “You
don’t understand at all,
my friend. Don’t you
see? My only son gave
his life to get this pearl,
and I wouldn’t sell it
for any money. Its
worth is in the life-
blood of my son. I
cannot sell this, but I
can give it to you. Just
accept it in token of the
love I have for you.”
Morse was choked,
and for a moment
could not speak. Then
he gripped the hand of
the old man.
“Rambhau,” he said
in a low voice, “don’t
you see? My words are
just what you have
been saying to God all
the time.”
The diver looked
long and searchingly at
Morse. Slowly he
began to understand.
“God is offering you
salvation as a free gift,”
Morse said. “It is so
great and priceless
that no man on earth
can buy it. Millions of
dollars are too little.
No man on earth could
earn it. If he were to
work for it all his life,
his life would be
millions of years too
short. No man is good
enough to deserve it. It
cost God the lifeblood
of His only Son to gain
entrance for you into
Heaven. In a million
years, in a hundred
pilgrimages, you could
not earn that entrance.
All you can do is accept
it as a token of God’s
love for you, a sinner.
“Rambhau, of
course I will accept the
pearl in deep humility,
praying God I may be
worthy of your love.
Rambhau, won’t you
accept God’s great gift
of Heaven, too, in deep
humility, knowing it
cost Him the death of
His Son to offer it to
you?”
Tears rolled down
the old man’s cheeks.
The veil that had
clouded his under-
standing was begin-
ning to lift. “I see it
now. I could not be-
lieve that salvation was
free. Now I under-
stand. Some things are
too priceless to be
bought or earned. I will
accept His salvation, my
friend!”
How very, very rich [God’s] kindness is, as shown
in all He has done for us through Jesus Christ.
Because of His kindness, you have been saved
through trusting Christ. And even trusting is not
of yourselves; it too is a gift from God.
Salvation is not a reward for the good we have
done, so none of us can take any credit for it.
It is God Himself who has made us what we are
and given us new lives [through] Christ Jesus;
and long ages ago He planned that we should
spend these lives in helping others.
—The Bible, Ephesians 2:7–10 TLB.
206
The Matchless Pearl
Glossary
1. Vivid. Very bright and clear
2. Encourage. To inspire with courage.
3. Admittance. Permission or right to answer or enter.
4. Pauper. A person without means of support.
5. Crawling. To move in a prone position, with the body resting on or close to the
ground.
6. Immortals. Not mortal.
7. Purchase. To acquire by the payment of money or its’ equivalent.
8. Pearls. Smooth round bead formed within the shells of certain mollusks.
9. Defect. A shortcoming, fault or imperfection.
10. Blemish. To destroy or diminish in perfection.
11. Mammoth. A large animal having a hairy skin and large molar teeth.
12. Awe. An overwhelming feeling of reverence.
13. Speechless. Temporarily deprived of speech.
14. Humility. The quality or condition of being humble.
15. Priceless. Very valuable, beyond price.
Points to ponder.
(A) Where do pearls come from?
(B) Mr. Morse was trying to prove a point to his friend Ramhau, by offering to pay for his
gift of a very valuable pearl. What point was he trying to prove?
REFLECTIONS
207
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
208
209
Taking Aim
The Rose
Glossary.
1. Garish. Crudely or tastelessly colorful.
2. Tint. Color or a variety of color.
3. Severely. Something done or carried out to the extreme.
4. Tizzy. A dither, excited.
5. Complaining. To express dissatisfaction, pain, uneasiness or censure.
6. Apology. A written or spoken expression of one’s express.
7. Exasperation. An act or instance of exasperating.
8. Glimpse. A very brief passing look, sight or view.
9. Precious. Of high price or great value.
10. Ornery. Ugly and unpleasant.
11. Self-centeredness. To think of or consider ones own personal interests
in a selfsh manner.
12. Dislike. To regard with displeasure.
13. Gruesome. Causing great horror.
14. Mangled. To injure severely.
Points to ponder.
(A) When was the last time that you said sorry?
(B) Explain the meaning of “Forgiveness.”
(C) What is the difference between Justice and Mercy?
REFLECTIONS
210
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raumif;aomt&mrsm; jzpfvmaomtcg
When Bad Things Happen
R 280, The Stuff I Don't Like, BUR
.q:._.,e._...
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
211
Looking back as a mother, I think I can
pinpoint the moment I knew what kind of a son
I had. I’d opened a can of vegetable soup for a
quick lunch for the two of us. He, with the frm-
ness of a seven-year-old, expressed his dislike of
vegetable soup. And I, with the annoyance of a
parent, answered, “Well, if you’re going to criti-
cize the food the Lord’s given us, then you can
just ask His blessing on it!”
Te dark, lash-rimmed eyes closed, and
the curly head bowed. “Dear God, I thank You
even for the stuf I don’t like. Amen.”
Ten without sourness or scowls or
The Stuff I Don’t Like
screams, he ate vegetable soup-in sweet submission.
Tat was 20 years ago. And during the interim
20 years he’s treated all his distasteful tasks, experienc-
es, and defeats the same way he did that bowl of vegeta-
ble soup; he takes whatever faces him. Without gripes.
Or complaints.
Whether or not he audibly says, Dear God, I
thank You even for the stuf I don’t like. Amen. For life’s
unpleasantries, this is still his attitude.
I confess it has not ofen enough been mine.
Which is probably the reason he is now the pastor of
a congregation of believers. And I’m merely one of the
many members in it.
Isabel Champ

When bad things happen
ave you ever wondered why bad things happen to you and to other
decent people? In asking that question you are in good company. Many times
King David of old cried out to the Lord, as recorded in the book of Psalms,
asking the same question. “My God, why are You so far from saving me, so far
from the words of my groaning?” (Psalm 22:1 NIV).
In this Psalm, David was so discouraged he said he was no better than
a worm (verse 6). Maybe he felt so low, as the joke goes, that he would have to
reach up to scratch a worm’s ankle.
Despite David’s lament, you will read later in the same Psalm that Da-
vid ends his heartcry on a positive note:
For He has not despised or disdained the sufering of the aficted one; He has
not hidden His face from him but has listened to his cry for help. Te poor
will eat and be satisfed; they who seek the Lord will praise Him--may your
hearts live forever! All the ends of the earth will remember and turn to the
Lord. (Psalm 22:24, 26-27 NIV)
David overcame his discouragement by praising God in spite of how he felt.
Shouldn’t we do the same?
(Prayer:) Tank You for all you do, Lord. Te things I don’t understand, I wrap
up in a bundle of faith and give to You to reveal to me in Your good time. I
love You for Your goodness, even when I don’t understand, for You are the
Most High. I will praise You, for truly You do all things well!
Curtis Peter Van Gorder
H
REFLECTIONS
212
The stuff I don’t like.
Glossary.
1. Pinpoint. The point of a pin, or to locate exactly.
2. Annoy. To disturb or bother.
3. Criticize. To censure or fnd fault with.
4. Blessing. The act of worship of a person, receiving a divine gift or directive.
5. Scowl. To draw down or contract the brows in a sullen manner.
6. Submission. An act or instance of submitting.
7. Distasteful. Unpleasant, offensive, or causing dislike.
8. Gripe. Informal, to complain naggingly or constantly.
9. Audibly. Capable of being heard, loud enough to be heard.
10. Pastor. A minister or priest in charge of a church.
11. Congregation. An assembly of persons brought together for common religious wor
ship.
12. Decent. Conforming to the recognized standard of propriety, good taste, modesty, etc.
13. Groan. A low mournful sound uttered in pain or grief.
14. Psalm. A sacred song or hymn.
15. Lament. To feel or express sorrow or regret for.
16. Heart cry. A sincere expression of emotion or feelings in speech or song.
17. Despise. To regard with contempt, distaste or disgust.
18. Disdain. To look at or treat with contempt.
19. Discouragement. An act or instance of being discouraged.
Points to ponder.
(A) This article is about positive ness and attitude. What is your reaction, when bad things
happen to you?
(B) Some people look at a partly flled glass of water and say, “The glass is half empty.”
Other people look at the same glass and say, “The glass is half full.” W hat is the difference?
REFLECTIONS
213
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R 303, The stuff heaven is made of , BUR
þt&mjzifh aumif;uifbHkudk jyKvkyfxm;onf/
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
214
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R 303, The stuff heaven is made of , BUR
a&mifjyef[yfjcif; pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
215
216
217
The Stuff Heaven is made of
Glossary.
1. Pedestal. The foot or base of a column or statue.
2. Self-effacing. Not trying to impress people, very modest.
3. Creator. A person who creates, sometimes referring to God as the creator of heaven
and earth.
4. Assumed. To take or accept as true.
5. Adolescent. In the stage between childhood and adulthood.
6. Appreciate. To be grateful for something and to someone.
7. Meek. Humble and not likely to complain, argue or react strongly.
8. Conviction. To prove or declare.
9. Reluctant. Unwilling
10. Mocking. To laugh at or cause to see ridiculously.
11. Astonished. To surprise greatly.
12. Apologized. To say that one is sorry.
13. Superior. Higher in rank, better or greater.
14. Emotion. Feeling of any kind, the moving or upsetting of the mind or feelings.
15. Panic. Sudden great fear especially that which spreads through a crowd.
16. Executed. To put to death by order of the law.
17. Deserter. Someone who goes away from and leaves without help.
18. Refuge. Shelter or protection from danger.
19. Adored. To love or like very much.
20. Sermons. A religious discourse delivered in public.
21. Miserable. Wretched, inadequate or meager.
22. Miracle. An extraordinary event or manifestation.
23. Transform. To change radically in composition or structure.
24. Reunion. An act or reuniting, the state of being reunited.
Points to ponder.
(A) Why did the offcers and his fellow soldiers, mock Mr. Gruenhage.
(B) Why do teenagers often go through a stage where they rebel against their parents?
(C) The poem is about a sample and a sermon. What is the difference between a sample
and a sermon?
REFLECTIONS
218
BudK;Nidaeaom iSufuav;
qkawmif;jcif;jzifh - toufu,fyg/
Save A Life Pray!
By Chole West
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By Curtis Peter Van Gorder
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R 265, The Tangled Bird, BUR
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
219
REFLECTI ONS REFLECTI ONS
Refections 222 GP—July 2003
By Chloe West
Picture life-and-death situations and the solution
that saves the day: A drowning man is thrown a
lifesaver. Someone bound in chains is released. An
abandoned baby is found, fed, and loved. A bridge
is built across a raging river so people in danger can
safely cross. A helicopter spirits passengers and crew
from a sinking ship. This is what God does when we
pray.
When we pray, we open the door for miraculous
intervention to take place. We’re allowing God’s hand
to move, to rescue those in need.
The next time you pray for some person or
situation, stop and think of what is needed to change
things, and then picture God’s hand intervening in a
miraculous way.
According to the level of your faith it will be done
for you, in answer to your prayers.
Topics: God’s help, freedom, prayer
My wife and I were walking in a grassy field in
Australia. We passed a fence that enclosed some
horses calmly grazing, when suddenly we heard
a pitiful racket. A small sparrow was tangled
in some string. Somehow its foot had gotten
caught in a string that was dangling from the wire
fence, and the sparrow was flapping and spinning
around, trying its best to get free, to no avail.
We tried to get close enough to free it, but
the helpless thing would have none of that. The
closer we got to it, the more it squawked and
flapped in frantic desperation. My wife and I
looked in our pockets for something that would
cut the string. My wife found a key, which cut
the string without any trouble. The sparrow flew
away as fast as it could without ever looking back
to thank us.
Sometimes we may feel like that sparrow:
We feel trapped in hard circumstances and
conditions. It seems that just when we’re least
prepared, troubles come calling. Maybe we get
laid off at work, are stricken with illness, argue
with someone we love. Maybe we get hit with
depression, pressures at work, or economic
difficulty.
Perhaps if we remembered the plight of this
little sparrow it would help us realize that God is
always there, trying to help us—if we would only
let Him. Trusting in God means that our spirits
are freed from worry and can be at rest, knowing
He will work things out. All we need to do is
believe and receive His help from Heaven. Like
the sparrow, we can experience a happy ending
to our troubles.
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present
help in trouble” (The Bible, Psalm 46:1 KJV).
Whatever things you ask in prayer, believing,
you will receive (Matthew 21:22 NKJ).
Whatever things you ask when you pray,
believe that you receive them, and you will have
them (Mark 11:24 NKJ).
Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you
will fnd; knock and the door will be opened to
you. For everyone who asks receives; he who
seeks fnds; and to him who knocks, the door will
be opened (Matthew 7:7–8 NIV).
“You will seek Me and fnd Me when you seek
Me with all your heart. I will be found by you,”
declares the Lord (Jeremiah 29:13–14a NIV).
By Curtis Peter Van Gorder
The Tangled Bird
If you’d like more inspirational reading, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address below or visit www.activated.org.
Copyright © 2003 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Curtis Peter Van Gorder and Chloe West are full-time volunteers with The Family.
Save a life—pray!
220
REFLECTI ONS REFLECTI ONS
Refections 222 GP—July 2003
By Chloe West
Picture life-and-death situations and the solution
that saves the day: A drowning man is thrown a
lifesaver. Someone bound in chains is released. An
abandoned baby is found, fed, and loved. A bridge
is built across a raging river so people in danger can
safely cross. A helicopter spirits passengers and crew
from a sinking ship. This is what God does when we
pray.
When we pray, we open the door for miraculous
intervention to take place. We’re allowing God’s hand
to move, to rescue those in need.
The next time you pray for some person or
situation, stop and think of what is needed to change
things, and then picture God’s hand intervening in a
miraculous way.
According to the level of your faith it will be done
for you, in answer to your prayers.
Topics: God’s help, freedom, prayer
My wife and I were walking in a grassy field in
Australia. We passed a fence that enclosed some
horses calmly grazing, when suddenly we heard
a pitiful racket. A small sparrow was tangled
in some string. Somehow its foot had gotten
caught in a string that was dangling from the wire
fence, and the sparrow was flapping and spinning
around, trying its best to get free, to no avail.
We tried to get close enough to free it, but
the helpless thing would have none of that. The
closer we got to it, the more it squawked and
flapped in frantic desperation. My wife and I
looked in our pockets for something that would
cut the string. My wife found a key, which cut
the string without any trouble. The sparrow flew
away as fast as it could without ever looking back
to thank us.
Sometimes we may feel like that sparrow:
We feel trapped in hard circumstances and
conditions. It seems that just when we’re least
prepared, troubles come calling. Maybe we get
laid off at work, are stricken with illness, argue
with someone we love. Maybe we get hit with
depression, pressures at work, or economic
difficulty.
Perhaps if we remembered the plight of this
little sparrow it would help us realize that God is
always there, trying to help us—if we would only
let Him. Trusting in God means that our spirits
are freed from worry and can be at rest, knowing
He will work things out. All we need to do is
believe and receive His help from Heaven. Like
the sparrow, we can experience a happy ending
to our troubles.
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present
help in trouble” (The Bible, Psalm 46:1 KJV).
Whatever things you ask in prayer, believing,
you will receive (Matthew 21:22 NKJ).
Whatever things you ask when you pray,
believe that you receive them, and you will have
them (Mark 11:24 NKJ).
Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you
will fnd; knock and the door will be opened to
you. For everyone who asks receives; he who
seeks fnds; and to him who knocks, the door will
be opened (Matthew 7:7–8 NIV).
“You will seek Me and fnd Me when you seek
Me with all your heart. I will be found by you,”
declares the Lord (Jeremiah 29:13–14a NIV).
By Curtis Peter Van Gorder
The Tangled Bird
If you’d like more inspirational reading, subscribe to Activated! Contact the address below or visit www.activated.org.
Copyright © 2003 by The Family. Visit our Web site at www.thefamily.org.
Curtis Peter Van Gorder and Chloe West are full-time volunteers with The Family.
Save a life—pray!
221
The Tangled Bird.
Glossary.
1. Grazing. Animals feeding on pasture or grassland.
2. Racket. A great deal of noise, or a dishonest way of making money.
3. Tangled. An untidy, confused or knotted state. To make or become tangled.
4. Flapping. To cause to move especially noisily, to and fro, up and down.
5. Frantic. Emotionally out of control.
6. Sparrow. Any of a number of small dull colored songbirds.
7. Circumstances. A condition or an event that accompanies, causes, or determines an
other. Also the sum of such conditions or events.
8. Laid-off. To lose your employment. In the case of a factory closing down or cutting
the size of the work-force.
9. Stricken. Hit or wounded.
10. Depression. An act or depressing or the state of being depressed. In economics it
means a time of economic down-turn.
11. Plight. To put or give in pledge. Or describing the miserable or poor condition.
12. Spirits. The animating of vital force of a living organism. Or pertaining to the soul or
souls.
13. Refuge. Shelter or protection from danger or distress.
14. Solution. An action or process of solving a problem.
15. Drowning. To become drowned to suffer death by immersion in water.
16. Abandoned. Given up or forsaken.
17. Miraculous. Of the miracle, of the supernatural, evoking wonder, like a miracle.
18. Intervention. The act of intervening, an outside party or force becoming involved.
Points to ponder.
(A) If we fnd ourselves in a diffcult or dangerous situation and we need outside help,
what does this article encourage us to do?
(B) One line from this article says, “When we prey we open the door for the miraculous to
happen.” What does that mean?
REFLECTIONS
222
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By Alice Gray
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223
2%&,%#4) /.3
R187 GP-October 2002
By Alice Gray (-ORE3TORIESFORTHE(EART)
The cheerIul girl with bouncy golden curls was
almost fve. Waiting with her mother at the checkout
stand, she saw them: a circle oI glistening white pearls
in a pink Ioil box. 'Oh please, Mommy. Can I have
them? Please, Mommy, please!¨
Quickly the mother checked the back oI the little Ioil
box and then looked back into the pleading blue eyes
oI her little girl`s upturned Iace. 'A dollar ninety-fve.
That`s almost $2.00. ... II you really want them, I`ll
think oI some extra chores Ior you and in no time you
can save enough money to buy them Ior yourselI. Your
birthday`s only a week away and you might get another
crisp dollar bill Irom Grandma.¨
As soon as Jenny got home, she emptied her penny
bank and counted out 17 pennies. AIter dinner, she did
more than her share oI chores and she went to their
neighbor, Mrs. McJames, and asked iI she could pick
dandelions Ior ten cents. On her birthday, Grandma
did give her another new dollar bill, and at last she had
enough money to buy the necklace.
Jenny loved her pearls. They made her Ieel dressed
up and grown up. She wore them everywhereSunday
school, kindergarten, even to bed. The only time she
took them oII was when she went swimming or had a
bubble bath. Mother said iI they got wet, they might turn
her neck green.
Jenny had a very loving daddy and every night when she
was ready Ior bed, he would stop whatever he was doing
and come upstairs to read her a story. One night when he
fnished the story, he asked Jenny, 'Do you love me?¨
'Oh yes, Daddy. You know that I love you.¨
'Then give me your pearls.¨
'Oh, Daddy, not my pearls. But you can have
Princessthe white horse Irom my collection. The one
with the pink tail. Remember, Daddy? The one you gave
me. She`s my Iavorite.¨
'That`s okay, Honey. Daddy loves you. Good night.¨
And he brushed her cheek with a kiss.
About a week later, aIter the story
time, Jenny`s daddy asked again, 'Do you
love me?¨
'Daddy, you know I love you.¨
'Then give me your pearls.¨
'Oh Daddy, not my pearls. But you
can have my baby dollthe brand-new
one I got Ior my birthday. She is so
beautiIul and you can have the yellow
blanket that matches her sleeper.¨
'That`s okay. Sleep well. God bless
you, little one. Daddy loves you.¨ And
as always, he brushed her cheek with a
gentle kiss.
A Iew nights later when her daddy
came in, Jenny was sitting on her bed
with her legs crossed Indian-style. As
he came close, he noticed her chin was
trembling and one silent tear rolled down
her cheek.
'What is it, Jenny? What`s the
matter?¨
Jenny didn`t say anything but liIted
her little hand up to her daddy. And when
she opened it, there was her little pearl
necklace. With a little quiver, she fnally
said, 'Here, Daddy. It`s Ior you.¨
With tears gathering in his own eyes,
Jenny`s kind daddy reached out with one
hand to take the dime-store necklace, and
with the other hand he reached into his
pocket and pulled out a blue velvet case
with a strand oI genuine pearls and gave
them to Jenny. He had had them all the
time. He was just waiting Ior her to give
up the dime-store stuII so he could give
her genuine treasure.
So like our heavenly Eather.
What are you hanging on to?
'
R not store up Ior yourselves treasures on earth, where moth
and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But
store up Ior yourselves treasures in Heaven, where moth and
rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and
steal. Eor where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
*ESUS(The Bible, Matthew 6:1921 NIV)
Topics: Solitude, comfort, reaching out, giving, Jesus' help.
224
The Treasure
Glossary
1. Cheerful. Full of good spirit.
2. Checkout stand. The cashier, where goods are paid for.
3. Pleading. Advocacy of a case in a court of law.
4. Chores. Routine tasks or jobs.
5. Neighbor. One living or situated near another.
6. Necklace. Ornament, a chain or string of beads or jewels.
7. Kindergarten. A school where younger children learn.
8. Quiver. To shake or vibrate with a slight rapid trembling motion.
9. Velvet. Any of various clothing or upholstery.
10. Genuine. Actually having the3 reputed or apparent qualities or character.
11. Treasures. To collect and store up valuables for future use.
12. Moth. Any number of fying insect, similar to a butterfy, known to ravage clothes.
13. Rust. The brittle reddish coating of ferric oxide, form or iron.
Points to ponder
(A) One important question is asked near the end of the story. “What are you hanging on to
in your life?” How would you answer that?
(B) Most people spend a great deal of their lives trying to get material things or trying to
become rich. Why is this not such a good idea?
REFLECTIONS
225
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
226
227
The Third Day.

Glossary.
1. Tomb. An excavation in which a corpse is buried, a grave.
2. Tears. A fuid coming from the eyes when crying.
3. Buried. To place a corpse in the ground or a tomb.
4. Cackled. To make a sharp broken squeaking noise.
5. Fiendish. Extremely cruel, wicked.
6. Legions. The principal part of the ancient Roman army consisting of 1,000 men.
7. Angels. A messenger or servant of God a divine being.
8. Wounded. To be injured or to injure a part of the body.
9. Endurance. To be able to sustain a physical demand.
10. Transgressions. To transgress. To go beyond the limit of what is normally acceptable.
11. Iniquity. A gross injustice or wickedness. A sin or iniquitous act or thing
12. Loomed. To appear in an impressively great or exaggerated position.
13. Apprehensive. Having understanding, capable of understanding, to be conscious of.
14. Linen. Cloth made from fax and noted for its’ strength and coolness.
15. Dawned. To begin to perceive or understand.
16. Butterfies. A slender bodied insect with colorful wings.
17. Moth. Any number of night fying insects with colorful wings.
18. Caterpillar. An elongated lave of a butterfy or moth
19. Cocoon. An envelope made of silk which a lave passes its’ pupa stage in.
20. Resurrection. The rising of the dead back to life. To come back to life.
Points to ponder.
(A) In what way does the life cycle of a butterfy or moth, refect spiritual principles?
(B) What happens when a grain of wheat falls into the ground?
(C) What will happen to you when you die?
REFLECTIONS
228
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R 279, The water, BUR
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229
t was one of the hottest days of the dry season. We
had not seen rain in almost a month. Te crops were
dying. Cows had stopped giving milk. Te creeks
and streams were long gone, having faded back into
the earth. It was a dry season that would bankrupt
several farmers before it was through.
Every day my husband and his brothers
would go about the arduous process of trying to get
water to the felds. Lately this process had involved
taking a truck to the local water rendering plant and
flling it up with water. But now severe rationing had
cut everyone of. If we didn’t see some rain soon,
we would lose everything. It was on this day that I
learned a true lesson of sharing, and witnessed the
only miracle I have seen with my own eyes.
I was in the kitchen making lunch for my
husband and his brothers when I saw my six-year-
old son Billy walking toward the woods. He wasn’t
walking with the usual carefree abandon of youth,
but with a serious purpose. I could only see his back.
He was obviously walking with great efort, trying to
be as still as possible. Minutes afer he disappeared
into the woods, he came running out again, toward
the house.
I went back to making sandwiches, think-
ing that whatever task he had been doing was com-
pleted. Moments later, however, he was once again
walking with that slow purposeful stride toward the
woods. Tis activity went on for an hour: walk care-
fully to the woods, run back to the house.
Finally I couldn’t take it any longer, and I
crept out of the house and followed him on his jour-
ney (being very careful not to be seen, as he was
obviously doing important work and didn’t need
Mommy checking up on him). He was cupping both
hands in front of him as he walked, being very care-
ful not to spill the precious water he held in them,
maybe two or three tablespoons in his small hands.
I sneaked close as he went into the woods.
Branches and thorns slapped his face, but he did not
try to avoid them. He had a much higher purpose.
As I leaned in to spy on him, I saw the most amaz-
Te Water
Author unknown
ing sight. Several large deer loomed in front of him.
Billy walked right up to them. I almost screamed for
him to get away. A huge buck with elaborate antlers
was dangerously close. But the buck did not threaten
him. He didn’t even move as Billy knelt down. And I
saw a tiny fawn lying on the ground, obviously suf-
fering from dehydration and heat exhaustion, lif its
head with great efort to lap up the water cupped in
my beautiful boy’s hands.
When the water was gone, Billy jumped up to
run back to the house and I hid behind a tree. I fol-
lowed him back to the house, to a spigot that we had
shut of the water to. Billy opened it all the way and a
small trickle began to creep out. He knelt there, let-
ting the drip-drip slowly fll up his makeshif “cup,”
as the sun beat down on his little back.
And it became clear to me. Te trouble he
had gotten into for playing with the hose the week
before. Te lecture he had received about the impor-
tance of not wasting water. Te reason he didn’t ask
me to help him. It took almost twenty minutes for
the drops to fll his hands. When he stood up and
began the trek back, I was there in front of him. His
eyes just flled with tears. “I’m not wasting,” was all
he said.
As he began his walk, I joined him, with a
small pot of water from the kitchen. I let him tend to
the fawn. I stayed away. It was his job. I stood on the
edge of the woods watching the most beautiful heart
I have ever known working so hard to save another
life.
As the tears that rolled down my face began
to hit the ground, they were suddenly joined by oth-
er drops ... and more drops ... and more. I looked up
at the sky. It was as if God Himself was weeping with
pride.
Some will probably say that this was just a
huge coincidence. Tat miracles don’t really exist.
Tat it was bound to rain sometime. And I can’t ar-
gue with that-I’m not going to try. All I can say is that
the rain that came that day saved our farm, just like
the actions of a little boy saved a life.
REFLECTIONS
I
230
REFLECTIONS
The Water
Glossary.
1. Creek. A small inlet or body of water.
2. Stream. A body or running water narrower than a river.
3. Bankrupt. A state of fnancial ruin.
4. Arduous. Hard to accomplish or achieve.
5. Rendering. A material made of sand and cement and lime used as
a protective covering for walls.
6. Rationing. To disribute in measured and equal amounts.
7. Miracle. An extrodinary event manifesting divine intervention.
8. Carefree. Free from care or responsibility.
9. Purposeful. Having a purpose or aim and full of determination.
10. Stride. To walk with long steps.
11. Antlers. Branched horn of an animalof the deer family.
12. Fawn. A young deer still unweaned or retaining a distinctive baby coat.
13. Dehydration. To lose water or other body fuids.
14. Spigot. A tap to control the fow of water from a pipe.
15. Trickle. very small fow of water, or liquid.
16. Weeping. Crying a feeling of sadness with tears.
17. Coincidence. Something that happens by chance at a timely moment
18. Miracles. An extrodinary event with divine intervention.
Points to ponder
(A) In the story towards the end, the mother began to cry. As her tears hit the ground, it also
started to rain. What is the connection between the tears hitting the ground and the raindrops
at the same time?
(B) The young boy was giving water to a fawn. Why did he not ask his mother to help him?
231
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oifo n fr ke fw dki f; \ t v , fw Gi fNi dr f o u fjc i f; u dk
& E dki fo n f/ , i f; u u RE fky fu dky e f; c sDNy dKi fy GJw p fc kt m; o w d& a p
o n f/ , i f; Ny dKi fy GJü y e f; c sDy n m& Si fr sm; t m; Ni dr fo u fjc i f; u dk
o & ky fa y : a t mi fa & ; q GJa p c Jh& m? Ny dKi fy GJ0 i f t m; v Hk; e D; y g; u
a u s; v u fa ' o \ w dw fq dw fr I? a t ; a q ; w n fNi dr fr Iq dki f
& m& Ic i f; r sm; y u w dw n fNi dr fa t ; c sr f; r Iu dkjy o o n fhy Hkr sm; u dk
w i fjy c JhMu o n f/ , i f; u Ni dr fo u fjc i f; \ y Hko @ e fy i fr [ kw f
y gv m; / o dkYa o mf q k& & Sdc Jha o my Hkw Gi f & , l& e fc u fc Jq Hk; a o m
Ni dr fo u fjc i f; r sKd; u dko & ky fa z mfx m; o n f/ x dky Hku m; c sy fw Gi f
a ' go w Bu D; E Si fh [ de f; a [ mu fu m t & Sde ft [ ke fBu D; r m; Mu r f;
w r f; p Gmjz i fhp D; q i f; a e o n fh a & w Hc Ge fBu D; a y : u dki f; n Tw fu s
a e o n fh o p fu dki f; w p fu dki f; a y : & Sd t o dku fu a v ; x Ji Su f
i , fa v ; w p fa u mi fu y w f0 e f; u si f\ Mu r f; w r f; r Ir sm; u dk
v sp fv sL& Ic g a t ; c sr f; p Gm o Dc si f; q dk a e o n fhy Hky i fjz p fo n f/
, HkMu n fu dk; p m; j c i f; u v Hk; v Hk; v sm; v sm; t e m; , l
jc i f; ? Ni dr fo u fjc i f; E Si fh p dw fE Sv Hk; o m; E Si fh 0 dn mOfw dkY\ w dw f
q dw fjc i f; q dki f& m y Hky e f; c sDy i fjz p fo n f
David Bravolt Berg
ol r \ c i fy Ge f; 0 Dv sHE Si fhu , fw i fjc i f; w y f( Salva-
tion Atmy) w dkYy lw GJw n fa x mi fc Jho l u u fo & i f; b k( o )
u o lr a o q Hk; c ge D; q Jq Jw Gi f w dw fq dw fji i fo m p Gmjz i fh ]]
a & a w Gw u fv ma e Ny D? ' ga y r Jh i gu e p fjr Sy fr a e b l; }} [ ka jy m
c Jho n f/ o dkYa o mf o lr o n f þ t & mu dko lr \ b 0 w a v Qmu f
v Hk; a jy mc Jho n f/ a o jc i f; w & m; \ a & r ms; t jy i f t jc m;
a o m a & Bu D; a & v QHr Ir sm; u o lr \ t o u f0 dn mOfy w f
y w f v n f w Gi fp ka 0 ; a e c Jha o mfv n f; o lr b , fc gr Qe p f jr §y f
jc i f; r & Sdc Jh? a u mi f; jr w fa o mb k& m; o c i fu o lr u dk a & a y :
a y : a e a p c Jho n fht jy i fo lr u r ke fw dki f; a y : a v [ ke fp D; c Jho n f/
rd r dw dkYw Gi f& Sda e a o mt & mE Si fhp mv Qi fr dr dw dkYa e mu fw Gi f
& Sda o mt & mE Si fhr dr dw dkYa & SUw Gi f& Sda e a o mt & mw dkYu b mr Q
r a jy my a v mu fy g/ Ralph Waldo Emerson
bk & m; o c i f\ p p fo n fw dkYv l\ t u lt n Dv dkt y f
c sde f?b k& m; o c i fo n ft p O ft Nr Jt c sde fu dku fa & mu f& Sdv m
a Mu mi f; u dk o dMu a v mh/ Oliver Cromwell.
vG ef c Jha o mE Sp ft e n f; i , f?y i fv , fc & D; u ?a v
a Mu mi f; c & D; x u fr sm; p Gmy dkí o r & kd; u st o Hk; r sm; a e c sde f?
t w åv e f w dw fo r k' ´& mu dk jz w fo n fh y i fv , fu l; o a b Fm
w p fp i f; r ke fw dki f; r dc Jho n f/ E Sp f& u fMu mr Qa v r ke fw dki f; u
a ' go w Bu D; w dku fc w fa e c Jhí ? c & D; o n fr sm; u x dw fv e fY
a Mu mu f& GHUv su f& Sda e c JhMu o n fha e mu fq Hk; p dk; & dr fa Mu mi fhMu v su f
& Sda o mc & D; o n fw p fOD; u o a b Fm r mv de fr SL; & Sd& mo dkYo Gm; a & mu f
a w GUq Hk& e fw u fo Gm; c Jho n f/ o l\ c & D; o Gm; a z mfr sm; & Sd& mo dkY
jy e fa & mu fv ma o t c g? Ni dr fo u fjc i f; E Si fhq dki fa o m 0 r f; a jr mu f
z G, f& m o w i f; p u m; u dk o lu a 0 i Sv dku fo n f/ o lu ]]u Re f
a w mfw dkY t m; v Hk; t E Å& m, fu i f; y gw , f? o a b Fmr mv de fr SL; u dk
a w GYNy D; Ny D? o lu Ny HK; Ny HK; & Ti f& Ti f& Sda e y gw , f/ }} [ ka jy mc Jho n f/
u RE fky fw dkY\ b 0 t o u fw mr sm; u dk Bu D; jr w fo n fh r mv de f
r SL; Bu D; u v r f; jy OD; a q mi fa e c sde f? r dr dw dkYo n f r ke fw dki f; w p fc k
p Du dkjz w fo e f; p OfNy HK; v su fE Si fh Ni dr fo u fjc i f; & Sda e r n fjz p fo n f/
ig o n fNi dr fo u fj c i f; t w Gu fq ka w mi f; v Qu f?
t e m; r a e a o mo u fo j c i f; u dkt dy fr u fr do n f/ e mu si fr Ir S
a q ; c y fc H& o n fhi dku fr sn f; t dy fa y smfjc i f; ?w dw fq dw fNi dr fo u f
o n fht e m; , ljc i f; /
i g\ O D; a c gi f; x u f?r Ja r Smi fv su f& Sda o ma u mi f; u i f?
r kefwdki f;u dkjzwfí . . . jyn fYpHkao mNi dr fo u fjci f;
r dr dw dkY\ p dk; & dr fy ly e fr Ir sm; u dk b k& m; o c i f\ v u fa w mfx Jo dkYt y fE SH
a o mt c go lo n fu RE fky fw dkY\ E Sv Hk; o m; x Jo l\ E Sv Hk; o m; x Jo l\ Ni dr f
o u fjc i f; u dkx n fha y ; o n f/
bk& m; o c i fo n fi gw dkY
c dkv IH& mjz p fí c Ge ft m; u dk a y ; a w mf
r l\ a b ; a & mu fo n fu mv t x l;
o jz i fhu lr a w mfr la Mu mi f; x i f
& Sm; v su f& Sd \ / - x dka Mu mi fhy x 0 D
a jr Bu D; o n f a & GUo Gm; í a w mi f
r sm; w ke fv Iy f v su f? o r k' ´& mo dkY
u sa o mfv n f; i gw dkYo n fa Mu mu f
v e fYjc i f; r & Sd/ ( q mv H4 6 ; 1 - 2 )
x dko dkYq dkv Qi f?
þ t & mu b k& m; o c i f\
u w da w mfy i fjz p fo n f/ ' ku ©
q i f; & Jjc i f; \ a & r sm; w dkY
u , HkMu n fo lw dkY\ y w f y w f
v n fw Gi fb , fc gr Qp ka 0 ;
v mr n fr [ kw f[ kq dkj c i f;
r [ kw fa o mfv n f; o lo n f
b , fc gr Q v Tr f; r dk; o Gm; jc i f; c H
& r n fr [ kw f[ kq dkj c i f; y i f
jz p fo n f/
J.H Jowett.
232
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i g\ & e fo lw dkY\ t j y i f; t x e fw dku fc dku fj c i f; u y dkí c u f
x e fMu r f; w r f; v mc Jho n f/
o dkYa o mfv n f; w dku fy GJu a ' go w Bu D; jz p fv su f
r ke fw dki f; x e fa e p Of? o l\ t o Ha w mfu dk i gMu m; c Jh& m? jy n fhp Hk
o n fhNi dr fo u fjc i f; jz p fa Mu mi f; i go dc Jho n f/
Annie Jonason Flint.
igu s& IH; E dki fo n f?o i fu s& IHl; E dki fo n f?u r ÇmBu D; w p f
c kv Hk; & IH; E dki fo n f?o dkYa o mf b k& m; o c i f\ E Iw fu y w fa w mf
o n fb , fc g r Q? y su fu Gu fu s& IH; v dr fhr n fr [ kw f/ t & m& mu
0 & ke f; o ke f; u m; ? A & r f; A w mjz p fa e Ny D; t & m& mu & Iy f
a x G; v su fr ke fw dki f; x e fa e o u Jho dkYj r i f& a o mt c g?E Iw f
u y w fa w mfü w dw fq dw fNi dr fo u fp Gmc Ge ft m; , ly g/
] ] , HkMu n fj c i f; o n fMu m; e mj c i f; t m; j z i fhj z p f\ ?Mu m; e m
jc i f; o n fv n f; b k& m; o c i f\ p u m; a w mft m; jz i fhjz p f\ }} ( a & mr
1 0 ; 1 7 ) / b k& m; o c i f\ E Iw fu y w fa w mfo n f t p Of p dw f o u f
o m& mjz p fNy D; ? o l\ 0 dn mOfa w mf\ t o Ha w mfo n f t Bu D; r m; q Hk;
p Hkp r f; p p fa Mu mr IBu D; r sm; ü t p Ofo jz i fht m; a y ; & m jz p fc Jho n f
r Sm? o i fht a e E Si fh t & m& mu r Sm; , Gi f; c Jho v dk& Sda e Ny D; o i f o n f
t E Å& m, f?' ku ©o dkYr [ kw fy la q G; a o mu a & mu fa e o n fh
w dki f, i f; u o i f\ t m; a y ; E Sp fo dr fh& mjz p fo n f/ u RE fky fw dkY\ t m;
a y ; E Sp fo dr fhr It w Gu fb k& m; o c i f\ E Iw fu y w fa w mfu dk
& , ljc i f; u t hHMo z G, f & ma u mi f; r Ge fjc i f; r & Sda y b l; v m; ? o l\ E Iw f
u y w fa w mfq dki f& mE Sp fo dr fhr It w Gu fb k& m; o c i fu dka u s; Z l; w i fy g/
David Brandt Berg
233
R65 GP
REFLECTI ONS
G
od is our refuge and
strength, an ever-
present help in trouble.
Therefore we will not fear,
though the earth give way
and the mountains fall
into the heart of the sea,
though its waters roar
and foam and the moun-
tains quake with their
surging (Psalm 46:1–2
NIV).
Y
ou can have peace in
the midst of storm. It
reminds me of an art contest that was held in which
the artists were asked to illustrate peace. Most of
the contestants handed in paintings of quiet, calm
scenes of the countryside—absolute tranquility.
Well, that’s a form of peace. But the hardest kind of
peace to have was illustrated in the picture that
won the award. It depicted the roaring, raging,
foaming rapids of a storm-swollen waterfall, and on
a little tree branch overhanging the torrent was a
nest, where a tiny bird sat peacefully singing in spite
of the raging river.
Trusting is a picture of complete rest, peace and
quiet of mind, heart and spirit.
—David Brandt Berg
W
hen Catherine Booth, co-founder of the Sal-
vation Army with her husband William, was
dying, she quietly said, “The waters are rising, but I
am not sinking.” But then she had been saying that
all through her life. Other floods besides the wa-
ters of death had gathered about her soul, but she
had never sunk! The good Lord made her buoyant,
and she rode upon the storm!
This, then, is the promise of the Lord—not that
the waters of trouble shall never gather about the
believer, but that he shall never be overwhelmed.
—J.H. Jowett
W
hat lies behind us and what lies before us are
small matters compared to what lies within us.
—Ralph Waldo Emerson
K
now ye, soldiers all,
that God always
comes to man’s help in
the nick of time.
—Oliver Cromwell
S
ome years back,
when sea travel was
much more common
than air travel, a trans-At-
lantic liner was caught in
a storm. For two days the
wind raged. Passengers
were frightened. At last
an anxious passenger
climbed to where he could see the pilot. Returning
to his fellow-passengers, he spread glad tidings of
peace. “We are all right!” he said. “The ship will make
port. I have seen the pilot, and he is smiling.” With
the great Pilot directing our life, we can smile on
through every storm and, smiling, be at peace.
I
prayed for peace, and dreamed of restless ease,
A slumber drugged from pain, a hushed repose.
Above my head the skies were black with storm,
And fiercer grew the onslaught of my foes.
But while the battle raged and wild winds blew,
I heard His voice, and perfect peace I knew.
—Annie Johnson Flint
I
can fail, you can fail, the whole world can fail. But
God’s Word will never fail! When everything is in
chaos, and it seems like all is confusion and stormy,
retreat into the Word. “Faith comes by hearing the Word
of God!” (Romans 10:17). His Word is always a comfort,
and the voice of His Spirit is always an encouragement
in the hour of greatest trial, even when everything
seems to have gone wrong and you’re in danger, trouble
or distress. Isn’t it wonderful to have God’s Word for our
encouragement? Thank God for the comfort of His
Word!
—David Brandt Berg
Peace in time of trouble.
T TT TThrough th hrough th hrough th hrough th hrough the S e S e S e S e Storm ... Perf torm ... Perf torm ... Perf torm ... Perf torm ... Perfect Peace ect Peace ect Peace ect Peace ect Peace
When we put our cares in God’s hands,
He puts His peace in our hearts.
Through the storm, perfect peace.
Glossary.
1. Refuge. A place which gives shelter or protection.
2. Quake. To tremble.
3. Illustrate. To graphically show something in picture form.
4. Contestant. A person who competes in a contest.
5. Rapids. Quick, fast fowing water in a river often on a downhill gradient.
6. Torrent. A fast fowing body of water or liquid.
7. Buoyant. The ability to stay above the water.
8. Anxious. Worried about what may happen.
9. Pilot. A person who fies an airplane. Or navigates a vessel into port.
10. Chaos. Complete disorder or confusion.
11. Confusion. To put in disorder; to mix up in ones mind
Points to ponder.
(A) The moral of these stories is that even when we are surrounded by noise, busyness, or
trouble, we can have inner peace. How do we get this inner peace?
(B) Do you have that kind of inner peace?
REFLECTIONS
234
235
e--:e=:-÷¸_=
Curtis Peter Van Gorder
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The newcomer
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R 305, The wedding Bullet, BUR
The newcomer
a&mifjyef[yfjcif;
236
237
The Wedding bullet.
Glossary.
1. Stroll. To walk or wander without hurry
2. Breeze. A gentle movement of the air.
3. Sirens. A kind of instrument that gives out a loud hooting noise.
4. Frantic. Anxious or very worried.
5. Gurney. A stretcher used by medics to move an injured person.
6. Tourist. A person who makes a tour.
7. Levied. To raise or collect (tax or an army)Jest.
8. Curb. Something which restrains or controls.
9. Rush hour. A time of heavy traffc when people are going to or leaving work.
10. Gossip. To talk about other peoples’ affairs.
11. Consequences. A result of an action.
12. Chatter. To talk quickly and noisily.
13. Torrential. A rushing stream.
14. Down pour. A very heavy rainstorm.
15. Aisle. A passage between rows of seats in a church or cinema.
16. Intense. Very great.
17. Reputation. The opinion which people in general have about a person.
18. Unrestrained. A state of trouble or discontent, not under control.
19. Gratitude. The state of feeling grateful.
20. Derisive. To come or develop from
Points to ponder.
(A) One quote from the story, The Wedding Bullet, says, “A little gossip can ruin a life.”
Often people enjoy listening to and spreading gossip. Why is that ?
(B) Sometimes when a new student comes to a school for the frst time, the other students
tend to ignore him or her. Why do they do that?
238
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
239
R97 GP
REFLECTI ONS
A five-member Air Force panel finished its investigation into
the crash of an F-117A. Better known as the stealth fighter, one of
these state-of-the-art jets literally came apart in the sky on Sep-
tember 14, 1997. The pilot parachuted to safety and no one in the
Baltimore suburb where the plane crashed was hurt.
The specific fighter in question had been repaired and checked
out thoroughly in January of 1996. As part of that maintenance
check, the wings were removed and reinstalled. The inspectors ap-
parently failed to install four of the five bolts that hold part of the
wing assembly in place. Two later maintenance checks missed the
same problem. One of those checks was prompted when a pilot who
had flown the jet reported there was too much “flex” in the wing.
Col. John Beard, head of the investigative panel, said, “It is my opinion the accident was caused by unintentional
maintenance oversight.”
For the lack of four fastener bolts, a $42-million stealth fighter crashed. Because of careless maintenance, the life
of a pilot was nearly lost. On account of someone’s “unintentional” oversight, dozens more on the ground were put
in jeopardy. It seems like a terribly high price for so trivial a thing as four bolts.
The same sort of thing happens all the time. A company fails because it doesn’t stay abreast of market research
or product development. A once-bright career goes down the tubes because an athlete didn’t control his temper
or because a junior executive was guilty of an ethical lapse.
Sadder still, all of us have known marriages to fail because of one or
both partners’ “unintentional maintenance oversight.” He didn’t pay at-
tention to her. She didn’t seem interested in him. Oh, there were occasional
signs of trouble, but they weren’t pursued aggressively enough to repair
the relationship properly. So one day the marriage came apart and
crashed—maiming both adults and kids.
And what of your personal spiritual life? A well-maintained heart is lov-
ing, joyful, and forgiving. It speaks truth and lives with honor. It longs for
God as a deer pants for water in a dry place (Psalm 41:1). Prayer is natural,
and Scripture is precious.
It would be wise to begin this week by checking the maintenance logs.
Be thorough. Leave no stone unturned. And be bold in addressing the
deficiencies. God wants you to fly, not crash and burn.
“Unintentional Maintenance Oversight”
By Rubel Shelly
When a maintenance check is needed …
Quotes by David Brandt Berg
Ø The Lord wants us to be happy, but there should be times when you are not satisfied with just the usual run
of things, when you really seek the Lord for a needed change and pray, pouring out your heart to the Lord.
Ø You must learn to make personal contact with the power of God to let Him do the work of bringing you joy,
health, and happiness.
Ø There’s always hope if there’s love and prayer!
Crash of stealth fighter, September
14, 1977 (Courtesy of CNN.)
F-117A Nighthawk,
the stealth fighter
Spiritual maintenance, change for the better.
240
Unintentional Maintenance Oversight.
Glossary.
1. Investigation. To examine or inquire into.
2. Stealth. A secret manner of acting
3. State-of-the –art. Very modern, using the latest technology.
4. Parachuted. An umbrella shaped piece of light, strong cloth used to safely land on the
ground from an aircraft.
5. Specifc. To name as wanted or demanded, exact.
6. Maintenance. Routine act of repair or inspection to maintain condition or safety.
7. Prompted. To persuade to do something.
8. Oversight. A failure to notice.
9. Jeopardy. Danger
10. Abreast. Side by side.
11. Ethical. The study or the science of moral conduct and behavior.
12. Lapse. To cease to exist.
13. Maiming. To injure badly.
14. Defciencies. Lacking in what is needed.
Points to ponder.
(A) Regular and thorough maintenance is something that is a very important principle in
life. The kind of people who pay close attention to details, are usually considered to be,
reliable and trustworthy. Explain why that is?
(B) Many business failures are brought about by a lack of attention to details. Name a few
reasons that could cause failure in a successful company.
(C) Human relationships also need maintenance to keep them together. Name a few things
that could be the cause of a breakdown in human relationships.
REFLECTIONS
241
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242
243
Turning trials into Treasure.
Glossary.
1. Glare. To stare fercely and angrily towards.
2. Clusters. A closely packed group of people or things.
3. Unpleasant. Disagreeable.
4. Slammed. To shut with violence making a loud noise.
5. Glands. A part of the body that produces hormones and other body fuids
6. Irritating. To annoy or bother.
7. Lustrous. Very strong desire.
8. Pearl. A valuable hard round object formed by oysters.
9. Inconvenience. Causing trouble of diffculty, awkward.
10. Humble. Not having a high opinion of one’s self.
11. Disguise. To hide the true identity of by altering the appearance.
12. Assassination. To murder.
13. Fatal. Causing death, disastrous.
14. Serum. A watery fuid which is given as an injection.
15. Consolation. To comfort.
Points to ponder.
(A) The story about the oyster and the pearl is to illustrate, that good things can develop
from seemingly bad things or events. Can you think of a time in your life when
something like that happened to you?
244
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
245
n medieval times, the goldsmiths had a
unique method to determine when the refning
fre had purged away all extraneous matter from
the precious metal.
They would stand patiently and peer in-
tently into the seething, molten mass, meantime
making the fre hotter and hotter. At last, a smile
of satisfaction would lighten up the perspiring
face of the goldsmith. He could see his face re-
fected in the molten mass of gold. Seeing his
face mirrored there, he knew that the refning
fre had wrought its purifying purpose.
Peter admonished, “Beloved, think it not
strange concerning the fery trial which is to try
you” (1 Peter 4:12a).
When God sees the image of His Son re-
fected in our lives, He knows that His purifying
fres have wrought their intended purpose.
An elderly man asked a boy to go with
him into the woods to cut down some hickory
trees to make axe handles. They soon came
to several young hickory trees. The boy said,
“These trees would make good axe handles. Let’s
cut them down.” The old man said, “These trees in
the lowlands have been protected from the storms
which rage higher up. Let’s go to the heights where
the trees have been rocked back and forth by ferce
winds. Those trees have been hardened by the tem-
pest and they will make much stronger axe handles!”
Those who have been exposed to diffculties,
rocked to and fro by the temptations, but who have
not yielded to them, are made stronger. We can be
“more than conquerors through Him that loved us!”
(Romans 8:37).
Job said, “When He hath tried me, I shall
come forth as gold” (Job 23:10).
REFLECTIONS
Does Jesus care
F
or feelings come and feelings go,
And feelings are deceiving;
My warrant is the Word of God,
Naught else is worth believing.
Though all my heart should feel condemned,
For want of some sweet token,
There is One greater than my heart
Whose Word cannot be broken.
I’ll trust in God’s unchanging Word
Till soul and body sever;
For, though all things shall pass away,
His Word shall stand forever.
Martin Luther
I
Does Jesus care when my heart is pained
Too deeply for mirth and song;
As the burdens press, and the cares distress,
And the way grows weary and long?
Does Jesus care when my way is dark
With a nameless dread and fear?
As the daylight fades into deep night shades,
Does He care enough to be near?
Does Jesus care when I’ve tried and failed
To resist some temptation strong;
When for my deep grief I fnd no relief,
Though my tears fow all the night long?
Does Jesus care when I’ve said, “Good-bye”
To the dearest on Earth to me,
And my sad heart aches till it nearly breaks,
Is it aught to Him? Does He see?
Oh, yes, He cares; I know He cares,
His heart is touched with my grief.
When the days are weary, the long nights dreary,
I know My Savior cares.
Frank E. Graeff
Does Jesus Care?
Glossary
1. Mirth. Laughter or amusement.
2. Distress. Great sorrow, trouble or pain.
3. Weary. Tired, without strength or patience.
4. Temptation. To tempt.
5. Grief. Great sorrow or unhappiness.
6. Dreary. Gloomy or very dull.
7. Extraneous. More than usual.
8. Mirrored. To see a refection of an image.
9. Purifying. To cleans and remove contaminants from.
10. Hickory. A type of strong white wood used for tool handles.
11. Conquerors. To overcome defeat.
12. Deceiving. To mislead or cause to make mistakes.
13. Warrant. To justify or to state. A legal document issued by a judge authorizing the
arrest of a person on criminal charges.
14. Condemned. To criticize as morally wrong or evil.
15. Soul. The spirit.
Points to ponder.
(A) In the section of the story where the elderly man is cutting Hickory with a boy to make
axe handles with. The elderly man tells the boy that the hickory on the top of a wind swept
hill is much tougher than that which has grown in the shelter of the valley. Why is that?
(B) In what way is the wind toughened wood similar to the diffculties that you have faced
in your own life?
REFLECTIONS
246
247
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- Caron Loveless
pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
REFLECTI ONS
R207 GP—March 2003
Charles Plumb was a U.S.
Navy jet pilot in Vietnam.
After 75 combat missions,
his plane was destroyed by a
surface-to-air missile. Plumb
ejected and parachuted
into enemy hands. He was
captured and spent six years
in a communist Vietnamese
prison. He survived the
ordeal and now lectures on
lessons learned from that
experience.
One day, when Plumb
and his wife were sitting in a
restaurant, a man at another
table approached them and
said, “You’re Plumb! You few
jet fghters in Vietnam from
the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk.
You were shot down!”
“How in the world did you
know that?” asked Plumb.
“I packed your parachute,”
the man replied.
Plumb gasped in surprise
and gratitude. The man
pumped his hand and said, “I
guess it worked!”
Plumb assured him, “It
sure did. If your chute hadn’t
worked, I wouldn’t be here
today.”
Plumb couldn’t sleep
that night, thinking about
that man. Plumb says, “I
kept wondering what he
might have looked like in a
Navy uniform: a white hat,
a bib in the back, and bell-
bottom trousers. I wonder
how many times I might
have seen him and not
even said, ‘Good morning,
how are you?’ or anything
because, you see, I was a
fghter pilot and he was just
a sailor.” Plumb thought of
the many hours the sailor
had spent on a long wooden
table in the bowels of the
ship, carefully weaving the
shrouds and folding the silks
of each chute, holding in his
hands each time the fate of
someone he didn’t know.
Now, Plumb asks his
audience, “Who’s packing
your parachute?” Everyone
has someone who provides
what they need to make it
through the day. Plumb also
points out that he needed
many kinds of parachutes
when his plane was shot
down over enemy territory—
he needed his physical
parachute, his mental
parachute, his emotional
parachute, and his spiritual
parachute. He called on
all these supports before
reaching safety.
Sometimes in the daily
challenges that life gives
us, we miss what is really
important. We may fail to
say hello, please, thank you,
congratulate someone on
something wonderful that
has happened to them, give
a compliment, or just do
something nice for no reason.
As you go through this
week, this month, this year,
recognize people who pack
your parachute.
Submitted by Diana Mercier
parachute?
Who’s packing
your
Become a missionary
of encouragement. As
you go about your day,
focus on individuals.
Make the most of every
contact with every
person every day.
Someone’s lifetime
opportunity may be
perched on the tip of
your tongue.
Revel in the rhythm
of ordinary things.
Embrace the days of
bite-size beginnings,
tedious tasks, and
mandatory meetings.
Your words at such times
will speak volumes
about the quality of life.
Let God use you in these
common situations.
—Caron Loveless
Appreciation is a
wonderful thing; it makes
what is excellent in others
belong to us as well.
—Voltaire (1694–1778),
French writer
and philosopher
Topics: Appreciation, encouragement, helping others, showing love.
248
249
REFLECTIONS
Who's Packing your Parachute?
Glossary.
1. Combat. A fght, fghting between two people or two armies.
2. Surface-to-air (SAM). Surface to air missile system.Aground bases air defence system
designed to strike and destroy enemy aircraft.
3. Ejected. To force something out of a place.A device in modern aircraft designed to seperate
the pilot from his plane then parachute him safely to the ground
4. Parachuted.To be equiped with a parachhute or eject from a plane using a parachute.
5. Ordeal. A diffcult or painful experience especially one that tests a persons character or
ability to endure.
6. Gasped. To take one or more quick deep breaths with one's mouth open, because of
surprise,pain or lack of air.
7. Gratitude. The feeling of being grateful or the desire to express ones thanks.
8. Bowels.One of a system of tubes below the stomache through which waste matter passes
before leaving the body. Deep in the interior.
9. Shrouds. A cloth in which a ded person is wrapped.
10. Emotional. Causing emotion, sensetive minds.
11. Spiritual. Feeling something relating to the spirits or a holy place.
12. Congratulate. To tell someone that one is pleased about their good luck or achievements.
13. Compliment. Expressing admiration or praise
Points to ponder.
(A) Charles Plumb was a U.S. Navy fghter pilot and an offcer. The lessons that he is trying to
bring out in this story were about his attitude. Explain what lessons that he learned in
relating to other people?
(B) While Charles Plumb was aboard the Aircraft Carrier, his attitude towards men of lower rank
and people in general was wrong. What was wrong with his attitude?
250
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R168,Wise Leadership, "To whom shall I leave My Kingdom?", BUR
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(Donald E.Wildmon)
tajrmftjrif
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pOf;pm;awG;ac:rIrsm;
251
2%&,%#4) /.3
R142 GP Topics: Leadership, people-handling, humility, love.
!n many cuItures, kíngs and queens
were enthroned at theír coronatíons, the
throne beíng a symboI oI power and
authoríty. But ín the ancíent AIrícan
kíngdom oI Ashantí, ín what ís now
Ghana, the kíng was not enthroned
but ¨stooIed." The IowIy stooI was the
royaI symboI, and IowIíness, not IoItí-
ness, was the quaIíty that was expected
oI royaIty.
¨TO WHOM SHALL ! L£AV£ MY K!MGÐOM?"
T
he kíng oI a Iarge kíngdom was growíng oId. He
decíded that ít was tíme to seIect an heír Irom
among hís Iour sons, so he caIIed them ín one at a
tíme to díscuss the ínherítance oI hís kíngdom.
The ñrst son entered the chamber oI the kíng and sat
down, and the kíng saíd, ¨My son, ! am very oId and wíII
not Iíve much Ionger. ! wísh to entrust my kíngdom to
the son best suíted to receíve ít. TeII me, íI ! Ieave my
kíngdom to you, what wíII you gíve to the kíngdom?"
Mow thís son was very rích, so when asked the ques-
tíon, he repIíed: ¨! am a man oI vast weaIth. !I you Ieave
me your kíngdom ! wíII gíve ít aII oI my weaIth and ít wíII
be the ríchest kíngdom ín aII the worId."
¨Thank you, son," the kíng saíd as he dísmíssed the
son.
The second son entered, and the kíng saíd, ¨My son,
! am very oId and wíII not Iíve much Ionger. ! wísh to
entrust my kíngdom to the son best suíted to receíve ít.
TeII me, íI ! Ieave my kíngdom to you, what wíII you gíve
to the kíngdom?"
Mow thís son was very ínteIIígent, so when asked
the questíon, he repIíed: ¨! am a man
oI vast ínteIIígence. !I you Ieave me
your kíngdom ! wíII gíve ít aII oI my
ínteIIígence and ít wíII be the most
ínteIIígent kíngdom ín aII the worId."
¨Thank you, son," the kíng saíd
as he dísmíssed the son.
The thírd son entered, and the
kíng saíd, ¨My son, ! am very oId and
wíII not Iíve much Ionger. ! wísh to
entrust my kíngdom to the son best
suíted to receíve ít. TeII me, íI ! Ieave
my kíngdom to you, what wíII you
gíve to the kíngdom?"
Mow thís son was very strong, so when asked the
questíon, he repIíed: ¨! am a man oI great strength. !I you
Ieave me your kíngdom ! wíII gíve ít aII oI my strength and
ít wíII be the strongest kíngdom ín aII the worId."
¨Thank you, son," the kíng saíd as he dísmíssed the
son.
The Iourth son entered and was greeted by the kíng ín
the same Iashíon as the other three.
Mow thís son wasn`t especíaIIy rích, or smart, or
strong, so he repIíed, ¨My Iather, you know that my broth-
ers are much rícher, smarter, and stronger than !. WhíIe
they have spent years gaíníng these attríbutes, ! have
spent my tíme among the peopIe ín your kíngdom. ! have
shared wíth them ín theír síckness and sorrow, and ! have
Iearned to Iove them. The onIy thíng ! have to gíve to
the peopIe oI your kíngdom ís my Iove. ! know that my
brothers have more to oIIer than ! do, so ! wíII not be
dísappoínted ín not beíng named your heír. ! wíII símpIy
go on doíng what ! have aIways done."
When the kíng díed, the peopIe anxíousIy awaíted the
news as to theír new ruIer. And the greatest rejoícíng the
kíngdom ever knew took pIace when they heard that theír
new kíng was the Iourth son.
÷ÐonaId £. WíIdmon
Jesus caIIed jHís díscípIes] to Hím
and saíd, ¨As you know, the kíngs and
great men oI the earth Iord ít over
the peopIe; but among you ít ís díIIer-
ent. Whoever wants to be great among
you must be your servant. And whoever
wants to be greatest oI aII must be the
sIave oI aII. For even !, the Messíah,
am not here to be served, but to heIp
others, and to gíve My IíIe as a ransom
Ior many."
÷The BíbIe, Morh 10:+2-+5 TLB

se

Leadershíp
252
Wise Leadership.
Glossary.
1. Cultures. Art; Literature; Music; and other intillectual expressions of a particular society or
time.
2. Enthroned. To place a king or a queen or a bishop on a throne, especially during a ceremony
tomark the beginning of their rule.
3. Coronation. A ceremony at which a crown is formally placed on the head of a new king or
queen.
4. Lowliness. Not high or tall, not extending far upwards. In or at a low level or position.
5. Loftiness. Very high and impressive, noble, worthy of admiration. Too proud
6. Messiah. A person expected to come and save the world.
7. Ransom. Money paid for the release of a person, held as a prisoner.
8. Heir. A person with the legal right to receive property, or money when the owner dies.
9 Inheritance. To receive money,property, etc as a result of the death of the previous owner.
10. Entrust. To give responsibility to someone to carry out a task or a duty.
11. Wealth. A large amount of money or property.
12. Dismissed. To remove someone, especialloy an employee, from a position.
13. Intelligent. The power of learning. Understanding and reasoning, mental ability, having or
showing intelligence.
14. Attributes. To regard something as belonging to a quality regarded as natural, or typical.
15. Sickness. Illness, bad health.
16. Sorrow. A feeling of sadness or distress, caused by loss, dissapintment, regret or grief.
17. Anxious. Feeling worried or nervous.
Points to ponder.
(A) There is a very big cultural difference between; Kings and queens and the peoples
expectations of them in Europe as compared to the Ashanti kingdom and culture of West
Africa.Can you explain the differences and what they mean?
(B) What were the qualities of the fourth prince in the story, that caused the king to select him as
the heir to the throne?
REFLECTIONS
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254
The true story of the mutiny on the British ship Bounty has ofen been retold. One part that deserves re-
telling was the transformation caused by one book. Nine mutineers with six native Tahitian men and twelve
Tahitian women put ashore on Pitcairn Island in 1790. One sailor soon began distilling alcohol, and the little
colony was plunged into drunken orgies and violence.
Ten years later, only one white man had survived, surrounded by native women and half-blooded chil-
dren. One day, in an old chest from the Bounty, this sailor found a Bible. He began to read it and then to teach
it to the others. Te result was that his own life and ultimately the lives of all those in the colony were changed.
Discovered in 1808 by the USS Topas, Pitcairn had become a prosperous community with no alcoholism, no
crime, and no jail.
Several friends were telling each other a little about themselves. One of them said, “My story is unlike
other men.” He continued: “I was a pickpocket. One day I saw a man with a defnite bulge in his hip pocket. `A
fat billfold,’ I thought, and soon it was in my pocket. When I arrived home, I was disgusted to fnd that it was
only a book. Later, out of curiosity, I opened it and began to read. It was a Bible. Before long, I had discovered
God’s love for me in its pages, and accepted Jesus Christ as my Savior. Tis book changed my life.”
God’s Promises
A
s the deep blue of heaven
Brightens into stars,
So God’s great love shines forth
In promises
Which, falling sofly through
Our prison bars,
Daze not our eyes, but with their
Sweet light bless.
Ladders of light, God sets against
Te skies-
Upon whose golden rungs we step by step
Arise.
Author Unknown
“He has given us exceeding great and precious promises, that through
these you may be partakers of the divine nature” (Te Bible, 2 Peter 1:4).
Te Word of God can change hearts and minds, something no atom
bomb or molotov cocktail or any number of bullets has ever done!
In God’s Word you can fnd the answer to every question, every problem
you will ever have in life.
Many people struggle through life needlessly, when only a little more
time spent with God’s Word would bring the peace, faith, and happiness they
seek.

From the Bible...
This is what God says about His Word: “For
as the rain comes down, and the snow from heaven,
and do not return there, but water the earth, and make
it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed to the sow-
er and bread for the eater, so shall My Word that goes
forth from My mouth; it shall not return to Me void,
but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall
prosper in the thing for which I sent it” (Isaiah 55:10-
11).
Wark
t
h
a
t
Words
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REFLECTIONS
Words that Work.
Gloassary.
1. Mutiny. Rebellion against authority, especially sailors.
2. Transformation. The action or instance of transforming something. Change
3. Tahitian. A person from the Island Nation of Tahiti
4. Distilling. Changing a liqiud to a gas by heating and then cooling back to liquid forml.
5. Alcohol. Pure colorless liquids in drinks such as beer, wine and wiskey.
6. Drunken. Showing the effects of too much alcohol.
7. Orgies. Excessive amounts of a particularactivity.
8. Bible. The Holy book of the Jewish and Christian faith.
9. Ultimately. In the end . Finally
10. Prosperous. Having an abundance of wealth, successful.
11. Alcoholism. Regular, habitual drinking of alcohol.
12. Pickpocket. A person who steals money.
13. Curiosity. Strong desire to know about something.
14. Void. A large empty space.
15. Accomplish. Succeed in doing something.
16. Daze. Unable to think clearly.
17. Exceeding. To a great or unusualdegree.
18. Precious. Of great value.
19. Partakers. Someone who has been invitedto takepart in an event.
20. Divine. Of or like God.
21. Molotov Cocktail. An improvised fre bomb normally using a glass bottle flled with petrol
with a lighted rag as a fuse, to ignite it. Named after, Mr. Molotov, the Russian foreign minis
ter in World war II
22. Bullets. Cartridges flled with gunpowder used as amunition in modern frearms.
Points to ponder.
(A) What were the contributing factors that caused the community of mutineers on Pitcairn Is
land to fall into chaos?
(B) How would you describe the transformation of Pitcairn Island community. How did it change
so much.
(C) What benefts do religious teaching bring to a society or nation?

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