www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 107
OBAMA, BOEHNER CLASH
NATION PAGE 7
SHAW TO STAY
AT THE FARM
SPORTS PAGE 14
STORES TRYING TO
SALVAGE SEASON
NATION PAGE 6
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By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Keeping children safe at schools is a priori-
ty for most people — a topic which local
schools take seriously and evaluate the plans
for regularly.
Last week, 20-year-old Adam Lanza killed
his mother then murdered 26 children and
adults at Sandy Hook Elementary in
Newtown, Conn. Threats at other schools
throughout the nation, and locally, have fol-
lowed. Some threats are more serious than
others but the media attention has created a
buzz with people interested in talking about
gun control and mental health issues, as well
as school safety. California requires districts
and individual schools to have safety plans
that include certain drills — like earthquakes,
fires and lockdown — which must be
reviewed annually. The topic of safety is
approached differently depending on the age
of the children involved.
The tragedy came in the midst of the cre-
ation of guiding principles for San Mateo
County schools, which is still in development.
A struggle often for schools is figuring out
best and most recent practices. The idea
behind the regional plan would be to create a
guide that includes opinions from a variety of
people — educators, emergency workers, law
enforcement, citizens — to discuss drills, how
to approach different scenarios and working
with children who have special needs,
Safety plans a top priority at local schools
Obama:
Tighten
gun laws
President to send Congress
firearm proposal in January
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Declaring the
time for action overdue, President
Barack Obama promised on Wednesday
to send Congress broad proposals in
January for tightening gun laws and
curbing violence after last week’s
schoolhouse massacre in Connecticut.
Even before those proposals are draft-
ed, Obama pressed lawmakers to rein-
state a ban on military-style assault
weapons, close loopholes that allow gun buyers to skirt back-
ground checks and restrict high-capacity ammunition clips.
“The fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an
excuse for doing nothing,” Obama said in his most detailed
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo County supervisors Don Horsley and Rose
Jacobs Gibson served hot meals for the Vocational
Rehabilitation Services’ 23rd Annual Holiday
Luncheon in San Carlos yesterday afternoon.Horsley
and Jacobs Gibson were joined by volunteers and
employees of the county’s Human Services Agency
to feed about 300 people a traditional hot holiday
lunch with turkey and all the trimmings. The meal
was provided through donations from individuals
and local businesses. Grocery store gift cards were
also handed out at the event. The Human Services
Agency assists individuals and families to achieve
economic self sufficiency,promotes community and
family strength and works to ensure child safety and
well-being.
HOLIDAY LUNCHEON
See page 5
Inside
• Shattered Newtown
buries its dead
• Shooting renews
argument over video
game violence
See GUNS, Page 16
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Japanese diplomat
accused of abusing his
wife several times, includ-
ing times prosecutors say
he hit her over the head
with a laptop, stabbed her
hand with a miniature
screwdriver and threw her from a car in their
San Bruno parking lot, is expected to settle the
case today.
Vice Consul Yoshiaki Nagaya, 33, was
scheduled for trial Feb. 4 but will appear in
court Thursday morning and is anticipated to
plead no contest to some of the charges, said
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Nagaya is charged with 16 felonies.
Japanese diplomat expected to
settle domestic violence case
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An 18-year-old East Palo Alto man who
prosecutors say fired several shots into a vehi-
cle on Highway 101 in Belmont, sending two
people to the hospital with wounds, delayed a
plea yesterday to several counts of attempted
murder and gun use.
Eric Valencia Vargas appeared with his
court-appointed attorney on the felonies stem-
ming from the Sept. 30 incident that also hos-
Teen nabbed in highway
shooting delays his plea
Prosecutors add new counts for threatening officer
See NAGAYA, Page 20
Yoshiaki Nagaya
See VARGAS, Page 20
See SAFETY, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Jonah Hill is
29.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1812
German authors Jacob and Wilhelm
Grimm published the first volume of the
first edition of their collection of folk
stories, titled “Children’s and
Household Tales.”
“Fairy tales are more than true; not because
they tell us that dragons exist, but because
they tell us that dragons can be beaten.”
— G.K. Chesterton, English poet-essayist (1874-1936)
Producer Dick
Wolf is 66.
Singer JoJo is 22.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A diver in a Santa Claus outfit shows a card shaped like a teddy bear to children at the Guadalajara zoo.The ‘Aqua Claus,’ as
he has been dubbed by the children who visit the zoo,has become an attraction for tourists and residents during Christmas
season, according to local media.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Breezy. A slight
chance of rain. Highs in the mid 50s.
Southeast winds 15 to 20 mph...Becoming
south 20 to 30 mph in the afternoon.
Thursday night: Breezy. Rain likely. Lows
in the mid 40s. South winds 20 to 30 mph.
Friday: Breezy...Rain. Highs in the mid
50s. South winds around 30 mph.
Friday night...Breezy...Rain. Lows in the upper 40s. South
winds 20 to 30 mph.
Saturday: Breezy...Rain. Highs in the mid 50s.
Saturday night: Breezy...Rain. Lows in the mid 40s.
Sunday: Breezy...Rain. Highs in the mid 50s.
Sunday night: Showers likely. Lows in the mid 40s.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in
the mid 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Big Ben, No. 4, in second
place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:45.49.
(Answers tomorrow)
SWIFT DODGE SOCIAL PAROLE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: All the other ghosts enjoyed being with Casper
because he was always in — GOOD SPIRITS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
HENTT
OUIDA
CUHRCN
MEHRMA
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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8 9 5
1 6 7 18 29 16
Mega number
Dec. 18 Mega Millions
10 19 22 25 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 0 3 1
Daily Four
9 1 9
Daily three evening
In 1790, the first successful cotton mill in the United States
began operating at Pawtucket, R.I.
In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase was completed as ownership
of the territory was formally transferred from France to the
United States.
In 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede from
the Union as all 169 delegates to a special convention in
Charleston voted in favor of separation.
In 1864, Confederate forces evacuated Savannah, Ga., as
Union Gen. William T. Sherman continued his “March to the
Sea.”
In 1912, the play “Peg O’ My Heart,” a “comedy of youth” by
John Hartley Manners starring his wife, actress Laurette
Taylor, opened on Broadway.
In 1945, the Office of Price Administration announced the end
of tire rationing, effective Jan. 1, 1946.
In 1963, the Berlin Wall was opened for the first time to West
Berliners, who were allowed one-day visits to relatives in the
Eastern sector for the holidays.
In 1972, the Neil Simon play “The Sunshine Boys” opened on
Broadway.
In 1978, former White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman
was released from prison after serving 18 months for his role
in the Watergate cover-up.
In 1987, more than 4,300 people were killed when the Dona
Paz, a Philippine passenger ship, collided with the tanker
Vector off Mindoro island.
In 1989, the United States launched Operation Just Cause,
sending troops into Panama to topple the government of Gen.
Manuel Noriega.
Actress Audrey Totter is 95. Actor John Hillerman is 80. Rock
musician-music producer Bobby Colomby is 68. Rock musician
Peter Criss is 67. Psychic/illusionist Uri Geller is 66. Rock musi-
cian Alan Parsons is 64. Actress Jenny Agutter is 60. Actor
Michael Badalucco is 58. Actress Blanche Baker is 56. Rock
singer Billy Bragg is 55. Rock singer-musician Mike Watt (The
Secondmen, Minutemen, fIREHOSE) is 55. Actor Joel Gretsch
is 49. Country singer Kris Tyler is 48. Rock singer Chris
Robinson is 46. Actress Nicole deBoer is 42. Movie director
Todd Phillips is 42. Singer David Cook (“American Idol”) is 30.
Spokane robbery suspect
tackled, caught on tape
SPOKANE, Wash. — Instead of let-
ting a robber get away, a witness to a
convenience store stickup in Spokane,
Wash., caught the armed man and held
him for police.
The surveillance camera at the G & B
Grocery shows a man wearing a ski
mask, threatening the clerk and other
people in the store, including three chil-
dren. He grabs the money and is trying
to run out of the store when one of the
customers chases him.
KREM reports it was the clerk’s
brother.
He tackled the fleeing man Monday
going out the door. Officers arrived a
few minutes later and arrested a 25-year-
old man for investigation of robbery,
assault and possession of a stolen
firearm.
Man, wife charged
with DUI on same night
LINCOLN, R.I. — Rhode Island State
Police say a husband and wife both face
charges of driving under the influence
after they were stopped separately on the
same night.
Police say 43-year-old Stephanie
Souza, of Warwick, was stopped in
Cranston on Friday, and a chemical test
on her at the Lincoln barracks indicated
she’d been driving under the influence.
They say 44-year-old Michael Souza
was pulled over for a motor vehicle vio-
lation in Lincoln while driving to get his
wife, then taken into custody. They say a
chemical test on him at the Lincoln bar-
racks indicated he was also driving
under the influence.
A number for the Souzas could not be
located Sunday and they could not be
reached for comment.
$500 million in checks
left at Jerusalem holy site
JERUSALEM — Worshippers usual-
ly leave notes to the Almighty at one of
Judaism’s holiest sites. But half a billion
dollars?
Rabbi Shmuel Rabinovitch, who over-
sees Jerusalem’s Western Wall, said a
worshipper found an envelope at the site
Wednesday with 507 checks in the
amount of about $1 million each. They
were not addressed to anyone, and it’s
doubtful they can be cashed.
Rabinovitch said most are Nigerian.
Israeli police spokesman Micky
Rosenfeld said some were from the
United States, Europe and Asia.
Rabinovitch says he has found similar
checks in Western Wall charity boxes
before, but they all bounced. He says
most of them were written by people
from Africa.
The rabbi says he thinks the check
writers “wanted to give all they had to
the Creator of the universe.”
Paul Rudd needs dose
of comedy after Broadway role
LOS ANGELES — Paul Rudd has
been killing himself every night.
The actor best
known for comedies
such as “Knocked
Up” and “Forgetting
Sarah Marshall” has
been performing a
decidedly darker role
on Broadway recent-
ly, as a devout man
whose loss of faith
makes him suicidal
in “Grace.”
“The guy just plunges off the deep end
in a really kind of emotionally raw and
draining way,” Rudd says during a turn-
around trip to Los Angeles to promote
his latest film, Judd Apatow’s “This Is
40.” The actor was back onstage in New
York the night after the interview.
He plays against his loveable-good-
guy type in both projects. In “Grace,” he
starts out confident, then unravels. In
“This Is 40,” he’s having a full-on mid-
life crisis, dreaming of living a different
life while his business struggles and his
marriage falters. Rudd stars with
Apatow’s real-life wife, Leslie Mann,
and the couple’s two daughters, Maude
and Iris, in the comedy in theaters Friday.
Next up is “Anchorman 2,” and Rudd
says, “I could not be more excited about
it.”
6 9 11 28 45 7
Mega number
Dec. 19 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
BELMONT
Disturbance. A person refused to leave a
parking lot on El Camino Real before 8:35
p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16.
Suspicious circumstances. A person received
anonymous threatening letters on Continentals
Way before 3:14 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16.
Theft. A cellphone was stolen on Ralston
Avenue before 12:03 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16.
Major injury accident. A vehicle and a
pedestrian were involved in an accident on El
Camino Real and Davey Glen Road before
6:11 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15.
Reckless driver. A driver cut people off on
Ralston Avenue and El Camino Real before
4:24 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 15.
Theft. Two bicycles were stolen from a
garage on Carlmont Drive before 8:05 a.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 15.
FOSTER CITY
DUI. A person was arrested for driving while
intoxicated at a recreation center on Shell
Boulevard before 8:42 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.
13.
Hit-and-run. A parked car was hit on East
Hillsdale Boulevard before 3:21 p.m. on
Thursday, Dec. 13.
Accident. A vehicle accident occurred at a
library parking lot on East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 1:49 p.m. on Thursday, Dec.
13.
Police reports
That’s cold blooded
Two pet lizards were found at a home
after a home alarm went off on Adams
Street in Redwood before 9:19 a.m. on
Saturday, Dec. 15.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 48-year-old man sentenced to 13 years in
prison for kidnapping his wife at gunpoint
while out on bail for beating the woman with
a hammer at a South San Francisco motel is
facing a life sentence for assault charges in the
earlier case.
Raymond Bepland McCowan, of American
Canyon, was convicted in the subsequent
crime in San Francisco before San Mateo
County prosecutors could try him in the Feb.
8, 2010 motel incident. In October, a jury
deliberated 70 minutes before finding him
guilty of felony domestic violence, assault and
weapons use. He was also convicted of resist-
ing arrest.
On Wednesday, prosecutors were set to seek
25 years to life for
McCowan but he requested
a new defense attorney and
returns to court Jan. 11 on
a motion for new trial.
Although voters
changed the state’s Three
Strikes law in November,
McCowan still qualifies
because of his violent
record which includes
prison time for assault
with a deadly weapon and a conviction for
pimping and pandering.
In the new case, McCowan and his wife of
19 years were checking out of the La Quinta
Inn in South San Francisco when two employ-
ees reported seeing him hit her repeatedly
with a hammer or crowbar inside their car.
Police responding to the 911 call for help
stopped the couple and their young son as they
were driving out of the parking lot and report-
ed McCowan was uncooperative and the
woman denied being assaulted. Police report-
ed finding two knives and a hammer in the dri-
ver’s area of the car and several circular marks
matching the hammer pattern on the woman’s
legs.
At the preliminary hearing the woman testi-
fied the injuries came from slipping on ice the
previous night.
McCowan posted bail in the case and after,
attacked his wife in San Francisco, kidnap-
ping her at gunpoint and holding her hostage
until arrested by SWAT officers.
He is currently in custody on $150,000 bail.
Husband facing third strike for attack on wife
Raymond
McCowan
T
he San
Mateo City
Fire Fighters
are in the midst of its
annual Tots for Tots
program by manning
their toy collection
booth at the Hillsdale
Shopping Center.
Off-duty San Mateo
firefighters along
with firefighters,
cadets and explorers from other fire agencies
in San Mateo County will collect toys and
donations for needy families starting through
Dec. 23.
The San Mateo City Fire Fighters’ Toys for
Tots program was established in 1973 and has
donated toys to thousands of children over the
years. For more information visit www.toys-
fortots.org and www.smffa.net.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California’s 848-
square-mile marine reserve, the largest net-
work of undersea sanctuaries in the continen-
tal United States, was officially completed
Wednesday with the opening of the last link of
protected areas off the state’s far north coast.
California’s patchwork of marine protected
areas now stretches from the Oregon state line
to the Mexican border and encompasses 16
percent of state waters. Nine percent is off-
limits to fishing.
State Fish and Game Commissioner
Michael Sutton said the 1999 Marine Life
Protection Act directed the agency to establish
the network of protected waters.
Modeled after strategies used on land, it sets
up parks and refuges to conserve wildlife and
help depleted fish stocks rebound.
“If you protect wildlife habitat and you
don’t kill too many, wildlife tends to do well,”
Sutton said. “We’ve done that on land with the
waterfowl population. Now, we’ve done it in
the ocean for fish.”
The network’s final segment, a 137-square-
mile protected zone, was part of a deal
reached among Native American tribes, con-
servation groups and fishermen to preserve
tribal traditions while protecting marine life.
California’s ocean conservation efforts join
those of other states and countries, where the
efforts have paid off. The Phoenix Islands,
Northern Mariana Island and Northwestern
Hawaiian Islands all have established similar
protected areas.
Not everyone was happy about the idea in
California, most of all fishermen.
During public meetings throughout the
state, fishermen protested and argued that
closing fishing was not the right remedy and
that pollution from coastal development and
urban runoff were more to blame for declining
fish stocks.
State completes network
of undersea sanctuaries
4
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
31st Union
5A Rent a Space
A.C. Seigart Construction
A&A Legal Services
A+ Day Spa
AAA Travel Redwood City
Aarco
Accent Homes
ACME Home Elevator
Acupressure Health Center
Addus Healthcare
Adecco
Ah Sam Florist
Aladdin Hauling
Alain Pinel
Albayk Restaurant
Aldo’s Pizza
All About Business Services
All Brands Vacuum
All Home Pros
Alliance Chiropractic
AM/PM Hauling
American Bull
American Roof Systems
Amerprise Financial
Andy Frain Services
Angel Spa
Anna Liviz, DDS,
Applewood Pizza
Arms To Hold Homecaregivers
Arya Restaurant
Astound Broadband
Asurion Mobile Applications
At Home With Care
AT&T Relay Services
Attic Restaurant
Aunt Ann’s Home Care
Auto Medics
Autostar
Avanti Pizza
AVID Translation
Aya Sushi
B St. Martial Arts
Bach Dancing & Dynamite
Backblaze
Barrett Insurance Services
Bay Area Laser Therapy
Bay Area Relocation Services
Bay City Medical Supplies
Bay Ink Screen
Bay Laurel Law Group
Bayshore Bridge Club
Bayview Villa
Baywood Insurance
Services LLC
Beauty Garden Landscaping
Bedroom Express
Belmont Construction
Belmont Iceland
Best Buy Cabinets
Better Homes & Garden
Blanca’s Cleaning
Blend Marketing
Blue Rock Dental
Books Inc
Boomerang Pet Express
BPO Elks 112- San Mateo
Bradley Construction
Enterprise
Bradley Parker, DDS
Brady Construction
and Roofng
Branson Bay
Breathe California
Bridge Point at Los Altos
Brightstar Care
Brisbane Marina
Broadway by the Bay
Broadway Grill
Bronstein Music
Brookdale Senior Living
Brothers Home
Improvement, Inc
Burlingame Aquatic Club
Burlingame LTC
Burlingame Motors
Burlingame Optical
Burlingame School District
Bustamante Enterprise
Buy Sell Loan
C2 Education
Cabinet World
Cafe Tradition
Cafe Sapore
California Bank and Trust
California Foreclosure
Assistance
California Hoarding
Remediation
California Telephone Access
California Water Service Co.
California World Guitar Shows
Calvary Cross Church
Calvary Preschool
Canyon Inn
CASA of San Mateo County
Catania Regency Apartments
CBUS, Inc.
CCHT
Cedar Creek Alzheimers
& Dementia
Celandine Day Spa
Central Peninsula Church
Century 21 Realty Alliance
Chalet Home Services
Chalet Ticino
Channing House
Chapel of the Highlands
Children’s Creative
Learning Center
Church of Christ
Cimino Care
Cindy’s Flowers
Cinnabar Home
Cision
City Electric
City of Burlingame
City of Foster City
City of Half Moon Bay
City of Millbrae
City of San Bruno
City of San Mateo
City of San Mateo Parks & Rec
Claire Mack
Clary Funeral Home
Clean Machine Carwash
Clear Path Education
Clooney’s Pub
Cloverleaf Care Inc.
COIT Carpet Cleaning
Coldwell Banker
College of San Mateo
Colma Cremation & Funeral
Comcast
Community Education
Community Gatepath
Congregational Church
of Belmont
Congregational Church of SM
Contreras Handyman
Cornerstone Home Design
Cornerstone Law Group
Costa’s / Just Things
Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy
County of San Mateo
County of San Mateo
Environmental Health
Craig Ichiuji, State Farm
Craig’s Painting
Create It Ceramics
Crippen & Flynn
Crosby & Gray Funeral Home
Crossroads Health
Crossroads of the
West Gun Show
Crowne Plaza Foster City
Crunch Fitness
Crystal Cleaning Center
Crystal Wave Spa
Cubia’s Tile
Cypress Lawn
David Jurick Construction
David’s Tea
Davies Appliance
Dean Distributors
Dedomenico William
Delevan Electric
Delizie
Destination Science
DHA Woodfooring
Dignity Health
Divine Home Care
Divino Restaurant
Divorce Centers
DLC Construction
Dojo USA
Dolma Tibetan Carpets
Doody Calls
Dorothy A. Larson, Ph.D.
Downtown San Mateo
Association
Dr. Sidney Marchasin
Duggan’s Serra Mortuary
E. L. Short
E.A. Concrete
East West Bank
EBI Consulting
Econodoormasters
Edible Arrangements
Edward Jones Investments
El Camino Hospital
Elder Care Network
Elements Theraputic Massage
Elite Volleyball Club
Embassy Suites
Emerald Hills Golf Course
Energy House
Episcopal Church of
St. Matthews
Esposto’s
Esthela’s House Cleaning
Eurotech Complete Auto Care
Exit Excel Realty
Exploramed Development
Family Travel
Fidelity National Title
Fifty Plus Boot Camp
Filice Insurance
Fino Fino
First Investors
First Peninsula Accounting
First Person Fitness
Fish Market Restaurant
Fisher Gardening & Landscape
Flamingo Flooring
Flat Rate Plumbing & Drain
Flawless, Inc.
Flores Handyman
Fly Bay Area.com
Fog City Optical
Forrest Faulknor & Sons
Foster City Chamber
of Commerce
Foster City Preschool
Four Seasons Foot Spa
Fresh Takes
Fusion Peruvian Grill
Gadzo Law Firm
Gala Maids, Inc.
Galligan and Biscay
Garden Club
Gary’s Housecleaning Service
Genworth Financial
Geofrey’s Diamonds
Glimmer Inc.
Global English
Golden West Painting
Goldenwest Diamond
Corporation
Good Deal Auto Sale
Goodwill Industries
Gordon Associates Insurance
Gough Insurance Agency
Grace Bible Church
Grace Church of the Bay Area
Grand National Rodeo
Graniterock
Growth Coach
Guitar Center
Gunter’s Restaurant
Habitat for Humanity SF
Hairspies
Hamilton Relay
Hanhan Dental
Hannig Law Firm LLP
Happy Feet Massage
Happy Science Buddhist Church
Harwood, New York Life
Healing Massage
Health Plan of San Mateo
Heidi’s Pies
Helping Hands Home Care
Hertz Car Sales
HICAP of San Mateo
Higa & Gipson
Highlands Christian Schools
Hiller Aviation Museum
Hillsdale Car Care
Hillsdale Transmission
Hillsdale United
Methodist Church
Hilton San Francisco Airport
HIP Housing
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery
Holy Cross Church
Home Care Assistance
Home Helpers of
San Mateo County
Home Instead Senior Care
Home Safety Services
Home Sweet Home Care
Hope Evangelical
Lutheran Church
Hotel Softel
House of Bagels San Mateo
Howard Garey, Esq.
HR Ventures
Human Services
Agency of San Mateo
Husher Construction
IBEW Local 617
ICF INTERNATIONAL
ID Tech Camps
IHSD
Immediate Care
Inner Awakening
Healing Center
Innovation Advertising
Institute on Aging
Irish Help at Home
Irongate
Israel Longhorn Project
Itosca Properties
J & K Construction
J Bliss Low Vision Systems
J. B. Bell Business
and Investment
J.B. Gardening Service
J.W. Construction Repair
Jack’s Restaurant
Jackson and Hertogs
Jackson Square Fine Jewels
Jake Bursalyan, State Farm
Janet R. Steele, LMFT
Javaddictions
Jewish Family &
Children Services
JK Plastering
John Kulacz Construction
Jon La Motte Painting
Jones Hall
Jose’s Complete Gardening
Junipero Serra High School
Just Between Friends
JZ Tile
K-119 Tools
Karp Property Management
Kaufmann’s Cameras
Kay’s Health & Beauty
Kehan Li DDS, INC.
Kelly Moore Paints
Kern Jewelers
Key Services
Kingston Cafe
Ko-Am Flooring
Kumon of Foster City
Kupfer Jewelry
L. L. Brown Jewelry
Lacewell Realty
Larose Group
Latitude Inc.
Laurelwood Veterinary Clinic
Law Ofce of Camiel Becker
Law Ofce of Jason Honaker
Law Ofce of Judy Tsai
Law Ofces of Brian Irion
Law Ofces of C.R. Abrams
Law Ofces of Galine,
Frye & Fitting
Law Ofces of Todd P. Emanuel
LB Steak
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
League of Women Voters
South San Mateo
Legal Documents Plus
Legal Shield
Lemus Painting
Len Privitera Insurance Agency
Les Petit Chefs
Liberty Bank
Lindamood-Bell
Learning Process
Liv Home
Lone Oak Lodge
Los Gatos Meadows
Lovering Insurance
Luv2Stitch
Lytton Health Care Center
Magis Care
Magnolia of Millbrae
Manor Association Inc.
Marina Plaza
Marsh Fence & Deck Co.
Marymount Greenhills
Massage Envy
Matched Caregivers
Mayers Jewelers
MB Garage
McGuire Real Estate
Medallion Steakhouse
Melanie Erceg, PHD
Mena’s Cleaning Services
Mendoza Charles
Menlo Designer Rugs
Menlo Park
Presbyterian Church
Mercedes-Benz Repair
Mercy High School
Michael Baker Jr.
Michael Hair Salon
Michaels Jewelry
Mid Peninsula Animal Hospital
Mid-Peninsula High School
Millbrae Chamber of Commerce
Millbrae Dental Care
Millbrae Jewelers
Millbrae School District
Mills/PAMF
Minuteman Press
Miracle-Ear Hearing Aid Center
Miramar Events
Mission Hospice
Mobile Gourmet
Molloy’s Tavern
Mona’s Hair Design
Mondi Hair Salon
Monney Car Audio
Morales Fence & Deck
Moser and Associates
Mr. Pizza Man
Mr. Z’s Stamp Shop
MTK Communications
MTP Painting
Musich Family
Mythos Restaurant
Nancy Goldcamp,
Coldwell Banker
Nancy’s Tailoring & Boutique
Napa Valley Wine Train
Neal’s Cofee Shop
Neptune Society of
Northern California
Neurolink Chiropractic
New England Lobster Co.
New York Life
No 9 Footspa
Nor Cal Mobility
Nordic Motors
Nordic Tree Service
North Fence Co.
Nothing Bundt Cakes
Notre Dame High School
Notre Dame
de Namur University
Nouvelle College Funding
Novelles Development
Numis International
O.K.’s Raingutter
O’Dowd Estates
O’Neill’s Irish Pub
Ogami Allison
Olsen Nolte Saddle Shop
Ombudsman Services of SMC
On Track Automotive
Operating Engineers, Local 3
Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
Orthoworks
Osteria Coppa
P G & E
Pacifc Coast Farmers’ Market
Pacifc Fine Arts
Pacifc Foot Care
Pacifc Retirement Services
Pacifc West Builders
Palm Avenue Motors, Inc.
Palo Alto Commons
Parent & Teen Coaching
& Counseling
Pariclin
Patelco Credit Union
Paul Lam
Paye’s Place
Payless Handyman Service
Peninsula Associates
Peninsula Ballet Theatre
Peninsula Celebration Assoc.
Peninsula Congestion Relief
Peninsula Family Services
Peninsula Family YMCA
Peninsula Hauling
& Demolition
Peninsula Health Care District
Peninsula Humane Society
Peninsula Law Group
Peninsula Sexual Health
Peninsula Stroke Association
Peninsula Volunteers
Peninsula YMCA
Pentagon Apartments
Perfect Me by Laser
Phase 2 Careers
Pilgrim Baptist Church
Play & Learn
Polly Klaas Foundation
Poly-Am Construction
Poplar Creek Grill
Port of Redwood City
Power Media Group Inc.
Premier Chiropractic Clinic
Premysis
Primepay Inc.
Private Practice Doctors
of the Peninsula
Pro Camps Worldwide
Professional Healthcare
at Home
Provident Credit Union
Prudential California Realty
Quality Coachworks
Quality Gardening
Ralph’s Vacuum &
Sewing Center
RDS Home Repairs
Rebarts Interiors
Rebuilding Together Peninsula
Recology San Mateo County
Red Crawfsh
Redwood Chapel
Redwood Church
Redwood City School District
Redwood General Tire Pros
Redwood Villa
Reese Law Group
Renaissance
Entrepreneurship Center
Reviv Medical Spa
Reyscapes, INC
Rib Shack
Richard Hokamp & Sons
Rigo Tinoco Landscaping
Risecon
Rissho Kosei-kai
RM Barrows Advertising
Robbie Geonzon
Roger Dewes, Coldwell Banker
Romolo’s
Rosener House Adult
Day Services
Round Table Pizza
Rudolph’s Interiors
Rusty Barn Promotion Group
Sage Elder Care
Sakura Restaurant
Samaritan House
Safe Harbor Shelter
Samir Nanjapa, DDS
San Bruno Park School District
San Carlos Auto Service
San Carlos Chamber
of Commerce
San Carlos Childrens Theatre
San Carlos Elms
San Mateo Athletic Club
San Mateo Buddhist Temple
San Mateo Area Chamber
of Commerce
San Mateo County Event Center
San Mateo County Ofce
of Education
San Mateo County
Parks Foundation
San Mateo County
Transit District
San Mateo Credit Union
San Mateo Garden Center
San Mateo Housing Authority
San Mateo Police
Ofcers’ Association
Satellite Healthcare
SBWMA/RethinkWaste
SDI Insulation
Second Harvest Food Bank
Security One Lending
Segue Construction, Inc
Senior Companions at Home
Senior Handyman
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
Sequoia Hospital
Sequoia Union High School
Silicon Valley Auction Service
Silverado Senior Living
Sisters of Mercy
SkyIMD Inc.
Skylawn Memorial Park
Slawinski Inc.
SMCOE Regional
Occupational Program
Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell
Sonia’s Apparel
Sonic.Net
Sons in Retirement (SIR’s)
South Harbor Restaurant
Specifc Chiropractic Center
Spine Fine Chiropractic
Sportshouse
St. Andrews Episcopal
St. James Assoc.
St. James Gate
State Farm Insurance
Steelhead Brewery
Sterling Court
Stifel, Nicolaus & Co.
Stride Away Farm
Stryker Orthopedics
Sundance Flying Club
Sunfower Massage
Sunshine Cafe
Superior Building Maintenance
Sutter Health
Sutton Motors
Takahashi Market
Tandoc Law
Tax-Aid
Ted’s Village Pharmacy
Telesensory
The Children’s Shoppe
The Debt-Free Spending Plan
The Melting Pot
The Spectrum Magazine
Thrift Shop of Episcopal Church
of St. Matthew
Town & Country Real Estate
Town & Country Resources
Town of Dumpling
Tpumps
Tranquil Massage
Travel Inn San Carlos
Trilogy Financial Services
Trouve Media
Turn Key Show Productions
UCSF
Uncle Chen Restaurant
Unexpected Treasures
United American Bank
United Health Care
United Studios of Self Defense
V & G Window Cleaning
Valerie De Leon DDS
Vanguard Properties
Vault 164
Veracom Ford
Wachter Investments
Waddell & Reed
Waldum Polly
Wallbeds ‘n More
Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo Advisors
Wemorph, Inc.
Westborough Royale
Western Exhibitors, Inc.
Whipple Ave Pet Hospital
Will Chen Acupuncture
Williams & Williams
Willoughby, Stuart & Bening
Windsor Auction House
Wise Commerce
Wittwer Chiropractic Center
Work At Home Business Expo
Workforce Development of
San Mateo County
World Class Shows
Worldwide Chiropractic
Yess! Tutoring
YMCA of San Francisco
Your Technology Support
Zypline
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5
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
By David Klepper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWTOWN, Conn. — One by
one by one by one, each with fresh
heartbreak, hearses crisscrossed two
New England towns on Wednesday,
bearing three tiny victims of the
Sandy Hook school massacre and a
heroic teacher in a seemingly never-
ending series of funeral proces-
sions.
“The first few days, all you heard
were helicopters,” said Dr. Joseph
Young, an optometrist who attended
one funeral and would go to several
more. “Now at my office all I hear is
the rumble of motorcycle escorts
and funeral processions going back
and forth throughout the day.”
As more victims from the slaugh-
ter of 20 children and six adults
were laid to rest, long funeral pro-
cessions clogged the streets of
Newtown, where Christmas trees
were turned into memorials and a
season that should be a time of joy
was marked by heart-wrenching
loss.
At least nine funerals and wakes
were held Wednesday for those who
died when gunman Adam Lanza,
armed with a military-style assault
rifle, broke into the school last
Friday and opened fire on their
classrooms. Lanza also killed his
mother at her home before commit-
ting suicide.
At St. Rose of Lima Catholic
Church, mourners arrived for
Caroline Previdi, an auburn-haired
6-year-old with an impish smile,
before the service had even ended
for Daniel Barden, a 7-year-old who
dreamed of being a firefighter.
“It’s sad to see the little coffins,”
said the Rev. John Inserra, a
Catholic priest who worked at St.
Rose for years before transferring to
a church in Greenwich. He returned
to his old parish to comfort families
wondering how a loving God could
permit such carnage, and has
attended several of the funerals.
“It’s always hard to bury a child,”
Inserra said of the unrelenting cycle
of sorrow and loss. “God didn’t do
this. God didn’t allow this. We
allowed it. He said, ‘send the little
children to me.’ But he didn’t mean
it this way.”
Hundreds of firefighters formed a
long blue line outside the church for
little Daniel’s funeral. Two of his
relatives work at the Fire
Department of New York, and the
gap-toothed redhead had wanted to
join their ranks one day.
“If me being here helps this fami-
ly or this community just a little bit,
it’s worth it,” said Kevin Morrow, a
New York firefighter and father of
two young girls. “He wanted to be a
firefighter, as any young boy wants
to be.”
Family friend Laura Stamberg of
New Paltz, N.Y., whose husband
plays in a band with Daniel’s father,
said that on the morning of the
shooting Mark Barden taught his
son to play a Christmas song on the
piano.
“They played foosball and then
he taught him the song and then he
walked him to the bus and that was
their last morning together,”
Stamberg said.
At Caroline’s funeral, mourners
wore pink ties and scarves — her
favorite color — and remembered
her as a Yankees fan who liked to
kid around. “Silly Caroline” was
how she was known to neighbor
Karen Dryer. “She’s just a girl that
was always smiling, always wanting
others to smile.”
Shattered Newtown buries its dead
REUTERS
Mourners hold hands as they walk toward a viewing honoring school principal Dawn Hochsprung, a victim in
the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, in Woodbury, Conn.
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — In the days
since the massacre at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Newtown,
Conn., a shell-shocked nation has
looked for reasons. The list of cul-
prits cited include easy access to
guns, a strained mental-health sys-
tem and the “culture of violence” —
the entertainment industry’s embrace
of violence in movies, TV shows
and, especially, video games.
“The violence in the entertainment
culture — particularly, with the
extraordinary realism to video
games, movies now, et cetera —
does cause vulnerable young men to
be more violent,” Sen. Joe
Lieberman, I-Conn., said.
“There might well be some direct
connection between people who have
some mental instability and when
they go over the edge — they trans-
port themselves, they become part of
one of those video games,” said Gov.
John Hickenlooper of Colorado,
where 12 people were killed in a
movie theater shooting in July.
White House adviser David
Axelrod tweeted, “But shouldn’t we
also quit marketing murder as a
game?”
And Donald Trump weighed in,
tweeting, “Video game violence &
glorification must be stopped — it is
creating monsters!”
There have been unconfirmed
media reports that 20-year-old
Newtown shooter Adam Lanza
enjoyed a range of video games,
from the bloody “Call of Duty”
series to the innocuous “Dance
Dance Revolution.” But the same
could be said for about 80 percent of
Americans in Lanza’s age group,
according to the Pew Internet and
American Life Project. Law enforce-
ment officials haven’t made any con-
nection between Lanza’s possible
motives and his interest in games.
The video game industry has been
mostly silent since Friday’s attack, in
which 20 children and six adults
were killed. The Entertainment
Software Association, which repre-
sents game publishers in
Washington, has yet to respond to
politicians’ criticisms. Hal Halpin,
president of the nonprofit
Entertainment Consumers
Association, said, “I’d simply and
respectfully point to the lack of evi-
dence to support any causal link.”
It’s unlikely that lawmakers will
pursue legislation to regulate the
sales of video games; such efforts
were rejected again and again in a
series of court cases over the last
decade. Indeed, the industry seemed
to have moved beyond the entire
issue last year, when the Supreme
Court revoked a California law crim-
inalizing the sale of violent games to
minors.
Shooting renews argument over video game violence
California picks retiree
to head prisons system
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown on Wednesday appointed a
retired corrections chief from
Pennsylvania to head California’s
prison system as it transitions to a
smaller institution with a higher
concentration of violent felons.
The Democratic governor named
Jeffrey Beard, 65, as secretary of the
California Department of
Corrections and Rehabilitation.
Beard oversaw a much smaller
department as corrections secretary
in Pennsylvania from 2001 until he
retired in 2010, serving under both
Republican and Democratic gover-
nors.
Around the state
6
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Burlingame teen stabbed
A 16-year-old Burlingame resident was stabbed multiple
times early Monday morning in what is being investigated as
gang related, according to police.
The boy was walking on the 500 block of El Camino Real
at about 12:50 a.m. Monday when he spotted a car with two
men inside following him.
One of the suspects hopped out of the car and started to
chase the teen as the other suspect followed in the vehicle,
according to police.
Eventually both suspects chased the victim on foot and
stabbed him multiple times with a sharp object, twice in the
arm and once in the back, according to police.
The victim was transported to a local hospital and released
with minor injuries, according to police.
Police said the victim, however, was uncooperative and has
a known gang affiliation out of San Mateo.
The suspects were described as Hispanic males in their 20s
driving a tan sedan, either a Toyota or Honda, according to
police.
Highway reopens after
shooting at government car
Authorities say a vehicle driven by a U.S. Marine was
apparently struck by gunfire.
Southbound lanes on Highway 85 in Cupertino near De
Anza Boulevard reopened around 3 p.m. Wednesday after
being shut down for about an hour.
Marine Sgt. Robert Durham said that a fellow sergeant was
traveling southbound on the highway when his government
vehicle was hit by bullets shortly after 12:30 p.m.
Durham said the sergeant pulled over to the side of the road
to call police.
Authorities closed part of the highway to investigate the
scene and search for suspects as the car’s window appeared to
be shot out.
The northbound lanes were not affected.
No injuries have been reported.
S.F. City College to lay off dozens of employees
The City College of San Francisco plans to lay off dozens
of employees and reduce salaries as it fights to keep its
accreditation and stay open.
School officials say City College will lay off 34 full-time
clerical workers, 20 to 30 part-time instructors and 18 part-
time counselors starting in January.
College trustees have also approved a 4.4 percent salary cut
for non-union employees, including most administrators, and
they are seeking the same cut for faculty members.
The community college also needs an additional 3,000 full-
and part-time students to register for the spring semester to
avoid losing $6.5 million in state funding.
City College is under pressure to reduce costs to retain its
accreditation from the regional Accreditation Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges.
San Jose water district adding fluoride to water
The nation’s largest city without fluoridated drinking water
will finally add tooth decay-fighting fluoride to its water, end-
ing years of debate over how San Jose should treat its tap
water.
Even so, residents of San Jose will only get a diluted
amount of fluoride in their water for the next two years,
because funding approved unanimously by the Santa Clara
Valley Water District on Tuesday will not cover the cost of
retrofitting all the wells necessary to provide the optimal level
of fluoride.
While San Francisco began fluoridating water in the 1950s,
the diversity of water sources and the complexity of San
Jose’s water system held up the process in California’s third-
largest city.
In recent years, critics of fluoridation have packed public
meetings arguing that the chemical isn’t safe, and that too
much fluoride can pit teeth, aggravate thyroid problems and
cause other ailments, all claims health officials refute.
Public health advocates see the move as a major advance
for residents.
Local briefs
By Anne D’innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — When it comes to fat
holiday discounts, better late than never.
This holiday shopping season, many
stores haven’t been offering the same
blockbuster deals as they did last year.
Instead, they’ve dangled offers of free
shipping and no-fee layaways to lure
shoppers.
But during the final weekend before
Christmas, shoppers should expect to
see more “70 percent off” and “buy one,
get one free” signs as stores try to sal-
vage a season that so far has been disap-
pointing.
Teen retailer Aeropostale Inc. has
slashed prices on everything in its stores
by 60 percent. Rival teen chain
American Eagle Outfitters is offering 40
percent off all purchases. Saks Fifth
Avenue is cutting prices on some design-
er clothing up to 60 percent. And
Children’s Place, a children’s clothing
chain, is offering up to 75 percent off on
its website.
The sales are aimed at luring shoppers
like Jennifer Romanello, who lives in
Rockville Centre, N.Y. Romanello, a
publicity consultant, is planning to
spend $400 less on holiday gifts this sea-
son as she spent a year ago. She said
she’ll be looking for deep discounts
when she heads to stores this weekend.
“I just want to be cautious,” said
Romanello, 47, who has two chil-
dren, ages 12 and 15. “If it’s a great
deal, I will consider.”
The price slashing may be good news
for shoppers, but it hurts stores. They’re
profits likely will suffer in their last-
ditch effort to boost sales during the
two-month holiday shopping period, a
time when they can make up to 40 per-
cent of their annual revenue.
Discounts abound as stores
try to salvage holiday season
REUTERS
During the final weekend before Christmas, shoppers should expect to see more
‘70 percent off’ and ‘buy one, get one free’ signs as stores try to salvage a season
that so far has been disappointing.
By Gene Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — The U.S. Army said
Wednesday it will seek the death penal-
ty against the soldier accused of killing
16 Afghan villagers in a predawn ram-
page in March, a decision his lawyer
called “totally irresponsible.”
The announcement followed a pretrial
hearing last month for Staff Sgt. Robert
Bales, 39, who faces premeditated mur-
der and other charges in the attack on
two villages in southern Afghanistan.
The slayings drew such angry protests
that the U.S. temporarily halted combat
operations in Afghanistan, and it was
three weeks before American investiga-
tors could reach the crime scenes.
Prosecutors said Bales left his remote
southern Afghanistan base early on
March 11, attacked
one village and
returned to the base,
then slipped away
again to attack anoth-
er nearby compound.
Of the 16 people
killed, nine were
children.
No date has been
set for Bales’ court
martial, which will be held at Joint Base
Lewis-McChord south of Seattle.
His civilian lawyer, John Henry
Browne, told the Associated Press he
met with Army officials last week to
argue his client shouldn’t face the possi-
bility of the death penalty, given that
Bales was serving his fourth deployment
in a war zone when the killings
occurred.
U.S. Army seeking death
penalty in Afghan killings
Snowstorm causing problems
from Rockies to Midwest
DENVER — A storm that has dumped
more than a foot of snow in the Rocky
Mountains was causing problems for
travelers as it spread across the Plains on
Wednesday.
The main east-west route across
Colorado, Interstate 70, was closed from
east of Denver to the Kansas line because
of poor visibility due to blowing snow.
Smaller highways were also closed in
eastern Colorado.
Drivers in Iowa and Nebraska are being
warned to be careful or stop driving alto-
gether starting Wednesday evening as the
Plains gets its first major winter storm of
the season.
Light snow is also expected at
Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport
on Thursday and strong winds could
make visibility poor. That, combined with
low clouds, could cause delays at the
nation’s second-busiest airport.
Around the nation
Robert Bales
NATION/WORLD 7
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Timing
BELT
Special
$199 +up
30K/60K/90K
Service
Mon-Fri 8am-5pm
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(650) 342-6342
635 South Claremont St. San Mateo, CA 94402
Belmont-Redwood Shores School District
NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARING
Please take notice that on Thursday, February 7,
2013, at 7 p.m. or as soon thereafter as can be
heard, at the Belmont-Redwood Shores School
District Board Room, 2960 Hallmark Drive,
Belmont, California, 94002, the District’s Board
of Trustees will conduct a public hearing. The
school board will consider adopting a resolution
proposing to renew and increase the District’s ex-
isting Measure G parcel tax and to renew and in-
crease its existing Measure U parcel tax each for
10 additional years to a combined level of $349
per parcel per annum (annual collections of ap-
proximately $4,240,000), maintaining an exemp-
tion for certain seniors and disabled persons from
both, to fund a variety of educational programs,
such as maintaining academic excellence by
continuing emphasis on math, science, reading,
writing, art, music, instructional technology, staff
development and maintaining qualified teachers
and instructional days.
Israel OK’s new homes
in West Bank, Jerusalem
JERUSALEM — Israel on
Wednesday pressed forward with
the construction of thousands of new
homes in the West Bank and east
Jerusalem, part of a series of new
settlement plans that have drawn
worldwide rebuke, including from
its closest ally, the United States.
Separate planning committees
gave approval Wednesday to a new
settlement in east Jerusalem, the first
to be built in the contested area since
1997, and construction of 1,000 new
homes in existing settlements across
the West Bank.
The announcements drew harsh
Palestinian condemnations and were
likely to heighten the already rising
tensions between Israel and its allies
in the West. The Palestinians claim
the West Bank and east Jerusalem,
captured by Israel in 1967, as parts
of a future state. The international
community opposes all Israeli settle-
ment in the two areas.
U.N. suspends polio drive
in Pakistan after killings
PESHAWAR, Pakistan — The
United Nations suspended its polio
vaccination drive in Pakistan on
Wednesday after eight people
involved in the effort were shot dead
in the past two days, a U.N. official
said.
The suspension was a grave blow
to the drive to bring an end to the
scourge of polio in Pakistan, one of
only three countries where the crip-
pling disease still survives.
On Wednesday, gunmen shot at a
woman working on the campaign in
northwest Pakistan, killing her and
her driver, one of five attacks during
the day on polio workers. A male
polio immunization worker was crit-
ically wounded in one of the shoot-
ings.
This week six other people have
been killed who were working on
the immunization program, which
has been jointly conducted with the
Pakistani government.
Around the world
By David Espo and Ben Feller
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Fiscal cliff
talks at a partisan standoff,
P r e s i d e n t
Barack Obama
and House
Speaker John
B o e h n e r
swapped barbed
political charges
on Wednesday
yet carefully left
room for further
negotiations on
an elusive deal to head off year-end
tax increases and spending cuts that
threaten the national economy.
Republicans should “peel off the
war paint” and take the deal he’s
offering, Obama said sharply at the
White House. He buttressed his
case by noting he had won re-elec-
tion with a call for higher taxes on
the wealthy, then added pointedly
that the nation aches for concilia-
tion, not a contest of ideologies,
after last week’s mass murder at a
Connecticut elementary school.
But he drew a quick retort from
Boehner when the White House
threatened to veto a fallback bill
drafted by House Republicans that
would prevent tax increases for all
but million-dollar earners. The
president will bear responsibility
for “the largest tax increase in his-
tory” if he makes good on that
threat, the Ohio Republican
declared.
In fact, it’s unlikely the legisla-
tion will get that far, as divided
government careens into the final
few days of a struggle that affects
the pocketbooks of millions and
blends lasting policy differences
with deep political mistrust.
Boehner expressed confidence
the Republicans’ narrow, so-called
Plan B bill would pass the House
on Thursday despite opposition
from some conservative, anti-tax
dissidents. The leadership worked
to shore up the measure’s chances
late in the day by setting a vote on
a companion bill to replace across-
the-board cuts in the Pentagon and
some domestic programs with tar-
geted reductions elsewhere in the
budget, an attempt to satisfy
defense-minded lawmakers.
With Christmas approaching,
Republicans also said they were
hopeful the tax measure could
quickly form the basis for a final
bipartisan “fiscal cliff” compromise
once it arrives in the Senate.
Democrats, in the majority in the
Senate, gave no indication of their
plans.
On paper, the two sides are rela-
tively close to an agreement on
major issues, each having offered
concessions in an intensive round
of talks that began late last week.
But political considerations are
substantial, particularly for
Republicans.
After two decades of resolutely
opposing any tax increases,
Boehner is seeking votes from fel-
low Republicans for legislation
that tacitly lets rates rise on mil-
lion-dollar income tax filers. The
measure would raise revenue by
slightly more than $300 billion
over a decade than if all of the
Bush-era tax cuts remained in
effect.
But Boehner’s office trumpeted
another figure — an estimate that
claimed it would amount to a tax
cut of nearly $4 trillion compared
with what would happen if all those
tax cuts were to expire as scheduled
with the turn of the year.
Obama and Boehner clash
as cliff edge grows closer
REUTERS
Barack Obama gestures as he speaks to the media about the ‘fiscal cliff’ in the White House Briefing Room in
Washington, D.C.
John Boehner
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
advertisement
Possible Hagel pick
raises concerns in Senate GOP
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama’s possible pick of Republican Chuck
Hagel to run the Pentagon raises serious con-
cerns among some of his former Senate col-
leagues, who question his pronouncements on
Iraq, Israel and the Middle East.
The reservations publicly expressed by a
few Republicans and even a Democrat hardly
rival the unyielding GOP objections to U.N.
Ambassador Susan Rice, who withdrew from
consideration last week for secretary of state
in the face of relentless attacks, mostly over
her public statements about the Sept. 11
assault on the U.S. diplo-
matic mission in
Benghazi, Libya.
But opposition was
growing among Senate
Republicans who held
their weekly, closed-door
meeting on Wednesday.
“When he served here,
he was willing to step on a
lot of toes and I think
some of those toes that he pinched are scream-
ing right now,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-
Mo. “But we’ll see how it goes along.
Around the nation
By Hyung-Jin Kim and Foster Klug
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, South Korea — Park Geun-hye,
daughter of a divisive military strongman
from South Korea’s authoritarian era, has
been elected the country’s first female presi-
dent, a landmark win that could mean a new
drive to start talks with rival North Korea.
After five years of high tension under
unpopular incumbent Lee Myung-bak (Lee
Myuhng Bahk), Park has vowed to pursue
engagement and step up aid to North Korea,
despite the latter’s widely condemned long-
range rocket launch last week.
On Thursday, Park mentioned the North
Korean rocket launch during a nationally tele-
vised speech.
“The North’s long-range missile launch
symbolically showed how grave our security
reality is,” Park said following a visit to
Seoul’s National Cemetery, where she paid
silent tributes to late presidents, including her
father.
North Korean state media, however, have
repeatedly questioned the sincerity of Park’s
North Korea engagement policy, since she
and Lee are from the same conservative party.
Ties between the Koreas plummeted during
Lee’s term. Many voters believe Lee’s poli-
cies drove North Korea to renew nuclear and
missile tests and to launch two attacks in 2010
that killed 50 Koreans.
The rocket launch, which Park’s party has
called a test of banned ballistic missile tech-
nology, made North Korea an issue in the
closing days of campaigning, although many
voters said they cared more about the econo-
my.
Park (Bahk guhn-hae) has said she is open
to dialogue with North Korea, but she has also
called on Pyongyang to show progress in
nuclear dismantlement. She has also raised
the possibility of a meeting with North
Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but only if it’s
“an honest dialogue on issues of mutual con-
cern.”
Huge crowds lined up in frigid weather
throughout the day to choose between Park
and liberal candidate Moon Jae-in (Moon Jay-
in), the son of North Korean refugees. Both
candidates steered away from Lee’s policies,
including, most strikingly, his hard-line
stance on North Korea.
Turnout was the highest in 15 years, and
some analysts thought that might lift Moon,
who is more popular with younger voters.
Despite moving to the center, however, Park
was carried by her conservative base of main-
ly older voters.
South Korea’s new leader vows renewed North Korean effort
REUTERS
South Korea’s presidential candidate Park Geun-Hye waves as she holds a bouquet of flowers
after arriving at the headquarters of the ruling Saenuri party in Seoul.
By Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Three State Department
officials resigned under pressure Wednesday,
less than a day after a damning report blamed
management failures for a lack of security at
the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi,
Libya, where militants killed the U.S. ambas-
sador and three other Americans on Sept. 11.
The resignations came as lawmakers
expressed anger and frustration over the find-
ings of an independent review panel, and the
State Department struggled to find a balance
between protecting its diplomats while allow-
ing them to do their jobs connecting with peo-
ple in high-risk posts.
Obama administration officials said those
who had stepped down were Eric Boswell, the
assistant secretary of state for diplomatic
security, Charlene Lamb, the deputy assistant
secretary responsible for embassy security,
and Raymond Maxwell, the deputy assistant
secretary of state who oversees the Maghreb
nations of Libya, Algeria, Tunisia and
Morocco. The officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because they weren’t authorized to
discuss personnel matters publicly.
Some of the three may have the option of
being reassigned to other duties, the officials
said.
The department declined immediate com-
ment on the resignation of the officials whose
decisions had been criticized in the unclassi-
fied version of the Accountability Review
Board’s report that was released late Tuesday.
The board’s co-chairman, retired Adm.
Mike Mullen, told reporters that the board had
not determined that any officials had “engaged
in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored
his or her responsibilities,”
But Mullen, a former Joint Chiefs of Staff
chairman, added, “We did conclude that cer-
tain State Department bureau level senior
officials in critical levels of authority and
responsibility in Washington demonstrated a
lack of leadership and management ability
appropriate for senior ranks in their respons-
es to security concerns posed by the special
mission.”
State Dept. security chief
resigning after Benghazi
Chuck Hagel
OPINION 9
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
By Rick Zobelein
A
nother shooting tragedy, this time
in Sandy Hook. Usually, it is gang
related, but now it is innocent chil-
dren. The press goes all out to cover the
details but in most all cases I have to ask,
“Where did they get the gun? Usually, there
is never an answer, but this time we know.
The guns Adam Lanza used were registered
to his mother, who seemed to spend time tar-
get shooting at a local range. Nothing wrong
here, but wait! She must have known about
her son’s mental condition. The schools
knew, the students knew, along with many
others. Why weren’t the guns locked up and
why did Adam Lanza have access to them?
Here in California, all handguns are sold
with locking devices (padlocks) which must
be used and all rifles sold are required to be
stored in a gun safe. In addition, there is a
10-day wait after purchase, and a written test
is required before a handgun is purchased.
This is the law. Lanza’s mother paid, with
her life, for not securing her guns. If she
were alive today, she would probably go to
jail.
On the topic of assault rifles, the state of
California will not allow the sale of any gun
with a magazine capacity of more than 10
rounds. As such, one can do as much damage
with a hand gun as you could with an assault
rifle. How many shootings in the Bay Area
are done with assault rifles versus handguns?
Very few. Drunk drivers kill more people
than assault rifles. Such rifles do have a pur-
pose in safe target shooting and competi-
tions. However, if you want one with a 30-
round magazine, join the Army or Marines
and go overseas to fight for our country.
Unfortunately, “the horse is out of the barn”
so to speak, and there are thousands of
assault rifles and large-capacity magazines
out there now. What to do? It is way too late
to make all the guns go away.
The National Rifle Association does serve
a purpose but in some ways it is “over the
top” in its gun rights religion. NRA members
are generally law-abiding citizens who
respect god, country, their community,
wildlife and the land. They fly the American
flag and hunt only what they can dress and
eat. Most live in small communities out in
the country and respect the right to own a
gun for hunting and protection. On the other
hand, the right to carry a gun in public
should be governed by the local authority,
which it currently is. In California, you must
have a permit to carry a gun. The NRA
would like to see everyone have the right to
carry a gun in public. This would be a major
disaster in highly populated areas where
there is the stress of close public interaction,
resulting in tension and anger that could
result in someone getting shot. Those who
have witnessed a shooting say that if they
had a gun, they could have stopped the crimi-
nal from doing more harm. There is some
truth here but what if the bullet you shoot
hits an innocent person? The end result is
that your life is over and not the criminal’s.
You go to court, you get jail time and the
victim and family sue for all your posses-
sions. Let the police deal with it (they get
administrative leave).
For many, all guns should be outlawed and
confiscated, but that is not reality, only a
wish. The government will have many issues
to deal with in controlling this situation.
Society has lost family values. Where are the
positive role models in this society? Why are
television and movies filled with violence?
Do violent video games promote the type of
personality that go on to invade schools and
malls to act out what they learn in a game?
In short, owning a gun is a right but only to
responsible individuals who secure them and
use them for hunting or competitive shooting.
It is up to the government to ensure these
guidelines are followed and weed out those
who do not fit such guidelines. Of course,
criminals will always get their guns regard-
less of the law since they write their own.
Rick Zobelein is a member of the National
Rifle Association and has interests in the histo-
ry of German hunting and sporting arms. He
is a 40-year resident of San Mateo.
Second Amendment
Editor,
Some of the letter writers arguing against
the ban of assault weapons because they fear
the government and need defense are fairly
laughable. Yeah right, if the government
wants to take you out, your rifle will slow up
the smart bombs, predator missiles, Abrams
tanks and fuel-air bombs. I forgot nuclear;
one of those will take out your block and the
next one over. Your assault rifle — well it
could help, I guess. It sure helped the world’s
most-wanted terrorist with a vast internation-
al network of support, millions and millions
in funds and the help of a nuclear-armed
country behind him. The guy’s name was
Osama bin Laden. Yup, that assault weapon
sure did keep him from harm’s way.
Don’t worry about that assault weapon.
Really, don’t worry. Nothing will happen in a
billion years. Ask Mrs. Lanza. Well, it’s a bit
late for that. She was a loving mother who
knew how to handle guns. Ask her neighbors.
John Dillon
San Bruno
The automatic assault
Editor,
Regarding his letter, “The Second
Amendment,” in the Dec. 18 edition of the
Daily Journal, Joseph Locasto believes that
the gun “keeps the tyrant or dictator at bay.” I
am sure there are some lunatic fringe people
out there who believe someone like Adolf
Hitler will take over the country. Then we as
citizens would band together and take to the
hills to defend ourselves with guns.
Also, the bitterness Locasto has toward me
is apparent in the language he uses against
me, and it all proves how insecure people
like him are about the views they hold them-
selves.
Patrick Field
Palo Alto
Our Second Amendment
Editor,
The Sandy Hook massacre should not
have happened and should never happen
anywhere or ever again. Twenty dead chil-
dren. Innocent beautiful children. I, like so
many others, simply cannot begin to wrap
my mind around such a vulgar display of
carnage. Disgusting. I could not hold back
my tears Friday morning. All I, we, can do
is pray for the families and those involved
in this, and all mass shootings, the most
horrific massacre imaginable.
These executions are becoming all too
familiar to our American way of life. There
is no reason, or excuse tolerable, it is not
OK. I am a former Marine, firearm owner
and gun enthusiast. Frankly, I do not have
any answer to this despicable epidemic.
What I do know is many men and women
have given their lives, often times in far
away lands, to protect our American Bill of
Rights.
Our Second Amendment, like all others,
is sacred to all of us as Americans. No
other country on earth can boast such
unalienable rights. It’s part of who we are
as a people. In a few weeks time, after we
have taken a collective deep breath, the
issue of firearm control should be up for
debate. We all know decisions that manifest
from emotion are foolhardy at best. Shame
on Feinstein and Yee for grandstanding
their agenda on the heels of tragedy.
Something should, and I’m sure will be
done on this issue. Do not punish the mass-
es for the action of a few. A firearm is not
more but a tool of recreation and defense in
the hands of the educated responsible
American. “From my cold, dead, hands,”
said Charlton Heston. N.R.A.
Andrew Stigge
Foster City
Guns in society
Nothing like
the present
L
ess than a week before Christmas and
still looking for the perfect gift for the
person who seems to have everything?
Tired of defaulting to Chia pets, I am T-Pain
microphones, the
ubiquitous Billy
Big Mouth Bass
and naming stars?
Never fear — the
Daily Journal elves
are here with a few
goodies your loved
ones probably
never will expect
under the tree and
tucked into stock-
ings with care (or at
least relief that the
shopping is done).
For the person who truly thinks they are the,
well let’s just say, thinks they are perfect, how
about a little something to really prove just how
golden they are? That’s right, for the rock bot-
tom price of $425 you can buy 24K gold leaf
capsules to, and this is a direct quote from the
sales site, “turn your innermost parts into cham-
bers of wealth.”
If the giftee prefers to wear their shimmer on
the outside, how about tanning lotion with real
flecks of gold — only $78 for the Xen-Tan
Absolute Gold Dark Suntan Lotion. Or, shell
out a bit more — five grand to be exact — and
pop some 24K gold nail polish into somebody’s
stocking. The bottle will fit perfectly inside their
$55,000 pill-covered purse designed by the
Olsen twins.
Before we go any further, rest assured one
does not need to break the bank to properly cel-
ebrate loved ones or keep up with the Joneses at
the company gift exchange. But why not?
Rumor has it the world is coming to an end
Dec. 21 so run up the credit cards! Take out a
loan to buy the $99,500 jet pack or $100,000
mini hen house from Neiman Marcus! Heck,
even shoplift — Earth is saying sayonara in
mere days so why not say Happy Holidays like
a true high roller? It’s not as if you’ll be around
to pay the bill or do a little sheriff’s work pro-
gram. Of course, you may also not be around
on actual Christmas to deliver these bundles of
joy. Better share early this year.
And, of course, one of the things you’ll want
to pretty up with a bow and gift label is a shiny
bauble from LifeGem. Everybody loves animals
and diamonds at Christmas. Why not put both
under the tree with a ring made from the cre-
mains of a beloved pet? Illinois-based LifeGem
says it has made more than 1,000 synthetic dia-
monds from animals ranging from cats and
dogs to horses and armadillos. Best part? You
don’t even need to brave the mall.
If perfume is more the recipient’s thing, avoid
the traditional Chanel No. 5 (blame it on the
laughable Brad Pitt commercial) and the trendy
name-dropping bottles. Sorry, Justin Bieber.
Neither the name “Girlfriend” or the space-age
packaging makes your entry into celebrity
smells appealing. Instead, opt for a scent that
almost nobody can resist: pizza. Seriously. Pizza
Hut is releasing a scent to its Facebook fans
promising “top notes of freshly baked, hand-
tossed dough.” Don’t dare call the gift cheesy.
If Japanese food is more your taste, there is a
sushi-scented cologne from perfumer Demeter
which describes it as a mix of “seaweed, ginger
and lemon.” Neither idea is original, surprising
as that might be. Burger King offered “Flame
by BK” in 2008 for those who couldn’t live
without a meat-flavored body spray. Perhaps the
company can reissue the cologne for the holi-
days although a Hickory Farms summer
sausage might be a more fitting scent.
If all else fails, go for the gift card. It’s boring,
it’s practical and it’s a safe bet. On the other
hand, if you’re looking to be memorable this
holiday season, don’t immediately brush aside
these humble ideas. Remember, it’s the thought
that counts.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of
this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com
Guest
perspective
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those
who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,251.97 -0.74% 10-Yr Bond 1.80 -1.48%
Nasdaq3,044.36 -0.33% Oil (per barrel) 89.42
S&P 500 1,435.81 -0.76% Gold 1,668.10
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stocks dipped Wednesday, recording
their first loss of the week. President
Barack Obama and Republicans in
Congress sniped at each other, and a
deadline to avoid sweeping tax increases
and government spending cuts drew clos-
er.
General Motors stock surged after the
government announced plans to sell its
ownership stake in the company.
The Dow Jones industrial average
closed down 98.99 points, or 0.7 percent,
at 13,251.97. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index dropped 10.98 points, or 0.8 per-
cent, to 1,435.81. The Nasdaq composite
index fell 10.17, or 0.3 percent, to
3,044.36.
Obama said that he and House Speaker
John Boehner were “pretty close” to a
deal to avoid the tax increases and spend-
ing cuts, a combination known as the “fis-
cal cliff.” The two sides have exchanged
proposals this week.
But the president also said that con-
gressional Republicans keep finding
“ways to say no as opposed to finding
ways to say yes.” He said the nation
deserves compromise in the aftermath of
the Connecticut school shooting.
Boehner, speaking to reporters for less
than a minute and in a defiant tone, called
on Obama to offer a deficit-cutting plan
balanced between spending cuts and tax
increases.
He predicted that the House would pass
his backup plan, which calls for extend-
ing decade-old tax cuts for Americans
making less than $1 million per year. The
White House has rejected that plan.
The S&P 500 index had gained more
than 2 percent over the previous two days
in part because of optimism about a deal
taking shape. The optimism seemed to
melt on Wednesday, and stocks finished
near their lows for the day.
GM soared $1.69, or 6.6 percent, to
$27.18 after the company said it would
spend $5.5 billion to buy 200 million
shares of its own stock back from the fed-
eral government.
The government pledged to sell the
other 300 million GM shares it owns on
the open market and shed its entire own-
ership stake in 12 to 15 months. The gov-
ernment got GM stock as part of a 2009
bailout.
U.S. builders broke ground on fewer
homes in November after starting work in
October at the fastest pace in four years.
Superstorm Sandy probably distorted the
totals in the Northeast.
The Commerce Department said
builders began construction of houses and
apartments at a seasonally adjusted annu-
al rate of 861,000.
First stock loss of week
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
General Motors Co., up $1.69 at $27.18
The automaker said it will spend $5.5 billion to
buy back 200 million shares from the Treasury
by the end of this year.
FedEx Corp., up 84 cents at $93.20
The package delivery company maintained its
earnings forecast for the full fiscal year on a
massive cost-cutting plan.
Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Inc., up 7
cents at $2.65
Lisa Gersh, CEO of the media and home goods
company, is stepping down after less than a
year on the job.
Nasdaq
Oracle Corp., up $1.21 at $34.09
The technology company said its fiscal second-
quarter earnings rose 18 percent as companies
spent more on software and other products.
Symmetricom Inc., down 41 cents at $5.59
The technology company lowered its fiscal
second-quarter forecast as government and
communications service providers’ spending
fell.
Francesca’s Holdings Corp.,up 33 cents at $27.11
A KeyBanc Capital Markets analyst reiterated
his “Buy”rating on the women’s retailer’s stock
and put it on his “Best Picks”list.
Monro Muffler Brake Inc.,up 86 cents at $34.24
A Stifel Nicolaus anlayst initiated shares of the
car-repair shop operator with a “Buy” rating,
citing the company’s growth potential.
Idera Pharmaceuticals Inc., up 15 cents at 92
cents
The drug developer said it got positive results
in a study of a treatment for psoriasis,a disorder
that affects skin and joints.
Big movers
By John Heilprin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA — Swiss bank UBS agreed
Wednesday to pay $1.5 billion in fines for
trying to manipulate a key interest rate
that affects borrowers around the world.
The settlement with U.S., British and
Swiss regulators caps a tough year for the
company and the reputation of the global
banking industry. The fine on UBS, which
will also see two former traders charged
with conspiracy, is triple the amount that
British bank Barclays PLC agreed to pay
in June to settle similar charges.
And it comes a week after HSBC
agreed to pay nearly $2 billion to settle
allegations of laundering money for
Mexican drug cartels and countries under
U.S. embargoes, such as Iran.
UBS, Switzerland’s largest bank, said
some of its employees tried to rig the
LIBOR rate — short for London
Interbank Offered Rate — in several cur-
rencies. The rate is set daily using infor-
mation that banks provide and is used to
price trillions of dollars in contracts
around the world, including mortgages
and credit cards.
Some UBS traders voluntarily submit-
ted — or pressured others to submit —
inaccurate data to gain some financial
advantage.
The bank’s Japan unit, where much of
the manipulation took place, entered a
plea to one count of wire fraud in an
agreement with the U.S. Justice
Department.
The Justice Department said two former
UBS senior traders, Tom Alexander
William Hayes, 33, of Britain, and Roger
Darin, 41, of Switzerland, will be charged
with conspiracy, while Hayes also will be
charged with wire fraud in New York fed-
eral court.
UBS to pay $1.5B over rate-rigging scandal
FedEx says it can grow by cutting costs
NEW YORK — FedEx may be pessimistic about the U.S.
economy, but it’s confident about growing its earnings.
The world’s second-largest package delivery company, a
bellwether for economic health because of the vast number
and kinds of shipments it handles, lowered its economic fore-
cast for the U.S., saying there remains a lot of uncertainty for
the country.
FedEx maintained its earnings forecast for the full fiscal
year ending in May, counting on a massive cost reduction
plan and a slightly more optimistic view of growth overseas.
Shares rose 84 cents to close at $93.20 Wednesday, even
though its forecast for the current quarter, which includes the
critical holiday season, falls short of Wall Street expectations.
U.S. housing starts slowed to 861K in November
WASHINGTON — U.S. builders broke ground on fewer
homes in November after starting work in October at the
fastest pace in four years. Superstorm Sandy likely slowed
starts in the Northeast.
The Commerce Department said Wednesday that builders
began construction of houses and apartments at a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 861,000. That was 3 percent less than
October’s annual rate of 888,000, the fastest since July 2008.
Still, the decline follows months of strong gains. Housing
starts remain on track for their best year in four years, and the
housing market overall appears to be sustaining its recovery.
Kodak sells digital imaging patents for $525M
ROCHESTER, N.Y. — Eastman Kodak is selling its digi-
tal imaging patents for about $525 million, money the strug-
gling photo pioneer says will help it emerge from bankrupt-
cy protection in the first half of next year.
Apple Inc., Google Inc., Samsung Electronics Co.,
Research In Motion Ltd., Microsoft Corp., China’s Huawei
Technologies, Facebook Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. are
among the 12 companies paying to license the 1,100 patents,
according to court filings. Patents have become very valuable
to digital device makers, who want to protect themselves
from intellectual property lawsuits.
Business briefs
<< Stanford women survive vs. South Carolina, page 12
• Shaw staying with Cardinal football, page 14
Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012
STILL A WANTED MAN: A KNEE INJURY DID NOT PREVENT CSM’S SIONE SINA FROM EARNING A DIVISION I SCHOLARSHIP >>> PAGE 13
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Lyman Faoliu (Washington State), Nate Jackson (Kansas State), Hoko Fanaika (LSU), Sione Sina (Cal) and Nick Maier (Missouri Southern)
signed their letters of intent to continue their football careers at four-year universities.
W
hen I first started covering the
College of San Mateo football
program back in the fall of 2001,
it was similar to the program I had recently
stopped covering, Chabot College in Hayward.
In many ways, the two schools were very simi-
lar: strong, solid programs but without a lot
fanfare.
Fast forward just more than a decade and
CSM is now a junior college powerhouse and
it’s paying off as far as moving players on to
the four-year level. While the stated goal of the
CSM staff is to move their players on to four-
year universities to eventually earn their col-
lege degrees, the football programs they were
attracting were not nec-
essarily household
names. In the early
2000s, CSM was happy
to have kids moving on
to play at much smaller,
less prestigious schools
like Humboldt State,
Eastern Washington or
North Carolina A&T,
with an occasional
player signing with a
Division I school.
Now, however, a
who’s who of college
football coaches now beat a path to the CSM
facilities. Recruiters from a lot of major
Division I college programs are now regularly
corresponding with CSM staff and players and
Bulldog Nation is scattering across the country.
Oregon, USC, Nebraska, Kansas State, BYU,
Texas Tech, LSU and Washington State are
just a few of the schools that have the phone
numbers of CSM coaches in their contact lists.
Take linebacker Sione Sina, a sophomore
from Monterey Trail High in Elk Grove —
who was coached by former CSM and San
Mateo High coach T.J. Ewing. Sina had offers
from 12 Division I universities, including near-
ly every Pac 12 school, BYU, Pitt, Texas
A&M and Texas Tech. Sina ended up signing
with Cal.
The transition to the upper echelon of col-
lege programs didn’t happen overnight. It’s
been a consistent buildup over the year and
coincides with the rise of the program. Back in
2001, the Bulldogs were playing in the Coast
Conference. Now, they are a fixture in the Nor
Cal Conference, arguably one of the toughest
conferences in the country. Competing against
a program like City College of San Francisco
A bull’s-eye
on Bulldogs
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
What’s there to do for fun in Missouri?
Southern Missouri to be exact?
Well, call Nick Maier in a couple of months and
he’ll be able to tell you.
The former Sequoia Cherokee and current
College of San Mateo offensive lineman was one
of five Bulldogs to sign commitment letters
Wednesday afternoon at CSM. Joining Maier
were Nate Jackson, Lyman Faoliu, Sione Sina and
Hoko Fanaika.
The first wave of JC signings also involved
Jerrell Brown, Eric Tuipulotu and CSM’s
Defensive Player of the Year Tevita Lataimua, for-
merly of Mills.
“They were the first school to show inter-
est,” Maier said of Missouri Southern. “And
my whole thing was, I wanted to be at my
four-year [university] in the spring and get
enrolled and get used to the system. So, as
soon as they put an offer on the table, I decid-
ed to go with it. That way I could focus on my
finals and get everything set up. Football is
what you make of it and school is the same
wherever you go, so I decided to choose
them.”
Jackson signed on to play for Kansas State
University. He played in all 11 games for the
Bulldogs this season, accounting for 28.5 tackles
and an interception.
“It gave me an opportunity to get my degree for
free,” Jackson, a former Terra Nova Tiger, said of
playing for the Wildcats. “They’re known for JC
recruits and I think that would fit me pretty good.
A lot of colleges don’t recruit JC or they get down-
graded and that’s a good thing I saw in K State.”
After committing to Louisiana State University
last spring, Fanaika put pen to paper on
Wednesday. Fanaika, the big offensive lineman,
leaves in January to attend orientation and begins
football prepartion the week after.
“It’s crazy,” Fanaika said. “I just can’t wait to
put some pads on and play.
“I came here (CSM) thinking I could get a
scholarship to Sac State, play ball where my fam-
ily could see me. And I guess I just took in all the
coaching and didn’t go through the motions any-
more. I’m glad I did. As you can see, LSU is bet-
ter than Sac State.”
After committing to Washington State last
week, Faoliu and his 32.5 tackles, made it official
on Wednesday, too.
CSM players moving on
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Vernon Davis had a
cross-country flight and an entire off day to
think about the touchdown that should have
been.
Colin Kaepernick overthrew the tight end
on a would-be 34-yard score during the first
quarter of Sunday’s 41-34 victory at New
England.
Davis acknowledges he is still getting used
to Kaepernick, who is 4-1 since becoming the
starter in place of Alex Smith and earned NFC
Offensive Player of the Week honors after the
upset of the Patriots.
“I get chills when I think about it,” Davis
said of the missed opportunities. “One thing I
learned in the beginning when I first got here,
everyone was talking about being on the same
page as the quarterback, as Alex Smith. You
have to develop that chemistry, that bond so
you can be on the same page. That’s some-
thing me and Kap don’t have right now. We
Davis, Kaepernick still
finding their rhythm
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Oakland Raiders running
back Mike Goodson is looking forward to play-
ing in Carolina for the first time since being
traded by the Panthers in the offseason.
He just doesn’t know what type of reception
to expect.
Goodson, who spent his first three NFL sea-
sons with Carolina, still owns property there
and routinely talks to some of his former team-
mates. Even Panthers coach Ron Rivera consid-
ers himself a fan of Goodson’s and speaks glow-
ingly about the 2009 fourth-round draft pick.
Make no mistake, however. While he remains
on friendly terms with his former club,
Goodson definitely wants to make a point to the
Panthers.
“It’s a pretty big deal,”
Goodson said Wednesday.
“That’s my old team and
where I used to be for so
long. (They) know me and
know of me. I want to beat
them just as bad as I want to
beat anybody else.”
While the scenery has
changed, Goodson’s role
has remained pretty much
the same in Oakland as it was in Carolina. He
has been the primary backup behind Darren
McFadden and has picked up additional reps
returning kickoffs.
McFadden has struggled adjusting to the zone
blocking schemes the Raiders use, but Goodson
has excelled in the few opportunities he has had.
Raiders Goodson looking
forward to facing Carolina
Mike Goodson
See RAIDERS, Page 13 See 49ERS, Page 14
Colin
Kaepernick
Vernon Davis
See LOUNGE, Page 14 See SIGNINGS, Page 13
“I came here (CSM) thinking I could get a scholarship to Sac State,
play ball where my family could see me. And I guess I just took
in all the coaching and didn’t go through the motions anymore.
I’m glad I did. As you can see, LSU is better than Sac State.”
— Hoko Fanaika
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Pete Iacobelli
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COLUMBIA, S.C. — Chiney Ogwumike
had 21 points and 15 rebounds, Mikaela Ruef
had a tiebreaking basket with 53 seconds left
and No. 1 Stanford held on to beat No. 21
South Carolina 53-49 on Wednesday night.
The Cardinal (10-0) came cross-country to
face the rising Gamecocks (10-1) and found
themselves in a tough matchup. The game
was tied at 45-all with 1:14 to go after
Aleighsa Welch’s foul shot. That’s when Ruef
drove left and put up a shot that barely caught
the rim and fell in for the lead.
South Carolina had a chance to tie on its
next possession, but Ieasia Walker made just
one of two foul shots. Walker’s 3-pointer with
3 seconds left pulled the Gamecocks to 51-49
but that was as close as things got
Tami Kokenis had 15 points for Stanford,
including six foul shots in the final minute to
keep control.
Amber Orragne scored 11 points and Joslyn
Tinkle had seven blocks for Stanford.
Welch had 17 points to lead the
Gamecocks, who fell to 0-9 all-time against
No. 1 opponents. Not that South Carolina
made it easy on the Cardinal, who shot just 40
percent and committed a season high 18
turnovers.
Stanford opened 10-0 for the third time in
school history and for the first time since
1991-92.
It was a matchup of coaching friends Tara
VanDerveer of Stanford and Dawn Staley of
South Carolina. Staley credits VanDerveer
with teaching her to be a student of the game
when Stanford’s coach was leader — and
Staley the star point guard — of the gold-
medal winning U.S. team at the 1996 Atlanta
Olympics.
VanDerveer’s gotten the better of things
since Staley arrived at South Carolina five
seasons ago, winning all three previous games
including a 76-60 decision in the NCAA tour-
nament’s round of 16 last March.
Stanford started its final pre-Pac 12
Conference stretch with a cross-country trek
to take on Southeastern Conference oppo-
nents in South Carolina and No. 10 Tennessee
in Knoxville on Saturday.
After that is the Cardinal’s showdown with
No. 2 Connecticut on Dec. 29 before opening
league play.
The Gamecocks didn’t make it easy on
Stanford. In front of a large, boisterous crowd
at Colonial Life Arena, South Carolina’s
defense dug in against its top-ranked oppo-
nent.
Stanford had scoring droughts of four and
five minutes in the opening half and commit-
ted 11 turnovers, nearly matching their 11.9
average per game this season in the first 20
minutes.
But Stanford kept control because of its
height — it featured seven players 6-foot-2 or
taller to just two for South Carolina — under
the boards. The Cardinal outrebounded South
Carolina 26-14 and put up seven blocks, six
by Tinkle, in the opening half.
The Gamecocks shot 8 of 33 (24.2 percent)
from the field, struggling to get clean looks
against among Stanford’s sea of long, waving
defensive arms.
Ogwumike had a bucket and two foul shots
and Orrange a driving layup just before the
buzzer to take a 24-19 halftime lead. Still, it
was the team’s lowest scoring half of the sea-
son.
No. 1 Stanford women slip past No. 21 South Carolina
RB Richardson thinks
Saban will stay at Alabama
BEREA, Ohio — Trent Richardson would
be surprised if Nick Saban followed him from
Alabama to the Cleveland Browns.
Saban, who will lead the Crimson Tide
against Notre Dame in the BCS national
championship game in Miami on Jan. 7, has
been mentioned as returning to the NFL, per-
haps with the Browns if second-year coach Pat
Shurmur is fired at season’s end.
“I can’t see him coming to the NFL,”
Richardson said Wednesday. “I would be very
shocked.”
And Richardson knows the coach quite
well. After all, he was a standout running back
for Saban at Alabama before being selected in
the first round by Cleveland in April.
Richardson ran for 1,679 yards last season for
the Crimson Tide.
“How can you get tired of winning,”
Richardson asked. “He’s got so much going
there. He has no reason to leave. He gets what
he needs and he treats his program like the
NFL (anyway). He makes sure his players are
prepared for the game and prepared for the
next level when the time comes.”
Any exit to the NFL wouldn’t be foreign to
Saban, who led Alabama to national titles in
2009 and 2011. He left his post at LSU, in
fact, to become coach of the Miami Dolphins
in 2005. After going 15-17 in two seasons
there, he went back to the SEC, this time in
Tuscaloosa, Ala.
“I can see him staying at Alabama,”
Richardson said, “and retiring at Alabama.”
Saban, who played and coached at Kent
State, has Cleveland roots, as well. He was the
Browns defensive coordinator from 1991-94,
which has helped to spark the speculation.
“I don’t believe it,” Richardson said.
“Rumors are rumors. I don’t buy into it and
that’s one thing he taught me to do — not buy
into rumors.”
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
We Buy Gold, Jewelry,
Diamonds, Silver & Coins
Goodson’s 6.7 yards-per-carry average —
on only 30 carries — is nearly twice that of
McFadden’s 3.4. He also has a higher receiv-
ing average than any other running back or
tight end on Oakland’s roster, and has the
team’s longest kickoff return this season.
That is not surprising to Rivera, who saw
Goodson have similar success in 2010 when
he put together back-to-back 100-yard games
after Carolina running backs DeAngelo
Williams and Jonathan Stewart were hurt.
Rivera backed the offseason trade that sent
Goodson to the Raiders for offensive line
prospect Bruce Campbell but remains fond of
his former player.
“We have always liked Mike,” Rivera said
during a conference call with Bay Area
reporters. “We tried to find a spot for him last
year in all the things that we did. It’s not one
of those things where we gave up on him. I am
glad to see that he’s playing and doing the
things he needed to do to be out on the field.
Mike is a terrific athlete.”
The timing of Goodson’s return to Carolina
couldn’t be better, either. He is coming off his
best rushing performance in more than two
years and is trying to help the Raiders win
consecutive games for only the second time
this season.
That is a much different scenario than he
expected to face this late in the year. Then
again, not much has gone as planned for
Goodson or the Raiders.
Oakland’s running game has been abysmal
for most of the season. McFadden and
Goodson only recently returned from foot
injuries they both sustained in a loss on Nov.
4 to Tampa Bay. While they were out, the
Raiders had to turn to fullback Marcel Reece
to carry the load in the backfield.
“You just take it in stride,” Goodson said.
“I’ve had a lot of practice time, so the coach-
es have got to see me. I just try to make plays
and make all of my touches count.”
Oakland is 29th in total rushing and has had
a running back reach the 100-yard mark only
three times all year.
Goodson nearly did it last week against
Kansas City when he ran for a season-high 89
yards on 13 carries. McFadden carried 30
times for 110 yards.
It was Goodson’s most yards rushing since
he had a career-best 120 against Baltimore on
Nov. 21, 2010.
“I like some of the things he’s done,”
Raiders coach Dennis Allen said. “He’s added
an element of explosiveness. He’s done a nice
job in the screen game. He’s had a couple
games this year where he’s really ran the ball
pretty good. I think him and Darren are a nice
complement to each other.”
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
so it’s always nice knowing I practiced against
someone who went to the Pac-12,” Maier said.
“Same with Sione, coming on those line-
backer blitzes, trying to pick him up. It’s good
to know that you didn’t waste three years.
That in junior college, you spent your time
doing something good with guys who were as
determined as you are to get their degrees.
Football is only so much of your time, but a
degree, you can hang on your wall forever.”
“What you don’t see is the preparation, a lot
of film study, a lot of extra practice on the field
and off the field on your own time,” Jackson
said. “If I was giving advice, I would say [aca-
demics] is the most important thing — handle
your grades. If you need help, ask, get a tutor
and put more work into school as you would
into football and practice.”
After visits to the University of Idaho,
Tuipulotu and Brown signed on to be Vandals.
Lataimua, who made 65.5 tackles in 2012,
with 5.5 sacks and nine tackles for loss, faxed
off his signature to the University of Hawaii.
“I really can’t beat that,” Jackson said of his
teammates. “These guys, the energy they
bring, the excitement for the game — the
make plays.”
Continued from page 11
SIGNINGS
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The College of San Mateo football locker
room has always had a family-style atmos-
phere.
But on Wednesday afternoon, that feeling
took on a whole different meaning.
Hour before, CSM superstar linebacker and
defensive end Sione Sina put an end to the
recruiting drama when he chose the University
of California-Berkeley to continue his playing
career. Sina chose the Golden Bears above a
slew of other Division I offers after his final
recruiting visit over the weekend.
Wednesday, to make it official, Sina made
sure to share his latest triumphant moment
with a large chunk of his family on hand. One
by one, 23 different members representing a
handful of Sina generations, filed into the
CSM football locker room to sign his letter of
intent.
“At first, I was just playing football, having
fun,” Sina said. “I wasn’t really thinking about
it too much. I’ve always dreamed of going to
places like that.”
At 6-4, 250 pounds with a 4.7 40-yard dash,
Sina has been a force for the Bulldogs since he
arrived on the CSM campus and gray-shirted
in 2009. After a freshman campaign when he
made 38 tackles, had 8.5 tackles for loss and
piled up six sacks, Sina opened a lot of eyes
across the Division I spectrum — with early
offers from schools like Oregon, Texas A&M
and BYU to name a few.
But all that excitement hit a major snag in
Week 8 of the season when Sina tore his ACL
and MCL against De Anza College.
“I thought I wasn’t going to play anymore,
for real,” Sina said. “I started crying after I tore
my ACL and MCL, I was on the field crying.
It is all I got. Football is all I had. But thank
God for the opportunities he gave me and for
the schools that still had interest in me.”
According to Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive
coordinator and assistant head coach, plenty of
schools still did. And the injury made Sina put
his life and career into a different perspective.
“[In the beginning] I took every school as a
blessing — DIII, NAIA,” Sina said. “After a
while, after like the 15th schloarship offer, I
started taking it for granted. When I tore my
ACL, it brought me back to life.”
Sina said his recovery is moving along
smoothly. And when Cal came knocking, he
simply could not pass up the opportunity to
play for, what he called, “my dream school.”
“I wanted to try something new,” Sina said.
“I feel like I can change the whole program
and with the new coaching staff, I feel like I fit
in perfectly. I want to step outside my comfort
zone and try something new. It was pretty easy
(to choose). You just sit back one day and do
some soul searching. And for some reason, I
just felt Cal was the place to be. Maybe it was
God’s will — that’s how I felt like.”
In eight games this season, Sina had 22.5
tackles, 7.5 for loss and 2.5 sacks.
Injury doesn’t derail Sina’s dream
“[In the beginning] I took every school as a blessing — DIII, NAIA.
After a while, after like the 15th schloarship offer, I started taking it
for granted.When I tore my ACL, it brought me back to life.”
— Siona Sina
SPORTS 14
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don’t have it; you have to expect it because he just stepped in.”
From gauging the zip on the ball after its release to learning the
tendencies of the strong-armed Kaepernick and finding their tim-
ing together, Davis said he believes things will soon start click-
ing.
Another special January would be just what Davis has in mind.
He caught the winning TD from Smith to beat New Orleans 36-
32 in last season’s divisional playoffs, then had touchdown recep-
tions of 73 and 28 yards in a 20-17 overtime loss to the New York
Giants in the NFC title game.
If they can get on the same page Sunday night at Seattle, then
even better as far as Davis is concerned. The Niners (10-3-1) can
clinch a second consecutive NFC West title with a win, and
they’re also determined to keep hold on the No. 2 seed — and a
first-round playoff bye that would come with it — by slowing
down the red-hot Seahawks (9-5).
Davis has only 39 catches for 516 yards and five touchdowns
this season, with just four receptions over the past four games
after getting a season-best six in a Monday night win against the
Bears on Nov. 19. He had one catch for 10 yards at New England.
Coach Jim Harbaugh has repeatedly said a big part of deciding
whether to target Davis has to do with the swarming defense and
double coverage he draws game after game.
Harbaugh is pleased with the extra work Davis and Kaepernick
are putting in after practice.
“I can think of a couple things in particular where Vernon and
Colin spent some extra time on certain routes, extra during and
after practice, and that helped,” Harbaugh said Wednesday. “Just
specific plays. That was a positive for us and that’s something we
can continue. ... I think there will be some more focus on that this
week.”
Of the near misses in Sunday’s win, Harbaugh said those might
be fixed with “maybe some more time on task, just between the
two of them.”
Kaepernick and wideout Michael Crabtree have quite the con-
nection going already, but now Davis is determined to find it, too.
“Just extra throws,” Kaepernick said, expanding only by say-
ing, “we’re making progress because we’re getting those extra
throws after practice.”
Not that Davis and Smith had a rhythm right away.
It was the 2009 season when Davis led the 49ers with 78 catch-
es for 965 yards and 13 touchdowns, which matched Antonio
Gates’ NFL record for TDs by a tight end. Davis made his first
Pro Bowl that year and tied for the league lead in touchdown
catches with Randy Moss and Larry Fitzgerald.
“It took a while, but with Kap I’m sure if we just continue to
rehearse and work on it, we can make it happen,” Davis said.
“He’s a fast learner, just like Alex. But it takes time.”
Davis and Kaepernick have had a running joke since training
camp. Davis claims the 6-foot-4, 230-pound Kaepernick wants to
“get bigger.”
“He’s a strong man. I heard rumors about him wanting to get
bigger,” Davis said. “I said, ‘Nooooo, nooooo, we don’t need you
to get bigger.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
— which has a long history of players playing at the highest lev-
els of college football — proves CSM has what it takes to send
players to the best programs in the United States.
***
Menlo College had four senior football players selected to
play in the 2012 All-American Bowl at the Metrodome, home of
the Minnesota Vikings, Saturday morning.
Quarterback Matt Pelesasa, wide receiver Robert Adan, line-
backer Devon Jonsson and defensive lineman Greig O’Connor
will all represent the Oaks at the all-star game that features the
best senior college players from Division IAA (Football
Championship Subdivision), Division II, Division III and the
NAIA.
Menlo College finished the 2012 season with a 4-6 overall
record.
Pelasasa, a former Woodside standout who spent two seasons
at College of San Mateo before transferring to Menlo College
for his final two years of college eligibility, threw for 1,356 yards
and completed 67.2 percent of his passes. He threw 10 touch-
downs and just four interceptions.
“What this says about me as a player is, first and foremost,
that I am blessed to be able to play collegiate football and at a
high level,” Pelesasa said in a press release from the school. “I
have worked very hard throughout my career to be the best I can
be and I am humbled to be acknowledged in such a great way.”
Adan finished the season with 570 receiving yards and was a
recipient of five of Pelasasa’s 10 touchdowns. Jonsson led the
Oaks in tackles with 62, including three sacks. He also intercept-
ed a pair of passes. O’Connor had 35 tackles, but a team-leading
11.5 tackles for a loss.
Last year, Menlo had one player selected to play in the game,
defensive lineman Chris Tosello.
***
The Sacred Heart Prep volleyball team had a pair of players
named to the MaxPreps.com Small Schools All-American
Team. Senior setter Cammie Merten was named to the first
team, while senior outside hitter Ellie Shannon was named to the
second team. The two helped lead the Gators to a 33-6 record
and a Central Coast Section Division IV title, a Northern
California crown and a spot in the Division IV state finals.
Merten recorded 867 assists this season, 243 digs and 43 serv-
ice aces. Shannon had 366 kills, 110 blocks and 108 digs while
committing only five service errors all season.
Shannon will be attending school and playing at Princeton
University next fall.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Any speculation David Shaw could be the
latest Stanford coach to jump to the NFL is over — at least for
now.
Shaw agreed to a “long-term contract extension” Wednesday
that will keep him with his alma mater beyond the two years
left on his remaining deal. Terms of the contract, including the
years, were not announced by the school.
New athletic director Bernard Muir said
the “agreement provides added stability
and reassurance that David will be at the
helm to secure our football program’s long-
term sustained success.”
“I feel blessed to work every day with an
outstanding staff and coach the best group
of young men in America,” Shaw said,
“and I am excited to lead the Stanford foot-
ball program for many years to come.”
Shaw has won back-to-back Pac-12
Coach of the Year awards since taking over for Jim Harbaugh,
who left for the San Francisco 49ers after starting Stanford’s
resurgence. The Cardinal finished 11-2 last season after a loss
in the Fiesta Bowl and won the conference title this year for the
first time since 1999.
No. 8 Stanford (11-2) will play in the Rose Bowl against Big
Ten winner Wisconsin (8-5) on Jan. 1.
The Cardinal have won at least 11 games each of the past
three years. The program had won 10 games only three times
before (1992, 1940 and 1926).
Stanford also is the only school to be in the Top 10 of The
Associated Press poll and U.S. News & World Report’s aca-
demic rankings the past three years, something Shaw and his
coaches have used to separate themselves on the recruiting
trail.
“David Shaw has led the football program to great success,”
Stanford President John Hennessy said. “He embodies the goal
we have for our scholar-athletes — success in the classroom
and on the field. We are pleased that he will lead our football
program for years to come.”
Shaw’s second season has perhaps been even more impres-
sive than his first.
Shaw helped Stanford overcome the departure of No. 1 over-
all draft pick Andrew Luck, seamlessly made a midseason
quarterback change from Josh Nunes to redshirt freshman
Kevin Hogan and overtook Oregon to win the league’s North
Division crown. After beating UCLA 27-24 in the Pac-12 title
game Nov. 30, Shaw has taken the Cardinal to a place
Harbaugh and even late the Hall of Famer Bill Walsh never
could: the Rose Bowl.
Shaw had been an assistant in the NFL for Philadelphia,
Oakland and Baltimore before joining Harbaugh as an assis-
tant at the University of San Diego. He joined Harbaugh at
Stanford in 2007 and coached receivers and running backs
while also serving as offensive coordinator for four years.
Shaw often credits coaching mentors Jon Gruden, Brian
Billick, Ray Rhodes, Dennis Green, Tyrone Willingham,
Harbaugh and Walsh, among others. Nobody, though, has had
a greater impact on his life and career than his father, Willie, a
retired NFL and college assistant who had two stints as a
Stanford position coach and was a finalist for the Cardinal
head coaching job in 1992 before Walsh decided to return at
the last minute.
Stanford, Shaw agree to extension
David Shaw
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 10 4 0 .714 506 315
N.Y. Jets 6 8 0 .429 255 320
Miami 6 8 0 .429 264 279
Buffalo 5 9 0 .357 306 402
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280
Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358
Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 285 396
Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383
North
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307
Cincinnati 8 6 0 .571 355 293
Pittsburgh 7 7 0 .500 302 291
Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 280 310
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Denver 11 3 0 .786 409 274
San Diego 5 9 0 .357 299 312
Oakland 4 10 0 .286 263 402
Kansas City 2 12 0 .143 195 367
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 8 6 0 .571 381 350
Dallas 8 6 0 .571 327 338
N.Y. Giants 8 6 0 .571 373 304
Philadelphia 4 10 0 .286 253 375
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 371 259
New Orleans 6 8 0 .429 389 379
Tampa Bay 6 8 0 .429 354 349
Carolina 5 9 0 .357 296 319
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 10 4 0 .714 344 292
Minnesota 8 6 0 .571 319 308
Chicago 8 6 0 .571 321 240
Detroit 4 10 0 .286 330 380
West
W L T Pct PF PA
x-San Francisco 10 3 1 .750 357 218
Seattle 9 5 0 .643 350 219
St. Louis 6 7 1 .464 258 315
Arizona 5 9 0 .357 224 302
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Saturday, Dec. 22
Atlanta at Detroit, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 23
Tennessee at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
New England at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
NFL STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 19 6 .760 —
Brooklyn 13 12 .520 6
Boston 13 12 .520 6
Philadelphia 12 14 .462 7 1/2
Toronto 8 19 .296 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 16 6 .727 —
Atlanta 15 8 .652 1 1/2
Orlando 12 13 .480 5 1/2
Charlotte 7 17 .292 10
Washington 3 20 .130 13 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 14 10 .583 —
Milwaukee 13 10 .565 1/2
Indiana 14 12 .538 1
Detroit 7 21 .250 9
Cleveland 5 22 .185 10 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis 16 6 .727 1/2
San Antonio 19 8 .704 —
Houston 13 12 .520 5
Dallas 12 13 .480 6
New Orleans 5 19 .208 12 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 21 4 .840 —
Denver 14 12 .538 7 1/2
Minnesota 12 11 .522 8
Utah 14 13 .519 8
Portland 11 12 .478 9
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 18 6 .750 —
Golden State 17 8 .680 1 1/2
L.A. Lakers 12 14 .462 7
Phoenix 10 15 .400 8 1/2
Sacramento 7 17 .292 11
Thursday’sGames
Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 4 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 6:30 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 7 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Indiana at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended free
agent minor league RHP Kyle Pelchy 50 games for
refusing to take an off-season drug test.
AmericanLeague
BALTIMOREORIOLES— Agreed to terms with 1B
Travis Ishikawa,LHP Daniel Schlereth and LHP Zach
Braddock on minor league contracts.
BOSTONREDSOX— Agreed to terms with RHP
RyanDempster onatwo-year contract.Designated
RHP Pedro Beato for assignment.
CLEVELANDINDIANS—DesignatedOFRussCan-
zler for assignment. Agreed to terms with RHP Joe
Martinez and C Brian Jeroloman on minor league
contracts.
DETROITTIGERS— Released LHP Adam Wilk.As-
signed LHP Matt Hoffman outright to Toledo (EL).
HOUSTONASTROS — Named Meg Vaillancourt
vice president of community relations and execu-
tive director of the Astros In Action Foundation.
Traded LHP Rob Rasmussen to the L.A.Dodgers for
RHP John Ely.
NEWYORKYANKEES— Agreed to terms with OF
Ichiro Suzuki on a two-year contract. Designated
RHP Jim Miller for assignment.
SEATTLEMARINERS— Traded LHP Jason Vargas
to the L.A. Angels for 1B/DH Kendrys Morales.
TORONTOBLUEJAYS— Agreed to terms with 2B
Lance Zawadzki on a minor league contract.
Claimed RHP Mickey Storey off waivers from Hous-
ton.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKS— Named Steve Sax
first base coach and Turner Ward assistant hitting
coach. Named Greg Gross hitting coach of Reno
(PCL); Andy Green manager and Jacob Cruz hitting
coach of Mobile (SL); Bill Plummer manager and
Gil Heredia pitching coach of Visalia (Cal); Jason
Camilli hitting coach of South Bend (MWL); Robby
Hammock manager,Doug Bochtler pitching coach
and Wilson Valera hitting coach of Missoula (Pio-
neer); and Luis Urueta manager of the Arizona
League Diamondbacks.
COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with
LHP Jeff Francis on a one-year contract.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Alfredo Figaro on a minor league contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONACARDINALS— Released TE Steve Skel-
ton from the practice squad.
BALTIMORE RAVENS — Released LB D.J. Bryant
fromthepracticesquad.SignedRBLonyaeMiller to
the practice squad.
BUFFALOBILLS— Signed WR Kevin Elliott and LB
Brian Smith to the practice squad.
CAROLINAPANTHERS— Placed C Zack Williams
on injured reserve. Signed G Hayworth Hicks from
the practice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
vs.Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/22
@Seattle
5:20p.m.
NBC
12/23
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/30
vs. Bobcats
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/21
vs.76ers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/28
@Jazz
6p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/26
@Clippers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/5
vs. Clippers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/2
vs. Celtics
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
12/29
@Panthers
1p.m.
CBS
12/23
@Chargers
1p.m.
CBS
12/30
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TORONTO — Donald Fehr and
the players’ association are ready to
get back to the bargaining table at
any moment. They are now just
waiting for the NHL to feel the
same way.
“(We aren’t talking) because the
owners have not indicated a desire
to resume,” the NHLPA’s executive
director said Wednesday night
before a charity hockey game.
“We’ve indicated any number of
times that we’re willing to resume
when they are (and) we’re willing to
resume without preconditions.
“So we’re waiting to hear back
from them.”
The sides haven’t negotiated with
one another since Dec. 6 in New
York, when talks broke down. They
also met with a U.S. federal media-
tor for two days in New Jersey last
week and reported no progress.
Since then, there has been only lim-
ited contact between the sides,
including a brief email exchange on
Wednesday.
The NHL believes that negotia-
tions should resume only when
there is something new to say.
“I don’t think either party is refus-
ing a meeting,” NHL deputy com-
missioner Bill Daly said in an email.
“But unless there is an indication
one side or the other is prepared to
move or has a new idea to move the
process forward — and so far nei-
ther side has indicated — I am not
sure what we would do at the meet-
ing.
Fehr says players waiting
for NHL to resume talks
16
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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comments on guns since Friday’s killing of
20 schoolchildren and six adults in Newtown,
Conn. “The fact that we can’t prevent every
act of violence doesn’t mean we can’t steadi-
ly reduce the violence.”
Gun control measures have faced fierce
resistance in Congress for years but that may
be changing now because of last week’s vio-
lence. Since then, Obama has signaled for the
first time in his presidency that he’s willing to
spend political capital on the issue and some
prominent gun-rights advocates on Capitol
Hill — Democrats and Republicans alike —
have expressed willingness to consider new
measures.
Still, given the long history of opposition to
tighter gun laws, there is no certainty the leg-
islation Obama backed Wednesday or the
proposals he will send to Congress next
month will become law.
Obama tasked Vice President Joe Biden, a
longtime gun control advocate, with oversee-
ing the administration-wide process to create
those proposals. Beyond firearms’ restric-
tions, officials will also look for ways to
increase mental health resources and consid-
er steps to keep society from glamorizing
guns and violence.
Obama’s January deadline underscores the
desire among White House officials to
respond swiftly to the Newtown shooting.
Obama aides worry that as the shock of the
shooting fades, so, too, will the prospects that
pro-gun lawmakers will work with the White
House to tighten restrictions.
“I would hope that our memories aren’t so
short that what we saw in Newtown isn’t lin-
gering with us, that we don’t remain passion-
ate about it only a month later,” said Obama.
He pledged to talk about gun violence in his
State of the Union address.
Emphasizing the need to take action,
Obama said eight people have been killed by
guns across the U.S. since the Newtown
shooting. Among them were a 4-year-old boy
and three law enforcement officers.
The president has called for a national dia-
logue on gun violence before, after other
mass shootings during his presidency. But his
rhetoric has not been backed up with concrete
action. And some of the gun measures Obama
has signed lessened restrictions on guns,
allowing people to carry concealed weapons
in national parks and in checked bags on
Amtrak trains
The president bristled at suggestions that
he had been silent on gun issues during his
four years in office. But he acknowledged
that the Newtown shooting had been “a wake-
up call for all of us.”
The shooting appears to have had a similar
impact on several longtime gun backers on
Capitol Hill. West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin,
a conservative Democrat and avid hunter, has
said “everything should be on the table” as
Washington looks to prevent another tragedy,
as has 10-term House Republican Jack
Kingston of Georgia
There was little response from Republicans
Wednesday following Obama’s statements.
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an
independent who has been sharply critical of
the president’s lack of action on gun issues,
called the effort a step in the right direction.
Obama, seeking to ease the fears of gun
owners, reiterated his support for the Second
Amendment. And he said no effort to reduce
gun violence would be successful without
their participation.
“I am also betting that the majority, the vast
majority, of responsible law-abiding gun own-
ers would be some of the first to say that we
should be able to keep an irresponsible, law-
breaking few from buying a weapon of war,”
he said.
He also challenged the National Rifle
Association to do “some self-reflection.” The
gun lobby is a powerful political force, par-
ticularly in Republican primaries, and previ-
ously has worked to unseat lawmakers who
back gun control measures.
The NRA, in its first statements since the
shooting, pledged Tuesday to offer “meaning-
ful contributions to help make sure this never
happens again.”
The Biden-led task force will also explore
ways to improve mental health resources and
address ways to create a culture that doesn’t
promote violence. The departments of
Justice, Education, Health and Human
Services, and Homeland Security, along with
outside groups and lawmakers, will all be part
of the process.
Biden will start his discussions Thursday
when he meets with law enforcement officers
from around the country. He’ll be joined by
Attorney General Eric Holder, Education
Secretary Arne Duncan, Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano and Health and
Human Services Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius.
Biden’s prominent role could be an asset
for the White House in getting gun legislation
through Congress. The vice president spent
decades in the Senate and has been called on
by Obama before to use his long-standing
relationships with lawmakers to build support
for White House measures.
The vice president also brings to the effort
a long history of working on gun control
issues, having chaired the Senate Judiciary
Committee and leading the original effort to
ban assault weapons. The ban expired in
2004, but Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.,
says she plans to bring it back for a vote early
next year.
Continued from page 1
GUNS
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSIUT, Egypt — A campaign of intimida-
tion by Islamists left most Christians in this
southern Egyptian province too afraid to par-
ticipate in last week’s referendum on an
Islamist-drafted constitution they deeply
oppose, residents say. The disenfranchisement
is hiking Christians’ worries over their future
under empowered Muslim conservatives.
Around a week before the vote, some
50,000 Islamists marched through the
provincial capital, Assiut, chanting that
Egypt will be “Islamic, Islamic, despite the
Christians.” At their head rode several beard-
ed men on horseback with swords in scab-
bards on their hips, evoking images of early
Muslims conquering Christian Egypt in the
7th Century.
They made sure to go through mainly
Christian districts of the city, where residents,
fearing attacks, shuttered down their stores
and stayed in their homes, witnesses said.
The day of the voting itself on Saturday,
Christian voting was minimal — as low as
seven percent in some areas, according to
church officials. Some of those who did try to
head to polling stations in some villages were
pelted by stones, forcing them to turn back
without casting ballots, Christian activists and
residents told the Associated Press this week.
The activists now see what happened in
Assiut as a barometer for what Christians’ sta-
tus will be under a constitution that enshrines
a greater role for Shariah, or Islamic law, in
government and daily life. Even under the
secular regime of autocrat Hosni Mubarak,
Egypt’s Christians complained of discrimina-
tion and government failure to protect them
and their rights. They fear it will be worse
with the Islamists who have dominated
Egypt’s political landscape since Mubarak’s
ouster in February 2011.
“When all issues become religious and all
the talk is about championing Islam and its
prophet, then, as a Christian, I am excluded
from societal participation,” said Shady
Magdy Tobia, a Christian activist in Assiut.
“If this does not change, things will only get
worse for Christians.”
But some of the Christians of Assiut are
pushing back against the emboldened
Islamists. In recent weeks, young Christians
joined growing street protests to demand that
the charter is shelved, casting aside decades of
political apathy.
Assiut province is significant because it is
home to one of Egypt’s largest Christian com-
munities — they make up about 35 percent of
the population of 4.5 million, perhaps three
times the nationwide percentage. At the same
time, it is a major stronghold of Egypt’s
Islamists, who now dominate its local govern-
ment. The province was the birthplace of
some of the country’s most radical Islamist
groups and was the main battlefield of an
insurgency by Muslim militants in the 1990s.
It was one of 10 provinces that voted in the
first round of Egypt’s referendum.
Nationwide, around 56 percent voted in favor
of the draft charter, according to preliminary
results. Assiut had one of the strongest “yes”
votes at more than 77 percent. It also had a
turnout of only 28 percent — one of the low-
est in a round marred by a low participation of
only 32 percent nationwide.
The second and final round will held the
coming Saturday in 17 provinces, including in
Minya, which has the country’s highest pro-
portion of Christians, at 36 percent.
Rights groups reported attempts at suppres-
sion of the “no” vote in many parts of the
country. But Christians say intimidation and
suppression are more effective in this smaller,
largely rural province.
“In Assiut, we face more danger than in
Cairo,” said businessman Emad Awny Ramzy,
a key organizer of local protests against
Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and his
ruling Muslim Brotherhood. “Here they can
easily identify, monitor and attack us.”
Fear keeps Egypt’s Christians away from polls
“When all issues become religious and all the
talk is about championing Islam and its prophet,
then, as a Christian, I am excluded from societal participation.
... If this does not change, things will only get worse for Christians.”
— Shady Magdy Tobia, a Christian activist in Assiut
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Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
More homes are decorated for Christmas
than any other holiday. This year is no different,
although the sluggish economy has created
renewed interest in inexpensive ways to cele-
brate the season.
The simple wreath can be a wonderful vehi-
cle for creativity. I have seen all sorts of beauti-
ful, and often unexpected, materials made into
wreaths.
One creative gardening friend made a wreath
out of radishes, put a bright green bow on it, and
hung it on the gate leading into her back yard.
Surprisingly the wreath held up just fine in the
cold weather, and I suppose in a pinch the
radishes could have been used for crudites at a
party.
Every year, some neighbors hang a wreath on
their front door made from shells collected on
walks along the seashore during the summer.
Another neighbor collects pine cones makes
beautiful wreaths. She tells me it is not hard to
do, but after years of sap-coated fingers, she
now advises wearing latex cloves when han-
dling fresh pine cones. A local florist has
wreaths hanging in his shop made of bright red
carnations — a low-budget flower that rises to
superstar status in this arrangement.
One of my favorites is a traditional wreath
frequently seen in New England and parts of the
mid-Atlantic. Made out of boxwood and con-
structed with a moss base, it stays fresh for
months when kept outside, and is as much a
wreath for the winter season as it is for
Christmas.
It’s simple to make. You will need a 12-inch
or 14-inch wire frame, which can be bought at
any DIY store or online. Look for a frame that
has a half-round base, which will hold the
wreath’s sphagnum moss. You will also need
dark colored garbage bags, sphagnum moss,
boxwood branches (available from florist sup-
ply companies), a pipe cleaner and any embell-
ishments you desire, such as ribbons.
Start by laying a large plastic garbage bag on
a flat surface and cutting it across it’s width into
3- to 4-inch strips using a utility knife. Each
strip will be a hoop section of the bag. Make
one cut through the hoop to create one long
strip of plastic. These strips will be wrapped
around the wreath base.
Now fill the wire frame with sphagnum moss.
Pack the moss densely into the frame, mounting
it enough so that you will have a plump, round-
ed, donut-like base in which to stick your box-
wood pieces.
Next wrap the long strips of plastic around
the moss and the frame. Use a single layer of
plastic, overlapping the ends to hold them
down. Tie the final piece to the frame.
When you have stuffed and wrapped the
frame, soak it in water until it is saturated, after
which you are ready to begin adding the box-
wood.
If you buy your boxwood (as opposed to clip-
ping it from your own shrubs), be sure to soak
it overnight before making your wreath to make
sure it is well hydrated.
Snap off small tips of the boxwood branches
and jab the stem end into the plastic-covered
sphagnum-filled frame at a 45-degree angle.
Work around the wreath so that all the branch
tips are going in the same direction. Be sure the
branch tips are similar in size.
After you have gone completely around the
face of the wreath, add branches to the sides
until the wreath looks full. Leave the back
empty so the wreath will lie flat.
Twist a pipe cleaner around one side of the
wreath with a double loop so you can hang your
wreath.
These wreaths are often hung without a bow,
but I choose to add a red serpentine ribbon
around mine.
The boxwood will remain fresh for a very
long time due to the moist sphagnum moss, but
an occasional soaking will keep the wreath
looking its best.
Wreaths a lovely do-it-yourself touch for the holidays
A do-it-yourself boxwood wreath.
18
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A New Year’s bash is one of the easier
parties to throw. Everyone’s already in
the merry-making mood, so it’s a simple
matter of setting the stage.
You can do that with decor, food, bev-
erages and music, but it’s also nice to
offer a party favor that guests can take
home as a token of a special evening.
For a clever collection of party favors
that can be customized, look to creative
gift maven Judy Walker of Seattle, at the
website TopsMalibu.com.
A sparkler in the shape of numbers
and letters makes a fun way to toast that
doesn’t involve drinks; simply touch
your sparkler to the one next to you. If
you’d like to get silly, buy some Poof
Balls — packets of tubes and colorful
paper balls like old fashioned peashoot-
ers.
Walker’s “Surprize Balls” recall a hot
item in the 1950s created by New
Orleans native Charles Gregor with the
tag line, “The Toy You Destroy to
Enjoy.” Walker’s handmade version con-
sists of crepe paper-wrapped balls that
you unravel to reveal a variety of little
trinkets and treasures. They were a hit
with retailers at this fall’s New York
International Gift Fair.
For New Year’s, she fills the balls with
vintage-style toys, keepsakes, charms,
gems, candy, bubbles, confetti poppers,
fortunes and quotes. She’ll make custom
ones with individualized notes or prizes.
Buy them already decorated, or plain to
embellish yourself.
Shiny red poppers filled with confetti
would be a fun midnight favor for
guests, and Walker has little wish cap-
sule necklaces too for recording resolu-
tions. (Deluxe Surprize Balls, $16.50;
set of six undecorated balls, $59; four
sparklers, $16.50; six Poof Balls, $15;
wish capsules, $9.50, www.topsmal-
ibu.com)
Brit Moran of San Francisco, who
runs her own monthly subscription-
based craft store, is offering a festive
LED balloon kit that includes mini LED
lights, glitter, air pump, balloons and rib-
bon to make decorations or favors that
glow and sparkle. ($24.99, www.brit.co)
Small yet thoughtful favors can be
found at the online wedding and party
supplier www.beau-coup.com. Chic sil-
ver snowflake wine stoppers, jeweled
snowflake votive holders and miniature,
cinnamon-scented pinecone candles
would all make pretty takeaways. (Wine
stoppers, $2.30 and up; votive holders,
$2.42 and up; pine cones, $7.24 and up)
A homemade take-home favor is
always appreciated. HGTV.com has
instructions for putting together interest-
ing ones like custom-mixed loose tea,
colorful candies packed in cork-topped
vials, and mini bottles of custom-fla-
vored liquors such as ginger anise vodka
and vanilla cinnamon bourbon. Music
lovers could create USB thumb-drive
mixes, perhaps with the evening’s party
playlist. (www.hgtv.com/entertaining )
Monica Pedersen, a designer, HGTV
host and author of “Make it Beautiful:
Designs and Ideas for Entertaining at
Home” (Agate Midway, 2012), has a
favorite fragranced candle she likes to
give.
“Pretty, scented votives wrapped like a
firecracker are always easy favors. Kai
brand’s my favorite, and definitely
soothing for New Year’s Day,” she says.
Kai’s Twilight candles are a heady blend
of exotic white florals. (box of four, $48,
www.lifetherapy.com )
Finally, as revelers head out the door,
Pedersen suggests setting out an attrac-
tive cooler filled with iced bottles of
coconut water.
“Encourage your guests to take one
for the road,” she says.
Offering some post-festivity hydration
may be the best favor of all.
Party favors with flair
For a clever collection of party favors that can be customized,
look to creative gift maven Judy Walker of Seattle, at the
website TopsMalibu.com.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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at 1220 Sixth Street, behind the Safeway on
El Camino Real in Belmont.
He has a Masters of Science in Traditional
Chinese Medicine, He is licensed to prac-
tice Acupuncture in California, nationally
certified in the practice of Acupuncture,
and is a certified practitioner of Tui Na
Chinese body work. He currently has a
Traditional Chinese Medicine clinic in San
Mateo and is a volunteer Acupuncturist for
Herban Health in East Palo Alto.
Traditional Chinese Medicine dates back
5,000 years. It uses Acupuncture, Acupres-
sure, Tuina massage, Herbs, moxibustion,
cupping and other treatment methods
to restore health to the body. It treats the
symptom of a illness and reduces pain but
more importantly it treats the origin of
the illness and eliminate pain. That makes
TCM an excellent tool for maintaining
optimum health and preventing illness.
Will Chen Acupuncture can help you feel relief from many conditions, including:
Don’t live in pain. Call Will Chen Acupuncture at 650-235-6761 for an appointment today.
They are open Monday – Saturday. Credit cards and most insurance plans accepted.
• Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
• Depression
• High Blood Pressure
• Hot Flashes
• Irritable Bowl Syndrome
• Low back pain
• Migraine headaches
• And more.
1220 6th Ave, Belmont
(Behind the Safeway on El Camino Real)
650-235-6761 www.willchenacupuncture.com willchenlac@gmail.com
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
It’s that time of year when texture,
character and warmth define the most
successful decor. The perfect time for
felt.
This season has seen a variety of cre-
ative, decorative felt items for table and
tree. You’ll find it sewn, lasercut,
appliqued or otherwise manipulated to
create eye-catching fashion accessories,
charming toys and sculptures, and chic
items for the home.
Or you can try your hand at felt-mak-
ing and crafting yourself. (More on that
later.)
In Portland, Ore., designer Alison
Comfort offers a woodsy wonderland of
little felt pumpkins, acorns, mushrooms,
nests and forest animals — small sculp-
tures that might add charm to a holiday
table — at her Etsy.com shop,
www.etsy.com/shop/houseofmoss.
“There’s something so dear and pre-
cious about starting with a natural mate-
rial in its raw state, using a simple tool
and my own hands, and transforming it,”
she says.
There are guides online for making
felt candy canes, but if you aren’t crafty
and still love the look, consider Land of
Nod’s delicious-looking versions; here
too, round ornaments in felt stripes or
gathered layers. All would look cute on a
kids’ tree. www.landofnod.com
At Crate & Barrel, laser-cut felt place-
mats with seasonal motifs, felt ball gar-
lands, and a collection of tree ornaments
including gingerbread men, Swedish
style birds and owls add homespun
charm. A felt pillow with appliquid par-
tridge in a pear tree might make a wel-
come hostess gift. www.crateandbar-
rel.com
The nature of felt — soft, pliable and
able to take on a variety of colors —
makes it terrific for crafting, not only for
designers but for creative amateurs.
“Felt is one of my favorite materials.
It’s an extremely easy material to work
with because, unlike most fabrics, it’s
non-woven, so it won’t unravel and
doesn’t require hemming,” says Jodi
Levine, designer-at-large for Martha
Stewart Living.
April Tatom of Louisville, Ky., sells
felting supplies on her website,
www.feltorama.com. When she decided
to try her hand at appliqued clothing for
children and experimented with various
fabrics, “I found that nothing matched
the lush texture of felt. It just beckons to
be touched and adds a cozy dimension to
any project. There’s no ‘right’ or
‘wrong’ side to it. Felt toys are wonder-
fully tactile for little fingers and visually
stimulating for kids of all ages.”
For her own kids, Tatom recently com-
pleted a felt “picnic” set complete with a
lunchmeat-, cheese- and lettuce-filled
baguette, and a cookie for dessert. She
also recreated one of her son’s favorite
book characters, Lowly Worm, from
Richard Scarry’s “Busytown.”
Food is a popular subject for felt
crafters, often as soft children’s toys but
sometimes so realistically rendered that
it’s elevated to something more artful.
Roving, a washed and carded wool
with a texture similar to cotton candy, is
the basis for many sculpted felt creatures
and items. The fiber is pulled into
strands that can be formed and poked
with fingers or needles into shapes.
Many of the animals on Etsy and in
stores are crafted this way; it’s easy to
manipulate roving and no sewing is
required. Check out www.livingfelt.com
for supplies and kits.
Alternatively, a method called wet
felting uses hot, soapy water and agita-
tion to enmesh wool or other fibers so
tightly that they cannot be pulled apart.
Additional online sources for wool
and wool-blend felt, Levine says,
include: www.purlsoho.com,
www.achildsdream.com and www.com-
monwealthfelt.com .
Or you may not have to buy anything
at all if a common laundry mishap
occurs.
“If you’ve ever shrunk a wool sweater,
scarf or hat, you’ve created felt,” Levine
laughs.
Check the closet for sweater castoffs,
then machine-wash and dry them on hot
settings and get crafting. Projects like
pillow covers, patchwork blankets and
pouches are on
www.marthastewart.com.
In the felting community, that method,
which uses yarn rather than roving, is
called “fulling.”
Martha Stewart’s site also has instruc-
tions for making little felt mitten clips,
mini stockings and mice ornaments, tree
skirts and gifts, as well as some easy
kids’ projects.
Children also might enjoy making lit-
tle felt animals with EK Success’ pen-
guin or snowman craft kits. www.eksuc-
cess.com
For first-time felt
crafters, Tatom offers these tips:
• Invest in high-quality felt so it will
hold up over time.
• Use a rotary cutter for larger cuts and
small embroidery scissors for details.
Rotary cutters save time, give precise
results, and are also available in scallop
and zigzag designs.
• Experiment with different types of
felt. Each has benefits: recycled eco-felt
(created from recycled bottles), 100 per-
cent wool felt (rich texture), wool-blend
felt (affordable, versatile), bamboo felt
(ultra-soft).
• Don’t create a machine-washable
project without first testing a swatch of
the felt in the washer.
Felt can add warmth, fun to winter days
This season has seen a variety of creative,decorative felt items
for table and tree.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 19
Medical Center and SantatoDeliver
Toys to Kids at Local Shelter. 2 p.m.
First Step for Families Shelter, 325 Villa
Terrace, San Mateo. Santa and the San
Mateo Medical Center’s Mobile Dental
Clinic will deliver toys donated by the
Golden Gate Harley Owners Group
and San Mateo Medical Center staff.
For more information visit
www.sanmateomedicalcenter.org.
San Mateo Public Library Presents
Las Posadas. 6 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, First Floor, 55 W.Third Ave., San
Mateo.This Library Program celebrates
a Latin American cultural tradition for
the whole family, including a
candlelight procession, music,
refreshments, stories and crafts. Free.
For more information call 522-7838.
Terry Hiatt and Friends. 7 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5.
For more information visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, DEC. 20
Mandarin/English Bilingual Story
Time. 10:15 a.m. Menlo Park Library,
800 Alma St., Menlo Park.The bilingual
story time will happen weekly on the
same day and time. Free. For more
information call 330-2530 or visit
menloparklibrary.org/children.html.
Annual Christmas Dinner. 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Little House, 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. $9. For more information
and to register call 326-2025.
FRIDAY, DEC. 21
Holidayparty. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Dancing with
the Swing Shift band and a ham lunch.
For more information or tickets call
616-7150.
Bethlehem AD. 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
1305 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Walk through a village of costumed
characters and animals and
experience ancient Bethlehem. Free.
For more information call 368-3821 or
visit www.BethlehemAD.com.
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha
Cha Cha. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $10. For
more information visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, DEC. 22
‘Big River’ at Theatreworks. 2 p.m.
and 8 p.m. This Tony Award-winning
musical brings Mark Twain’s beloved
novel ‘The Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn’ to life onstage with a toe-tapping
score by Country Music Hall of Fame’s
Roger Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures. Ticket
prices start at $27. For more
information and to order tickets call
463-1960.
Bruce Steivel’s ‘Nutcracker’ with
Peninsula Ballet Theatre. 4 p.m. Fox
Theatre, 2223 Broadway, Redwood
City. Following the finale, audience
members are invited on-stage to meet
the dancers. Doors open one hour
prior to performance. Tickets range
from $20 to $50 based on age and
seating area. For more information
visit bev@peninsulaballet.org.
Elvin Bishop. 8 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $25. For
more information visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
SUNDAY, DEC. 23
Bruce Steivel’s ‘Nutcracker’ with
Peninsula Ballet Theatre. 2 p.m. Fox
Theatre, 2223 Broadway, Redwood
City. Following the finale, audience
members are invited on-stage to meet
the dancers. Doors open one hour
prior to performance. Tickets range
from $20 to $50 based on age and
seating area. For more information
visit bev@peninsulaballet.org.
‘Big River’ at Theatreworks. 2 p.m.
and 7 p.m. This Tony Award-winning
musical brings Mark Twain’s beloved
novel ‘The Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn’ to life onstage with a toe-tapping
score by Country Music Hall of Fame’s
Roger Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures. Ticket
prices start at $27. For more
information and to order tickets call
463-1960.
Solstice Sings for the Holidays:
Church of the Epiphany, San Carlos.
3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Church of the
Epiphany, 1839 Arryoyo Ave., San
Carlos. Hear Solstice’s live
performance of their just-released,
first holiday recording, ‘Winter
Solstice.’ Donations accepted at the
door. For more information call (415)
450-8437.
MONDAY, DEC. 24
Christmas Eve Service and
Traditional Children’s Pageants. 4
p.m. The Episcopal Church of St.
Matthew, 1 S. El Camino Real, San
Mateo. Free. For more information visit
episcopalstmatthew.org.
Christmas Eve Services and
Children’sMass. 4 p.m., 6 p.m. and 10
p.m. Our Lady of Angels Catholic
Church, 1721 Hillsdale Drive, San
Mateo. Children’s mass will be at 6 p.m.
Services will be at 4 p.m. and 10 p.m.
For more information call 347-7768.
Worship Services. Noon, 4:30 p.m.
and 10 p.m. First Presbyterian Church
of Burlingame, 1500 Easton Drive,
Burlingame. Communion Worship
Service at noon, Family Worship
Service at 4:30 p.m., Candlelight
Communion Worship Service at 10
p.m. Free. For more information call
342-0875 or visit www.burlpress.org.
Children’sMass and Midnight Mass.
4:30 p.m., 8 p.m. and midnight. Saint
Robert’s Church, 1380 Crystal Springs
Road, San Bruno. Free. For more
information call 589-2800.
Family Service. 5 p.m. St. Peter’s
Episcopol Church, 178 Clinton St.,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 367-0777 or visit
www.stpetersrwc.org.
Christmas Eve Worship. 5 p.m. and
10 p.m. Hope Lutheran Church, 600 W.
42nd Ave., San Mateo. There will be a
family worship service at 5 p.m. and a
traditional candlelight service at 10
p.m. Free. For more information call
349-0100.
Christmas Eve Worship Service. 5
p.m. and 10:45 p.m. Redeemer
Lutheran Ministries, 468 Grand St.,
Redwood City. Family service of
candlelight and carols at 5 p.m. Service
of light at 10:45 p.m. Free. For more
information call 366-5892 or visit
www.redeemerministries.org.
Christmas EveCelebration. 5:30 p.m.
Open Door Church, 4150 Picadilly
Lane, San Mateo. Children of all ages
welcome. Free. For more information
call 323-8600.
Christmas Eve Service. 7 p.m.
Peninsula Metropolitan Community
Church, 1150 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. PMCC is an LGBT and friends
community. Free. For more
information call 515-0900.
Christmas Eve Celebration. 7 p.m.
and 11 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church,
2825 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo.There will be lessons and carols
at 7 p.m.There will be a divine service
at 11 p.m. Free. For more information
call 345-9082 or visit glcms.org.
Worship Services. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Hillsdale United Methodist Church,
303 W. 36th Ave., San Mateo.There will
be a family worship at 7 p.m. and a
candlelight service at 11 p.m. Free. For
more information call 345-8514.
‘Big River’ at Theatreworks. 7:30
p.m.This Tony Award-winning musical
brings Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures. Ticket
prices start at $27. For more
information and to order tickets call
463-1960.
TUESDAY, DEC. 25
Christmas Day Services. 8 a.m., 10
a.m. and noon. Our Lady of Angels
Catholic Church, 1721 Hillsdale Drive,
San Mateo. For more information call
347-7768.
Christmas Day Worship. 10 a.m.
Hope Lutheran Church, 600 W. 42nd
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 347-7768.
Christmas DayService.10 a.m. Grace
Lutheran Church, 2825 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. Divine service at 10
a.m. Free. For more information call
345-9082 or visit glcsm.org.
Christmas Day Service. 10 a.m.
Peninsula Metropolitan Community
Church, 1150 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo. PMCC is a LGBT and friends
community. Free. For more
information call 515-0900.
Christmas Day Worship Service. 10
a.m. Redeemer Lutheran Ministries,
468 Grand St., Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 366-5892 or visit
reedeemerministries.org.
Christmas Day Service. 10:30 a.m. St.
Peter’s Episcopal Church, 178 Clinton
St., Redwood City. Free. For more
information call 589-2800.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 26
The Volker Strifler Band. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For
more information visit
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
‘Big River’ at Theatreworks. 7:30
p.m.This Tony Award-winning musical
brings Mark Twain’s beloved novel ‘The
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’ to life
onstage with a toe-tapping score by
Country Music Hall of Fame’s Roger
Miller, lively characters and
unforgettable adventures. Ticket
prices start at $27. For more
information and to order tickets call
463-1960.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
explained Nancy Magee, spokeswoman
for the San Mateo County Office of
Education. A training is planned in
February for teams representing San
Mateo County schools to discuss best
practices and also how to offer training
for teachers and staff with and without
students. Safety officials and law
enforcement will be asked to join an all-
day summit on the plan in March.
Creating such a plan will take time and
vetting of many but the hope is to have it
in place for the 2013-14 school year,
said Magee.
Locally, most school districts require
three different types of drills: evacua-
tion, lockdown and shelter in place.
These type of drills can be applied to a
variety of safety situations such as fire,
earthquake or an intruder on campus.
Most districts require younger students
to partake in evacuation drills monthly
while high school students may only do
it twice a year. Lockdown drills are held
from two to four times a year depending
on the district. How these drills are
explained differ most depending on the
age of the students.
For example, when schools practice
lockdown drills in the San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District, an
announcement that goes out to class-
rooms uses the word lockdown,
explained Amber Farinha, coordinator of
enrollment and communications.
“It is explained to children throughout
the year that we practice many things,
including playground rules, to ensure
everyone is safe. We do not talk about
guns or the possibility of shootings, we
discuss safety,” said Farinha.
On the other hand, the San Mateo
Union High School District finds it
important to be really open with students
about the possible safety issues, said
KindyLee Stump, director of alternative
program and attendance/welfare.
There’s a good reason for that.
In 2009, Alexander Robert Youshock,
who was then 17, went onto the
Hillsdale High School campus carrying
a chain saw in a soft guitar case, a tacti-
cal vest outfitted with 10 homemade
pipe bombs, a 10-inch sword, a face
shield to protect him from blood splatter
and four door stops to keep teachers
from locking classes inside. He had a
plan to kill three teachers. Youshock was
unable to start the chain saw and explod-
ed two bombs that injured no one before
being tackled by a teacher and held until
police arrived. Last year, he was convict-
ed of six felonies related to the attack;
two counts of exploding a destructive
device with intent to commit murder;
possessing a destructive device in a pub-
lic place; using explosives in an act of
terrorism and possessing a deadly
weapon. He is now in the Napa State
Hospital.
After Youshock’s attempt, the South
San Francisco Unified School District
hosted a county-wide shooter-on-cam-
pus training, facilitated by South San
Francisco police and the San Mateo
County Sheriff’s Office in conjunction
with a number of other agencies, said
Ryan Sebers, supervisor of student
attendance and welfare.
Similarly, a number of districts held
lockdown drills this week following the
tragedy in Connecticut.
In addition to drills, some schools
have installed locks that allow teachers
to secure the doors from inside. Teachers
in other schools have requested for such
locks to be installed in the wake of
Friday’s school shooting.
Continued from page 1
SAFETY
Wagstaffe declined to share the potential
plea deal until after it is accepted today
but said settling does not reflect on the
case’s merits.
“We think the case is strong for the
prosecution and resolution of it is an
appropriate admission of responsibility,”
said Wagstaffe.
Nagaya faced up to 20 years if con-
victed by a jury.
Nagaya previously pleaded not guilty
to the charges but was held to answer
after a preliminary hearing spanning six
days in which his wife, Yuka, detailed
him hitting her and prosecutors present-
ed photographs she took of the injuries.
Yuka Nagaya testified that the couple,
who had married in April 2010, often
quarreled over suspicions he was having
a relationship with a fellow consul
employee. The alleged abuse began
when they lived in San Francisco and
continued after they moved to San
Bruno. She said between January 2011
and March 31, 2012, he also poured milk
over her head, stomped on her chest sev-
eral times so she was unable to move for
hours, struck her so hard an upper molar
later fell from her mouth while eating
and stabbed the webbing of her hand
with a miniature screwdriver.
San Bruno police arrested Nagaya
April 1 after he allegedly threw his wife
from a car in the parking lot of their San
Bruno apartment.
Nagaya’s case drew substantial atten-
tion from the Japanese media, including
crews that traveled to San Mateo County
for the preliminary hearing. The hearing
itself generated its own buzz, in part for
the implication consul employees tried
intimidating Yuka Nagaya in the court-
room and because her testimony dragged
out over several days over translation
issues, claims she didn’t recall incidents
and painstakingly detailed cross-exami-
nation by the defense. A translator even
quit midway through the first day, claim-
ing he was too tired to continue.
Nagaya is free from custody on
$350,000 bail.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
NAGAYA
pitalized another passenger with minor
non-gunshot injuries. After prosecutors
added 10 new counts of threatening a
police officer, Vargas put off a plea.
He is also charged with 16 other
felonies including three counts of
attempted murder, three counts of felony
gang affiliation, three counts of shooting
into a vehicle and gun possession.
Although Vargas wasn’t arrested for
the shooting until Dec. 6 when he was
apprehended in the juror parking lot out-
side the Hall of Justice in Redwood City,
he was actually in custody on a different
matter in between the two points. The
San Mateo County Gang Task Force
contacted Vargas in East Palo Alto Nov.
14 and he reportedly fought the several
officers trying to arrest him for having a
loaded Glock handgun and extended
magazine. He posted bail but was rear-
rested two weeks later after forensics
linked the Glock to the Sept. 30 highway
shooting.
That the task force visited Vargas
while he was still at large for the shoot-
ing was pure coincidence, said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
The shooting began near the Ralston
Avenue exit when the driver of a red
Dodge Charger was shot from another
car while traveling south past the State
Route 92 interchange. The Charger
swerved before crashing into a fence and
stopping in a drainage ditch between
Ralston Avenue and Holly Street. Two of
the passengers, a 24-year-old man from
Menlo Park and a 19-year-old East Palo
Alto man, were hit by bullets. A 23-year-
old Santa Cruz woman in the car was
also hospitalized.
Prosecutors believe the shooting was
motivated by rivalry between two gangs
in East Palo Alto and Menlo Park.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
VARGAS
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Although
you’ll be able to adequately fend for yourself, your
more notable benefts are likely to come from a
partnership. You could actually be involved in two of
them, with happy results.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- When you need
something the most, your chart indicates life will
be trending in your favor. Be both patient and
hopeful, and see what you’ve started through to its
conclusion.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Do not be a
capricious risk-taker, but also don’t be afraid to take
a chance if doing so might serve your best interests.
You must not let unfounded fear stop you.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- When it comes to
your fnancial affairs, you might not do everything
letter- perfect, but your good moves should outrank
many of your bad ones and put you in the plus
column.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It behooves you to be
positive in all that you do. Instead of worrying about
what may or may not happen, go out into the world,
enjoying what your heart and head tell you to do.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- A pleasant surprise
might be in store for you, when something that
hasn’t looked too proftable suddenly makes a big
change for the better.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Trust that things have a
way of balancing themselves out, and you’ll quickly
fnd out that if you’re not being treated too well in
one case, something else will make up for it.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You’ve heard the old
saying: “The harder your work, the luckier you get.”
This could be true in your case, when you achieve
more than you expected through a lot of strong
effort.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although you’re presently
in a rather good cycle where your general interests
are concerned, material rewards will require more
arduous work. However, it’ll be worth it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t depend on luck
to provide what you want. However, an ambitious
aim can be realized if you give it top priority and are
willing to work hard to achieve it.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you have to make an
important judgment call that would affect others as
well as yourself, make it from a noble perspective.
Good intentions will produce big advantages.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- By being willing to
work hard and playing your cards well, you could
generate great fnancial benefts through a valuable
and unusual source.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
12-20-12
WEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Invite
4 Automaker
8 Icy coating
12 Python
13 Heavy hydrogen
discoverer
14 Big -- -- elephant
15 Thing with wings
17 Takes a powder
18 Choose
19 -- Lama
21 Hera’s son
23 Board game pair
24 Zen poem
27 Thin fog
29 Ms. Lupino
30 Beowulf quaff
32 Sandwich shop
36 Lisbon lady
38 Risked a ticket
40 Pentagon VIP
41 Big name in speakers
43 Police van
45 Splotch
47 Clock front
49 “Satchmo” Armstrong
51 Butter rating (2 wds.)
55 Cook too long
56 Well site (2 wds.)
58 Advance
59 Sunblock additive
60 Narrow inlet
61 Very, to Yvette
62 Trudge
63 Crash into
DOWN
1 Camel hair robes
2 Mademoiselle’s silk
3 Socialist -- Marx
4 Seesaw support
5 Declaim
6 Toon pooch
7 Applied henna
8 Came back to win
9 Physicist -- Newton
10 Mrs. Eisenhower
11 USN offcer
16 Climber’s challenge
20 Woodworking tool
22 Molded
24 Stashed away
25 Turmoil
26 Fleming or Woosnam
28 Lime cooler
31 Dangerous curve
33 Omelet ingredient
34 Sign before Virgo
35 Country hotel
37 Is plentiful
39 Towered over
42 Geisha’s tie
44 Jai --
45 More gloomy
46 Ben on “Bonanza”
48 Home with a dome
50 Daytime drama
52 Earl -- Biggers
53 Charles Lamb
54 Not know from --
55 Diner sandwich
57 Feverish
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday• Dec. 20, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
PLUMBING -
GUARANTEED INTERVIEW
We need ENTRY LEVEL and SKILLED employees!!!
No experience? Looking for a career? Have you considered the plumbing industry?
Get paid while you train!!!!!
Already a Skilled Plumber or Drain Tech? We’re looking for you, too! We’re more
than just a rooter company.
• Uniforms, Tools, and Vehicle provided
• Top Techs can earn 60K to 80K per year
• Paid time off
• Excellent Benefits
Apply in person at Rescue Rooter:
825 Mahler Rd, Burlingame
or at www.rescuerooter.com/about/careers.aspx
EEO
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CLEANERS - We are looking for House
Cleaners/Laundry personnel in the Bur-
lingame area. Apply in person at 1100
Trousdale Dr., Burlingame.
GILEAD SCIENCES, Inc., a biopharma-
ceutical company, has opening in Foster
City, CA for an Associate Manager, Drug
Safety & Public Health (MDS02): respon-
sible for specific projects, including safe-
ty database support, MedDRA upgrade,
safety systems validation, and data-re-
trieval. If interested, please reference
code and send resume to Gilead, Attn:
HR, #CM-0819, 333 Lakeside Dr. Foster
City, CA 94404.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
SECURITY OFFICERS -
Traditional Security Officers
(San Carlos)
G4S Secure Solutions seeks
officers that are at least18
years or older with proof of
high school diploma or equiva-
lent. Must be able to pass a
background check. Drug test-
ing required. CA Guard Card
required.
Please visit the local office
or fill out our online
application at
www.usajobs.g4s.com
Walk-ins are welcome
M-F, 8:30am-5pm
100 Century Center Court,
Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95112
408.453.4133
EOE • MFDV • DFWP
110 Employment
SOFTWARE -
Systems Engineer. Asurion,
LLC, San Mateo, CA. Respon-
sible for the configuration, in-
stallation and day-to-day admin-
istration of various portions of
Mobile Applications Team's
global production Network. Will
function as part of an implemen-
tation team on large projects,
and may provide service and
support for smaller projects. Will
also serve as an internal esca-
lation point to support and trou-
bleshoot network problems for
various departments Bachelor's
degree in any science field, or
foreign equivalent, plus 2 years
Cisco networking experience, to
include 2 years Linux/Unix sys-
tem administration experience;
Excellent knowledge and ap-
plied experience in network se-
curity including firewall, authen-
tication services and VPN; Ex-
cellent Communications Skills
both written and verbal; Exten-
sive knowledge and experience
with data center network infra-
structure. Send resume: Kent
DeVinney, 1400 Fashion Island
Blvd., Suite 450,San Mateo, CA
94404
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253334
The following person is doing business
as: Flow Salon,132 South B St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Roy Ho, 1380 El
Camino Real Apt. 8, Millbrae, CA 94030.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roy Ho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 517443
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Andy Berdj Gamitian
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jennifer Rene’e Palm filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Andy Berdj Gamitian
Proposed name: Andrew Berdj Gamitian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on January 8,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 11/01/2012
/s/ Beth Larson Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/30/2012
(Published, 11/29/12, 12/06/12,
12/13/12, 12/20/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253215
The following person is doing business
as: Hitting World, 1353 Cordilleras Ave.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: B Side
Enterprise, INC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Bryan Sidensol /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253340
The following person is doing business
as: Made In China Restaurant, 681 San
Mateo Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Fengzhi Gao, 1763 Hubbard Ave., San
Leandro, CA 94579. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Tiffany Lapedus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253172
The following person is doing business
as: Lo Reaux & Son Plumbing, 570 San
Bruno Ave., West, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: John I. Lo Reaux, 549 Cedar
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066-4117. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/1960.
/s/ John I. Lo Reaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253259
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Laurie McLean Consulting, 2) Am-
bush Books, 3) Joyride Books, 9200 Al-
pine Rd., LA HONDA, CA 94020 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Laurie McLean, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Laurie McLean /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253088
The following person is doing business
as: Chateau Esthetics, 549 Commercial
Ave. #6, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Elise Chateauvieux, 2211
33rd Ave., San Francisco, CA 94122.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Elise Chateauvieux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253385
The following person is doing business
as: Terrazza on 25th, 25 West 25th Ave.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jamie Lynn
Oliveira, 47 East 20th Ave. San Mateo,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Jamie Lynn Oliveira /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
23 Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253375
The following person is doing business
as: C & A Tours, 17 E. 4th Ave, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Philip Zhou, 300
Murchison Dr., #316, Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Philip Zhou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253374
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Table Tennis Club, 1299
Bayshore Hwy #100, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Yu Xuan Chen, 3826 Kirkham
St., San Francisco, CA 94122. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Yu Xuan Chen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/29/12, 12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253392
The following person is doing business
as: Ugly Duck Studio, 662 Coleman
Ave., MENLO PARK, CA, 94025 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Pauline Prideaux, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Pauline Prideaux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253409
The following person is doing business
as: K-Bob Co., A Partnership, 217 Irving
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Robert
Kidwell, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/01/2012
/s/ Robert Kidwell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253332
The following person is doing business
as: Integrity Auto, 1792 El Camino Real,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Roger
Kanbar and Paulina Kanbar, 1670 El Ca-
mino Real, #260, Menlo Park, CA 94025.
The business is conducted by Husband
and Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Paulina Kanbar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 11/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/06/12, 12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253572
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Bellingham Group Consul-
tants, 4 Buccaneer Lane, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94065 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Stephen Paul Bel-
lingham & Mayling M.L. Bellingham,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by Husband & Wife. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mayling M.L. Bellingham /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253533
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Source Beads & Arts, 810
Schooner Bay Dr., REDWOOD CITY, CA
94065 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Ting Li Xia and Zhi Ping
Wang, same address. The business is
conducted by Husband and Wife. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Ting Li Xia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253444
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bombshell, 263 Hatch Ln., Ste.
A, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ste-
phanie Palladino, 152 Poplar Ave., San
Bruno, CA 94010, Christina Palladino,
1628 Virginia Ave., CA 94061. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
03/29/2006.
/s/ Stephanie Palladino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/13/12, 12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253526
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Mangia Kai Pasta Party, 2)Ms. Din-
nertable, 2509 Ensenada Way, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Anthony T. Calegari-
Heimuli, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Anthony T. Calegari-Heimuli /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/12, 01/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253616
The following person is doing business
as: Shannon Financial Services, 274
Redwood Shores Pkwy, #407, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: David
Shannon, 804 Cape Cod Dr., Redwood
City, CA 94065. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ David Shannon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/12, 01/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253560
The following person is doing business
as: Little Footprints, 609 Poplar Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Megan Portillo 609 Poplar Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 12/01/2012.
/s/ Megan Portillo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/20/12, 12/27/12, 01/03/12, 01/10/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-246550
The following persons have abandoned
the use of the fictitious business name:
Dymaxicon, 502 Barbados Ln., FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404. The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 09/06/2011. The business
was conducted by: Chris Sims, 502 Bar-
bados Ln., FOSTER CITY CA 94404
/s/ Chris Sims /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/19/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 12/20/12,
12/27/12, 01/03/12, 01/10/12).
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PRPERTY
AT PRIVATE SALE
No. 122764
In re the matter of the Estate of Olive
Robertson, Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that subject
to conformation by this court, onDecem-
ber 16, 2012, or thereafter within the time
allowed by law, Ralph A. Rizzo, as exec-
utor of the above-named decedent, will
sell at private sale ot the highest and
best net bidder, on the terms and condi-
tions stated below, all right, title, and in-
terest of the decedent at the time of
death and all right, title, and intrest that
the estate has acquired in addition to that
of the decedent at the time of death, in
the real property located in the San Ma-
teo County, California, more particulary
described below:
The property is commonly referred to as
114 McLellan Avenue, San Mateo, Cali-
fornia, assessor’s parcel number 040-
052-200, and is more fully described as
follows:
The Southwesterly 50 feet, front and rear
measurements of lot 2, Block4, Map of
Town of Beresford Map 1, filed October
30, 1926, Book 14 of Maps,Page 44, San
Mateo County Records.
The property will be sold subject to cur-
rent taxes, covenants, conditions, restric-
tions, reservations, rights, rights of way,
and easements of record, with any en-
cumbrances of record to be satisfied
from the purchase price.
The personal repersentive has given an
exclusive listing to Teri Shaughnessy, a
licensed agent of the offices of RE/MAX
Star Carlmont.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be deliv-
ered to or mailed to the office of Teri
Shaughnessy, RE/MAX Star Carlomont,
1940 Ralston Avenue, Belmont, CA
94002, or to Matthew M Shafae, attorney
for the Executor, at 1156 El Camino Re-
al, San Carlos, California 94070, at any
time after the first publication of this No-
tice and before any sale is made.
203 Public Notices
The property will be sold on the following
terms: all cash, 10% of the amount of
the bid to accompnay the offer by certi-
fied check, and the balance to be paid
upon confirmation of sale by the court.
Taxes, rents, operating and maintenance
expenses and premiums on insurance
acceptable to the purchaser shall be pro-
rated as of the date of recording of con-
veyance. Examination of title, recording
of conveyance, transfer taxes, and any ti-
tle insurance policy shall be at the ex-
pense of the purchaser or purchasers.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
ject any and all bids.
For futher information and bid forms,
contact Teri Shaughnessy, of the offices
of RE/MAX Star Carlmont, 1940 Ralston
Avenue, Belmont, CA 94002
Date: December 5, 2012
/s/ Executor, Ralph A. Rizzo/
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on December 6, 13, 20, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND CHIHUAHUA mix Terrier tan
male near West Lake shopping Center in
Daly City (415)254-5975
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Gold rim glasses, between 12th
& 14th Ave. in San Mateo on 12/9/12,
(650)867-1122
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST SET of keys. Down town San Ma-
teo. 8 to 10 keys on Key chain including
Lincoln car key, kodatrue@gmail.com
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., (650)342-8436
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., (650)342-8436
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $50 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
296 Appliances
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1937 LOS ANGELES SID GRAUMANS
Chinese Theatre, August program, fea-
turing Gloria Stuart, George Sanders,
Paul Muni, Louise Rainer, $20. SOLD!
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1969 LIFE MAGAZINE “Off to the
Moon”, featuring Armstrong, Aldrin, and
Collins, article by Charles Lindburgh,
$25., San Mateo, SOLD!
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
62 USED European Postage Stamps.
Many issued in the early 1900s. All dif-
ferent and detached from envelopes.
$5.00 SOLD!
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE ALCOHOL ADVERTISING
STATUE - black & white whiskey, $75.
OBO, SOLD!
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO (650)345-5502
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY Alums! Want
a "Bill Orange" SU flag for Game Day
displays? $3., 650-375-8044
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair,
(650)375-8044
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET TV - double doors,
34”W, 22”D, 16”H, modern, glass, $25.,
(650)574-2533
24
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Canaanite god
5 Humiliate
10 Speed-of-sound
ratio
14 Play the siren
15 Mombasa’s
country
16 Flash, perhaps
17 Red states?
18 Hotel room
amenities
19 Convinced
20 Reason for
detention,
perhaps
23 Fore-and-aft-
rigged ship
24 Samson’s
betrayer
28 “I am Fortune’s
fool” speaker
32 Dough
33 Intel collector
36 Unexpected
attack, as of
dizziness
39 Srs.’ income
sources
41 Pedro’s lucky
number?
42 Masters champ
between Craig
and Ben
43 Melodious
sounds
46 Like Mars,
apparently
47 Pioneering
computer
48 Tennis great with
11 Grand Slam
singles titles
50 Frat party
recyclable
53 __ code
57 Publication since
1967, and a hint
to the end of 20-,
36- and 43-
Across
61 Where to find a
hero
64 Icy cold
65 Floor plan
division
66 Hubristic
67 “Hunger
Games” battle
setting
68 Prefix with
European
69 Put under
70 Lamb creation
71 Hammer part
DOWN
1 Control tower
spots
2 Ear-related
3 Playground retort
4 Rent collector
5 Similar
6 Cold water
hazard
7 Before thou
know’st
8 Church council
9 Cause of many a
mistake
10 Religious
enterprises
11 Busy goings-on
12 Disney collectible
13 Hornswoggled
21 NASDAQ debuts
22 Saint with a fire
25 Short-straw
drawer
26 Anti-
inflammatory
brand
27 Abominable
29 It’s not optional
30 Polish language
31 Ancient Greek
theater
33 Hit back?
34 Trim, as a tree
35 Singer in the
Whiffenpoofs
37 Italian peak
38 Sine qua non
40 Permanently
marking
44 Danish shoe
company
45 Weakens
49 Deliver, as a
rant
51 Aquatic plant life
52 Phils, e.g.
54 Whom to trust,
per a 33-Across
55 Positive pole,
perhaps
56 Fruit high in
vitamin C
58 Places in la mer
59 One of a historic
seagoing trio
60 Howdy from
Adelaide
61 Pirate’s booty?
62 Teacup handle
63 C.W. Post is its
largest campus
By Jeff Stillman
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
12/20/12
12/20/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
BASE CABINET, TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $55 Call (650)342-7933
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$99 (650)315-5902
COCKTAIL BAR, Mint condition, black
leather, SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET - mint condition,
brown, 47 in. long/15 in wide/ great for
storage, display, knickknacks, TV, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. SOLD!
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ HUTCH - Stained
green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WINGBACK CHAIR $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CHRISTMAS CRYSTAL PLATTER - un-
opened. Christmas tree shape with or-
naments, SOLD!
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FEATHER/DOWN PILLOW: Standard
size, Fully stuffed; new, allergy-free tick-
ing, Mint condition, $25., (650)375-8044
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 10x30”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
306 Housewares
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, $25 ea, (650)315-5902
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 (650)375-8044
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TOWLE SALAD BOWL/SPOONS - mint
condition, 12-inch round, 2 spoons,
mother of pearl , SOLD!
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor $99 (650)315-5902
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
310 Misc. For Sale
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADJUSTABLE WALKER - 2 front
wheels, new, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
2 1/2' by 5,' $99., (650)348-6428
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office,
brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, Best Offer,
(650)315-5902
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOOD DEHYDRATOR made by
Damark, 5 trays, works good. $30.00
(650)367-8146
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT - Book ti-
tled “Fire Mountain”, reasonable, 380
pages, wine country story, adventure,
love & life, $2.00 each, (650)583-2595
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
KITCHEN FAUCET / single handle with
sprayer (never used) $19, (650)494-1687
Palo Alto
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD WOODEN Gun case SOLD!
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLAYBOY MAGAZINE COLLECTION -
over 120 magazines, SOLD!
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RUG - 8x10, oriental design, red/gold,
like new, $95., San Mateo, SOLD!
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOW CONTAINERS for show, with pin
frog, 10-25 containers, $25 all, (650)871-
7200
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 (650)341-1728
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $10.
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF RACK 3 piece. clamp-on,
$75 (650)948-4895
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WHEELCHAIR - Used indoors only, 4
months old, $99., (650)345-5446
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
KEYBOARD CASIO - with stand, adapt-
er, instructions, like new, SanMateo,
$60., (650)579-1431
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
UPRIGHT BASS 3/4 size, SHEN SB100
with bag and stand and DBL Bass bug-
gie, all new $2000, OBO
wilbil94204@yahoo.com
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
ZITHER - CASE: Antique/rare/excellent
cond; Maroon/black, gold stenciling. Ex-
tras. Original label "Marx Pianophone
Handmade Instrument", Boston. $100.
(650)375-8044
25 Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
312 Pets & Animals
KENNEL - small size, good for small
size dog or cat, 23" long 14" wide &
141/2" high, $25. FIRM (650)871-7200
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, SOLD!
SERIOUS HUNTERS ONLY -yellow
labs, TOP pedigree line, extreme hunters
as well as loving house dogs available
11/19/12 see at at
www.meganmccarty.com/duckdogs,
(650)593-4594
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT - 3/4 length, black,
never worn, SOLD!
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
316 Clothes
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS JACKETS
(2) - 1 is made by (Starter) LG/XLG ex-
cellent condition $99. for both,
SOLD!
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
318 Sports Equipment
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
(650)589-8348
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday
and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$1950. obo, (650)465-6056
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
orSOLD!
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95.,
(650)333-4400
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
26
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 •
Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
HVAC
HRAC HEATING & APPLIANCES
Refrigeration - Water Heaters
REPAIR ,REPLACEMENT
& SERVICE
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES WITH REPAIR
SAME DAY SERVICE
(650)589-3153 (408)249-2838
www.hracappliancerepair.com
Lic.#A46046
Landscaping
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S
PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of
Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets
(650) 461-0326
Lic#933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
Food
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
THE COLLEGE of SAN MATEO
OFFERS
EVENING SOCIAL BALLROOM &
SWING DANCE CLASSES at the
BEGINNING & INTERMEDIATE
LEVELS
Starting Jan. 14, 2013
• fees average $4.70 per class
• go to http://collegeofsanmateo.edu
• or call (650) 574-6420 or Email
waltonj@smccd.edu for more info
27 Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER
JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
RELAXING
MASSAGE
THERAPY
Enjoy a premium massage with
essential oils that relieves
stress and fatigue.
Come and pamper yourself.
Please call to book your session.
(408)796-9796 Sophia
SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • Dec. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
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Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 12/31/12
WEBUY
$â0
OFF ANY
$â0
OFF ANY

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