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Chew Valley School Teaching and Learning

THE TEACHER’S TOOLKIT Version 1.2

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Strategy

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Literacy3

Reading

Writing
• Long and Short Sentences • Good writing contains a mix of long and short sentences. • Tell students this! • Varied Sentence Starters • Try banning the use of "a" or "the" (articles) at the start of sentences • Teach students to begin sentences with: • "-ed" words (past participles) • "-ly" words (adverbs) • "-ing" words (present participles) • Varied Connectives • Connective help structure writing and thinking • Point out connectives in a text and ask what they are doing • Provide a help sheet (see below) and teach students to use it

Spelling
• See • Does it look right? • Hear • Does it sound right? • Feb-ru-ar-y • Bus-i-ness • Link • What's the rule? • Mnemonics (Rhythm Helps Your Two Hips Move) • Phrases (there is "a rat" in "separate") • Analogy ("ice" is a noun, so is "practice"; "ise" is not a noun, neither is "practise" - it's a verb)

• Skimming • Read to get an overview of what a whole text is about • Look for clues - the first sentence of each paragraph (the "topic sentence) • Try showing a text to a class for five seconds, then asking what it was about. How did they know? • Scanning • Reading to retrieve a particular piece of information • Teach students that the key points in texts are likely to be in the first and last paragraphs • Teach them to hunt for clue words • Research • Avoid FOFO • What exactly do you want students to find out? • Teach students to triangulate sources - they need at least three to make the evidence stand up

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Strategies
1 GIVE ME FIVE – As students to name five things they have learnt from the lesson or previous lesson. To give the activity structure ask students to draw around their hand and then place the 5 items on the fingers. The palm of the hand can be used to identify a personal target for the lesson or next lesson. Students can swap books/paper and then try to add additional things that have been missed. REGISTER RESPONSE - When taking the register ask all students to answer with a subject specific word or a response to a pre-asked question rather than yes sir/miss. Questions can be opinion based, rating something out of 10 or giving a descriptive word in response to a photo or word, e.g. mountain, science, music. SENTENCE COMPLETION - Give the students an opening to a sentence. Select students to finish it off. E.g. the most important reason for counterurbanisation is… A series of sentence stems maybe placed on the whiteboard, or placed into different boxes to differentiate asking certain students to do one from a particular box. OPINION LINE - Read out a controversial statement or one over which there will be disagreement, e.g. people who don’t recycle should be fined. On two walls have the extreme views, e.g. definitely should be fined, and definitely shouldn’t be fined. Ask students to stand in a part of the line that represents their view most accurately. Question students to draw out their justification. Can also be a very effective plenary to see if opinions have changed. Students can also be identified to argue their case to shift the views of others. MISSING WORD – Students are given a piece of text with missing words. Each gap has a number in it. Students are asked to write the numbers into their books and write down what they think the missing words might be. Less able students can be given a sheet of paper with some/all of the words on. TRUE & FALSE CARDS - Ask a question to which students have to hold up true or false cards. If you don’t have any cards get students to put their thumbs up or down. Questions could relate to previous learning or to assess the current lesson. KEYWORD BINGO – Ask students to write ten key words on a page that are linked to days lessons. I.e. key aspects/words they have learnt. In turn students call out one of their key words, the teacher pools these on the board one at a time and students tick them off if they have them. Student who ticks off all their key words wins.

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TWENTY QUESTIONS - Write a key word onto a post-it note and stick to a student’s head or back. He/she then has to ask no more than 20 questions to work out what their words is. Students can only answer yes or no. This can be done with one individual in front of the class or with each student having a post-it note and walking around the classroom asking fellow students questions to guess their identity. READY STEADY TEACH - In pairs or groups students are asked to teach to their partners/group a key parts of the lesson e.g. How do solids become liquids? They must only use the either a task card or an object – e.g. a task card may say mime the answer or an object maybe some play dough etc. They have a limited time to complete the task which the rest of the group listen to and watch. The group then feed back what has been explained and what could be added. This can then be extended by swapping the task card with another group, selecting a different person to teach and having a different key part of the lesson to teach. QUESTION AND ANSWER – ask students to create as many questions and answers to do with the previous series of lessons or the lesson they have just experienced. The teacher then asks students to either read out their question or to answer a student’s question. 5 W’S - Put up an unusual picture that is related to the content of the lesson. Ask questions related to the 5 W's: Who, What, Where, When and Why. PICTURE REVEAL - Reveal parts of the picture gradually on PowerPoint – students guess what the picture is each time a piece is revealed. The template is provided on the network under ‘Picture Board Reveal Exercise’. Simply add in your own picture. DIAMOND 9 – Template on the system for drag and drop– ask students to rank 9 items based on a set criteria then allow them to change and reflect after discussion. CREATE THE HEADLINE- Students are given a picture and have to create a suitable headline for it. Can be one picture projected onto a whiteboard or several individual pictures which can then be shared. QUESTION THE PICTURE - Students come up with questions they would like to ask about what is going on in a given picture. Students may return to the picture at the end of the lesson and see if they now know the answers to their original questions. SPOT THE DIFFERENCE - Two pictures put side by side which illustrate a change. Students have to find all the differences possible. COLLECTIVE MEMORY – place a complex image or diagram in a part of the room away from students. Place students in pairs or groups and ask them in turn to look at the image for a few seconds, they should then return to their group and draw/recreate the image/diagram. See group activities on page 20.

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PICTIONARY – In groups or pairs. One student is shown a key word or phase and then has to draw it without using any words or speaking. If the guessing students get it right, the drawing student nods and the students guessing put their hands up. Teacher stops the activity, reviews and continues if the student has got it wrong. TABOO – Students work in pairs. One student is given a set of key words from last lesson or from the current lesson. They have to describe them to their partner without using that key word. Their partner guesses. After a period of time stop the activity and ask students how many they have achieved. Swap the card and the other student can mime the words, do Pictionary for the words, try to talk about the topic for 1 minute using as many of the key words as possible. Both students could then summarise the learning in the lesson by using the keywords to construct a paragraph. Students could also be tasked with creating their own taboo cards to summarise a lesson which they swap and carry out the activity. ODD ONE OUT – complete one or make their own on a theme. To differentiate ask students to create their own odd one out. Alternatively you can ask them to add a fourth word or concept to the list without changing the odd one out. WORD WHEELS – A variation on anagrams. Write a keyword into a wordwheel template and ask the students to unscramble it and see how many other words they can make. Five extra marks for words connected to the topic. Useful as bell-work when students are first arriving to the lesson. UNSCRAMBLE KEY WORDS – series of key words scrambled on the board for students to unscramble. This can be extended by asking students to identify odd one out or linking them together. The key aim of the lesson can also be unscrambled. LINKING – key words / concepts and themes across the board – ask students to link them and ask why they have linked them. Come up to the board draw a link and explain to the class. CATEGORISING – series of key words on the board. Ask students to create their own set of categories and then place the key words into the categories. Alternatively give the students the categories from the beginning. JEOPARDY - Lists of answers or key words which students are familiar with are written on the board. Students have to create a question with one of the key words as the answer. KEYWORD/WORD BANK - A list of key words is displayed on the board. Students have to create a sentence using as many of these key words as possible. To differentiate students are given word banks with a more extensive vocabulary to include.

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STEPPING STONES – Keywords are placed into three groups – this could be based on knowledge, verbs, nouns etc. Students have to create a sentence or paragraph using a word from each group in order supported by other words of their choice. E.g. In 1933 Adolf Hitler became Chancellor of Germany after a series of political deals. Give students a selection of words in each group (stone). More stones (groups) can be added to see how far students will go. CONTENTIOUS STATEMENT - End the lesson with a statement which students should challenge or defend explaining their choice. Students should be encouraged to discuss it first in pairs and then bullet point a response which they share with the class. Followed by a final vote. MNEMONIC - Create a mnemonic to remember today's key idea - e.g. a simple example is Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain to remember the colours of the rainbow. HOTSEATING – A series of questions or key words are placed on the board. A student is selected to come up to the board and tick one question/word on the board and then take the hot heat. The students has to then explain the key word/answer to the class. They maybe cross examined by the teacher/students. MUSICAL HATS - Have a series of starters to sentences which are about the work that has been carried out. Put them into a hat, play some music and pass them round. When the music stops the student has to take a slip of paper out of the hat and complete the sentence that they have the starter to. Questions can be colour coded. When the music stops as students to select a particular coloured question. The colours should relate to the difficulty of the question. STUDENT AS TEACHER - One student assumes the role of the teacher to explain concepts to class in their own words. Alternatively a student expert could demonstrate a process or activity for others to learn. JUST A MINUTE - Ask two students to talk about the subject of the lesson without repeating any key aspects. Girls v boys competition works well! G&T students can take a lead role in this activity. You can stretch them by extending the time they have to speak for. They can take the role of referee to mark off those words already mentioned. VERBAL TENNIS – On a specific topic or theme, students in pairs take it in turns to say a word on the topic. E.g. earth , moon, sun, solar , Pluto etc. FOOTBALL – See football template – split the class in half and answer questions – the team moves closer to the goal for every answer correct. After 5 correct answers a goal is scored. KEY LETTERS – Teacher shouts out a letter and pupils have to respond with a key word beginning with that letter that they are currently using in their topic of study. Teacher can target groups by saying only one side can answer or pupils with surnames beginning with ........etc.

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BINGO – Pupils are given ‘bingo’ sheets containing key words from the subject. Teacher reads out definitions of key words. Pupils mark their bingo sheets when they hear teacher read a definition that matches one of the key words on their sheet. First pupil to get a line calls ‘BINGO!’ and wins. Students can also make their own bingo cards or be asked to give definitions from their own card. COUNT DOWN – 30 seconds to unscramble a new key word or select letters / numbers. See big clock. CREATING TITLES – Teacher writes 3 or 4 key words on board. Pupils create their own titles for the piece of work they are about to do, using all of the key words. MIND MOVIES – Pupils close eyes. Read part of a short story or passage to class. Tell them to imagine what is happening in their mind. When you have finished reading, tell pupils to keep their eyes closed and continue to ‘run the movie’ in their minds for one minute. Take feedback from class about what happened in their mind movies. Could be very good for introducing certain topics. 20 QUESTIONS – Teacher (or a pupil volunteer) picks a key person, event, place etc. that is connected to the topic. The class is allowed to ask 20 Yes or No answer questions to try to find out what person, event etc. has been picked. WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNT AND HOW CAN YOU PROVE IT? – ask students to answer this question as part of a plenary. PLAY YOUR CARDS RIGHT - Another good one for Chronology or process is 'Play your cards right'. Same rules as the quiz show. One contestant has AD year cards, and the other has BC year cards. Instead of 'higher' or 'lower', the contestants (and 'audience', if you are encouraging all the pupils to participate) have to choose 'earlier' or 'later'. They usually get the BC ones wrong at first of course, but it encourages them to remember the way BC works correctly. See template. FORMULAS / ANAGRAMS – test students understanding by breaking down learning points into simple formulas. USE OF MUSIC - Bring in a small ghetto blaster and play them some music: something lyrical; something that excites a response: Tupac, Bob Dylan, MC Paul Barman, Sparks, The Silver Jews; anything which is of interest linguistically, and linked to your topic. Get your class to transcribe the lyrics. This is not only a really buzzy way to start a lesson, but it gets students quiet, developing their ability to listen pointedly, and allows them a brief moment bathing in language. SPOT THE MISTAKES – Students are given a piece of text/labeled diagram/sequence etc. or shown it on a PowerPoint slide. Ask students to identify as many mistakes as possible and review.

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ALPHABET LISTS - Hand out a worksheet of the alphabet with room to write next to the letters. The task might 'List words describing Macbeth beginning with each letter of the alphabet'. Such a chart structures thinking and works especially for boys, creating a sense of competitiveness to fill as many boxes as they can. It stops the usual list of five responses and the 'Have I done enough yet?' cry. It doesn't matter if some letters are not fruitful. WRONG STATEMENTS – ALL GOLD IS BLUE – ask students to create a number of clearly wrong statements to share with the class. In order for them to create clearly wrong statements they will be demonstrating what they clearly know. SNAKE TONGUES – to test opinion – students put their hands up and then down very quickly as the teacher gives a range of options or moves their finger over a scale/list. Ask students to circle to key word in the title or aims and then perform a snake tongue when the teacher passes a ruler or finger over the words. Test class understanding. DIALOGUE A PICTURE – give students a picture e.g. of two character and ask them to fill in speech bubbles to highlight what the characters might be saying to each other. THE SQUAD – Ask students to select 11 key words from the lesson to make a team – now select which 5 would make the 5-a-side team as the 5 key words/elements of the lesson and justify their choice. PASS THE ANSWER - Conveyor belt system – students in pairs start to write an answer to a key question, they then are asked to stop and ‘pass the answer’ backwards, the pair behind then continue the answer. This is repeated; those students at the back of the class will need to walk their contribution to the front to keep the conveyor belt going. Repeat until pairs get their original answer back. Works effectively on an individual basis or with story/poem writing. JIGSAWING – students have a “home group” and split up, sending representatives to new “expert groups” to learn specific aspects of a topic. They then return to their home group to share what they have learned. See group activities on page 20. GRANNY WENT TO MARKET – method for memorising, testing and revision – students have to repeat what the previous student said but adding on an extra item. Items must be linked to the lesson or can be the order of a sequence/process. Granny went to market and brought Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Jupiter.
Memory Sequence – adaptation of ‘When I went on my holiday, I put in my suitcase….’ Could be played in any subject where pupils follow a sequence, e.g. in technology. Pupil 1 - ‘When I made my box, first I ……….‘ Pupil 2 ‘- When I made my box, first I …. then I ….’ etc. Good for consolidating sequences and practising time sequencing words – first, next, then, finally etc.

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TRAFFIC LIGHTS –used to gain understand, not sure, don’t understand – or opinion – agree, disagree, not sure, or an A, B , C answer approach. 6

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MIME IT – ask students in silence to mime an aspect of the lesson. The game of charades gives this activity structure. FREEZE FRAME – students act out a scene or process and then the teachers says ‘freeze’. Students then discuss at which point it has been frozen, those students in the freeze frame explain what they were doing at the point of the freeze frame. POST IT NOTES – variety of uses - Share an answer / Show opinion / who or what am I ▪ On 4 sheets of A3 paper, stick, write or place a different question/ statement/ picture/ painting /diagram or object. ▪ Put pupils into 4 groups. ▪ Give each group A, B, C or D one of the sheets so each group has a different one ▪ Also give some post-it notes to each group. ▪ Pupils have 2 minutes to respond to the question/ describe the visual/ annotate the diagram etc. They write their responses on post-its, legibly and stick on the A3 paper. ▪ Now, group A moves to group B's table, B to C's table, C to D’s table and D to A’s. ▪ They read the previous post-it notes and add to the responses – they cannot repeat ideas. ▪ Groups move around again and repeat. Each time their thinking will be extended as they cannot repeat ideas. ▪ Pupils move back to original table to read their post –its. ▪ Groups feed back to the class. This activity is: visual; auditory; kinaesthetic; differentiated to support weaker pupils; an excellent means of extending pupils; quick to resource (it may sound complicated but it isn't!); an excellent way of getting pupils to 'see the details' as preparation for written work, essay, evaluation, design notes, and it can be applied in almost all subject areas. FLOW CHARTS - Provide pupils with a flow chart which they are to complete
by filling in the missing boxes.

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STORY BOARDS- students map out a process, event or narrative in a cartoon-strip fashion. See also “Photostory” on page 14. PLENARY GRID / LEARNING IN ‘STYLE’ MENU – Give students a range of options to demonstrate learning or how they will learn. Students are challenged further by saying that they need to use a certain number or must use one from each section. See template. INTERVIEW – Interview students about the lesson. Split the class into interviewers with set questions and those being interviewed. Then swap over. Start the interview questions off at a basic level e.g. what is you name? then scaffold up to key enquiry questions.

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CARD SORTS – used to match key words with definitions, placed in priority order, select and deselect, grouped in different ways. Add blank cards for more able to add information/options. In card sorting, pupils classify, categorise, sequence, prioritise or rank order information. This requires pupils to make connections between ideas and see patterns. Card sorting is an excellent means of developing pupils’ ability to: structure writing in a logical way; support their ideas with evidence; identify what is relevant and irrelevant. Particularly useful in English, History, Geography, RE and PSHE An example from a History lesson on slavery: Give each group an envelope containing the cards and a piece of sugar paper. Explain that on cards in the envelope are points which answer the following question: What was life like for slaves? Some are 'big' points and some are 'little' supporting points. There are also 2-3 points which are about slavery (topic relevant), but which are not relevant to the question. Differentiation/ Extension C) The 'big' points are in bold, the 'little' points are not. Pupils match little supporting points to the big points. B) As above but include more cards than for group C A) Pupils devise their own way of grouping the points and write their own headings on blank cards provided ▪ Pupils try and identify the irrelevant points and put these outside the 'zone of relevance', i.e. outside the sugar paper. ▪ Pupils rank order big points so the 'biggest big' point comes first. They then rank order the little supporting points. ▪ A further extension task can be to add an extra little point of your own to each big point. Pupils write these on blank cards provided. ▪ Pupils can be asked to note only the key word from each point onto a 'Big Points – Little Points' grid. Later, pupils use their key word note grid to reproduce the essay, 'What was life like for slaves?' Other sorting ideas. Points which are: For/Against; Cause/Effect; Relevant/Irrelevant; Similarities/Differences; Description/Explanation ▪

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FACE IN THE CROWD – Using a relevant picture to the topic which contains a number of people – ask students to select a person and then note down what they could see, smell, here, touch, taste and then explore what they might be feeling and thinking. See template. WHAT’S IN THE BAG? Students ask questions about what might be in the bag – leads into the topic.

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NEWSFLASH – ICT using PowerPoint – autocue – students work in pairs looking at creating a newsflash about a key topic. One student selects images for the newsflash which will be emailed to the teacher to show on the projector. The other student on a laptop creates the text. See newsflash template. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Students complete a story/picture

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QUESTION WALLS – series of questions are placed on post its by the teacher and then placed on the wall – each pair takes 1 or 2 post its which they will need to answer for the class by the end of the lesson in addition to the lesson objectives. SPIDER DIAGRAMS – give students the key elements and they keep adding. Ask students to then label the key parts by adding numbers to key parts based on a criteria e.g. impact/importance/order/theme INTERNALISATION – students transfer their learning from one medium to another e.g. pictures into words or vice a versa. GUESS THE AIMS – don’t give the students some of the aims of the lesson and some point as them what they believe they might be – perhaps they have been covered up or placed in an envelope. TRANSFER – Ask students to think carefully and answer the question – where can you use/apply this skill in another subject? TIME ACTIVITIES – use the electronic clock 6 THINKING HATS – Factual/emotional/optimistic/pessimistic/creative/judge decision PHYSICAL BAROMETER – place a large agree on one side of the room and disagree on the other. Get students to move to their choice. Add more information or try to get students to persuade the other side to change. Pair students up one from each side and allow them a minute each to put their case forward. Then allow students to move. BRING IT TO LIFE – divide the class into three and allow students to select which area they want to go to, to then demonstrate what they have learnt. Drama / Visual Image / Writing. Give students a limited time and then ask them to move to another area and add to their original style with this new style – e.g. add a visual to the drama or script. WHITEBOARDS – use mini-whiteboards for quick responses to check understanding, for drafting, or small-group collaboration. SPLAT – place a number of answers/keywords on the white board. Two students stand in front of the board and a question is asked to the class/pair of students. The students have to wipe the answer off the board as quickly as possible.

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THE QUESTION WALL – five key questions from the lesson on large pieces of paper. Students are placed into 5 groups and then asked to discuss one of the questions each. After a set time one member of the group is asked to come up and answer the question by writing on the paper. The groups are then asked to move onto the next question and asked to come up look at the previous answer and now add to it after a discussion. This can then be repeated or groups can then be asked to mark it, suggest an improvement etc. etc. BLOCK IT – students draw a set of blocks in a pyramid style – three/two/one - Three blocks at the bottom – three things that you have learnt today? Two blocks – two questions you would still like answering? One - what you have learnt today which connects with what you knew before? FOUR SQUARE – Students create a four square grid – to review/demonstrate – draw a picture in one square / write a paragraph in another / compose a rap/song/poem in one and one square make a list. REMEMBER THE IMAGE / TEXT – students are shown a series of pictures or piece of text. Ask to memorise it and then explain to the class or make notes. SMILEY AND SAD FACES – ask for the student’s opinion – in books make a simple table with a smiley or sad face. Ask students to list what they have understood or not understood, which learning objectives they have/have not achieved or what they have or have not enjoyed about the lesson. INFORMATION RACE – working in pair students are set a series of questions related to the topic which are closed questions e.g. What date was the Battle of Hastings? How large is the Earth? – students are forced to refine their information processing if using the internet or carefully search in textbooks. BE CONCISE – ask students to cut and paste a document then set them a word limit that they need to condense the information into. Then challenge them further by cutting it down to a few key words. How many key words match the teachers set? EDITING - ADD THE VISUALS – give students a key piece of text and ask them to identify and select a limited but accurate set of images to support the text. Ask them to explain their choice and allow students to then change and again explain any changes they have made. VIRTUAL JIGSAW – Students work on a particular element of the topic via ICT working in a small group. They are then given a list of students that they must email their work to. Students have success criteria, evaluate, comment and email back. A MATTER OF OPINION – students are given a ‘dry’ factual report about an event or topic. Working in pairs or individually students adapt the report adding adjectives e.g. good, evil, poor, excellent

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CREATE YOUR OWN WEBPAGE – Using one page on PowerPoint students create a webpage design using hyperlinks which will take them to relevant webpages related to the topic. NEWS TEAM – Groups of 4 – one researcher (info – the facts/background), one editor (the layout), one reporter (opinion/interest) and one photographer (images) – email parts to editor to pull together. Hit a deadline time and email to the teacher to share with the class. Get one students to read out. FOLLOW ME CARDS – create a series of cards with an answer and a question. Get one student to read their question, then the student who thinks they have the answer should answer and then read their question. Creates a chain. This is an excellent activity for end of unit revision. The same Card Loop activity can be used several times as a means of review and revision – pupils will get a different question and answer card each time. Alternative ways of using the activity/ to speed up the activity: ▪ split the class into 2 groups to do the activity separately (means you need ½ the number of questions) ▪ do it as a mingling activity – pupils move around the room trying to find the person with the answer to their card – they will end up in a line in a domino effect. ▪ Get the pupils to write the questions: Ask pupils to write 5-8 questions and answers on a given topic for homework. When marking their books, circle questions which are appropriate for this activity, ensuring that you don't circle the same question more than once. In the next lesson, give each pupil a blank piece of card and ask them to fold it in half. Ask them to write the question circled in their book in the first half of the piece of card. Take in the cards and give them back out again, (if any pupil receives their question again, they should tell you so you can swap cards with someone else), pupils then write the answer to their own previous question in the second half of the new card. You now have a prepared loop game. MATCH UP CARDS – heads and tails exercise to end the lesson – every student is given question or an answer. They pack away and get ready to leave the class. They must then find their partner based on their question or answer. They then line up. The teacher can then ask students to read their question and answer in turn as they leave the room or line up. This can be extended by asking students if they can remember anybody else’s Q&A or by swapping the cards again.

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WORD FUNNEL – Draw a large funnel on the board – as a class students suggest key words / short phrases linked to the learning which are written into the top of the funnel – students can also do this in their books at the same time. Students are then asked to select a limited numbers that will go through the funnel to summarise the learning. 4 CORNERS – Place A, B, C, and D around the room. The Teacher displays a series of questions and answers with A-D options. Students move to the part of the room in accordance with what they believe is the answer. 4 words, headings or categories are stuck on the wall in each corner of the room – 1 in each corner. The teacher calls out a word or sentence and pupils move to the correct area of the room, the last one to get there is out. This can be done as a whole class activity, (rowdy and can get too physical) or in teams by numbering each person – 1 person from each team plays, e.g. all the ones, then the twos etc. The first person to the correct corner scores a point for their team. Examples: • • • • Ways of cooking / Cooking implements/ Weights/ Liquid Measures Verbs / Nouns / Adjectives / Adverbs Words that describe texture/ pattern/ tone/ shape Metal/ Plastic/ Wood/ Textile

It can of course be played with 3 or just 2 corners of the room. The teacher reads statements and pupils move to: • • • •

Agree / Disagree True / False Cause/ Effect For / Against Natural/ Man made

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CROSSWORDS – Get students to create a crossword. This can then be swapped and completed. SEVEN STEPS – Place a starting point on the board and an end point. Ask students to draw a line between them and on the line add 7 key steps that stake place going from start to finish. E.g. Hitler as an artist to Hitler as Chancellor.

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VENN DIAGRAMS Write the nouns in one circle, verbs in another, and words which can be both in the middle. E.g. (D&T) saw / timber /measure vice / construct / fold This can be made kinaesthetic by using areas of the room as parts of the Venn diagram. Pupils move to stand in the correct area.

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CREATE A FLICK BOOK TO SHOW A PROCESS/EVENTS

NEWS CONFERENCE – Explain to students that they will be interviewing an individual about a certain topic e.g. The Prime Minister / a scientist etc. and that they will need a series of questions to ask. From these questions they will need to create a brief statement/report. Play the beginning of a news programme e.g. News24. The teacher acts as the individual and the students ask the questions by raising their hands. Students are then placed in groups to pull together a brief statement about the interview based on a theme. 100 PLANT QUESTIONS OR OPINIONS – Ask students to ask certain questions or to ask questions from a certain perspective. 101 LISTEN TRIADS – Working in threes students take on the role of talker, questioner and recorder. 102 STAR PROFILES – these are used to chart responses to different aspects of a single item (e.g. taste, texture, colour, size). See excel template.

103 PISTONS – Place 4/5 keywords from the lesson on the board. Students then create questions, facts/statements linked to the words. Write the words on separate A4 pieces of paper and ask 4 students to come to the front sitting on a chair each. The rest of the class read their questions/facts etc. and the correct keyword should stand up and sit down like a piston. The quicker the facts/questions the faster the pistons and more entertaining! 104 PHONE A FRIEND – Encourages class to listen and offers students a way out if they are stuck. 105 PAIR REHERSAL – Ask students to plan and rehearse an answer before sharing it with the class. Encourages interaction, engagement and depth. 106 WORD LIMIT – You can only answer this in 15 words.

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107 RUN AROUND – a series of questions are placed at a location in the room. These usually become more challenging descriptive, explain, analysis, etc. Students work in groups and one student is sent to look at the question return to the group who try to answer it from a range of information. Once they have the answer they go to the teacher who will check, asking for more depth or saying that they can move onto the next question. 108 PHOTOSTORY – create a narrative using pictures which students take themselves. These can be animated in PowerPoint, Prezi or Movie Maker. 109 SPEED DATING – create a series of questions and answers. Students move around the room and ask other students their question, giving the answer if they don’t know. They then swap cards once both questions have been answered. This is repeated for a set time after which students return to their seats. The question cards are collected and the students now work in pairs/groups to answer the same questions as the teacher asks them. 110 TREE OF KNOWLEDGE - Draw a large, bare tree on the board. Pupils given post-it notes which represent the leaves. At the end of the lesson, pupils write what they’ve learnt on the leaf, and attach their leaves to the tree. To extend G&T pupils can arrange the leaves hierarchically – key concepts nearer the trunk with secondary ideas as branches. 111 NOMIN8 - A group of students nominated at the beginning of the lesson is given 8 key questions which will be covered in the lesson. These students must at the end of the lesson read out the questions to the class and provide the answers. This is an excellent way to challenge the G&T students discreetly issuing challenging questions that they should answer by the end of the lesson. 112 FEEDBACK LEADERS - Students nominated at the beginning of the lesson to feedback the key learning points at the end. Excellent opportunity to extend G&T students by giving them this responsibility. 113 TABLEAUX TO EVENTS/STAGES - Small groups prepare still picture(s) of key moments- e.g. 5 tableaux which show St. Alban’s story / the main events of The Battle of Hastings etc. Speak aloud thoughts in role at that particular moment. 114 LABELLING - Label/annotate a diagram or illustration associated with the lesson. 115 GOLDEN RULES - Pupils devise ’golden rules’/tips for others attempting the same task/topic area. 116 CREATE A SURVEY AND TEST STUDENTS OPINIONS – students can create their own survey or select a set number of questions from a list presented to them. 117 DOODLE COMPETITION – give students the beginning of a picture and ask them to complete it based on the lesson aims.

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118 SCREENPLAY – See template – students create six shots/stages to explain what they have learnt in a film format. They can add dialogue/sound effects/locations/characters etc. 119 SHARK - Version of hangman. A volunteer from the class chooses to be the person walking the cliff. Draw them on the end of the cliff. Pupils call out letters, teacher writes correct letters into the word and notes incorrect ones on w/b as a reminder. For every incorrect letter, the person moves further along the cliff, finally falling into the shark's mouth. This can be made kinaesthetic by having a pupil move along an imaginary cliff. 120 CONSTANTINOPLE - Pupils have 5 minutes to make as many words as possible from the letters in a long word. 121 SPELLING PATTERNS ROOTS - Teams find as many words as possible with the same spelling pattern or root, e.g.: light, sight , bright automobile , autograph , autobiography 122 MEMORY GAME - Write 15 words on the w/b or on flashcards. Give pupils a couple of minutes to memorise them then rub out / remove words. Pupils see how many they can remember. This should be differentiated by using words varying in difficulty, both in terms of meaning and spelling. Can be played in teams with more words. 123 CHANGE THE WORD - Pupils try to change a word into another word in so many moves, by changing one letter each time. E.g. Warm – Cold: Warm Ward Word Cord Cold 124 SENTENCE EXTENSION - Pupils add words and phrases to a sentence to see how much longer they can make it. This can be done in teams as a competition. 'King……was a bad king' can become, '……King……who……..in……when………was a …….bad king because he………….and ……………which meant…………..' ' A vice can be dangerous' can become, A vice which is used to…… can be ….dangerous if………. ……because it can…………………….which will cause…………' The winner is the team with the most words in a grammatically correct and well punctuated sentence. It can be used to revise facts, events, cause and effect etc. and also to produce creative writing. 125 WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE? - Pupils explain the difference between two subject keywords which are closely related and may cause confusion., e.g. climate and weather. Can be used as an introduction to a new unit/ to consolidate previous learning. Pupils may need dictionaries. Encourage pupils to use whereas to signal the difference – write a sentence frame on the w/b-' …..is…..whereas…….is……..'

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126 NOUGHTS AND CROSSES - Draw a noughts and crosses grid on the w/b and write a number in each – 1-9. Split class in half and label them noughts or crosses. Team 1 chooses a number from grid. Teacher reads previously prepared question/ definition/ task which corresponds with that number. If pupils respond correctly, they win their O or X. For incorrect answers, the other team wins the O or X. It is now team 2's turn. First team to get 3 Os or Xs in a line wins. 127 HIDDEN SENTENCE - Volunteers sit at the front of the class (any number from 2-4). Teacher gives them a topic to discuss or argue, (revision activity), and gives a card to each pupil. Each card should have a different sentence about the topic written on it. Pupils learn their sentence. At some point during the discussion, each pupil should say their sentence as naturally as possible (and without reading it!) The rest of the class have to guess which sentence was given to them by the teacher – they will need to make notes as a reminder. This can be used to try and get pupils to use subject specific vocabulary in discussion (otherwise their sentence will stick out like a sore thumb!). It is an excellent activity for English to highlight / practice formal language. It can also be fun if one joke sentence/ really posh sentence or 'street' slang sentence is used, especially if it totally contrasts with a pupil's speaking style. 128 CUT UPS - Draw up a list of sentences (about 12) that revise a topic or grammatical point. Sentences should ideally be no longer than 10 words. Ensure they vary in length and difficulty. Number each sentence. Starting with sentence 1, write each word in the sentence on a small piece of card (10 words = 10 cards). Put them in an envelope and write the number 1 on the envelope (it also helps to note the number of words in the sentence on the envelope so pupils can count them back in). Do the same for all sentences. Pupils should be in groups of 3-4. Ask pupils to write numbers 1-12 (depends on number of sentences) in their exercise book. Put the envelopes on a table at the front of the room. One person from each group takes 1 envelope only back to their group. They sequence the sentence and write it in the corresponding number in their book. They then replace the word cards very carefully, counting them back in (nominate a counter), take the envelope back and take another one etc. Winning group is first to finish, providing sentences are correct. Excellent for revising a particular grammar structure, e.g. the passive (English / Science / History) or for revising a topic. 129 ARTICULATE - Put pupils into groups of 3-4 and give each group an envelope containing at least 25 words or phrases. Taking it in turns, pupils have 45 seconds each to explain as many words/phrases as possible without using any derivations of the word(s) (they should take one word/phrase at a time from the envelope, not a handful!). The explainer scores a point for every word/phrase they describe that is guessed correctly, (the skill is in the explaining). Pupils also score a point every time they correctly guess a word/ phrase. Good for practising subject specific terminology and for revising whole topics. 16

130 ANALOGIES - Pupils develop understanding by exploring relationships between words. E.g. metal: car / ______: furniture. Pupils guess missing word Metal is to car as wood is to furniture. Pupils can produce their own 'puzzle' analogies for homework. 131 LIVING PHOTOGRAPHS - Provide 1 or more photographs (containing people, e.g. a war photograph. If more than one, they should be linked in theme). In groups, pupils choose one to recreate as a freeze frame. Teacher then asks for suggestions as to what the 'bigger picture' might be – what is going on that we can't see? Pupils then create the 'bigger picture'. Ask them to be ready to speak their thoughts as the person in the photograph. 132 CONCEAL AND DESCRIBE - In pairs, one pupil describes a picture or photograph to their partner who draws it. The partner should ask questions if anything is unclear. Teacher then asks what was hard to describe, how it was overcome, what sort of questions helped to clarify. It enables pupils to reflect on, and improve, their explanations. It can also help pupils to see the value of knowing the correct terminology as well as giving them an opportunity to practise using it. 133 GUESS THE QUESTION - Write about 6 words on individual pieces of card. The words should be connected by topic or theme. Put them in an envelope (you will need several sets). In groups, pupils take 1 word from the envelope and, orally, ask as many questions as they can think of with that word being the answer. When they can think of no more, they take out the next word. As they go along, they should try and identify the topic or theme that links the words. Having asked questions for the last word, and hopefully identified the topic, they then identify and write down just one question for each word. This time the question should be related to the topic. For Example: Africa / Ship / Drowned / Triangle / Route : The Slave Trade Triangle is the topic. The final questions could therefore be: ▪ Where did the slaves who were part of the trade triangle come from? ▪ How were the slaves transported to America? ▪ What did they do to slaves if food supplies on the ship were running low?

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134 POLYGOBBLING - This works best in practical subjects. It is similar to the game ‘Twenty Questions’ but uses verbs rather than people. In groups, 1 pupil chooses an action (verb) that is commonly done in that subject area. The others have to try and guess the action by asking questions in which they substitute the action for the word ‘polygobble’ and all tense variations of it. The pupil can only answer Yes or No and can include never, rarely, occasionally, sometimes, often always. They should answer in full sentences. The aim is to guess by asking as few questions as possible. E.g., in Food Technology: Q: Do you ever polygobble in water? No, you never polygobble in water. Q: Is polygobbling done on a hob? Yes, polygobbling is done on a hob. Q: Would you polygobble peas? No, you would rarely polygobble peas. Q: Would you polygobble eggs? Yes, you would often polygobble eggs. Q: Did we polygobble yesterday? Yes, we did. Q: Is polygobbling frying? Yes, it is. 135 CLASSROOM OBJECT MODELS - Pupils recreate maps, diagrams and models using objects in the classroom. For example: reproduce the outline of a country or continent using a tie reproduce a battle scene from History or represent an army's route through a country ▪ represent the digestive process – show the route of a piece of food as it travels through the body 136 3-4-5 - In this activity, pupils have 4 minutes to tell the 3 main points of the lesson to 5 people. This is a fast and effective plenary activity. It can also be used as a starter but with questions instead of main points: pupils have 4 minutes to tell 5 people the 3 questions they would like answered on a particular topic. 137 SNOWBALLING - In this activity, pupils combine ideas to find as many examples of something as possible. They begin by writing down 2 ideas of their own. They combine ideas in pairs then in 4s, by joining another pair, and then in 8s etc. 138 "The Room is….." The teacher tells the pupils what the room is, pointing out or labelling key areas. For example: ▪ ▪ ▪ The room is a grid square labelled with letters and/or numbers. The teacher reads out co-ordinates or map references, pupils move to the correct place. The room is Australia, pupils are the population. They move to areas of the room to represent the density of the population. The room is the human body, the head is here, feet are here… Pupils represent parts of the body or internal organs. ▪ ▪

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139 JIGSAW - Pupils are asked to cut up a text/ image or diagram. They then give it to someone else to reproduce/sequence. It is important to tell pupils how many pieces should be in the jigsaw; otherwise some pupils will cut it into 150 tiny pieces that will end up all over the floor! 140 ONE QUESTION BEHIND - Give pupils a list of 8-12 questions on a particular topic, or as a whole class, get pupils to come up with the questions and write them on the w/b. The aim of the game is to answer each question with the previous question's answer. Demonstrate to pupils: get one pupil to ask you the first question but respond with a 'Mmmm'. When they ask the second question, you give the answer to the first question and so on. The combinations can be quite amusing. Give out the list of questions or use ones written on the board, pairs then have a go. You could give a prize to the first pair to get through the whole list. This is a good activity for end of unit revision and regular reviews, as the fun and game element means pupils will be willing to ask and answer the questions on many different occasions. It can be made 'new' again by having the same questions in a different order. 141 KWL GRID - This is a 3 column grid with the headings: What I already Know/ What I Want to know/ What I have Learned. When beginning a topic, pupils brainstorm everything they already know about it and write notes in the K column They then write some questions that they would like to have answered throughout the unit in the W column. At the end of a lesson or unit, pupils complete the L column. This is an excellent means of scaffolding a lesson or unit of work. 142 HEADS TOGETHER - This activity is a means of ensuring all pupils are involved in Question and Answer routines. Put pupils into groups of 4 and ask them to number themselves 1-4. Tell them you will ask a series of progressively more challenging questions that all pupils will be expected to answer – in fact they will not know who will be called on to answer the question. Ask the first question and say ‘Heads Together’ – pupils have to discuss the answer to the question and ALL must be able to verbalise it. Call out a number between 1-4. If you call number 3, all number 3s must put up their hand, you then choose one of them to answer the question. Ask the other number 3s if they agree with the answer and if they would like to add anything further. Ask the next question and repeat. If pupils do not put up their hands when you call a number, it will show that they need more discussion time. This is an excellent plenary activity. It could also be turned into a competition if scoring is used.

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Group Activities

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