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The Hong Kong Polytechnic University 香港理工大學

Department of Computing 電子計算學系

Definitive Programme Document for

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in

Computing 電子計算
Programme Code : 61025 Self-Financing Part-time Mode

September 2012
This Definitive Programme Booklet is applicable to 2012/13 entry cohort.
This Definitive Programme Document is subject to review and changes which the Programme offering Faculty / Department can decide to make from time to time. Students will be informed of the changes as and when appropriate.

Table of Contents Part 1: 1.1 1.2 General Information Introduction Aims and Outcomes of the Programme 1.2.1 Aims 1.2.2 Outcomes Entrance Requirements Programme Structure and Curriculum Design List of Compulsory and Elective Subjects Programme Award 2.2.1 Minimum Credits for the Programme Award 2.2.2 Normal and Maximum Periods Allowed 2.2.3 Minimum and Maximum Credits Per Semester 2.2.4 Zero Subject Enrolment 2.2.5 Language Requirements 2.2.6 General Education Requirements 2.2.7 Eligibility for Award 2.2.8 Award Classification Additional Subjects Assessment 2.4.1 Assessment of Performance in a Subject 2.4.2 Credit Transfer 2.4.3 Overall Assessment 2.4.4 Progression / Academic Probation / Deregistration 2.4.5 Retaking of Subjects 2.4.6 Exceptional Circumstances 2.4.7 Award Classification 2.4.8 Plagiarism Programme Management, Resource and Support Programme Operation and Management 3.1.1 Programme Committee 3.1.2 Programme Leader 3.1.3 Programme Tutor 3.1.4 Programme Executive Group 3.1.5 Subject Leaders 3.1.6 Student / Staff Consultation Group Facility and Support 3.2.1 Computing Hardware. 3.2.2 Computing Software 3.2.3 Computing Laboratories 3.2.4 WebCT Teaching and Learning Support Subject Syllabi Stage 1 Subjects 4 1

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COMP206 Mathematics COMP207 Discrete Structures and Data Model COMP305 Data Structures and Algorithms COMP306 Software Engineering and User Interface COMP307 Operating Systems and System Programming Stage 2 Subject COMP320 Introduction to Internet Computing Stage 3 Subjects COMP451 Final Year Project COMP452 Computing Professionals In Society Electives COMP316 Object-Oriented Methods for Information system Development COMP318 Systems Simulation COMP319 Introduction to Multimedia Computing COMP323 Foundations of Chinese Computing COMP325 Information Systems Management COMP406 Artificial Intelligence COMP407 Computer Graphics COMP408 Parallel & Distributed Computing COMP416 Internetworking Protocols and Software COMP417 Data Warehousing and Data Mining Techniques in Business and Commerce COMP418 Electronic Commerce COMP431 Business Process and Workflow Management COMP432 Logistics Management COMP433 Information Retrieval COMP434 Computational Models COMP435 Biometrics and Security COMP436 Middleware and Distributed Objects COMP437 Mobile Computing COMP439 Game Programming COMP440 Customer Relationship Management COMP441 Software Testing and Quality Assurance COMP443 Knowledge and Information Management COMP444 Internet Infrastructure Security COMP445 Software Process and Project Management COMP446 Computational Finance COMP447 Scientific Computing COMP448 Virtual Reality and Applications COMP449 Information Systems Audit and Control COMP450 IT Governance

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1.1. other all-roundedness characteristics in terms of communication and presentation skills. a foundation for the development of an intellectually curious and questioning individual with desire to keep oneself well-informed (life-long learning) on issues within the computing discipline. which. 1998 (under CBS) 1. Graduates should also be able to contribute to the overall development of the profession and of Hong Kong.5 Normal Duration 1. 1 . with regard to this part-time conversion programme. and the public sector.2 Aims and outcomes of the Programme 1.PART 1: GENERAL INFORMATION 1.1 Aims The aims of the part-time conversion programme are similar to those for the corresponding fulltime programme. except for the relaxation on fundamental concepts of computing. and team work. Graduates should be sensitive to the technical and human aspects of computer applications and be prepared for continued personal development as the computing discipline.A.6 Maximum Duration : Three years : Six years 1.1.1. the value of professional standards and codes of conduct and the appreciation of legal. In particular.8 Final Award : B. is already expected of mature professional higher diploma graduates.4 Mode of Attendance : Part-time 1. and in general. industry. social and ethical issues. defining.1.1 Title of Programme 1.1. the aims include the development of a more reflective individual with a background of knowledge. experience and motivation related to student’s role and his/her ability in professional communal life.1 Introduction 1. The overall aims of this programme are to provide an opportunity for the student to attain a higher standard of education and to obtain a qualification which is internationally recognized and which properly reflects the student’s education ability.7 Programme Structure : Credit-based 1.2. critical and independent thinking.9 Implementation Date : September.(Hons) in Computing 1.2 Programme Code 1.3 Host Department : Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Computing : 61025 : Department of Computing 1.1.1. This programme aims to produce graduates with the intellectual and practical skills necessary to make a greater creative contribution to the application of computers and associated technology in various information processing areas such as business. the environment and the role of the computing professional evolve continually. practice in engineering and logical subject matter for problem recognizing.1. and solving.

1 of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. 4. computer organization and data communication from PolyU. 5. or similar qualifications at an appropriate level from other tertiary educational establishments. understand and value ethical issues in design and development of computing systems. namely Category A and Category B. 2. and be able to design and evaluate for the proper solution by applying computing and related technologies (A/B). Upon finishing this conversion programme. 1. students graduating from the programme would be achieving the programme learning outcomes. 6. Statistics and Computing from PolyU. while exhibiting leadership in a group or team whenever designated or necessary (B). 8. Information Systems.) in Computing programme is an outcome-oriented programme. Systems Analysis. The outcome-oriented programme is designed to geared towards the objective. or Mathematics. communicate effectively in Chinese and English at a level sufficient for project and system presentation and documentation (B). Category A outcomes are tied to the development of professional and academic knowledge and skills and Category B outcomes are relevant to the attributes of all-roundness. OR (c) Pass in Part I Examination of British Computer Society (BCS). 3.1. as well as with each individual subject. Learning outcomes are associated with the programme as a whole. In particular. think and reason critically on developing alternatives in problem solving and application development. students should be nurtured to become all-round upon graduation. In line with the Strategic Objective 1. Software Engineering. solve problems and develop solutions with computing and information technologies in different application areas (A). be responsive to and follow closely the advancement in information technology and their impact to the industrial need for information technology. or similar qualifications at an appropriate level from other tertiary educational establishments. in safeguarding information therein and in developing dependable systems as computing professionals and engineers (A/B). work together as a team in project design and development. with an attitude of continuous and lifelong learning (A/B). 2 . OR (b) Higher Diploma in science or engineering with substantial coverage of computing subjects such as computer programming. There are two specific categories of learning outcomes.2 Outcomes The Bachelor of Arts (Hons.2.3 Entrance Requirements Minimum Entrance Requirements Applicants must have: (a) Higher Diploma in Computing Studies. demonstrate a global outlook in factors that can affect the way computing systems are developed and used (B). they should be able to: 1. possess technical knowledge needed to solve computing problems and to realize solutions in programming and associated technology (A). 7.

will be of great importance to the success of the students on the programme.Applicants are expected to be engaged in relevant full-time employment in an appropriate work environment. 3 . Applicants who do not possess the above qualifications may. Employer support. experience and academic attainment. In recognition of this. applicants who do not possess the formal academic qualifications required for admission but are aged 25 or above on 1st September immediately prior to admission may be granted exemption from the University’s entrance requirements provided that they can demonstrate. In these cases an interview will be conducted in order to determine the suitability of the applicant and other selection criteria may be applied. only be admitted on an individual and exceptional basis. to the satisfaction of the University. inability to obtain employer support will not necessarily preclude the applicant from admission onto the programme but preference will be given to those applicants who can demonstrate support. aptitude/suitability for the programme on the basis of maturity. In a minority of cases the relevant experience may be lacking. subject to the approval of the Faculty Board. in the form of adequate time allowance for study. It is recognised that there will be considerable variation between the applicants in the scope and nature of work experience gained since graduation. In particular. However. the applicant will be requested to seek a letter of support from his/her employer.

etc. % Exam % 100 100 # --# # pre-requisite requirement and assessment method depending on individual subject 4 . Stage 1 Code COMP206 COMP207 COMP306 COMP305 COMP307 Subject Mathematics Discrete Structures & Data Model Software Engineering & User Interface Data Structures & Algorithms Operating Systems & System programming + 1 elective in Semester 2 Sem 1 1 1 2 2 C/E C C C C C E Prerequisites -----Credit 3 3 3 3 3 31 18 Assessment C. Stage 2 during year 2.% Exam % 55 45 55 45 55 45 60 40 55 45 # # # Total Credits: Stage 2 Code COMP320 Subject Introduction to Internet Computing + 2 electives in Semester 1 and 3 electives in Semester 2 Sem 1 C/E C E Prerequisites -# Total Credits: Credit 3 35 18 Assessment C.A. % Exam % 55 45 # # Stage 3 Code COMP452 COMP451 Subject Computing Professionals in Society Final Year Project + 1 elective in each semester Sem 1 1-2 C/E C C E Prerequisites --# Total Credits: Credit 3 9 32 18 Assessment C.A. taking the subjects in Stage 1 during year 1.1 List of Compulsory and Elective Subjects A “regular” student would normally take 3 years to complete the programme.PART 2: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM DESIGN 2.A.

A. % Exam % 60 40 55 45 55 45 55 45 55 45 55 45 60 40 55 45 55 45 55 45 55 55 60 55 55 60 55 55 55 60 55 55 60 55 60 55 60 55 55 45 45 40 45 45 40 45 45 45 40 45 45 40 45 40 45 40 45 45 * electives are subject to change and revision 5 .Electives* Code COMP316 COMP318 COMP319 COMP323 COMP325 COMP406 COMP407 COMP408 COMP416 COMP417 COMP418 COMP431 COMP432 COMP433 COMP434 COMP435 COMP436 COMP437 COMP439 COMP440 COMP441 COMP443 COMP444 COMP445 COMP446 COMP447 COMP448 COMP449 COMP450 Subject OO Methods for Information Systems Development Systems Simulation Introduction to Multimedia Computing Introduction to Chinese Computing Information Systems Management Artificial Intelligence Computer Graphics Parallel & Distributed Computing Internetworking Protocols and Software Data Warehousing and Data Mining Techniques in Business and Commerce Electronic Commerce Business Process and Workflow Management Logistics Management Information Retrieval Computational Models Biometrics and Security Middleware and Distributed Objects Mobile Computing Game Programming Customer Relationship Management Software Testing and Quality Assurance Knowledge and Information Management Internet Infrastructure Security Software Process and Project Management Computational Finance Scientific Computing Virtual Reality and Applications Information Systems Audit and Control IT Governance Credit 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prerequisites --COMP305 --COMP305 COMP305 COMP307 --COMP320 --COMP305 COMP305 & COMP307 COMP207 & COMP319 -COMP307 COMP305 COMP305 -----COMP305 COMP407 COMP325 COMP325 Assessment C.

award classification.4 Assessment The prime purpose of assessment is to enable students to demonstrate that they have met the aims and objectives of the academic programme. deferment of study. Academic regulations governing assessment.e. etc. 0.7 The minimum (unweighted) GPA value for graduation is 2. in particular that they have fulfilled the requirement of each subject and have.2. 2.3.5 There are no specific language requirements. exemption and credit transfer.2. de-registration. and 4 subjects are 0. subject registration.0.2. For the list of additional subjects.3 The maximum number of credits to be taken by a student in a semester is 21 credits. re-assessment. Students are not required to retake additional subject that has been failed. Appropriate methods of assessment will be employed to achieve this purpose. 2. 2.2 The normal and maximum duration for completion of the award is 6 and 12 semesters respectively.1 Students are required to complete a minimum of 54 credits. grading.2. The additional subjects can only be selected within the BAC (Part-time) curriculum. students are allowed to take additional subjects on top of their curriculum requirement subject to availability of study place.4 Students will not be allowed to take zero subject in any semester unless they have obtained prior approval from their department. Weighted GPA). otherwise they will be classified as having unofficially withdrawn from their study. 3. Any semester in which the students are allowed to take zero subject will nevertheless be counted towards the maximum period of registration. The assessment methods will also allow discrimination between the performance of students in each subject. at the end of their study achieved the standard appropriate to the award.2 Programme Award 2. The weights for Level 2.2.1. 2. students should access the subject registration facilities on web during add/drop period. 2. 2. 2.2. and 0. However. respectively. the BAC(PT) programme also have a few programme-specific regulations of its own. The regulations are summarized as follow: 6 .3. are subject to the prevailing regulations which are common to all credit-based programmes of the university. Assessment will also serve as feedback to students. Additional fees will be charged for credit fee paying students.2.8 The weighted GPA is used to determine the award classifications. they will be excluded from counting toward the fulfillment of award and the calculation of the GPA for award classification (i. progression.2.2. 2.3 Additional Subjects Starting from 2002/03. 2.6 There are no general education requirements. Students will be informed of their performance in the assessment so that they are aware of their progress and attainment. These subjects will be included in the calculation of the cumulative GPA. retaking of subjects. Within this framework.

It fully meets the intended subject learning outcomes. The student's work is satisfactory. projects.1 Assessment of Performance in a Subject Students’ performance in a subject shall be assessed by continuous assessment and/or examinations as depicted in individual subject syllabus. For subjects offered by Department of Computing. assignments. Assessment grades shall be awarded on a criterion-referenced basis. 7 . The contribution made by each student in coursework involving a group effort shall be determined and assessed separately. Performance in the Continuous Assessment and/or Final Examination components will be assessed. Criteria would be given for each subject with respect to the expectation. The student's work is good.2. It exceeds the intended subject learning outcomes in nearly all regards. presentations and other forms of classroom participation. No credit will be earned if a subject is failed. according to the weighting factor of both components in a certain subject. The student's work is barely satisfactory. The student's work is wholly satisfactory. a student may be given a condoned grade of “D” or “D+” instead of “F”. The grade conversion of assessment result is as specified in the General Assessment Regulations. laboratory work. It exceeds the intended subject learning outcomes in all regards. “F” is a subject failure grade. The student's work is very good. the passing criteria may vary according to the syllabus. It largely meets the intended subject learning outcomes. if he/she is doing well in one component while failing the other component. It meets the intended subject learning outcomes only in some regards. The student's work is inadequate.4. unless specified explicitly. The student's work is outstanding. It marginally meets the intended subject learning outcomes. It fails to meet many of the intended subject learning outcomes. At the beginning of each semester. For subjects offered by other departments. according to the following table: Subject grade A+ A B+ B C+ C D+ D F Short description Exceptionally Outstanding Outstanding Very Good Good Wholly Satisfactory Satisfactory Barely Satisfactory Barely Adequate Inadequate Elaboration on subject grading description The student's work is exceptionally outstanding. Continuous assessment may include tests. the subject teacher will inform students of the details of the methods of assessments to be used within the assessment framework. whilst all others (“D” to “A+”) are subject passing grades. The student's work is barely adequate. field exercises. It exceeds the intended subject learning outcomes in some regards. It exceeds the intended subject learning outcomes in most regards.

The corresponding grade point for the subject overall grade. but for subjects which have been retaken. In addition. instead of the actual grade points obtained by students.5 4 3. 2.4. please refer to the student handbook or consult the Programme Leader / Department’s General Office. only the grade obtained in the final attempt will be included in the GPA calculation. This methodology for deriving subject overall grades only serves as an aid to subject assessors.2.5 3 2. using the weightings as specified in each subject syllabus. In the event that grade is awarded to subject components. Grade A+ A B+ B C+ C D+ D F Grade Point 4.2 Credit Transfer Students may apply for credit transfer at initial enrolment. Credit transfer with grade should normally be used when the credits to be transferred have been gained from within the University on the same subject.3 Overall Assessment The overall grade for a subject is obtained by combining the results for the Continuous Assessement and Final Examination. a student’s performance will be defined in terms of the Grade Point Average(GPA) which is calculated as follows:  Subject Grade Point x Subject Credit Value n  Subject Credit Value n GPA = where n = number of all subjects (inclusive of failed subjects) taken by the student up to and including the latest semester/term. re-enrolment or during add/drop period at the beginning of the semester. As assessment should be a matter of judgement. a grade point with the decimal value will be converted to grade for deriving the overall result of the subject.5 1 0 At the end of each semester.4.5 2 1. Numerical grade point is assigned to each subject grade for the computation of the GPA. where applicable. For procedural details. the following subjects will be excluded from the GPA calculation: (i) Exempted subjects (ii) Ungraded subjects (iii) Incomplete subjects 8 . will be used for GPA calculation. not merely a result of computation. the subject lecturer will have the discretion to assign a grade which is considered to reflect more appropriately the overall performance of the student in a subject to override the grade derived by the computer.

The status of “academic probation” will be reflected in the examination result notification but not in transcript of studies. the Board of Examiners has the discretion to allow the students who fall into categories as stated in (ii) or (iii) above to stay on the programme. 2. If such an appeal was upheld by the Department/School concerned. 9 . Under the current procedures. GPA is an indicator of overall performance and is capped at 4.0.0. a student can appeal against the decisions of Boards of Examiners to deregister him. determine whether each student is (a) eligible for progression towards an award. absent from examination. A student may be deregistered from the programme enrolled before the time frame specified in (ii) or (iii) above if his academic performance is poor to the extent that the Board of Examiners considers that there is no much of a chance for him to attain a GPA of 2.e.0 at the end of the programme. In the event that there are good reasons. or (c) required to be deregistered from the programme. will be included in the GPA calculation and will be counted as “zero” grade point. The progression of students to the following academic year will not be affected by the GPA obtained in Summer Term. GPA is thus the unweighted cumulative average calculated for a student for all relevant subjects taken from the start of the programme to a particular reference point of time. he/she will be put on academic probation in the following semester. or (iii) the student’s GPA is lower than 2. the recommendation (to reverse the previous decision to deregister the student) should also be presented to the relevant Faculty/School Board for final decision.4 Progression/ Academic Probation/Deregistration The Board of Examiners shall.0 for two consecutive semesters and his/her Semester GPA in the second semester is also lower than 2. Once when a student is able to pull his/her GPA up to 2. or (ii) the student’s GPA is lower than 2. i. the status of “academic probation” will be lifted. and these cases will be reported to Faculty/School Board for information.e. at the end of each semester.0 for three consecutive semesters. either of which may be regarded as grounds for deregistration from the programme: (i) the student has exceeded the maximum period of registration for that programme as specified in the definitive programme document. When a student has a Grade Point Average (GPA) lower than 2. those with the grade “W”) Subject which has been given an “S” subject code.0 or above at the end of the semester. or (b) eligible for an award.4.0.(iv) Subjects for which credit transfer has been approved without any grade assigned (v) Subjects from which a student has been allowed to withdraw (i. A student will have “progressing” status unless he/she falls within the following categories.

i. by what means.) In cases where a student takes another subject to replace a failed elective subject. the Faculty/School Board will determine whether the student will be granted an aegrotat award. or request to be assessed on another occasion to be stipulated by the Board of Examiners. 2.5 Retaking of Subjects Students may retake any subject for the purpose of improving their grade without having to seek approval. The number of retakes of a subject is not restricted.4. the Board of Examiners may determine whether the award 10 . An aegrotat award shall normally not be classified. the Panel will determine whether the student will have to complete a late assessment and. (The grades obtained in previous attempts will only be reflected in transcript of studies. and before the commencement of the following academic year (except that for Summer Term. the fail grade will be taken into account in the calculation of the GPA. Aegrotat award will be granted under very exceptional circumstances. credits accumulated for passing the subject in a previous attempt will remain valid for satisfying the credit requirement for award. and considered by the Subject Assessment Review Panel as legitimate. This late assessment shall take place at the earliest opportunity.e. Aegrotat award If a student is unable to complete the requirements of the programme in question for the award due to very serious illness. the Faculty/School Board Chairman shall decide on an appropriate time for completion of the late assessment. Retaking of subjects is with the condition that the maximum study load of 21 credits per semester is not exceeded. Students wishing to retake passed subjects will be accorded a lower priority than those who are required to retake (due to failure in a compulsory subject) and can only do so if places are available. The acceptance of an aegrotat award by a student shall disqualify him/her from any subsequent assessment for the same award. but they must retake a compulsory subject which they have failed. despite the passing of the replacement subject. the student’s exercise of this option shall be irrevocable.4. and the award parchment shall not state that it is an aegrotat award. if so. If the late assessment cannot be completed before the commencement of the following academic year. or other very special circumstances which are beyond his/her control. obtained an F grade.6 Exceptional Circumstances Absence from an assessment component If a student is unable to complete all the assessment components of a subject. due to illness or other circumstances beyond his/her control. and considered by the Board of Examiners as legitimate. A student who has been offered an aegrotat award shall have the right to opt either to accept such an award.2. However. Only the grade obtained in the final attempt of retaking (even if the retake grade is lower than the original grade for originally passed subject) will be included in the calculation of the Grade Point Average (GPA). which may take place within 3 weeks after the finalisation of Summer Term results). If students have passed a subject but failed after retake.

a student may take more credits than he/she needs to graduate up to a maximum of 9 credits on top of the prescribed credit requirements for the award in or before the semester within which he/she becomes eligible for award. Any subjects passed after the graduation requirement has been met or subjects taken on top of the prescribed credit requirements for award shall not be taken into account in the grade point calculation for award classification.7 Award Classification Each level is assigned a WEIGHTING FACTOR. and 4 subjects are 0. and 0.0 or above at the end of the programme. The Weighting Factor places weighting on different levels of the course for the GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA).3. A student is required to graduate as soon as he/she satisfies all the conditions for award above. if a student attempts more elective subjects (or optional subjects) than those required for graduation in or before the semester in which he/she becomes eligible for award. the excessive subjects attempted with a lower grade/contribution. a student’s overall performance or Weighted GPA will be calculated as follows: Weighted GPA =  Subject Grade Point x Subject Credit Value x Wi n  Subject Credit Value x Wi n where Wi = weighting assigned according to the level of the subject A student would be eligible for award if he/she satisfies all the conditions listed below: (i) Accumulation of 54 credits. will be excluded). including failed subjects.3. and (iv) Having a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2. Other particular circumstances A student’s particular circumstances may influence the procedures for assessment but not the standard of performance expected in assessment. (ii) Satisfying the residential requirement for at least one-third of the credits required for the award to be completed under the current enrolment at PolyU.e.1. and (iii) Satisfying all the compulsory and elective requirements as defined above.should be classified provided that they have adequate information on the students’ academic performance. Subject to the maximum study load of 21 credits per semester. respectively.4. the elective subjects (or optional subjects) with a higher grade/contribution shall be included in the grade point calculation (i. 0. However. At the end of the final year. 2. The following are guidelines for Boards of Examiners’ reference in determining award classifications: 11 . 3. The weights for Level 2.

all students should read the session on “Plagiarism and Bibliographic Referencing” which is provided in the Student Handbook. paper.7 does not automatically mean graduation with First Class Honours because award classification is a decision by the Board of Examiners. but when he has nonetheless covered the prescribed work of the programme in an adequate fashion. Penalties for plagiarism include:    disqualification of the project.2.3- There is no automatic link between the weighted GPA and the award classification. In particular.Honours 1st 2:i 2:ii 3rd Guidelines The student’s performance/attainment is outstanding.3. Students should also refer to the following departmental policy on plagiarism: 12 .4.3. which is set out in the official Student Handbook. but has not attained Honours standard. A Pass-without-Honours degree award will be recommended.0 . but the award parchment will not include this specification.4 3. and clearly higher than the “essential minimum” required for graduation. for instance. Under exceptional circumstances. The student has reached a standard of performance/ attainment judged to be satisfactory. a weighted GPA of 3. a student who has completed an Honours degree programme.22. The student has reached a standard of performance/ attainment which is more than satisfactory but less than outstanding. 2. A Pass-without-Honours is an unclassified award. for Boards of Examiners’ reference. The student has attained the “essential minimum” required for graduation at a standard ranging from just adequate to just satisfactory. may be awarded a Pass-without-Honours degree.2+ .7+ .3+ . The following is a set of indicators. which can be used in helping to determine award classification in this programme: Honours 1st 2:i 2:ii 3rd Weighted GPA 3. when the student has demonstrated a level of final attainment which is below the ‘essential minimum’ required for graduation with Honours from the programme in question. and identifies him as exceptionally able in the field covered by the programme in question.72. essay or assignment in which plagiarism occurred reprimand or suspension of studies for a specified period expulsion for a specified period.8 Plagiarism Students’ attention is drawn to The Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s views and regulations on plagiarism. or indefinitely. while failing to show sufficient evidence of the intellectual calibre expected of Honours degree graduates.

20% X 2) of the grade.First offence: zero marks on the plagiarised assignment/ continuous assessment for both the copycat and the one who offers to be copied and deduct additional marks that carries the same weight as the assessed component.e. if a student is caught plagiarising on written assignment which contribute to 20% of the total grade. For serious first offence. For example. 13 . teaching staff can follow the penalty for serious or repeated offence. both the copycat and the one who offers to be copied will receive zero marks for 40% (i. For serious or repeated offence: submit the case to the Student Discipline Committee and the final decision will be made by the Committee.

and consists of the Programme Leader and Programme Tutor. procedures and regulations.1.1.1. 3. 3. it meets more often than this. assignments and examination papers for their subjects.3 Programme Tutor The Programme Tutor assists the Programme Leader in operating the programme by coordinating the assignments to students by individual subject lecturer to ensure an even workload for students. the Subject Leaders would co-ordinate the team of lecturers/tutors teaching the same subject.1. The composition of the Programme Committee is: Programme Leader (Chairman) Head of Department of Computing Programme Tutor Subject Leaders Student representatives 3. the Programme Tutor and the Programme Leader provide counseling to students having difficulties with their studies.2 Programme Leader The Programme Leader is responsible for providing academic and organizational leadership for the programme.4 Programme Executive Group This group is informal. materials. 3.1 Programme Committee The Programme Committee exercises the overall academic and operational responsibility for the programme and its development within defined policies.1 Programme Operation and Management The programme is operated and managed according to the University guidelines. In addition.1. The Programme Leader is accountable in day-to-day operational terms to the Head of department.5 Subject Leaders For subjects involving more than one teaching staff. 14 . They are responsible for ensuring uniformity of standards. They also provide a good channel to the gathering and analysis of feedback from the students and staff. 3. It is required to meet at least twice a year and.PART 3: PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT. in practice. RESOURCE AND SUPPORT 3. The group manages the day-to-day operation of the programme within the agreed scheme and initiates the discussion on possible modification and improvement. through the Programme Committee and the Programme Executive Group.

1. While some of the computing facilities mentioned in the list are located in the offices of academic staff and research staff.2. This group meets approximately once per term. electronic mail.2. The departmental LAN consists mainly of 100 Mbps UTP Ethernet segments interconnected together using the state-of-art gigabit network switches. It gives students the opportunity to contribute to the running of the programme in a less formal environment than the Programme Committee. 3. file transfers.3.2. and other forms of interaction with the world-wide computing community. internet news.1 and 3. and of possible improvements. of the demands of the programme on students. which are provided and maintained by the University.6 Student/Staff Consultative Group This group meets for constructive discussion of the programme in general. They are listed in Section 3.3. A wide variety of computing hardware and software is available to support both the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. The group comprises: Programme Leader Subject Leaders Student representatives 3. The departmental LAN is also connected to The Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus Gigabit Network and then to the Internet.2. The Internet connection is used for web access. remote logins. most of them are located in the departmental Computing Laboratories as depicted in Section 3.2.1 Computing Hardware              4-CPUs/16core Fujitsu M5000 Server 1-CPU/8-core Sun Fire T1000 Servers 4-CPUs Sun Fire 4800 Server 2-CPUs Sun Fire V880 Server 2-CPUs Sun Fire V890 Server 2-CPUs Sun Fire E280R Servers 2-CPUs Sun Fire V245 Servers 1-CPUs Sun Fire V215 Servers HP Blade BL20p G2 servers HP Proliant DL360 G5 servers HP Proliant DL 380 G3 servers HP Proliant DL 380 G4 servers HP Proliant DL 380 G5 servers 15 . Facility and Support The Department attaches importance to the practical work of students.2. Academic programmes and research activities are well supported with a wide range of computing facilities available in the departmental Computing Laboratories (located at 6/F of PQ Wing and 4/F of QT Wing) and the University’s Information Technology Services Office (ITS) via the departmental Local Area Network (LAN).

 Cisco Dial-in Modem servers  Castelle FAXpress server  Intel Core-2 Duo PCs  Intel Core-2 Quad PCs  Sun Blade 150 workstations  Sun Blade 1000 workstations  HP and Xerox LaserJet Printers  Xerox Colour Laser Printers  Wireless Access points

3.2.2 Computing Software  Data mining and warehousing tool - Clementine Data Mining  Database management system - Oracle - Microsoft SQL Server - MySQL Server  Project management software - Microsoft Project  Distributed computing software - MPI - Visibroker  Graphics and Game Development tools - 3d Studio Max - Virtool - Adobe PhotoShop  Microsoft Visio  Office software - Microsoft Office - Operation system software - MS Win XP Professional and Win 2003 server - Novell Netware - SuSe Linux - Ubuntu  Programming language - Java - Microsoft Visual Studio.Net  Simulation packages - CSIM - ALPHA-Sim  Software Engineering packages - StarUML  Statistical and Mathematical analysis tools - Matlab 16

- SAS - SPSS  Web Publishing - Adobe Creative Suite - Microsoft Expression  Web Server software - Apache/Tomcat While some of the above mentioned computing facilities are located in the offices of academic staff and research staff, most of them are located in the departmental Computing Laboratories as depicted below:-

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3.2.3 Computing Laboratories Project laboratory - is located on 6/F of PQ Wing - is dedicated to the final year Undergraduate and Postgraduate students, who carry out their final year project implementations; - has Wireless Access points for notebook PC connections to the campus network; - is supported by 7 sets of Intel Core-2 Duo PCs, 8 sets of Sun Blade 150 workstations and a high speed Laser printer. Student laboratory (2 rooms) - is located both on 6/F of PQ Wing and 4/F of QT Wing; - provides a general computing environment for student’s work; - has Wireless Access points for user’s notebook PC connection to campus network; - is supported by a total of 20 sets of Intel Core-2 Duo PCs, and 5 sets of high speed Laser printer. PC laboratory (4 rooms) - is located on 6/F of PQ Wing and 5/F of QR Wing - provides the facilities for basic and advanced programming on the Window environment for all students in the department; - serves as an instruction laboratory with overhead LCD projectors during some class hours; - is supported by a total of 137 sets of Intel Core-2 Duo PCs PC/Unix laboratory - is located on 6/F of PQ Wing; - provides a mix of Window and Unix computing environment; - serves as an instruction laboratory with overhead LCD projectors during some class hours; - is supported by a total of 8 sets of Sun Blade 150 workstations and 40 sets of Intel Core-2 Duo PCs. Linux laboratory - is located on 4/F of QT Wing; - provides a mix of the prevailing Linux and Window computing environment for all students of the department; - serves as an instruction laboratory with overhead LCD projectors during some class hours; - is supported by a total of 40 sets of Intel Core-2 Duo PCs Research / Teaching laboratories A number of special laboratories including: 18

digital sound. just do typing. 3. Class Calendar 8.4 WebCT Teaching and Learning Support To enhance interactive learning and facilitate communications.Student database for class management and performance tracking Furthermore multimedia components such as digital video. Password Authentication 10. Please browse http://webct.2. the proposed programme will be supported by the WebCT system. 2. import or cut and paste) 5. 3. 19 . 4. WebCT is a web-based teaching and online content management system.hk for details. Internal Content Search 9. computer graphics and animations can be imported into WebCT for creating web-based lessons.polyu. Online Bulletin Board (newsgroup) Online Chat Room (similar to ICQ) Online Whiteboard (for drawing pictures jointly through Internet) Web Page Creation (no programming required. All the essential functions for interactive teaching/learning through Internet are built-in as standard features of WebCT.        Advanced Enterprise Infrastructure Laboratory Biometrics Laboratory Embedded System Laboratory eToy Laboratory Game Laboratory Human Language Technology Laboratory Internet and Mobile Computing Laboratory Software Engineering Laboratory have been created for research development and teaching support. Interactive Quiz (no programming required) 6. Internal Mail 7.edu. These include: 1.

They will also practice more in written assignments. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems.PART 4 SUBJECT SYLLABI Stage 1 Subjects Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP206 Mathematics 3 4 Nil  To provide students with fundamental concepts and working techniques of calculus and linear algebra. (b) apply the mathematical skills in process of system design and analysis. calculus and linear algebra. programming exercises. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) solve problems in a systematic manner. (c) possess the capability to read research papers in which concepts are expressed mathematically. 20 . and project. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills through assignments. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the fundamentals of important mathematical skills. namely.  To help students attain the techniques for proper formulation and analysis of problems that are important for success in upper-level computing subjects.

linear functionals and dual space. vectors and matrices. The lectures give the basic knowledge of the course and some examples. linear transformations and its algebra. derivatives. chain rule. vector spaces and subspaces. The tutorials allow students to do exercises. linear operators. definite and indefinite integrals. Project 4. determinants. Linear algebra Linear equations. Some extra materials such as using Matlab to solve integration or linear systems are optional. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Lectures 16 12 28 The course includes 14 lectures and 14 tutorials. optimization. linear independence. change of variables.Programme Outcome 5: this subject contributes to motivate student using learnt technology to solving problems in industrial through tutorial and assignments. Lab exercises 3. implicit differentiation. rank and basis. Programme Outcome 8: This subject contributes to developing student solving problems by using different technologies in different application areas through assignments. double integrals. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Calculus Continuous functions and slope. Examination Total 22%  33% 45% 100 %       Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing 21 . curve sketching. 2. characteristic values and spaces. approximation. integration by parts and other tricks. Assignments 2. transpose. Mid-term 5. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning outcomes to weighting be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c  d  1.

82 Hrs. David C. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbooks: 1. Brian H. Ellis Horword. 9th Edition. Addison-Wesley. Calculus and Mathematical. Learning Linear Algebra Through DERIVE. Lay and Schneider. Part 1. The final exam is comprehensive. 14 Hrs. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 28 Hrs. Denton. One mid-term exam is given to test how good the students understand the materials. 20 Hrs. Porta and Uhl. 2nd Edition. 2001. Prentice-Hall. AddisonWesley. 1994. Other student study effort:   Assignment and exercise Review 20 Hrs. So more practice is necessary. 22 . 2. Calculus and Its Applications. 2000. Brown. Goldstein.the intended learning outcomes: The most important of the course is to solve mathematical problems such as optimization problem. Lay. 1994. Reference Books: 1. 2. Linear Algebra and Its Applications. Two assignments which include all the aspects of the course are designed.

Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through lecture. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to making students to describe a system from a global view. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) apply discrete structures knowledge and skills to solve real world problems using computers. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) acquire mathematical knowledge and skills required to further study other more advanced computing-related subjects. (e) relate learned mathematical knowledge to other computing subjects. (b) possess the capability to read research papers in which concepts are expressed formally in terms of probability and statistics. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills in English to mathematically formulate a technical problem.  To help students attain the fundamental mathematical knowledge and reasoning skills they need to be successful in upper-level computing subjects. probability and statistics. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP207 Discrete Structures and Data Model 3 4 Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP210  To introduce students to the concepts and applications of discrete mathematical structures. (c) acquire skills to compute probabilities of events in the reality. tutorial and assignment exercises on 23 .

Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning outcomes weighting to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c  d  e 1. Graph and Tree Graph. relations and functions Sets. Probability Conditional probability. statistical inference and estimation methods. cardinality. stochastic process. graph coloring. connectivity.solving problems. quantifiers. 2. random variables. trees and tree traversal. expectation. sample mean and variance. 3. t. tautologies. Appropriate assignments and quiz are given to encourage student learning of mathematical knowledge. normal. Bayes’s rules. isomorphism. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology    Duration of Lectures 4 4 10 6 4 28 Lectures are designed to clearly explain mathematical topics included in the subject. quiz and exams. predicates. Karnaugh maps. Set. spanning trees and minimum spanning trees. relations and functions. Assignments 24  . Euler and Hamilton Path. order relations. Propositional and predicate logic Logical expressions. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with reasoning skills through tutorial exercise. Tutorials are set in the class to assist students to solve related questions. equivalence. shortest path problems. χsquared. Poisson and exponential distributions. truth tables. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Statistics Sampling. 5. hypothesis testing.and F-distributions. formal reasoning. 4. digraph. planar graphs.

PrenticeHall. K. Busby. 4. 3. Myers. Eighth Edition. Discrete Mathematics.2. Fifth Edition. 5. Mid-term 5. 70 Hrs. R. Raymond H.. mid-term and examination can force students to independently acquire required mathematical knowledge to attain the learning outcomes. 8th Edition. B.C. Introduction to Probability Models. 2000. Quiz 4. S. Ronald E. Discrete Mathematical Structures. 2003. Examination Total 55%   45% 100 %              Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: Assignments and quiz can assist students in the learning of mathematics knowledge and extending their study to computing-related subjects. Probability & Statistics for Engineers & Scientists..M. 14 Hrs. Kolman. Myers and Keying Ye. ISBN: 0131593188. Other student study effort:   Assignment Review 10 Hrs.C. Richard Johnsonbaugh. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications. 2008. ISBN: 0-13-204767-5. Tutorial exercises 3. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 28 Hrs. S. 2007. Academic Press. McGraw Hill. Walpole. Rosen. and Ross. Fourth Edition. Ross. 7th Edition. Prentice Hall. H. 25 . Prentice Hall. 18 Hrs. 2. 2003. Quiz.. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. Sharon L.

identify the strengths and weaknesses of different data structures. analyze and compare the efficiency of algorithms. think critically for improvement in solutions. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) (b) understand the properties of various data structures. (f) possess the ability to design efficient algorithms for solving computing problems. (d) (e) possess the knowledge of various existing algorithms.  To introduce techniques for analyzing the efficiency of computer algorithms. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) (h) solve problems independently. (c) design and employ appropriate data structures for solving computing problems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to communicative effectively by having students working in small teams to discuss and present programming in the lab and solving data structure design problems. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to the global outlook by 26 .Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives Data Structures and Algorithms COMP 305 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP201 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide knowledge in various data structures and algorithms.

average-case and worst-case analysis. dictionary and hashing. optimal-time algorithms: quick sort. Data structures: representation and algorithms Linear structures: linked-lists. heap sort. divide-and27 Duration of Lectures 2.5 10 10 2. They will also practice in written assignments. and potential projects. 7. topological sorting. Sorting and searching algorithms Quadratic-time algorithms: bubble sort. analysis of algorithms. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises as well as direct exchanges on novel uses of data structures and algorithms. 3. balanced trees. binary search. 5. merge sort. test for acyclicity. other common data structures: priority queues. tree traversals. run-length encoding. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Selected advanced topics Advanced topics such as AVL trees. programming exercises. Graph algorithms Depth-first and breadth-first search. 4. tree search.having students understand the use of different computer platforms for different applications and their uses. stacks. 2.5 5 2. 6.5 . Analysis of algorithms Mathematical techniques. Introduction Types of algorithms. searching algorithms: sequential search. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work by employing a small group-based approach to lab problem solving. selection sort. assignments and mini-projects. m-way trees. tree structures: binary trees. dictionary. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to technical problem solving by initiating a wide variety of algorithm design and implementation skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. classification of algorithms and their efficiencies. insertion sort. abstract data types. Text processing and data compression Prefix and suffix. data structures.5 2. Huffman coding. queues. heaps.

Textbook material 4. Additional reference material 5. Lecture delivery 2. Web links to active tutorials and other presentation material 6. Total 35 Laboratory Experiment: Use of different data structures Teaching/Learning Methodology The teaching methodology is based on three main activities: 1. Lecture notes 2. Laboratory exercises consisting of hands-on programming exercises and tests 4. Mid-term 4.conquer. Office hours questions. Group interactions and supervised discussion sessions. Examination 30% 30% 40% 28     . Interactive exchange with students in class 3. lectures and labs The learning methodology will be based on: 1. Laboratory notes and programming exercises 3. Lab exercises 3. Assignments 2. Tutorial sessions in and/or outside the lecture and laboratory sessions 5. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c     d     e      f g h 1. answers and clarification of material 6. Discussion sessions with optional additional workshops.

homework 4 Hrs. 2007. evaluate and develop a critical perspective in the development of both small and large systems and integration of systems. Third Edition. Leiserson. Rivest. Data Structures and Algorithms in C++. independence. Cormen. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbooks: 1. the assignments and the lab exercises are selected to develop the technical skills and knowledge to solve problems in computing and software development as well as to realize effective solutions. Stein. Reference Books: 1. Broooks/Cole. Second Edition. Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++. 42 Hrs. 21 Hrs.Total 100 % The assignment weights will be effectively distributed amongst the intended subject learning outcomes to nurture creative thinking. 29 . discussions. Addison Wesley. 2001. 102 Hrs. technical skills and a global perspective towards the technological base of this subject. effective communication and a demonstrable global outlook will be incorporated at every level of exercises and mid-term examinations. Addison Wesley. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 35 Hrs. Specifically. understand. The final examination accounts for a global and comprehensive understanding of the entire subject material and serves as the final checkpoint for the learning outcomes against technical skills and critical problem solving with respect to all components of programming and data structure design. Frank M. Critical thinking. Other student study effort:   Class participation Course work: reading. Mark Allen Weiss. 2001. 2. teamwork. MIT Press. Adam Drozdek. 2007. Data Abstraction & Problem Solving with C++: Walls & Mirrors. Introduction to Algorithms. 2. Carrano.

Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP306 Software Engineering and User Interface 3 3 Nil  To introduce students a general knowledge of the application of software engineering techniques in different stages and aspects of software development. and design. Program Outcome 3. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Program Outcome 1. Attributes for all-roundedness (f) solve problems by using systematic approaches. (g) communicate effectively through report writing and project presentations.  To provide students with knowledge and understanding of interface architecture. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (c) understand the user’s requirements in human computer interface design and be able to collect such requirements. Practice communication skill in discussion and project presentation and documentation . Understand and value ethical issues in user interface 30 . (b) apply software engineering techniques to real-life projects. development and evaluation of user interface. (e) evaluate a human computer interface design. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) apply software engineering techniques in the systems specifications and design stages of software projects. (d) design a professional human computer interface according to the user’s requirements using suitable technologies.

X. Dialogue interactions and structures Dialogue interaction: types and techniques. multimedia and nongraphical dialogues. 5. Macintosh and Microsoft windows).design and development of computing systems. 31 Duration of Lectures 3 4 4 6 5 . Solve problems and develop solutions with design and user interface technologies in different application areas. and be able to design and evaluate the proper user interface by applying related technologies. model-based specification. documentation. 3. look and feel. control. User interface design Graphic design basics: design languages. use of color. formal specification. participatory design and phototyping. Think and reason critically on developing alternatives in problem solving and user interface development. statistical models for describing interaction processes. typography. Software management Project planning and scheduling. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. windows manager model (e. software cost estimation. use of metaphors for describing interface behaviour. Program Outcome 5. standards. temporal sequencing. layers model of architecture of design and windowing systems. user-centred design and task analysis.g. 2. Software specification Requirements specification. Program Outcome 4. Work together as a team in project design and development. Program Outcome 7. 2D and 3D spatial organization. real-time systems design. algebraic specification. Software design Object-oriented design. color representation. Possess technical knowledge needed to solve design and user interface problems and to realize solutions in programming user interface technology. software quality assurance. navigation and orientation. Program Outcome 8. nonformal cognitive approach. computer graphics. dialogue issues: response time. 4. function-oriented design.

protocols. MacApp. User interface evaluation Evaluation techniques: productivity and figures of time. windows and Visual Basic). project and mid-term test act as a measure on the understandings of the students on the basic concepts of the software 32 . and develop teamwork skill. video. MacPaint. Students will be encouraged to work in groups to share and present ideas. usability testing techniques: field observation. Apple Macintosh. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. review other’s work. dBASE IV. Total Laboratory Experiment: Use of HCI tools 3 3 28 Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures focus on introduction and explanation of key concepts and techniques. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to weighting be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a   55%   45% 100 %  b      c  d        e   f        g Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: Assignments. HyperCard and Multi-media systems. tameability.6. preference. Mid-term 5. example systems and case studies: MS DOS. HyperCards.Assignments 2. NextStep. Project 4. user interface management system. Assignments and project allow students to deepen their understanding of the concepts taught in class and apply the theory and techniques to software design and user interface development. User interface development Dialogue toolkits (e. 7. Lab exercises 3. errors.g. psychometric methods. UNIX. experiment design. Tutorial and lab sessions provide students opportunity to practice the techniques and tools presented in class.

R.. 2003. Prentice Hall.. C. Second Edition. Software Engineering. Ghezzi. 3. and Mandrioli. 33 . Students can also develop their analytic and problem solving skills. Addison-Wesley. project will be used to measure the understandings of the students about the current practice in software design and user interface design.. software design and user interface concepts and technologies. In addition. design and user interface design and evaluation. Fundamentals of Software Engineering. I. 132 Hrs. Sommerville. Human-Computer Interaction. Third Edition. Finlay. 14 Hrs. Total student study effort Reading List and Reference Books: References 1. M. and Beale. J. Abowd. 2010. D.specification. 25 Hrs. 9th Edition. A. Examination will be used as an overall measure of the understandings of the students on specification and design process. Prentice Hall. Other student study effort:   Work on assignments/ reading related material/ group discussion Study for mid-term and examination 65 Hrs. Dix. G. 2004. and practice team work.. The students can improve their presentation and communication skills through the project presentation. Jazayeri. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 28 Hrs.. 2.

presentation and technical writing skills. 34 . and project. They will also practice more in written assignments.Subject Title: Operating Systems and System Programming Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP 307 28 hours 14 hours Hours Assigned: Lecture Tutorial/Lab Pre-requisite: Nil Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives: This subject provides students knowledge on:  basic concepts of operating system and the abilities to maintain it. Attributes for all-roundedness (4) Students need to solve complex problems in groups. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to build team spirit and practice collaboration skills. programming exercises. mutual exclusion. (5) build up on team spirit. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to teaching students to understand how operating systems can affect the computing systems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject.  writing system software with the aid of sophisticated system programming tools. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercises and project with proper design and implementation. deadlock and synchronization. (2) understand the internal structure of an operating system and be able to write programs using system calls. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) identify the services provided by operating systems. (3) understand and solve problems involving process control. This will develop their skills in problem solving using systematic approaches.

concurrent processes. synchronization. Shell. inter-process communication. Program translation Compiler. process manipulation. scheduling and context switching. pipe and script. Windows NT. Process management and coordination Process concepts. scheduling algorithms. 5. System configuration System initialization. concept of systems programming. device drivers. Duration of Lectures 2 8 4 2 4 2 6 28 Case Study: Unix. Total Laboratory Experiment:   Hands-on experience on Unix or Linux.Syllabus: Topic 1. 6. input and output. Memory management Virtual memory. machine and run-time environment. system configuration. T-diagram. compilation process. deadlock. 2. Introduction What is an operating system. mutual exclusion. device controllers. code generation. Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Assignments Lab exercises Project Mid-term Quizzes Examination Total % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x 35 55% 45% 100% . boot strapping. I/O devices. Linux. lexical analysis. different types of I/O. 4. 7. Interrupt processing. directory and file system structure. 3. File management Secondary storage allocation. signal processing. syntax analysis. device drivers Interrupt mechanism. paging and segmentation system.

7/E. Second Edition. Silberschatz. Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles.. 3/E. 5/E. 3. Aho. 1999.. John Wiley and Sons. Reference Books: 1. 36 . Addison Wesley.. W.Textbooks: 1. 2004. Ben Salama. Prentice Hall. Gary Nutt. Stallings. J. P. Addison Wesley. 4.D. A.. Operating System Concepts. 2006. and Ullman. and Galvin. Sethi. Compilers Principles. Unix System Programming : A Programmer's Guide to Software Development. Operating Systems: A Modern Perspective. R. Techniques and Tools. Keith Haviland. Dina gray. 2. A.V. 1986. Addison Wesley. 2005.

 Review state-of-the-art technologies such as distributed client/server computing paradigm. (j) think and reason in a critical and creative mind. including wireless and intelligent Internet computing. especially in applying 37 . (d) design. middleware concepts and architecture. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) identify different components of distributed client/server on Internet computing. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) communicate effectively in project / system presentation and technical documents / reports. (h) learn independently for problem solving and solution seeking. (b) understand the basic concepts of Internet services and related technologies. while exhibiting leadership in a project team whenever designated or necessary. develop and implement interactive Web applications. XML. enterprise and Internet based information systems. wide area and highly accessible computing environment. (c) be proficient in using Java Servlets and related Web development tools.  Examine the analysis.Stage 2 Subjects Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP320 Introduction to Internet Computing 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP201 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP420 Objectives  Highlight the impact of Internet in facilitating a truly distributed. (f) understand latest and future Web technology. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. design and implementation techniques required to develop the network. (e) identify different components of XML and its related standards and technologies. (i) collaborate with other team members for project design and development. wireless and intelligent Internet computing. web-based client/server computing technologies.

Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with groupbased project for students to practice team spirit. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to the learning of the state-of-the-art internet technologies and their impact to the industrial needs. Servlet JDBC. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their presentation skill by a project in designing a true userinteractive system. 3.different computing technologies to interactive Web applications. concepts of two-tier versus three-tier architectures. building blocks of network infrastructure including bridges. programming exercises. 2. transaction servers. 38 Duration of Lectures 7. XLink and XPointer. database servers. They will also practice more in written assignments. Servlet Session Tracking technology. and project. Introduction to distributed client/server Internet computing Client/server evolution and its relation to Internet computing Internet vs Intranet computing. XML data management: Querying XML data. design and modelling. Web protocols and hypertext technology. Extensible Markup Language (XML) XML introduction: XML Schema. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1.5 17. and also advertising their work to the selected users. web model. HTTP data representation and response. XSL and XSLT. Web programming with Servlets.5 5 . Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. overview of Internet services including file servers. web servers. routers and gateways. DTD concepts. Web-based client/server computing Revolution of Web as the intergalactic client/server Internet computing platform. interactive Web-based client/server. network infrastructure and support for internet computing. XML conjunction standards: DOM and SAX.

Javascripts workshop. 4. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. Latest and future Internet computing Introduction to wireless Internet. 2. intelligent Internet computing using agent technology. related applications using XML technology. Mid-term 5. Examination Total % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b  c d e f g h   i j       55%                     45% 100 %   Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment is appropriate. 4. Internet Computing (IC) project workshop. XML and WAP workshop. Assignments 2. Total Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. wireless Internet applications. 3. XML relational mapping. labs and projects are the 39 . Project 4. Java Servlet workshop. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Laboratory 2 6 4 2 14 5 35 The teaching and learning process will be tightly associated with projects and labs. this course is heavyweighted with labs and projects. More specifically.XML data storage. Lab exercises 3. As a course aims at on-hand experience of the state-of-the-art technologies of the Internet. The course will provide the students with on hand experience of each individual technique taught in class.

Addison-Wesley. Ceponkus and F. 2001 A. 2001. Networking Protocols. Murach. 14 Hrs. 91 Hrs. “PHP and MySQL Web Development”. “Core Web Programming”. 2. Hoodbhoy. 4. 40 . “Web Protocols and Practice: HTTP/1. Hrs.best for the individual techniques learned and group collaborations. Brown. A. A. John Wiley & Sons. 6. Caching. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 35 Hrs. Godbole and A. The exams and assignments will evaluate the student the knowledge they learned and the skills to solve problems independently. B. and Traffic Measurement”. 5. Rexford. 2008 M. 1999 Self-study/assignments/project 42 Hrs. Hall and L. Other student study effort:   Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. McGraw-Hill. Thomson. Welling and L. Steelman and J. 2009 L. 2010. and Java Programming”.1. Krishnamurthy and J. Prentice Hall. Addison-Wesley. Mike Murach & Associates. “Web Tecnologies: TCP/IP Architecture. 3. Kahate.“Applied XML: A Toolkit for Programmers”. “Murach’s Java Servlets and JSP”.

Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking ability through the need to understand critically research or practical problems and derive the proper solution systematically. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) conduct literature survey to locate for materials and sources relevant to the selected problem area. (6) evaluate the final outcome in an objective manner. Attributes for all-roundedness (1) develop critical thinking in general problem solving. It aims at developing and measuring the capabilities of a student in analyzing and solving complex and possibly real-case problems. in the analysis of approaches to the solution and their implementation. 41 . as well as presentation skills with project presentation and demonstration. to provide a student the opportunities to apply knowledge acquired in the undergraduate study. (4) develop the ability to learn independently and to find/integrate information from different sources required in solving real-life problems. (2) understand the materials obtained and connect the materials with the problem to be solved. (5) think critically the formulation of alternative models and solutions to the problem. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. (3) enhance technical report writing skills with proper organization of materials. (3) define and specify the problem precisely. (5) manage the project efficiently and effectively through the assistance and supervision of the supervisor. (2) improve presentation and communicate skills via oral presentation.Stage 3 Subjects Subject Title: Final Year Project Number of Credits: 9 Subject Code: COMP 451 40 hours 200 hours Hours Assigned: Staff Contact Self Work Pre-requisite: Nil Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP 401 Objectives: The final year project represents the most important ingredient in the undergraduate study. Students also need to evaluate the solution critically. (4) assimilate and apply the knowledge learnt in generating good solutions to the problem.

project development. The student has to submit a proposal. and report writing. which includes the total time spent on literature search. Some projects require good teamwork. according to the nature of the project. a mid-term checkpoint progress report and a final report throughout the academic year for the final year project. The proposal must be approved by the supervisor 42 . fact finding. academic or a hybrid in which the student is encouraged but not constrained to have some original contributions. Project Management: The calendar duration of the project spreads over the final year of the curriculum and extends normally from September to April. The total man-effort required is approximately 40 hours of staff contact and 200 hours of laboratory work and independent study for a normal student. or an area of his/her own research interest contingent upon the condition that he/she could find an interested academic staff to supervise the project. The other four programme outcome may be aligned depending on the nature of the project. while some others could be related to professionalism and ethics issues. A typical research process to the final year project is as shown: Projects should be problem-oriented and there is no restriction to the nature of the problem except that it should be relevant to the computing discipline and there must be a computing element in the project. The project could be practical. However. Programme Outcome 8: This subject requests the student to apply and integrate all relevant knowledge they had learnt throughout the programme into the project and demonstrate that they are able to achieve the programme specific outcome. Projects are normally sponsored by academic staff of the department or in conjunction with external organizations or other departments in the university. background reading. a student may propose a topic which forms an extension of his/her work during industrial placement. The actual amount of time spent may vary for individuals.Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to developing student problem solving skills through the design and implementation of a system to solve research or practical problems.

including demonstration and question/answer session. A rejected proposal must be rewritten and resubmitted. Because of the different degrees of involvement.before the student can proceed to the final year project. that the student demonstrated. If deemed appropriate. The assignment of supervisor normally follows a set of prescribed procedures. an eventually good project with poor self-discipline and lack of consistent progress will not be awarded the grade A. The supervisor is responsible for assessing the student based on the set of abilities. and a Final Report. each student will be assigned a supervisor who is in charge of the entire project. the supervisor may liaise with the co43 . Supervisor 15% 40% 10% 10% Co-examiner 5% 10% 10% 0% Problem Identification (literature search) Problem Solving (critical thinking) Communication and Presentation (Demonstration Reports) Project Management and Self-Discipline and The major criteria are standardized for ease of management and fairness to all. Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment Supervisor Co-examiner 100% 75% 25% There will be an oral presentation of the projects. as laid down in the “objectives” and “learning outcome” sections above. the project evaluation will be based on a holistic approach. there will be an oral presentation and demonstration which will normally be conducted during week 29 to 31. At the end of year 4. However. the co-examiner will be responsible for 25% of the marks based on the first three criteria only while the supervisor will contribute to 75% of the marks in terms of all four. An oral presentation and demonstration is essential at the end of the project. Proper documentation must be done throughout the project and the techniques from ELC 3507 should be applied to ensure the quality of the necessary documentation. a Mid-term Checkpoint Progress Report. The presentation lasts for 30 minutes. The deadlines for these are normally week 4. the supervisor and co-examiner could refine a certain criterion in terms of detailed breakdown. At or before the beginning of the academic year. Late submission of these reports is construed as a lack of self discipline and good project management skill on the part of the student who should be penalized accordingly unless the student could give a reasonable justification such as on the ground of valid medical reasons. week 14 and week 28 of year 4 respectively. Both supervisor and co-examiner have to fill in a detailed assessment form to evaluate on different aspects of the project and the associated subject and programme learning outcomes and the overall grade will be derived. announced a few months before the academic year. However. The check point progress report should be limited to two pages and signed by the supervisor if he/she approves and agrees with the content of the progress report. For instance. There is no limitation as the content of these deliverables except that the initial proposal should include the original problem definition while the final report should include the initial proposal. The supervisor and co-examiner will score according to the following indicative criteria and weightings. Technically. mid-term presentation may be held. The deliverables required from a student are: an Initial Proposal.

Addison-Wesley Longman. Newton.examiner on the expected results of the project but they should always provide an independent assessment of the project based on the criteria of their concern. 2004. 9. Statistics. APA.. Surviving Your Dissertation: A Comprehensive Guide to Content and Process. K. American Psychological Association.T. internal moderators will be appointed to moderate the projects. Longman. 7. Technical reports from universities and major companies. programming. L. Writing with Style: APA Style Made Easy. C. Corwin Press. Relevant conference proceedings and magazines (including ACM and IEEE conferences). and to recommend best FYP award candidates. Theses and Dissertations. Marcel Dekker. 2002. Fifth Edition. Mauch. ACM and IEEE magazines. 1996. G. A. Third Edition. This often takes the form of a judging (and arbitration) panel to consider all projects with high and low grades for fairness and quality assurance for their final grades. 12. N.M. 14. Marcel Dekker. The Dissertation Journey: A Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Planning. Longman. Fifth Edition. 4.E. Sage Publications. 3. 8. 13. R. Introduction to Research Methods. Szuchman. 5. 10. Writing. In principle. 1999. 2003. Research Methodology: A Step-by-step Guide for Beginners. 2001. there are major discrepancies arisen. The panel also helps to resolve any disagreement between supervisor and coexaminer.D.. Roberts. Burns. 1997. Writing Academic English. Some other projects may also be moderated so as to even out any undue differences. and relevant books. Transactions and Journals. Publication Manual of The American Psychological Association. simulation. Kumar. Rudestam. 1999. Guide to Writing Empirical Papers. 11. 2. Second Edition.B. R. Brooks/Cole. Oshima. R. Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Project Total % weighting 100 100 Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5 x 6 x 7 x 8 x 9 x 10 x 11 x Reference Books: 1. 6.R. Third Edition. Other International Journals. and Defending Your Dissertation.E. Guide to the Successful Thesis and Dissertation: A Handbook for Students and Faculty. Park. 2001. 44 . J. Garson.

so that they are more likely to see issues and respond appropriately. The third objective is to promote student participating in class discussion as well as taking quizzes and completing a number of written assignments.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP452 Computing Professionals in Society 3 4 Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP402. To be addressed in particular are professionalism and computer ethics. This makes the writing intensive side of this course. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. through thoughtful discussion so that students are expected to come to class well-prepared. This means (i) identifying correctly the potential for an ethical problem in a particular context. the moral rules that might be compromised. (iii) deciding on courses of action and recommend changes to prevent recurrence of those events. and the cause of these issues. (b) heighten their sensitivity to ethical issues in the use of computers and in the practice of the computer profession. The second objective is to develop students’ ability to analyze the fact and to communicate well in writing and orally because only well-informed opinions based on fact and presented in a well-reasoned professionally competent way are acceptable. since opinions can be changed. (ii) being aware of the responsibilities with respect to ethical issues in human activities affected by computers. and improved. (c) apply the conceptual tools provided in the course to develop analytical skills for determining what to do in ethical decision making or what the likely impacts the computer will have in this or that context. and (iv) communicating well-informed opinions based on fact in a well-reasoned professionally competent way. which emphasizes clear written expression. because they hold a very powerful position in society. and 45 . students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) be aware of the ethical issues surrounding computers. COMP427 The general objective is to enable students to understand the social responsibilities of the computing professionals.

(d) work alone or in groups to arrive at ethical decisions. Attributes for all-roundedness (e) communicate effectively (both in Chinese and English) verbally at a level sufficient for project and system presentation, as well as general conversation ; (f) communicate effectively in writing with technical documents and reports; (g) learn independently for problem solving and solution seeking; (h) collaborate with other team members for project design and development, while exhibiting leadership in a project team whenever designated or necessary; (i) think and reason critically, especially on different issues related to computing professional in the society.

Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to helping students’ effective communication skills (writing and oral skills) through logical argument analysis assignment (individual) and scenarios analysis report and presentation (group project) in English. Programme Outcome 3: This subject contributes to developing students’ understanding and ability to evaluate ethical issues through an examination of ethical principles, the impact of such applied ethical issues as privacy, intellectual property and computer crimes and laws, and ethical and social analysis of these issues. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to training critical thinking through logical argument analysis assignment. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to cultivating team work spirit through group project. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Introduction Generic skills; typical scenarios of profession; characteristics of a profession; the system of professions; the Computing profession; social issues 2. The underpinning ethical principles What is ethics; traditional/philosophical ethics; relativism/utilitarianism/ deontology; rights/social contract/Rawl’s theory of justice. 46 Duration of Lectures 3

3

3. Computer ethics Policy vacuum; social context; is computer ethics unique? 4. Methods/tools for ethical analysis Competing factors in decision making; practical approach/the 4-step analysis; sample cases. 5. Computer crimes and laws 6. Privacy Personal privacy; computer and privacy. 7. Software ownership and intellectual property Ethical/legal issues of software; intellectual property; property rights; legal protection; philosophical basis; consequentialist argument. 10. Seminars/Tutorial, presentation, etc Case/scenario analysis

3

3

3 3

3

21

Total Guest Speakers:

42

Subject specialists from industry are invited to conduct forums to discuss and share with students the state-of-the-art developments and opinions relevant to the topics. Teaching/Learning Methodology The course will be conducted in a combination of methods, specifically, three lectures, three seminars, one workshop, one or two forums (to be led by subject specialists from industry) and student-presentation of case analysis. As such, students are expected to read and understand the ideas presented in lectures and seminars, and in the reading list recommended, explain the ideas, analyze issues and see them from diverse perspectives, and formulate and critique arguments. Therefore, students are required to demonstrate this in class discussion and in written assignments. Quizzes will be given, aiming at determining the student’s grasp of the materials learned.

47

Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes

Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. Class participation 2. Assignment: Ethical Analysis 3. Mid-term quiz 4. End-term quiz 5. Case/scenario Analysis: presentation and report Total

% Intended subject learning outcomes to weighting be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a 10% 20%      b          c   d   e        f g h i

20% 20% 30%

100 %

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: While class participation and the quizzes aim to assess students’ performance on an individual basis, the Ethical Analysis assignment and the case analysis presentation and report are designed to encourage/train/ assess performance in a group This arrangement of assessment is designed to achieve an even distribution of individual-group performance. While individual performance is important, group participation is an essential attribute expected of a modern computing professional. Furthermore, the assignment and case report aim at refinement and improvement writing skills, the oral presentation an opportunity for dialogue in English on their (students’) feet, and of course, the rest of the assessment is without saying part of the convention which lays in the core of the students’ total performance portfolio. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture/seminar/forums Tutorial/workshop/presentation 28 Hrs. 14 Hrs.

Other student study effort:  Reading of recommended materials 48 14 Hrs.

D. & Chan. December 2008) 6.P.G.G. Quinn. Johnson. Computer Ethics 3rd edition. Ethics and Technology. Computer Ethics 4th edition. 2001 2.A. VDM (Verlag Dr Müller). M. Keith C. Ethical Decision Making and Information Technology. D. H..C. 1995 4.. Lee.. Prentice Hall.. Johnson. Computer Ethics & Social Value. Ethics for the Information Age. Prentice Hall. & Grillo. Tavani. Total student study effort Reading List and References 1. 2006 8. Information Systems Control & Audit Association (Jonline. E.G. Johnson. J. 2009 3. 1996 5. Prentice Hall. H. Information Security Management: Semi-intelligent Risk-analytic Audit. Addison Wesley. 2nd edition. Wanbil W.. John Wiley &Sons. Kallman. D. 2010 7. McGraw-Hill. Wanbil W.T. Reading of supplementary materials 7 Hrs. Lee.. & Nissenbaum.. 2007 49 . IS Audit &Control Journal.J. 63 Hrs.. “Computer Ethics: a Potent Weapon for Information Security Management”.

the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) analyze a problem using an object-oriented approach. (5) cooperate with team members in problem solving. design and implementation. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. and be able to design and evaluate for the proper solution by applying computing and related technologies. and implement the design using appropriate object-oriented tools and techniques. This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. report and present the solution to an information system problem clearly. To expose students to the applications of object-oriented technologies. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: communicate effectively in Chinese and English at a level sufficient for project and system presentation and documentation. (2) design an object-oriented model for a problem. This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. Attributes for all-roundedness (4) analyze and solve information system problems in a systematic manner. This subject teaches elements of this 50 . This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome. Programme Outcome 4: think and reason critically on developing alternatives in problem solving and application development.Electives Subject Title: Object-oriented Methods for Information System Development Subject Code: COMP 316 Number of Credits: 3 Hours Assigned: Lecture 35 hours Tutorial/Lab/Sem 14 hours Pre-requisite: Nil Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP 314. Programme Outcome 5: possess technical knowledge needed to solve computing problems and to realize solutions in programming and associated technology. To familiarize students with the tools and languages for object-oriented analysis. (3) document the analysis and design of an information system using UML. Programme Outcome 2: demonstrate a global outlook in factors that can affect the way computing systems are developed and used. COMP 414 Objectives:    To introduce students to the concepts and practices of the object-oriented approach to software development.

51 Duration of Laboratory 14 Duration of Lectures 5 5 15 5 5 35 .outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. Information system analysis and design System Development Life Cycle: requirement definition and specification. Presentations and demonstrations of projects. Total Tutorials/Laboratories/Project presentations and seminars: Topic 1. mapping an OO data model into a relational model. object relationships. attributes instance connection. Object-oriented paradigm Rationale for the OO approach. system conversion. polymorphism. Programme Outcome 6: be responsive to and follow closely the advanceme in information technology and their impact to the industrial need for information technology. 2. Object-oriented Project Management Applications in information system analysis. Syllabus: Topic 1. association. services. OO software development life cycle. objects and classes. Smalltalk. 3. 5. testing. implementation. inheritance hierarchy. 3. 2. software cost estimation. generalization. Class exercises on OO analysis and design problems. task management and human interface components. patterns. This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome. user guide and operations manual. design issues in problem domain: data management. analysis and design. design and software engineering. 4. Java. with an attitude of continuous and lifelong learning. This subject provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. user interfaces. Unified Modeling Language (UML). OO/UML development tools such as Rational Rose. metaclass. messages. identification of classes and objects in a problem domain. user training. aggregation. reuse. system development planning and scheduling. services and message connections. and frameworks. identification of structures. abstraction. Object-oriented languages and systems Characteristics of object-oriented tools such as C++. Programme Outcome 7: work together as a team in project design and development. encapsulation. Object-oriented analysis and design Object behaviour analysis. while exhibiting leadership in a group or team whenever designated or necessary.

McGraw-Hill. group project involving implementation. McGraw-Hill. Scott. Java: How to Program. UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language. Grady Booch. 2002. Hughes and M. Lethbridge and Robert Laganiere. John Wiley & Sons. 2003. Meyer. 2nd Edition. McGraw-Hill.Total Case Study: Nil 14 Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment 60% Individual exercises. 1. James Rumbaugh and Ivar Jacobson. 2005. 7. 10. 2nd Edition. Engineering Distributed Objects. Cotterell. 2000. Object-Oriented System Analysis and Design Using UML. 2004. B. 3rd Edition. Object-Oriented Software Engineering – Practical software development using UML and Java. Deitel & Deitel. 6. 2002. Object-Oriented Software Construction. 5. Steve McRobb and Ray Farmer. 4. 3rd Edition. 2. 1999. C++: How to Program. Software Project Management. B. tests. 2005. Simon Bennett. Wolfgang Emmerich. 52 . 9. The Unified Modeling Language User Guide. demonstration and presentation Examination 40% Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Assignments Lab exercises Project Mid-term Examination Total % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 x x x 60 40 100 x x x x x x x x x x Reference Books: Timothy C. 5th Ed. 2002. Object-Oriented Analysis and Design with Applications. Addison Wesley. Grady Booch. Prentice Hall. 3rd Edition. 6th Ed. 3. M. Benjamin/Cummings.. Fowler and K. Addison Wesley.. 2nd Edition. Deitel & Deitel. Prentice Hall. Prentice Hall. 8. 2005.

The quality of the report(s) measures how the 53 . students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) acquire the ability to think and reason in a creative and critical manner when applying IT technology to different information processing areas. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) solve problem with an analytic and critical view. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: It makes the student learn to present results.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP318 Systems Simulation 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP201. (b) acquire the skills that include analytic modelling and simulation so that appropriate solution alternatives in problem solving and application development can be soundly determined by a process of guided evaluation. COMP211 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP308 Objectives  To provide students with basic knowledge of modern computer simulation methods and languages  To enable students to apply computer simulation techniques to simulate the operations of various kinds of real-world facilities or processes Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. such as business. industry and public sectors. (c) know how to use simulation packages and tools that are immediately applicable in business and industry. (e) learn to collect performance data independently and analyze them empirically so that the dynamics of the target system can be deciphered. which are produced from the assignment project(s) that verify what they have learned in class.

Problem solving and case studies Simulation experiments. replication. sequential batching. Computer simulation Applications of computer simulation. continuous model. inverse transform method.g. e. Computer simulation languages and software Entity-oriented language. e. and combined model. e. regenerative methods. 5. triangular. e.g.student(s) has mastered the techniques they learned. system performance simulation. verification and validation. Programme Outcome 4: It helps students polish their critical thinking through the process of analyzing the project/programming results. Simscript. Total Duration of Lectures 2. acceptance-rejection method. 2. which they have to improve to keep abreast with time – lifelong learning. Zipfian. autocorrelation.g. event scheduling.5 10 10 5 35 54 . generation of random variates for various distributions. e.g. discrete event simulation concepts. and flight simulator. Programme Outcome 6: The laboratory exercises and project assignments help students’ problem solving skills. simulation software. problem solving in realistic applications. network simulator. CSIM. 4. Simulation of deterministic and random processes Random number generator. e. Programme Outcome 2: It helps student(s) grasp what factors would affect system correctness and stability. embedded language. processoriented/event-oriented language. GPSS. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Gaussian.g.g. discrete model. case studies.5 7. Modeling and analysis techniques for simulation Models versus simulation models. Programme Outcome 7: The group project inculcates team spirit. 3. trace-driven simulation. list processing and time advance algorithms. exponential. Petri-net.

Assignments 2. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b  c   30% 15% 45% 100 %           d    e      1. basically the students are drilled in important topics by resolving them alone and then in open discussions. 2. Evaluate Petri-nets that model real-life systems (e. Program the firing sequence for system constraints analysis. ii) associate – at this level effective learning is easily achieved by associating with hand-on experience.Laboratory Experiments and other Practical Work: Topic (indicative only) 1. iii) test and examine – this reinforces the rehearsal in the learning process so that short-term items can become long-term memory. 3. Examination Total 10%  The assessment methods are appropriate to produce the expected outcome 55 . Project 4. Draw Petri-nets for different systems for logical analysis. 4. Lab exercises 3. for this reason the theories are practiced in laboratory exercises and group projects in which students can discuss and learn from one another with a team spirit. tutorial and take-home exercise.g. Total Teaching/Learnin g Methodology Duration of Laboratory 1 1 1 2 5 The methodology consists of three main parts other that lectures: i) understand and rehearse – understanding is deepened through repeated class. Mid-term 5. a TCP channel). Set up the link to a time-Petri-net package.

that transfers knowledge in the short-term memory into the long-term memory. J.E. Prentice Hall. Other student study effort:   Assigned reading Take-home exercise 10 Hrs. and Nicol. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 35 Hrs. Discrete-Event System Simulation. 2010 2.because they together represent an effective rehearsal process. Walpoleand.. B. R. 10 Hrs. 5th Edition.. J. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists.H. R. 2007 56 . Nelson. 8th Edition. 69 Hrs. Prentice-Hall. Banks. Carson. and Myers.. 14 Hrs.. in light of cognitive science. Total student study effort Reading List and References 1. D.

multimedia system design and implementations. compression standards.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP319 Introduction to Multimedia Computing 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP305 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP419 Objectives  To provide the foundation knowledge of multimedia computing. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the characteristics of different media. multimedia representation. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. be able to take into considerations in multimedia system designs. e. Attributes for all-roundedness (e) learn independently and search for the information required in solving problems. 57 . (d) program multimedia data and be able to design and implement media applications. understand different compression techniques.g. data formats. understand different data formats. understand the characteristics of human’s audio system. media characteristics.  To provide programming training in multimedia computing. multimedia technology development. be able to design and develop multimedia systems according to the requirements of multimedia applications. (c) understand different compression principles. (b) understand the characteristics of human’s visual system. understand different multimedia compression standards. be able to take into considerations in multimedia techniques design and implementation. understand the representations of different multimedia data.

Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their communication skills and demonstration ability with project presentation. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to forming the global outlook that can affect the way computing systems are developed and used. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through lectures and lab exercises on solving problems. They will also practice choosing and evaluating the solutions for different technique problems. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to follow closely the advancement in information technology and their impact to the industrial need. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with groupbased project for students to practice team spirit. Programme Outcome 8: This subject contributes to solve problems and develop solutions with computing and information technologies in multimedia area. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Overview of multimedia computing Definitions, terms, terminologies, characteristics and requirements of different media; components of multimedia systems. 2. Human’s visual and audio system Characteristics of human visual system, light and visible light; human retina structure and functions; non-perceptual uniform color models and perceptual uniform color models; Characteristics of human’s audio system, frequency response and magnitude range. 3. Multimedia data representation and analysis Representation of sound/audio, image and video; speech generation, analysis and software; image analysis, display, and printing. 4. Multimedia coding and compression Coding requirements; compression principles; entropy 58 Duration of Lectures 1

10

10

12

and hybrid coding; compression standards: JPEG, MPEG, and etc. 5. Multimedia technology development Multimedia history, technology development, challenging problem, research difficulty, multimedia industry Total 2

35

Laboratory Experiments and other Practical Work: Topic 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Introduction to Matlab and the user interface Programming using Matlab Basic operations in Matlab. Functions in Matlab. Image processing using Matlab. Compression algorithms design and implementation. Image/video compression and decompression. Total Teaching/Learnin g Methodology Duration of Laboratory 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 14

A mix of lectures and lab sessions is used to deliver the various topics in this subject. Lectures are conducted to initiate students with the concepts and techniques of multimedia computing that are reinforced by in-class exercises and quizzes. Lab sessions will be used to illustrate the practical problems and to train multimedia programming ability. Students are given the opportunity to gain hands-on experience on designing and implementing a multimedia system.

Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes

Specific assessment methods/tasks

% weighting

Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b  c     d      e

1. Quizzes 2. Project 3. Examination Total

55%

 

45% 100 %

Continuous assessments consist of a project and several quizzes, which are designed to facilitate students to achieve intended learning outcomes. The quizzes are designed to drive students to review how comprehensively and correctly they have understood the knowledge concepts, principles, and 59

theories taught in the subject. The project is designed to enhance students’ ability to acquire the understanding and using different multimedia computing principles, techniques, tools to solve a real problem through team work. Examination will evaluate student’s understanding and usage of multimedia computing knowledge, e.g. concepts, principles, techniques, and standards. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 35 Hrs. 14 Hrs.

Other student study effort:    Prepare the quizzes Design and implement the project Prepare the examination 30 Hrs. 27 Hrs. 10 Hrs. 116 Hrs.

Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. 2.

Z.N. Li and M.S. Drew, Fundamentals of Multimedia. Prentice Hall, 2003. K. Jeffay and H. Zhang, Readings in Multimedia Computing and Networking. Morgan Kaufmann, 2002.

60

(h) learn independently and be able to search for the information required in solving problems. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the technical difficulties in representing and processing text written or encoded in Chinese. (b) understand the (operating) system support for displaying and entering Chinese in computers.g. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (e) handle the software development of Chinese enabled software applications in the context of developing internationalized software and in adhering to international software development practices. (d) handle Chinese text data encoded in various standards or format (e.  To provide training in software design methodology for the recognition of human/machine interface.g. Chinese abstraction and Machine Translation) that demonstrates the integrated use of various techniques. (f) handle some basic algorithmic problems and some basic computational Chinese linguistic techniques to enable efficient and intelligent Chinese enabled software applications. (c) understand some Chinese information processing applications (e. GB and Big5). Attributes for all-roundedness (g) solve problems using systematic approaches. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to enhance the student’s 61 . Chinese information retrieval.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP323 Introduction to Chinese Computing 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP201 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP423 Objectives  To provide the students with a basic understanding of the foundation in system coding and design for text processing with a specific emphasis on the Chinese language and its co-processing with other languages such as English.

word. 4. design and evaluation issues for different keystroke input methods: shapebased (e. 2. compression and scaling problems). Characteristics of Chinese language Historical development. to solve tutorial and assignment questions and to design and implement the project. phonetic-based and shape-phonetic based input methods. character decoding techniques and character conversion problems. phrase and sentence) and quantitative analysis (Zip Law. vector / outline fonts (Limn algorithm). They will also practice more in written assignments. Output processing of Chinese Font technology. image. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to developing student problem solving ability with programming in lab exercises. and even CJK languages in a more global context. 62 Duration of Lectures 2. specification. typesetting terminology and text rendering process.5 5 5 . input method architecture (e. extraction and user-defined glyph addition). character set organization (e.. geographical variations (dialects). coverage curve). discussion of (de facto) standard character sets (for PC.5 7.g. Integration of tools and applications also help to develop the global outlook. morph. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. its coding and processing. 3. programming exercises and the project. speech and keystrokes. encoding schemes (ISO2022 and UTF). Representation of Chinese character sets Mathematical description of representation. Students will go beyond standard English representation to Chinese. bitmap fonts (representation. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises. Q9). unbounded alphabet representation and processing. GB and Big5).horizon in knowing the variety of language and its impact on the computer. workstation and network).g. Input processing of Chinese Introduction to Chinese input processing by pen.g. linguistic descriptions (character. X-Windows fonts (BDF and Postscript) and font related operations (installation. automatic glyph construction. for Microsoft Windows and X-Windows).

string searching (KMP. Software development for Chinese computing Open systems. and class questions and answers for easy understanding. 5. Homework assignments help students to develop analytical and problem solving skills. dictionary lookup. string-set searching. Total 7. BM and Quick). abstraction or machine translation. together with comprehensive examples. codeset announcement and conversion Programming using Internationalization methodology Total Duration of Laboratory 14 7. 63 . 2.5 7. ANSIC model. Windows programming for Chinese computing (Microsoft.and X-Windows). Programming assignments will give students the opportunity to solve problems through implementation where they understand and practice on how programs can be written and compiled to run to complete certain tasks.5. Chinese information retrieval. 6. 6. 4. 14 Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures teach students on the main concepts of the course. internationalization. Tutorials and lab sessions offer the opportunity for students to review the lecture materials through online exercises and also the use of programming tools to learn to program. word segmentation. Selected topics in Chinese computing Character set selection (NP-complete). Locale Setting for operating systems and Locale detection checking of character encoding using binary reading tool Foundations of Multilingual Website design and web page language setting Installation of Input Method Engine (IME) to operating system System font set detection Character string data handling and processing in programming environment. hashing functions for Chinese character sets. localization.5 35 Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. 3.

Postscript by Example. K. Japanese. K. Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing. Other student study effort:   Reading to understand the concepts Homework and Programming Assignments. PHI.D. Developing International Software. GNU Font utilities (Limn algorithm). K. online QA. 1989. 4.. 99 Hrs. Open Systems. and Hargraves.. Huang.A. 1989.Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. 20 Hrs..計算機漢字處理實用技術. Reference Books: 1..J. Berry.哈爾濱工業大學出版社. Lab exercises 3. Lunde. Japanese and Korean Computing.E. AddisonWesley. An Introduction to Chinese. M. Hopcroft.. Singapore: World Scientific.. K. G. Korean and Vietnamese Computing. 3. and Huang. Mid-term 5. 1995. Nutt. Project 4. 1979. N. 1992. 1999. 1993. H. Theory and Languages. Chinese. McGilton. J. 8. and Ullman. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to weighting be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a 55%     45% 100 %    b c   d        e f          g h   Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 35 Hrs. 2. Kano. Prentice Hall. 王曉龍. 64 . 7.. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbook: 1.T. Introduction to Automata.D. Assignments 2. 1993.李紅斌. J. Addison-Wesley. J. 14 Hrs. and Campione. Microsoft Press. and preparation for Quizzes and Final exam 30 Hrs. Jain. 5. 6.A.K. T. O'Reilly & Associates.

The Unicode Consortium. Communications of COLIPS. Addison-Wesley Developer Press. 11.9. 14. 胡裕樹,現代漢語, 三聯書局,1992. Journal and Conference Proceedings of Computer Processing of Oriental Languages. The Unicode Standard. 10. 12. 13. 1991-96.0. ACM Transactions on Asian Language Information Processing. Version 2. 65 . Journal of Chinese Information Processing.

Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. The presentation and documentation of student 66 . Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their presentation and documentation skills through assignments. methods and techniques in solving real-life business problems related to the use of information systems. management. project and case studies. (b) understand the various activities related to the management of information systems.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP325 Information Systems Management 3 3 Pre-requisite: COMP302 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP405 Objectives   To present an integrated view of the planning. and control of information systems in the organization. (e) develop the ability to learn independently and to find/integrate information from different sources required in solving real-life problems. To allow students the opportunity to develop critical evaluation in the selection and appraisal of relevant approaches. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) improve presentation and communication skills (through cases discussion and project presentation). students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the strategic role played by the information systems department in modern enterprises. (c) appreciate and evaluate existing and emergent information technologies on their applicability to modern enterprises.

Information systems. alternative approaches to systems development.5 7.g. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit.5 5 5 7.5 . Programme Outcome 8: This subject contributes to providing student with basic concepts and techniques for building and managing systems implementation from the managerial perspective. IS planning techniques including competitive forces model and value chain analysis. organizations and control Technical and behavioral definitions of organization. outsourcing. They will also practice more in written assignments and project. valuation methods. 4. Strategic uses of IT and strategic IS planning Strategic impacts of IT. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1.coursework will also be measured. operational measures. and a group project. IT architecture and IT operations management Corporate IT architecture versus IT infrastructure. risk 67 Duration of Lectures 2. Building and managing systems implementation Systems development lifecycle. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through case studies. profit center approach). IT governance. types of enterprise distributed systems. IT project management. 3. 5. Student level of understanding will be also assessed in the examination. Information systems management’s leadership role Escalating benefits of using IT. pros and cons of outsourcing. IT-enabled organizational change. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to developing student understanding of the impact of IT to the industries using real-life cases. control architecture (e. individual assignments. how organization affects IS and vice versa. Student also gets to practice through in-class case discussions and exercises. cost center approach. 2. changing roles of the information systems department and staff. Student will also have the opportunity to participate in the discussion of these cases.

tacit and explicit knowledge management. change management. intellectual capital issues.management approaches. virtual organizations. 7.5 35 Case Study: Presentations and discussions will be held during the seminars. knowledge creation lifecycle. Systems for supporting knowledge based work Systems to support collaboration. where the students will form groups to read. Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures focus on the introduction and explanation of key concepts. Students will learn not only in the class but also through various coursework activities. projects. computer ethics. Assignments are designed to reinforce the concepts and methods 68 . Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d  e   Continuous assessment Examination Total 55% 45% 100 %   Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment items include written and oral assignments. Total Laboratory Experiment: Use and evaluate some existing and emerging information technologies and understand their applicability to modern enterprises. methods for measuring system benefits. 6. Seminars provide students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the concepts taught in lectures and to apply the theories to the analysis of real-life issues. and tests. present and discuss real-life cases related to the subject's topics.

10th edition. H. Management information systems: Managing the digital firm. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Seminar 35 Hrs. 8 th edition. O’Brien and G. K. Laudon and J. 2008. K. R. A. 8th edition. and C. 35 Hrs. McNurlin. Management information systems.. 3. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbook: B. 2. The written part of the assignments and projects helps student develop their organization and documentation skills. C. 2008.learned in the class. Projects are used to develop students’ analytic and problem solving skills. 98 Hrs. Information systems management in practice. Prentice Hall. Other student study effort:   Reading and self learning Coursework 14 Hrs. and Tung Bui. Information Systems: Enabling and Transforming Business. Jr. 2rd edition. Wiley & Sons. Marakas. C. J. Tests give students opportunity to review and reflect on their learning. P. Sprague. Cegielski. Rainer Jr. Prentice Hall. 2007. Reference Books: 1. M. 69 . McGraw Hill. G. R. 14 Hrs. The oral part of the coursework allows students to practice their presentation and communication skills. Laudon. 2009.

(2) familiarize with propositional and predicate logic and their roles in logic programming. organization. 70 . (4) learn the knowledge representation and reasoning techniques in rule-based systems. (10) appreciate the rooted philosophical arguments in logic and its impact on human thoughts. Attributes for all-roundedness (8) explore the nature of human intelligence and its role in problem solving. To explore the different paradigms in knowledge representation and reasoning. techniques based on probability theory and possibility theory (fuzzy logic). (6) master the skills and techniques in machine learning. reasoning and planning. casebased systems. and genetic algorithm. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to the learning of project development. (9) deepen thoughts and understanding of human abilities such as learning. (7) apply and integrate various artificial intelligence techniques in intelligent system development as well as understand the importance of maintaining intelligent systems. To evaluate the effectiveness of hybridization of different artificial intelligence techniques. such as decision tree induction. artificial neural networks. and model-based systems. in particular. presentation and report writing skills. To understand the contemporary techniques in machine learning. (5) appreciate how uncertainty is being tackled in the knowledge representation and reasoning process. (3) understand the programming language Prolog and write programs in declarative programming style. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to the development of problem solving skills in intelligent systems development. Progamme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to the developing of critically thinking skills on developing alternative artificial intelligence techniques for real world problems. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) understand the history. To equip students with the knowledge and skills in logic programming using Prolog. development and various applications of artificial intelligence.Subject Title: Artificial Intelligence Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP 406 Hours Assigned: Lecture 42 hours Laboratory 7 hours Pre-requisite: COMP 305 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives:      To introduce the fundamental concepts of artificial intelligence. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject.

Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to the development of team work experience and the associated communication skills. Knowledge representation and reasoning Rule-based production systems. the development of formal logic. the Turing test. Total Case Study: Nil 7 Duration of Laboratory Duration of Lectures 6 12 9 9 6 42 71 . maintenance of the completeness. 4. planning and robotics. 3. artificial neural networks. genetic algorithms and other intelligent techniques for problem solving. using inference rules to produce predicate calculus expressions. case-based reasoning systems and model based reasoning systems. monotonicity and informedness of search algorithms. automated theorem proving. admissibility. Total Laboratory Experiment: Topic (1) (2) (3) (4) Prolog programming language exercises and practices. Machine learning Decision tree induction algorithms. expert systems. 5. Artificial neural network exercises using Matlab or other similar software. and machine learning. Artificial Intelligence (AI): its roots and scope Early history and applications. Artificial intelligence as representation and search The Propositional Calculus and Predicate Calculus. recursion-based search. correctness and consistency of intelligent systems. Syllabus: Topic 1. Building a decision tree induction program. Hybrid intelligent techniques and maintenance of intelligent systems Hybridization of neural networks. heuristic search. fuzzy expert systems. Developing a program to run the genetic algorithm. fuzzy logic and fuzzy set theory. reasoning under uncertain situations: stochastic methods. 2. natural language understanding and semantics. overview of AI application areas: game playing. fuzzy logic. strategies and structures for state space search. genetic algorithms.

Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment Examination 55% 45% Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method % / task weighting Assignments Lab exercises Project Mid-term Examination Total 15% 25% 15% 45% 100% Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Textbook: 1. Luger. Pal and Simon C. George F. 72 . Addison Wesley. K. Michael Negnevitsky. John Wiley. 2. Artificial Intelligence: A Guide to Intelligent Systems. 6th Edition. Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving. Reference Books: 1. Sankar K. Shiu. 2005. 2004. 2009. Addison Wesley. 2nd edition. Foundations of Soft Case-Based Reasoning.

Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to the global outlook by having students understand the use of computer graphics for different applications and their uses. Attributes for all-roundedness (e) understand. high performance rendering. (c) possess in-depth knowledge of display systems. examine applications of modelling. 73 . design and visualization. including advanced technologies for 3D modelling. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) gain proficiency in 3D computer graphics API programming. and interactive control of 3D computer graphics applications. Upon completion of the subject. appreciate and follow the development and advancement of computer graphics technologies. shape modeling. learn image synthesis techniques. (b) understand the interactive computer graphics architecture. image synthesis. analysis and interpretation of 2D and 3D visual information.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP407 Computer Graphics 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP305 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil This subject allows students to:    Intended Learning Outcomes learn basic and fundamental computer graphics techniques. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to communicative effectively by having students practice programming in small groups in the lab and solving digital image design in small teams. (d) enhance their perspective of modern computer system with modeling.

Applications of computer graphics Introduction to OpenGL and device independent Application Programming Interfaces (API). scene hierarchy. 2D transformation. 2D primitive drawing. Total Duration of Lectures 15 12 15 42 Laboratory Experiment: Laboratory exercises will normally be conducted using the currently available computer graphics API such as OpenGL. color and interactive animation. virtual reality. pixel processes. 3D transformation and projection. and potential projects. related issues such as anti-aliasing and texture mapping. Case Study: If applicable.Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises as well as direct exchanges on novel uses of 2D image construction and 3D rendering algorithms. They will also practice in written assignments. scanconversion. 3D transformations. case studies may be conducted on modeling and design 74 . clipping. rasterization. Basic computer graphics hardware/software interfaces Graphical input/output devices. programming exercises. 3. rasterization. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. object modeling and hierarchical structures. synthetic camera and viewing volume. local illumination models. projections. hardware supported 3D modeling and rendering. 2D drawings. Image synthesis and generation techniques Some of the important image generation techniques including hardware-based rendering. The students will be exposed to basic frame-buffer control. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work by employing a small group-based approach to lab problem solving. assignments and mini-projects. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to technical problem solving by initiating a wide variety of application design and implementation skills through lab exercise and mini-project with proper design and implementation. reflections and shading. 2. modeling objects.

Exposition and training sessions on a commercial grade studio package 6. Lecture delivery 2. Project 30%   75 . Additional reference material 5. Sessions on 3D artistic design and special effects 7.systems that are used in commercial applications. Discussion sessions with optional additional workshops. Lecture notes 2. Interactive exchange with students in class 3. Textbook material 4. Office hours questions. lectures and labs The learning methodology will be based on: 1. Tutorial sessions in and/or outside the lecture and laboratory sessions 5. Assignments 2. Web links to active tutorials and other presentation material Group interactions and supervised discussion sessions. Lab exercises 3. Laboratory exercises consisting of hands-on programming exercises and tests 4. Teaching/Learning Methodology The teaching methodology is based on three main activities: 1. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d e 1. Laboratory notes and programming exercises 3. answers and clarification of material 8.

Other student study effort:   Class participation Course work: reading. 2. 2009. Peter Shirley and Steve Marschner. A top-down approach with OpenGL. Critical thinking. Computer Graphics with OpenGL. http://math. 4. Addison-Wesley. Hearn. 2010.. Watt. The final examination accounts for a global and comprehensive understanding of the entire subject material and serves as the final checkpoint for the learning outcomes against technical skills and critical problem solving with respect to all components of computer graphics and 3D modeling. A. Fundamentals of Computer Graphics with Java and OpenGL. assignments 4 Hrs.S.hws. 3D Computer Graphics. Fundamentals of Computer Graphics. Third Edition. and Baker.S. independence. Peters. David Eck. 2000. Mid-term 5. 42 Hrs. 7 Hrs.4.. 2004. Examination Total 30% 40% 100 %       The assignment weights will be effectively distributed amongst the intended subject learning outcomes to nurture creative thinking. A.. K. OpenGL: A Primer. E. E. effective communication and a demonstrable global outlook will be incorporated at every level of exercises and mid-term examinations. Specifically.. evaluate and develop a critical perspective in the development of both small and large systems and integration of systems. 2000.edu/graphicsnotes. Angel. Third Edition. Second Edition. teamwork. Addison-Wesley. Reference Books: 1. 5. 95 Hrs. Third Edition. Addison76 . Interactive Computer Graphics. understand. D. M. 3. Prentice-Hall. technical skills and a global perspective towards the technological base of this subject. Angel. the assignments and the lab exercises are selected to develop the technical skills and knowledge to solve problems in computing and software development as well as to realize effective solutions. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 42 Hrs. discussion. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbooks: 1.

6. F. Prentice Hall. Jr.S. 2001.Wesley. 77 . Second Edition. 2000. Hill. Computer Graphics Using Open GL..

To equip students with skills to design and analyze parallel and distributed applications. including internet-based ones. especially those time-critical ones. (d) gain hand-on experience with the agent-based and Internet-based parallel and distributed programming techniques. (h) apply the different techniques. (e) master skills to measure the performance of parallel and distributed programs. (f) learn advanced techniques such as Internet caching and its application in practical systems. hardware devices and software agents. appreciate and apply parallel and distributed algorithms in problem solving.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP408 Parallel and Distributed Computing 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP304. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) evaluate whether a parallel and distributed application is efficient or not by using the right tools. efficaciously in e-business perspectives. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the evolution of high performance computing (HPC) with respect to laws and the contemporary notion that involves mobility for data. 78 . (c) evaluate the impact of network topology on parallel/distributed algorithm formulations and traffic their performance. COMP312 (COMP307 for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil   To provide students with contemporary knowledge in parallel and distributed computing. (b) understand.

applications of parallel and distributed computing. client-server computing. parallel languages. resource allocation. 4. message passing primitives. Programme Outcome 5: The laboratory exercises and project assignments improve the students’ problem solving skills. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. synchronization techniques. 3. network of workstations. importance of Moore’s Law. Programme Outcome 6: The subject matter points out where the edge of distributed and parallel computing is. Lamport's logical clock. synchronization mechanisms. agents. The quality of the report(s) measures how the student(s) has mastered what they learned. for lifelong learning. message passing. supercomputing and the grid. SIMD versus MIMD architectures.Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: It makes the student learn to present results. problem decomposition and parallelization. Programme Outcome 2: It helps student(s) grasp what factors would affect system correctness and stability. Programme Outcome 3: The team assignment helps students learn how to collaborate ethically. Programme Outcome 4: It helps students polish their critical thinking through the process of analyzing the project/programming results. Distributed computing Fundamental issues and problem types. remote procedure call. Parallel computing Different HPC system architectures and models: tightly coupled versus loosely coupled architectures. 2. Programme Outcome 7: The group project inculcates team spirit. shared memory MIMD. Overview High performance computing (HPC) paradigms evolution with respect to different laws and learning curves. Selected topics In-depth studies on EITHER parallel computing OR 79 Duration of Lectures 6 12 12 12 . naming facility. by example. and meanwhile helps students develop methods. which are produced from the assignment project(s) that verify what they have learned in class.

c.. Application of the programming language to solve problems. one-to-all versus allto-all operators. Learning the programming language for the platform. Internet congestion control. distributed resource management. common parallel operators and reduction. vi) test and examine – this reinforces the rehearsal in the learning process so that short-term items can become long-term memory. v) associate – at this level effective learning is easily achieved by associating with hand-on experience.g. dependability of distributed systems. Total Laboratory Experiment: Topic a. Distributed computing topics may include load balancing. b. performance monitoring. for this reason the theories are practiced in laboratory exercises and group projects in which students can discuss and learn from one another with a team spirit. grid computing. faulttolerance. tutorial and take-home exercise. Internet congestion control. traffic analysis. 80 . Internet traffic pattern analysis. e. Internet-based distributed computing. Installing mobile agent or relevant platform. use of caching to reduce response time. Parallel computing topics may include design of parallel algorithms. basically the students are drilled in important topics by resolving them alone and then in open discussions. Total Teaching/Learnin g Methodology Duration of Laboratory 1 2 2 42 5 The methodology consists of three main parts other that lectures: iv) understand and rehearse – understanding is deepened through repeated class. distributed deadlock.distributed computing. Internet end-to-end performance measurement.

Other student study effort:   Assigned reading Take-home exercise 10 Hrs. Assignments 2. J.K. 69 Hrs. that transfers knowledge in the short-term memory into the long-term memory. 4th Edition. Kindberg. Lab exercises 3. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 42 Hrs. Dollimore and T.W. Coulouris. Addison Wesley. T. in light of cognitive science. A. Techniques and Cases. Selected current articles from ACM and IEEE journals and conference proceedings 2.Y.S. 10 Hrs. Mid-term 5.Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. 7 Hrs. Harnessing the Service Roundtrip Time Over the Internet to Support Time-Critical Applications – Concepts. Dillon and W. 81 . Nova Science Publishers. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to be weighting assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a 10%  b  c   30% 15% 45% 100 %          d    e      f        g     h  The assessment methods are appropriate to produce the expected outcome because they together represent an effective rehearsal process. Distributed Systems: Concepts and Design. Wong. Project 4. G. 2005. 2008 3. Total student study effort Reading List and References 1. Inc. New York.K Lin.

 Earn practical exposure of TCP/IP operations in the form of realistic and practical experiments.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives  Acquire foundational understanding on the concept of Internetworking in terms of the technologies and techniques that drive Internet. (b) understand the important issues encompassing internetworking and how these issues affect the evolution of Internet and its applications. (d) rapidly learn new techniques and to align new technologies to existing Internetworking infrastructure.  Deepen understanding of advanced concepts of TCP/IP protocol suite and its architecture. 82 COMP416 Internetworking Protocols and Software 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP312 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil . (c) understand the complete architecture of Internetworking and the operations of underlying protocols and software. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) understand and solve internetworking problems in a systematic and principled approach. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (e) equipped with practical knowledge on configuring and monitoring network operations using Internet tools and software. (f) develop networking software that demonstrates their understanding of the concepts taught in the class. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) identify and explain the essential components that drive internetworking (students would be equipped with the knowledge to explain the relationships between the components and how they affect one another).

Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. TCP timers: setting timeouts. connection control. TCP packet format. silly window syndrome: Nagle’s algorithm. special IP addresses. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. TCP/IP protocol suite Hierarchical address routing. TCP state transitions. multihome addresses. multiplicative decrease and additive increase.(h) develop practical software and present results in the form of technical report. slash notation. classless addressing. Internet routing Direct versus indirect internet routing. assigning address blocks. flow and congestion control. routing decisions. 4. address resolution protocol and RARP. connection termination. connecting LAN and WAN technologies. User Datagram Protocol. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to develop student with industrial technologies through labs and assigments. transport addressing. routing methods. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with groupbased project for students to practice team spirit. IP packet format. Advanced addressing and IP Supernetting. (i) learn to work effectively as a team member. protocol mechanisms including error. ICMP error reporting. interior gateway routing versus exterior gateway routing. Transport protocol Transport services and protocols. 2. Programme Outcome 3: This subject contributes to motivate student to understand the system integration design through project. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with lab report and project report. subnet addressing. TCP congestion control: slow-start. IP classful addressing: IP classes. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through lab exercises and project on solving problems. credit-based flow control. 3. routing protocols: RIP 83 Duration of Lectures 3 3 6 6 .

Core Base Tree (CBT) multicast. The project asks the students to join a 84 . Snoop TCP.5. The students can fully understand the protocols by inspecting the real Internet packets. and 1 project. hardware multicast. Teaching/Learning Methodology Using Internet tools Ethereal for packet capturing and analysis Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) Network management Total Duration of Laboratory 1 2 2 2 7 The course includes 10 lectures. The labs allow the students getting real Internet experiences. foreign agent. agent discovery protocol. private networks and security: Virtual Private Networks (VPN). 3. 6. Network Address Translation (NAT). mobile transport protocol: TCP over wireless. intranet versus extranet. Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM). setting traps. The other two labs ask students to writing Socket programming to build a simple client-sever communication software. The lecture gives the basic knowledge on the Internet protocols. The project ask the students to design routing protocols such as how to use implement Dijstra’s Algorithm. Two labs teach student to use Wireshare software to catch real Internet packets and exam the packet information. home agent. Distance Vector Multicast Protocol (DVMP). IMAP4. 2. SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol: Management Information Base (MIB). reliable multicast. Mobile Internet Mobile IP. 4 labs. Internet services BOOTP versus DHCP. IP Security (IPSec). Authentication Header mode versus Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP). SMTP. Structure of Management Information (SMI). OSPF routing mechanisms: area border routers. Internet multicast N-to-N unicast. link state routing. triangle routing. BGP. autonomous systems. Realtime Transport Protocol (RTP). Inverse Domain Mapping. Through the labs. Indirect TCP (I-TCP). Total 6 6 9 3 42 Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. versus OSPF. Dijkstra’s algorithm. MOSPF. The knowledge is tested through 2 half hour quizzes. proxy and Internet multicast. 7. private network addressing. SNMP protocol. 8. Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP). Domain Name Services (DNS). POP3. 4. the students can learn how to write Internet programming to communication.

Mid-term 5. Four labs (20% total) ask students to submit 2 lab reports. Project is a group project. the student can get real experiences on the Internet and Internet programming. 20 Hrs. Project 4. Lab exercises 3. It tests the knowledge of the whole course. Quizzes 2. it allows students to learn how to do team work and also deeply understand the routing protocols. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. Through the labs. Other student study effort:   Review course materials Project and Lab report 20 Hrs. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 42 Hrs. one report for Wireshark software and the other is for Socket programming. Final exam is comprehensive. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to be weighting assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a 22% 11% 22%    b     c d  e    f g h   i     45% 100 %     Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment includes 2 half hour quizzes. The quizzes test if the students understand the basic materials of the course. 85 . 7 Hrs.team and learn how to work in a team.

Prentice Hall. Addison Wesley. Prentice Hall. 86 . Richard Stevens. ACM Communications Magazine. “Internetworking with TCP/IP: Principles. Reference Books: 1. Textbooks: 1. Forouzan. 4. The Internet Protocol Journal. McGraw Hill. IEEE Internet Computing. 2. “Computer Networks”. Vol 1”. and Architectures”. W. “TCP/IP Illustrated. Articles from IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. Douglas Comer. Behrouz A. 3. “TCP/IP Protocol Suite”. 4th edition. Protocols.Total student study effort Reading List and References 89 Hrs. Andrew Tanenbaum. 2nd Edition.

 Utilize various techniques developed for data mining to discover interesting patterns in large databases.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP417 Data Warehousing and Data Mining Techniques in Business and Commerce 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP311 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil This subject aims at equipping students with the latest knowledge and skills to:  Create a clean. (c) design a data warehouse and understand the process required to construct one. (h) obtain hands-on experience with some popular data mining 87 Intended Learning Outcomes . students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand why there is a need for data warehouse in addition to traditional operational database systems. consistent repository of data within a data warehouse for large corporations. (g) understand a typical knowledge discovery process such as CRISPDM. (e) understand the details of different algorithms made available by popular commercial data mining software.  Use existing commercial or public-domain tools to perform data mining tasks to solve real problems in business and commerce. (d) understand why there is a need for data mining and in what ways it is different from traditional statistical techniques.  Expose students to new techniques and ideas that can be used to improve the effectiveness of current data mining tools. (b) identify components in typical data warehouse architectures. (f) solve real data mining problems by using the right tools to find interesting patterns. Upon completion of the subject.

data warehouses. Introduction to data warehousing and data mining Introduction to data warehousing and data mining. 2. Data warehouse architecture and design Data warehouse architecture and design. They will also practice more in written assignments and projects involving real cases in business and commerce. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. data capturing and indexing. definitions and terminologies. replicated data and derived data. two-tier and three-tier architecture. Data warehousing Data warehouse and data warehousing. star schema and snowflake schema. data warehouse and the industry. Online Analytical 88 Duration of Lectures / Tutorials 3 3 3 6 . (k) Solve complex problems individually or in groups and develop group work skills directly and indirectly. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through assignments. definitions. tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems. operational databases vs. possible application areas in business and finance. types of data mining problems.software. (j) learn independently and search for relevant information to write reports to recommend appropriate data warehousing and data mining tools. data characteristics. static and dynamic data. data transformation and cleansing. 4. data marts. meta-data. 3. Data Replication and Online Analytical Processing Data replication. Attributes for all-roundedness (i) solve real-world problems in business and commerce using data mining and data warehousing tools. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit.

nearest neighbor approach. binary. multidimensional databases. genetic algorithms and neural networks for data mining. classification and clustering of temporal data. fuzzy logic. 10. neural network based approach. genetic algorithms based technique. pre-processing. hierarchical algorithm. evaluation of classification model. interestingness measures. 9. 7. Clustering Clustering. 89 . 8. 5. k-means algorithm. Knowledge discovery lifecycle using CRISPDM 2. Sequential data mining Sequential data mining. decision tree based algorithms. data cube. Association rules Mining of association rules. statistical approaches. Data mining and knowledge discovery Data mining and knowledge discovery. types of problems and applications. time series analysis. Other techniques Computation intelligence techniques. Total 3 3 6 6 3 6 42 Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. Classification Classification. Discover Association rules and sequential patterns using Clementine 3. Discover Clusters using Clementine Total Duration of Laboratory 2 2 2 1 7 Case Study:  Application of data mining techniques to solve real business problems. Bayesian approach. time dependent data and temporal data. 6. sub-sequence matching. evaluation of effectiveness. prediction. Discover Classification rules using Clementine 4. neural network and genetic algorithms based approach. data transformation. the data mining lifecycle. quantitative and generalized association rules. the Apriori algorithm.Processing (OLAP). Condorset.

a group project and an examination. They are expected to tackle a number of cases drawn from different application areas in business and commerce so that they can understand why there is a need for data warehouse in addition to traditional operational database systems and 90 . All assignments and projects will also be given in the form of different cases collected so as to allow students to learn more about how data warehouse and data mining can be and have been used in real business environment. For the class lectures. Assignments 2. Attributes leading to success and failure of data warehousing projects tutorials when appropriate. For the assignments and projects. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/ tasks 1. they are expected to also learn to work with each other collaboratively. Students will be given time to participate in discussions when the cases are presented. Project 3. Examination Total % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a  b c d e f g h i j k 55%             45%          100 % The assessment consists of written assignments. various cases will be presented to help student understand why there is a need for data warehouse to be built and why data mining is important for modern day business intelligence. As students will work in teams on the project. They are expected to practice their writing kills through project documentations and report writing. During laboratory sessions. students will be introduced to popular software products from Oracle and IBM that can support the building of data warehouses and the mining of them. Students are expected to solve real data mining problems by using the right tools to find interesting patterns. Teaching/Learning Methodology This subject consists mainly of class lectures and laboratory sessions. they are designed to ensure that students are able to achieve the learning outcomes intended for this subject. For the projects and assignments. students are expected to learn independently and think critically with minimize guidance.

Course Notes and Lab Manuals for COMP417. I. 7. Data Mining for Intelligence. They are expected to learn independently and search for relevant information to write reports to recommend appropriate data warehousing and data mining tools. Witten. L. O. Morgan Kaufmann. They are also expected to use such popular tool as Oracle Warehouse Builder to construct data warehouses. students will learn through the questions and cases. Rokach. D. and Maimon. Inmon. G. They are expected to learn how real-world problems in business and commerce should be tackled using realworld tools as Oracle’s Warehouse Builder or IBM’s Clementine data mining system. 2008.. McGraw-Hill. Fraud & Criminal Detection: Advanced Analytics & Information Sharing Technologies. Chan.... Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 42 Hrs. and Neushloss.. M. World Scientific. Students are expected to practice their writing skills with project document and report writing.. C. 2009.... Westphal. Golfarelli. M.A. Other student study effort:   Assignments and case studies Projects and research 40 Hrs. 2008.. For the projects. S.why data mining is important for modern-day business intelligence. 109 Hrs. when a particular data warehouse architecture or when a particular data mining algorithm is useful and should be used. 2011. E. Strauss. DW 2. 2008. Questions in the assignments are expected to help students learning the details of the data mining algorithm and the use of popular data mining software. Morgan Kaufmann. . 2.0: The Architecture for the Next Generation of Data Warehousing. 20 Hrs.. students are expected to work in groups of three to four to tackle a real case involving the design of a data warehouse or the use of data mining to mine very large data bases. Fuzzy Modeling and Genetic Algorithms for Data 91 3. Cox. In addition. and Rizzi. Data Mining with Decision Trees: Theory and Applications. Third Edition: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques. W. Data Warehouse Design: Modern Principles and Methodologies. CRC Press... 4.H. 6. They will learn to develop critical thinking and team work skills.C. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1.H. Hall.. 2009. 7 Hrs. E. K.C. 5. Data Mining. Frank.

Han. 8. Morgan Kaufmann. Liu... Morgan Kaufmann.C. 2009. L. and Chorianopoulos. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques. and Jain. 2005. A. 9. Intelligent and Other Computational Techniques in Insurance: Theory and Applications. J. and Kamber. M. Data Mining Techniques in CRM: Inside Customer Segmentation.. Tsiptsis. Web Data Mining: Exploring Hyperlinks. Wiley. 2003. 2010.F. and Usage Data. Springer. Contents.. 2005. A. K. Berlin Heidelberg. 92 .. 11. World Scientific. Shapiro. 2nd Edition. 10.Mining and Exploration.. B.

the students should  understand applied cryptographic technology and Web security protocols. presentation and technical writing skills. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) acquire a good knowledge of e-commerce. business models. (2) understand the principles and practices of e-commerce and its related technologies. Syllabus: Topic 1. major components. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with a project for students to work in a team.  understand the necessary infrastructure and functional components to develop E-commerce systems. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through written assignments and a project. (3) design and implement a basic e-commerce application. both the technical and business aspects. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercises and a project. business issues. Introduction to E-commerce E-commerce fundamentals. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. Attributes for all-roundedness (4) follow trends of e-commerce. specifically.  understand the design and application of E-commerce systems. different types of E-commerce. 93 Duration of Lectures 6 . (5) build up on team work. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with report writing.Subject Title: Electronic Commerce Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP 418 42 hours 7 hours Hours Assigned: Lecture Lab/Tutorial Pre-requisite: COMP 320 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives: To thoroughly understand the information technology for supporting E-commerce.

. Web system. Viehland. 5. D. E-check. E-cash. Web programming. smart card.2. SSL. 2001. H. public key encryption. Internet payment services. 94 . Dillon.. Electronic Commerce: A Managerial Perspective 2006.... 4. auctions. Internet payment systems Credit card payment (e.. 2006. digital signature. IPSec. Turban. message authentication. E. T. Cryptography and Internet security Security requirements. Case Study: E-commerce applications. SET protocol). advanced Ecommerce systems. R. encryption methods. Chan. D. case studies. E-commerce applications and advanced topics Various E-commerce applications. and Chang. Total Laboratory Experiment: Laboratory exercises on an E-commerce application. Reference Books: 1. basic cryptography. E-Commerce: Fundamentals and Applications.g. and Lee. John Wiley & Sons. Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment Examination 55% 45% 6 9 6 15 42 Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 x x x x x x x x x x x x x Assignments Project Mid-term Examination Total 55 45 100 Textbook: 1. King. Lee. Web model. firewalls. J. E. Prentice Hall. message digest. Web system Internet basics. digital certificate. 3. Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Fourth Edition..

J. Computer Money: A Systematic Overview of Electronic Payment Systems.. Prentice Hall. Fourth Edition.2.. 5. A. E. G.. 2006.S. John Wiley & Sons. Springer-Verlag. W. Fuzzy-Neuro Approach to Agent Applications (From the AI Perspective to Modern Ontology). Muchow. R. 2002. Morgan Kaufmann. C. 3 Furche..W. 1999. 4. Moss.. 95 . Stallings. and Wrightson. Prentice Hall. Mc-GrawHill. Lee.E. 2006. 6.T. 1996. 7.. and Giguere. 2001. Java Servlets. Heidelberg. Ortiz. Core J2ME: Technology and MIDP. Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice. K. Mobile Information Device Profile for Java 2 Micro Edition.

(b) understand the basic steps in business process engineering/reengineering. Intended Learning Outcomes Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their presentation and writing skills with project presentation. (e) understand the existing industrial workflow standards.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP431 Business Process and Workflow Management 3 4 Pre-requisite/Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To present a process-oriented view to business modeling and the application of workflow technologies to business process engineering. 96 . (c) understand the application of workflow technologies to process modeling and implementation.  To equip students with the fundamental knowledge of workflow management systems. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the role of business processes in modern enterprises. (d) understand the building blocks of a workflow management system. project document and report writing. (h) learn independently and to find/integrate information from different sources required in solving real-life problems. Upon completion of the subject. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) improve presentation and communication skills (through case study presentations). (f) apply workflow technologies to solve business problems.

workflows and objects. Programme Outcome 8: This subject contributes through the lectures and seminars. Runtime system structure. Duration of Lectures 3 6 9 12 6 97 .g. Workflow systems architecture Application structure. Buildtime metamodel: process data. performance spheres. Programme Outcome 3: This subject teaches some of the elements of the ethical issues in design and development of computing systems. container materialization. transactions. advanced join conditions. context management. compile spheres. examples of business processes. 4. Fundamental concepts of workflow Major components of a workflow management system. emergent technologies. middleware.Program Outcome 2: This subject shows the factors that can affect the way computing systems are developed and used. Internet and mobile workflow. 2. case studies and project) that require critical thinking skills. control flow. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes through teaching some of the technical knowledge of the field Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes by teaching students state of the art technologies. 5. process re-engineering. dynamic modification of workflows. Introduction to business process Modern business environment. 3. process-oriented view to organizations. activities. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes by providing an opportunity for students to practice working in a team setting. Advanced functions of workflow Events. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes by giving students practice in solving problems (e. Business process engineering Process analysis. business engineering and workflow. data flow. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1.

project can be used to measure the understandings of the students about the current industrial workflow standards. Assignments 2. Seminars provide students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the concepts taught in lectures and to apply the theories to the analysis of real-life issues. Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures focus on the introduction and explanation of key concepts.6. Workflow standards OMG’s Workflow Management Facility. where the students will form groups to read and present real-life cases related to the subject's topics. Examination Total 45% 100 % 55%     The course will be expected to be accessed using both examination and coursework including assignments. technologies and understand the 98 . project and mid-term examination. The students could be further improve their presentation and communication skills through the project presentation. Total 6 42 Case Study: Presentations will be held during the seminars. Workflow Management Coalition standards. project and mid-term examination can be act as a measure on the understandings of the students on the basic concepts of the business process and building blocks of a workflow management system. Mid-term 4. Project 3. Assignments. Examination can be used as an overall measure of the understandings of the students on the workflow concepts. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c d            e f g h 1. In addition.

paperback edition. Reference Books: 1. Business Proess Management Concepts. Methods. Architectures. van der Aalst and K. Languages. F. and T.). Roller. The MIT Press. 3. Articles from journals. Workflow Management Systems for Process Organisations. magazines. Chang. Workflow Management: Models. L. Prentice-Hall. van Hee. T. Workflow Handbook 2004. Springer. 2004. 2007. Leymann. IEEE TKDE. 7. 5. FL: Auerbach Publications. Schal. 4. and Systems. M. Other student study effort:  Reading & self-learning 49 Hrs. Schael. ICDE. IEEE TSE. 2000. T. 2006. 7 Hrs. 6. 1998.W. Ficher (ed. Future Strategies Inc. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Seminar 42 Hrs. and conference proceedings. Total student study effort Reading List and References 98 Hrs. 2. D. CACM.existing standards which discussed in the lectures. Schaller. Weske. CIKM. W. 2004. Boca Raton. J. Business process management systems: strategy and implementation. including ACM TOCS. 99 . F. IEEE TOC. T. Springer. Production Workflow: Concepts and Techniques. ACM TODS. IEEE Computer..

(h) build up on team spirit. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as 100 . Attributes for all-roundedness (f) improve presentation and communication skills (through case study presentations). (e) perform case modelling. (d) possess knowledge in system analysis. (c) recognize production systems and how such systems improve the operation management. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the importance of logistics and its role in competitive strategy. system evaluation and strategic management.  To learn how to solve various logistics problems using computer skill. simulation and concepts. (b) be aware of the value of information on decision making and logistics system performance. operation evaluation and performance monitoring of logistics operations. presentation and technical writing skills.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP432 Logistics Management 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP302 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide the knowledge in logistics operations. (g) learn independently and to find/integrate information from different sources required in solving real-life problems.

3. management tools and methods in assessing logistics operations. business practices. e-logistics. supply chain integration. This subject provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. Programme Outcome 4. Supply chain Customer service dimensions. Principles of logistics management Development of logistics. strategic alliance. where the students will form 101 . rules and responsibilities. 5. 5. Inventory Inventory costs. capacity planning. Programme Outcome 7: This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome. warehousing. economic significance of logistics. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Multi-modal transport operations Multi-modal transport concept. databases and data exchange standards and technologies. maximum flow algorithms. supply chain management concepts and applications. importance of logistics management in transportation and distribution systems. Logistics management Logistics performance measurement. liability and legal issues. Programme Outcome 5: This subject teaches elements of this outcome and provides practice for the students on this outcome as well as providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. Solving logistics problems using computer Shortest-path algorithms. Total Duration of Lectures 6 6 6 6 6 12 42 Case Study: Presentations will be held during seminars. 2. control and management.providing an opportunity to measure parts of the outcome. decision-support algorithms for logistics problems 6.

Examination can be used as an overall measure of the subject. Other student study effort:   Project Assignment 42 Hrs. 18 Hrs. The students could further improve their presentation skills through the project presentation. Lab exercises 3. Examination Total 40% 100 % 60%                  Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: Assignments. project and mid-term examination can be acted as a measure of the understanding of the basic concepts.groups to read and present real-life cases related to the subject’s topic. Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures focus on the introduction and explanation of key concepts. 7 Hrs. 102 . Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b  c d e f g h 1. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Seminar 42 Hrs. Seminars provide students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the concepts taught in lectures and to apply the theories to the analysis of real-life issues. Mid-term 5. Project 4. Assignments 2.

Prentice Hall. Handfield R. Deborah L. England: Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Strategic Logistics Management. Harlow. 4. 1996. 2. Carlos F. Articles from magazines. John Joseph. 3. Logistics Systems Analysis. Oxford University Press. Thomson Learning. Vogt J. 109 Hrs. Daganzo. E-Commerce Logistics and Fulfillment: Delivering the Goods. 7th Edition. Journal of Information Technology. J. 1999. Coyle. Bayles. Logistics Information Management. including Harvard Business Review. 2002. 2002. and Nichols E Jr. 4th Edition. 103 . and journal references. 2001. Logistics Management and Strategy. Prentice Hall. Journal of Business Logistics. James R. Introduction to Supply Chain Management. Alan. The Management of Business Logistics: A Supply Chain Perspective. 5. Stock. 7. 8.Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. 2002. McGraw-Hill. 2003. Harrison. 6.. Springer. Business logistics management : theory and practice..

(c) write programs to implement search engines. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand and apply the basic concepts of information retrieval. (d) evaluate search engines.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP433 Information Retrieval 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP311 (not applicable for 61025). Attributes for all-roundedness (e) develop skills in problem solving using systematic approaches.  To appreciate the different applications of information retrieval techniques in the Internet or Web environment.  To appreciate how to evaluate search engines. (f) solve complex problems in groups and develop group work.  To equip students with sound skills to solve computational search problems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students to practice their writing skill with project document and report writing. COMP305 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide the foundation knowledge in information retrieval. (b) appreciate the limitations of different information retrieval techniques. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.  To provide hands-on experience in building search engines and/or hands-on experience in evaluating search engines. 104 .

evaluation methodology. Web retrieval Characteristics of the web. query expansion. 8. inner product similarities. filler pattern matching. Fundamentals of information retrieval System architecture. string searching. cosine similarities. query processing for vector space models. 5. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to measuring the technical problem solving ability by administering quiz or classwork. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. HTML markup. (DOM). naï Bayesian ve classifier and evaluation methodology. benchmarking. 2. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit. spidering. Models of information retrieval Boolean retrieval models. 4. Indexing strategies Inverted file construction. relevance feedback. k-means clustering algorithms. Text categorization Rocchio classifier. performance measures. limitations of information retrieval systems. Text properties and information extraction Zipf law. Query processing Query languages. k-NN classifier. vector space models. fuzzy Boolean retrieval models. Total 105 Duration of Lectures 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 42 . web link analysis. Heap's law. adaptive clustering algorithms. Text clustering Hierarchical clustering algorithms. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to informing students about the advancement of information retrieval via lectures or tutorials. They will practice more in doing their project. XML markup.Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorials on solving problems. indexing to support phrasal search and proximity. 6. term weighting schemes. basic query processing for Boolean retrieval models. 7. efficient dictionary management. 3. Document Object Models. weighting schemes for web documents.

Mid-term 5. The mid-term and examination will tests the basic concepts learnt by the students as well as to see if the students are capable to use retrieval techniques and perform search engine evaluation. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Laboratory 1 2 2 2 7 Teaching is based on lectures which include solving technical problems in information retrieval (aligned to Programme Outcome 6). Assignments 2. Web processing techniques. 5. Ranking techniques. Student Study Class contact: 106 . Examination Total 30% 25% 45% 100 %             Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The project is suitable to assess all the intended learning outcomes as it involves all of them. 4. Quizzes and/or classworks are administered to students to strength their technical problem solving ability (aligned to Programme Outcome 5).Laboratory Experiment and Tutorial: Topic 1. 6). Evaluation techniques. There is a project that students need to write their report (aligned to Programme Outcomes 1. Text processing techniques. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c d e f 1. 3. This project is typically a group project (aligned to Programme Outcome 7). Tutorials are used to provide examples of problems and to show how solutions are developed (aligned to Programme Outcomes 4. 4). Project 4. 2. Lab exercises 3.

5. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold. 2. 2004. 7 Hrs. Grossman and O. D. 107 .A. Modern Information Retrieval. Baeza-Yates. 1999.C.G. Freider. Moffat and T. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. Facet. R. I.A. Chowdhury.) Cross-language Information Retrieval.H. Kluwer Academic Publishers. London. An Introduction to Modern Information Retrieval.Effort Required   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 42 Hrs. Grefenstette (ed. 1998. ACM Press. Other student study effort:   Project Self Study 14 Hrs. 1994. G. 70 Hrs. 4. Dorhrecht. 7 Hrs. Managing Gigabytes: Compressing and Indexing Documents and Images. Bell. G. 3. The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers. B. Information Retrieval: Algorithms and Heuristics. A. Riberio-Neto. 1998. Witten.

(5) apply the knowledge in specific applications such as algorithm design. (3) appreciate existence and development of smart algorithms that solve problems effectively. 108 Duration of Lectures 15 . Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial exercises on solving comparatively theoretical problems. (2) describe. grammars. in the presence of unsolvable and intractable problems. They will also practice more in written assignments. express and solve problems through formalism and precise formulation.Subject Title: Computational Models Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP434 42 hours 7 hours Hours Assigned: Lecture Tutorial Pre-requisite: COMP 305 & COMP 307 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives: This subject provides students knowledge on:  computational models and theoretical computer science. Formal languages and automata Strings and languages. regular languages. Attributes for all-roundedness (1) develop critical thinking on evaluating solution models and approaches. (4) evaluate the effectiveness of computer algorithms employed in different applications. Syllabus: Topic 1. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) acquire fundamental knowledge and concepts in computational models and theoretical computer science. context-free languages. compiler construction. and addresses the fundamental limitations to the ability of performing computing on different types of problems. Programme Outcome 8: This subject contributes to important concepts underneath algorithms and computer science.  fundamental concepts behind computing and problem solving. (2) understand the limitation of computers and algorithms in problem solving.

g. travelling salesperson problem. final automata.g. e. simulated annealing. 2.g. NP-hard and NP-complete problems Intractable problems. well-known NP-complete problems. definition of the class NP. 3 6 6 6 6 42 Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment Examination 55% 45% Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Assignments Mid-term Examination Total % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 x x x x x x x 55 x x x x x x 45 x x x x x x 100 109 . lexical analyzer (lex).. recursively enumerable languages. halting problem. Total Laboratory Experiment: Nil Case Study: Existence of real-life undecidable problems (e. pushdown automata.context-sensitive languages. office hours scheduling. approximated solutions. scheduling. undecidable or unsolvable problems. Post’s correspondence problem. deterministic and non-deterministic automata. Dynamic programming and approximation Principle of dynamic programming. Halting Problem) and NP-hard problems (e. 5. Unsolvable problems Technique of diagonalization. bin packing. branch-and-bound. 6. 3. Travelling Salesperson Problem) and approximated and practical solutions to NP-hard problems. 3SAT.g. Turing machines. problem reduction. 4.. parser (yacc). algorithm analysis techniques.. complexity classes. real-life NPcomplete applications. Applications Complexity implication. e.g. pumping lemma for regular and context-free languages. Computational complexity Complexity of algorithms. TSP variant. e.

Hopcroft. Prentice Hall. 1983. Sedgewick and P. Motwani. 1997. R. 2.C.H.R.D. Freeman. Second Edition. Springer. Hopcroft. 7. Automata and Computability. 110 . 6.E. Kelley. and J. Addison-Wesley. A. Ullman. An Introduction to the Analysis of Algorithms. D. Flajolet. 3. Data Structures and Algorithms. M. Garey and D.Reference Books: 1. Yan. World Scientific. 1998. D. 1979. 5. 4. Introduction to Automata Theory. J. AddisonWesley. R. W.V. Computers and Intractability: A Guide to the Theory of NPcompleteness. and Computation. Aho. An Introduction to Formal Languages and Machine Computation. 1996. Ullman. 1995.E.Y. Addison-Wesley. S. J. Johnson. and J. Languages. Automata and Formal Languages: An Introduction. 2001. Kozen.

(c) apply biometric technology into two applications: security and diagnosis.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP435 Biometrics and Security 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP207 (for 61025)/ COMP211. To introduce biometric computing knowledge and methods. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to developing a global outlook at various factors that affects the performance and function of a computing system Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student 111 . Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. as well as project presentation. Attributes for all-roundedness (e) communicate effectively with project presentation and technical reports. COMP319 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil    To understand the problems with current security systems. To learn some basic biometrics systems based on the learned techniques. (f) learn independently for problem solving and solution seeking for biometrics applications. (d) learn some useful biometric techniques to solve the current problems. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand fundamental problems with current biometric systems. (b) recognize physical and behavior biometric characteristics.

Diagnosis application: tongue diagnosis and pulse diagnosis. Fundamental techniques Biometrics data acquisition and biometrics database. e-commerce. information security. some basic introduction of physical biometrics systems (such as fingerprint. Typical physical biometrics Basic physical characteristics of biometrics. and gesture recognition. as well as pulse. time. banking services. finger. 5. Multi-biometrics and applications Security application: Internet/Intranet. etc. Introduction to biometrics and authentication Why biometrics? What about biometrics? How to design biometric systems? Biometrics definitions and notations. biometric applications. Typical behavial biometrics Basic behavioral characteristics of biometrics. immigration and naturalization service. 3. They will also practice more in written assignments. Total 112 Duration of Lectures 6 9 12 9 6 42 . as well as tongue. including digital image and signal representation. programming exercises. and face. etc. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. 2. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with groupbased project for students to practice team spirit. physical access. 4. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. security technologies and systems. attendance and monitoring. computer systems. telephone systems. palm-print. the related image processing and pattern recognition technologies. face.critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems.). iris. and project. signature. some basic introduction of behavioral biometrics systems (such as voice. hand. basic PCA/LDA approaches of automated biometrics identification and verification.). pattern extraction and classification. authentication.

Total student study effort Reading List and Reference Books: References 1. Mid-term 5. Kluwer Publisher. Project 4. Assignments 2. 7 Hrs. Teaching/Learni ng Methodology The course material will be delivered as a combination of lectures. Automated Biometrics: Technologies & Systems. Zhang. machine learning. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning outcomes weighting to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c d e f 1.Case Study: Security and diagnosis applications using biometrics authentication technologies. 73 Hrs. and especially the underlying common technology that enables the biometric systems. 2000. 12 Hrs. 113 . image analysis..g. Lab exercises 3. Examination Total Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   40% 20% 40% 100 % Lecture Tutorial 42 Hrs. tutorials and small group project. Students will get familiarized with biometric system and applications. Other student study effort:   Homework Project 12 Hrs. D. e.

. Kluwer Academic Publishers.. 15. IEEE Transaction on Image Processing. IEEE Computer Society Press. (Eds. Springer Verlag. Palmprint Authentication. 1991. 1997. 14.). 2003. Prentice Hall.. W. 2005. (Eds. X. Zhang. 800pp.W. 4. IEEE Transaction on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence. 2006. and Yang. 3. D. Russell. 1996. IRM Press. Third Edition. Jing. LNCS 3072. Second Edition. Biometrics: Personal Identification in Networked Society. D. 7. D. O'Reilly & Associates. Kluwer Publisher. Y. 1999. 10.). (Eds.A. New Riders Publishing. 6. D.. Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice.ICB2006. Sid-Ahmed. 9. Abrams. Springer Verlag. et al. D. Stallings. LNCS 3832. 114 . M. Zhang.... Zhang.2. Advances in Biometrics. USA. 2004. 8. 11. Jain.J.. Internet Security Professional Reference.). Computer Security Basics. Derek Atkins.). Zhang.. (Ed. Zhang. G. 5. First International Conference on Biometric Authentication (ICBA). 2002.K.D. D. and Podell. et al. & Architectures. et al. H. Awcock. Applied Image Processing. 13. Algorithms. Proc. A. Image Processing. McGraw-Hill. 2004 12. Jajodia... and Jain. Information Security: An Integrated Collection of Essays. Biometric Images Discrimination (BID) Technologies. International Conference . M. Theory. McGraw-Hill. and Jain.K. A. 1995. S. USA. Kluwer Publisher. Biometric Solutions for Authentication in an e-World. 1994..

students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the basic structure of distributed systems. Attributes for all-roundedness (g) apply the technical knowledge learned to solve real-life practical problems. (c) understand the basic theories underlying the design of middleware.  To provide training in using CORBA as middleware to build practical distributed systems. (f) develop distributed object-based systems using CORBA. (b) understand the motivation of using middleware. (e) understand the basic concepts of CORBA. (h) appreciate and evaluate existing and new technologies. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP436 Middleware and Distributed Objects 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP201 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP403 Objectives  To present an integrated view of the basic building blocks of a distributed system and how middleware can help developers to more easily satisfy the requirements of building distributed systems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: 115 . particularly object-oriented middleware.  To provide the foundation knowledge of middleware. (d) learn to make judgment in choosing a suitable middleware for application problems.

practising programming techniques useful for developing middleware-based systems with laboratory exercises and assignments. pros and cons of different communication paradigms of CORBA. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to the programme outcome through the teaching of the trend of development of various technologies related to middleware. 6. Fundamentals of CORBA Architecture. asynchronous requests.Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to the programme outcome through the teaching of the related concepts of distributed systems and middleware. servants. 2. object-oriented middleware. Case study 1: load balancing Using POA to implement various load balancing solutions for distributed systems. oneway requests. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. local versus distributed objects. resource lookup. Total Duration of Lectures 3 9 6 12 6 6 42 Laboratory Experiment: 116 . resource acquisition. Interface definition language (IDL). servant activator and servant locator.g. deferred synchronous requests. 4. request invocation via POA. Portable Object Adaptor (POA) Objects vs. Principles of object-oriented middleware Role of middleware in distributed systems. e. types of middleware. dynamic invocation. Communication paradigms of CORBA Synchronous requests. CORBA naming service. as well as assessing their knowledge of the development and application of middleware in distributed systems with programming assignments and examination. CORBA event service. system development using CORBA. 3. Case study 2: resource management Using CORBA to implement facilities for resource management in distributed systems. lifecycle of objects. 5. developing systems with object-oriented middleware.

Case Study: Case studies on load balancing and resource management with CORBA. The programming tools used are CORBA and Java. Examination Total 15% 45% 100 %   40%  b c  d e f g h               Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: For the assignments. Project 4. Lab exercises 3. This requires good understanding/application of distributed systems concepts and programming skills/techniques in using CORBA/Java to solve real problems.g. the students have to design and implement middleware-based systems using CORBA and Java to solve common problems in distributed systems study (e. 117 . using Java as the programming language.. Assignments 2.In the laboratory session. called VisiBroker (or the Borland Enterprise Server – VisiBroker Edition). The mid-term test and the examination aim at assessing the students’ understanding of the concepts related to the theory and practice of middleware and distributed systems. 2. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning outcomes weighting to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a 1. students will learn how to develop distributed systems using an implementation of CORBA. Lecture: students learn the technologies and concepts related to middleware. Teaching/Learning Methodology 1. Mid-term 5. load balancing). Laboratory session: students implement short programs (with guidance of the tutor) related to the lecture to gain experience in using the technologies and concepts learned.

1999. W. Emmerich.. IEEE Distributed Systems Online. Bolton. Articles from journals. 2002. 3. magazines. 2. Reference Books: 1. DOA. 3rd ed. Wiley. IEEE TPDS. Client/Server Survival Guide. At least 49 Hrs. Other student study effort:   Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbooks: 1. Harkey and J.. and conference proceedings. F. Hrs. Sams. IEEE TSE. including ACM TOCS. D.Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Seminar/Lab 42 Hrs. Pure CORBA. ICDE. Wiley. CACM. IEEE TOC. Edwards. 4. Orfali. 7 Hrs. R. 2000. 118 . Engineering Distributed Objects. Hrs. IEEE Computer.

Attributes for all-roundedness (g) analyze requirements and solve problems using systematic planning and development approaches.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP437 Mobile Computing 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP304 (not applicable for 61025). students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) grasp the concepts and features of mobile computing technologies and applications. COMP307 (for 61025). their technical features. (e) develop mobile computing applications by analyzing their characteristics and requirements. (h) search for and read critically the information required in solving 119 . (b) have a good understanding of how the underlying wireless and mobile communication networks work. and what kinds of applications they can support. COMP311 (not applicable for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To learn about the concepts and principles of mobile computing.  To explore both theoretical and practical issues of mobile computing. selecting the appropriate computing models and software architectures. (c) identify the important issues of developing mobile computing systems and applications. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.  To develop skills of finding solutions and building software for mobile computing applications. and applying standard programming languages and tools. (f) organize and manage software built for deployment and demonstration. (d) organize the functionalities and components of mobile computing systems into different layers and apply various techniques for realizing the functionalities.

Synchronization server. Wireless Mobile Internet Wireless Internet architecture. Programme Outcome 5: Train students in problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. Wireless networks Wireless communication concepts. (i) write and present technical survey papers in well-organized and logical manner. 4G). 2. Satellite networks. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. and project. Mobile computing models and architectures. Messaging server.. Programme Outcome 7: Enable students to engage in team work with group-based project and to practice team spirit. and applications of mobile computing. (j) work in teams and collaborate with classmates. mobile OS. routing in mobile ad hoc networks.. Mobile device platforms Mobile devices. concepts. classification of wireless networks: Cellar networks (1G. BREW 4. Data dissemination. WMAN. 2G. WPAN. relationship with distributed computing. 3G. Mobile ad hoc networks Concepts and applications.Net Framework. Mobile Internet proxy services (transcoding. Wireless gateway. Programme Outcome 4: Develop student critical thinking through class discussion. WLAN. Windows Mobile and . Overview of mobile computing Motivations. lab exercises on solving problems and programming. sensor networks. challenges. ubiquitous/pervasive computing. Internet computing. 3. Wireless application server. mobile peer-topeer computing 120 Duration of Lectures 6 6 3 6 9 . J2ME. Disconnected operations (hording).problems. 5. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: Enable students to practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. caching).

Tutorials 2. During lectures. Mobility management Handoff and location management concepts. 7. adaptive location management methods. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. J2ME programming. The labs serve the purpose of training the students to apply the knowledge and technical skills learnt to develop applications. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to be weighting assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a  b c d e f g h i j       55%         45% 100 %          Assignments include individual an individual work on writing survey 121 . by using trendy programming platforms. Total 6 6 42 Tutorials / Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. Project 4. mobile positioning techniques. Discussion on various topics related to mobile computing will also be conducted. and labs. mobility management in mobile Internet. Labs a. WAP programming. the fundamental concepts and principles of mobile computing together with the challenging issues in system design and application development will be introduced. mobility management in mobile agent systems. GIS. Lab exercises 3. LBS architecture and protocols. Location-based services LBS applications. b. Students are also encouraged to learn through self-study and team work. mobility management in PLMN. tutorials.6. Assignments 2. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Laboratory 3 4 1 3 7 The subject includes lectures. Mid-term 5.

Thomson Learning. Reference Books: 1. 4. 2003. “Mobile and Wireless Design Essentials”. 2006.N. Yu-Kwong Ricky Kwok. 2005. 2007. 7 Hrs. 2. Martyn Mallick. Reference books and articles will be used. Together with the tutorial and lab sessions. Wiley Publishing. The mid-term and final exams are used to assess the students’ understanding. critical thinking. Zeng.P. 2nd edition. Textbooks: No particular textbook. Reza B’Far. Cambridge University Press. Pearson Education. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Reading List and References Lecture Tutorial/Lab 42 Hrs. J. “Introduction to Wireless and Mobile Systems”. and problem solving abilities. Agrawal and Q. 2nd edition. “Wireless Internet and Mobile Computing: Interoperability and Performance”. 122 . Through group project. Vincent K. “Mobile Communications”.report and a group project on developing mobile computing applications. 5. (Google Book) 3. Schiller.-A. Lau. Wiley-IEEE Press. 2003. they will be used to assess students’ ability and skills to develop innovative applications and conduct survey on current trend of technology. report writing and presentation skills will also be assessed. D. “Mobile Computing Principles: Designing and Developing Mobile Applications with UML and XML”.

(9) appreciate the broader perspectives of digital entertainment. (8) communicate effectively and present. such as event loops. collision detection and physically-based modeling. To allow students to explore the different techniques and tools in rendering and animation in 3D computer games. testing. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. rendering. (5) learn the computing game programming aspects. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to the learning of project development. Attributes for all-roundedness (7) work in a team to build a 3D computer game. (2) understand the overall hardware and software architecture of a typical 3D computer game. texturing. organization. (3) familiarize with the different practical implementation techniques that apply to the development of computer games across different platforms. polygonal models. To equip students with the knowledge and skills in programming interactive games and virtual reality simulations. evolution and recent development in computer games. the result of developing a 3D computer game. and multi-user games and networking. To ensure students understanding game AI. presentation and report writing skills. and social impact of computer games. Progamme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to the developing of critically thinking skills on using alternative game programming techniques for real world computer games development.Subject Title: Game Programming Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP 439 Hours Assigned: Lecture 42 hours Tutorial/Lab 7 hours Pre-requisite: COMP 305 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives:      To let students understand the nature of computer games and digital entertainment. (4) learn game design. multi-user games and networking To guide students to study and evaluate the social impact of computer game. animation. terrain and background representation. game AI. both in terms of an oral presentation and a written report. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) understand the history. (6) understand the social impact of computer games. and playability principles. execution threads. 123 .

future of computer games. console-based (e. game AI.. collision detection. VRML.g. sound digitizer. 6. audios. image-based rendering. chasing and evading. rotation. 2. non-photorealistic rendering. Game behavior and game AI Algorithms in game animations: acceleration. Total Laboratory Experiment / Tutorial: Topic 1. learning the opponent behaviors. obstacle avoidance. X-box. X3D. motion analysis. Game software. Maya. and the like. social and cultural characteristics in computer games. game cube). Programming techniques in computer games 3D models. Syllabus: Topic 1. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to the development of team work experience and the associated communication skills. camera control. 3D studio max. and quaternion interpolation. finite state machines. race. mobile and wireless game platforms. Social impacts of computer games Gender. 5. arcade games. collision detection. texturing. hardware and platforms Different game platforms: Web-based. search and heuristics in games. 4. Languages and tools in game programming Java 3D. play station. flocking. geometry. youth violence and digital entertainment software rating. A team project of building a 3D computer game. level of details (LOD). lighting.Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to the development of problem solving skills in computer games development. and the like. Total Case Study: Nil Method of Assessment: 124 Duration of Laboratory 7 Duration of Lectures 3 6 9 9 9 6 42 7 . 2. game design methodology and principles. 3. terrain. Introduction and game history Early origins of video games and computer game programming. handheld games. some popular home game systems. such as graphics. swarming. pattern movement. shading. and other authoring tools for various components in the game. Virtools. Programming exercises in various aspects of game algorithms and game AI techniques. such as path finding. game physics. pc-based. decision trees. current development in computer game industry.

2. 2005. Bourg. 2005. 2005 Peter Walsh. Physics-Based Animation. 2008. 2005. 5. David M. Steve Rabin. Advanced 3D Game Programming with Direct X 9.Continuous Assessment Examination Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Assignments Lab exercises Projects Mid-term Examination Total 55% 45% % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 x x x x x 10 x x x x 35 x x x x x x x x x 45 x x x x x x x 100 9 x Textbooks: 1.0. Rick Rarent. Introduction to Game Development. 2nd Edition. Mat Buckland. Programming Game AI by Example. Ultimate Game Programming with DIRECT X. and Henrik Dohlmann. Grant Palmer. 125 . 2006 Reference Books: 1. Physics for Game Developers. 2002. 4. Jon Sporring. 2. Allen Sherrod. Physics for Game Programmers. Computer Animation: Algorithms and Techniques. 3. 2003 Kenny Erleben. Knud Henriksen.

students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the concepts of CRM / eCRM in eCommerce environments. presentation and technical writing skills. which are essential for business operations. (g) build up on team spirit. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (d) develop skills and CRM-based business strategies.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP440 Customer Relationship Management 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP305 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide the knowledge in CRM / eCRM. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving 126 .  To introduce CRM measurement and tools in the market. (b) build the knowledge infostructure to support decision making and marketing. process management. customer behaviour and analysis. Attributes for all-roundedness (e) improve presentation and communication skills (through case study presentations). Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing. (f) learn independently and to find/integrate information from different sources required in solving real-life problems. (c) apply the latest development in Internet marketing / CRM tools. people management.

CRM initiatives and economic impact. Marketing strategies Mobilizing operations. customization. 4. management issues and measurement. Introduction to CRM CRM process. Knowledge-enabled CRM and Technology Knowledge management. data mining techniques and analysis. Customer behavior and analysis Customer profitability. 3. 127 . personalization. integrated CRM solutions. customer values. eCRM application development. They will also practice more in case study presentation and project. brand strategy.problems. to give presentations and write reports. 5. data warehouse. with an attitude of continuous and lifelong learning through case study presentation and project. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to having student be responsive to and follow closely the advancement in information technology and their impact to the industrial need for information technology. CRM software packages. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to problem solving with programming skills through lab exercise and project with proper design and implementation. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit. CRM strategies planning Customer strategy. 2. channel strategy. customer buying values analysis. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. loyalty programs. Total Duration of Lectures 6 9 9 9 9 42 Case Study: Seminars are held for students to discuss in-depth real-life cases related to the subject's topics. customer profiling.

Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Seminar 42 Hrs. Students will also have in-depth discussion and study of cases and present their results. 133 Hrs. Other student study effort:   Total student study effort Reading List and Reference Books: 128 Case study and project and other assessments 84 Hrs. Hrs. 7 Hrs. Project 4. Assignments 2. . Lab exercises 3. The abilities to solving real-life problems and work in teams will also be evaluated in projects. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b      c      d         e  f g 1. Examination Total 40% 100 % 60%      Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The professional and academic knowledge and kills will be evaluated through continuous assessments as well as examination.Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures are held for students to learn the basic knowledge. giving presentations and reports. Presentation and communication skills will be evaluated through assignments and projects. Mid-term 5. Tutorials and Labs are held for students to have hand-on exercises and practices. Students will also complete a project.

Prentice Hall. W.. 2001. Harvard Business Review. Special Edition Using Microsoft CRM. Geatz. John Wiley and Sons. 2001. sales. 10. 9. Designing A Data Warehouse: Supporting Customer Relationsh ip Management. Customer Relationship Management: A Databased Approach. 3. Data Mining: A tutorial-based Primer. 129 . Swift. Laura Brown. Data mining techniques for marketing. IT Solution Journal. Prentice Hall. Ed Peelen. Francoise Tourniaire. Ronald S. Richard J. John Wiley & Sons. 2003. Don Peppers. Chris Todman. 7. and customer relationship management. 2005. 2004. and journal references. 2003.J. Gordon Linoff. Prentice Hall. Financial Times Press. Roger and Michael W. 2004. 2004. 8. 5. Addison Wesley. Kumar. Articles from magazines. Just Enough CRM. Accelerating customer relationships: Using CRM and relationship technologies. John Gravely. Prentice Hall. Michael Berry. Martha Rogers. 2. Wiley. Inc. 6. "Customer Relationship Management".References 1. 4. Managing customer relationships: a strategic framework. V. 2006. including ComputerWorld. Reinartz.

(f) communicate effectively in English for general project presentation. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) appreciate the importance of software quality assurance. They will also practice more in written assignments. (e) communicate in writing a technical document. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students practice their writing skills with project document and report writing.  To enable students to gain a working knowledge of techniques for management of testing projects.  To develop a good understanding of issues. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises on solving problems. techniques and metrics for quality assurance in software development.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP441 Software Testing and Quality Assurance 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP302 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To present the concepts. (b) apply software development. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) work together as a team in preparing a report. techniques and tools for software testing. programming 130 . testing techniques for information systems (c) know the inputs and deliverables of the testing process.

Specification-based techniques Equivalence partitioning. Inspection technique Team and roles. boundary value testing. domain testing. mutation testing. state machine testing. Measuring software quality Product metrics. students will work on exercises and case studies on software testing techniques. Code-based techniques Control flow and data flow testing.exercises. unit testing.g. GQM. test process 3. Test tools Test generation. process metrics. 6. testing concepts. 7. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Lectures 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 42 The software testing techniques and quality assurance concepts will be covered in the lectures. Testing fundamentals Understanding defects. 5. 4. testing maturity model. and project. coverage measurement. program verification. defect tracking. error-oriented testing. levels of testing. cost of quality. performance testing). Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with groupbased project for students to practice team spirit. GUI testing. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. process. 2. In the tutorials. The tutorial will also cover common software testing tools (e. code coverage tool. Software quality assurance Quality factors. 131 .

Software Testing (2nd Edition).Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks 1. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 42 Hrs. and (f) communicate effectively in English for general project presentation. Also. Hrs. 7 Hrs. Examination Total % Intended subject learning outcomes to be weighting assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a  b   55% 45% 100 %       c     d e f Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: Students are required to work as a team on a project related to software testing and software quality assurance. Assignment(s). mid-term(s) and the final examination will be used to assess the students on their academic knowledge and skills in software testing. Assignments 2. Ron Patton. which include the ability to (a) appreciate the importance of software quality assurance. (b) apply software testing techniques for information systems development and (c) knowledge in the inputs and deliverables of the testing process. the students will be assessed on their ability to (d) work together as a team in preparing a report. . This can be used to assess the students on their (b) understanding in software testing techniques for information systems development. Mid-term 4. Project 3. (e) writing technical documents. 2005 132 Hrs. At least 49 Hrs. Other student study effort:   Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. Sams Publishing .

Jaskiel. Artech House Publishers. Nguyen. Godbole . 4. Software Quality Assurance: Principles And Practice. 2002 Nina S. 2003 Rick D. Bob Johnson. Craig and Stefan P. 133 . Systematic Software Testing.2. Ltd. Alpha Science International. Hung Q. John Wiley. Michael Hackett and Robert Johnson . Testing Applications on the Web: Test Planning for Mobile and Internet-Based Systems (Second Edition). 2004 3.

Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. representation and processing of knowledge and information. (b) relate knowledge and information management to support decision making. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) learn fundamental knowledge and concepts in the acquisition. (c) develop and apply the skills in real-life organizational problem solving with core methods. processing of knowledge and information.  a class of knowledge-based systems that support decision-making activities. and tools of IT-enabled knowledge and information systems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: This subject contributes to corresponding programme outcomes by facilitating students to Programme Outcome 1: practice communication skills in case 134 .Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP443 Knowledge and Information Management 3 4 Nil This subject provides students knowledge on:  acquisition.  concepts and applications of knowledge and information management. techniques. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) develop critical thinking and analytical skills using systematic approaches. representation. (e) demonstrate the skills in conducting team works.

e. knowledge transfer and exchange. impact of culture and technology. different representation of information and knowledge including rules. information and knowledge society. production systems. 5. ontology.discussions and writing skills in project documentation. assignments and projects that involve solving problems. information processing. retrieval and use. Duration of Lectures 6 6 3. lab exercises. Introduction to knowledge and information management Data. strategic school. Bayesian networks. Knowledge and information management approaches Schools of knowledge management: economic school. transfer.g. Knowledge and information processing Information storage. Programme Outcome 4: develop critical thinking through tutorials. Programme Outcome 6: understand advancements in knowledge and information systems and their impact in organizations and industry. difference between information and knowledge management. modal and temporal logics. organizational school. Knowledge and information acquisition and representation Various information and knowledge acquisition techniques. retrieval and use. expert systems. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. semantic networks. application and management. storage and retrieval. barrier to knowledge management. knowledge network. inference engines. Programme Outcome 7: develop team spirit through group-based projects and discussions. knowledge storage. knowledge life cycle. knowledge as enterprise asset. frames. knowledge acquisition. Programme Outcome 8c: undertake a professional application of knowledge and information tools in order to effect improvements in organizational problem contexts. 9 6 135 . first order. representation. 2. information and knowledge. Programme Outcome 2: identify global organizations’ best practice in knowledge and information management.

a class of computer-based information systems including knowledge-based systems that support decision-making activities. Students learn through listening. strategies for knowledge management. observation. discussions. tests. use of tools such as Clementine. ebusiness. lab exercises. 136 . and assignments together. enterprise information portal framework and application. representation. and processing of knowledge and information in case studies of real-life systems. and projects. formulating specific knowledge and information implementation with reference to the business environment of specific organizations for decision making. collaborative portal. 6. and projects. Teaching/Learnin g Methodology This subject integrates lectures. Knowledge management and applications Knowledge management techniques. Total 6 9 42 Laboratory Experiment and Case Study: Acquisition. tutorials. and participation. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d   e  Continuous assessment Examination Total 55% 45% 100 %   Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment items include class participation. chief knowledge officer and chief information officer.4. seminars. Knowledge-based decision support systems The relationship between DSS and knowledge management. content management.

and R.Class participation pools ideas and experiences from group. 9th Edition. information. J. R. 2. 137 . Other student study effort:   Self learning Projects 14 Hrs. Routledge. 2010. Oxford University Press. E. Articles on knowledge. A. T. 73 Hrs. Zilli. Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems. P. K. and allows everyone to participate in an interactive process. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Lab 42 Hrs. E. 2009. Knowledge Management Primer. Semantic Knowledge Management: An Ontology-Based Framework. D. Damiani. Bali. 2009. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. Knowledge Management in Organizations: A Critical Introduction. Sharda. Hislop. and decision support systems. Aronson. Turban. P. Wickramasinghe. 2009. Projects are used to develop students’ analytic and problem solving skills. Information Science Reference. 5. and B. 3. 10 Hrs. Prentice Hall. Ceravolo. 4. 7 Hrs. Lehaney. Tests give students chances to reflect on learning and experience. N. Liang. E.

(4) acquire practical skills.Subject Title: Internet Infrastructure Security Number of Credits: 3 Subject Code: COMP 444 Hours Assigned: Lecture 42 hours Tutorial/Lab 7 hours Pre-requisite: Nil Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: Nil Objectives: To equip students with a foundational understanding of the threats to the Internet infrastructure security and the countermeasures. public-key encryption. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to this outcome through project report writing.  acquire practical experience in implementing. Student Learning Outcomes: After taking this subject. Students will be equipped to  understand and evaluate the current Internet infrastructure from the network security point of view. implementing and/or integrating security functions. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to this outcome through group-based projects. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to this outcome through reading. (2) understand the major security issues in implementing the four major security functions: secrecy. the students should be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (1) acquire a foundational understanding of the three cryptographic primitives: secret-key encryption. secure tunnels. laboratory and project. 138 . and one-way hash functions. such as denial-of-service attacks and Internet worms. (5) understand the major threats to the Internet-wide security today. and assessment of system security. such as setting up a secure private network using firewalls. (7) acquire the skill of synthesizing various security problems into a small set of fundamental security issues and solutions. message authentication. identity authentication. Attributes for all-roundedness (6) acquire critical and independent analytical skills in the process of analyzing the security problems in the Internet. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to this outcome through problem solving in assignments. setting up. and testing network security measures. laboratory and project. and nonrepudiation. and the countermeasures to mitigate the corresponding attacks. (3) understand the major security issues and problems in the TCP/IP protocol suite and the lower layers. and end-to-end secure applications. assignments.

the role of cryptography in network security. Preliminaries Types of attacks. Kerberos. e. Public Key Infrastructure. threat model.g.. denial-of-service. DDOS. key management issues. 3. message authentication codes. 2. Secure Shell. 4. Key negotiation and management Diffie-Hellman algorithm. IP and lower-layer security IP security and Internet key exchange protocols. key negotiation protocols. a secure channel and the implementation issues. routing security. Total Laboratory Experiment: Laboratory exercises for project. wireless network security. and Pretty Good Privacy. examples of secure application protocols. Cryptographic functions and services Block cipher. RSA algorithm. 6.Syllabus: Topic 1. Advanced topics Internet worms. quantum cryptography. hash functions. Case Study: Nil Duration of Lectures 3 6 12 6 6 9 42 Method of Assessment: Continuous Assessment Examination Method of Assessment for Learning Outcomes: Assessment method / task Assignments Lab exercises Project Mid-term % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please check as appropriate) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 20% x x x x x x 5% x 35% x x x x 0% 139 60% 40% 9 . block cipher modes. End-to-end security TCP security. Secure Socket Layer. 5.

Perlman and M. Cryptography and Network Security. Journal articles and conference proceedings. C. Wiley 2000. Applied Cryptography. Prentice Hall PTR 2003. 5.Examination Total 40% 100 x x x x x x Textbooks: None Reference Books: 1. 9. Wiley 2004. Speciner. 140 . B. A. Second Edition. Stinson. Schneier. 2. Springer 2003. Bellovin. Zwicky. C. Cryptography Engineering. Security Engineering. Wiley 2010. 8. Third Edition. Forouzan. 12. 10. Wiley 2008. Cryptography: Theory and Practice. Wiley 1996. R. Boyd and A. Young and M. Second Edition. 3. 11. Yung. Firewalls and Internet Security. Protocols for Authentication and Key Establishment. 6. Introduction to Computer Security. Ferguson. Chapman and Hall/CRC 2006. O’Reilly & Associates 2000. N. Chapman and E. Second Edition. D. Schneier. Bishop. D. B. Addison Wesley 2005. Schneier. W. Building Internet Firewalls. B. Cheswick and S. Second Edition. Addison Wesley 2003. B. Malicious Cryptography. B. Kohno. 7. Secrets and Lies. Network Security: Private Communication in a Public World. and T. Anderson. 4. Mathuria. Second Edition. D. M. McGraw-Hill 2008. Kaufman. R.

 To enable students to gain a working knowledge of ISO 9000 and CMMI.  To develop a good understanding of the nine project management areas. (f) communicate effectively in English for general project presentation. and techniques used in project management processes. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) appreciate the importance of software process and management. and the role of a typical PM. (b) apply project management techniques for information systems development. plan. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) work together as a team in preparing a report. and process improvement techniques. (e) communicate in writing a technical document. (c) Apply the management skills to monitor and control a software project. control and close a software project.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP445 Software Process and Project Management 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP302 (not applicable for 61025) Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide students a systematic approach to initiate. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: Practice communication skill in discussion 141 . Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.  To equip students with understanding of the best practices. execute.

risk response planning. contract closeout. Procurement management Procurement planning. ISO 9001. 9. configuration management. improvement cycle. cost/benefit analysis. CMMI. scheduling. and be able to manage projects by applying suitable process models and management technologies. 10. performance reporting. change control. corrective and preventive action. value analysis. risk monitoring and control. trend analysis. Project scope management Project charter. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Human resource management Organization structure. cost management plan. Project integration management Project plan. Project time management Project size and metrics. team building. Project cost management Estimation techniques. conflict. 7. scope planning. Project management fundamentals Attributes of project. successful project manager. building effective team communication. 142 Duration of Lectures 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 . solicitation. Programme Outcome 7: Work together as a team in project management. risk analysis. WBS. PBS. earned value analysis. 2. net present value. general management skills. CPA.and project presentation and documentation. budgeting and control. Communication management Communication means. stakeholder analysis. COCOMO. negotiation. 8. 6. 3. 4. critical chain. Risk management Different types of risk. contract administration. verification and change control. communication techniques for teams of different sizes. Project quality management Quality model. identifying activities. effective team. resource planning. barriers to communication. project life cycle. Programme Outcome 4: Think and reason critically on developing alternatives in process and project management. reviews. quality definition. project management processes. 5. reward and recognition systems. team meeting. solicitation planning. source selection. definition.

project and mid-term test act as a measure on the understandings of the students on the basic concepts of the software process and project management. Total 9 42 Case Study: Case studies and projects are adopted for students to discuss and study the software process and management. Examination Total 55%   Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: Assignments. project will be used to measure the understandings of the students about the current practice in process and project management. Assignments and project allow students to deepen their understanding of the concepts taught in class and apply the theory and techniques to software process and project management. The students can improve their presentation and communication skills through the project presentation. and develop teamwork skill. review other’s work.11. Lab exercises 3. Process improvement models Software process improvement tools and techniques. and practice 143 . Project 4. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c      45% 100 %       d e f 1. Tutorial and lab sessions provide students opportunity to practice the techniques and tools presented in class. Teaching/Learning Methodology Lectures focus on introduction and explanation of key concepts and techniques. Mid-term 5. In addition. Students will be encouraged to work in groups to share and present ideas. Assignments 2. Report writing and presentation is needed.

sei. Project Management Institute. 2009.CMMI Tutorial.. 2006. http://www.ch SEI. Project Management for Information Systems.cmu. ISO standard.iso. Other student study effort:   Work on assignments and project. 7 Hrs. Cotterell. B. Hughes. 2008. Yeates.edu/cmmi/publications/stc. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 42 Hrs. 30 Hrs.. McGrawHill.team work. Students can also develop their analytic and problem solving skills. M.. self study Prepare mid-term test and exam 75 Hrs.presentations/tutorial.html 144 . Software Project Management. Prentice Hall. J. Total student study effort Reading List and References Textbooks: Cadle. 154 Hrs. www. Reference Books: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. Examination will be used as an overall measure of the understandings of the students on software process and project management. D..

Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorials on solving problems.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP446 Computational Finance 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP211 (Nil for 61025) Co-requisite: COMP417 (Nil for 61025) Exclusion: Nil Objectives  To introduce the knowledge of financial models. Programme Outcome 3: This subject contributes to informing students about the ethical issues in (computational) finance. (c) make reasonable judgment in choosing suitable computation model to solve problems in finance. (f) solve complex problems in groups and develop group work. They will 145 . Attributes for all-roundedness (e) develop skills in problem solving using systematic approaches. (d) perform financial simulation and analysis. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) understand the fundamental concepts of financial engineering. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.  To demonstrate the methodologies for financial simulation and evaluation. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students to practice their writing skill with project document and report writing. quantitative methods and computational analysis techniques. (b) be aware of the computational tools for finance.

4). 4. foreign exchange forecast. Computational tools for finance Numerical methods for PDEs. forecasting. 6). Case studies Customer credit risk analysis. Computational intelligence techniques for financial problems Prediction. to give presentations and write reports. classification. Introduction to financial options Derivative. Monte Carlo simulation. technical analysis. 5). Tutorials are used to provide examples of problems and to show how solutions are developed (aligned to Programme Outcomes 4. 3. practicing such ability in tutorials and measuring such ability by administering quiz or classwork. Black-Sholes equations. random walks and Markov processes. This project 146 . foreign exchange. Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to informing students about the advancement of computational finance via lectures or tutorials. Total Duration of Lectures 12 9 15 6 42 Case Study: Seminars are held for students to discuss in-depth real-life cases related to the subject's topics. Ito’s lemma. modeling tools for financial options. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to teaching the technical problem solving ability by examples in lectures. There is a project that students need to write their report (aligned to Programme Outcomes 1. Teaching/Learning Methodology Teaching is based on lectures in which ethical issues of finance is presented (aligned to Programme Outcome 3). artificial intelligence techniques. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit. hedging. etc. financial data mining and information retrieval. finite difference methods. 2. Lectures include solving technical problems in computational finance (aligned to Programme Outcomes 5. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1.practice more in doing their project.

Academic Press. N.. 2003. Lab exercises 3. Other student study effort:   Project Self Study 14 Hrs. Mid-term 5. 7 Hrs. Elsevier. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial/Seminar 42 Hrs. Levy. 147 . Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c d e f 1. Examination Total 35% 25% 40% 100 %           Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The project is suitable to assess all the intended learning outcomes as it involves all of them. G. 70 Hrs. Principles of Financial Engineering. Assignments 2. 2003. Neftci. Project 4. 2. Salih. Computational Finance: Numerical Methods for Pricing Financial Instruments. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1.is typically a group project (aligned to Programme Outcome 7). The mid-term and examination will tests the fundamental concepts learnt by the students as well as to see if the students are capable to perform financial simulation and analysis. 7 Hrs..

. 2002. 2003. Journal of Computational Intelligence in Finance.. 4. Journal of Computational Finance. Levy. SpringerVerlag. M. S. Tools for Computational Finance. Computational Finance: A Scientific Perspective. Lavy. Articles from magazines. and journal references. Microscopic Simulation of Financial Markets. C. Rudiger Seydel. World Science Publishing. 6. H.A. Academic Press. including Asian Journal of Business and Information Systems.. and Solomon. 5.3. 148 . 2001. Los.

MATLAB) or a professional technical programming language (e. (e) Be proficient in using the programming constructs for scientific computing. Attributes for all-roundedness (f) develop skills in problem solving using systematic approaches. (d) Familiarize with a programming environment that supports scientific computing. (g) solve complex problems in groups and develop group work. (b) Appreciate the limitations of different scientific computing techniques.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP447 Scientific Computing 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP211 (not applicable for 61025). students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) Understand and apply the basic concepts of scientific computing.g.  To equip students with sound skills in solving problems in scientific computing using a scientific computing programming language (e. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject.g. C++).  To demonstrate how scientific computing solves scientific and engineering problems. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to having students to 149 . COMP305 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To provide an introductory survey of fundamental concepts in scientific computing. (c) Write programs to implement scientific computing techniques.

practicing such ability in tutorials and measuring such ability by administering quiz or classwork Programme Outcome 6: This subject contributes to informing students about the advancement of scientific computing via lectures or tutorials. stability issues.practice their writing skill with project document and report writing. well-posed problems. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to developing student critical thinking through tutorials on solving problems. Optimization One-dimensional optimization. mathematical modeling. systems of nonlinear equations. Scientific computing software Mathematical software libraries. Integration and differential equations Finite difference approximations. 2. 4. orthogonal methods to solve linear least squares. pseudo-inverses. automatic differentiation. computing environments. norms and condition numbers. nonlinear least squares. error bounds. boundary value 150 6 6 9 6 . They will practice more in doing their project. approximations in scientific computing. 5. initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. multidimensional unconstrained optimization. Duration of Lectures 6 3 scientific 3. constrained optimization. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work with group-based project for students to practice team spirit. Numerical linear algebra Solving linear equations. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to teaching the technical problem solving ability by examples in lectures. Nonlinear systems Nonlinear equations in one dimension. eigenvalues and singular values. 6. time-space complexity. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Scientific computing fundamentals Scientific computing overview. computer arithmetic.

4). 2. Solving engineering problems using scientific computing techniques. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b c d e f g 1. Assignments 2. Partial differentiation Time-dependent problems. Solving scientific problems using scientific computing techniques. Programming for scientific computing (e. Total 6 42 Laboratory Experiment: Topic 1. matrix computation.). 3. Quizzes and/or classworks are administered to students to strength their technical problem solving ability (aligned to Programme Outcome 5). iterative methods. Lab exercises 3. finite numerical quadratures. time-independent problems. 6). Tutorials are used to provide examples of problems and to show how solutions are developed (aligned to Programme Outcomes 4. There is a project that students need to write their report (aligned to Programme Outcomes 1. This project is typically a group project (aligned to Programme Outcome 7).g. 6). Mid-term 5. Examination Total 10% 25% 20% 45% 100 % 151             . etc. 7.problems for ordinary equations. double and multiple integrals. vector computation. direct methods for sparse linear systems. Project 4. Total Teaching/Learning Methodology Duration of Laboratory 2 3 2 7 Teaching is based on lectures which include solving technical problems in scientific computing (aligned to Programme Outcomes 5.

Quateroni and F. Monte Carlo Strategies in Scientific Computing. In doing so. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. 4. 5. Scientific Computing with MATLAB (Text in Computational Science and Engineering 2). A. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 42 Hrs. Saleri.H. Health.S. John Wiley & Sons. 1992. Lucqion and O. by requiring them to write programs implementing scientific computing techniques. B. Springer. The examination tests these as well as the ability to write programs implementing scientific computing techniques. M. Golub and J. 2002. Pironneau.T. 1998. 2nd ed. Ortega. familiarize with a programming environment for scientific computing and be proficient in using programming constructs. 2003. McGraw-Hill.. Laboratory exercises help students to understand and apply basic concepts. 152 .Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The project tests whether the student can understand and apply the basic concepts of scientific computing. J. Scientific Computing: An Introductory Survey. The mid-terms tests the basic concepts learnt by the students and the limitations understood by the students. Academic Press. 70 Hrs. Scientific Computing and Differential Equations: An Introduction to Numerical Methods. 2002. 2. this develops skills in problem solving. Liu. 7 Hrs. 7 Hrs. The project is group work. SpringerVerlag.M. 3. Introduction to Scientific Computing. G. Other student study effort:   Project Self Study 14 Hrs.

(e) understand the characteristics of visualizing physical and nonphysical data.  visualization and rendering techniques. medicine.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion COMP448 Virtual Reality and Applications 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP407 Co-requisite: Nil Exclusion: COMP421. students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) solve problems in 3D modeling for VR worlds. GIS.  evolution and scalability of VR. aerospace. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (f) develop and maintenance of large VR environments. movies and special effects.  VR interfaces and devices. science and engineering applications.  VR applications: 3D games.  dynamics and persistence of VR environments. COMP438 Objectives This subject will provide students with:  skills for generating 3D VR worlds. 153 . (d) implement a scalable rendering system. (b) understand illumination and light transport techniques for VR rendering.  animation techniques.  the principles of development for large VR worlds.. (c) understand the major problems in time and space sampling of 3D graphics.

geometrical data streams. engineering. High performance computer graphics hardware support Computer graphics pipeline. and potential projects. Programme Outcome 7: This subject contributes to team work by employing a small group-based approach to lab problem solving. development. representation and dissemination of data for scientific. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: Programme Outcome 1: This subject contributes to communicative effectively by having students practice programming in small groups in the lab and solving VR design in small teams. interaction and social impact. assignments and mini-projects. Attributes for all-roundedness (h) gain a new perspective on physically-based simulations as well as information visualization. 154 Duration of Lectures 6 . They will also practice in written assignments. medical and financial analysis. image resolution. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. interactive control and event management. VR models. color management. programmable GPU. scalability. programming exercises. Programme Outcome 2: This subject contributes to the global outlook by having students understand the use of virtual reality and immersive technologies for different applications and their uses. (i) design and develop high quality visual applications that are required in all aspects of digital communication. image buffers. Programme Outcome 4: This subject contributes to critical thinking through tutorial and lab exercises as well as direct exchanges on novel uses of 3D rendering and visualization algorithms. Programme Outcome 5: This subject contributes to technical problem solving by initiating a wide variety of application design and implementation skills through lab exercise and mini-project with proper design and implementation. display systems. texture memory.(g) understand Augmented Reality and its applications.

Scalable shape modeling and representation Large data representation and scientific visualization. Teaching/Learning Methodology The teaching methodology is based on these main activities: 1. color perception. physical light spectrum. Lecture delivery 2. 5. Case Study: If applicable. boundary surface representations and volumetric object and space partitioning. point-based representations. animation and data visualization. representation of time and space. subdivision schemes and scalability. object space discretization. The students will be exposed to examples of shape modeling. rendering. polygonal mesh representations. 3. implicit and parametric shape representations. illumination and dynamic range. surface sampling criteria. sampling. 4. color spaces and gamut mapping. Shape modeling and representation Point-based object representation. Physical light and color Achromatic light and intensity. anti-aliasing techniques. structural information. Object space and image space sampling Device independent image representation. medical diagnosis. case studies may be conducted on modeling and design systems that are used in commercial applications. data flows and relational diagrams. multi-phase objectspace and image-space rendering. basis functions. Total 12 12 6 6 42 Laboratory Experiment: Laboratory exercises will normally be based on exercises and demonstration of the commonly available computer graphics API such as OpenGL. piece-wise continuous curves and surface patches. filtering. virtual reality with applications in science and engineering. advanced color models for VR rendering. colorimetry. multidimensional projections.2. geographic information systems. Laboratory exercises consisting of hands-on exercises and tests 155 . view mapping and projections.

Mid-term 5. Discussion sessions with optional additional workshops. Additional reference material 5. Critical thinking. lectures and labs The learning methodology will be based on: 1.3. Laboratory notes and programming exercises 3. Lab exercises 3. Project 4. Lecture notes 2. evaluate and develop a critical perspective in the development of both small and large systems and integration of systems. Tutorial sessions in and/or outside the lecture and laboratory sessions 4. Examination Total 30%      30% 40% 100 %         The assignment weights will be effectively distributed amongst the intended subject learning outcomes to nurture creative thinking. the assignments and the lab exercises are selected to develop the technical skills and knowledge to solve problems in computing and software development as well as to realize effective solutions. independence. Assignments 2. Web links to active tutorials and other presentation material Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % weighting Intended subject learning outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d e f g h i 1. teamwork. understand. Specifically. effective communication and a 156 . technical skills and a global perspective towards the technological base of this subject. answers and clarification of material 5. Textbook material 4. Office hours questions.

Michael Mortenson. F. Geometric Modeling. Watt. 1992. Diehl. Second Edition. “Virtual Reality Technology. Scientific Visualization. Addison-Wesley. and CROBA. Sherman.demonstrable global outlook will be incorporated at every level of exercises and mid-term examinations. and Policarpo. Mathematics for Computer Graphics Applications: An Introduction to the Mathematics and Geometry of CAD/CAM. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Laboratory 42 Hrs. Theory and Practice. 1998. homework 4 Hrs. 95 Hrs. Distributed Virtual Worlds: Foundations and Implementation Techniques Using VRML. Burdea and P. Prentice Hall.” John Wiley and Sons. The Computer Image. “Developing Virtual Reality Applications: Foundations of Effective Design. Alan Watt and Mark Watt. Other student study effort:   Class participation Course work: reading. Computer Graphics Using Open GL. Addison-Wesley. and Other CG Applications. Hill. 2001. discussions. Will. 2003. Total student study effort Reading List and References Suggested Reference Books: Alan Craig.. Java. Second Edition. William R. F.S. G. Jr. 7 Hrs. S.” Morgan Kaufmann Publishers 2009. Industrial Press. A. Jeffrey D. The final examination accounts for a global and comprehensive understanding of the entire subject material and serves as the final checkpoint for the learning outcomes against technical skills and critical problem solving with respect to all components of virtual reality systems and 3D user interface design. 157 . Advanced Animation and Rendering Techniques. 1999. Coiffet. 42 Hrs. 2001. Springer-Verlag.

Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP449 Information Systems Audit and Control 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP325 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To recap of different information systems in operation and their management;  To extend the potential graduates’ horizon into the realm of audit and control aspects of information management;  To evaluate the effectiveness of information systems. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject, students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) apply the concept of audit in managing information systems; (b) identify various types of controls and develop new control measures; (c) conduct audit exercises, collect and evaluate audit evidence; Attributes for all-roundedness (d) improve presentation and communication skills through various exercises; (e) develop the ability to conduct group works and solve related problems; (f) think and reason in a critical manner, especially on different issues related to audit and control.

Alignment of Programme Outcomes: This subject contributes to corresponding programme outcomes by facilitating students to Programme Outcome 1: practice communication skills in case discussions and writing skills in project documentation; Programme Outcome 2: identify the effects of best practices, industry 158

guidelines, and laws about IT audit in the world on managing information systems; Programme Outcome 3: comply with the code of conduct for IT professionals; Programme Outcome 4: develop critical thinking through tutorials, exercises, and projects; Programme Outcome 5: possess technical knowledge to solve computing problems and realize solutions during case discussions, exercises, and projects; Programme Outcome 6: follow the advancement of IT and understand their impacts on industries by case discussions; Programme Outcome 7: develop team spirit by group-based projects; Programme Outcome 8c: undertake a professional application of information systems in order to effect improvements in organizational problem contexts. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. Information systems audit and control Audit charter and nature of IS audit; concepts of auditing; types of audit; concepts of internal controls. 2. Management controls Top management control frameworks: CobiT, COSO; systems development management controls; programming management controls. 3. Applications controls Boundary controls; input/output controls; data validation edit and controls, processing controls; business process controls; testing application systems. 4. Evidence collection and evaluation Nature of evidence; evidence collection; computerassisted audit techniques; analysis and review. 5. Protection of information assets Information security management; risk management concepts and methodologies; the process and components of information assets and risk management. 6. The application of IS audit and control The application of IS audit and control in financial systems and industry; Basel; case studies. 159 Duration of Lectures 9

9

6

3

6

6

7. Business continuity and disaster recovery Concepts; the planning process and components; case studies. Total

3

42

Case Study: Real-life local or foreign companies case studies for discussion, e.g. from IS Audit and Control Journal and Harvard Business Review. Teaching/Learnin g Methodology This subject integrates lectures, seminars, tutorials, lab exercises, discussions, and projects, and assignments together. Students learn through listening, observation, and participation.

Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes

Specific assessment methods/tasks

% Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d  e  f  

Continuous assessment Examination Total

55% 45% 100 %

 

Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment items include class participation, tests, and projects. Class participation pools ideas and experiences from group, and allows everyone to participate in an interactive process. Tests give students chances to reflect on learning and experience. Projects are used to develop students’ analytic and problem solving skills. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 42 Hrs. 7 Hrs.

Other student study effort:   Self learning Projects 160 14 Hrs. 10 Hrs.

2. 73 Hrs. 3. Information Systems Control Journal. Certified Information Systems Auditor Exam Guide. 2009. Gregory. ISACA Publications. McGraw-Hill.Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. IS Standards and Summaries of Guidelines and Procedures for Auditing and Control Professionals. 161 . 4. P. 2010.H. CISA Review Manual. 2010. ISACA Publications.

 To extend the potential graduates’ knowledge of a control framework called COBIT (control objectives for information and related technology). students will be able to: Professional/academic knowledge and skills (a) make a link between IT policy and business needs. (e) develop the ability to conduct group works and solve related problems. which provides good practices that represent the consensus of experts. (b) organize IT activities into a generally acceptable process model. ensure service delivery. (c) help businesses to optimize IT-related investment.Subject Description Form Subject Code Subject Title Credit Value Level Pre-requisite / Co-requisite/ Exclusion Objectives COMP450 IT Governance 3 4 Pre-requisite: COMP325 Co-requisite/Exclusion: Nil  To recap of different information systems in operation and their management. Alignment of Programme Outcomes: This subject contributes to corresponding programme outcomes by 162 .  To evaluate IT adoption in a company. especially on different issues related to adoption of IT in companies. and establish measures against which to judge when things do go wrong. Intended Learning Outcomes Upon completion of the subject. (f) think and reason in a critical manner. Attributes for all-roundedness (d) improve presentation and communication skills through various exercises.

managing the configuration. Programme Outcome 7: develop team spirit by group-based projects. Programme Outcome 6: follow the advancement of IT and understand their impacts on industries by case discussions. Linking business goals and IT objectives Business-IT alignment requirements. information architecture. exercises. The framework Need for a control framework for IT governance. 2. performance measurement. Programme Outcome 4: develop critical thinking through tutorials. determining technological direction. 163 Duration of Lectures 6 6 7. 4. IT processes. Planning and organization Defining strategic IT plan. 5. maturity models. organization and relationship. Programme Outcome 2: identify the effects of best practices and industry guidelines about IT governance on managing information systems. control risk assessment. the COBIT model. 3. educating and training users. physical environment and operations. Subject Synopsis/ Indicative Syllabus Topic 1. and projects. technology and infrastructure. managing IT investment.5 7.5 . assessing and managing IT risks. how COBIT meets the needs.facilitating students to Programme Outcome 1: practice communication skills in case discussions and writing skills in project documentation. managing change. Delivery and support Defining and managing service levels. performance and capacity.5 7. quality and projects. control and process maturity and their assessment. Programme Outcome 8c: undertake a professional application of information systems in order to effect improvements in organizational problem contexts. IT human resources. installing and accrediting solution and change. communicating management aims and direction. Acquisition and implementation Acquiring and maintaining application software.

6. Total 7.5 42 Case Study: Real-life local or foreign companies case studies for discussion. and projects. lab exercises. Monitoring and evaluation IT performance. tests. and participation. and projects. internal controls. regulatory compliance. observation. Students learn through listening. and allows everyone to participate in an interactive process. Class participation pools ideas and experiences from group. . tutorials. Projects are used to develop students’ analytic and problem solving skills. and assignments together. Other student study effort:  Self learning 164 14 Hrs. IT governance. Tests give students chances to reflect on learning and experience. discussions. seminars. Assessment Methods in Alignment with Intended Learning Outcomes Specific assessment methods/tasks % Intended subject learning weighting outcomes to be assessed (Please tick as appropriate) a b   c   d  e  f   Continuous assessment Examination Total 55% 45% 100 %   Explanation of the appropriateness of the assessment methods in assessing the intended learning outcomes: The assessment items include class participation. Teaching/Learning Methodology This subject integrates lectures. Student Study Effort Required Class contact:   Lecture Tutorial 42 Hrs. 7 Hrs.

Implementing IT Governance: A Practical Guide to Global Best Practices in IT Management. Cater-Steel. COBIT User Guide for Service Managers. 2009. Information Technology Governance and Service Management: Frameworks and Adaptations. G. Selig and J. 3. Information Science Reference. 2. 73 Hrs. Van Haren Publishing. IT Governance Institute. 2008. Projects 10 Hrs. 2009. IT Governance Institute. A. Wilkinson. Total student study effort Reading List and References Reference Books: 1. 165 . J.