You are on page 1of 25

  

 

 

Youth Perspectives 2008
Camille Jones Taylor Oliver
Tiffany Bailey Kerrie Green
Hassante East Blair Oliver
Lakesha Mack Sharnae Mack

Adult Advisor: Liz Walker Support Specialists: Catherine Wolfgang
Catalina Gonzales

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Introduction

II. Objectives

III. Methodology

IV. Survey Results
V. Overall Results

VI. Conslusions

 
I. INTRODUCTION:

YOUTHadelphia is the Youth in Philanthropy Committee of The Philadelphia 
Foundation's Fund for Children (FFC). YOUTHadelphia was established in October 2003. 
YOUTHadelphia is a group of diverse youth leaders and philanthropists that seek to better 
Philadelphia communities through granting youth‐led projects organizations. YOUTHadelphia 
gives Philadelphia teens opportunities to build youth power by being in control of giving back to 
their communities and funding youth‐led projects. YOUTHadelphia has the responsibility of 
advising the FFC Advisory Board on the allocation of at least $100,000 a year in grants to youth 
led programs and projects throughout Philadelphia. 

The $100,000 is 10% of the FFC's annual allocations and comes from money given by the 
Philadelphia Phillies and the Eagles, according to an agreement made by teams and the City of 
Philadelphia. When the two Philadelphia teams built their stadiums, the Philadelphia City 
Council brokered a deal in which each team would give a portion of their profits back to the 
city. Each year, for a total of 30 years, both teams will donate $1,000,000 to support youth‐
serving programs in Philadelphia. Every year half of the money donated by these teams goes 
into an endowment. By doing so, the money will collect an interest that can help these youth‐
serving programs run longer than 30 years. 

In August 2008, YOUTHadelphia transferred locations from The Philadelphia Foundation 
to The Greater Philadelphia Federation of Settlements (GPFS). During the transition, The Fund 
for Children allotted funds to hire a full time adult advisor to support the growth and expansion 
of YOUTHdelphia as Philadelphia’s only City‐Wide youth led Philanthropy Board.  

II. YOUTH PERSPECTIVES HISTORY: 

     During the summer of 2004, YOUTHadelphia sought to reach out to youth across the 
city in order to better understand their needs and interests. They named the project Youth 
Perspectives.  The main purpose of the 2004 Youth Perspectives Project was to help direct both 
YOUTHadelphia committee members and the Philadelphia Foundation's Fund for Children 
Advisory Board on its grant making priorities.   The survey included six questions concerning the 
youth of the city, their gender, age, and the area in which they reside. The survey included 
questions regarding issues youth feel are important to the city of Philadelphia; issues that 
impact the personal lives of youth; ways that youth spend their free time; factors that limit 
youth participation in extracurricular activities; ways in which youth get information about 
community and school events; and the types of programs and activities that are of interest to 
them.  At the end of the project, based on the answers they received from youth in 
Philadelphia, the board came to the decision that YOUTHadelphia's grant‐making priorities 
would be: education, safety, poverty, health, environment, substance abuse, and racism and 

 
discrimination. For four years YOUTHadelphia granted funds to projects that addressed one or 
more of those seven priorities. 

In 2008, The Fund for Children underwent an evaluation and introduced a number of 
changes to its grant‐making strategies including a proposed shift for YOUTHadelphia. The 
decision was made that YOUTHadelphia spend 70% of its $100,000 in support of a single 
priority. The remaining 30% can be used to support the previous seven grant making priorities. 
One benefit of this change is that it allows YOUTHadelphia to be more conscious of where their 
money is going in order to make a stronger impact on the community. Funding in this way will 
also allow the board to better track the effectiveness of the grant and the impact that the 
money has had on a specific area.  Another benefit is that YOUTHadelphia will be actively 
seeking grantees whose programs revolve around the single focus. This will help 
YOUTHadelphia bring awareness and education to the singular issue youth need addressed. We 
will be sharing what we’ve found and offering the information to other organizations. 

With these ideas in mind we began the Youth Perspectives Project 2008. We realize that 
the opinion of the youth and the issues that we face have changed in order of importance and 
relevance since 2004. During the summer of 2008, interns and former YOUTHadelphia 
members began to modify and improve the 2004 Perspective Project, and designed a survey to 
distribute to the youth ages 14‐21. We surveyed 412 youth all over the city to find out what the 
number one issue that young people in Philadelphia face. 

III. OBJECTIVES:

The 2008 Youth Perspectives Project was conducted over an eight week period 
beginning June 30th and ending August 22nd. We worked diligently with our adult advisor 
Elizabeth Walker, and the University Community Collaborative of Philadelphia (UCCP) at Temple 
University to help us complete the project. 

In order to determine what the single focus would be, summer interns were charged 
with making sure that youth voices from every part of the city of Philadelphia were heard.  The 
summer interns were a select group of current YOUTHadelphia members. We developed and 
implemented a survey, revised the questions used on the 2004 Project, and visited community 
organizations. We also held focus groups in order to determine the most important issues for 
youth in Philadelphia, what the root causes of these issues were, and to brainstorm potential 
solutions. We found that the focus groups   allowed us to network with youth who are working 
toward a change in Philadelphia. The results from the surveys and focus groups are summarized 
in the 2008 Youth Perspectives Report. 

We did as much research as possible before and after developing our survey to make 
sure we constructed a well thought out report analyzing the data from the survey ion order to 
determine our single granting focus. We researched the city's statistics relating to the five top 

 
issues youth found important to them so we could be knowledgeable and aware of the issues 
affecting our youth. 

 The eight weeks of work were captured in a 10 minute film that was also filmed and 
edited by the interns. The film was created to show the process of the 2008 Youth Perspectives 
Project and how we came forth with our single focus. A trailer was created to be shown at 
Temple Youth Voices' End‐of‐Summer event to introduce the YOUTHadelphia Youth 
Perspectives Project and to announce our upcoming RFP event. The RFP event is used to tell 
organizations that we are accepting grant proposals and what our guidelines are.

 

IV.  METHODOLOGY:

In September of 2007, The Philadelphia Foundation's Fund for Children underwent an 
evaluation process that determined that YOUTHadelphia's funds would be better utilized if 
spent on one major focus. Beginning in June 2008, a committee of 8 interns was formed to 
determine a single focus for granting funds throughout the next three years.  The committee 
decided to use surveys and focus groups to find out the number one issue facing youth in 
Philadelphia. 

 The initial step of designing the survey began in a meeting with the YOUTHadelphia 
Alumni Board who were also a part of the original 2004 Youth Perspectives Committee.  By 
meeting with the original committee we hoped that they could guide us in a process of creating 
a new survey.  Using their feedback and the 2004 survey the committee brainstormed ideas 
regarding issues that Philadelphia youth face in 2008.  (Appendix A)  

 Next the committee decided the sets of questions that would accurately determine the 
issues that concern youth in Philadelphia.  In order to ensure that the survey would be 
effective, YOUTHadelphia collaborated with the UCCP to get feedback.   After three formal 
rewrites and testing the tool with small groups of youth, the committee finally created a survey 
that was ready for distribution.

            The survey covered several topics including (1) the major issues that impact the personal 
lives of youth, (2) the things youth participate in on a daily basis, (3) factors that limit youth 
from participating in activities, (4) ways that youth get information about events or activities, 
(5) activities youth are interested in participating in, (6) the top issue that youth as a whole face 
in the city. (Appendix B) 

Knowing that youth in Philadelphia come from diverse ethnic, racial, and economic 
backgrounds, we realized that acquiring the diversity the committee needed was a very big 
challenge during this project.  We found that trying to get Asian, Caucasian and Latino youth 
who are not involved in any community organizations to fill out the surveys was difficult.  We 
believe one reason is because many youth in Philadelphia don't travel outside of 

 
their neighborhood.  Approaching people on the streets was one of our major obstacles. We 
realize, from our surveying experience, how segregated the youth in Philadelphia really are.  
Youth hang out in cliques of people who are the same as they are and these cliques remain in 
the same areas. In order to make sure that the opinions of all youth in the city were heard we 
had to reach out to all sections of the city.  

To resolve the challenges with ensuring diversity, we chose to contact youth groups and 
community organizations based on their demographics and zip codes.  (Appendix C) We also 
went to central public places, like malls and transportation centers, where youth from all over 
the city spend their time.  We found that spending an hour at a central location allowed for us 
to talk with a greater number of people, from all over the city and collect more surveys. Even 
though going to specific sites was a great opportunity to network, we found that site visits were 
not as effective for collecting numbers of surveys. 

  

 
 

Part V   
SURVEY FINDINGS: 
These statistics result from a total of 411 surveys administered. Please note, not all questions were answered.  

 
 

For the following questions, 411 youth were asked to check all that applied.  

 
Issue    Number of Youth  
Environment    (176) 
Employment   (163) 
Health     (90) 
Economy/Poverty   (92) 
Sexuality     (143) 
Discrimination   (69) 
Education    (143) 
Violence     (194) 
Politics     (38)

What are Some of the Things YOU Participate in on a Daily Basis? 
 
Activity    Number of Youth  
Church Activities   (82) 
Study/HW/Read   (166) 
Sports     (138) 
Family Activties   (138)   
 Clubs/Organizations   (99) 
Volunteer    (107) 
Work     (287) 
Other     (20) 
 

 
What Limits YOU from Participating in Extracurricular Activties?  
 
Activity      Number of Youth  
Work Obligations    (110)  160
No Activities in my Community   (85)  140
120
Too Busy/Not Enough Time   (43)  100
80
No Activties in my School   (53)  60
I Don’t Know of Anything   (43)  40
20
Lack of Transportation   (82)  0
Family Obligations     (70) 
Don’t Know How to Get Involved (36) 
Cost      (55) 
Nothing Limits me    (64) 
Other       (7) 
 
 

How Do You Find Out What is Going on in Your School or Community? 
 
300
Method       Number of Youth  
School Fliers    (81)  250

Friends       (273) 
200
Community     (138) 
Word of Mouth     (181)  150

Newspaper    (128) 
100
Parents       (155) 
Radio      (131)  50

Web / Email     (108)  0
TV      (163) 
Other       (15) 
Other       (7) 
 
Check 2 Activities that YOU are interested in participating in: 
 
Method       Number of Youth   250
Sports       (202)  200
Arts       (149)  150
Financial Literacy     (57)  100
Outdoor Experience    (48)  50
College Prep/Access     (91)  0
Computer Technology   (57) 
Film Making, Photography   (32) 
Culinary Arts     (52) 
Cosmetology     (44) 
Other      (22)    

 
PART IV  
OVERALL FINDINGS: 
Issues and Concerns:

When youth were asked to identify three of the top issues that they faced in the City of 
Philadelphia (from a list of eleven main categories) 194 youth chose Violence as one of their top 
concerns.  Also, high among youth’s concerns for their city are issues relating to Environment 
(176), Employment (163), Sexuality and Education (143). 

In order to ensure room for their own answers, the survey also had an open ended 
question for youth to provide more detail as to why those were their concerns. We held focus 
groups and spent significant time researching and discussing each of these issues. Below is a 
summary of our findings, organized by theme.  In many cases, we found the issues were very 
much related to one another.  

 

 
B ul lying ( 13 )
Violence
Gang ( 3 8 )

   Po l ice  
Har r asment
Gun ( 10 2 )
 
NA (3 )

 

According to the Philadelphia Police Department's website for the end of June 2008, 
there have been 163 murders so far this year. YOUTHadelphia used the Webster dictionary 
definition of violence, “The exertion of physical force so as to injure or abuse.”  In the 
survey, YOUTHadelphia broke violence down into four subcategories: bullying, gang, police 
harassment, and gun violence, and asked everyone to choose which one was the greatest issue 
for them. As we surveyed the youth in Philadelphia, the greatest issue identified by youth in the 
city was violence. 194 youth surveyed said that violence is one of the most important issues 
they face.  

In a focus group youth identified the main causes of teens’ violent behavior to be 
boredom, the selling of drugs, the need for young people to make fast money, and people 
wanting to be powerful or in charge. Boredom was recognized as a major cause of violence in 
Philadelphia by teens, and can be the fuel to do other violent acts. We related this to our survey 
findings, 53 of youth said that there are no activities or programs in their school that interested 
them and 85, of youth said, that there are no activities or programs in their community. In our 
focus group someone said, "Kids in my neighborhood jump other people for no reason, just to 
be able to say that they did something."

 
The selling of drugs and the need for fast money was the next cause of violence 
identified by our focus group. Selling drugs because youth are in need of jobs they see that 
selling drugs is the easiest way to get money but unlike regular jobs it is one of most dangerous 
ways to get money. Because the media shows us that being "flashy" is the best way to be, it is 
looked at in the sense that if you have a lot of money, then you will have a lot of respect. 
Where ever there is money concerned there will be a form of violence involved. 

While conversing with the youth many commented that a lot of people, old and young, 
mainly care about being powerful or in charge.  From that comment others said that the 
quickest way to do that is by getting respect from the people who are feared in the community, 
mostly gangsters. Someone said that "There are too many people that want to be gangstas."  
Someone else in our focus group said "Violence is big in the city because of neighborhood or 
group wars.” If there is more than one person trying to be the boss or the person in charge than 
there will be a conflict. Many people try to prove themselves to their peers and they do not 
think before they make decisions or of the consequences that they may face because of them.  
Often people take small situations and turn them into violent or deadly ones. Part of the cause 
of this is that there is easy access to guns for youth.

A lot of the issues with violence for youth go far beyond what the news media      
emphasizes. We found that generally youth feel there is a lack of support for citizens and a poor 
police system. Youth identified police harassment as equally a major issue as gang violence lets 
us know the degree youth in Philadelphia feel protected by the law. The youth we surveyed 
have the perception that often the police have negative feelings about the area they are serving 
and take it out on the youth living there. Youth in focus groups identified the main cause of 
police harassment as poor training for officers. In addition to having poorly trained officers on 
the street many young people are concerned about the negative feelings that police have for 
the area and the residents they serve.  

10 

 
 
A ccess t o C o l leg e
R ead i ness
  Pr o g r ams ( 6 1)
A vailab ili t y o f
C r eat i ve A r t s
EDUCATION:  Pr o g r ams ( 2 9 )
A ccess t o A f r t er
Scho o l Pr o g r ams
  ( 4 5)
NA (8 )

 

Out of all the youth surveyed, 143 found education as a major issue they faced living in 
Philadelphia.  Our survey showed that 61 youth who picked education as their main concern 
felt that the need for more college readiness programs was their primary issue.  45 youth felt 
that the need for more after school programs was their primary concern, while 29 youth 
identified the need for creative art programs as their greatest issue.    

One cause of youth wanting more creative programs and after school activities is found 
within the structure of the schools that they attend.  In our focus groups, youth pointed out 
that they didn't like their schools because they didn't go on trips, teachers were disrespectful, 
and the classes were boring. Having arts and after school programs would make the day more 
enjoyable.  One person said,   "No Child Left Behind destroyed our education system."  

Even though many youth have a negative view of No Child Left Behind, many don’t 
know the details about this legislation. When YOUTHadelphia took the time to view the pros 
and cons of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, we found than many people feel that NCLB has 
forced teachers to basically teach standardized tests to the students so that they can receive 
higher scores.1  After looking at this information YOUTHadelphia believes that this method of 
education lowers the excitement of the learning environment and causes youth to stop paying 
attention and retaining information, leading many students in Philadelphia to withdraw 
completely from pursuing their education. 

Philadelphia’s drop out statistics and attendance records verify that students are 
becoming less and less engaged in their own education.  In a statistics based report produced 
by American Youth Policy Forum and Philadelphia's Project U‐Turn we see that  "In total, 13,000 
students could be classified as dropouts or ‘near‐dropouts.’ [ Near drop outs are classified as 
students whose attendance is less than 50%].”2  

Those students who are concerned with their education and want to finish high school 
feel held back from their full potential because they are taking ineffective tests that were made 
for the students to pass. The schools have even lowered their academic standards causing 
teachers to teach one teaching style. A youth participant at one of our focus groups revealed 
that "Most of my teachers feel that I don't understand things when in reality they just aren't 
catering to my learning styles. When I ask for help they don't assist me. I feel like I have to 
teach myself."

11 

 
A very detailed article has been posted on the Hoover Institute’s website also discussing 
the pros and cons of No Child Left Behind. This research has confirmed the things that the 
youth are saying. One huge issue members of Congress had when reexamining the effects of 
NCLB was that in such a system, "High‐achieving students are actually held to lower standards 
of achievement than before NCLB, whereas historically under performing schools—many in 
impoverished inner‐city districts—are often labeled failing even if their year‐to‐year progress is 
significant."3

 Although the survey did not include issues with teachers, the majority of youth in our 
focus groups felt that lack of teacher support was a huge concern. "Teachers need to be better 
trained to understand the student's point of view."  In our focus groups some students even felt 
that they should be given more homework, but feel that in the end of the day “the teachers just 
don't get it.”  In addition to poor standards of instruction, many students also felt Philadelphia 
schools were poorly resourced in general, stating that their “books were too old to use and all 
torn apart.”

Philadelphia students’concerns for education in the city is not only related to the school 
system, but it does also go back to the home and family life. One person said "The lack of 
education in today's youth is because parents fail to stress it in the home.”  Some feel 
education is not enforced in homes because the financial challenges of pursuing a higher 
education becomes too overwhelming.  One youth said, "I think one issue is the money for 
college." Almost every year, college tuition alone gets more expensive, not including room and 
board. This becomes an issue for youth, especially those who may be in financial need. It is also 
hard to get scholarship money because the funds for certain scholarships are too restricted 
making many youth unqualified.  

Youth also have issues with going to college because their schools may not offer a wide 
range of opportunities for them to apply to scholarships and college access programs. We 
found that many youth want to attend college but often don’t get the support necessary to 
make this dream a reality.   

  After reviewing this feedback YOUTHadelphia will encourage the school district 
to offer more training opportunities, and programs to help adults better their approach 
towards teaching and working with youth. Although we are unable to directly fund the schools 
in the district, we can fund and partner with youth groups that are engaged in bettering the 
educational system.  

 
 
 
 

 

12 

 
 

 

 

 
Pollution/Enviro
nmental
ENVIRONMENT:  Awareness (79)
Clean
Neighborhoods
(87)
NA (10)

 
 
 
Out of all the youth we surveyed this summer, 176 youth said that environment was the 
number one issue that they face in the city today. Environment to youth in Philadelphia can 
take on two meanings;  one that relates to global issues such as global warming and energy 
conservation, while the other one relates to urban issues such as neighborhood resources and 
safety. Regardless of which term is being referred to, youth in Philadelphia are very concerned 
about it. 
 
  When the discussion of environment came about with the board, our first thoughts 
were concerning global issues as opposed to community issues. However, we found that youth 
living in the city are more upset with the immediate quality of their living conditions and what is 
available to them in their neighbrohood rather than other global issues. For example one of the 
youth in one of our focus groups said, ’’ We have libraries but they’re never open.’’ 
YOUTHadelphia feels that a healthy urban environment allows its residents to have immediate 
access to necessary resources like libraries, parks, food markets, and medical facilities. 
 
  87 people who took the surveys felt having clean neighborhoods was their personal 
issue. One of the youth said, "Although my street was voted the cleanest in Philadelphia, two 
streets up, the houses are run down and covered with graffiti and the people are getting in 
fights every day, I would really appreciate a clean neighborhood." No matter how clean one 
block is another street is not always going to be clean. This shows that in the city the issues are 
attacked in some areas, but ignored in others. 

Regardless of how severe immediate urban issues are to many Philadelphia youth, 
others are still very concerned with global issues. In the survey 79 youth said that pollution and 
environmental awareness was a problem. One young person felt that the number one issue all 
youth in Philadelphia face is “Global warming... I know that violence is happening, but if all the 
attention is to try and stop violence, once it gets stopped it's going to be too late to stop global 
warming and the world's going to die out. But if we work on them equally, we can save both." 
  

13 

 
We found that dealing with the issues of urban environmental needs and global 
environmental needs don’t necessarily have to be separate. Tackling these issues can be as 
simple as planting a garden on a city block. This may not seem like it would have a big impact, 
but it does deal with both scales of the issue. It helps to beautify the city and provides organic 
resources for consumers in the area. YOUTHadelphia has already started partnering and 
showing support to organizations that work to accomplish these tasks. We also plan to team up 
with them to find out more about these problems and how we can help to make a difference. 

  Job Availability
for Teens (143)

EMPLOYMENT:
Entrepenuershi
p Opportunity
(11)
NA (9)

We found that employment is a major issue for youth. Our survey indicated that 163 
people identified it as their number one concern.   Over the years employment has become a 
bigger issue to youth. The seriousness of employment for teens is affected by the economy; 
Adults are losing their homes due to foreclosures because everything is going up with the 
exception of wages.  
All ages, races, and genders are experiencing the weakening job market, including teens 
in Philadelphia.  According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Only 33% of the nation's 
teens, ages 16 to 19, had jobs in the January through March period compared to 40% a year 
earlier.”4 Through discussions in our focus groups we found that there are multiple reasons why 
the youth in Philadelphia need jobs.  
Some youth need jobs is to help provide for their family with the expenses in their 
home. For other teens they just want jobs to pay for their material luxuries. By doing this they 
help to lift the burden off their guardians who provide for them on a daily basis, and gain their 
own independence. One teen told us that she felt school was a financial concern for youth. She 
said, “I really need a job to help pay for my prom because I want limos and everything. I don’t 
want to ask my mom because she got mouths to feed.” 
  Even though teens are determined to get jobs there are still many obstacles in the way. 
Out of the 163 youth that chose employment as the biggest issue, 143 of them said that job 
availability is the main problem. In some of the focus groups we held the youth said that, 
"Stereotypes are the reason teens are unemployed… Adults feel that teens are too immature to 
take on the task."  With so many negative stereotypes targeting youth in society, employers 
don’t want to take the risk of hiring them.  Another obstacle keeping youth from finding jobs in 
the city is competition. ‘’Adults are taking all the jobs that the teens should have like at fast 
food restaurants."  Not only do teens have to compete with each teens they also compete with 
adults to obtain minimum wage or higher paying jobs. 
   In every focus group we’ve held, youth reported back that the major career exploration 
programs that are available in the city of Philadelphia are not effective. A few felt that the one 

14 

 
issue with many programs is that “the application process is extremely long to complete. “ One 
focus group participant said,  ‘’Out of 20 program participants in my program who applied, only  
8 completed the paper work and were given a job.”  Another issue with these programs is that 
there are not enough jobs to distribute to youth that are accepted in the program. One person 
said, ‘’I got accepted into the program and was never placed at a job site.’’ The youth are also 
concerned about the low pay and lack of hours available through the city’s summer work 
programs.  
  From discussions that we’ve had with youth we do see how big of an issue employment 
is for them. We also feel that programs realize it too but can’t seem to come up with proper 
solutions. YOUTHadelphia feels that the way to start addressing the problem would be to talk 
to the people in charge of these programs, figure out the issues, and try to create solutions. 
 
     Sexuality (13)
 
STD's (33)
 

SEXUALITY  Teen
Pregnancy
(64)
 
Healthy
Relationships
  (26)

When surveyed by YOUTHadelphia, 143 young people chose sexuality as one of the 
most important issues facing them. On the survey YOUTHadelphia broke sexuality down into 
four subcategories; Sexual Orientation, STDs, Teen Pregnancy, and Healthy Relationships. The 
issues were ranked in the following order; 33 indicated that STDs were their main concern, 26 
said healthy relationships, 64 identified teen pregnancy and 13 indicated sexual orientation.  

Teen pregnancy was ranked as the first most important issue under sexuality. 34% of 
young women in America become pregnant before they reach the age of 20. This amounts to 
820, 000 young women a year.5 On the survey, youth gave reasons as to why they thought teen 
pregnancy is such a major issue. One youth said, "It seems as though more and more teenagers 
having children at younger and younger ages." Another young person wrote, “…I had a baby at 
a young age."

Dealing with teen pregnancy, as well as STDS for a teen is very difficult because society 
doesn’t provide enough support for youth who end up in these situations.  Unfortunately, the 
babies that are born to teens who don’t have enough support are the ones that suffer the most.  
Children of teen mothers are more likely to “have lower birth weights, perform poorly in school 
and are at a greater risk of abuse or neglect.”i[i] The lack of support affects the young mothers 
from doing the positive things they want to do for themselves and their family. It can also be 
harder for them to see the better choices that they can make for their future. 

15 

 
Talking about sexuality is difficult by itself, talking about Sexually Transmitted Diseases is 
even more of a taboo.  Unfortunately for us, sexually transmitted diseases are a huge issue, 
which is why it ranked 2nd in the category of sexuality.  According to Choice Teens, every year 3 
million teens acquire an STD.ii[ii]iii[iii]  When asked on the survey what is the top issue facing 
youth in the city of Philadelphia one teen answered "… sex, because if they wasn't having sex 
they won't have kids, STDs or drama." In our focus groups we found that some of the issues 
that go along with teens having STDs are peer pressure, lack of knowledge, and low self esteem.  

With peer pressure the youth gets persuaded into making the wrong decisions. In most 
cases not knowing about sexuality makes it easier for youth to give into peer pressure. 
Confidence becomes a huge part of this whole issue because youth sometimes feel that having 
sexual experiences will boost their confidence and the way people think about them, therefore 
making them want to fit in and feel accepted by their peers and society. 

Healthy relationships ranked third under sexuality. Youth see very few examples of 
healthy relationships in the city. Adults and family members also affect the outlook on healthy 
relationships because they don’t always portray it on a daily basis. The media also greatly 
contributes to youth perspectives of “normal” relationship and interactions between partners 
by only focusing on the drama that goes on. By watching talk shows and sitcoms youth get 
ideas about how they want relationships to go. They feel that because they see it so much it’s 
the right thing to do. 

  We believe that educating the youth about sexuality is a larger portion of the solution. A 
few of YOUTHadelphia’s board members are also involved in abstinence sexual education 
programs. They don’t only try to encourage abstinence but they also educate youth on sexuality 
as a whole. We plan to hold community service days with places such as these programs and 
health clinics in the city.  

  

YOUTH INTERESTS:  

YOUTHadelphia wanted to know what useful activities and programs interested teens so 
that we could use that information when settling on grants in the future.  When deciding on 
options for youth to select from, YOUTHadelphia did not want to give obvious activities that 
most teenagers enjoy participating in, such as talking on the phone, hanging out with friends, 
etc. Instead, we wanted to give options that would let us know what activities or programs 
youth in the city would be drawn to.  

We asked youth to select two activities out of a list of ten that they would be interested 
in participating in. In order to make sure they could indicate their personal options, we left 
space for them to specify other activities not listed.  The greatest activity that interested youth 
in Philadelphia was sports, chosen by 202 youth. The next greatest activity selected was art 
programs, chosen by 149 youth.  

16 

 
91 youth indicated that they would attend programs related to college readiness as well 
as programs that explore jobs and careers options. These results are very interesting because 
they show that there is a correlation between the issues that young people are facing and the 
supports they would be interested in receiving.  

19 youth chose to answer "Other." Many of these answers also matched; 8 identified fashion 
and modeling as their choice, 3 said youth development and 3 said music.  

      

BARRIERS AND LIMITATIONS:  

YOUTHadelphia wanted to know why so many youth don’t participate in activities that 
are offered in the city. In order to develop strategies for engaging youth and creating successful 
outreach and recruitment, we wanted to know what some of the obstacles were, if any, for 
youth who were interested in joining extracurricular programs.  

Out of ten options being too busy/not having enough time had the highest percentage 
as 149 youth chose that.   The next highest percentage went to work obligations, which 110 
youth indicated as the reason they couldn't participate in extracurricular activities.  This 
information directly relates to the large numbers of youth who felt that employment for teens 
was a huge concern. 

       85 of youth indicated that there were no activities in their community.  In our focus group 
we found that this specifically meant activities that while communities do have extracurricular 
programs, most of them are not interesting or worthwhile. In addition to the lack of programs 
in their communities 65 youth felt that their schools also didn't provide programs they would 
want to participate in.  

Obstacles preventing youth from exploring programs outside of their community was 
the issue of transportation, which 82 youth selected. This is also a huge point of focus for 
YOUTHadelphia because we realize that for many youth traveling around the city is not an 
option.   For a program to attract youth participants it needs to provide transportation as well. 
Family obligations ranked by 70 people as a common obstacle that made teens unable to 
participate in extracurricular activities.  

In line with issues related to economics, 55 youth felt that the cost of programs limited 
them from participating in activities. 43 people felt that they just didn't know about programs 
and that programs were not advertised enough. 36 youth also noted that they didn't know how 
to get involved with programs.  

Other reasons youth had for not participating in clubs or activities were because they 
"don't feel like it" and because there is "nothing for my age." In the end of the day certain social 
17 

 
barriers also stand in the way, as one youth said that the reason they didn't participate in 
activities was because they were "shy." 

GETTING INFORMATION: 

YOUTHadelphia asked the youth in the city how they get their information about events 
and activities going on in their community. The majority of the youth, 237,  said that their main 
source of information is their friends and 181 people identified word of mouth. After analyzing 
our surveys, we did realize that word of mouth and friends could be considered the same type 
of information source. This lets us know a few things about programs in Philadelphia. One, 
youth tend to stay in the cliques and groups with other friends. It is more common for youth 
organizations to have a few people who come in as friends and already know each other from 
the neighborhood or school. While this sometimes can create a lack of diversity in programs, 
young people feel more secure when they are around their friends.  This also lets us know  that 
programs will not be able to recruit participants or have an effective outreach strategy if youth 
are not excited and interested in joining it and bringing their friends with them. 

   TV was the third highest source of information with 163 people selecting it.  155 youth 
said that they get their information from their parents. The radio and community had a close 
number of votes. Radio had 131 and community had 138. The Newspaper was selected by 128 
people. Surprisingly, web/e‐mail was only selected as a source of information by 108 students.  
The lowest ranking way of accessing information were school fliers, which only 81 [people 
selected.  Other ways teens said they obtained information were from school teachers, 
traveling, and at the library. 

FREE TIME ACTIVITIES: 

     YOUTHadelphia asked youth across the city what did they do in their free time; we wanted 
to know a little bit more than the obvious which was hanging out or being on the phone. We 
got the following results: work had 287, study /homework/read with 166, family activities with 
138,participate in sports with 138, volunteer work with 107, participate in clubs/organizations 
with 99, church activities with 82, other with 20, and none with 5. 

Even though employment came up as a major issue for teens in the city, from our survey 
data, 287 youth ages 14‐21 are working in their free time. While out distributing surveys we 
found out that the teens that do have jobs either don't like their job or need more than what 
they are getting paid. 

The next highest rank was study/homework/read which tells us that even though 143 of 
youth said education was a big issue that they are still getting their work done. There are a lot 
of youth that participate in sports and when asked what type of programs they are interested in 
138 of youth said sports. On the survey we did not ask any questions relating to faith based 
activities in general but there are 82 youth that participate in church activities.  
18 

 
The number of youth that do volunteer work (107) and the number who participate in 
clubs/organizations (99) are so close YOUTHadelphia felt this was because many clubs and 
organizations help youth with volunteer and community service hours. 

PART IV: 
Conclusion  
 
  When looking at violence as the number one issue youth in the city face, we realized 
that there are already many anti violence programs in Philadelphia. YOUTHadelphia knows 
from our everyday experiences and feedback from youth throughout the city, that even though 
there are many antiviolence programs available youth are not interested in participating in 
them.  How do typical antiviolence programs expect to be effective when they don’t even 
attract youth?  In order for YOUTHadelphia to figure out what type of programs we should fund 
in order to have a large impact towards decreasing violence in the city, we knew that we had to 
look deeper into the causes of violence so serious change could be made. 

  Our first step was discussing the concept of violence through the eyes of youth. We 
decided that violence is when people are involved in a conflict they don’t know how to solve 
positively it could lead to aggressive physical or verbal force or intimidation. After redefining 
violence in our own words and compared it to the dictionary definition we initially used, we 
found that the dictionary definition doesn’t discuss the fact that the person engaged in the act 
has a choice in their situation. Our definition shows that violence can be stopped and 
controlled.  

YOUTHadelphia has decided that it is imperative that we continue to grant programs 
which engage youth, but will focus our funds on those that specifically address the causes for 
violence identified in this report (boredom, the need to make fast money/ selling drugs, 
wanting to be powerful and in charge). After analyzing the feedback from focus groups we 
found that these causes all  stem from the underlying issue of poverty and lack of power. This 
served as a platform for us to prioritize our funds in order to address the issue of violence in a 
unique and effective way. 

Many youth identified boredom as a cause of violence.  As a board we translated this 
into the need for youth to be engaged in the structuring and design of programs. Engaging 
youth in this way would also make them more interested in programs, killing two birds with one 
stone. Additionally, by advocating youth engagement throughout the city we would also be 
breaking down discriminatory behavior towards youth.  When we mention discriminatory 
behavior towards youth we mean not allowing the youth to be decision makers when they are 
capable. This term is also known as “adultism”. John Bell talks about adultism as a behavior 
based on;   “the assumption that adults are better than young people, and entitled to act upon 
young people without their agreement.” iv[i] 

19 

 
  Having the high position of structuring a program would also give the youth a sense of 
power and respect that is accepted on a large scale. Youth will gain the knowledge of a positive 
way to get power and respect. They may also share with their peers the respectful way to gain 
the same power. Currently youth identify power and respect with being gangsters or being 
intimidating to those in their neighborhoods. They get the idea that this is the right way to gain 
the respect through the media. Many forms of media suggest aggressive and confrontational 
images when presenting urban youth, particularly young black males.   

  Media also creates a materialistic mindset with youth. YOUTHadelphia sees that popular 
media such as magazines, music and music videos, promote the images of expensive lifestyles. 
These images make youth think that expensive clothes are the only way to get power and 
respect. Youth end up doing anything to live that lifestyle. In many cases this causes youth to 
resort to selling drugs or joining gangs or stealing. In order to combat violence in the city 
YOUTHadelphia is interested in funding programs that inform youth of the deeper influence of 
media and teach media literacy. We would like to see youth being educated about the media so 
that they can have a voice and represent the youth in the right way.  

  YOUTHadelphia is also interested in funding programs that provide the youth with pay. 
These programs could be providing a stipend, or paying by the hour. They could even be an 
entrepreneurship program that can help them start their own business. These will all address 
the problem of youth resorting to drugs or stealing. 

   

 

 
 
 

20 

 
Appendix A 
 

YOUTHadelphia Alumni Board Members: 
These former members was a great help with the YOUTHadelphia  Youth Perspective Project 2008 
 

• Jocelynn Jordan 

• Victoria Holmes 

• Sarah Simms  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21 

 
Appendix B: 
 

YOUTHadelphia is the Fund for Children’s youth philanthropy board. We fund youth‐led programs in the city of Philadelphia. Your answers will 
be used to help distribute money to youth programs. 
Youth Perspectives Survey 2008 

Age_____  Gender______   Zip code_________  Neighborhood____________________ 

Race/Ethnicity:   

‐‐‐‐‐African American   ‐‐‐‐‐Caucasian   ‐‐‐‐Latino/Hispanic   ‐‐‐Asian    ‐‐‐‐Other ____________________ 

1. Put a check next to 3 of the 11 topics that are in bold that YOU face.  
Underneath the 3 topics that you checked, fill in the circle for the most important issue within 
that topic.  
___ 1.  ENVIRONMENT         ___2.EMPOLYMENT 
o Pollution/ Environmental awareness      o Job availability for teens 
       
o Clean neighborhoods       o Entrepreneurship opportunity 
   
___3.HEALTH                       ___4.ECONOMY/POVERTY 
o Substance Abuse               o Financial literacy 
o Mental Illnesses (Depression)        o Health Care 
o HIV/AIDS              o Prices Rising (INFLATION) 
 
___5.SEXUALITY                      ___6.DISCRIMIANTION 
o Sexual Orientation              o Gender 
o STDs  o Age 
o Race/Ethnicity 
o Teen Pregnancy                
o Sexual orientation 
o Healthy Relationships            
 
___7.EDUCATION                        ___8.VIOLENCE 
o Bullying 
o Access college readiness programs                           
o Gang 
o Availability of art programs (dance, drama, painting)  o Police Harassment 
o Access to after school activities (driving, home ec.)  o  Gun Violence 
            
             
___9. POLITICS                         ___10.IMMIGRATION 
o Voting/Elections                    o Access to Citizenship 
o Political Awareness/Engagement           o Language Barriers 
o Social Barriers 
o Knowledge of International Affairs              
 
___11.FAMILY 
22 

 
o Parental involvement/support 
o Verbal/Physical Abuse in the home 
o Nontraditional Family 
 
2. What are some of the things YOU participate in on a daily basis? Check all that apply. 
___Work       ___Participate in sports   ___Volunteer Work     

___Church Activities    ___Family Activities    ___ Other__________________ 

___Study/Homework/Read   ___Participate in clubs/organizations  ___None 

3. What limits YOU from participating in clubs or extracurricular activities? Check all that apply. 
___Work obligations           ___Lack of transportation 
___There are no activities in my community    ___Family obligation/issues 
___Too busy/not enough time        ___Do not know how to get involved 
___There are no activities in my school that interest me    
___I don’t know anything/not advertised enough  ___Other________________________ 
___Cost            ___Nothing limits me 
 
4. How do YOU find out what is going on in your community? Check all that apply. 
___School Flyers  ___Friends    ___Community 
___Word of Mouth  ___Newspaper    ___Parents  
___Radio    ___Web/E‐mail   ___TV 
___Other_________________________ 
 
5. Check 2 activities that YOU are interested in participating in: 
___Sports     
___Arts (Writing, Drama, Dance, or focus Activities)   
___Programs that explore jobs & career options or jobs preparation 
___Programs that teach ways to earn and manage money 
___Outdoor experience, camp, or challenge course 
___College Prep/College Access          
___Computer Technology     
___Film making or Photography  
___Culinary Arts 
___Cosmetology 
___Other_____________________________ 
 
6. What is the top (ONE) issue facing YOUTH in the city of Philadelphia? Please explain your 
answer._____________________________________________________________________ 
____________________________________________________________________________ 
____________________________________________________________________________ 

23 

 
Appendix C 
 

YOUTHadelphia Youth Perspective Project 2008 Sites Visits: 
Organizations were chosen based on demographics or people served and zip codes 
 

• Aspira 

• Philadelphia Freedom School 

• Girls Inc. 

• SECP (Work ready)  

• Southeast Collaborative Temple Youth Voices 

• Zang Sah 

• Nascent (Work ready) 

• Cambodian Association of Greater Philadelphia 

• Indochinese American Council 

• Teens 4 Good 

• Cunningham Community Center 

• Eastern University Cross Boundaries Dual Credit Program 

24 

 
ENDNOTES: 
                                                            
 
1
 http://www.educationcenteronline.org/blog/index.php/education‐degrees/teacher‐education/pros‐
and‐cons‐of‐the‐no‐child‐left‐behind‐act/ 
2
  http://www.aypf.org/forumbriefs/2007/fb030807.htm 
3
http://www.hoover.org/research/focusonissues/focus/11282221.html 
4
 http://www.hoover.org/research/focusonissues/focus/11282221.html 
5
 http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/youth.pdf 
6
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/chdcollier/services/Teen_Pregnancy/teen_pregnancy_facts.htm 
7
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/chdcollier/services/Teen_Pregnancy/teen_pregnancy_facts.htm 
8
 http://www.choiceteens.org    
 
9
Bell, J. (n.d.) Understanding Adultism: A Key to Developing Positive Youth‐Adult Relationships. 
Olympia, WA: The Freechild Project.   

 

 

 

 
 

  

25