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ACTIVITY
REPORT
 2008
‐
2010


E UROPEAN
 U NION
OF
 J EWISH
 S TUDENTS 



 2


INTRODUCTION

The current financial climate has led every organization to reflect about its strategic plans. EUJS has been particularly affected by the crisis due to the general trend of a severe decrease in support from Jewish organizations. society in modern history.
 Over the last several years, we have sought partnerships with the established Jewish world. We continue to do so as we strongly believe that our idealism and commitment is a unique contribution to an often-conservative framework. In these critical times for the Jewish people it is pivotal for all of us to work together and we strongly urge the entire Jewish world to work hand in hand with us to ensure a positive and proactive Jewish future. Time after time we have proven that we act as leaders today and have an intrinsic and indispensable voice in framing our common agenda.

While analyzing the financial statistics for the last five years, it was remarkable to discover that 40% of the total annual budget derives directly from participation fees: in other words, Jewish students have been financing themselves in recent years.


In the past two years we have seen a significant growth in anti-Semitism, calling for urgent action regardless of our financial capabilities. Despite these challenges we have kept the highstandards of our organization by organizing more than 40 programs and events in this time period. We have strived to reflect the innovative and dynamic nature of the organization and the individuals we represent in all our programming and have remained faithful to the mission of EUJS.


The Durban Review Conference in 2009 proved that we, as young Jews, are able to take the lead and to set the agenda. Unlike the conference in Durban in 2001, we did not react defensively, but rather we focused attention on the real human rights abusers that we speak out against daily across Europe. The events in Geneva proved that a new generation of young Jews has come of age and is ready to raise its voice and fight for its rights as Europeans and as Jews. In 2001 we left Durban with heavy hearts; eight years later we left Geneva with renewed optimism for our common future.


In 2008 EUJS celebrated its 30th anniversary, marking the completion of another decade of its impact on Jewish life on the continent. This coincided with the 25th anniversary of Summer University and was celebrated at a milestone event in Istanbul, Turkey, making SU 2008 the largest Jewish event to occur in a Muslim


On a more personal note, the last two years have been astounding and unique for me in every way. I am grateful for having had the opportunity to lead

3


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I
leave
EUJS
with
joy
and
pride,
 confident
of
its
future
and
outreach

this amazing and vibrant organization. I leave EUJS with joy and pride, confident of its future and outreach and with an increased confidence in the future of the Jewish people. I wish to express my deepest gratitude to Lili Dardashti, the EUJS Executive Director, who through her vision and commitment has succeeded in preparing the organization for its future challenges. Words cannot describe our gratitude towards those who have supported EUJS and have given us so much on a professional and personal level. In particular, I want to thank each student that has participated in our activities and programs, who have not only made EUJS what it is today but have also generated strong hope for the future of Jewish activism. 



We are proud and honored to offer a glimpse into the activities of our organization and to present the biannual report of the European Union of Jewish Students. Jonas Herzberg Karpantschof, President



 4


TABLE
OF
CONTENTS


 A.
AN
INVESTMENT
IN
THE
FUTURE:
ABOUT
EUJS
 
 B.
PROGRAMS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 1.
A
Rite
of
Passage:
EUJS
Summer
University
 2.
One
Voice:
Jewish
Youth
Take
the
Floor
 3.
In
the
Name
of
History:
European
Citizenship
 4.
A
Coat
of
Many
Colours:
Inter‐religious
and
Interfaith
Dialogue
 5.
In
Memory’s
Shadow:
Genocide
Awareness
and
Education
 6.
Diplomacy
and
Pro‐Israel
Advocacy:
Balance
and
Dedication




 C.
ORGANISATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
 
 
 
 
 
 1.
EUJS
Presidium
Meeting
 2.
EUJS
Professional
Staff
Development
 3.
EUJS
Website
 4.
EUJS
Financial
Analysis
 5.
American
Friends
of
EUJS



 D.
PUBLICITY
 
 
 1.
EUJS
in
the
Media
 2.
EUJS
Online
Communication



 E.
2010
AGENDA
 
 F.
FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS
 
 
 1.
2008
 2.
2009


G.
INSTITUTIONAL
PARTNERS



 5



A.
AN
INVESTMENT
IN
THE
FUTURE:
ABOUT
EUJS

The
 European
 Union
 of
 Jewish
 Students
 (EUJS)
 is
 the
 umbrella
 organisation
 for
 thirty‐four
 national
 Jewish
 student
 unions
 in
 Europe
 and
 the
 Former
 Soviet
 Union,
 representing
 over
 200,000
 Jewish
 students.
 
 Founded
 in
 1978
 in
 Grenoble,
 France,
 and
 formerly
 known
 as
 the
 European
Section
of
the
World
Union
of
Jewish
 Students,
 the
 formation
 of
 EUJS
 solidified
 a
 strong
 and
 independent
 Jewish
 student
 leadership
 in
 Europe.
 In
 1982,
 EUJS
 opened
 its
 office
 in
 Brussels,
 Belgium,
 from
 where
 it
 continues
to
operate.

 In
 contrast
 to
 the
 view
 that
 today’s
 students
 are
tomorrow’s
leaders,
EUJS
operates
on
the
 basis
 that
 the
 students
 which
 it
 serves
 and
 represents
 have
 a
 duty
 to
 act
 as
 leaders
 today,
 paving
 the
 way
 for
 a
 future
 infused
 with
 a
 strong
 Jewish
 identity
 and
 in
 turn,
 a
 commitment
 to
 the
 humanistic
 ideals
 embraced
by
Judaism.




As
 stipulated
 in
 its
 founding
 charter,
 the
 European
 Union
 of
 Jewish
 Students
 was
 created
to
foster
the
unity
of
Jewish
Students
 at
 a
 European
 level
 and
 to
 ensure
 their
 Cognizant
of
the
religious,
linguistic
and
cultural
 participation
 in
 the
 fulfillment
 of
 the
 diversity
 that
 make
 up
 the
 European
 Jewish
 aspirations
of
the
Jewish
people,
its
continuity
 community,
EUJS
strives
to
present
a
variety
of
 and
the
development
of
its
cultural,
religious,
 perspectives
 through
 its
 leadership
 training
 social
and
spiritual
heritage.

 programs,
 educational
 seminars,
 and
 To
that
end
it
seeks:
 international
 conferences,
 all
 tailor‐made
 to
 • to
unite
the
national
Unions
of
Jewish
 the
needs
of
its
students.

EUJS
has
placed
itself
 students
 and
 young
 adults
 between
 at
 the
 cutting
 edge
 of
 inter‐cultural
 and
 inter‐ the
 age
 of
 18
 and
 35
 of
 all
 European
 religious
programming
in
the
European
context.


 countries;



 6



 •

to
 facilitate
 the
 exchange
 of
 ideas
 and
 information
 between
 their
 member
 and
 when
 appropriate
 to
 co‐ordinate
 their
 activities;
 
 to
 represent
 the
 Unions
 within
 the
 World
 Union
 of
 Jewish
 Students
 (WUJS)
 and
 to
 co‐ordinate
its
activities
with
other
regions
 within
WUJS
;
 to
 represent
 and
 to
 act
 on
 behalf
 of
 its
 Member
 Organisations
 before
 international
 bodies
 with
 respect
 to
 matters
 which
 concern
 Jewish
 students
 as
 a
whole;
 
 to
 assist
 Member
 Organisations
 and
 to
 encourage
the
formation
of
Jewish
student
 organisations
wherever
there
are
students;
 to
strengthen
the
ties
of
Jewish
students
at
 a
European
level
with
Israel
and
to
support
 activities
 at
 strengthening
 the
 state
 of
 Israel
and
the
idea
of
Zionism;
 



 •

to
 strengthen
 the
 ties
 of
 solidarity
 among
 Jewish
 students
 everywhere,
 by
 encouraging
and
assisting
in
the
creative
 development
 of
 young
 Jews
 in
 all
 spheres
of
Jewish
life;
 to
 encourage
 Jewish
 learning
 and
 to
 promote
 the
 study
 of
 Jewish
 culture
 generally
including
the
knowledge
of
the
 Hebrew
language;
 to
 make
 Jewish
 students
 aware
 of
 the
 problem
 of
 Jewish
 survival
 in
 the
 Diaspora,
 and
 to
 secure
 the
 rights,
 status
 and
 interest
 of
 Jews
 and
 Jewish
 communities,
 and
 to
 defend
 them
 wherever
they
are;

 to
 fight
 anti‐Semitism,
 racism,
 xenophobia,
 anti‐Zionism
 and
 other
 forms
of
discrimination;
 to
 do
 all
 the
 things
 that
 the
 Union
 may
 feel
 incidental
 or
 conductive
 to
 the
 attainment
of
the
above
aims.



 •

• 
 •

EUJS
is
a
constituent
member
of
the
European
Youth
 Forum,
 the
 leading
 platform
 for
 more
 than
 90
 national
youth
councils
and
international
NGOs,
and
 is
 the
 only
 Jewish
 organization
 represented
 at
 that
 level.
 It
 is
 supported
 by
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe,
 the
 European
 Commission,
 all
 recognized
 Jewish
 organizations,
 and
 is
 a
 member
 of
 the
 World
 Union
 of
Jewish
Students
(WUJS).
EUJS
is
one
of
the
largest
 international
 student
 organizations
 worldwide
 and


the
 first
 Jewish
 Youth
 NGO
 to
 obtain
 the
 special
 Consultative
 Status
 to
 the
 ECOSOC
 of
 the
United
Nations.


Its
annual
programming
 includes
 the
 Summer
 University,
 international,
 inter‐religious,
 inter‐ generational
 seminars,
 study
 sessions
 at
 the
 European
 Youth
 Centre,
 and
 cutting
 edge
 work
 that
 puts
 it
 at
 the
 forefront
 of
 the
 European
context.
 
 



 7



CHAIRPERSON

Jonas
Karpantschof
 (Denmark)
 


Presidium
Members

Aleksander
 Belevski
 (Serbia),
 Vice
Chair
 Gal
 Leiferman
 Bensadon
 (Spain),
Vice
Chair
 Benjamin
 Zagzag
 (France),
 Vice
Chair
 Andrei
 Schwartz
 (Romania),
 Treasurer
 Chaggai
Kon
(Netherlands)
 Gad
Lazarov
(Italy)
 Victor
Pliner
(Russia)
 Aron
Waltuch
(Switzerland)
 


Executive
Director

Lili
Dardashti
(Switzerland)
 



 8


+

B.
PROGRAM

1)
A
RITE
OF
PASSAGE:
EUJS
SUMMER
UNIVERSITY



Every
 year,
 the
 European
 Union
 of
 Jewish
 Students
 and
 it
 is
 an
 exceptional
 annual
 opportunity
 for
 holds
Summer
University,
the
largest
annual
gathering
 European
 Jewish
 youth
 to
 interact
 on
 Jewish
 of
 European
 Jewish
 students,
 and
 the
 single
 largest
 issues.


 European
Jewish
event
to
occur
on
an
annual
basis.


 Thematically,
 Summer
 U
 seeks
 to
 address
 all
 The
 highlight
 of
 EUJS’s
 Jewish
 student‐focused
 issues
of
concern
to
its
participants,
ranging
from
 programming
 since
 1983,
 Summer
 University
 has
 Jewish
 culture,
 entertainment,
 and
 education,
 developed
 into
 an
 institution
 and
 a
 symbol
 of
 Jewish
 Jewish
 identity
 and
 tradition
 to
 anti‐Semitism,
 life,
 Jewish
 youth,
 and
 vibrant
 Jewish
 continuity
 for
 Israel
 and
 Zionism,
 Shoah
 and
 genocide
 hundreds
 of
 thousands
 of
 young
 people
 on
 the
 education,
 interfaith
 dialogue,
 politics,
 history,
 continent.
 This
 one‐of‐a‐kind
 event
 provides
 the
 and
 leadership.
 Conceptually,
 Summer
 U
 unique
 opportunity
 for
 approximately
 500
 young
 celebrates
 Jewish
 life
 and
 strong
 Jewish
 identity
 European
 Jews
 to
 interact,
 while
 participating
 in
 a
 and
 enables
 its
 participants
 to
 return
 home
 weeklong
 educational
 program
 that
 allows
 the
 empowered,
 inspired,
 and
 enlightened
 by
 the
 students
to
raise
and
voice
their
concerns
to
a
roster
of
 power
 of
 Jewish
 youth
 and
 our
 joint
 internationally‐renowned
 speakers,
 ranging
 from
 responsibility
of
Jewish
continuity.

 political
 representatives
 and
 leaders
 of
 NGOs
 to
 Summer
University
is
so
much
more
than
just
an
 academics,
religious,
and
cultural
figures.

 annual
EUJS
event
–
it
is
the
future
of
Jewish
life
 Summer
 University
 is
 the
 launching
 ground
 for
 future
 on
 the
 continent.
 It
 is
 the
 hope
 for
 Jewish
 generations
 of
 student
 and
 professional
 leadership;
 it
 continuity
 and
 a
 home
 for
 the
 revival
 of
 Jewish
 is
 the
 pathway
 on
 which
 student
 involvement
 in
 EUJS
 identity,
 and
 it
 is
 the
 only
 platform
 on
 which
 and
 its
 member
 unions
 often
 begins.
 Above
 all,
 Judaism
 and
 youth
 are
 joined
 together
 in
 an
 Summer
University
embodies
an
incredible
networking
 innovative,
modern,
and
inspiring
way.
 experience
for
participants,
speakers,
and
intellectuals,
 
 9


1.2. Summer
University
2008:

 

 
 
 
 Celebrating
the
Future,
Istanbul,
August
2008.

Summer
 University
 2008
 marked
 three
 important
 milestones
 for
 EUJS,
 as
 the
 400
 participants
 celebrated
 the
 30th
 anniversary
 of
 EUJS
 as
 well
 as
 the
 25th
 anniversary
of
Summer
University.
Furthermore,
Summer
 U
 2008
 was
 unique
 in
 the
 fact
 that
 such
 a
 large,
 successful
 international
 Jewish
 event
 took
 place
 in
 a
 modern
Muslim
society.


 The
 historical
 event
 hosted
 in
 Istanbul,
 Turkey
 was
 planned
in
partnership
with
the
Turkish
Union
of
Jewish
 Students.

 Summer
 University
 2008
 brought
 together
 500
 participants
 from
 over
 40
 countries
 and
 included
 an
 amazing
 roster
 of
 speakers
 representing
 academia,
 politics,
 education,
 and
 entertainment.
 EUJS
 was
 proud
 to
 host
 Mr.
 Bashy
 Quraishy,
 former
 President
 of
 the
 European
 Network
 Against
 Racism,
 Mr.
 Hillel
 Neuer,
 Executive
Director
of
UN
Watch,
Professor
Soli
Ozel,
and
 Mr.
 Hagai
 Segal,
 along
 with
 twenty
 other
 speakers.
 The
 most
prominent
leaders
of
the
Jewish
world,
such
as
Mr.
 David
 Harris,
 Executive
 Director
 of
 the
 American
 Jewish
 Committee,
 and
 Mr.
 Dan
 Mariaschin,
 Executive
 Vice‐ President
 of
 B’nai
 Brith
 International,
 were
 present
 to
 address
the
participants
as
well.

 Given
 the
 historic
 location
 of
 Summer
 University,
 an
 entire
 day
 was
 devoted
 to
 promoting,
 discussing,
 and
 reflecting
on
various
aspects
of
intercultural
dialogue.

 Entitled
 “Celebrating
 the
 Future,”
 Summer
 University
 2008
 celebrated
 the
 future
 of
 the
 State
 of
 Israel,
 the
 future
 of
 student
 activism,
 and
 the
 future
 of
 EUJS’s
 commitment
 to
 reaching
 out
 to
 and
 to
 embracing
 European
diversity.




 10


1.3. Summer
University
2009:

 

 
 
 




Discover
New
Horizons,
Switzerland,
August
2009

In
conjunction
with
the
Swiss
Union
 of
 Jewish
 Students,
 EUJS
 will
 hold
 Summer
 University
 2009
 in
 Switzerland.
 This
 year,
 Summer
 University
 will
 host
 over
 450
 students
 and
 young
 adults
 from
 Europe,
 Israel
 and
 the
 world
 at
 this
 incredible
 and
 unforgettable
 weeklong
event.


 Summer
 University
 2009
 will
 offer
 concurrent
 all‐day
 workshops
 and
 activities
 to
 its
 450
 participants.
 Given
 the
 size
 and
 the
 duration
 of
 the
 event,
 Summer
 U
 is
 the
 perfect
 platform
on
which
EUJS
can
present
 and
 broadcast
 the
 core
 activities
 it
 conducts
throughout
the
year.

 Summer
 U
 participants
 will
 have
 an
 incredible
 opportunity
 to
 meet
 an
 amazing
 line‐up
 of
 speakers
 representing
 various
 fields
 ranging
 from
 human
 rights
 activists
 and
 religious
 figures,
 to
 journalists,
 politicians
and
cultural
personalities.
 EUJS
is
proud
to
host
Yossi
Melman,
 leading
 Israeli
 journalist,
 Farshad
 Kholgi,
actor
and
opinion‐maker
and
 many
 other
 fascinating
 and
 diverse
 speakers,
who
will
once
again
make
 Summer
U
meaningful
and
unique.

 In
 keeping
 with
 this
 year’s
 theme,
 “Discover
 New
 Horizons,”
 Summer
 University
 2009
 will
 engage
 participants
in
a
variety
of
new,
distinctive
lectures
and
workshops
and
will
encourage
them
to
question,
 challenge,
and
discuss
their
own
beliefs
and
everything
they
experience.
Summer
U
will
thereby
allow
 the
 participants
 to
 discuss
 and
 to
 exchange
 ideas
 for
 future
 initiatives
 in
 the
 local
 unions
 and
 will
 encourage
the
cultivation
of
a
common
interest
by
building
joint
international
cooperation.
 
 



 11


2)
ONE
VOICE:
JEWISH
YOUTH
TAKE
THE
FLOOR


 One
 of
 the
 most
 important
 pillars
 of
 EUJS
 activity
 is
 our
 continuous
 attempt
 to
 bridge
 the
 gap
 between
 young
 leaders
 and
 the
 established
 leadership
 of
 the
 Jewish
 communities
 in
 Europe.
EUJS
recognises
the
importance
of
investing
in
youth
in
order
to
secure
the
future.
 As
we
strive
to
empower
our
constituents
as
leaders,
we
insist
on
providing
them
with
an
 opportunity
to
take
the
floor,
to
become
active,
and
to
speak
up.




2.1
 The
American
Jewish
Committee
Annual
Meeting,
Washington
D.C.



 Since
2005,

the
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
has
sent
a
large
group
of
student
activists,
including
 its
entire
leadership,
to
Washington
D.C.
for
the
annual
conference
of
the
American
Jewish
Committee.
 The
AJC
Annual
Meeting
gives
the
EUJS
delegates
the
unique
opportunity
to
meet
with
Jewish
leaders
 and
 peers
 from
 the
 United
 States,
 Israel,
 and
 the
 Jewish
 world
 in
 its
 entirety.
 This
 experience
 has
 become
 a
 hallmark
 of
 EUJS’s
 annual
 activities,
 as
 it
 offers
 European
 Jewish
 students
 the
 chance
 to
 develop
leadership
and
networking
experience
in
the
company
of
some
of
the
world’s
foremost
leaders.

 
 MAY
2008
 In
2008
AJC
invited
EUJS
to
bring
a
delegation
of
fourteen
students
and
youth
leaders
for
 its
 102nd
 Annual
 Meeting.
 Thanks
 to
 the
 generosity
 of
 AJC,
 our
 students
 had
 the
 opportunity
 to
 meet
 political
 and
 cultural
 leaders
 from
 around
 the
 world.
 The
 EUJS
 delegates
also
had
the
chance
to
interact
with
their
American
peers.
EUJS
was
honoured
 to
 have
 both
 its
 current
 Chairperson,
 Jonas
 Karpantschof,
 and
 its
 former
 Chair,
 Olga
 Israel,
 featured
 in
 various
 panel
 discussions
 on
 Israel‐Diaspora
 relations
 and
 Creating
 a
 Just
America:
UN
Foreign
Policy
at
a
Crossroad
respectively.
 
 
 12


MAY
2009


Following
what
has
already
become
a
great
tradition,
in
2009
EUJS
brought
a
delegation
 of
ten
student
and
youth
leaders
to
the
103rd
Annual
Meeting.
This
year,
our
delegates
 had
 the
 additional,
 meaningful
 experience
 of
 spending
 the
 day
 prior
 to
 the
 Annual
 Meeting
 visiting
 the
 offices
 of
 local
 political
 and
 cultural
 officials
 and
 meeting
 their
 representatives.























































2.2


EUJS‐AJC
Fellowship
Program
2009


Based
 on
 the
 mutual
 desire
 to
 empower
 young
 people
 in
 Europe
 and
 the
 success
 of
 an
 initial
 pilot
 program
 in
 2007,
 this
 year,
 for
 the
 second
 time,
 AJC
 and
 EUJS
 offered
 a
 European
 student
 the
 opportunity
 to
 be
 involved
 in
 the
 work
 of
 one
 of
 the
 most
 successful
 and
 influential
 Jewish
 organizations
 today.
 An
 EUJS
 fellow
 was
 placed
 at
 the
 AJC
 office
 in
 New
 York
 for
 a
 period
 of
 three
 months
during
the
spring
of
2009.

 


2.3
 What
to
do
about
Durban
II?

 

 
 
 
 May
2009
‐‐
Geneva,

Due
to
EUJS’s
commitment
to
work
related
to
the
United
Nations
Human
Rights
 Council
in
Geneva,
EUJS
was
invited
to
the
conference
What
to
do
About
Durban
 II?
organised
by
UN
Watch.
The
conference
brought
together
representatives
of
 numerous
organisations
and
delegations
with
the
aim
of
discussing
the
agenda
 and
the
preparations
for
the
Durban
Review
Conference.
During
the
conference,
 EUJS’s
publication
Durban
Diaries
was
launched.




2.4


European
Jewish
Congress
Extraordinary
General
Assemblies
 






February
–
Paris,
France
&
December
2008
–
Brussels,
Belgium


As
 future
 leaders
 of
 our
 individual
 Jewish
 communities
 in
 Europe,
 EUJS
 assigns
 great
 value
 to
 its
 cooperation
with
local
Jewish
communities.
EUJS
stands
firm
in
its
attempt
to
narrow
the
generational
 and
other
gaps
between
current
and
young
leadership,
and
it
continuously
invests
in
joint
ventures
and
 collaboration
between
the
two
in
each
of
its
programs.

 As
a
pan‐European
Jewish
organisation,
EUJS
is
naturally
partnered
with
the
European
Jewish
Congress,
 the
 sole
 representative
 body
 of
 democratically‐elected
 European
 Jewish
 Communities
 throughout
 Europe.
 
 EUJS
 cooperates
 with
 the
 EJC
 and
 takes
 part
 in
 its
 activities
 as
 the
 only
 organisation
 that
 represents
 a
 united
 Jewish
 youth
 voice
 at
 the
 European
 level.
 In
 February
 and
 December
 2008,
 EUJS
 
 brought
delegations
to
the
two
extraordinary
General
Assemblies
in
Paris
and
Brussels
respectively.

 13


2.5


Auschwitz
Day
 
January
2008
‐
Brussels,
Belgium



As
part
of
its
cooperation
with
the
European
Jewish
Congress,
EUJS
was
invited
to
bring
a
delegation
to
 the
 Auschwitz
 Holocaust
 Remembrance
 Day
 ceremony
 in
 the
 European
 Parliament
 in
 January
 2008.

 The
ceremony
marked
the
63rd
anniversary
of
the
liberation
of
Auschwitz
and
gathered
representatives
 from
most
European
Jewish
communities.

 


2.6


Building
Together
the
Future
of
Europe
 March
2009
‐
Brussels,
Belgium


Following
 the
 increase
 in
 anti‐Semitic
 attacks
 on
 European
 Jewry
 in
 the
 spring
 of
 2009,
 the
 European
 Jewish
 Congress
 organised
 a
 one‐day
 symposium
 at
 the
 European
 Parliament
 in
 order
 to
 analyse,
 discuss,
and
promote
the
fight
against
anti‐Semitism
in
Europe.
EUJS
brought
a
ten‐person
delegation
to
 the
symposium
so
that
the
students
could
voice
their
experiences
in
Europe.

 


2.7


World
Jewish
Congress,
13th
Plenary
Assembly
 January
2009
‐
Jerusalem,
Israel


EUJS
has
in
recent
year
been
working
directly
with
the
World
Jewish
Congress
as
its
activities
continue
 to
 gain
 a
 more
 global
 character.
 EUJS
 has
 ensured
 that
 its
 leadership
 is
 present
 at
 WJC
 General
 Assemblies
and
is
in
contact
with
WJC
on
regular
basis
so
that
the
voices
of
young
people
are
heard
and
 taken
into
account.

 


2.8


Facing
Tomorrow
–
Presidential
Conference
 May
2008
‐
Jerusalem,
Israel


On
the
occasion
of
the
60th
anniversary
of
the
State
of
Israel,
President
Shimon
Peres
organised
the
first
 ever
Presidential
Conference,
Facing
Tomorrow.
The
aim
of
the
conference
was
to
discuss
the
future
of
 the
global,
Jewish,
and
Israeli
challenges
of
tomorrow.
EUJS
brought
a
delegation
to
this
event
that
had
 the
opportunity
to
meet
prominent
world
leaders
such
as
George
W.
Bush,
Tony
Blair,
Elie
Wiesel
and
 hundreds
of
other
political
and
cultural
figures.

 


2.9


London
Conference
on
Combating
Anti‐Semitism

 February
2009
–
London,
United
Kingdom


In
February
2009,
EUJS
leadership
was
invited
to
the
groundbreaking
London
Conference
on
Combating
 Anti‐Semitism
organised
by
the
Inter‐Parliamentary
Coalition
for
Combating
Anti‐Semitism
in
the
United
 Kingdom.
The
event
offered
a
unique
opportunity
for
EUJS
to
discuss
action
needed
on
a
pan‐European
 level
 and
 to
 exchange
 knowledge
 and
 experience
 with
 regards
 to
 the
 battle
 against
 discrimination,
 particularly
anti‐Semitism.




 
 
 14


2.10
 A
European
Voice
at
the
World
Union
of
Jewish
Students
 
2008
and
2009
–
Jerusalem
and
Tel
Aviv,
Israel

In
 the
 past
 two
 years,
 EUJS
 leaders
 have
 attended
 and
 helped
 to
 lead
 two
 WUJS
 Congresses
 held
 in
 Jerusalem
and
Tel
Aviv.
EUJS
Chairperson
Jonas
Karpantschof
served
on
the
Steering
Committee
during
 the
WUJS
General
Assembly
in
December
2008
when
its
new
President
was
elected.
During
each
WUJS
 Congress,
EUJS
organised
a
meeting
of
European
Jewish
leaders
to
discuss
the
most
pressing
issues
in
 order
to
encourage
EUJS
member
unions
to
be
more
active
on
a
global
level.
Throughout
the
past
two
 years,
EUJS
has
also
sent
its
leaders
to
the
meetings
of
the
WUJS
Executive
Board.




 2.11
 ROI
Summit
 July
2009
‐
Tel
Aviv,
Israel


In
July
2009,
EUJS
was
invited
to
participate
in
the
third
Annual
ROI
Summit,
which
gathers
young
adults
 and
professionals
in
an
effort
to
inspire
Jewish
entrepreneurship.
EUJS
values
its
partnership
with
ROI
 given
 that
 many
 EUJS
 leaders
 can
 benefit
 from
 ROI’s
 support
 and
 networking
 resources
 for
 young
 Jewish
professionals.

 


2.12
 European
Encounters
 March
2009

‐‐
Cracow,
Poland

Given
 EUJS’s
 commitment
 to
 strengthening
 its
 member
 unions,
 in
 the
 spring
 of
 2009
 EUJS
 launched
 European
 Encounters
 2009,
 an
 initiative
 focused
 on
 building
 leadership
 by
 fostering
 dialogue
 between
 the
 leaders
 of
 the
student
unions
and
their
established
communities,
as
 well
as
between
the
various
member
unions
represented
 within
EUJS.
This
seminar,
organised
in
partnership
with
 CEJI,
 A
 Jewish
 Contribution
 to
 an
 Inclusive
 Europe,
 was
 also
 dedicated
 to
 strengthening
 the
 commitment,
 involvement,
and
presence
of
a
diverse
European
Jewish
 society
in
Central
and
Eastern
Europe.

 Today,
we
see
that
the
international
outlook
of
the
Jewish
communities
across
the
European
continent
 lags
 because
 of
 the
 focus
 on
 pressing
 internal
 local
 and
 national
 needs.
As
a
result,
communities
do
not
take
advantage
of
valuable
 opportunities
for
collaboration
on
the
European
level.

 By
 reinforcing
 contact
 within
 and
 between
 communities
 and
 encouraging
 participants’
 involvement
 in
 the
 European
 Union,
 the
 seminar
 enhanced
 the
 participants’
 understanding
 of
 their
 home
 communities
 and
 motivated
 them
 to
work
towards
a
united,
inclusive
 European
society
with
a
strong
and
active
Jewish
population.
European
 Encounters
 developed
 its
 participants’
 understanding
 of
 political
 realities
 and
 institutional
 opportunities
 in
 the
 European
 Union
 and
 supported
 their
 efforts
 in
 organising
 international
 collaborative
 activities. 
 15


3)
IN
THE
NAME
OF
HISTORY:
EUROPEAN
CITIZENSHIP


 EUJS
works
enthusiastically
towards
promoting
civil
responsibility
and
active
citizenship,
thereby
 ensuring
that
European
Jewish
students
and
young
adults
remain
involved
in
their
societies
and
 in
the
European
youth
sector
and
remain
committed
to
Judaism
and
to
the
state
of
Israel.

EUJS
 is
conscious
of
its
responsibilities
as
one
of
the
largest
Jewish
student
organisations
in
the
world,
 representing
 the
 approximately
 200,000
 students
 of
 the
 thirty‐four
 national
 Jewish
 student
 unions
 in
 Europe
 and
 the
 former
 Soviet
 Union.
 
 With
 its
 offices
 in
 Brussels,
 the
 home
 of
 European
policy
and
law‐making,
EUJS
seeks
to
influence
a
new
generation
of
young
people
who
 are
 proud
 of
 being
 European
 and
ready
to
be
actively
involved
in
 their
respective
societies
on
 both
Jewish
and
non‐Jewish
issues.

 


3.1


EUJS
at
the
European
Youth
Forum


EUJS
 is
 a
 member
 of
 the
 European
 Youth
 Forum
 (EYF),
 the
 largest
 political
 youth
 platform
 on
 the
 continent
 made
 up
 of
 ninety‐nine
 national
 youth
 councils
 and
 international
 non‐governmental
 youth
 organisations,
which
are
themselves
federations
of
youth
organisations.
EYF
is
institutionally‐affiliated
 with
both
the
Council
of
Europe
and
the
European
Commission.
Organised
in
order
to
represent
their
 common
interests,
EYF
brings
together
tens
of
millions
of
young
people
from
all
over
Europe,
many
of
 whom
go
on
to
become
European
political
leaders.
As
the
only
Jewish
organisation
present
at
this
level,
 EUJS
has
a
special
responsibility
to
convey
a
balanced
but
strong
message.

 Every
six
months
all
the
members
of
the
European
Youth
Forum
meet
for
several
days
to
discuss
the
 most
important
issues
and
to
vote
on
and
adopt
policies
that
the
EYF
will
carry
out
in
the
months
to
 come.
 The
 decisions
 voted
 on
 vary
 from
 budgetary
 matters
 to
 pan‐European
 policies
 and
 campaigns
 that
will
be
carried
out
on
behalf
of
all
member
organisations.
EUJS’s
presence
and
active
role
at
these
 meetings
is
crucial,
as
the
interests
of
the
Jewish
youth
in
Europe
would
remain
absent
from
the
agenda
 otherwise.




 3.2


EUJS
Inside
the
Council
of
Europe


In
2006
former
EUJS
Chairperson,
Lionel
Schreiber,
was
elected
member
of
the
Advisory
Council
2006‐ 2008
at
the
Directorate
of
Youth
and
Sports
at
the
Council
of
Europe.
He
was
also
elected
Chairperson
 of
 the
 Programming
 Committee
 of
 the
 European
 Youth
 Foundation.
 This
 put
 EUJS
 at
 the
 forefront
 of
 setting
the
agenda
as
well
as
the
priorities
on
youth
policy
across
the
continent.
Lionel’s
position
was
 prolonged
until
mid‐2009.




 3.3


Council
of
Europe
–
Participatory
Status
for
International
NGOs
 with
the
Council
of
Europe.


16


In
 2008
 EUJS
 acquired
 participatory
 status
 as
 an
 international
 NGO
 at
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe.
 In
 accordance
 with
 resolution
 8
 (2003),
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe
 grants
 this
 status
 to
 NGOs
 that
 are
 
 particularly
 representative
 in
 fields
 of
 action
 shared
 by
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe,
 that
 is,
 those
 that
 are
 active
on
European
level
and
work
towards
European
unity.



3.4


Council
of
Europe’s
“Speak
out
Against
Discrimination”
Campaign.


“Speak
out
Against
Discrimination”
is
the
Council
of
Europe’s
anti‐discrimination
campaign
on
various
 aspects
 of
 discrimination
 arising
 out
 of
 racist
 attitudes
 and
 prejudice
 with
 a
 special
 emphasis
 on
 Islamophobia,
anti‐Semitism
and
anti‐gypsy
sentiment.
As
this
campaign
is
a
follow‐up
to
the
Council
of
 Europe’s
2006‐2008
campaign,
All
Different,
All
Equal,
it
is
natural
for
EUJS
to
continue
its
collaborative
 efforts
 on
 this
 project
 given
 that
 diversity
 education,
 human
 rights,
 and
 civic
 involvement
 figure
 prominently
in
EUJS’s
mission.
EUJS
has
organised
a
series
of
activities,
conferences,
and
events
as
part
 of
the
new
campaign.


 


COALITION
EUROPE


3.5
EUJS
as
Member
of
European
Networks
 

EUJS
was
one
of
the
first
organisations
to
join
Coalition
Europe.
This
coalition
serves
as
a
new
 platform
for
pan‐European
human
rights
NGOs
to
work
together
on
human
rights
issues,
such
as
 combating
racism
and
discrimination
and
granting
rights
for
migrant
workers,
women,
the
LGTB
 population,
and
Roma,
among
others.
Coalition
Europe
recognises
the
need
for
a
cohesive
NGO
 community
 throughout
 Europe,
 one
 that
 will
 develop
 common
 campaigns
 and
 that
 will
 broadcast
the
unheard
voices
of
those
who
suffer
from
discrimination,
exclusion,
and
racism.




 UNITED
 UNITED
is
a
European
network
against
ultra‐nationalism,
racism,
and
fascism
and
in
support
of
 migrants
and
refugees.
It
is
based
on
the
cooperation
of
more
than
560
organisations
from
49
 European
 countries
 working
 together
 in
 the
 biggest
 anti‐racism
 network.
 EUJS
 has
 been
 a
 member
 of
 the
 UNITED
 network
 for
 many
 years
 and
 proactively
 supports
 and
 promotes
 the
 work
of
this
important
initiative.
Some
of
the
actions
taken
by
UNITED
have
been:
“Action
Week
 Against
 Racism,”
 “International
 Refugee
 Day,”
 “International
 Day
 Against
 Fascism
 and
 Anti‐ Semitism,”
 “One
 Race
 ‐
 Human
 Race!,”
 “Open
 Borders
 ‐
 Open
 Minds!,”
 and
 “Protection
 and
 Equal
Rights
for
Roma!”
 


4)

A
COAT
OF
MANY
COLOURS:

 INTERFAITH,
INTER‐RELIGIOUS
AND
INTERCULTURAL
DIALOGUE


 We
live
in
a
Europe
that
has
multiple
faces
and
identities,
and
it
is
our
task
to
learn
how
to
best
 reconcile
our
differences
while
celebrating
the
heritage
and
rich
culture
each
of
these
identities
 brings.
The
richness
and
diversity
of
our
faiths
should
serve
as
a
starting
point
for
a
joint
journey
 towards
a
better
future
rather
than
as
a
cause
for
division
and
separation.

There
are
many
ways
 of
 undertaking
 inter‐religious
 dialogue,
 each
 of
 which
 begins
 with
 introspection
 and
 understanding
one’s
roots
and
background
before
engaging
with
others.

 In
a
continent
of
over
fifty
countries,
each
young
person
lives
a
very
different
reality.
We
are
a
 generation
 of
 highly‐individualised
 European
 students—a
 generation
 that
 is
 marked
 by
 the
 choices
 we
 make,
 the
 obstacles
 we
 choose
 to
 overcome,
 and
 the
 taboos
 we
 vow
 to
 break.
 Cognisant
of
the
reach
and
the
impact
its
activities
have,
EUJS
is
committed
to
contributing
to
a
 more
united
yet
diversified
Europe
with
equal
rights
for
all,
regardless
of
faith
or
ethnicity.

 17


4.1
EUJS
as
a
founding
member
of
the
Faith‐Based
Expert
Group
(FBEG)

In
 2003
 a
 group
 of
 faith‐based
 international
 non‐governmental
 youth
 organisations
 began
 to
 meet
 regularly
at
the
European
Youth
Forum
secretariat
in
Brussels
in
order
to
exchange
ideas
on
how
their
 organisations
 could
 improve
 communication
 and
 promote
 cooperation
 in
 the
 field
 of
 inter‐religious
 dialogue.
This
informal
group
was
accepted
as
an
official
group
called
the
“Faith‐Based
Expert
Group,”
 supported
by
the
European
Youth
Forum
during
its
General
Assembly
in
Madrid,
11‐13
November
2004.
 According
to
its
charter,
the
aim
of
this
group
was
“to
develop
an
understanding
of
the
role
of
religion
 and
 inter‐religious
 dialogue,
 to
 contribute
 to
 the
 current
 and
 future
 activities
 of
 international
 institutions
 and
 to
 develop
 actions
 related
 to
 this
 topic.”
 EUJS
 advocated
 for
 the
 FBEG
 to
 become
 an
 official
working
body
of
the
European
Youth
Forum
so
as
to
give
it
a
true
pan‐European
character
and
 respective
mandate.
This
suggestion
was
accepted
in
December
2006
 Despite
 current
 political
 sensitivity
 resulting
 from
 an
 escalation
 of
 intolerance,
 anti‐Semitism,
 Islamophobia
and
religious
attrition
in
general,
the
group’s
formation
has
engaged
in
fruitful
discussions
 in
order
to
tackle
the
critical
issues
facing
Europe
today.

Once
the
issues
were
identified—e.g.,
social
 and
 cultural
 segregation,
 conflicts
 and
 misunderstandings,
 discrimination
 and
 integration
 challenges‐‐ the
FBEG
compiled
its
goals
and
priorities
and
presented
its
findings
to
the
EYF
Summit,
which,
in
turn,


TOOL KIT ON INTER-RELIGIOUS DIALOGUE IN YOUTH WORK - 2008

LIVIN FAI HS T GETHER


 18


CHRONOLOGY 
 
 J ANUARY
 2 004 



 

EUJS
 is
 a
 founding
 member
 of
 the
 first
 inter‐religious
 sub‐group
 at
 the
 European
 Youth
 Forum,
 composed
 of
 seven
 European
 Faith‐based
 youth
 organisations
representing
all
major
monotheistic
faiths:
 1. FEMYSO
 –
 The
 Forum
 of
 European
 Muslim
 Youth
 and
 Student
 Organisation

 2. Pax
Christi
International
 3. FIMCAP
–
International
Federation
of
Catholic
Youth
Organisations
 4. EPTO
–
European
Peer
Training
Organisation
 5. EYCE
–
Ecumenical
Youth
Council
in
Europe
 6. JECI‐MIEC
–
International
Movement
of
Catholic
Students
 7. WSCF
‐
World
Student
Christian
Federation


J ANUARY
 2004 ‐ 2006 
 The
Faith‐based
group
meets
regularly
in
Brussels
to
outline
the
activities

and
methodology
of
its
holistic
approach.


 


M AY
 12 ‐ 17 
 2005 


The
Faith‐based
group
holds
its
first
European
interfaith
youth
meeting
in
 Warsaw,
 Poland,
 entitled
 Juma‐Shabbat‐Sunday
 as
 part
 of
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe
Youth
Summit
and
parallel
to
the
Head
of
State
Summit.




J ANUARY
 17 ‐ 23 
 2006 
 EUJS
 holds
 second
 interfaith
 meeting
 in
 conjunction
 with
 the
 European

Commission
entitled
Finding
One
Voice:
Faith
Based
Education
as
a
Tool
for
 Avoiding
 Misunderstandings
 and
 Overcoming
 Prejudices
 in
 Barcelona,
 Spain.

 


N OVEM BER
 2006 


The
 Faith‐Based
 Expert
 Group
 decides
 to
 join
 the
 European
 Youth
 Forum
 as
its
expert
body.
This
decision
is
adopted
at
the
European
Youth
Forum
 General
Assembly
in
Vilnius,
Lithuania.

 EUJS
holds
third
inter‐religious
meeting
in
conjunction
with
the
Council
of
 Europe
 entitled
 Sharing
 our
 Faith
 –
 Sharing
 our
 Pride:
 an
 inter‐religious
 perspective
 on
 religious
 identity
 for
 young
 people
 in
 the
 new
 Europe
 in
 Brussels,
Belgium.



Dec . 
4
 – 
9
2006 


Jan.
07 ‐ Dec.
2008 


Publication
 of
 Living
 Faiths
 Together 
 – 
 Toolkit
 on
 Inter ‐ religious 
 Dialogue 
(see
below)
 . 



 19


4.2
Living
Faiths
Together
–
Toolkit
on
Inter‐religious
Dialogue.


Following
its
conception,
in
May
2005
the
Faith‐Based
Expert
Group
undertook
an
effort
to
develop
an
 educational
toolkit
on
inter‐religious
dialogue
for
trainers
and
youth
organisations
across
Europe.
The
 aim
 of
 this
 toolkit
 is
 to
 encourage
 youth
 organisations
 to
 promote
 inter‐religious
 dialogue
 in
 their
 respective
societies
and
to
provide
trainers
with
the
logistical
information
needed
for
activities
of
this
 genre.
The
toolkit,
published
in
December
2008,
is
the
first
of
its
kind
and
can
be
used
as
a
reference
for
 activities
and
as
a
way
of
exploring
the
similarities
between
the
different
religions.
 


4.3
"Living
our
faith
in
a
multicultural
society
‐
Developing
Intercultural
 Dialogue
as
a
lifestyle,"





November
2008
‐‐
Derbyshire,
United
Kingdom

EUJS was invited to speak alongside Muslim and Christian colleagues at a panel dealing with the understanding of other religions and what they can offer post-modern society from both a secular and a religious perspective. The conference provided an ideal forum for discussing the relationship between faith, culture, and society and was enlivened by contributions from participants with diverse backgrounds and opinions. EUJS Presidium member Victor Pliner represented EUJS at the conference. 


4.4
“Kazan
International
Forum
on
the
Religious
Dimensions
of
 Intercultural
Dialogue,”

 
 
 December
2008
‐‐
Kazan,
Russia




 In
 December
 2008
 EUJS
 was
 invited
 by
 the
 Council
 of
 Europe
 to
 take
 part
 in
 a
 five‐day
 International
 Forum
 on
 the
 Religious
 Dimensions
 of
 Intercultural
 Dialogue
 in
 Kazan.
 The
 forum
 covered
 several
 aspects
of
inter‐religious
dialogue,
including
education,
ethics,
role
of
young
people,
discrimination
and
 freedom
of
speech,
and
proved
valuable
for
EUJS,
allowing
it
to
develop
ties
with
youth
organisations
 from
 across
 Europe.
 During
 the
 forum,
 EUJS
 was
 invited
 to
 present
 its
 work
 in
 conjunction
 with
 its
 partner
organisations
from
the
Faith‐Based
Expert
Group
and
the
results
of
its
recently‐published
toolkit
 on
inter‐religious
dialogue,
Living
Faiths
Together.



 20


5)
IN
MEMORY’S
SHADOW:
GENOCIDE
EDUCATION
AND
AWARENESS


The
phrase
“Never
Again”
embodied
the
hope
of
humankind
after
the
Holocaust.
Since
then
the
world
 has
witnessed
genocides
in
Cambodia,
Bosnia,
and
Rwanda,
and
currently
in
Darfur.
These
events
are
a
 stain
on
the
record
of
humanity,
and
EUJS
is
determined
to
make
the
world
remember,
acknowledge,
 and
internalise
these
experiences,
so
that
humanity
as
a
whole
does
not
repeat
the
same
mistakes
and
 actions.
 Young
 people
 need
 to
 be
 educated,
 both
 about
 their
 own
 history
 and
 about
 the
 history
 of
 others
in
order
to
find
common
ground
and
to
search
for
ways
to
strive
towards
a
more
peaceful
and
 tolerant
 world.
 EUJS
 is
 determined
 to
 extend
 its
 outreach
 so
 as
 to
 fulfil
 its
 commitment
 to
 raise
 awareness
and
to
educate
young
generations
about
the
universal
message
of
the
Shoah.
 With
this
in
mind,
EUJS
and
its
partners
launched
“Shared
Memories
‐
Collective
Action,”
a
long‐term
 campaign
 on
 genocide
 education,
 in
 April
 2006,
 beginning
 with
 a
 mission
 to
 Rwanda
 that
 brought
 together
Jewish
students
and
Tutsi
students,
most
of
whom
were
survivors
of
the
Tutsi
genocide.

 The
goals
of
the
campaign
are:
       
 5.1
 To
share
a
common
history
with
other
peoples
whose
identities
have
been
shaped
by
genocide
 To
learn
about
the
universal
dimension
of
the
Shoah
 To
understand
the
processes
and
the
mechanisms
that
allow
genocide
to
occur
 To
educate
young
people,
Jewish
and
non‐Jewish,
about
the
unique
place
of
the
Holocaust
in
the
 context
of
genocides
 To
 discuss
 and
 set
 an
 agenda
 on
 how
 to
 raise
 sensitivities
 and
 challenge
 ideologies
 that
 encourage
or
allow
genocide
to
take
place
 To
take
action
against
anti‐Semitism
and
other
forms
of
racism
 Shared
Memories,
Collective
Action:
Sharing
Our
Past
and
Future
 
May
2008
–
Amsterdam,
the
Netherlands
 In
May
2008,
the
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students,
in
cooperation
with
the
European
Union
of
Young
 Survivors
of
the
Tutsi
Genocide,
the
Cercle
Des
Etudiants
Rwandais
de
Belgique,
and
Peace
and
Justice
 for
Darfur,
organised
the
seminar
“Shared
Memories,
Collective
Action:
Sharing
Our
Past
and
Future”
in
 Amsterdam,
the
Netherlands.

 
 
 21


As
 an
 organisation
 catering
 to
 the
 needs
 of
 the
 young
 generation,
 we
 hold
 the
 responsibility
 of
 preserving
 the
 memory
 of
 the
 Shoah
 and
 of
 educating
 the
 newer
 generations,
 which
 have
 a
 more
 distant
 association
 with
 the
 atrocities
 of
 World
 War
 II.
 As
 the
 descendants
 of
 survivors,
 young
 Jews
 must
 re‐examine
 and
 bring
 new
 life
 to
 the
 task
 of
 sustaining
 awareness
 about
 the
 Shoah
 and
 of
 committing
to
the
“Never
Again”
campaign
of
their
predecessors.
The
Jewish
community
must
now
take
 an
active
role
in
preventing
and
dealing
with
the
consequences
of
 genocide.
 The
 main
 theme
 of
 this
 programme
 was
 to
 understand
 the
 evolution
 of
 collective
 memory
 and
 genocide
 education,
 particularly
 regarding
 the
 Shoah,
 throughout
 the
 last
 several
 decades.
The
project
investigated
how
the
Shoah
has
become
part
 of
 people’s
 identity
 and
 how
 this
 identity
 has
 changed
 in
 light
 of
 advances
 like
 the
 Eichmann
 trial,
 the
 official
 recognition
 and
 acknowledgement
 of
 Shoah,
 and
 the
 growing
 fear
 that
 the
 atrocities
 of
 Shoah
 will
 be
 forgotten
 when
 the
 last
 generation
 of
 survivors
has
passed
away.

 With
these
fears
for
the
future,
it
is
crucial
that
we
examine
the
different
phases
of
internalisation
and
 coping
mechanisms
present
in
the
aftermath
of
such
horrific
tragedy.
Concurrently,
given
our
history,
 we,
 as
 Jewish
 people,
 become
 natural
 defenders
 of
 the
 rights
 and
 freedoms
 of
 others
 both
 through
 sharing
 our
 experiences
 and
 taking
 action.
 It
 is
 for
 this
 reason
 that
 this
 programme
 brought
 together
 young
Jews,
young
Tutsi
survivors
of
the
genocide
in
Rwanda,
and
young
Darfuri
refugees
in
order
to
 share
their
thoughts
and
feelings
about
peace,
tolerance,
and
reconciliation.

 


5.2


70th
commemoration
of
the
Kristallnacht
and
the
Special
Event
 Promoting
Tolerance
at
the
European
Continent
 November
2008
–
Brussels,
Belgium
 


EUJS
brought
a
delegation
of
20
Jewish
students
and
partners
to
the
international
commemoration
of
 the
 70th
 anniversary
 of
 the
 Kristallnacht
 as
 well
 as
 the
 Special
 Event
 Promoting
 Tolerance
 at
 the
 European
Continent
held
at
the
European
Parliament
in
Brussels
in
November
2008.
The
EUJS
delegates
 came
from
Belgium,
Bulgaria,
Denmark,
France,
Italy,
Poland,
Portugal,
Romania,
Russia,
Serbia,
Spain,
 Switzerland,
 Turkey,
 and
 United
 Kingdom
 and
 were
 joined
 by
 three
 Tutsi
 survivors
 of
 the
 1994
 Tutsi
 genocide
in
Rwanda.


 With
 pride,
 our
 students
 joined
 several
 European
 politicians
 and
 cultural
 leaders
 at
 the
 European
 Parliament
to
represent
and
emphasise
the
survival
and
the
role
of
the
Jewish
people
in
Europe.
The
 meaningful
and
impressive
ceremonies
deeply
touched
and
empowered
each
of
our
students.



 22


6)
BALANCE
AND
DEDICATION:
DIPLOMACY
AND
PRO‐ISRAEL
ADVOCACY



 Across
Europe,
a
new
generation
of
young
Jewish
men
and
women
is
emerging,
a
significant
majority
of
 whom
are
indifferent
to
issues
of
Jewish
political
activism
and
the
State
of
Israel.
While
some
of
these
 youth
are
still
students,
many
of
them
are
young
professionals
in
influential
positions
with
regards
to
 European
politics
on
both
national
and
pan‐continental
levels,
thus
embodying
immense
potential
and
 opportunity
 in
 the
 political
 sphere.
 Today,
 we
 witness
 an
 increased
 need
 for
 involvement
 within
 civil
 society
and
a
greater
need
not
only
to
voice
one’s
opinion
but
also
to
act
upon
it
in
an
effort
to
change
 the
political
status
quo.

 The
political
reality
in
Europe
reflects
the
active
involvement
of
young
people.
Nonetheless,
the
input
 from
the
Jewish
population
has
been
very
modest
both
in
advocating
for
European
Jewish
interests
and
 for
those
related
to
the
State
of
Israel.
The
Jewish
communities
of
the
“old”
continent
tend
to
maintain
 a
more
conservative
and
neutral
stance,
which
often
results
in
a
failure
to
empower
their
membership
 or
to
encourage
political
activity
and
involvement.

 This
 turning
 point
 in
 the
 history
 of
 European
 Jewish
 life
 offers
 the
 chance
 for
 a
 new
 generation
 of
 leaders
 to
 raise
 political
 awareness
 across
 the
 continent,
 to
 revitalise
 their
 political
 activism,
 to
 strengthen
the
bonds
across
Europe’s
diverse
Jewish
communities,
and
to
reinforce
ties
with
Israel
and
 its
future.


 The
 success
 of
 EUJS
 diplomacy
 and
 advocacy
 can
 be
 attributed
 to
 its
 unique
 structure,
 which
 infuses
 Eurocentrism
 with
 Jewish
 values
 and
 Israel
 education
 and
 focuses
 on
 building
 a
 network
 that
 encourages
youth
involvement
in
European
political
and
public
affairs
and
development
for
the
future.




 23


6.1
EUJS
at
the
United
Nations

Having
 obtained
 the
 Special
 Consultative
 Status
 to
 the
 Economic
 and
 Social
 Council
 of
 the
 United
 Nations
in
2006,
throughout
the
last
several
years
the
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
has
expanded
 its
activities
in
this
field.
EUJS
is
the
first
and
only
Jewish
youth
voice
with
such
a
status,
which
allows
it
 to
fight
for
human
rights,
for
the
security
of
Israel,
and
against
genocide
in
the
centre
of
the
diplomatic
 sphere.

 The
relationship
of
Israel
and
the
United
Nations
has
been
one
of
ambivalence
since
Israel’s
founding
 following
a
UN
resolution
in
November
1947.

In
its
years
as
a
State,
Israel
has
been
the
focus
of
 relentless
and
biased
resolutions
repeatedly
condemning
the
State
and
her
actions.

The
treatment
of
 Israel
at
the
newly‐reformed
Human
Rights
Council
and
its
preceding
body,
the
Human
Rights
 Commission,
serve
as
proof
that
there
is
a
need
for
careful
investigation
into
the
motives
of
the
UN
and
 the
biased
actions
it
has
undertaken
as
a
result
of
the
hijacking
of
key
UN
bodies,
which
have
 compromised
its
legitimacy.


 Many
of
the
challenges
facing
the
UN
and
much
of
the
problematic
treatment
of
Israel
are
centred
at
 the
United
Nations
Human
Rights
Council.
EUJS
has
identified
the
need
to
take
a
proactive
stance
with
 regards
to
these
issues
and
to
extend
its
activities
as
a
global
voice
of
Jewish
youth.


 


6.2
EUJS
Delegation
to
the
Human
Rights
Council
 March
2008
‐‐
Geneva,
Switzerland


 In
March
2008,
EUJS
sent
a
delegation
of
students
and
young
 leaders
 to
 the
 United
 Nations
 Human
 Rights
 Council
 in
 Geneva.
 The
 delegation,
 led
 by
 EUJS
 Vice‐Chair
 Aleksandar
 Belevski,
 met
 with
 several
 heads
 of
 diplomatic
 missions,
 including
those
of
Germany,
Italy,
Egypt,
and
Turkey,
among
 others,
 in
 order
 to
 express
 its
 concern
 about
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference
 and
 about
 human
 rights
 violations
 around
 the
 world.
 The
 delegation
 also
 addressed
 the
 assembly
 in
 an
 unprecedented
 manner
 when
 delegate
 Lisa
 Levy
questioned
the
legitimacy
of
the
process
of
the
Durban
 
Review
Conference.
 


6.3
EUJS
brings
Sderot
student
to
the
Human
Rights
Council
at
the


 






United
Nations
 
 
 January
2009
‐‐
Geneva,
Switzerland
 


During
the
Israeli
operation
Cast
Lead,
EUJS,
in
partnership
with
UN
Watch
brought
a
23‐year
old
law
 student,
 Liraz
 Madmony,
 from
 Sderot,
 Israel
 to
 the
 Special
 Session
 on
 Gaza
 of
 the
 United
 Nations
 Human
Rights
Council
in
Geneva.
On
behalf
of
EUJS,
Liraz
addressed
the
assembly
and
spoke
about
her
 daily
life,
the
plight
of
her
family,
and
their
suffering
and
survival
in
a
city
bombarded
by
nearly
10,000
 Hamas
rockets
throughout
the
past
eight
years.
She
pled
for
the
United
Nations
Human
Rights
Council
 to
take
the
necessary
measures
towards
ending
the
constant
barrage
on
Israeli
border
cities.



 24


6.4
EUJS
Ambassadors
to
the
UN:
Setting
the
Tone
for
the
Durban
Review
 Conference:
April
2008
–
April
2009,
pan‐European
campaign.


In
2001,
the
former
Chairperson
of
the
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students,
Joelle
Fiss,
led
a
delegation
 of
Jewish
student
activists
to
the
United
Nations
World
Conference
Against
Racism
(WCAR)
in
Durban,
 South
 Africa.
 Ironically,
 in
 the
 name
 of
 anti‐racism,
 the
 WCAR
 turned
 into
 a
 disastrous
 failure
 where
 many
NGOs
trampled
on
the
fundamental
values
of
the
United
Nations,
as
well
as
on
the
principles
of
 the
 Universal
 Declaration
 of
 Human
 Rights.
 The
 conference
 became
 a
 spectacle
 of
 hatred
 and
 of
 demonisation
 and
 even
 re‐awakened
 a
 panoply
 of
 long‐forgotten
 anti‐Semitic
 stereotypes.
 This
 outburst
of
political
alienation
and
anti‐Semitism
laid
the
groundwork
for
the
modern
phenomenon
of
 anti‐Semitism
 disguised
 as
 anti‐Zionism,
 rooted
 in
 the
 denial
 of
 Zionism,
 particularly
 its
 fundamental
 right
 of
 self‐determination
 for
 the
 Jewish
 people
 as
 well
 as
 the
 right
 of
 the
 Jewish
 Diaspora
 to
 feel
 connected
to
its
Motherland.


 
 Aware
 of
 the
 outcome
 of
 the
 2001
 Durban
 Review,
 in
 April
 2008
 EUJS
 launched
 a
 one‐year
 initiative
 with
the
aim
of
creating
awareness
and
preparing
Jewish
students
across
Europe
for
the
2009
Durban
 Review
Conference.
 


6.5


Durban
Diaries:
What
Really
Happened
at
the
World
Conference
 Against
Racism.


 
 




 
 Published
in
May
2008.




 In
 order
 to
 prepare
 students.
 EUJS
 compiled
 and
 distributed
 written
 material
 about
 the
 WCAR
 in
 anticipation
of
the
2009
Durban
Review
Conference.

 
 Upon
 the
 return
 of
 the
 EUJS
 delegation
 from
 the
 WCAR,
 former
 EUJS
 Chairperson
 Joelle
 Fiss
 published
 the
 article,
 “The
 Durban
 Diaries,”
 which
 EUJS
 translated,
 edited,
 and
 republished.
More
than
1,000
copies
of
“The
Durban
Diaries”
 were
 distributed
 in
 the
 first
 few
 weeks
 following
 its
 publication,
and
delegations
from
across
the
world
expressed
 the
 need
 for
 more
 copies
 that
 they
 could
 distribute
 locally.
 “The
 Durban
 Diaries”
 was
 also
 downloaded
 more
 than
 500
 times
from
the
EUJS’s
homepage.
A
second
edition
was
later
 published
 in
 partnership
 with
 the
 American
 Jewish
 Committee
in
November
2008.


 


What really happened at the UN Conference against Racism in Durban (2001)

DURBAN DIARIES
JOËLLE FISS

THE


 25


6.6
EUJS
delegations
to
the
Preparatory
Meetings
for
the
Durban
Review
 Conference.

 
 
 
 April
2008,
January
and
April
2009.


 EUJS
brought
delegations
of
students
to
the
sessions
of
the
Preparatory
Meetings
in
order
to
prepare
 the
 students
 for
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference
 and
 to
 ensure
 that
 there
 was
 Jewish
 student
 representation
and
involvement
in
the
conference,
as
well
as
to
build
coalitions
with
non‐Jewish
NGOs.
 The
 students
 raised
 concerns
 about
 the
 conference’s
 agenda
 and
 reminded
 other
 NGOs
 about
 the
 responsibility
of
UN
member
states
to
uphold
the
Universal
Declaration
for
Human
Rights
throughout
 the
entire
process.



6.7
 EUJS
AMBASSADORS
TO
THE
UN:
Setting
the
Tone
for
the
Durban
 Review
Conference
 
 
 
February
2009
‐‐
Geneva,
Switzerland



 As
part
of
the
Durban
Review
Conference
campaign,
EUJS
held
a
five‐day
seminar
in
order
to
prepare
 the
students
for
the
Durban
Review
Conference.
EUJS
 recruited
 thirty
 talented
 and
 capable
 students
 from
 twenty
 countries
 across
 Europe
 and
 Israel
 and
 equipped
them
with
advanced
diplomatic
skills,
tools,
 and
 information
 in
 preparation
 for
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference.
 
 After
 intensive
 training
 the
 participants
 had
 the
 opportunity
 to
 utilise
 their
 new
 skills
 in
 preparing
 and
 setting
 the
 agenda
 for
 meetings
 with
 UN
 officials,
 diplomats,
 and
 ambassadors.
 The
 group
 met
 with
 ambassadors
 and
 mission
 representatives
 from
 Turkey,
 the
 Czech
 Republic,
 South
 Africa,
 Poland,
 Switzerland,
 Italy,
 United
Kingdom,
Japan,
and
Israel.

 
 By
 spearheading
 the
 preparations
 for
 and
 the
 execution
of
these
meetings,
the
students
were
able
 to
 prepare
 for
 the
 challenges
 that
 awaited
 them
 some
 months
 later.
 The
 EUJS
 delegates
 conveyed
 their
 concerns
 regarding
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference
 consistently
 and
 effectively
 and
 urged
 the
 diplomatic
 corps
 to
 ensure
 that
 the
 Durban
 Review
Conference
would
uphold
the
lofty
mandate
 of
the
United
Nations.

 



 26




 


6.8


United
Nations
Durban
Review
Conference

EUJS
 brought
 a
 110‐person
 delegation
 from
 across
 the
 world
to
the
Durban
Review
Conference.
Cognisant
of
the
 agenda
 that
 would
 be
 put
 forth
 at
 the
 conference,
 the
 objective
of
the
EUJS
delegation’s
presence
was
to
redirect
 the
 focus
 of
 the
 conference
 to
 the
 actual
 forms
 of
 discrimination
 currently
 occurring
 in
 Europe
 and
 in
 the
 world,
 especially
 regarding
 the
 treatment
 of
 Roma,
 the
 ongoing
 genocide
 in
 Darfur,
 and
 rights
 regardless
 of
 sex
 and
 sexual
 orientation.
 EUJS
 aimed
 to
 broaden
 the
 dialogue
 on
 these
 issues
 through
 diplomacy,
 advocacy,
 demonstrations,
 leafleting,
 and
 other
 forms
 of
 necessary
 action.


 
 The
 primary
 actions
 of
 the
 EUJS’
 delegation
 during
 the
 DRC
were
the
following:

 • A
primary
concern
prior
the
conference
was
the
 visit
and
address
of
Iranian
President
Mahmoud
 Ahmadinejad.
 Set
 to
 take
 place
 on
 Yom
 HaShoah,
the
conference
became
a
platform
for
 President
 Ahmadinejad’s
 hateful
 rhetoric,
 specifically
Holocaust
denial
and
anti‐Semitism.
 As
 a
 response
 EUJS
 led
 a
 proactive,
 focused,
 student‐driven
 response
 that
 initially
 involved
 demonstrating
 outside
 the
 plenary
 and
 then
 outside
 Ahmadinejad’s
 press
 conference
 The
 UN
response
was
to
annul
EUJS’s
accreditation.

 In
cooperation
with
StandWithUs
EUJS
staged
a
 silent
project
entitled
The
UN
Remains
Silent.
75
 EUJS
delegates
donned
tape
on
their
mouths
as
 a
 symbol
 of
 the
 silence
 of
 UN
 and
 displayed
 banners
 exhibiting
 human
 rights
 crises
 that
 have
not
been
addressed
by
the
UN,
specifically
 the
 genocide
 in
 Darfur,
 the
 nuclear
 threat
 of
 Iran,
 and
 the
 lack
 of
 human
 rights
 around
 the
 world.
 
 In
cooperation
with
StandWithUs
EUJS
staged
a
 silent
project
entitled
The
UN
Remains
Silent.
75
 EUJS
delegates
donned
tape
on
their
mouths
as
 a
 symbol
 of
 the
 silence
 of
 UN
 and
 displayed
 banners
 exhibiting
 human
 rights
 crises
 that
 have
not
been
addressed
by
the
UN,
specifically
 the
 genocide
 in
 Darfur,
 the
 nuclear
 threat
 of
 Iran,
 and
 the
 lack
 of
 human
 rights
 around
 the
 world.



 •

Throughout
 the
 past
 several
 years,
 EUJS
 has
 campaigned
 and
 organised
 events
 to
 bring
 attention
to
the
ongoing
genocide
in
Darfur.
As
 such,
it
was
intrinsic
for
EUJS’s
commitment
to
 fighting
 racism
 to
 raise
 this
 issue
 during
 the
 Durban
Review
Conference.

With
collaboration
 from
Peace
and
Justice
for
Darfur
and
Le
Cercle
 Des
 Etudiants
 Rwandais
 de
 Belgique,
 EUJS
 organised
a
demonstration
in
front
of
the
UN
in
 order
 to
 raise
 awareness
 about
 the
 genocide
 and
 to
 demand
 that
 the
 UN
 take
 immediate
 action.

 
 EUJS
 was
 proud
 to
 be
 part
 of
 the
 Steering
 Committee
 representing
Jewish
 organizations
 at
 the

 Conference
 Against
 Racism,
 Discrimination
and
Persecution,
 
organized
 by
 UN
Watch,
as
well
as
Israel
Inspires
prior
to
and
 during
the
Durban
Review
Conference.




 28


6.9


The
Initiative
for
a
New
European
Voice
 April
2009
–
Madrid,
Spain


As
 EUJS
 recognises
 the
 urgency
 of
 mobilising
 young
 Jewish
 political
 forces
 across
 the
 European
 continent,
The
Initiative
for
a
New
European
Voice,
was
created.
This
project
combines
core
advocacy
 and
pro‐Israel
educational
strengths
with
the
spirit
of
civil
activism,
commitment,
and
vitality
that
has
 come
to
represent
EUJS.

 In
April
2008
EUJS
launched
the
innovative
pilot
of
a
long‐term
initiative
to
build
a
network
of
European
 youth
 who
 are
 aware
 of
 Israel‐related
 issues.
 EUJS
 brought
 together
 young
 adults
 from
 France
 and
 Spain
of
a
certain
professional
background
in
a
groundbreaking
seminar
to
provide
them
with
necessary
 tools,
facts
and
analysis
for
greater
awareness
and
advocacy.
 The
 goal
 of
 the
 project
 was
 to
 offer
 knowledge
 that
 the
 participants
 could
 use
 in
 their
 working
 environments
 and
 daily
 professional
 situations.
 As
 opposed
 to
 other
 initiatives
 that
 take
 a
 more
 theoretical
approach,
EUJS
sought
to
equip
young
participants
with
practical
logistical
information
and
 tools.
 The
 conference
 allowed
 the
 participants
 to
 gain
 knowledge
 and
 insights
 from
 a
 unique
 set
 of
 speakers,
panellists,
and
trainers.

 Additionally,
as
part
of
the
programme,
two
young
professionals
were
granted
nine‐month‐long
 fellowship
positions
in
pro‐Israel
advocacy
organisations
in
their
home
countries.

 



 6.10
 AIPAC
Policy
Conference
 
June
2008
and
May
2009
–
Washington,
D.C.

EUJS
 is
 continuously
 trying
 to
 offer
 as
 many
 diverse
 opportunities
 and
 experiences
 as
 it
 can
 in
 its
 attempt
 to
 broaden
 the
 horizons
 of
 its
 young
 activists
 and
 leaders.
 For
 the
 last
 four
 years,
 EUJS
 has
 sent
 its
 leaders
 to
 participate
in
the
Annual
Policy
Conference
of
the
American
 Israel
 Public
 Affairs
 Committee.
 This
 fascinating
 gathering
 offers
 a
 unique
 experience
 for
 EUJS
 students,
 opening
 a
 window
 to
 the
 unique
 realm
 of
 pro‐Israel
 advocacy
 in
 the
 United
States.

 
 
 
 29


C)
ORGANIZATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT


 


1)
EUJS
Presidium
Meeting

The
EUJS
Presidium
is
the
elected
consultative
body
that
assists
the
Chairperson
in
implementing
EUJS’s
 policies
and
decisions.
It
consists
of
seven
Presidium
members
and
a
Treasurer.
 By
the
end
of
its
term,
EUJS
will
have
held
seven
Presidium
Meetings:
 Transitional
Weekend
in
Brussels,
December
2007
 Presidium
Meeting
in
Washington
DC.,
May
2008
 Presidium
Meeting
in
Amsterdam,
May
2008
 Presidium
Meeting
in
Istanbul,
August
2008
 Presidium
Meeting
in
Brussels,
November
2008
 Presidium
Meeting
in
Switzerland,
August
2009
 Transitional
Weekend
in
Brussels,
November
2009
 
 Parallel
 to
 the
 official
 meetings,
 EUJS’s
 elected
 leadership
 has
 maintained
 contact
 via
 phone
 conferences
 and
 e‐mail.
 The
 Presidium
 is
 regularly
 updated
 by
 the
 Chairperson
 on
 all
 EUJS
 activities,
 developments,
and
endeavours.

 • • • • • • • The
members
of
the
EUJS
Presidium
serve
as
EUJS
Ambassadors
in
their
respective
countries
and
as
part
 of
the
organizing
team
at
all
EUJS
events,
and
they
promote
EUJS
activities
at
different
conferences
and
 gatherings
throughout
the
world.




2)
Fellowship
at
EUJS


 EUJS
 has
 been
 home
 to
 many
 fellows
 and
 interns
 in
 the
 past
 several
 years.
 This
 has
 contributed
 to
 EUJS’s
professional
and
organisational
progress
and
development
and
has
allowed
these
individuals
to
 experience
how
a
pan‐European
Jewish
organization
operates,
how
international
programs
are
run,
and
 what
Jewish
youth
leadership
means
today.
EUJS
has
hosted
three
fellows
at
its
office
over
the
past
two
 years.

 As
we
continuously
strive
to
empower
young
Jewish
leaders
in
many
diverse
ways,
EUJS
has
developed
 its
 partnership
 with
 the
 American
 Jewish
 Committee
 and
 StandWithUs,
 which
 serve
 as
 host
 organisations
for
fellows
at
EUJS.
We
are
aware
that
the
experience
of
working
at
the
EUJS
secretariat
 can
change
a
fellow’s
life
and
reshape
his
or
her
traditional
views
on
Jewish
leadership.



3)
EUJS
Financial
Analysis


 EUJS’s
annual
budget
has
remained
stable
throughout
the
past
several
years
with
only
a
slight
decrease
 recorded
in
2008
and
2009.
This
decrease
can
be
attributed
primarily
to
the
ongoing
global
economical
 crisis
as
well
as
the
continuously
shrinking
support
from
the
Jewish
world
at
large.
 In
recent
years
significant
efforts
have
been
made
to
diversify
sources
of
income
in
order
to
make
the
 organization
less
dependent
on
traditional
donors
and
therefore
less
vulnerable
to
the
fluctuations
of
 
 their
support.
 30


Despite
 these
 efforts,
 participation
 fees
 have
 been
 the
 main
 source
 of
 income
 for
 EUJS
 over
 the
 past
 five
years,
surpassing
any
other
source
of
income
at
least
threefold.
Participation
fees
amount
to
40%
of
 the
total
annual
budget
thus
indicating
that
Jewish
students
have
been
mainly
self‐financed
themselves
 and
their
Jewish
activities.

Operaponal
 As
 an
 organisation
 dedicated
 to
 preserving
 Costs
 accountability,
 EUJS
 works
 continuously
 towards
 Programming
 finding
 different
 ways
 to
 lower
 its
 operational
 and
 administrative
 costs
 in
 order
 to
 directly
 invest
 the
 83%
 most
 resources
 in
 programming
 and
 its
 students.
 Significant
 successes
 by
 both
 previous
 and
 current
 leadership
 have
 emerged
 in
 these
 efforts.
 In
 2009
 EUJS
directly
allocated
83%
of
its
total
funding
to
programming.
 
 17%


SOURCE
OF
INCOME
2008






















 
 


World
Union
of
Jewish
Students
 World
Jewish
Congress
 World
Holocaust
Forum
 UN
Watch
 Turkish
Jewish
Community
 Swiss
Federapon
of
Jewish
Communipes
 Stand
With
Us
 Safra
Foundapon
 Private
Donors
 Parpcipapon
Fees
 Other
 MASA
Israel
 Legacy
Heritage
Fund
Limited
 ISSN
Foundapon
 Fondacion
de
la
Memoire
de
la
Shoah
 European
Youth
Forum
 European
Jewish
Fund
 European
Commission
 Edmond
&
Benjamin
de
Rothschild
Foundapon
 Council
of
Europe
 B'nai
Brith
Internaponal
 American
Jewish
Joint
Distribupon
Commiree
 American
Jewish
Commiree
 AIPAC
 0
 50'000
 100'000
 150'000


SOURCE
OF
INCOME
2009
(JAN‐JUN)





UN
Watch
 Safra
Foundapon
 Parpcipapon
Fees
 Newton
&
Rochelle
Becker
 Charitable
Trust
 European
Jewish
Fund
 Edmond
&
Benjamin
de
 Rothschild
Foundapon
 B'nai
Brith
Geneva
 American
Jewish
Joint
 Distribupon
Commiree
 AIPAC


0


40000


80000


31


4)
American
Friends
of
EUJS
 

American
Friends
of
EUJS
is
a
non‐profit
501(c)(3)
charitable
organisation
formed
to
raise
support
in
the
 United
States
for
the
activities
of
the
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students.


 American
Friends
of
EUJS
was
established
as
part
of
EUJS’
efforts
to
diversify
sources
of
income
so
as
to
 make
 the
 organisation
 less
 dependent
 on
 traditional
 donors
 and
 to
 further
 pursue
 partnerships
 with
 American
foundations
and
private
donors.


 American
Friends
of
EUJS
was
possible
thanks
to
the
generosity
and
support
of
the
American
Jewish
 Committee.


D)
PUBLICITY



1. EUJS
in
the
Media
 

• More
 than
 20
 local
 and
 international
 news
 agencies,
 including
 Turkish
 Daily
 News,
 Hurriyet
 Daily
 News
 and
 the
 Jewish
 Chronicle,
 reported
 on
 the
 Summer
University
2008.



David
 Harris,
 the
 Executive
 Director
 of
 the
 American
 Jewish
 Committee
 mentioned
EUJS’s
work
on
his
Jerusalem
 Post
 blog
 several
 times
 throughout
 the
 last
two
years.


The
Jerusalem
Post
reported
and
printed
 the
 speech
 by
 Sderot
 resident
 Liraz
 Madmony
at
the
United
Nations
Human
 Rights
Council
in
January
2009.


The
 European
 Jewish
 Press
 covered
 EUJS’s
 meeting
 with
 Venezuelan
 Ambassador,
German
Mundarian
Hernadez
in
February
2009.

 •

An
article
on
discrimination
and
anti‐Semitism
from
the
perspective
of
young
people
was
written
 by
EUJS
chairperson
Jonas
Karpantschof
for
the
European
Youth
Forum
publication
Racism
and
 Its
Impact
on
Young
People.



• •

Interview
 with
 Jonas
 Karpantschof,
 EUJS
 chair,
 in
 Jødisk
 Orientering
 the
 Jewish
 monthly
 magazine
in
Denmark.


The
Swedish
daily
Världen
Idag
published
an
article
about
the
traumatic
experience
of
the
EUJS
 delegation
at
the
World
Conference
Against
Racism;
cited
was
the
EUJS
publication
“The
Durban
 Diaries”
as
well
as
an
interview
with
former
Chair
Joelle
Fiss.



• 
 32


Over
 200
 news
 agencies,
 including
 Associated
 Press,
 Reuters,
 Jerusalem
 Post
 and
 Ha’aretz
 covered
EUJS’s
expulsion
from
the
Durban
Review
Conference.



Jonas
 Karpantschof,
 EUJS
 Chair,
 and
 Lili
 Dardashti,
 Executive
 Director,
 were
 interviewed
 and
 quoted
 on
 several
 occasions
 by
 the
 Jewish
 Telegraphic
 Agency
 during
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference.



Pictures
 of
 EUJS
 delegates
 demonstrating
 against
 Ahmadinejad
 appeared
 in
 numerous
 news
 papers
and
magazines
across
the
world
including
La
Repubblica
(Italy),
Spiegel
(Germany),
El
País
 (Spain),
Le
Monde
(France),
Jerusalem
Post
and
many
others.
Pictures
of
EUJS
delegates
during
 Ahmadinejad
address
in
the
plenary
were
widely
covered
in
the
Jerusalem
Post.

 EUJS
 delegate
 Zach
 Novetsky
 blogged
 daily
 on
 Jerusalem
 Post
 during
 the
 Durban
 Review
 Conference.
 The
 blog
 was
 picked
 up
 by
 several
 news
 agencies
 primarily
 in
 the
 United
 States.
 Other
EUJS
participants
blogged
on
several
other
media
outlets.

 Pictures
from
the
Stop
the
Ongoing
Genocide
in
Darfur
demonstration
were
covered
on
several
 online
websites
including
the
Wall
Street
Journal.



2.
EUJS
online
Communication


 In
the
past
two
years
EUJS
has
put
forth
several
press
releases
underlining
its
political
views.
It
has
also
 released
over
15
newsletters
with
information
about
EUJS
programming
as
well
as
the
programmes
of
 its
member
unions.
 


E)
2010
AGENDA


 The
 2008‐2010
 EUJS
 board
 has
 made
 sure
 that
 the
 agenda
 for
 the
 next
 generation
 of
 European
 leadership
is
determined
and
outlined
well
in
advance.

 
 
 DEC.
 –
 JAN.
 2009‐10:
 

 
 
 The
 Dignity
 of
 Difference,
 Interfaith
 and
 inter‐cultural
 Symposium
 on
 human
rights

and
democracy.
 FEBRUARY
2010:
 EUJS
 
 Seminar
 on
 bridge
 building
 with
 other
 European
 minorities
 and
 in

 particular
Armenians.


 
 APRIL
2010:
 
 
 MAY
2010:
 
 AUGUST
2010:
 
 NOVEMBER
2010:
 
 33
 
 EUJS
Seminar
on
the
increase
of
European
extremism,
Brussels
 AJC
Annual
Meeting,
Washington
DC
 






Summer
University

 






EUJS
Seminar
at
the
United
Nations
Human
Rights
Council


HALF
YEAR
REPORT
2009


 January
 February
 March
 April
 May
 Jun
 July
 2009


I.
EXPENDITURES
 1.
OPERATING
COSTS

Secretariat
 7’502.17
 5’174.89
 7’267.89
 5'361.97
 7’911.50
 6'280.89
 6’087.98
 45'587.29


2.

EUJS
PROGRAM
COSTS

The
Initative
for
a
 New
Eu.
Voice
 EUJS
Ambassadors
 to
the
UN
 European
 Encounters
 EUJS
Ambassadors
 to
the
DRC
 American
Friends
 of
EUJS
 SU
2009‐
 Switzerland
 Website
 Remainders
from
 2008
 Sub‐Total
EUJS
 Programs
 
 
 
 
 411.29
 120.38
 
 295.48
 827.15
 
 14'151.33
 
 
 
 84.95
 
 
 14'236.28
 
 
 214.96
 
 
 168.03
 
 
 382.99
 
 
 
 14'638.93
 
 138.48
 
 
 14'777.41
 
 
 
 
 
 534.53
 900
 119.97
 1'554.50
 
 
 
 
 
 570.47
 
 
 570.47
 2'304.66
 
 
 
 
 156'191.60
 
 
 158'496.26
 2'304.66
 14'151.33
 214.96
 14'638.93
 411.29
 157'808.44
 900.00
 415.45
 190'845.06


3.
Other
Program
Costs

AJC
Annual
 Meeting
 AIPAC
Policy
Conf.
 London
Conf.
 Against
 Antisemitism
 ROI
 WJC‐Plenary
 Meeting
 SUB‐Total




 
 
 
 406.25
 406.25



 
 160.00
 
 
 160.00



 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 


4'027.30
 858.96
 
 
 



 
 
 180.94
 



 
 
 
 
 


4'027.30
 858.96
 160.00
 180.94
 406.25
 5'633.45


4'886.26
 180.94


4.
MEMBERSHIP
FEES

34
 
 



EYF
Annual
Fees

United
Annual
Fee
 Sub‐Total




 
 



 
 



 
 



 
 


1'376.00
 
 1'376.00



 
 



 55.00
 55.00


1'376.00
 55.00
 1431.00


TOTAL
EXPENDITURES

(1+2+3+4)
 II.
INCOME

2007
Balance

 AIPAC
 AJC
 JDC
 BBI
 B’nai
B’rith
Geneva
 CoE
 E.
&
B.
de
 Rothschild
Found°.
 EC
 Eu.
Jewish
Fund
 LHFL
 N.
&
R.
Becker
 Charitable
Trust
 Other
 Participation
Fees
 Private
Donors
 Safra
Foundation
 FSCI
 UN
Watch
 WJC
 Sub‐Total
 46'495.26
 
 3'900.00
 
 
 
 3'000.00
 
 
 
 
 
 22.71
 585.72
 1'000.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 2'290.18
 
 1'000.00
 
 
 
 
 3'633.94
 
 
 475.66
 
 
 
 
 
 
 6'919.00
 
 
 
 
 7'537.80
 
 5'125.72
 
 
 
 6'432.14
 
 
 935.00
 1'050.00
 
 
 
 16'000.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
 1'906.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 4'320.00
 
 766.04
 7'778.50
 24'969.75
 17'568.54
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 6'885.20
 
 1'965.00


243'496.80


46'495.26
 935.00
 7'240.18
 4'320.00
 1'000.00
 766.04
 33'697.50
 24'969.75
 17'568.54
 3'633.94
 6'885.20
 7'537.80
 2'463.37
 80'494.40
 20'906.16
 5'000.00
 6'763.56
 6'432.14
 412.79
 277'521.63


150.00
 1'796.84
 
 
 
 
 412.79
 
 
 
 
 


24'305.40
 46'624.72
 3'088.30
 5'000.00
 
 
 
 16'817.86
 
 
 
 


55'003.69
 562.79
 9'196.62
 26'014.66
 19'891.00
 87'796.53
 79'056.34


TOTAL
INCOME
 SURPLUS
(II‐I)





277'521.63
 34'024.83

35


FINANCIAL
REPORT
2008


FINANCIAL
REPORT
2008


G.
INSTITUTIONAL
PARTNERS

Jewish
youth
and
students
across
Europe
do
not
live
in
a
vacuum.
They
form
an
integral
part
of
 the
 international
 Jewish
 community
 and
 have
 strong
 ties
 to
 the
 Jewish
 communities
 in
 the
 United
States
and
Israel.
They
also
live
as
full
and
equal
citizens
in
their
respective
countries,
in
a
 united
 Europe
 that
 is
 increasingly
 multicultural,
 reflecting
 the
 values
 of
 a
 pluralist
 and
 peace‐ seeking
 mindset.
 The
 objective
 of
 EUJS—to
 cater
 to
 the
 needs
 of
 young
 people—can
 only
 be
 accomplished
with
the
active
support
and
engagement
of
our
partners
in
both
the
Jewish
world
 and
in
the
institutions
of
a
united
Europe.
EUJS
strongly
treasures
these
partnerships
based
on
 our
shared
belief
in
the
power
of
youth
as
a
vehicle
for
positive
social
change.

 
 
 


1. The
American
Jewish
Committee
(AJC)


The
 American
 Jewish
 Committee,
 under
 the
 visionary
 leadership
 of
 David
 Harris,
 has
 long
 been
 a
 prime
partner
of,
a
believer
in,
and
a
supporter
of
EUJS.
The
special
relationship
of
EUJS
and
AJC
was
 cemented
 in
 a
 formal
 partnership
 agreement
 signed
 in
 Washington
 D.C.
 in
 March
 2005.
 The
 AJC
 helps
 to
 bridge
 the
 transatlantic
 divide
 by
 sponsoring
 a
 fellowship
 program
 that,
 every
 summer,
 gives
an
American
college
student
the
unique
opportunity
to
spend
nine
weeks
working
at
the
EUJS
 office
in
Brussels
preparing
for
Summer
U.
We
are
proud
to
have
had
David
Harris
as
a
regular
guest
 at
 Summer
 U
 every
 year
 since
 2002.
 Furthermore,
 for
 several
 years
 AJC
 has
 hosted
 an
 EUJS
 delegation,
 comprised
 of
 leading
 student
 activists
 from
 across
 Europe,
 at
 its
 annual
 conference
 in
 Washington
 D.C.
 The
 continuous
 financial,
 logistical,
 and
 moral
 support
 of
 the
 AJC
 is
 crucial
 in
 enabling
EUJS
to
fulfil
its
mandate
in
securing
the
Jewish
future
in
Europe.



 
 
 


2. The
American
Jewish
Joint
Distribution
Committee
(JDC)

The
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
is
a
long‐time
partner
of
the
JDC.
Throughout
the
years
the
 two
organisations
have
worked
together
to
further
our
shared
vision
and
desire
for
vibrant
Jewish
 life
across
Europe.



 
 
 


3. The
Council
of
Europe
(COE)

The
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
is
an
accredited
NGO
of
the
Council
of
Europe’s
European
 Youth
Foundation.
In
collaboration
with
this
organisation,
EUJS
has
held
yearly
seminars
and
study
 sessions
 over
 the
 past
 twenty
 years.
 
 Such
 programs
 emphasise
 the
 promotion
 of
 youth
 policies,
 minority
rights,
intercultural
dialogue,
and
human
rights
education.



 
 
 


4. The
European
Commission

The
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
is
an
accredited
organisation
with
the
Directorate‐General
 for
Education
and
Culture
and
is
a
recipient
of
a
yearly
grant
for
administrative
support
offered
to
 the
most
active
European
youth
organisations.




5.
The
European
Jewish
Congress
(EJC)


The
European
Union
of
Jewish
Students
works
with
the
EJC
to
ensure
that
the
voice
of
Jewish
youth
 in
 Europe
 is
 prominently
 heard
 at
 all
 levels.
 EJC
 leaders
 have
 been
 guests
 at
 EUJS
 events
 on
 numerous
occasions.
Given
our
similar
democratic
and
representative
structures
in
Europe,
EUJS
will
 continue
working
closely
with
the
EJC
leadership
to
ensure
Jewish
continuity
and
prosperity
on
the
 continent.
 It
 is
 through
 the
 European
 Jewish
 Congress
 that
 EUJS
 also
 receives
 support
 from
 the
 World
Jewish
Congress
(WJC).



6. The
European
Youth
Forum
(EYF)


The
 European
 Youth
 Forum
 is
 the
 largest
 European
 youth
 organisation,
 working
 directly
 with
 the
 institutions
 of
 the
 European
 Union
 and
 promoting
 youth
 empowerment
 among
 its
 twenty
 million
 members.
As
an
International
Youth
NGO
(IYNGO),
EUJS
is
a
member
of
the
European
Youth
Forum
 and
 enthusiastically
 represents
 the
 interests
 of
 its
 Jewish
 members,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 interests
 of
 minority
groups
across
Europe.


 
 
 


7. The
World
Union
of
Jewish
Students
(WUJS)



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The
World
Union
of
Jewish
Students
is
the
worldwide
umbrella
for
all
Jewish
student
organisations.

 EUJS
 is
 a
 constitutional
 member
 of
 the
 WUJS
 network
 and
 is
 a
 direct
 partner
 in
 their
 worldwide
 activities
through
its
presence
of
European
Jewish
student
representatives
on
the
WUJS
executive
 board.





Written
by
Jonas
Herzberg
Karpantschof
 Edited
by
Merav
Levkowitz
 Designed
by
Arielle
Herzog
 Special
thanks
to

 Olga
Israel,
David
Nachfolger
and
Lili
Dardashti


European
Union
of
Jewish
Students

3
Avenue
Antoine
Depage
 1050
Brussels,
Belgium
 +32
2
647
72
79
 www.eujs.org