MYMATURETIMES.

COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 2

SOCIAL SECURItY COLUmN
By Ray Vigil Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in El Paso, Texas

January is Financial Wellness Month — a great time to think about your own financial future. It also happens to be at this time that many people make resolutions for the New Year. Why not combine the two and make your own financial wellness a resolution for 2013?

FINANCIAL WELLNESS CAN BE YOURS IN 2013
lutions for your financial wellness.
Start your financial plan with your Social Security Statement. The online Statement is simple, easy to use, and provides estimates you should consider in planning for your retirement. It provides estimates for disability and survivors benefits,

Here are our suggested reso-

making the Statement an important financial planning tool. Your Statement allows you to review and ensure that your earnings are accurately posted to your Social Security record. This feature is important because Social Security benefits are based on average earnings over your lifetime. If the information is incorrect, or you have earnings missing from your record, you may not receive all the benefits to which you are entitled in the future. www.socialsecurity.gov/mystatement Work the numbers. Once you get your online Statement, you can use the other free resources provided by Social Security. Use our Retirement Estimator, where you can get a personalized, instant estimate of your future retirement benefits using different retirement ages and scenarios. Visit the Retirement Estimator at www.socialsecurity.gov/estimator Once you are in the know, choose to save. The earlier you begin your financial planning, the better off you will be. Social Security replaces about 40 percent of the average worker’s pre-retirement earnings. Most financial advisors say that you will need 70 percent or more of preretirement earnings to live comfortably. You also will need other savings, investments, pensions or retirement accounts to make sure you have enough money to live comfortably when you retire. Visit the Ballpark Estimator for tips to help you save. www.choosetosave.org/ball-

park Do some light reading. Learn more about Social Security, the benefit programs, and what they mean to you and your family, by browsing through our online library of publications. In particular, our publication entitled “When To Start Receiving Retirement Benefits” provides helpful information regarding the things you should consider when making a decision on when to collect retirement benefits. Many of our publications also are available in audio format and other formats. Our library at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs is always open. Help someone you love. Sometimes we get the most satisfaction out of helping someone else. If you have a grandparent, parent, relative, or friend who could benefit from Social Security, share our website and the features of our online services with them. You can even help a loved one apply for Social Security benefits in as little as 15 minutes — or for Extra Help with Medicare prescription drug costs. Whether you forward a publication or sit down to help someone apply for Social Security, the place to go is www.socialsecurity.gov. There are a number of ways you can celebrate Financial Wellness Month, so start off the New Year by looking out for your own financial wellness at www.socialsecurity.gov.

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 3

Tango Argentino del Sol: Target audience? Senior Citizens
By Joe Olvera ©, 2012

Argentina has come to El Paso in a big
way, thanks to a couple who say they’re fanatics about introducing tango dancing to El Pasoans. “We’re fanatics,” said Elizabeth Rueda who, with her husband, Mundo Rueda, runs the dance classes aimed at improving senior citizens ability to remain active. “We’re targeting senior citizens in El Paso because tango dancing helps to improve their flexibility, their balance, and their mental aspects.” Elizabeth Rueda said that she and her husband spend each summer season in Buenos Aires, Argentina and they have lived there the past ten years. Mundo Rueda said that he has the largest collection of tango music in the world, with more than 25,000 tunes. “We’ve even got a museum at our home where we feature everything there is to know about dancing the tango.” They hold classes every Friday at 7 p.m. at Elena Baker’s Dance Studio, 1815 Trawood, Suite B-2. “Tango dancing is ideal for seniors be-

cause it helps them improve their flexibility in ways that can’t be imagined, ”Elizabeth Rueda said. “Plus, it’s a slow dance, so that it avoids pitfalls that other dances do not, such as injuries and the like. Elizabeth and Mundo Rueda It’s exercising in Tango Argentino del Sol a slow, elegant way. We have students in their 80s who love what we’re doing. It also helps their mental aspects, because we teach them step by step and it’s a challenge for them to remember each step. It helps to improve their alertness and it provides them with meaningful exercise in a slow, painless way.” The Ruedas have about 20 students of various ages, ranging from age 18 to age 73. The classes are inexpensive, at $3 or $5 per class. Their focus will be on seniors in 2013, but, they will continue to attract younger people. The classes don’t only teach tango dancing, they also teach Argentine arts, music, lumfardo language, cuisine, and the traditions of Buenos Aires. They frequent senior citizen centers where they work to recruit older El Pasoans to become involved in a fun-loving experience. “My husband, Mundo, has been teaching dancing for 15 years, and he’s very adept,” said Elizabeth Rueda. “Our aim is to leave a legacy. We love Argentina and we love tango dancing, we love the music, and we want El Pasoans to love it too.”

M

E

R

I

D

I

A

N

Medical/Ostomy Supply, Inc.

915-351-2525
We specialize in carrying the following products for:
Ambulatory Aids To Daily Living Bath Safety Infusion/iv Supplies Ostomy Needles/Syringes Orthopedic/Soft Goods Incontinence Patient Care Enteral/Nutritional Home Diagnostic Personal Protection/Safety Professional Diagnostics Seating/Cushions Tracheostomy Care Wheelchairs/Accessories Wound Care Skin Care Urological HOURS OF OPERATION Monday thru Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Saturday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm

PICTURE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY

Hablamos Español!

1815 Montana Ave.
(located at the Montana Shopping Village strip mall)

El Paso, TX. 79902

info@meridianmedicalsupply.com Fax: 915-351-1970

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 4

testosterone Deficiency or a Panacea for Virility?
Thanks to a brilliant marketing campaign, there has been increased awareness among men of the condition of testosterone deficiency — or "Low T." A number of young adults are wearing a Low T badge with pride to show off their newfound virility. At long last, they can blame their chronic fatigue, insomnia, poor work performance, depression and an evaporation of libido on low testosterone levels. This new syndrome was not developed through the effort of brilliant scientists, but by the Eli Lilly and Co. as an attempt to let everyone know how widespread testosterone deficiency is among men from age 30 on. To make the problem easier to understand and by using a nationwide campaign blitz, "Low T" is WellneWs BY scott laFee now a familiar phrase. If you have it, you are part of the in crowd who hopes to be forever young. Numerous scholarly studies have shown that in men over 45, an average of 37 percent will have testosterone levels in the low normal, but not deficient, range. Low testosterone does interfere with some critically important functions. The hormone is essential for the production of viable and healthy sperm — it plays a role in libido but not in becoming aroused or having an erection. It is not surprising then that a research study just published in the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that adding testosterone to the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra in men with low testosterone did not improve the quality of the erection in any way. Testosterone also is essential for strong, healthy muscles and bones, and when deficient, can lead to osteoporosis and weakness. These symptoms generally occur in men well beyond 75 and are much rarer in men in their 60s. The nonspecific symptoms that have been ascribed, in part, to low testosterone include fatigue, reduced muscle mass and weakness, decreased sports performance, depression, increased body fat, decreased bone strength, loss of body hair, a need to shave less frequently and temporal crown baldness. Whether in a doctor's office or at a Low T clinic, patients are begging for a testosterone shot, preferably combined with a vitamin B-12 injection, to boost vim and vigor. Because so many of the symptoms of low testosterone are nonspecific and could be caused by stress, depression, sleep disorders and many other conditions, rushing to treat a younger patient with a testosterone injection or cream should be done with caution. Testosterone should not used as a panacea for more energy, better sleep habits or greater prowess on the tennis court or golf course. It should be used for the far more serious problems, such as infertility, muscle mass loss, osteoporosis and improving libido. And testosterone is not without side effects. It can lead to prostate cancer and cause the prostate to enlarge, leading to symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), which causes difficulty with voiding and emptying the bladder completely. Prior to initiating treatment with

By Dr. David Lipschitz testosterone, the prostatespecific antigen (PSA) test should be measured and the patient examined to define the severity of BPH. Therapy can be given as self-administered injections every two weeks. This is the safest approach, as the materials can easily be discarded to avoid contamination of others. There are testosterone creams available that are effective and easy to use but very expensive. And if a woman, child or pet comes in contact with cream, virilization can occur. The most important positive results of treatment are improved libido, more muscle strength, less fatigue and less osteoporosis. And remember, there are significant side effects that include acne, hirsutism, male pattern baldness, seborrhea and breast soreness, priapism (a painful enlarged penis), bladder irritability, headache, virilization, liver damage and bleeding tendencies. Sadly, hormone replacement, with testosterone for men and estrogen and progesterone for women, is not the fountain of youth. In the long term, side effects are more serious than any short-term benefit.
Dr. David Lipschitz is the author of the book "Breaking the Rules of Aging." More information is available at:

Pillow Talk
Younger adults and the elderly might not have much in common awake, but in slumber, they're bedroom buddies. A new University of Pittsburgh study says half of all retired people age 65 and older sleep at least 7.5 hours per night, usually between the hours of 11p.m. and 7:30 a.m.

"Our findings suggest that in matters regarding sleep and sleepiness, as in many other aspects of life, most seniors today are doing better than is generally thought," said lead study author Timothy H. Monk, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. "The stereotype of most seniors going to bed at 8 p.m., sleeping very lightly and being unduly sleepy during the day may be quite inaccurate, suggesting that 60 really is the new 40."

The finding runs counter to the commonly held assumption that older folks go to bed early and have trouble sleeping through the night. It's also more in line with the sleep patterns of younger adults.

www.DrDavidHealth.com
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 5

GRANDPARENTS HOPE!
By Doug Mayberry Q: Our grandson will be celebrating his 17th birthday soon, and for his gift, he has asked us for a list of what we believe are the most important things he should accomplish during his lifetime. What is important? A: To cope and be competitive, he should strive for a career, which hopefully becomes his passion. He should love himself and find someone who loves him, perhaps plan to have children, keep abreast on innovative technology, maintain good health habits and seek a personal faith. Beginning in the mid-1980s, technical advances and cheaper computers dramatically changed how we exchange information and news. Today, anything you want to know and learn is instantly available on the websites and distributed internationally. One can instantly learn and research others' viewpoints and opinions. Those of us who do not use computers are nicknamed "dinosaurs." Some of the issues for your grandson's future include the possibilities of losing face-to-face contact, needing to work longer hours, fighting to get and keep long-term jobs, realizing the need for ongoing education and being prepared for population increases, plus more female and international competition for jobs. Today, even before children learn to speak, parents are providing them with electronic toys, which entertain and teach. The results are that we are distancing families and friends from each other. Seniors are no longer concerned with hearing aids being exposed because most young people already have something plugged into their ears. Unfortunately, these plugs also keep generations from talking to each other. Getting an email birthday card is not like a written one. Even new languages, such as texting, make it difficult for generations to stay in touch. Your grandson already knows most of this. Assure him you understand his challenges and that you will back him up when help is needed. Knowing this may be your greatest gift! Q: Recently at a financial seminar we realized we have procrastinated getting our affairs in order and got a wake-up call. Twelve years ago, we set up family trusts that are now outof-date because of two deaths, one grandchild now with special needs and other personal factors that we never anticipated. We are in our 80s now and motivated to update our plans. What should we do? A: First, pull out your trust documents and pencil in what changes you want to make. That attorney may still be available, or his firm may have a recommendation for you. Do you have neighbors or friends who could recommend a good attorney? It has never been more important than now to put your financial affairs in order. The truth is that if you don't, someone else will do it for you, which may not be your wishes. List an inventory of your bank accounts, savings, stocks, jewelry, cars, heirlooms and other valuables to determine whom you want to get what. Name an executor whom you believe will do the best job. Don't forget health and medical directives and other documents that spell out your hopes. Although it is a pain to do so, keep your documents current when family changes occur. Remember that most documents are not set in stone. They can be changed relatively easily! Doug Mayberry makes the most of life in a Southern California retirement community. Contact him at deardoug@msn.com.
COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 6 - 7

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 8

My life as a boomer and reality of old age
By Sandi Smith, CSA President, Comfort Keepers El Paso and Las Cruces According to Wikipedia “A baby boomer is a person who was born during the demographic Post-World War II baby boom from 1946 and 1964. In general, baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values; however, many commentators have disputed the extent of that rejection, noting the widespread continuity of values with older and younger generations. As a group, they were the healthiest and wealthiest generation to that time, and amongst the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time.” The earliest boomers are now 65 and taking social security. I am 62 and eligible for early social security, which really is a startling revelation. In my mind I am still young, my thinking is young, and it’s really true that aging is in the mind. Unfortunately, the body doesn’t understand that concept. That is why it is so important, I am just discovering, to keep as healthy as we can now, so that we continue healthy into old age. I have been on a quest to find the magic bullet to good health after mine has somewhat diminished. I decided to go on a cleanse to release my body of all the bad stuff I have been eating and start with a clean slate. The cleanse is very limited in the food you can eat, basically all natural, no refined sugars or starches, which just leaves fruits and vegetables and meat. No dairy during the cleanse but slowly integrating food back into your diet. When you slowly add food, you are able to see how these foods affect your body and then you stay away from them if they affect you adversely. I really feel better after the cleanse but the harder part is making it a way of life. I recently read a couple of articles that startled me considering I was now so into the cleanse and food. Research shows that sugars might just be evil to our bodies. The drinks, fruit juices, sports drinks, and hidden in almost all processed foods – from bologna to pretzels to Sandi Smith Worcestershire sauce to cheese spread, and even injected into meat. Infant formula has corn syrup which is sugar. There are a hundreds of ways manufacturers hide sugar by names such as barley malt, beet sugar, can juice crystals, corn syrup, carob syrup, castor sugar, date sugar, demerara sugar, dextran, dextrose, diastatic malt and diastase to name a few. largest source of calories for Americans comes from sugar – specifically high fructose corn syrup. I also found statistics that are frightening • In 1700, the average person consumed about 4 pounds of sugar per year. • In 1800, the average person consumed about 18 pounds of sugar per year. • In 1900, individual consumption had risen to 90 pounds of sugar per year. • In 2009, more that 50 percent of all Americans consume one-half pound of sugar PER DAY – translating to a whopping 180 pounds per year. • Sugar is loaded into your soft Someone young asked me the other day, “What was your favorite fast food when you were growing up?” I said “We didn’t have fast food when I was growing up.” “No really, where did you eat?” he said. “It was a place called at home. My mother cooked every day and when Dad got home from work, we all sat down together at the dining room table, and if I didn’t like what was on the plate then I sat there until I did…. and had to have permission to leave the table”. Fast food has really taken over our lives.

El Paso Parks and Recreation

Senior Division Well-Fit Program
El Paso, Texas - The City of El Paso Parks and Recreation Department in collaboration with WellMed Medical Management will start a wellness and exercise program to overcome overweight and obesity while promoting a change from a sedentary lifestyle to a more active life style among the older adult population in the community. The program will last through February 12, 2013 with registration limited to 20 participants per center. Program Objectives: * Assessing participant’s physical fitness * Identify Health Risk Factors * Establish exercise program routines * Weight management * Provide educational and physical participative workshops. The program is for 12 weeks and is free for the qualified participant. A combination of exercise routines will be introduced to the participants to develop cardiovascular capacity, endurance, strength, and flexibility. Information: Program Coordinator David Lopez (915) 544-0753 Hilos De Plata Senior Center Sylvia Marquez (915) 533-3207 Father Martinez Center Esperanza Yee (915)860-9131 Wellington Chew Senior Center Michael Hon (915) 747-2523 Polly Harris Senior Center Melchor Carreon (915)581-9525

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 9

Out & About
DOwnTOwn/ wESTSIDE
UTEP Women’s Basketball Home games are in the Don Haskins Center. Tickets: $5. Information: 747-5234 or utepathletics.com. • 5:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 28 — Sam Houston State • 2:05 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30 — UTPA.

If you want your upcoming event listed in SPOTLIGHT’S Out & About section, please send all your relevant data by e-mail to: editorial@spotlightepnews.com

Calendar of upcoming events for El Paso/ Southern New Mexico are from Dec 28th - January, 2013

5200 ext 4269.

El Paso Museum of History
— 510 N. Santa Fe. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday (open until 9 p.m. Thursdays), and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Closed Mondays. Museum admission is free except for “Motorcycle Madness” exhibit. Information: 351-3588 or elpasotexas.gov/history. An afternoon celebrating the wild side of El Paso’s history, “Elvis, El Paso and the Real Old West” is 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 30, with reenactments and music from Six Guns and Shady Ladies, Paso Del Norte Pistoleros, The Wild Bunch and Old West Thunder. Doug Wilson will portray Elvis with scheduled performances. Hands-on activities include branding a piece of wood to take home, a kidney bean race, trying on old west clothes, and more. Mandy the Mule will be on hand to say “Howdy” to Sun Bowl visitors.

to be announced from the PAC 12 and ACC conferences. Tickets; $15, $20, $30, $40, $50, $60 and $150. Information: 533-4416, 1-800-915BOWL or sunbowl.org, or Ticketmaster.com. Pre-game activities begin at 11:30 a.m. in the stadium with introduction of 2012 Legends of the Sun Bowl Game, Introduction of Sun Court, performances by university bands and the Golden Knights Army Parachute Team.

SOUThERn nEw MExICO
‘Ballroom With A Twist’ —
Inn of the Mountain Gods Resort and Casino in Mescalero, N.M. will host its New Year’s Eve gourmet dinner and concert beginning at 9 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31, with entertainment by ballroom dance group as well as party favors, dancing and a balloon drop. Tickets: $125 (Ticketmaster). Information: (800) 5459011 or (575) 464-7090. A matinee New Year’s Eve performance is 1 p.m. Tickets: $75.

UTEP Men’s Basketball Home games are at the Don Haskins Center. Tickets: $8-$50. Information: 747-5234 or utepathletics.com. • 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 28 — Cameron.

Ardovino’s New Year’s Eve Bash — Ardovino’s Desert Crossing, One Ardovino Drive in Sunland Park, will ring in 2012 Monday, Dec. 31. Reservations recommended; details to be announced. Information/reservations: (575) 589-0653 or ardovinos.com.

THE BEAT GOES ON, BEAT AT AND SO DOES THE DO OES

MADALYN PARNAS, VIOLIN CECILY PARNAS, CELLO
In collaboration with EPPM’s El Paso Chamber Music Festival

Sunland Park New Year’s Eve — The New Year’s Eve celebration in the Signature Showroom at Sunland Park Racetrack & Casino is Monday, Dec. 31. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with dinner served 7 to 8:30 p.m. and entertainment with Sha’Vone and The Vibe 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Tickets: $35 (includes dinner buffet, entertainment, favors and champagne toasting); $250 table for eight. Ages 21 and older welcome. Information/reservations: (575) 874-

Hyundai Sun Bowl — The 79th
annual football classic begins at noon, Monday, Dec. 31, with teams

LAWRENCE LOH, CONDUCTOR

JANUARY 25 & 26, 2013
Hindemith Symphonic Metamorphosis Saint-Saëns The Muse and The Poet Elgar Enigma Variations

PLAZA THEATRE THEATRE ATRE 7:30PM

SEASON

Sponsored by:
BEVERLY BEVERLY & L KEN JINKERSON

For tickets and other information, contact

915.532.3776 www.epso.org
With the support of the City of El Paso Museums and Cultural Affairs department and the Texas Commission on the Arts. Texas

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 10

Capital Puns

44 1966 hit 96 ___ 45 Capri and Wight 46 Unit of resistance 47 Pilaster 48 Northern constellation 51 James Dean's last movie 54 Diamonds, to a cat burglar 57 Irwin Shaw novel? 60 Renaissance family 61 Saw a ghost? 62 Nautilus commander 63 Small dam 64 Alfred Nobel, e.g. 65 Greek god of war

DOWN
1 Hindu prince 2 Stern rival 3 All Things ___ 4 Stretch out 5 San Antonio five 6 Wayne's World actor Rob 7 Former Davis Cup captain 8 Part of a necklace 9 JFK flier 10 Author of The Stranger 11 Produced fine wine 12 Boast 13 Not mad 18 Drive the getaway

ACROSS
1 Houston university 5 Hunks of marble 10 These are hailed in New York 14 Out of control 15 Sits 16 Site of the Taj Mahal 17 Get it? 20 Balaam's mount

21 Yorkshire terrier, for one 22 Persuasive push 23 Folk singer Burl 25 Emmitt Smith scores them: abbr. 26 1976 Peace Prize winner 28 Discoverer of radium 31 Reeling in the Years

group Steely ___ 34 Dumbfounds 35 Thoroughly ___ Millie 36 ___ Jima 37 Hmmmmmm . . . I'm not sure 40 "I like ___" 41 Farewells, to Henri 42 Section section 43 Breakfast companion

car 19 Secretary's break 24 Expansive 25 Spends too much energy 26 Indian address 27 Up and about 28 Skin layers: anat. 29 Source of milk 30 Famous uncle 31 Denial of responsibility 32 On top of it 33 The Highwayman poet 35 Internet connection 38 1967 Raquel Welch romp 39 Hop kiln 45 Taking part 46 Earth tone 47 Battery terminal 48 Teenage sleuth Nancy 49 ___ and shine! 50 Broadway beginning 51 Chew on 52 Wait at the red light 53 Copied 55 "I ___, I saw, I conquered" 56 Adam's grandson 58 Harvest goddess 59 Genetic inits.

MYMATURETIMES.COM JANUARY 2013 PAGE 11

By: “Doppler” Dave Speelman

What is a First Alert?
It’s a question that hopefully you know the answer to. What is an ABC-7 First Alert? We’ve been issuing these First Alerts for about the past fifteen months. Why is a First Alert important to you? Whenever our meteorologists feel that the El Paso area will experience a dramatic weather change in our current weather pattern, we want to let you know about this change as soon as possible. It could be a major wind event, a big drop in our temperatures or a rain event that could impact your travel. A First Alert does not necessarily mean that the weather will be severe; it’s just that the weather change likely to occur will be a major change from what we have been accustomed to. Many times the weather computer models will indicate a big weather change a week or more in advance. We make note of the There will be times that we issue a First Alert days in advance, and, at other times, a First Alert will be issued just minutes in advance. We would do this on short notice if, for instance, a general thunderstorm becomes severe.

PICTURES FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY

Here are some of the weather changes that will warrant an ABC-7 First Alert:
-Flooding -Hail storms possible changes and monitor the atmospheric conditions for several days before we issue the alert. At times, the storm track will shift a bit and in that case the major weather changes may become less dramatic and we either do not issue the First Alert, or cancel the alert if we have already issued one.

-Heavy rains -First snowfall of the year -Heavy snowfall -High winds/gusts 40+ mph sustained -Freezing temps, under 25 degrees -Excessive heat, 105+ degrees -Significant change in temperature from what we have been experiencing

Weather Trivia
“Doppler" Dave Speelman is the chief meteorologist at KVIA-TV in El Paso. You can watch his forecasts at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm on ABC-7 (channel 6 cable). If you would like Doppler Dave to address (explain) any weather issues you can email him at Dopplerdave@kvia.com.
Answer: C - 3.1"

How much snow did El Paso receive last winter? A. 1.4” B. 2.0” C.3.1” D. 5.3”

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