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THE

RevJOSIAHHENSON/'UELETOM,"
IN SCOTLAND.

EBPOET
t»^wdl %\^iiH
»«^t

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CITY HALL,

GLASGOW FRIDAY, APRIL

20, 1877.

GLASGOW:
GEORGE GAELTE
k SON,
18
!J!)

BUCHANAN STRELT.

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PREFATORY NOTE,

The

following Reports of the proceedings connected with

the Farewell Meetings of the Rev.
original of Mrs. Beecher Stowe's "

JosiAH Henson,

tlje

Uncle Tom," are pubhad, and

lished in the lielief that those

who

many who
his

had

not, the

opportunity of seeing Mr.

Henson and

wife,
this

whose portraits arc

prefixed, will be glad to preserve
It
is

Memorial of their

visit to Scotland.

hoped, also,

that the circulation of the book, especially in the United
States of
pose,

America and Canada, may serve a useful pur-

by showing how the people of Great Britain can love
his

and honour a man of worth, whatever his country or
clime,

and thus
which

assist in
still

removing the

foolish prejudice

to colour
it

exists in

some

quarters,

and which

may

yet take years to destroy.
Mtiii, 1877.

riLAsaow,

^

^ ^

/

a

FAEEWBLL MEETING
WITH

UNCLE
>

TOM.'

TESTIMONIAL TO MR. AND MKS. HENSON.

»

<

In the sumrner of 1876 the

of Mrs. Beecher Stowe's " Uncle

Josiah Hcnson, the prototy})o Tom," came over from Canada to England to raise funds to clear off a mortgage which he had boon obliged to grunt over his farm in order to meet the costs
of a lawsuit connected with the

Rev

Dawn

Educational Institute,

incorporated

now

as the

Wilberforce University.

The required

sum
plus

—about
;

.£1000

—had

been obtained, leaving a small surto Scotland in February,
raise another

and Mr. Henson having come
it

1877,

was proposed, before he returned, to

large sum, as a present to

Mr. Henson himself, in the evening
first

of his long
visited,

life.

In Edinburgh and the East, which he

£350 was raised, and it was believed that in Glasgow and the West a large amount would also be readily obtained.

At
held

a numerously attended meeting of
in

influential

citizens,

the

Religious

Institution

Rooms,

Glasgow,

on

^

Monday, 19 th March John Burns, Esq. of Castle Wemyss, in the chair, and which was addressed by Mr. Henson committee was appointed to carry out the object and it was

;

6
of the Bank of ScotUmil, intimatod that Mr. James A. Wcnloy, The to receive subscriptions. Bt Vincent Phvce, had agreed

gentlemen -.-John committee was composed of the foUowing Peter Coats, Alex. Allan, Bailie Burns, James White, Sir William Collins, and William Smeal. Institution Rooms, Following on the; meeting in the llcligious audiences in the City liall Mr. Hensou addressinl crowded
capable, resi)ectivcly, of and the Kibble Art Palace, Glasgow— He likewise addressed persons. accommodating 3000 and 5000 Paisley, and other towns, and preached meetings in Greenock,

had done elsewliere, while several Iq different churches, as lie of the subscriptions, which, with the proceeds friends gave
meetings referred
to this" report.
to, will

be found noted in the
efforts,

lists

api)ended

As

the result of these

combined with

and the East of proceeds of the efforts in Edinburgh held in the City Hall, (Masgow, Scotland, at a ftirewell meeting, a Testimonial was on the evening of Fri.lay, 20tli April, 1877, Tom," consisting of a cheque for .£7;)(», presented to "Uncle and chain, the same time, a beautiful gold watch
the
while, at

furnished by Messrs. Aird

& Thomson, Buchanan

Street,

were

place at eight o'clock, given to Mrs. Heuson. The meeting took of ladies and gentleand there was a numerous attendance

Alex. Allan Mr. Alex. Allan, of the firm of James & line of steamers), occupied the chair, (proprietors of the Canadian On and around and on the right sat Mr. and Mrs. Henson. platform were— Rev. Dr. Alex. Wallace, Rev. the crowded Edinburgh Rev. Dr. Jose])h Brown, Rev. J. Davis Bowden, John M'Dermhl, Walter Roberts, J. M. Rae (Mary-

men.

;

Messrs.

hill),

Geo. A. Andrew, Wm. Jetfrey, Wm. Miller (Lenzie), and (Dairy), Mr. Wm. Colquhoun Proudfoot Mr. Thomas Biggart Colquhoun Councillor (Luss), with Major and Mr. Robert Messrs. James A. Wenley, William Kerr, William Brown;
; ;

James William Crawford, A. S. 13. Colquhoun, James Thomson, Macfarlane (of Wilson, George Mathieson, George Hay, George (of Geo. Macfarlane &, Huttou), J. R. MUler, George Macfarlane

of Scotlauil,
ptions.

Tlie

men

:

—John
Bailie

\U:iii,

V. Gray Macfarlane & Co.), Colin Brown, Andrew Aird, W. M'Auslanr, Hunter, James Hunter, John Robertson, W. T. George Burns, and others. Apologies were received from Mr. John Darns, of Castle Wemyss Mr. J. W«inyss House Mr.
;

;

ution Rooms,
e City

Hall

Orknc^y C. •Vhite,of CroHslet; Rev. Dr. Marshall Lang; Provost Rev. Robert Cameron, Rev. R. Niven (Maryhill), (Roiiesay); Mr. Thomas Ellis (Coatbridge), Mr. John Frew, Mr. Daniel

spectivcly, of
ise

Maonab, and Mr. Sanuiel
Association, Greenock.

Duncan, Young Men's Christian

addiessed
pi'caclied

and

while several
ceeds of the
ists a]>])ended

Tlu proceedings comuienc(;d with the singing of the Hundredth Rsalm led by the Ewing J'lace Evangelistic Choir, with Miss
J3onar presiding as accompanist.

After prayer by the Rev.
the choir,

Mr. M'Derraid, and a always do

hymn from
taste

sung— as

they

Hnbined with
the
East of
[all,(rlasgo\v,
jitiuionial

and effect, Mr. "Vm. Crawford read the names of the gentlemen from
apologies liad been received.

— with admiraljle

whom

was

ue for
;h
1

£7;")0,

and chain,

Street,

were

The CiiAiHMAN then said—The occasion of our meeting Our dear old friend. this evening is a very interesting om^ Uncle Tom, being now about to recross the Atlantic, after an absence of eleven months from his home in Canada, we have
assembleo to-night to bid Mrs. Henson and him God-speed on their fiture journey through life, and to present them with
substantial tokens of our esteem
I

eight o'clock,
i

and

gentle-

Alex. Allan
pied the chair,

and

affection.

(Applause.)

am

sure

it

will be gratifying to

you

to

know

that the object
satisfiio-

and around Wallace, Rev.
>n

of Mr. Heason's visit to Great Britain has been most
torily acconplished,
tions.

and in a manner much beyond his expecta-

aburgh
'..

;

Rev.

(Ajplause.)

His reception in

this country has indeed

Rae (Mary-

and Geo. m. Colqulioun
izie),

been most enthusiastic, and nowhere has he been more corilially received than by the ]ieople of Scotland and the citizens
of Glasgow.

(Applause.)

The

thrilling story of his

life,

the

n

;

Councillor

Villiam Kerr,

hoirors of the slave system, his wonderful escape to the free soil of North America, and his subsequent history as a freedman

lomson,

James

and a minister of the Gospel, are of themselves sufficient to

Macfarlane (of
arlane (of Geo.

avaken the sympathy and the

interest of

e^ is

right-thinking

man

in this country; but I believe there

something over

and above
friend has

hearty thiB to account for the

have the people of this country a deep interest in Uncle Tom, sounc. rospectrng thoir uncertain been desirous to give forth no to res their determination never detestation of slavery, and of
satisfied
till

met

with.

My

welcome our rcBpcctea such conviction is that, in showing

this fearful

and horrid system

is

swept away fiom

groa..ing (Applause.) Africa is still every part of the world. light of the God! the glorious under its burden, but, thank

Gospel

and benighted land. Wc and valleys of that hitherto dark wil at no to hope that it, too, have, indeed, good reason to fearful bondage, and --hat this distant day, be ransomed from CLnstian privilege of extending the and it we may have the joy
,

is

now beginning

to shine on the lake,

and mourtams

help implored in the well-known

hymn—

From GrccnlaniVs icy mountains, From India's coral strand, Where Afric's sunny fountains Roll down their golden sand From many an ancient river, From many a palmy plain. They call us to deliver
;

Their land from error's chain.

(Applause.)
for

1

must

not,

which we are

this

satisfaction (addressing Mr. Scotland-of asking your acceptand your numerous friends in applause)-and of assuring

object however, forget the spcnal hav3 now the evening convened. I Henson)-in name of tiis meeting

£750-(loud ance of this cheque for of your you that during the remainder

you shah have our I trust you may have warmest sympathy and earnest prayers. y^rs the Atlantic-that some a safe and speedy passage across
life

of usefulness

be in store for you-and that, earth are finished, you miy God's wise purposes with you on into the joy of tly joyful welcome-- Enter thou

may

vrhen

still

receive the

T.nrd"
'

^E«nftwed applause.)
called

The Rev. Mr. Bowden was then

upon to make

tlr.

ffl:

)ur respected

ihowing such country have
ipecting their

Mrs. Henson, and, in so doing, said— Before proceeding to perform the very pleasing task which has bcou personal assigrioil to me, allow to exi)ress the very spcjcial and
presentation
>

satisfaction I

never to
|)t

rest

Sitting hero,

my

have in being present at this gatiiering to-night. tlujuglits have been going back over the past

away

fi'oni

Btill

groaaing

light of the
[id
(1

niouitains
kind.
will, at

two or three months, and more es])Ocially to the occiision when I first met Mr. Hensoii in London in the month of October last. Henson I may hei'c say that it was upon my invitation that Mr. I met him then, as wo would was inchu'od to come to Scotland.
say, casually,

Wo
no

and he expressed a very strong

desire, before

leaving Britain

»,

— never, as he
some of
its

said, to return to it again

to see
its

e,

and

/hat to

Hcotland, to visit
people.
I at

large cities,

and

to look

upon

the CLristian

once invited him to come to Edinbi'.i.d;, offered
cluiroli

him my own
tainty that
tically,
if

to holii sonu;

meetings

in,

with

ih-^ cer-

he came he would be received most enthusias-

and

liave expressions of

sympathy on the part of the

I)eople of Scotland (piite equal to

what he had experienced

in

England.

(Applause.)

He

arrived in Scotland on, I

think,

the 17th day of February.

He

held a meeting in

my

church,

and such was the outburst of
that,

intei-est

and sympatliy exjjressed
comi)l(!ted,

while

my

obligation to
close of

him had been
visits

Mr.

Henson, at the
spcnal object

the

meeting, implored

me
first

to stand

by him, for there were requests for

from him coming
;

hav?
)f

now the
meeting

from
it fell

all

quarters,

and from Glasgow among the

and so

tlis

to

my

lot to

arrange meetings for him in the East of

ig

your accept-

Scotland, just as Mr. Crawford has been doing in

Glasgow and

ed of assuring
shaV.
;

the West.

It has Ijeen a great delight to

me

to see

how

out of

have our

that small beginning there has been such a great result.

But

you may have ,hat some years

the people of Scotland have not been satisfied with merely
man-'' sting their interest

nd

that, vrhen

meetings to hear Mr. Henson's thrilling story
expression in a more substantial

and symj^athy by attending crowded they have given
;

shed,

you miy

way

of their interest in him,

the joy of tly

and sympathy with his work
have taken occasion to show

— (applause) —and
theii"

not satisfied

with manifesting their interest in Mi-. Henson himself, they

n to make

tie

goodwill to Mrs.

Henson

!1
10 (Applause.)
I ilon't

also.

this.

And I think know why it is that

thoro
I

is

a special

(itnosa iu

have been asked to make
from the circumstances

this presentation to Mrs. H.'nson, unless

house in K.linl.urf^h, and that they lived four weeks in my anyone present to therefore I am perhaps better able than ,i,'reatest pl.-asure in d,)irig-to testify— as I can, and hav<> the (Applause.) I have Mrs. Ilensoi.'s worth as a Ohristian lady. this further trespassing upon th(s time of therefore, without the namci of to present to you, Mrs. llenson, in meeting, (holding in his hand Christian friends in Scotland, this tok.m
in and .sympathy the gold watch and chain) of their interest work in which you wen^ with you and your husban.l in tlus inscription: engaged in (!anada. The watch beat i]w following

—° rrewnited,
departure
Scotland."
for

Henson, as a token of respect, to Mr.s. Josiah in testimonial to her husband ("Uncle Tom"), along with a previous to their City Hall, Glasgow, on 20tli April, 1877, the
Canada, and
as

a souvenir of

her

visit

to

I have to (Applause.) and watch and chain in nanu« of Christian friends iu Scotland, and my own, our regard and tc express, on their behalf desire sympathy with yon and your husband, and the carn(;st holds the waters in the hollow of His hand n\ay He who

ask your acceptance

oi this

that

may fo ba-ili: take you and him safely to Canada, .uid that you '"jly on more there stimulated and encouraged to carry have been engaged. ever the good work in which you
".
•<

than

(ApT'laase.)

M. bowod

Henson, who had risen to receive the testimonial, l.nov.dedgments and resumed her seat. i.
<i
.

Mr. Mi

'OK.

V,

lo,

on coming forward, was greeted with pro-

gentlemen, and longed cbce< m-, said— M.. .Chairman, ladies and before you in Christian friends, I have the honour of standing I do not know, life. probability for the last time in this
all

Sir, in

the present state of

my

health, that I shall be able to
this audience

make those satisfactory remarks which
have.

ought to

My

bodily health is so impiiired that T

am

scarcely able

11
3ial
fjkeil
I

fitnoas in

to stand

;

but

I iim

ihankful to be permitted to be heiv, and
affections of
rect!iv(!il sinc(>
I

I

to

make
aiul

hope to

I'O

able to present tho deepest

my

heart

circuniHtancci

for tho •.varai reception
liotMiir of putting
fiu

which

I

have

had tho
It

ilintiiirf^h,

my

foot in Scotland.
;

(Applause.)

has

10

prosont to

ctceedfid

my

e.xpcctations

and allow mo

to say that what
ellbrt,
\

in (l)ing
LIU8C.)
)

— to
of

has been done has been a spoutau(>ous, a voluntary

I

have

had no thought of spending more than a fortnight in Scotland
Iteyond anything I could

;

time of this
tho iiiuno

but the manner in which I have been treated has been so far

have t'Xpeeted that

I

have been
that
I

lit

ill

liis hiiiul

induced to prolong
co'.iM <Io

my
all

stay.

Now,

Sir, I don't

know

and Kyinpathy
liich

anything more than tender an ex])ression of thanks-

yovi vv(;n^

giving to you and to
lue liy tho

my

friends that have so kindly tak(!n

iig inscri|)tiou;

osiah HonsoH,
cle

as T
I

hand and presented me with a token of respect such never before had presented to mo in my life. (A|)plause.)

Tom"),
visit

in

can scarcely control

my own feelings

at this

moment.

I

thank

ovious to their

Ood

that I have been permitted, through all
lif(>,

tho toils and

her

to

conflicts of

to

have the honour of standhig before a Uritish

!0|)taiico oi this
I

audience

Scotland, and

(applause)—-whose minds and hearts are right upon what we in America call " ti.o goose (juestion." (Laughter.)
is

•ur
5

regard and

That

one of tho greatest questions in America.
call
it

If there

is

earnest desire

anything done good and noble, they

" a grand thing

His hiuid may
III

upon the goose
;

ques*;ion."

(Laughter and applause.)
(llenewed laughter.)
I

This

is

may
I'

,To I'M -^
..i

goose question indeed,

look back

lore

,'.

l)een engaged.

trom whence I came, and see by tho eyes of my mind what you cannot see with your eyes, because you have not been there, and feel in my heart what you cannot feel, and I hope never
will feel,

ho testimonial,
sat.

and no one can

feel it

but the

man who

has had the
years ago
1

iron through his
])ro-

own

soul.
of

(Applause.)

A few

ceted with
gentleraen,

was dragging the chains
deliver,

oppression and groaning beneath

and

the bondsman's burden, with not an eye to pity nor an

arm

to

g before
I
ihall

you in do not know,
be able to

and could not

tell

but I looked steadfastly to

—at
and

which way the thing would ti God, and dc))ended u})on His wu.
it

least as well as I

understood

— (ai)plauso)— and

now
soil.

lience
\,m

ought to

these dark clouds have all been dispersed and blown asunder,
I

scarcely able

have the honour to-nicht of standing uiion British

12

among
lil)orty.

British people, with

British feelings,

and a love of
to

(Loud applause.)
Mr. Bowden

I wanted,

Sir,

when speaking

my

I left for Canada, because I

to come had a reason for it. It was not for noney— I did not know I was going to get any. (Laughter.) I did not think mucli about it; but I wanted to put my foot and in Scotland, for when I was, as it were, between heaven
friend,

— I wanted

to Scotland before

earth,

and exposed to death, dragging through the wilderness dear little woman and four little children when I had got to the extreme point and could get no farther, having
with

my

] reached the waters of Lake Erie, I knew not what to do. and children in the wood, in the prairie bushes, liid my wife

and went out and exposed my life, because I could not do I lay in the woods and groaned till the groans of ray wife and children, who were starving with hunger, aroused my
better.

heart.

I said

— " Lord,

I cannot bear this

;

for

if

I

lie

here I

must die. I can only die, and I am bound to try and save my I went out, not knowing where I was wife and children." should meet; but, as the Lord would have it, going or what I
something was prepared for me, as something was prepared for (Laughter.) Well, what was it? It was not a whale. Jonah.

was a man with a heart in him as big as a great fat ox. And he was not only a man but a Scotchman. I don't say this because I am among Scotch (Applause.)
It

(Laughter.)

people now.

I have written this
it

some thirty-seven years ago,

and you
I
to

will find

in the history of
it

my
now.

life

written then
I don't

;

so

am

not making

a specukition of

And

need

do that to have your affectionate sympathies and prayers, because I have got them already, and shall remember your kindness in all time coming, when I get home to my land

where
hour

I expect to live

and

die.

This man, a Scotchman, in the

took me by the hand, board his vessel, and took us brought myself and family on He asked me what I had to live on. I told to Bufialo city.
of
trial,

stepi)ed

forward,

him

— "Three

threepenny bits"— that

is,

about 18 cents in

13

md

a love of

American
cent,"

coin.

"Is that

all

you have got 1"
to do ?"

"Yes; every
all

n speaking to
cotland before
It

" "What are

you going

" I will give you

I

have got."

" Well," he said, " never mind.

You

see those

was not
put

for

(Laughter.)
;o

my

foot

;n

heaven and

"Yes, Sir." " Well," says he, you get there; but when you get there you stand a man." That good man helped me and my wife and children. Ho stood on the deck above me. " I am a

trees across the river there?"

"you

are not a

man

till

the wilderness

poor

man

myself," he said, " and have a wife
I wail this boat
;

dren

— when

I

children.

I

am

hired to do

arther,

having
1

vhat to do.

prairie bushes,

could not do
e

groans of

er,
if

aroused
I
lie

my my

servant. If I had anything wortli while I something to help you to buy some bread. I will pay your ferry over. Here is one dollar. Go away, then," he said, and, putting his hand on my head, added, " be a good fellow won't you r I told him I would. (Applause.) I have nothing to

and four or five and am but a would give you
it,

here I

;

y and save my where I was
would have
it,

but I iironiised him and T pron)ised ; the Lord before, that while I lived I would be a good man that whatever took place if I starved I would be a o-ood man. I niiide up that in my mind ever since the Lord con;

brag about lay goodness

verted

my

IS
1,

prepared for

shall live

soul ; and I hope I am a good man now, and that I and die a good man— a straiglitforward man. I went

what was

it?

L

great fat ox.
a Scotchman,

i

among Scotch
!ven years ago,
ritten then
;

I toiled with my hands during the week and preached on the Sabbatli for a livinrr. (Laughter. ) I suppose you call a livelihood a living— (laughter) but I toiled with my hands to make a living, and preached to
to in Canada.
for a

work

livelihood

live hereafter.

(Applause.)
I used to
feet,

so

how

I got on.

I may tell you a few things about walk from twelve to fifteen miles on

d
es

I don't need

Sabbath on

my

and preached twice and sometimes three

and

pi-ayers,

times a day the best

way

I could.

I could not read, Init then

[•emember your

ne to

my

land

)tchman, in the by
il,

the

hand,

and took us
I told

and kneel down and pi-ay with them, and would teach them to be honest, and upright, and frugal, and to serve God, and by and by tliey would be better. I preached "repentance toward God and fiith toward our Lord Jesus Christ." I ha].pen("d to say that to
little,

I could sing and talk a

Archbishop

ive on.

Sumner

in

my

interview with him
it

when

I visited

London

in

ut 18 cents in

ISal, and he said

was very good preaching.

I used to go

14
ulmost naked.
I

and on Saturday

went barefooted cvei7 day during the week, had night got a pair of shoes tied with string,

cloth, and took them bhickened uj) a little, wrapped them in a walked barefooted till I got m them with me on Sabbath. I try to hold forth, when sight of the place where I was going to (Applause.) I put them on whon I came on. I put the shoes commands respect, of the houses or cabins, because God

in sight

and

I think a minister ought to as good a looking
I

command respect— (hear,
as

hear)

--and be

man

any

of the rest.
;

(Laughter

and applause.)
something to

eat,

preached as well as T could if they gave me to give, I I took it, and if they had nothing

and applause.) went home without it. (Renewed laughter nine or ten 1 was asked to stay all night, having Frequently " You had better excused. miles to go, but I would beg to be " you are tired, aiid it will bo ten o)stop," they would say Well, I would think the matter eleven before you get home. stayed, for I and would have been glad enough to have
;

over,

dishonouring but I found I could not do so without My wife had tixed on my shirt collar— the cause' of Christ. neck to make me (laughter)— and put a white rag round my T would have been glad to hiok something like a minister. have been obliged to have stayed, but if I had done so I would have been] (Laughter.) I take off my coat, and how would that way, and let the Sooner than I would dishonour the Lord poor as not to have a shirt on, I would p.^ople know I was so next get there at ten or eleven, and go to work

was

tired,

walk home, and Further morning.

details connected with his early experiences

some particulars of his were given by Mr. Henson, including hundreds of miles- to attend long journeys— extending to some night and twice on Sabbatli; meetinus, his preaching every week prejudice against colour, and and one incident illustrative of the account, he was subjected in the hardships to which, on that the people .had raised money to pay his In Hamilton Canada.
weather was cold ami expenses to London by the stage, as the went to the stage office, paid for a seat, and wa« He
storjviv

15
luring the week,

forward next morning befor
to
start,

ight,

when

the conveyance was
ladies

with
I

string,

had

The

stage drove up,

and some

came forward
first,

cloth,
till

and took
I got in

who wanted
lie

to travel,

and

whom

he allowed to get in

as

ted

always gave the ladies the jjreferenoe.

(Laugliter.)

Two

hold forth, when

on whon
ect

I

came
hear)

)ramau(ls respect,

— (hear,

rest.
;

(Laughter

he then put his foot on the and was about to go inside, wlien a great ruffian of a fellow, the driver, seized him by the collar, foi'ced hiT. l)ack, and refused to let liim enter, saying that if he wanted Mr. Henson civilly to go to London he must ride on the top.
step of the stage,

or three gentlemen followed, and

if

they gave

me

remonstrated with him, and Jiually asked back his montsy, but to

lothing to give, I
V

no purpose.

The man

— wlio

used language towards him such

and applause.)
nine or ten
better'
oi-

as he would not lepeat

—would

not give him his money, nor

vin<x

would he permit him

to enter the stage,

even though there was

"

You had

plenty of room, and he was obliged to climl) up to the top, with the prospect of riding there between eighty and a hundred
miles, exposed to the chilling elements.

it will

bo ten

think the matter
liave stayed, for I

forty miles to go, a

When they had about gentleman on his way to London, and who

lout dishonouring

had been vainly expostulating with the driver
halting places, spoke to

my

shirt collar

leck to

make me

lave been glad to ve

at some of the Mr. Henson, saying he felt he was very badly treated, and offered him, if he had no objection, the use of a covered waggon in which were his dogs. JMr. Henson

been obliged to
(Laughter.)
let

ienl
t

way, and

the

thanked him very kindly, accepted his offer, and in this conveyance was b)'ought on to London, feeling that he would rather ride with these dumb dogs than with another dog the

shirt on, I
(1

would

coarse fellow

go to work next
early experiences

I

particulars of his
f

had been invited to remain three or four weeks in London, and one day met in ihe street the gentleman who had shown him so much kindness, and whom he found to be Bishop Cronin of London,
so ill-used liim.

who had

He

miles— to attend
and
in

llenson's submitting himself as he

had done, and taking things

twice on Sabbat] i;
itrainst colour,

as they were
Ids
friend,

when he could not help himself, made the Bishop and through him gained the friendship of otiier
distinction
j

was subjected
[

jjcrsons of

and many
liis

a

live-dolkir

bill

did

the

money

to

pay his and wa«

Bishop afterwards put into
refeiring to his
assault

hand.

(Applause.)

After

ther was cold and
for a seat,

maimed condition— the i-esult of the brutal made on him by Bryce Litton (Mrs. Stowe's " Legree"),

16

who broke

of his shoulder blades, in consequence

which he was

head, Mr. Henson, in unable since to raise his hands to his the to accept my deepest thanks for conclusion, said— Please you have shown me, and the warm-hearted-

Christian affection

I shall remember me. ness with which you have received able to remember anyyour liberality and charity while I am
thinc^,

and hope that with the grace of

God-and

nothing can

as a

be done without that-I may respect. man and a Christian, worthy of your confidence and God, leave to-morrow, and, by the help of (Applause.) I shall when I have an in the arms of my faith, and, shall take you present you all to the opportunity of bowing to the Lord, will
I

be always able to prove myself,

Please to accept this, and throne of divine giace. (Loud Christian love. your friend and brother in the bonds of about to resume his seat, when, applause.) Mr. Henson se .med added—When I heard apparently reminded of an omi'ssion, he new be presented with a watch— rather a mv wife was going to thing-(laughter)-I told her that she would thing, but a good (Laughter and applause.) have to get up and do something. a bow, or something of that I said she would have to make She replied, " Oh, no." I asked laughter.)
sort.

remam

why and

(Renewed she said— "It

is

in Scotland."

I said, " Well,

not customary for ladies to do that how then T' " The gentlemen
(Applause.)
:

always present thanks for their wives." " I will tell you what I will do I said,
thiiig,'l shall

" Well,"

if

you promise me one

acknowledgment for you." " What is that ? " " If you promise you will behave yourself— "Well," said (laughter)-bet,ter than you ever did before." ] I'm sure I have behaved " do that." " Why " "

make some kind

of

she

I cannot

mv.self as well

difference
so,

and I

(Applause.) " There may be a that— (laughter) -you might thmk of opinion about never dismight not." "Well, I don't know we
as I could."
j

"No; we always think both just exactly alike." aa'ree.r' then turned to his wife. (Laughter and applause.) Mr. Henson
Mi

17

which he was Mr. Henson, in
of

who, in response to his request, rose and bowed her acknowledgments, after which they sat

down amid

great applause.

thanks for the
B

warm-hearted-

Prayer was then offered up by the Rev. Dr. Brown, and the choir sang, " I've been redeemed."
Th(? Rev. Dr. Alex. Wallace was afterwards called upon, and said On rising to address you to-niglit, my feelings are of a very mingled character. I don't know that I can stand here

shall
1

remember remember anynothing can

iiid
;o

prove myself,

to-night without referring, in the presence of our venerable
friend, to

snce

and

respect,

something at

least of the horrors of the hell of slavery

the help of God,
('hen I
it
s,

from which he has
poem, "The Inferno"
tified,

escapell.

When

the great Italian poet

have an
all to

Dauto, who lived in Florence, and

you

the

who wrote with whicli his name
is

that remarkable
is

always iden-

and I remain an love. (Loud e his seat, when,

just

as

Milton's

with "Paradise Lost"
mothers,
in

— used
of

to

pass

through
xxp their

the

streets,

a

kind

terror,

held

children to look at the weird-like

—When
h
I-

I heard

whispered in their ear
hell."

— " That
man

man, and

is

the

man

that has been in

— rather a new
that she would

And

so

you see here

to-night,

City Hall of Glasgow, a

in his eighty-eighth year

on the platform of the who was
redeemed

and applause.) mething of that I asked h, no."
r

for nearly half a centuiy in the horrid hell of slaveiy,

—not

merely .'edeemed

by the proclamation of Abraham

Lincoln, that set four millions of slaves free in the United
States, but

ladies to do that

redeemed by the precious blood of the Lamb.

Now,
It

"The gentlemen
lause.)
.

I cannot look

on "Uncle

Tom"

without recalling one very

"Well,"

menioi'able fact in the history of the Anti-Slavery struggle.
is

promise

me one

not yet

much more than

a centuiy since Granville Sharp,

gment
,"

for you."

a nol)le friend of the slave, obtained a decision of the English

ehave yourself
" Well," said

judges in the famous case o" the negro Somerset, that as soon
as a slave sets his foot upon English ground he becomes free. That was quite an era in the struggle against slavery. No slave power could carry Somerset back from this country into

e T
'

have behaved

There may be a you might thinlc
r

the land of bondage.

His feet had touched British

soil

and he

J
-j

we never

dis-

was

free.

(Applause.)

Well, there has been a great and mighty

exactly alike."

struggle since that in order to set the slave free in our

West

u'ued to his wife.

Indian possessions, and afterwards in America.

Our

friend has

B

18
referred to his

my an account of which I hold in to get it, for you will hand-and I advise every one of you friend has referred to his read it with thrilling interest-our The if I should do the same. own life, and I may he pardoned up that man's father, for standing Why, horrors of slavery the brutal and for laying hands on in defence of his own wife, mention, in an had assaulted her-I shall not overseer who his blood boiled with by which audience such as this the crime humanity-he happened to indignation from the instincts of brawny blackthe result ? was strike the o^^erseer, and what one father of Uncle Tom received smith was selected, and the A pause ensued after he got bare back. hundred lashes on the his pulse, it was decided to but judicious men having felt fifty was left a bleeding mass of wounds aive him the whole, till he
own
life,
!

A

Ind

bruises

;

to the whippmgthen his right ear ^vas nailed

the head, and all this as a cut right from the side of dare not lift a hand against a warning to negroes that they that man's nature became utterly white man. From that hour heart was of human kindness in his "The milk changed.
post

turned to

was marred for ever, and then he I don t never more heard ot. was sold down to the South and What his after " know anything more touching in history. " neither my mother nor I ever was," says Uncle Tom, fate
gall."

His

life

Yes, the great day the great day will reveal all." what a revelation of the unspeakable win reveal all ; and oh Then, again, our villanies horrors of this sum of human hand to his head. How was that friend says he cannot lift his name will go down to posterity, done 1 By a fellow whose bad " Key to It has been said read the like that of Legree. there has been any exagUncle Tom's Cabin," if you think unvarnished facts. This very geration in that tale -^f the plain defence platform, for standing up man whom you see on the kindness Isaac Riley -for that act of of his drunken master, another estate, who, by repeated was assaulted by the overseer of shoulderfence-rail, broke his arm and blows from a heavy
learned
;

!

!

m

I

in

m

19
Lold
"or

in

my
will

blades

in

such a

way
head
his

that he has never been able to raise
since.

you

his hands to his

And

then, because our friend,

;rred to his

when a

boy,

wished to learn to read,
master's

how was he
initials

treated?

The 3tanding up
same.
\

He

had seen on
Riley).

butter the

"

I.

K."

(Isaac
a pen,

With

a goose quill, cut so as to look like

the brutal

tiou, in

an

boiled with

he imitated as best he could those two letters, and In the story of then he wanted to get a spelling book. " It seemed to me if I took some of the his life lie says

lappened to

ai)ples that fell

from the trees in the orchard, and sold them,

awny
after
IS
;s

black-

I should he able to get the

money

for the spelling book.

I did

•eceived one

he got

Early the next morning I was about to harness the horse this. for my master; the; hovso was frisky and ran, anil I ran to
catch him,

decided to
of

when my hat

fell ofV,

and the book in

it

drop})ed on

wounds

to the ground.

After I had harnessed
that?'

my
'

horse

my

master

le

whippinga

exclaimed, 'What's
it
'/

'A

spelling
it 1'

dl this as a
id against

'

'

Mine.'
to

'

Where

did you get

'Whose is Bought it. Sir, when
book.'
it?'

I

went

market.'

'How
!'

nnioh was

Eleven

cents.'

came utterly s heart was and then he
of.
liat
I"

'Where

did you get the money?'
'

'I sold some apples out of
'

our orchard.'

Oar orchard
it.

he exclaimed, in a passion.

I'll

teach you to get apples from our orchard for such a vile pur-

I don't
his after

pose

;

so you'll reineml)er
it

Give me that book.'

I stooped I dodged.

to pick
'

up, and as I

saw

his big cane

coming down

nor I ever
great day

Pick up that book,' he
obliged to do
till

cried,

using an awful oath.

At

last I

lie
I

was
back

it,

when he beat me

across the head and

unspeakable
again, our

my eyes

[1,

poor mother found
Ijefore I

were swollen and I became unconscious. My me in this state, and it was some time
to be about

low was that
L

was able

my work
he

again.

When my
'

to posterity,

master saw

me

after I recovered,

said, sneeringly,
if

the "

Key

to

want

to be a fine
I'll

gentleman ?

Remembei-,

So you you meddle with

en any exags.

a book again

This very
of kindness

knock your brains out.' very humorously adds, "The wonder to me
left,

"
is

And our friend why I have any

up in defence
t
lO,

brains

I shall carry to

my

grave a scar

my

master made
till

that day on

my

head.

I did not o})en a

book again

I

was

by repeated
shoulder-

lud

42 year? of age and out of the land of slavery." Now, while we thank God with all our hearts to-night, let us remember that

20
there are
still

million, of

human boMg»

in slavery.
I

was brought once and blood sold

face to face

with slavery.

"- »-

In 1866 I
«

I was till that Jay. hundred other passengers, along with five or si. nont spending the time at the I^a.^^^^^ :Jrr;;uarantine. been

at Aby.los

^'^_ on the H.Ues

Win-

when a «'°-> beautiful Sabbath morning, ^ j^, found .v Tu, t. li forward, to my horror I the Sfluare, on going tins land ever h^. Shall the people of cti n going on. lav

One

«- *"

frTnrkey)

AnkLrican

Mud

si* Mm
i:.

and w 11 blood tingling at the sight, felt "<""I unless you hold my hand." ['^f.;:* each to a Cu.lush The boys were sold for £7.5 indication. system !• said n,y friend, "that horrid "Thank «od '-ve a ;" .uul here yo" in my country f shwery L, over Theie are a (.Vpplause. evening. proof of it before you this know in connection «th our friend. few things I would like to was the name of the Scotchman who I wlkUike to know the terrible struggle for after a onlTo give him the last push, There is notlnng more the land of freedom. merty, into fact to winch whole of this book than the thri fn» in the He tells " referred in the outset of his address. "Und:Tom
sayin..-" I
feel

.t. sentiment will never allow se!* away for ever. Public for boys were exi»sed Ine.) Two flue jet-black Nubian ,,uaht,es. ' expatiating on their good he auctioneer w,>s al to hold h^ who was with me asked me

(Loud

cries of

"No.")

That

>s

one thmg that

\

friend

my

l™g

after the whole story-how, ^^--^'""^'"Y"^ 'if lest the day and travelling by mght, hiding in the woods by should be down upon them Ive-tanter. or the bloodhounds

Zltl

and then a the banks of Lake Ene, he ca-e at last to near to get across that How was he progress seemed stopped. with his schoonc Itwasaspecial providence. A man Ctt. Uncle and, as with grain,

was
his

there, loading it

Tj

i

i

I" i^ as he approached, ate "Yes Sir," was the reply; and his Uuldien carrying two of weary march of six weeks,

appearance, cried

"Hallo "-"' "-"^

='^",

^

'-Jf.

f^

"

21

In 1866 I ^er saw flesh
I

the Hellespassengers,

c

ke Lazaretto.
1

on his hack all the way for six hundred miles till the skin was raw to an extent almost equal to the size of the knapsack in which he bore them, no wonder he came up weary and crippling. " I'll give you a shilling an hour," said the man; but on seeing "Uncle Tom," ho added, "Oli, you
can't

collected iu

itl

a Turkish

but "Uncle Tom" quickly

lid
le

ever fight

thing that
it.

and ho was going to let him off; "Can't II" seized a bag corn, followed the gang, coming and going, and wrought with of a will. Then he got into conversation with a coloured man,

work—you're

cripi)leil,"

replied,

!ver allow
3

exposed for
to hokl his

one of the labourers, and asked him, "How far is it to Canada?" This coloui'ed brother, com))rehending the situation,
answered, "

3od qualities.
i

iirht,

and

will

Woidd you like to go to Canada?" "Yes, if I "Then toll our Captain; he's a fine fellow." The could get." Captain came, and all honour tu that nameless Scotchman who
f^ave

uivering with
to a

our friend the

last

push from the land of bondage into the
I
it

Turkish
system

land of freedom.
his

(Loud applause.)
it.

do regret I don't

know

lorrid

name.

I wish I could get

Be
bless

]\Lvcpherson or Living-

I

have a living There are a
our friend.
the

stone, or

on the

Duncan Macdougall face of God's earth, God

(a laugh)


!

if

living

anywhere
ho will

him

But

if not,

ith
1
}

who was

reward from that Saviour who at the have " Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the
his

last will say,

least of these

struggle for

my

brethren, ye have done

it

unto me."

" Uncle

Tom "

has

nothing
fact to
•ess.

more which
tells

redeemed the pledge he gave the Scotchman that morning, when, having one more river to cross, and after receiving from

He

X long weeks, night, lest the

him money to pay the ferryman. Green, the Captain put his hand on his head and said, " Be a good fellow, won't you 1
" Uncle

Tom "

gave a pledge, which I will (^uote in his
I'll

own
give

wn upon them,
e,

words.

" Yes," he said, "

use

my

freedom well

;

I'll

and then
across

all

my

soul to God."

He

has i-edeemed that pledge to the Scotch-

et

that

th his schooner
;le

Tom

"

made
his

man, and he is here to show he has redeemed it both to God and man. " I'll use my freedom well." He has has he not? He has used it well in this way, that he has endeavoured in

n you workl"
,ched, after
,f

Canada
began

to

educate and elevate his coloured brethren.

He

at once to do this.

On

getting to the land of freedom

his

children

he saw their degraded condition.

He

got schools erected, had

;

22
preacher, and he has sawmills established, became a missionary nobly the pledge he gave to redeemed, all of you will a<hnit, freedom well." Has he not

that

Scotchman-" I'll
it 1

use

my

done

(Applause.)

I think the deeds ho has

done " praise
I

him
the

in the gates."

You have

heard how
;

he has described that

remarkable ride of his with the dogs

and yet
than

don

t^

thnik

Queen ever di.l a nobler thing has done many a "Uncle Tom" to come and see her. She which history will place her name noble, womanly thing, for
ui.

when

she invited

renown; but I don t win her affection, know 'anything she has done more to that prejudice against and that'will tend more to remove and see her u. her own colour, than the call to come up the meeting of Uncle Tom I believe that
hich

on the

page

of

immortal

palace.

(Applause.)

and

his wife

and the Queen

will yet

historical

painting.

Why

not]

This

form the subject of a great is a subject worthy of

I am not a prophet painter. the pencil of the greatest living daresay, see the lives a few years longer will, I but whoever wife a great painting, Queen's meeting with Uncle T(mu and his who came to see the chiefs as in the case of those African what ..as the reason Queen, and on parting with her asked

of this country's greatness

;

and in the beautiful engi-aving in
find the

the print-shop

windows, we
telluig

Queen presenting them

with a Bible, and

country's greatness."
art of the painter will

them, " This Book is the source of my I have no doubt that the (Applause.)

convey to the can' .s that scene which It reminds me of old was worthy of our noble Queen. Pharaoh, though Jacob was Jacob going into the presence of " Uncle Tom ;" and when Pharaoh was so much older than leaning on the top touched with the aged appearance of Jacob, Queen herself, we learn from Mr. Bowden and
of his
stafl'.

The

the eight of " Uncle Tom," others, was remarkably struck with for one who was and complimented him on his hale appearance motion to propose, but I I have no nearly ninety years of age. prayer for our friend ask you alfto join with me in earnest

;

23

and he has ho gavo to
las he not

and
be
it

iiis

noh\o. wife,

longer or shorter, that

wishing God's blessing on t.hom in the future, In my ( Api»lause.) lies before them,

own

me

"praise

scribed that
lon't think

church, when referring to this same visit to the Queen. I was struck with the expression our venerable friend employed. lie felt the honour, doubtless, but lie felt there wan sometliing

hi"her and better in what
witii

is still

she invited

emphatic

earnestness
is

— "Ah,

before him, and
it

said to
visit

me,
the

vvas

good to

one
)

many
I

a

Queen, but there
about
whicli

something better ahead

— som(!thing

better

her

name
don't

alunid," referring to the bright

)ut
;r

the ehoir

affection,

dice against iu her

" That hynni tells me " somettiing better ahead," in the happy, hai)i)y
immort'ils,
wlierc;
1

and hapjjy home " over there," were engaged singing at the time, Yes, there is sometliing better ahead."

home
those

of the

own

trust

you
:

will

m(!et with
lost,
all

whom
In

Uncle
:ct
•t »t

Tom

slavery

sundered

from

you
!

" not

but gone before."
look forward.

of a great

" Something
closinj,, I

better

aheau

"

Let us

worthy of
a proi)het

cannot but refer to the fact that in this same hall

•esay, see
•eat
le

the

many noble advocates for the slave have stood, most of whom have now passed away, I cannot but recall the names of Dr,
Heuj'h, Dr. Wardlaw, Dr. King, Dr.
of Dr.

painting,

Mobson, and, above

all,

to see the

s the j-eason

William Anderson, who })led for liberty for the slave. And I woidd refer, too, to our own Livingstone. (Ap])lause.)
his

engi-aving in
renting

The words on

tomb are supposed

to be the last words he

them

uttered on his knees for Africa,

He was
night."

found dead on his

source of
Diibt

my

knees by his devoted attendants.
night."
It

He; had bade

them "good
sleep-

that the

was

his last
;

"good

He

had said to them,
"

scene which
3

" Don't

come back

" but,

when they thought

Massa was

me

of old

ing long," they ventured in, and the sun of Africa had arisen on the face of their dead master.

jh

Jacob was

The prayer is now appropriately

was so much
ng on the top Bow den and
,

placed on his tombstone in Westminster Abbey
rich blessing

— "May Heaven's

Turk,
ji'he

who

Uncle Tom," one who was
propose, bnt I
for our friend

last

come down on every one, American, English, or slavery." the open sore of the world prayer of David Livingstone was on behalf of the
will heal

slave.

Now
with

I don't

know

if

ever I addressed a meeting with
to-night,

dee'per interest
all J rin

and emotion than

and I

am

sure you

me in

the words of the benediction uttered by Moses,

j£2g25Sfc--

24

who

led his people out of the himl of

bondage,

when

in blessing thorn he

E^ypt and the house of said-and let us use the

leave our city towords on behalf of our dear friends as they The Lord bless morrow, an.l are about to quit our shores-" shine upon thee, his face thee and keep thee, the Lord make lift up his countenance and be gracious unto thee ; the Led (Loud applause.) upon thee and give thee j>eace." The choir sang the hymn " Over There." received with reMr. Henson then came forward, and was the name of the newed applause. After mentioning that in his elforts to Scotchman who had so nuich befriended him recollection, John Burns reach Canada, was, to the best of his to move a vote of thanks to or Burnet, ho said he now rose Crawford, who had so generously theii- friend, Mr. William visit to Glasgow and the stood by him on the occasion of his ami voluntaScotland, and had done so spontaneously

West
rily.

of

(Applause.)

very hearty vote The Rev. Dr. Wallace likewise proposed a had brought Mr. Henson to of thanks to Mr. Bowden, who
his meetings in the East, Scotland, and had charge of arranging -^ ar old friend. raised in behalf of their where £330 had been

(Applause.)

compliment paid him, Mr. CuAWFORD, in acknowledging the the intercourse ho had expressed how much he had valued man, upright, straightenjoyed with Mr. Henson as a Christian
bore testimony to the forward, and anxious to do his best, Henson, and how much both she and Mrs.

amiable qualities of
her husband had

won

the esteem of those
first

who had met them,

including some of the

by

letter

and personally,

people in Scotland, several of whom, regretted that their stay had been so
to

short.

One gentleman had wished Mr. and Mrs. Henson

spend six weeks at his estate. the real "Uncle Tom." reference to whether Mr. Henson was

A

great deal had been said in

was In connection with the proof that he

so,

Mr. Crawford

" Eva," given on a previous referred to a musical performance of

25
e hotiso of
\i8

night in the Wellington Talaco, Soutli Side, in connection with
the

iiso

the

Foundry Boys'
little

llcligiouH Society.

Mr. Henson

pr('si<lcd,

lur city to-

and

in sonic reniaiks ho

made on the

occasion, adverting to tho

Lonl bless
xipou thee,

incident of
said he

Eva having been taken out

of the water,

ouutenance

was the man who did it. The audience rose in admiration, and loudly aj)plauded Mr. Henson, as much as to say, ' There is no doubt this is Uncle Tom." Mr. Crawford added
that he had had tho honour and privilege of mingling with various ])eople, but a mon; pi-actical Christian, and out-and-out

ed with
inio
H

re-

of the

straightforward
in all his
life.

man than Mr. Henson ho had
(Applause.)
also returned

nevi^r

met with
tlie

efforts to

Fohii

Burna

The Rev. Mr. Bowden
accorded to him.

thanks for

vote

f thiinks to
1

After stating that in tho East .£350 had
of which had been united to the
tlie

generously

been

raised,

£330

amount
ho

ow ami
iiul

tho

obtained in Glasgow and
said
it

West

for the testimonial fund,

voluuta-

^
hearty vote

had been a source of great lujppiness to him that he had been in any way heli)ful to Mr. Henson, and it would bo a bright spot in hia life that ho had enjoyed his acquaintance.
(Api)lause.)

Henson
ill

to

the East,

The second paraphrase

—"

God

of Bethel

"

— was

after-

old friend.

wards appropriately sung by the company. vote of thanks to the Chairman, proposed by Councillor

A

it

paid him,

iirso

ho had

ght, straight-

William Brown, and a similar vote to the Choir-, proposed by Dr. Wallace, were carried by acclamation and the Rev. IMr. Roberts closed the meeting with the benediction.
;

nony
1

to the

)oth she

and met them, ral of whom,
had been so
.

Large numbers of the audience then pressed forward to shake hands with " Uncle Tom " and his wife, and the venerable man was afterwards followed to the ante-room, where he was nearly
overpowered by these mani' estations of regard, and was obliged,

from exhaustion, to
wish

Henson

to

— " God

desist,

with the fervent expression of the
shortly before ten

bless

you

all."
o'clocl:.

been said in

The proceedings terminated

Uncle Tom." »Ir. Crawford
on a previous

26

«'

IN UNCLE TOM'S" LAST APPEARANCES

SCOTLAND.
(From
the

brANUAKu j n».ir.vv»v St\ni)AR1> of Wednesday, Dumfries and Gai.lonvax
April 25, 1S77.)

Mn. H.NSOS

L
at

,mnd to make his ivceut ap -P Ws v^Uic la.t '"^;'^^:'^^ poarance in Glasgow .„ l,i» had heo„ f"™;'"; ^^^f;';;,^ a committee of gcntlcn.eu a visit, and plied by t e pay endeavouv to persuade him to Johnstone, meretan, he impoitiiiiity of Mr. John
ha.l n,a,te

7-7he

m

; taciou,

C"'^ ^°" »' guests of Mr. and Mi.. arrived, becoming the L™e afternoon he F-ehed Chapelmoiint. On Sabbath filled The ehnreh was completely burn Street U.l>. Church. the pulpi be placed up the aisle, Hill seats having to accompanied to the " Uncle Tom" was steps also being occupied. tlie congregaUon Mr. Eae, the pastor of lit .V the Rev.

Saturday forenoon kst consented, and on

"^

- ;*

m

:„

-Uncle Ton of the service. conducted the other pai-ts and ten years, has a surfourscore although en the verge of eona clear, distinct voice of hale appearance, and

Sy

Ue"lle slreng". and which

in

-'- "fe-;"
^-'^^l

,,e vigour of manhood tiuths ot len^io countrymen the imperishable

^^w
^^^t

^^^J^^'^'^^.

invitation, "Come unto his text the Gospel you rest -Matthew heavy laden, and I will give labour and are an able and impressive dishe preachcl

xtTs-from which

which he said :— course, in the course of some of my own experiences^ Ill^w me to refer you to do you good. I because I know it will I offer you this know -1-t prayer prayer has done, and I

remember what

upon me, The spirit of the Lord is can do and will do. gospel to the poor. He has anointed me to preach the to the captive, to open He has sent me to preach deliverance bound, and to proclaim that arc the prison doors of them

Z

!

27

Lord-the universal salvation of all the acceptable year of the Jesus Christ. All in the blood and redemption of that believe
I
f

am

so glad that

it

does not

show any

difference.

Any who

Wednesday,

may will qive their hearts to Christ some sixty or seventy years so in the country where I lived There one-sided, one-handed salvation. afro. It was a kind of the poor negro. all the whites, but none for was a salvation for grew a little older and thought for myself,
come. It

was not preached

None
life,

!

and heard the
sins
if

sermon that ever I heard preached in my Christ had died for the I knew it had Jesus Christ in it. the question, I wond(;r of all men, and I only had to settle
first

But when

I

Christ died for

me

I

The minister preached that Christ died

for all

men— yes,

poor, the for the high, the low, the rich, the

might have bond, the free— the poor negro dragging his chains and an enslaved body. The next thought I had was, a free soul praying if this is what my mother has always been
I

wonder

for,

that I might be brought to Christ.
I

Poor

little

starving

negro as I was.

wondered

if

Christ would save

my

little soul.

The minister

would bear the burden and the there He hung, sins of the world on His shoulders on the cross He promised to and sighed, and died. and bled, and groaned, He ascended up to rise again on the third day, and He did.
said that Jesus
;

God on high and
l)lood.

led captivity captive,

sons of men, and the greatest gift
I

He

and gave gifts unto the gave was His precious

looked through the door. My soul was so engrossed with the truth which I had never I always remember heard before. My heart was wound up. looked at the

man.

I

him, and today,
iwn expei'iences.

friends, I have the honour to stand before an example of amazing mercy, and the prayers Yes, and I think now, and ever have of a dear old mother. thought, that never will the prayei's of a faithfid mother or

my

this congregation

father go to the ground.

They may not be answered in the God never forgets them. He never forgets the prayers of some of your dear old mothers who have bended over you and wetted your cheeks with their tears. They

way they

expect, but

m

ill

28
answered. are perhaps not answered yet, but they will be He treasures them and treasures them up. Yes,
hears

God
them

up in the book of
(Heb.
glory
ii.

life.

The

minister's

text

was
little

this

9)—"

We

see Jesus,

who was made

a

lower

than the

angels

for

the

suffering of

death, crowned with

honour; that he by the grace of God should I remember the day, the taste death for every man." all that I time, the place, when and where I yielded up was brought to my soul, had for Christ*, and then peace

and

Can and I have walked in ways of peace and joy ever since. to. I was if you cannot say it, you ought you say thati Well, with Jesus in fifteen or sixteen when I heard the first sermon
it.

It

was a sermon

of free salvation to

prayers of

heaven.

my dear old mother who triumph She lived the Christian's life, she died in the to heaven, and I expect to go of faith, and she has gone home will be I have thought what a l)lessed thing it there by-and-by.
collection that a few days and months will bring this glorious pleasure of and selection around, when you and I will have the away to mounting on the wings of the wind, and be escorted blessed thing it is to And what a that place of rest above. societies we think of the friends we will meet there, and the

I thought of the has gone long since to
all.

will be connected witli.

I wish to impress on your mind the which will take place when you go there. sacred congratulations anywhere else. I don't say what will be your fate if you go friends Here we are divided from one another— some of our
grave, but Christ are on the briny ocean, and some sleep in the and I think by the invites us all to come to that place of rest, meet Him. I eyes of my mind that I see thousands going to shall meet there on the frontier of shall be there too. Oh what a morning it will be to see the mothera eternal rest. sons and fathers meeting on the frontiers of

We

!

and daughters and morning "—it glory, and hearing the congratulation—*' Good mother." will always be morning there—" Good morning, my crossed over at ' Good morning, my daughter." "Have you

29
last?"
of the

"Which way did you comer' " I came by the way To see Oh what a morning that will be cross."
!

your dear father clasping hands with his son, with her daughter on the frontiers of glory
!

and the mother

Mr. Henson addressed a monster meeting in the INTechanics' Every part of tlu; hall Hall, Dumfries, last night (Tuesday).

was crowded, platform, aisles, and doorways and numbers of other people had come in from Annaii, Kirkcudbright, and more remote, the audience including several places nearer and On Mr. Henson entering the hall, he of the county families. INIrs. Henson was also on received with great cheering. was The chair was taken by Dr. Gilchrist, of the the platform.
;

and among those present were— Starke, of Troqueer Tlolm, Mr. Mr. Maxwell, of Munches, Starke, Mrs. Da vies, Mrs. S. A damson, Starke, yr., and IMrs.
Crichton Royal Institution
;

^Nlr.

John Paton, Rev. Marshall N. Goold, Rev. John D. M'Kinnon, Rev, G. Rae, Rev. W. Graham, Rev. R. INt'Kenna,
Rev.

Rev. J. Strachan, Rev.

J.

Duff, Rev.

W.

Tiplady, Rev. T.

Bowman, Rev. L. M'Pherson, Rev. Mr. Simpson (Crichton
Institution),

Mr. Boyd, Kinder House, Mr. Walter (h-ierson, Chapelmount, Mr. W. Grcgan, St. Christopher's, Mr. J. B. Milligan, Mr. James Rodger, Mr. John Johnstone, merchant, Mr. Johnston, Bank of Scotland, Mr. :M'Neillie, of Castlehill, Provost Gillies, :Mr. R. B. Carruthers, Mr. M'Dowall, Mr. Johnstone, Mr. J. Ewing, Mr. J. Clarke, Mr. Scott, INIr. W. F.
Allan, inmmonger, &c.

The Rev. Mr.
prayer, and the

Paton having

ojtened
J.

the

meeting with
leading, having

100th Psalm, Mr.

Rodger

been sung,

The Chairman
you expect
occasion,

said

:

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I

know
on

that
this

me

to say nothing,

or next to nothing,

and I need not certainly waste your time in explaining to you the object of this meeting, as you are all acquainted
with
it

equally with myself.

It is a trite observation that
o*^^her

man

never chanoea.

Like many

trite observations,

it

has a

30
.00(1 deal of truth in it;

and

if

we

look at what

is

going on
that
see

around us

wc, in this nineteenth century,
is

cannot

fail to see

the truth of the observation

pretty well confirmed.

We

in the slavery that that confirmation, for example,

still

exists

in Africa,

anticipating in the and in the M-ar which we are we cannot divine. I. is, however, East, a war whose results

an equally
gressive,

trite

observation that
still.

man
is

is

changeable

pro-

and never stands

There

probably more truth
all

observation. hi this than in the former man's history hike an extended view of

At

events,

if

we
1

from the creation,

think
i.

we

will

come

a creature of change .ml Old Book-which we ought
find that,

that man very confidently to the conclusion consult an progression and if we
;

all

to

know- we

shall

certaudy
that he
is

from beginning I think, that the very It is very remarkable, too, progressive. " Book of books " is a witness to the whole last book of that progress from time into continuing the history of man's
subject,

to end, it is sim,.ly a proof

perfect developis to attain to a the future eternity, where he people in the present day tell us ment. Now, a great many progression of man can be accomplished that this development or But it appeal^ or civilization. through education, or science, education merely furnisli and to me that science, civilization, of acquiring it^ Knowmen with knowledge, or the means thing-a great power. But, after lecde, no doubt, is a great knowledge of Nature-only puts an science-which is the the art hand, and we still want to get certain tools into man's the garden oi If we look l>ack to of using these tools aright. the error that man find that this was precisely Eden we shall that knowledge was everything.

at first

made

in supposing

Eve wanted

to acquire

knowledge, thinking that with know-

ledcre all else

Ik

iM

truth 's, she would be within her reach. But the which she got, and lost much crained nothing by the knowledge What she wanted acquire it. hideed by the w^y she took to would useful was a something which to mnke the knowledge

enable her to apply

it.

Now

I come, very briefly, to

my

con-

I

31

J

going ou

clusion—namely, that in order to apply this knowledge which
education, ocience,

to see that

We
still

see

exists

and civilization give us, we want the inand the power to apply it rightly, for the mere clination knowledge of good and evil, as shown by the history of Fuve,
and of
all

m<* in the
,

the evil,

is

not

suflicicnt.

Now

there

is

nothing that

however,
pro-

eahle,

more truth
3nts, if

we

can direct \is to where we may power except that Old Book I have named— the Bible. I have made these observations because 1 think they are naturally and I conclude by su<'c'ested by the object of this meeting
;

get that inclination and that

creation, I
in

simply turning to the best living evidence that I

know

of the

that man

consult an
11

truth of what I have said, and whom I am hajjpy to recognise and present to you as our Christian brother. (Loud cheers.)

cortahily

f

that he

is

lat

the very

tlu-'

whole

Mr. Henson, who was loudly cheered, in the opening part of and written his address said: There has been so much said me, so much read about me, and so many things thought about about me, that I did not know that I could do better than

m

time into
ns

come and

ct dcvelo])-

day

tell

(Laughter and ai)plause.) It has let you see me. been spread abroad that " Uncle Tom' is comiug," and that is what has brought you here. Now allow mo to say that my
'

:coin})lished
.

name

it

appears
furnish

•ely
it.

not Tom, and never was Tom, and that I do not want for me than to have any other name inserted in the newspapers own. My name is Josiah Henson, always was, and always my
is

Know-

will

be.

I never change
if T could,

my

colours.

But, after

would not
laughter.)

and

I could not if I would.

I (Loud laughter.) (Bene wed

—only puts
nret

the art

e
ir

oarden of
that

Well, inquiry in the minds of some has led to a You have read and deal of inquiry on the part of others. " Uncle Tom' was dead, and how heard some persons say that
'

man

can he be here
us."

1

It is an

imposition, that is being practised

on
do

everything,

Some

people in this
for

town have
I

said so.

Very

well, I

with knowtruth
id lost
's,

not blame you

saying that.
to

she

A great many have come
I

me

do not think you are to blame. in this country and asked me if
I,

nuich

was not dead.

(Laughter.)

Says

"

Dead? "

Says he, " Yes.
" Well," says
(Laughter.)
it

she wanteil
vhich would
to niv con-

I heard you were dead, and read you were." " I heard so too, but I never believed it yet.

I,

I

tliought in all

probsibility I would have found

out as soon as

32

anybody
is

else."

(Laughter.)

Well,

now,

to

remove

this
it

difficulty, if it

exist in

your minds.

not a very pleasant thing to imposition upon the traversing the country and practising an and the only way I have No, it is not pleasant; people.
to

As me

a matter of course
to hear that I

am

upon meet it is to say that when people have this doubt me they ain't well read, or have fortheir minds it shows ever read at all. gotten what they have read, if they have Stowe's " Uncle (Laughter.) They have forgotten that Mrs. " is a novel seemed a glorious and it must have Tom's Cabin
;

kill her finish to that novel that she should

hero— a

glorious

Uncle Tom's Cabin"— you Now you get the Key finish. about sixpence, fifteen or sixteen cents— and you can buy it for I see iliat gentleman along there commence and read it. [Referring to our reporter.] That is all it down. setting (Laughter.) Well you comI see you. (Laughter.)
to "
right.

chapter of mence at the^37th chapter and read up to the 57th " Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin," and I think you will there the (Laughter and applause.) You remember that when see me. shook the foundations this novel of Mrs. Stowe came out, it shoes, It shook Americans almost out of their of this world. It left some of them on (Laughter.) of their shirts. and out barefooted and scratching their heads, without knowthe sandbar

However they came to the ing where to go, or what to do or say. fabrication, a falseconclusion to say that the whole thing was a her of writing it, and they hood, and a lie ; and they accused written, the demanded of her a clue or key to the novel she had made, and the libel she had fixed on the exposure she had And so, as she was in duty bound to give someUnited
States.

brought out the "Key," between in that way set you and she, and in that she si)oke of me, and I am not a Robert (Laughter and applause.) the negro free. Burns— (laughter)—but that is a fact. (Applause.) You will " of me, the position which I held in relation find in tl'.at " Key
thing, she, I think in 1853,
^

to her work.

They

said there

were never any such things per-

33

*l
smove this
jf

potrated on the negroes

;

never any negroes so

atfiictetl,

iind

course
I

it

that the book was a libel on the people of the United States

that
1

am
have

and when she took to
find a

this

upon the
I

man
I

called Josiali

"Key," she told them where they would Henson. She gave me a great name

ay

loubt upon

was a venerable fellow, in which she was not much mistaken, for I was an old man, to be found in Canada West,
and said
labouring there as a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ preaching to the fugitive slaves, encouraging the cause of education,

have

forall.

ead at
3's

" Uncle

and building up the poor

aiflicted
is

race

of
I

negroes.

a j;ioriou3

—a
;s

glorious
"

ibin

—you —and you
there

am not written in Mrs. Stowe's novel, but only for what she wrote about me. You can find that where(Applause.)

Josiah Henson, then,

my

name.

responsible for anything

ever I have been T have never changed

ilong

colours— (laughter)—for mine
—(laughter and cheers)
ladies all love
it,

3II
li

That is all you comchapter of

my predilections of a good substantial, fast colour one of the best in the world, and the
is

for they like to dress in black.

(Laughter.)

u will there
that

when

have nothing but the truth, the whole truth, and my manhood ; and they who don't like that may let me alone. I am
I

not ashamed to shov/

my

face,

and never did anything that

I

foundations
their shoes,

am ashamed
Crossley,

of.

Do you

suppose that such

men

as

Samuel

r

them on thout knowcame to the
of
tion, a false-

Samuel Morley, George Sturge, the Earl of Shafteswho have honoured me with their friendship and given me their pulpits, would be deceived by me, or that 1, by falsifying one of the highest
bury, Earl Cray, Baptist Noel, and others
principles in this world,

it,

and they

friends?
that,

written, the

would jiractise an imposition on my Never! never! (Cheers.) Too much of a man for even though I am a black man. Mr. Henson then protell

ixed on the
o give soniey>

ceeded to

the story of his

life.

them

for their patient hearing,

between

He concluded by thanking and by singing the slave hymn

of parting, the audience taking
hallelujah,
T

hat
ot a
)

way

set

the chorus "Glory, glory, freedom reigns to-day," ahjrjn, which after Lincoln's

Robert
will

proclamation received
for the negroes

You

ttime,

d in relation
I

to their heels

— he boundint^ smd

new words, " John Brown," and a quicker wer^ then made happy from their heads
lieaisiing as

he rendered a stave

things per-

i

;

34
of the

joyous strain, the immense audience cheering him to the

echo.

Mr. Maxwell, of Mimchos, said Mr Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen,— I have been most unexpectedly asked to take 1 have attended many part on this very interesting occasion.
:

meetings in Dumfries, of various kinds, but I can honestly say, and with perfect confidence, that I never witnessed so large a

meeting as this within the walls of this ancient burgh. (Cheers.) come I do not wonder that so vast an assemblage should have what here, and I am sure none of you will wonder at it after Wo have this night you have just seen and heard. (Cheers.)

had an opportunity

of seeing and listening to one

who

is

older,

I presume, than almost any other person in Dumfries, address us for two hours and a half—(cheers)— and who is ready, evidently, to address us for two hours longer— (cheers) —and

whom I would have been delighted to have listened longer to, (Cheers.) giving us more and more of his interesting history. Let me urge you, however, to buy his book, and so have
amplified the account of his
life

which you have just been

.

I<

have hoard the address of a man who has seen hearinc^. more and knows more from practical experience of the hoirors and miseries of slavery than any man alive, and who can show

We

you what a
despised.

spirit there

is,

fellow-beings

who have been
I

and what a heart there is, in those looked down upon so much and

benefit by.

We have heard much which we may have now to ask you to award a vote of thanks You have already shown by your (Cheers.) to Mr, Henson. you will do so most heartily. (Cheers.) I trust cheers that that he may safely return to his own country, and be spared
(Cheers.)

many days

to see that district, in

which he has made his home
life,

and where he is resolved to end his for you know that it is because of

prosper and succeed

his desire to

promote the

prosperity of that district that he has come among us here, and In his address there were frequent (Cb.eers.) is now with us.
references to a subject which

must have come liome

to the

I

;

35

him

to the

nearts of

many

— I mean the

benefit

which he derived from his
;

mother's tender care for his immortiil interests

and when we

Ladies and
sd to take
tided

bear that great regard wliicli ho has for his niotlior in mind,

you

will the

more

readily join to the vote of thanks to himself

many

Diicstly say,

an expression of the satisfaction we have felt in the circumstance that he is to-night accompanied here by his better-half.
(Cheers.)

so large a
.

(Cheers.)

Mr. Starke,

yr., said

:

Ladies and Gentlemen,

—T have been

liave

come
night
older,

asked, and rise with the greatest pleasure to propose our cordial

after wliat
3

this

thanks to the Chairman for presiding here this evening. I am sure that we in Dumfries and neighbour(Applause.)

lio is

ies,

address
ready,

hood owe Dr. Gilchrist a debt of gratitude for his kindness in forsaking his professional duties and being with us to-night.

is

leers)
L

—and
have

We have

to-night had an opportunity of seeing

and heaving one
in the
life,

whom we have
in our hearts

long

known most
lips

intimately, and long clierished
to see
flesh,

longer to,
(Cheers.)

—one

whom we

have longed

and hcf

r

from his own

the story of his

and those

,nd so

e just

been

sentiments of liberty which he has expressed, and which are The negro (Cheers.) the sentiments of the race he represents.
race I

10 has seen

know something about

the hoiTors
10
is,
)

judge in Jamaica]

— [Mr. Starke was formerly a — and I can assure you their hearts are full
(Cheers.)

can show
in those

of the sentiments of independence and liberty.
are as fond of liberty

They

ich

much and we may
by your
I trust

and independence as wo Scotchmen are. But unfortunately theii- lot in life has been one of slavery. There have been good slave-masters, but they have been the
exception.
I

e of thanks

am

proud to think that Uncle

Tom

has had the

wn
s.)
1

opportunity of seeing the good town of Dumfries, the Queen of
the South
appreciate
;

be spared

its

and he will well know the jiroverb of his race, and ** Come see me is nothing use on this occasion

ie his

home

nd succeed;
promote the
us here, and
^ere freouent

come live with me is something." The blessing was then pronounced, and the interesting
meeting terminated.

home

to the

On Wednesday (Iho day after the meeting) Mr. and Mrs Henson left Dumfries for Liverpool, from which, on the after-

36

noon of Thursday, they
steamship China.

sailed for

Boston on board the Canard

They were accompanied from Dumfries to Liverpool by Mr. William Ci-awford, Glasgow, with whom, and with Mr. Lobb, of Loudon, editor of '' Uncle Tom's Story of his Life," who met them at Liverpool, they had some pleasant
but aftecting intercourse ere they bade what, iu
will
l)e

all probability,

their final farewell to Britain.
his sojourn in the

During
already
Glasgo\\

West

of Scotland, Mr. Henson, as

of the towns adjacent to where he was the guest of a number of well-known philanthropic gentlemen, who showed him and INIrs. Henson every possible kindness, being forward through him to evince
indicated,
visited

several

,

their

sympathy with a long-oppressed

race,

and

to lecognise in

him, though of a different colour, a brother man, endowed with more than ordinary [)owers both of mind and body, and who,
as the prototype of the hero of Mrs. Stowo's tale, of his

own

thrilling story of his experience,

and on account was an object of

such deep interest.

Mr. Henson stayed
;

at Paisley, with Sir

Peter Coats, of Woodsidc
Esq., of

at

Dumbarton, with James White,
at

Overtoun
;

;

at

Helensburgh, with John Ure, Esq., of
;

Cairndhu

at Gi-eenock, with Provost Lyle

Wemyss
Ellis,

Bay,

with John Burns, Esq., of Castle
Provost Oi-kney
the
;

Wemyss;

at Rothesay, with
Esq., of

at Coatbridge,

with Thomas

North British Iron Works ; at Lenzie, with the Rev. William Miller, of Union Church ; and at Dumfries, with
Walter Griersou, Esq., of Chapelmount.

i|

i!

lio

Canard
and

TESTIMONIAL FUND
Til
rili:

iimfrics to

vliom,
s
lo

j

Rev.

JOSIAH HENSON, "UNCLE TOM."
AND PROCEEDS OF MEETINGS.
KDINHI'HCH
-

Story of
pleasant

SUBSCRIPTIONS
Glasgow
Allan, MrH. Alexander,

roljability,
St'iiscnir •lON.S.

£20

rienson, as

Allan, Alexander,
lUirns,
I\li'8.

Troceoils of Subscrijitions and Meeting, - i'MHO

djaccnt to

George,

-

5
r,
(:

i^cU-known
s.
1

Burns, John,
]5urnley, Wni. F.,
Collins, Bailie,
-

Clark

&

Paisley Sunsfitin-ioNH. (;o., £20

Henson
to evince

rj

Coats, J.
(1

&

P.,

.

20
r>

5
^
.')

Coats, Sir Peter,

Findlay, Junieg,

-

Palsley—
1)

cognise in

Kerr, AVilliani,
Hniitli,

-

Proceeds of Meeting,

IS 12

fi

lowed with

George
A. B.,

&
-

Sons,

r.

1)

Gkelnock—
Proceeds of Electing,
JO 12
Ci

and who,
on account
L

i'-<tewart,

Wiitc, James, Biggart, T., Dairy Ewing, J. Orr,
Kidston, J. B.,
-

5
-

DUMFUIES Proceeds of Meeting,
:>\
;?

.3
;{

object of

COATB
)
•>

II

1

1

r,

with Sir

-

•>

Ellis,

S U liMCUI PTION— Thomas,
k;

E

')

Smeal, William,
ics
e,

2 2

('OATiilUl)GE—

White,
Esq., of

Mitchell, James,

White, J. C,
Scott, Bailie,

2
1
-

Proceeds of Meeting, Young Men's Christian Union, 20
()

myss Bay,
lesay,
s,
I

1

with

Bro'.vu, Rev. Dr. Joseiih,

1 1 1
t

Brown,

Jolin,

Esq., of

HEI.E.VSliUUCH SUBSCHIPTION.-n Presented to I\Irs. Henson by a few friends, per John Ure, Escj., iJ")
:\lillar,

Brown, William, Councillc r
Crombie, A.,
-

Hugh, M,D., Thomas,

-

1

the Rev.

Breingan, John,
lAI'iAIicking,
-

1

fries,

with

Hannay, A.,
Miller, J. K.,
-

I 1 1 1

10

Robertson, John,

Thomson, James, Wenley, J. A., -

Helensburgh— Proceeds of Two KOTHESAY—
.

I^Ieetings,

28

7 10

1

Proceeds of Meeting,
Len/.ie

-

Glasuow, Proceeds of Meetings


-

25 18 11

Two

greetings in City Hall

and one in Kibble, John Street U.P. Church,
East Campbell Street U.P. . . Church, .
.

161

Proceeds of Meetiui^', Union Church, <>
;5

18

20
20

Dumbarton Subscription—
Mrs. Jamea Overtoun,

White, of
-

0-

-

-

10 12 8 2

Free St. Paul's Church,

16
14

Dumbarton—
Proceeds of Meeting,
-

Crown

Street Singing Class!,

Barony Free Church, Dennistoun U.P. Church,

11

WEMY.S3 Bayy

8 la

Skelmorlie Church,

-

14

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