Michael Arnowitt

50
th
Birthday
Sunday, January 6���2 pm
Montpelier High School Smilie Auditorium
.. .. , ,,
piano soloist conductor
with a professional orchestra of 55 musicians

Brahms tConcerto no. 2 in B-fat
and music by Prokofev, Arnowitt and Bach
.
Advance tickets available at:
Barre tNext Chapter Bookstore
Montpelier tBuch Spieler Music, Bagitos
Hardwick tGalaxy Bookshop, Gagnon’s Video and Music
or by credit card at www.MAPiano.com/gala.htm.
General admission by section $50/$30/$20
.,....
802-229-0984 or www.MAPiano.com/gala.htm
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WE GET RESULTS!
FREE DOOR-TO-DOOR DELIVERY IN CENTRAL VERMONT
Vol. 41, No. 35 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 January 2, 2013
On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com
More people than ever before are asking for our help.
That’s why we’re asking for yours.
Ways to Give this holiday season (and beyond):
 Become an overnight volunteer
 Donate financially to our cause– every dollar counts!
 Volunteer for a special project
 Donate food, laundry soap, and other needs
 Help with fundraisers!
 Walk with us in our annual Walk for Shelter
This holiday season, give the gift of shelter.
105 North Seminary Street (802) 479-2294 www.goodsamaritanhaven.org
Barre, Vermont 05641

 Cook a meal once a month
 Drop off unwrapped gifts of new socks, un-
derwear, boots, etc.
 Offer your services and special skills
 Donate a coupon for a haircut

More people than ever before are asking for our help.
That’s why we’re asking for yours.
Ways to Give this holiday season (and beyond):
 Become an overnight volunteer
 Donate financially to our cause– every dollar counts!
 Volunteer for a special project
 Donate food, laundry soap, and other needs
 Help with fundraisers!
 Walk with us in our annual Walk for Shelter
This holiday season, give the gift of shelter.
105 North Seminary Street (802) 479-2294 www.goodsamaritanhaven.org
Barre, Vermont 05641

 Cook a meal once a month
 Drop off unwrapped gifts of new socks, un-
derwear, boots, etc.
 Offer your services and special skills
 Donate a coupon for a haircut

www.goodsamaritanhaven.org (802) 479-2294
105 North Seminary Street • Barre, Vermont 05641
The storm gave us a lot of beautiful snow, but the weather was tough on the homeless people.
Please consider giving a donation to help the Good Samaritan Haven
open early during extreme weather.
Rumors
Racing &
Ramblings
Remembering
David Heath
page 18
CVHS Hosts a Successful
“Holiday with the Animals”
page 2
Central Vermont Rotary
Club & The Salvation
Army of Barre
2012 World Santa Project
page 4
pages 17-19
Gala Concert
to Celebrate
Michael
Arnowitt’s
50th Birthday
page 14
page 2 The WORLD January 2, 2013
Today, I...
washed my windows,
cleaned my carpets,
scrubbed and sealed
my stone floor,
and got that nasty stain out
of my couch.
I didn’t have to
lift a finger!
HOUSEWORK
The Best Part?
Professional Carpet/Upholstery
Cleaning & Maintenance
223-6577
407 BARRE STREET • MONTPELIER • www.MontpelierCarpetCleaning.com
LOST
“Wilson,” Beautiful long-haired
Maine Coon Cat from Elmore St., Barre
This is an indoor cat that accidentally got out.
Please call
476-4117
if you
know of his
whereabouts.
His family
is devasated.
Reward
Offered
GENTLE, CARING ATMOSPHERE
85 WASHINGTON STREET
BARRE
476-7162
Tooth Whitening Veneers
White Fillings Root Canals
Implants Snoring Relief
Extractions Dentures
Crowns Bridges
MOST MAJOR INSURANCES ACCEPTED
ACCEPTING NEW DENTAL PATIENTS
JAMES J. CRUMBAKER, DDS
CVHS Hosts a Successful
“Holiday with the Animals”
On December 22nd, Central Vermont Humane Society hosted a
“Holiday with the Animals” party and fundraiser. Guests were
invited to bring gifts for the animals, and by the end of the party,
the Christmas tree was surrounded with bags of kitty litter, food,
treats, toys, cleaning supplies and more.
Party-goers were welcomed to visit with the shelter animals,
enjoy some warm beverages and sweet treats, have their faces
painted, buy tickets for the big CVHS holiday raffle, and decorate
holiday cookies. A highlight for the kids, of course, was a visit
from Santa Claus!
CVHS staff member Heather Morin with some of the many gifts donated for the animals.
Some happy kids visit with Santa after dropping off their gifts for the
shelter.
Growing Marketing Opportunities
for Vermont’s Farmers: NOFA
Vermont's 8th Annual Direct
Marketing Conference
Vermont farmers who sell their products directly to their local
communities through farmers’ markets, farm stands, and CSA
(community supported agriculture) farms, will gather for a day of
workshops and networking on Sunday, January 13th at the
Vermont Law School in South Royalton.
The Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont’s 8th
Annual Direct Marketing Conference is designed to bring together
farmers and market experts to serve as an educational opportunity
helping farmers build stronger marketing opportunities to serve
the thriving Vermont market for local food.
The conference will feature 20 workshops on a variety of mar-
keting and market development topics including Strategies for
Marketing Local and Organic, Targeting and Communicating Your
Message: A Grassroots Marketing Workshop, and Online Direct
Markets. The conference will also host the annual meeting of the
Vermont Farmers’ Market Association.
In addition to these opportunities, conference attendees will
continued on next page
■ ■ ■
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Volunteers Needed to
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Daffodil Days
The American Cancer Society is
seeking volunteers to help plan and
execute the 2013 annual Daffodil
Days campaign which welcomes
spring and helps raise funds and
awareness to create a world with less
cancer and more birthdays.
Daffodil Days, which kicks off in
January to arrive the first week of
spring, involves offering daffodils to
donors in appreciation for their con-
tributions to the American Cancer
Society and delivering bouquets to
cancer patients in treatment at local
medical facilities. It is about more
than just giving beautiful flowers; it
is an opportunity to share hope for a world where cancer never
steals another year from anyone’s life.
The American Cancer Society is currently seeking Daffodil
Days coordinators in Washington County to rally businesses,
schools, churches and service organizations to contribute to a
cancer-free future. Coordinators will be responsible for marketing,
coordinating daffodil orders and product delivery, and supervising
community volunteers.
“Bringing spring time to people makes me feel like I am doing
something worthwhile,” expressed Dena St. Amour, a long-time
Vermont Daffodil Days site coordinator. “Knowing that people
purchase daffodils to support our fight is empowering. This simple
yellow flower is a symbol of hope and a reminder that we can end
cancer. Spring always comes with the hope of a bright tomor-
row.”
Daffodil Days is a meaningful way to fight back against cancer
in Washington County. Only through local support can the Society
continue its lifesaving work to help those touched by cancer,
empower people to fight back against this disease, and save more
lives.
The American Cancer Society offers free services to Washington
County residents including Road to Recovery, free rides to cancer
treatment; community resource volunteers at Central Vermont
Medical Center to help cancer patients navigate their cancer jour-
ney, and Hope Lodge, a home-away-from-home for cancer
patients receiving medical care in Burlington. The American
Cancer Society invests nearly $1 million in cancer research at
Vermont institutions and offers free cancer information all day,
every day, through 1-800-227-2345 and cancer.org.
To help make a difference in the fight against cancer by volun-
teering with the Daffodil Days program, contact Michele Almeida,
your American Cancer Society staff partner, at 802-872-6344 or
Michele.almeida@cancer.org or visit www.cancer.org/daffodils.
enjoy a variety of featured speakers inspired by the TEDTalks
format of brief but excellent presentations on “ideas worth spread-
ing.” We’re excited to replace the usual keynote address with
shorter dynamic and motivating talks with five direct marketing
experts. (Learn more about TEDTalks at ted.com.).
NOFA Vermont strengthens farmers’ markets and CSAs in
Vermont by providing technical assistance, collecting annual eco-
nomic data, serving as the umbrella organization for the Vermont
Farmers’ Market Association, and offering a farmers’ market mini-
grants program.
More information and registration for the conference is avail-
able online at www.nofavt.org/DMC. Walk-in registrations are
also welcome, but lunch may not be available for walk-ins. Each
Vermont Farmers Market Association member market is invited to
send a representative to the conference, and to attend and vote at
the organization’s annual meeting held at the conference. The
market can invite anyone to be their representative, and they will
be admitted into the conference for free. Registration fees are $40
for NOFA Vermont members, $50 for non-members. A lunch
made with local ingredients and refreshments are included with
the conference fee.
Direct Marketing Conference
continued from previous page
■ ■ ■
Central Vermont Rotary Club &
The Salvation Army of Barre

2012
SANTA PROJECT
To purchase new winter coats, boots, hats, and mittens
for children of need in central Vermont.
Send your check to: WORLD Santa Project, 403 US Rt. 302, Barre, VT 05641,
or call Bob Spaulding or Gary Hass at
479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753 for more information.
CENTRAL
VERMONT
®
OF BARRE
Our 30th Year!
THANK YOU TO...
In Memory of Jason, Tate, Ted
and Jay Guinard
Robert Kinzel & Margaret O'Toole
Robert & Harriet Buchicchio
In Memory of Harry Deitrich
In Memory Of Dr. John Perry
Ronald Stocker
David & Deborah Sanguinetti
Kay Roberts & David Santamore
Inabelle Peake
Margery S. Hudson
Hilda Webster-Knoerl &
Melvin Knoerl
Angelina B. Carpenter
Dessureau Machines, Inc.
East Montpelier Elementary School
Robert & Mary Couture
Bonnie & Ed Peterson
Mary Heney
Andre & Arlene Rouleau
Connie Boyce
In Memory of Bev Tetreault
In Memory of Margaret Carty
In Memory of Harriet Sweet
Estelle Tanguay
In Memory of Aline & Bill Nuissl
Leszko Cleaning Co.
Abby's Self-Storage, LLC
Daniels Metal Fabrication, Inc.
Claire Dessureau
Donald Lyons
Elizabeth & Connor Aitchson
In Memory of Arthur Hill, Jr.
Employees at Social Security, Adm.
Betsy & Stephen N. Kelty, Sr.
In Memory of Perley Thomas
Gary & Anita Rogers
In Memory of Dot & Bino Lavin
Marilyn Goodell
Andrea Houghton
Cobble Hill Grange Inc.
Barbara Donnelly
Susan & Jeffrey Tucker
Mark & Patricia Austin
Janice Bevins
Robert & Beth Sabens
& Kim Daniels
Hope Loso
In Memory Of Allan G. Couch
Eleanor Perreault
Geraldine Gilman
Henry & Arlene Perkins
Peter Goodell
Elizabeth Brown
Pratt Leasing Partnership
Bruce Haskel
Auxiliary Knights of Columbus
VFW Post 792
Gary & Carole Hass Family
Henry & Patricia Poirer
Arthur & Mary Perreault
page 4 The WORLD January 2, 2013
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WOODBURY
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Tim Groth has been hired as
Director of Development for
Vermont Mutual Insurance Group
®
in Montpelier. Tim has more than
20 years of senior management
experience in the IT and software
development industry. Mr. Groth
is a graduate of the University of
California, Santa Barbara, holding
a B.S. in Electrical Engineering.
He has held CTO and CIO posi-
tions and has been responsible
for mission critical, high availabil-
ity product development since
1992. Tim resides in East
Montpelier with his wife, Gail.
Erin C. Sigrist has
joined the northern New
England law firm Downs
Rachlin Martin PLLC.
She will serve as a gov-
ernment relations special-
ist in the Montpelier
office, working in the
firm’s Government and
Public Affairs Group.
“We are pleased to welcome Erin to our
Government and Public Affairs Group,” said
group co-chair Joseph Choquette. “Erin brings
recent experience in public affairs and public
relations work and an excellent understanding of
the legislative process. She is also held in high
regard within the State House. Outside of the
legislative session, we intend to put her writing
and editing skills to use as we continue to build
our public affairs practice.”
Most recently, Sigrist was an account execu-
tive at Capital Connections, LLC, a Montpelier
lobbying, advocacy and public relations firm,
where she was responsible for coordinating all
facets of public relations – including letters to
the editor, opinion editorials, informational
handouts and social media – managing client
communication, researching relevant legislation
and advocating on behalf of clients in front of
the legislature.
She previously held positions as a sales and
marketing assistant at the Seneca County (N.Y.)
Chamber of Commerce, generating the organi-
zation’s promotional materials and assisting in
the planning, coordination and execution of pro-
grams and events, and as an account executive at
DAC Group in Rochester, N.Y., a marketing and
public relations firm where she served as a liai-
son between all departments within the compa-
ny, its clients and publishers.
Sigrist received her bachelor’s degree from
Elmira College in Elmira, N.Y., where she
majored in business with a concentration in mar-
keting. In addition to her legislative experience,
Sigrist has skills in desktop publishing, graphic
design, media relations, publications, advertis-
ing and social media. She is an active Rotarian
in Montpelier, and previously served on the
Board of Directors of the American Red Cross
of the Finger Lakes as well as the Seneca County
Cornell Cooperative Extension. She currently
resides in Northfield.
Downs Rachlin Martin PLLC is a full-service
law firm with more than 60 attorneys and six
offices in Vermont, New Hampshire and New
York. For more details, www.drm.com.
Government Relations Specialist Erin Sigrist
Joins Downs Rachlin Martin PLLC
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
Classified
Deadline
Is Monday
Before
10:00AM
78 Barre St., Montpelier
229-0366
Open Monday thru Friday, as early as 7AM & Most Nights By Appointment
Jan Crossan • Ruthie Comeau • Toni Campbell
Happy New Year To All!
Start your new year with an exciting new
look! Remember, we always consult with
you about your hair.
Come see us today!
•Kids' Cuts
•WiFi
•Men's Cuts
•Colors
•Trendy Cuts
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•Classic Cuts
Paul and Lynn Putney of S.W. Rentals in Berlin have assembled a large Christmas village
scene at their store, with close to 500 pieces. “It’s really Paul’s project that started a few years
ago,” says Lynn, “And a great way to decorate for the holidays.” Word has gotten around and
attracted not only their customers’ attention, but also other friends and interested people from
all over central Vermont. The display will be up for another week or two.
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 5
FREE Delivery and Setup : : 1 877 489 0486
The largest selection of Lyndon Furniture
anywhere ~ Just one mile from the factory.
We also proudly carry American-made:
PREPARE FOR WORK AS A CABLE TECHNICIAN!
Are you a female who enjoys hands-on and physical work, is an eager
trouble-shooter and problem solver, and has customer service skills?
Be part of a new introductory training program
that will give YOU the skills you’ll need to work as a
Residential Cable Technician.
VT Works for Women is piloting STEP UP TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS,
a career-entry program for women that will include
technical training, job success instruction, and networking & interview
connections for jobs.
This program may be no cost to
qualifying applicants.
To register for an informational
orientation and to apply:
Contact Rachel Salloway
at 802-793-2548 or
rsalloway@vtworksforwomen.org
TRAILBLAZERS
WANTED!
Women ’s
Clinics
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For Uninsured and Under-Insured Women
People’s Health & Wellness Clinic*
Clinics Held Every Month
Daytimes & Evenings
No Health Insurance? High
Deductible? No problem!
Call 479-1229
*553 North Main Street, Barre
Serving all of Central Vermont
Call for the Next Available Clinic.
Call to See if You Qualify. You May
Be Eligible for Additional Women’s
Health Services and Insurance.
Physical Exam / Pap Test / Breast Exam
Pelvic Exam / Self-care Instruction
Health Education / Referrals to Specialists
Clinics Held Every Month
Next 2 dates:
Thursday, Jan. 10
5:30 to 8:30PM
Wednesday, Feb. 13
9:00AM to Noon
Call 479-1229
*553 North Main Street, Barre
Serving all of Central Vermont
NEW YEAR - NEW CAREER: REGISTER NOW
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THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
Washington County flood insurance questions
will be addressed at five public meetings in
Waterbury, Barre City, Northfield, Marshfield,
and Montpelier. The meetings will focus on
newly revised flood hazard maps and the insur-
ance options available for structures that may be
affected by the updated designations. Structures
that have been identified for the first time as
being at a high risk of damage by flooding may
benefit by getting flood insurance now before
the official map changes go into effect.
The Washington County Digital Flood
Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) will take effect
on March 19, 2013. In some places the boundar-
ies of the flood hazard area have changed.
Where the flood hazard area is more extensive,
flood insurance is available for residential struc-
tures as a low cost “Preferred Risk Policy”
(PRP). After the map change the PRP can be
renewed twice before the insurance increases
step-wise to the full cost.
The Washington County DFIRM data can be
viewed online at the VT ANR Natural Resource
Atlas: http://anrmaps.vermont.gov/websites/
anra/ If your home is in the flood hazard area
(Zone A or AE) for the first time then you may
want to consider taking advantage of the
Preferred Risk Policy (PRP) option before the
March 19, 2013 deadline. More information is
available online at vtfpm.blogspot.com.
Meetings to discuss insurance options are now
scheduled for:
- Tuesday, Jan. 8, 7pm at Thatcher Brook
School, Waterbury
- Thursday, Jan. 17, 7pm Alumni Hall, Barre
City
- Tuesday, Jan. 22, 7pm, Brown Public Library,
Northfield
- Thursday, Jan. 31, 7pm, Old Schoolhouse
Common, Marshfield
- Tuesday, Feb. 5, 6 pm Memorial Rm, City
Hall, Montpelier
In Vermont in a high risk flood hazard area an
average flood insurance policy currently costs
around $1,400 per year for $170,000 in cover-
age. Under the new DFIRM it is estimated that
around 200 structures will be identified for the
first time as being in the high risk zone.
Approximately 500 structures will no longer fall
into a high risk area. Flood insurance is available
to any structure in a community that participates
in the National Flood Insurance Program. For
more information on flood insurance contact the
agent that manages your homeowner’s insurance
or visit www.floodsmart.gov.
Public Meetings Will Explain New Flood
Insurance Options Available to
Washington County Property Owners
Beginning in January
2013, Efficiency
Vermont will launch a
year-long effort
designed to encourage
more Vermonters to
make their homes more energy efficient. Now
through the end of the year, town energy com-
mittees and other local groups throughout the
state can sign their communities up to partici-
pate in the “Vermont Home Energy Challenge.”
Under the Challenge, which is being promoted
in partnership with the Vermont Energy and
Climate Action Network (VECAN) and other
organizations throughout the state, towns will
set a target of weatherizing 3% of the homes in
their community over the course of a year and
fostering more public awareness and engage-
ment in energy efficiency efforts. They can then
measure their progress toward this goal along
with that of other communities in their region
and across the state. At the end of the year,
towns, regions, and local partners will be recog-
nized for the effectiveness of their efforts to
encourage participation in their communities.
“The Home Energy Challenge is designed to
build on the focus and enthusiasm of community
groups that are engaging with their friends and
neighbors around energy issues every day,” said
Jim Merriam, Director of Efficiency Vermont.
“Over the course of 2013 – and beyond – we
will continue to seek innovative ways to support
these efforts, and we are hoping that the
Challenge will help inspire even more action to
increase energy efficiency at the local level.”
Johanna Miller, Coordinator of VECAN, noted
that recent years have
seen a surge of interest
in community-based
energy efforts: “The
goal of VECAN is to
strengthen and support
a grassroots movement that is growing through-
out every corner of Vermont,” she said. “We are
very excited by the potential of the Home
Energy Challenge to further increase the momen-
tum behind investing in energy efficiency and
helping our state achieve its energy efficiency
goals.”
As part of the Challenge, Efficiency Vermont
and its partners will support a number of turnkey
projects that local partners can implement in
their communities, including home energy vis-
its, door-to-door community outreach, home
energy workshops, and free home energy saving
kits.
Towns and organizations that want sign up for
the Vermont Home Energy Challenge, or learn
more about it may visit www.efficiencyvermont.
com/homeenergychallenge.
The Vermont Energy and Climate Action
Network's mission is to start and strengthen
town energy committees as a powerful people-
powered response to advancing efficient, renew-
able energy solutions -- www.vecan.net.
Efficiency Vermont was created by the
Vermont Legislature and the Vermont Public
Service Board to help all Vermonters reduce
energy costs, strengthen the economy, and pro-
tect Vermont's environment. For more informa-
tion, contact Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-
5990 or visit www.efficiencyvermont.com
Efficiency Vermont to Launch
Statewide Home Energy Challenge
n n n
page 6 The WORLD January 2, 2013
CRYPTO QUOTE
STICKLERS
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802-479-2582 VT TOLL FREE 1-800-639-9753
Central Vermont’s Newspaper!
Delivering your message to
3
7
,
0
0
0
potential customers every week!
Winter is really here, and the Kellogg-Hubbard has some great
events lined up for January.
On Wednesday, 2 January at 7pm, Dr. Nils Daulaire, director of
the Office of Global Affairs at the US Dept. of Health and Human
Services, presents Vermont, the US, and the World: How Our
Health Ties Together. Dr. Daulaire examines how global healthy
priorities are set and the importance of US government invest-
ments in global health. A Vermont Humanities Council program.
The Community Cinema Film Series continues on Wednes-
day 9 January at 7pm. Join us for Soul Food Junkies, in which
filmmaker Byron Hurt explores the upsides and downsides of
soul food, a quintessential American cuisine. Soul Food Junkies
explores the history and social significance of soul food to black
cultural identity, and its effect on African-American health, good
and bad. Soul food will also be used as the lens to investigate the
dark side of the food industry and the growing food justice move-
ment that has been born in its wake.
On Tuesday 15 January, our popular friend Ven. Amy Miller re-
turns for another discussion of meditation and Buddhism. At 6pm,
she’ll present Overcoming Negative Emotions. Beat the January
blues and join this insightful talk about how to apply practical anti-
dotes to negative mind states. Meditation and discussion included.
Open to all levels.
Ven. Amy Miller is the director of Milarepa Center in Barnet,
Vermont and has been a nun in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition since
2000. She is the co-author of Buddhism in a Nutshell and is happy
to help people connect with meditation and mindfulness in an ef-
fort to gain a refreshing perspective on normally stressful living.
Meanwhile, in the Children’s Department…
Join us on Saturday January 5 for Sit-n-Knit Winter Crafter-
noon, from 1-3pm. First time knitters and crocheters welcome!
Bring projects you may be working on, brainstorms for new ones,
and sip hot drinks with fellow stitchers. Ages 5 and up. (Under 9’s
with grownup, please.)
On Thursday January 10 from 6:30-8pm, author Vicki Hoefle
presents Duct Tape Parenting, A Less is More Approach to
Raising Respectful, Responsible, Resilient Kids. There’s a new
set of 3Rs for our kids — respect, responsibility, and resilience
— that will better prepare them for life in the real world. Join
Vicki Hoefle, founder of the Parenting On Track™ program, for a
one-hour presentation and book signing. Vicki challenges parents
to “sit on their hands, stay on the sidelines” and allow children to
blossom, becoming confident, capable, and independent. Not to
be missed!
Dungeons and Dragons fans have been waiting long enough!
Gaming Master Ben T. Matchstick Returns on Saturday Janu-
ary 12, 1-3pm. Join Ben for D&D-inspired board gaming. Bring
a friend or five. If you want to have an ongoing D and D group
and special events, tell us! Find your tribe at the Kellogg-Hubbard
Library.
Questions about any Children’s Department events? Ask Linda
at 223-4665.
Kellogg-Hubbard
Library News
Montpelier
Barre Area Senior Center
135 N. Main St., Barre • 479-9512
New Hours as of July 1, 2012: Mon-Thurs 9-3, Fri 9-12
Well, another year come and gone. The Barre Area Senior Cen-
ter has had a year of growth and positive outlook for the future.
We want to take this opportunity to thank The World for con-
tinuing to print our announcements twice a month. We also give
thanks to Central VT Council on Aging, Neighbor-to-Neighbor
Americorps, Spaulding Technical Center, Return House, Aldrich
Library and Ron York branch, Times Argus, CVHH&H, City and
Town of Barre residents, Central VT Catholic School art class, our
very dedicated past and current board members, instructors, do-
nors, staff and volunteers (and any others I may have inadvertently
left out). It truly takes a community effort and spirit to engage in
the types of support, programming, activities, meals, trips and ev-
erything we accomplish here at the Barre Area Senior Center.
Lastly, a huge thank you to the members for continuing to sup-
port the center by your participation and understanding of its im-
portance in the community.
Best wishes for a peaceful, healthy & happy New Year!
Groton Free
Public Library
Quilt Trunk Show and Thread Painting Workshop
Sunday, Jan. 6, 2pm-4pm
Mary Schilke, local master quilter and founder of Machine Quil-
ters Exposition, will share a wide variety of quilts and quilting
techniques -- with special focus on thread painting. Join us for
quilting inspiration and light refreshments!
S.A.M: Arctic Adventure: Saturday, Jan. 12, 10:30-11:30am
S.A.M. (Stories And More) takes place on the second Saturday of
every month at 10:30am. Preschoolers and elementary schoolers
are invited for read-aloud stories, along with a craft and snack.
Family Program: Wood Turning and Folk Toys
Sunday, Jan. 13, 2pm-4pm
Folks of all ages are invited to come and watch local artist Richard
Montague turn a top. The first 20 children can assemble, decorate,
and take home a folk toy. Any questions about wood turning with
the lathe are welcome!
YA: Between the Covers: Monday, Jan. 21, 6:30pm
NEW Book Club for teen and adult readers! This group meets the
3rd Monday of every month. This month: Room by Emma Dono-
ghue. “Room is home to Jack, but to Ma it’s the prison where she
has been held for seven years. Through her fierce love for her son,
she has created a life for him… But Jack’s curiosity is building
alongside Ma’s own desperation – and she knows that Room can-
not contain either much longer…” (book jacket)
Book Discussion: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
Monday, Jan. 28, 7pm
“The story of young, sensitive, and idealistic Francie Nolan and
her bittersweet formative years in the slums of Williamsburg has
enchanted and inspired millions of readers for more than sixty
years.” (book jacket) This group meets the 4th Monday of every
month, and all are welcome!
Crafts & Conversation: Every Wednesday, 1pm-3pm
Join us with your ideas and projects-in-process, or just join us!
All programs are free and open to the public. For more informa-
tion, find us on Facebook (Groton Free Public Library) or contact
Anne: grotonlibrary@fairpoint.net, 802-584-3358.
Understanding Post-Colonial
Africa Book Discussion Series at
Morristown Library
All are invited to attend Understanding Post-Colonial Africa, a
free book discussion series sponsored by Vermont Humanities
Council and Lamoille South Supervisory Union. Discussions will
be hosted by Morristown Centennial Library at 7 Richmond St. in
Morrisville on Thursdays at 7pm. The site is ADA accessible.
What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be
summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dicta-
tors, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme
poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind
these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can
portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to
the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater
depth – including the West’s complicity in them.
Discussions will be on the following books:
- January 10: The River Between by Ngugi wa Thiong’o
- January 31: The Shadow of the Sun by Ryszard Kapuscinski
- February 21: Sizwe’s Test: A Young Man’s Journey Through
Africa’s AIDS Epidemic by Jonny Steinberg
- March 14: What is the What by Dave Eggers
For more information, contact Frances Ruggles at 802-888-
2616. Books will be on loan in advance. The program is free and
open to the public.
The Vermont Humanities Council is a private nonprofit organi-
zation affiliated with the National Endowment for the Humanities.
To learn more about VHC or to find out aout other events in your
area, visit www.vermonthumanities.org or call 802-262-2626.
■ ■ ■
Story Time and Playgroup: Wednesdays, 10am to 11:30am
Join Sylvia Smith for story time, and follow up with Melissa Se-
ifert for playgroup. For children birth to age six, and their grown-
ups. We follow the Twinfield Union School calendar and do not
hold the program the weeks Twinfield is closed.
Classic Film Night with Rick Winston and Tom Blachly
First Wednesdays at 7pm. Our film viewing experience will be
greatly enriched by Rick’s presentation of each film followed by a
lively discussion after the viewing.
Monthly Book Group for Adults: Fourth Mondays, 7pm
Join us for the Jaquith book group. For copies of the book,
please stop by the library. New members are always welcome, and
it’s only one hour a month! The January book is Angle of Repose
by Wallace Stegner.
Herbal Class with Sage Zelkowitz: Wednesday, Jan. 9, 3-5pm
Learn to make calendula cream for dry, irritated, cracked winter
skin. Calendula is used for bruises, burns, and is a soothing aid in
the relief of pain, itching and irritation. Each person will get to take
home some cream made at the workshop. We will also sample a
condiment containing seaweed, as this too is healing to the skin.
Song Circle. Community Sing-A-Long
With Rich & Laura Atkinson, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 6:45pm
No experience is necessary and song books will be provided.
Singers of all ages and abilities are welcome.
Friends Annual Book Sale: Saturday, Jan. 19, 9am to 1:30pm
Clean out those bookshelves and get some new reads! There
will be bargain books on all subjects. All books are $2 or less, with
children’s books as little as 25 cents. Prices will be further dis-
counted toward the end of the day. Your purchases help support the
library. In the gym of the Old Schoolhouse Common. If you have
books to donate, they can be dropped off starting one week ahead
of the sale. Please no moldy or musty books, no encyclopedias,
textbooks, magazines, or Reader’s Digest Condensed books.
Art and Author Night with the Grist Mill Guys
Friday, Jan. 25, 6pm. Join us for an art opening of Michael Schu-
macher’s work, followed by a reading at 7pm with local author
Vince Feeney. Feeney will read from his short story, The Peddler
and the Priest, based on a true incident that happened 100 years
ago in Fairfield, Vermont, when a Jewish peddler and a Catholic
priest met purely by chance and the impact of that meeting led to
an unusual religious twist forty years later. The story was a final-
ist for the Ralph Nading Hill Prize sponsored by Green Mountain
Power and Vermont Life magazine. Refreshments will be served.
Contra Dance with Susannah Blachly and Friends
Friday, February 8, 7pm. Come and dance in Vivien and Mike
Fritz’s barn in Marshfield. This should be a great time for all.
George White on guitar and Susannah Blachly and Susan Reid on
fiddle. This is a fundraiser for the library for adults and children 10
years & up. There will be child care provided at the library for a
small fee, but you must call in advance to reserve a place for your
child. The Fritz home and barn is located at 693 McCrillis Road in
Marshfield. For directions call 426-3190.
Unless otherwise noted, all events are held at the Jaquith Public
Library at 122 School St. in Marshfield. Call 802-426-3581, e-mail
jaquithpubliclibrary@gmail.com or visit Marshfield.lib.vt.us
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 7
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As Vermont works to slow the rising cost of health care, the
Green Mountain Care Board (GMCB) is seeking comment from
Vermonters about proposals for setting statewide targets for health
expenditure growth beginning later in 2013.
On January 9, the GMCB will resume deliberation on a set of
proposals discussed at an open meeting in December. For fiscal
year 2014, which begins in October 2013, the GMCB is consider-
ing two complementary ways of limiting growth in health spend-
ing:
- For hospital budgets, which account for more than 40 percent
of Vermont health spending, budget growth would be limited to
3.1 percent. This would translate to approximately $65 million in
additional health care spending in Vermont for the year.
- For Vermont’s entire health system, the GMCB will set a target
after analyzing the results of a forthcoming 2011 statewide health
spending analysis and a three-year forecast of health expenditure
growth. This target will serve as a guide in monitoring total system
costs and in identifying areas of potential excess growth. The
overall growth target also will guide GMCB review of health care
cost trend factors embedded in health insurer rate increases.
“The fundamental issue we’re trying to address is that the
growth in health spending in Vermont continues to outpace the
growth in other areas of the economy,” said GMCB Chair Anya
Rader Wallack. “This is simply not sustainable, because it means
that each year Vermonters have to make greater sacrifices in other
areas in order to pay for health care.”
The GMCB arrived at its recommendations after reviewing
relevant indicators of health care cost growth and economic
growth, including projected growth in Vermont’s Gross Domestic
Product (GDP) – a standard measure of economic growth based on
the total value of all goods and services produced in an area over
a set period of time. Vermont’s 2014 GDP growth is projected to
be 3.1 percent. The cost of hospital inputs is expected to increase
2.49 percent in FY 2014, while the cost of inputs in physician
practices is expected to increase 1.26 percent. Changing demo-
graphics in Vermont (in particular, the aging of our population) are
expected to increase the demand for hospital services, contributing
an additional one percent to the state’s cost growth. Taken alto-
gether, these factors forecast a rate of growth in hospital and
physician costs of about three percent. About 45 percent of spend-
ing on physician services in Vermont is included in hospital bud-
gets.
The proposal to pin targets to economic indicators such as GDP
comes after the GMCB’s first full year of regulating both hospital
budgets and health insurance rates. In the first round of hospital
budget reviews, the GMCB set an initial cap of 3.75 percent
growth. The final approved 2013 budgets included a total increase
of 5.1 percent after the Board allowed certain “exemptions” for
hospital spending to fulfill state or federal mandates, or invest-
ments in health reform. Under the new proposal, the Board would
allow no exemptions to the 3.1 percent target.
The GMCB encourages comments on the concept of pinning
spending targets to key economic indicators and on the specific
proposal regarding hospital budgets. Comment will be accepted
until 11 a.m. on January 9, when the GMCB will take up the issue
at its 2 p.m. meeting. All Board meetings are open to the public.
More information, including the motion approved by the GMCB
at yesterday’s meeting and a link to the online comment form is
available at www.gmcboard.vermont.gov/publiccomments
Green Mountain Care Board Seeks Comment
on Health Care Expenditure Targets
This February, The Vermont Center for
Integrative Herbalism (VCIH) is moving to
252 Main Street in Montpelier. The new
4,000 square foot building will be fully
renovated with a much larger classroom and
teaching kitchen, herb processing facility,
and a fully accessible clinical floor with
seven offices. There are also plans in the
works for an education garden on the South-
facing hillside adjacent to the building.
VCIH has come a long way since its
inception in 2007. The non-profit organiza-
tion grew out of the Sage Mountain Free Herbal Clinic, started in
2001 in Barre, as well as the collective teaching and clinical expe-
rience of founding directors, Betzy Bancroft, Larken Bunce, and
Guido Masé. VCIH began its first year in a 1,000 sq ft space with
ten students and three professional herbalists.
Today, four professional herbalists along with student clinical
interns staff the sliding scale herbal clinic, providing over 800
hours of clinical service per year as well as access to herbal prod-
ucts regardless of ability to pay. Nineteen students have graduated
from the clinical herbalist program and 44 from the family herbal-
ist program. Fifty-five students are currently enrolled.
With increasing interest in the herbal clinic and training pro-
grams, VCIH is ripe for expansion into a larger space. Larken
Bunce, clinical herbalist and teacher at VCIH explains, “This
move will help us realize many dreams, including accepting more
students, expanding our clinic capacity, increasing our ability to
make our own tinctures, and hosting larger special events.”
One such dream being realized is the launching of The
Community Health Worker Project. This collection of courses has
been designed with a simple goal: to help people take care of
themselves and their friends and families using safe, natural and
traditional approaches. The focus is to increase health literacy,
making health information accessible, engaging and immediately
useful. VCIH hopes that this project will one day serve as a repli-
cable model for community-based public health initiatives cen-
tered on simple, natural, accessible peer-care.
The first course in the series, Medicine in the Microcosmos, runs
from 9am-5pm on February 16 & 17 and March 2 & 3. In this
28-hour course, Guido Masé will demonstrate how the microcos-
mos mirrors the world around us and the many different levels at
which the environment interfaces with human beings. Students
will examine basic chemical structures, study the fundamentals of
cell biology, and explore solubility, chemical reactions, extraction,
and absorption—all to gain a more rich and nuanced understand-
ing of the actions of what we put into our bodies. Tuition is $280,
including a $30 deposit.
The Roots of Healing will run from March 18th through May
20th and explore the rich history and evolution of global medicine
traditions. Healing Presence, offered on Mondays in June, will
demonstrate safe and simple practices from sources such as
Chinese Medicine, Peer Support and HeartMath, that cultivate the
compassionate presence that is innate in every person. Taught in
three seasonal sessions by Lisa Masé, Kitchen Medicine will dem-
onstrate where to find affordable high-quality food, how to stock
a kitchen, create balanced meals, follow and improvise recipes,
and prepare healing foods for everyday enjoyment. In April, Peter
Muckerman of First Lead, will lead a Wilderness First Responder
course to train “everyday people” to be medics when the need
arises. Herbs from the Ground Up will continue to be offered as an
apprenticeship from April to October, focusing on home herb gar-
dening for the purpose of growing and maintaining one's own
apothecary in accordance with the natural rhythms of the plants
and the year. Taught by several local practitioners,
Traditional Body Therapies introduces simple, safe massage and
acupressure techniques that anyone can employ for common dis-
comforts and takes place on four Saturdays from October to
December. In Whole Human Wellness, running from July to
December, students will learn how to approach health imbalances
from both physiologic and energetic perspectives as a self-con-
tained introduction to using plants and whole foods for oneself and
one's loved ones.
These short courses can be taken one at a time over many years,
or as a sequence in one year. There is a certificate of completion
available after taking all of the courses. Courses are open to all
members of the community. Details, dates and costs of each course
can be found on VCIH's website, www.vtherbcenter.org.
VT Center for Integrative Herbalism
to Expand and Offer New Programs
Vermont Surpasses 200
Businesses Recognized for
Green Practices
Over 200 Vermont businesses
have been recognized by the
Vermont Business Environmental
Partnership (VBEP) for their
environmental stewardship
efforts. The VBEP is a state pro-
gram that provides assistance to
businesses desiring to “green up”
their operations and recognizes
businesses of all sizes for meeting
a set of environmental standards.
These standards are posted on the
program website, www.vbep.org and www.vtgreenhotels.org.
VBEP is a joint program of the VT Department of Environmental
Conservation and the VT Small Business Development Center
that is voluntary and free of cost to participating businesses.
Vermont businesses joining the VBEP go beyond compliance with
existing environmental regulations, using resource conservation
strategies and implementation of environmental best management
practices. In addition to attracting customers seeking environmen-
tally responsible businesses, program members can save thou-
sands of dollars a year by reducing energy and water use as well
as waste disposal costs. They benefit from the operational advice
and knowledge of VBEP representatives.
The VBEP program that started in 1998 now has 109 Green
Hotels, 12 Green Restaurants, 4 Clean Marinas, 3 Green Links
golf courses, 69 general sector business Environmental Partners,
and 5 Environmental Leaders. All of these businesses have imple-
mented a variety of environmental best management practices
including energy and water conservation measures, waste reduc-
tion and recycling, environmentally preferable or green purchas-
ing, and formation of environmental teams to continually improve
environmental performance.
Participating businesses are listed on the VBEP web site and are
encouraged to identify themselves as Vermont Business
Environmental Partners with the program logo at their businesses
and on their websites. More information on the program can be
found at: www.vbep.org.
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God Bless America!
page 8 The WORLD January 2, 2013
The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning pub-
lic issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may be
subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should
also contain the name of the author and a contact telephone
number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our
advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit rates are
available.
Vermont Must Move Forward with
Affordable Health Coverage for All
Editor:
Vermont has accomplished more than most states to help work-
ing Vermonters gain access to affordable health coverage through
programs like VHAP and Catamount Health. We are at the fore-
front of heath care reform and once again Vermont was named as
the healthiest state in the nation.
Why would Governor Shumlin advocate for increasing costs to
working Vermonters when the Health Benefit Exchange starts
January 2014 and moving the state backwards?
VHAP and Catamount Health will end January 1, 2014, when
the Health Benefit Exchange starts. These programs provide the
only option for affordable coverage for working Vermonters. The
end of these programs will affect about 30,000 Vermonters,
including those who are currently enrolled and those who are
uninsured who will have to obtain coverage through the
Exchange.
In the Exchange, their out-of-pocket (OOP) costs increase dra-
matically. These are costs paid on top of premiums. Those in
Catamount Health could see their OOP maximum increase from
$1050 year to as much as $6250 year. This is about 28% of gross
income for someone making about $34,000 who reaches the OOP
maximum. Working Vermonters in these tough economic times do
not have savings to fall back on. Those with chronic or disabling
conditions are at most at risk. It can take only one accident or
medical crisis to be faced with overwhelming medical debt. Faced
with such high costs, Vermonters will not get care when they need
it or simply not enroll.
We do not have to go backwards. The Legislature already pri-
oritized this spending to provide affordable coverage to working
Vermonters. It should not be taken away now. We must do all we
can to keep moving forward on the promise of universal affordable
coverage for all Vermonters.
Donna Sutton Fay, Policy Director
Vermont Campaign for Health
Care Security Education Fund
Montpelier
The Sessions
★★★1/2
The religious rule prohibiting sex before
marriage seems pretty outdated.
Granted, I can understand why the rule
was created to begin with.
In the days before contraception and be-
fore venereal disease was fully understood,
saving yourself for your future spouse was the responsible and
decent thing to do.
In the days when people lived in small farming villages, you
would probably have contact with everyone you slept with for
the rest of your life (and not just on Facebook). Under these cir-
cumstances you would, in fact, be doing your future spouse a
disservice by being too promiscuous in your youth.
In the 21st Century, however, I think you are literally doing a
disservice to your future spouse by remaining a virgin until you
meet her. There is no substitute for the confidence and compe-
tence that only comes from experience.
Hopefully, my pro-sex before marriage argument makes sense
to you. I can certainly understand why it doesn’t resonate with
unmarried, chaste clergyman. So it is completely understandable
that the Roman Catholic Church has been slow to evolve with the
times and soften its rules.
This is the dilemma that Mark O’Brien (John Hawkes) faced.
He was a virgin and a faithful Catholic. But he wanted to sin
very badly.
To complicate things further, Mark was
stricken with polio as a child. Though he
could experience sensations throughout his
body, he was paralyzed below the neck.
In 1988, at age 38, Mark met a sexual
surrogate - a therapist who teaches troubled
men to deal with their sexuality. Mark fi-
nally had an opportunity to face his fears
and his guilt head on.
But as with any sexual encounter outside
of marriage, there were complications.
The sexual surrogate - Cheryl Cohen Greene (Helen Hunt) -
had to deal with some guilt issues of her own.
First, she was a married woman with a justifiably jealous hus-
band.
Second, Cheryl had to try to convince herself that she was not
a prostitute. It wasn’t easy.
At the end of the day, the major difference between a sexu-
al surrogate and a prostitute is that a licensed sexual surrogate
spends the proceeds on private school tuition and Viking River
Cruises as opposed to baby formula and crack.
The film concludes that the sessions with the sexual surrogate
were enlightening and empowering for Mark. And bittersweet
and confusing for Cheryl. It is a happy, but reasonable, ending.
This isn’t a message movie. It doesn’t argue that the Catholic
Church’s rules are totally uptight or that sexual experimentation
is consequence free.
“The Sessions” is simply the uplifting story of two brave, in-
trepid souls sharing something special.
C
hristmas 2012 is over. In fact, by the
time you read this column, it will have
been over for over a week. How strange
that seems to me, after all the planning, prepar-
ing, procrastinating, and purchasing that went
into it. Hopefully, many of us did remember the true reason for
the celebration. Along with Christmas now past, another year has
passed with it. Like it or not, for better or for worse, whether over
a fiscal cliff or into a prosperous new year, we have all begun the
journey ‘round the sun one more time. The world did not come to
an end on December 21st, so we must be meant to continue into
2013. I do hope your new year is a happy and prosperous one.
(No, that’s not the end of the column. You can’t get out of it that
easily.)
Christmas was a bit difficult for me this year. Our daughter, Em-
ily, is sixteen now, and her brother Andrew is nineteen. For the
past few years there hasn’t been much desire to have us read “The
Night Before Christmas” and leave cookies and milk out for Santa.
Big surprise. But old habits do die hard, especially when you have
been ‘doing’ Christmas with your children for thirty-eight years.
At this point, in our family, some traditions are slipping into the
past, and even the remembering of some of these things can be-
come a thing of the past. But, enough about the past.
We have always told our kids, as they have grown, to plan big.
“Get a good education, so that you can get a good job!” and “Don’t
let your grades in school determine your future!” I stick by this
advice, and always will. Lately, though, I would also advise my
children and yours, to think small. In that, I mean to think past the
‘big’ things, the big job, the big home, the possible big bank ac-
count. It has been my experience that the small things, the details,
are the things that will be remembered most fondly when their
family nest begins to empty, as is ours. I would tell them to spend
every possible moment, day, and vacation with their families, and
to work to live, not live to work. I would also love to have our
children continue our family traditions, and would advise them to
add their own. That way, times like Christmas and other holidays
will be truly theirs, and belong to their family.
The new year is just beginning, and, so far, it looks to be a very
trying one for our world. If so, family, and family traditions may
prove to be more important than ever before. And, if times become
tough, such things may be exactly those things that keep us to-
gether. Our future may well rest on the simple acts of planning big
and thinking small.
“George’s World,” a new 740 page collection of George’s col-
umns from The World, is available at xlibris.com, amazon.com,
barnesandnoble.com and your favorite bookstore. “The Smoke
And Mirrors Effect,” George’s first novel, can be seen at amazon.
com and barnesandnoble.com. Happy Reading!
Planning Big, Thinking Small
By G. E. Shuman
403 Route 302-Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Tel.: (802)479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753
Fax: (802)479-7916
email: editor@vt-world.com or sales@vt-world.com
web site: www.vt-world.com

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Contacting Congress
U.S. Rep. Peter Welch
Mailing address:
30 Main St.,Third Floor, Suite 350
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.welch.house.gov
Phone: (888) 605-7270 or (802) 652-2450
U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders
Mailing address:
1 Church St., Second Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.sanders.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 862-0697
U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy
Mailing address:
199 Main St., Fourth Floor,
Burlington, VT 05401
Web site: www.leahy.senate.gov
Phone: (802) 863-2525
CONTRACTORS NEEDED!
The Vermont Center for Independent Living –
Vermont’s ADA technical assistent and training
provider – is looking for contractors to do home
access modifications: entry ramp, home entrance
door, bathroom modifications and minor home
repairs. Familiarity with ADA guidelines a plus.
To submit bids on future
projects, please contact:
Joyce Werntgen
VCIL
11 East State Street
Montpelier, VT
joywert@vcil.org
802-224-1826
INCOME TAX SERVICES
Soon it will be time to file your
2012 Income Tax Returns.
Call to discuss your taxes in full confidence.
Competitive Rates • 37 Years Experience
William L. Hull
343 E. Cobble Hill Rd., Barre, VT 05641
802-476-6327
william.hull@charter.net
DRIVER EDUCATION
CLASSES
OFFERED IN BARRE
The Precision Driver
Training School is accepting
applications for classes that
will start January 26th.
Ph(802) 754-2842 or
www.vtdrivered.com
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 9
A
s we approach the new year, we are
threatened with the “Fiscal Cliff”
almost every day. The more that I
think about it, I am still not sure what those
words mean. But I do know that you and I
are going to take the hit, whatever it may
be.
Think about it, the overbearing, posturing, blowhards who are
running our government, supposedly partnering with the White
House, have no touch to reality! Those of us who are considered
the “middle class” and are attempting to live on a limited amount
of money, are being treated like fools by these overblown politi-
cians. Not only do they make
more money, per year, than
I and probably many of you,
have ever made. They and their
families also get the best medi-
cal care, and it means nothing to
them that you and I fnd it more
diffcult to get the medical care
we need because the costs have skyrocketed. And did you know
when these arrogant jerks retire, they receive a retirement package
that brings to mind the idea of a golden parachute! I don’t know
about you, but neither Malcolm nor I get a pension from anyone!
Every single time I see one of these arrogant megalomaniacs
talking about how it just wouldn’t be fair for the richest 2% of our
population to pay more taxes, I could just scream. Of course, most
of my thoughts come because of how I am forced to live in my
old age! For the 47 years Malcolm and I have been married, we
have never made a lot of money but we have always had to pay all
of our taxes. No one has ever said, “let the old fools have a break
and don’t raise their property taxes every year and certainly don’t
raise their federal taxes.” No one says that and so every year we
dig down and pay, through the nose! But I assure you that if those
privileged jerks raise our taxes and cut out Medicare and social
security, we could be giving up food in order to stay in our house!
What bothers me the most is that our Congress and our Senate
either have no idea how diffcult life is for the middle class, or
they just don’t care - after all, they have theirs and their nests are
feathered with the best! After I have said all this, I immediately
think that we, the Vermont middle class, need to demand better and
not stop demanding until we get it. And then when a saner head
prevails, I realize that in actual fact, we have no ability to demand
anything! Although the country voted to bring President Obama
back into offce for four more years, and one of his main proposals
that we all voted for was to fgure out how to balance the budget,
reduce our debt and raise taxes on the very rich! But regardless of
how hard he tries to fulfll these promises, the House and Senate
refuse to work with him and insist on standing frm and keeping
the rich isolated from tax increases, that of course, you and I are
saddled with.
I think that our two Vermont Senators and one Congressman are
exceptionally good, but it would seem that their infuence is mini-
mal when it comes to protecting their Vermont constituents. We
are asked to pay and pay and pay,
and the very rich? It is almost im-
possible for us to believe how the
very rich live and it would seem
that the thought of them having to
kick in to keep our country afoat
is just too daunting to contem-
plate.
I was one of those who cheered and danced when President
Obama was re-elected. But what I didn’t realize or even believe
could happen, is that the group that surrounds him is a solid block
of white men who are willing to let our country fall into fscal
chaos rather than work with him. Truthfully, I thought that we had
come a lot further than that.
I wish I had an answer on how we, the average middle class
family, could make ourselves heard. I certainly don’t want to see
us go the way of Egypt or many of the other middle eastern coun-
tries who would rather riot and kill one another as they want their
demands fulflled. But there must be some way we can make our
wishes heard!
Regardless of the mess in Washington and the buffoons who are
willing to see us collapse just to make a point, I want to wish you
all a Happy New Year! The past year has taught me several things.
First and foremost, I learned that life is very short and that you owe
it to yourself to try and enjoy every single day. And that is my wish
for you, live every single day of 2013 like it might be your last, and
always remember to sing and dance like no one is watching! Your
slate is clean and the new year makes it possible for you to not only
live life to fullest but to spread the joy and have a truly great day.
Again, from our house to yours, Happy New Year!
T
he road to independence was a long
and diffcult one for the 13 American
Colonies. In January 1776, Thomas
Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, crystallized public opinion.
Paine said it was common sense for Americans to break away from
a corrupt monarchy that was an unnatural parent toward the Colo-
nies. George II was no more ft to rule America than a “satellite
was ft to rule the sun.” “O! Ye that love mankind! Ye that opposed
not only the tyranny, but the ty-
rant, stand forth!”
The Continental Congress
closed American ports to Great
Britain, communicated with all
other foreign powers and urged
the Colonies to establish their
own governments.
On July 1, 1776, the Conti-
nental Congress passed a reso-
lution “that these United Colo-
nies are, and of a right, ought to
be, free and independent states; that they are absolved from all
allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection
between them and the state of Great Britain is, ought to be, totally
dissolved.”
Two days later, Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of In-
dependence. He stated that all governments were formed to protect
the rights of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Secondly,
he listed the crimes of King George, who broke a contract with the
Colonies and lost claim to their loyalty.
The Declaration of Independence, with its principle “all men are
created equal,” helped inspire the French Revolution. The Decla-
ration increased foreign aid and led to France becoming an active
and important ally.
Six months later, January 15, 1777, Vermont declared its inde-
pendence from Great Britain and New York:
“Whereas the Honorable Continental Congress did, on the 4th
day of July last, declare the United Colonies in America to be free
and independent of the crown of Great Britain; which declaration
we most cordially acquiesce in: And whereas by the said declara-
tion the arbitrary acts of the crown are null and void, in America,
consequently the jurisdiction by said crown granted to New York
government over the people of the New Hampshire Grants is to-
tally dissolved:
“We therefore, the inhabitants,
on said tract of land, are at present
without law or government, and
may be truly said to be in a state
of nature; consequently a right re-
mains to the people of said Grants
to form a government best suited
to secure their property, well be-
ing and happiness.”
Vermont’s Declaration, infu-
enced by the American Decla-
ration, stated that “we will, at all times, consider ourselves as a
free and independent state and the people have an inherent right
of ruling.” The Vermont Declaration went on to support the War
of Independence.
While Vermont fought with great valor to win American Inde-
pendence, she was not admitted into the Union until 1791, 14 years
later, to become the 14th state.
The American Declaration of Independence proved a great ex-
ample for Vermont to follow.
Senator Bill Doyle serves on the Senate Education Committee
and Senate Economic Affairs Committee, and is the Senate Mi-
nority Leader. He teaches government history at Johnson State
College. He can be reached at 186 Murray Road, Montpelier, VT
05602; e-mail wdoyle@leg.state.vt.us; or call 223-2851.
Reiss’s Pieces
By Judy Reiss
Senate Report:
Vermont Celebrates Independence Day
With Pride as 14th State
by Senator Bill Doyle
n n n
n n n
I wish I had an answer on how we, the
average middle class family, could make
ourselves heard. But there must be some way
we can make our wishes heard!
The Declaration of Independence, with its
principle “all men are created equal,” helped
inspire the French Revolution.
The Declaration increased foreign aid and
led to France becoming an active and
important ally.
BATCHELDER ASSOCIATES
Certified Public Accountants
Comprehensive Tax Preparation
*Individual & Business Tax Returns
*Authorized by IRS E-File
for all Clients
*On-going tax planning based on
current tax laws
*Accepting new clients
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1 Conti Circle, Barre, Vermont 05641
(802) 476-9490 / Fax (802) 476-7018
Best Hospital
Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections
9 out of 10 child car seats are not used correctly.
Vermont law requires all children up to age 8 to
ride in a federally approved safety seat. To ensure
that your child is riding safely, get a free safety seat
inspection from a certified Child Passenger Safety
Technician. Appointments are required. Please call
371-4198 to make an appointment.
When Saturday, January 5
9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Where Berlin Fire Station, Berlin Corners
Childbirth Education Classes
CVMC offers ongoing sessions of prenatal education
and birthing classes for women starting their 7th
and 8th month of pregnancy. All instructors are
certified childbirth instructors. For more information
or to register, call 802-371-4299.
When Class 1: Mondays, January 7 - February 18
Class 2: Tuesdays, February 26 - April 9
Where CVMC Conference Rooms
Cost $84.00 for Mom & partner
Eat for Life
A Mindfulness Based Weight Control Program
Tired of fad diets? Have you lost weight but find that
it is difficult to keep it off? Are you a stress eater? Do
you feel full before realizing you’ve eaten too much?
This unique class uses an integrated approach
to help you lose weight. It includes mindfulness
meditation practice, cognitive-behavioral strategies,
and information on nutrition, cooking with whole
foods, and increasing physical activity. You will
improve your ability to self-regulate emotions,
thinking patterns, and physiological cues. The goal
is to help you make sustainable lifestyle changes in
support of weight loss, overall health and well being.
A Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 or above is required.
Please call 223-4738 to determine eligibility or for
more information.
When Schedule one intake on January 15 or
January 23, 5:30 – 7:00 pm
Sessions: Tuesdays, January 29 - April 2
5:30 - 8:00 pm
Where Montpelier Integrative Family Health
156 Main Street, Montpelier
Cost $395. Tuition assistance is available.
Please inquire.
Healthy Community
Classes
Central Vermont Medical Center Partner Pharmacies:
Kinney Pharmacy Barre, Kinney Pharmacy Waterbury, Kinney
Pharmacy Waitsfield, Kinney Pharmacy Morrisville, Medicine
Shoppe Pharmacy (Barre), Montpelier Pharmacy, Northfield
Pharmacy, Rite Aid Pharmacy Montpelier, Rite Aid Pharmacy
Barre, Rite Aid Pharmacy Hardwick, Waterbury Pharmacy
Got Something To Sell?
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641
479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com
page 10 The WORLD January 2, 2013
HEATH, DAVID J., 66, of Barre, died
December 20 at Central Vermont Medical Center.
Born in Barre Sept. 8, 1946, he was the son of John
D. and Hazel A. (Farr) Heath. He was a graduate of
Northfield High School in 1965 and attended
Wentworth Institute in Boston. After graduation, Mr.
Heath was employed at Fastener Bearing Co. in New Britain,
Conn. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1970 to 1974. He was
a member of the Canadian Club in Barre. Photography was
David’s passion and profession. He was a long time freelance
photographer and photo technician for The WORLD. In addition,
he took pictures for the Times Argus, Thunder Road and many
other organizations. Weddings, family portraits, anniversaries,
new babies, new business, etc. were all part of his achievements.
Survivors include his wife, Sonya (Edson) Heath of Barre, whom
he married Dec. 10, 1983, in Barre; one daughter, Mary Scheid; a
brother and sister-in-law, Daniel & Linda Heath of Pennsylvania;
many nieces and nephews. A celebration of his life was held on
Friday, Dec. 28 at Barre Congregational Church. Burial will be at
a later date in Vermont Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Randolph
Center.
CAMPBELL, MALCOLM F.
"MICKEY," 72, died December 18 at Menig
Extended Care Facility in Randolph. He was born
June 10, 1940, in Randolph, the son of Francis and
Mildred (Clark) Campbell. He attended Randolph
schools. He served in the U.S. Army from 1960-
1963. He married Frances Cassidy on Aug. 22, 1964, in Randolph.
He worked as a machinist at Fellows Gear Shaper in Springfield.
He later worked at Ethan Allen in Randolph for a few years before
returning to Fellows Gear Shaper. He had lived in the Randolph
and Springfield areas. He enjoyed working on cars, bowling and
doing carpentry work. Survivors include his son, Richard
Campbell, of Brattleboro; three daughters, Pamela Goulet, of
Bellows Falls, Patricia Scoggins, of Gulf Breeze, Fla., and Melissa
Campbell, of Brookfield; two brothers, Clark Campbell, of
Melbourne, Ark., and Alan Campbell, of Wilmot, N.H.; a sister,
Linda Wakefield, of Cape Elizabeth, Maine; nine grandchildren;
and four great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents
and a grandson, Kyle Goulet.
DESMARAIS, REAL JOSEPH, 76, passed away in
Ocala, Fla., on December 16. He was born in Rock Island, Quebec,
on Aug. 14, 1936, to Aime and Jeannine Desmarais. He retired
from IBM after 27 years. He was a U.S. Army veteran. He moved
to the Ocala area in 2006 from Barre. Real is preceded in death by
a brother, Gaston Desmarais, and a sister, Marcelle Perreault. Real
is survived by his loving wife, Joanne, of 57 years; four daughters:
Deborah Celley and Phil, of Marshfield; LeaAnn Gibbs and
Randy, of Williamstown; Cathy Scott and Mark, of South Barre;
Susan Desmarais and partner, Frank, of Barre; one sister, Rae
Covey, and Tom, of Mason, Ohio; one brother, Donald Desmarais,
and Nancy, of Hampden, Mass.; also six grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren.
WHITTEMORE, GRACE K., 93, of North Port, Fla., passed
away on December 23. She was born on June 7, 1919, in East
Corinth. She moved to North Port in 1991 from Largo, Fla. Grace
was a homemaker and was a Presbyterian by faith. She is survived
by her son, Richard Whittemore, and daughter, Marilyn MacIver,
both of North Port, Fla.; several grandchildren and several great-
grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a son, Charles
Whittemore, two brothers and three sisters.
GRENON, MURIEL M. BUTLER, 85, of
Websterville, died December 24 at her home, with
her family at her side. Born on May 1, 1927, in
Websterville, she was the daughter of Margaret
(Finnegan) Butler and Robert Butler. She attended
the Websterville Graded School and graduated from
Spaulding High School in Barre in 1945. She went
on to attend Johnson Teachers College in 1946. On Oct. 12, 1962,
she married Louis Roger Grenon. They always made their home
in Websterville. He died on Dec. 5, 2008. Muriel had worked for
the state of Vermont Department of Employment Security in
Montpelier until 1963, when she retired to care for her family. For
many years, she served as a clerk and tax collector for Fire District
3. In earlier years during high school, she worked at Lawson's
Store in Websterville and served as clerk and the postmaster
replacement in the Websterville Post Office, serving under six dif-
ferent postmasters. Muriel enjoyed knitting, doing puzzles, and
taking trips in the car. She especially enjoyed the several trips she
took to Disney World in Florida. Survivors include her two sons,
Timothy Grenon and James Grenon and his wife, Deseree, all of
Websterville; two granddaughters; a great-granddaughter; her sis-
ter Lorraine Marcotte and husband, Gerald, of New Hampshire;
three sisters-in-law, Barbara Clark, Marie Blow and her husband,
Gordon, all of Websterville, and Muriel Grenon, of Plainfield;
several nieces and nephews; and also her extended family the
Rubalcabas, Cynthia, Patricia, Michael and Steven. Besides her
husband, a sister, Patricia Rubalcaba, predeceased her.
MACLEOD, ROY R., 59, of Newnan, Ga., went home
to be with our Lord on December 22, at the home of his mother, in
Toccoa, Ga. Born in Barre on Sept. 27, 1953, he was the son of
Cassie T. MacLeod and the late Leslie J. MacLeod. A member of
the Presbyterian faith, he was raised in Graniteville, and was a
1971 graduate of Spaulding High School in Barre. He served four
years as a medical technician in the Air Force and a career path for
the past 35 years in sales. Survivors include his mother, Cassie T.
MacLeod, of Toccoa, Ga.; wife, Christine Schrade MacLeod; step-
children Nicole, Brian and Tina; son from a previous marriage,
Jeremy (and Cynthia) MacLeod; one granddaughter; sisters and
brothers-in-law, Alice and Don Ennis, of Graniteville, Margaret
and Allen Perrin, of Toccoa, Ga., Carolyn and Tino Broggini of
South Barre; brother and sister-in-law, John and Susan MacLeod,
of Graniteville; mother-in-law, Patricia Schrade, of Cumming,
Ga.; sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law, Kim and John Birch, of
Cumming, Ga., and Robert and Allison Schrade, of Alpharetta,
Ga.; seven nephews; two nieces; as well as many cousins. A
memorial service will be held at a later date in Graniteville.
HENRY, DIANNE, 61, of Randolph, died December 22 at
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. She was born April 10,
1951, in Randolph, the daughter of Paul and Virginia (Martin)
MacDougall. She attended schools in Half-Day, Ill., and graduated
from Adlai Stevenson High School in 1969. She graduated from
Chicago School of Cosmetology and earned a beautician's license.
She moved back to Randolph in 1982, where she worked for sev-
eral years as an industrial sewer at Merrimaids. She was later a
co-owner, along with her sister Brenda MacDougall, of BD Mac's
Restaurant in Randolph. After closing the restaurant, she worked
at Aadco in Randolph Center and the Cabot Hosiery Mill in
Northfield. She married Lynnford Henry on March 13, 1996, in
Randolph. She enjoyed designing and making polymer clay jew-
elry, cooking and sewing. Survivors include her husband, of
Randolph; a daughter, Jessica Cowell, of Randolph; a son, Jason
Cowell, of Bethel; four grandchildren; a sister, Brenda Preston, of
Braintree; and two stepsons, Jeremy Henry, of Naples, Fla., and
Logan Henry, of Montpelier. She was predeceased by her par-
ents.
SMALL, LINDA F., 47, of South Randolph, died
December 20 at her home, following a long illness.
She was born April 13, 1965, in Landstuhl, Germany,
the daughter of Frederick and Joyce (Manning)
Small. She was raised in Texas and Ohio, before
coming to Vermont in 1971. She lived in Randolph,
Williamstown, and South Royalton before moving to
South Randolph. She married Steven Small in Randolph, on May
4, 1991. She assisted with the Elf Program at East Randolph
School and Randolph Center Elementary School, and had been
secretary for the Hackett Fund. She enjoyed flower gardening,
cooking and working with children. Survivors include her hus-
band, Steven Small of South Randolph; three sons, Jeffrey Small
of Randolph, and Dan Small and Ethan Small, both of South
Randolph; six grandchildren; her mother, Joyce Small of
Williamstown; a brother, Rod Small Sr. of Sharon; and three sis-
ters, Robin Lynch of West Fairlee, Bonnie Barnett of Barre, and
Barbara Allen of Graniteville. She was predeceased by a sister,
Cenceal Joyce Small.
HERRIN, NED EVERETT JR., 84, of
Randolph, died December 14, at his home. He was
born July 27, 1928, and raised as the only child of
Ned Everett Sr. and Euphemia "Effie" (MacLean)
Herrin, in Concord, N.H. He attended Concord High
School before earning his bachelor's degree in civil
engineering from the University of New Hampshire in 1950. He
earned his master's degree in civil engineering from Purdue
University in 1971. In 1951, he married his high school sweet-
heart, Elberta Ruth Farrar, of Canterbury, N.H. They were married
for 39 years until her death in 1991. In 1995, he married Dorothy
Lee (Thompson) Herrin, of Randolph. Following his graduation
from UNH, he worked over a seven-year period for the Highway
and Public Works Department in New Hampshire as a resident
engineer, interrupted by two years' service in the U.S. Army as an
engineer at Fort Belvoir in Virginia. In 1957, he accepted a posi-
tion as instructor at Vermont Technical College (then the Vermont
Agricultural and Technical Institute) in the Civil Engineering
Technology Department. That would begin a 33-year engagement
with VTC that marked his passion for education and instruction.
He joined the faculty just as VTC launched a new emphasis on
technological fields, and he was instrumental in designing the
department's curriculum. He taught a number of subjects in the
program - among them surveying, a favorite class that put him
outside with his students. He would rise to a full professor and
served as department chairman at VTC. For five years beginning
in 1975, he served as president of the college, stepping down from
that position in 1980 to return to teaching. He served a year as
academic dean at the conclusion of his career and then retired from
the college in 1990. He was granted the title of professor emeritus
upon his retirement. Upon settling in Randolph, he and Elberta
built a home on Greenhouse Avenue, where they raised their fam-
ily. His skills and enjoyment of building were manifest not only in
the home he built, but also in his woodworking and his involve-
ment with Habitat for Humanity in Randolph. He was active as a
member of the local University Club and in the American Society
of Civil Engineers. He was a lifelong Unitarian Universalist, meet-
ing both his spouses at church. Beyond his passions for teaching
and woodworking, he found great joy in the outdoors - a dedicated
hiker in the White Mountains' Presidential Range who preferred a
good camping holiday to a business trip. He was attentive to his
family heritage - with long affection for Prince Edward Island
(Canada) and twice visiting ancestral grounds in western Scotland.
Survivors include his second wife, Dorothy Lee Herrin; his chil-
dren and their spouses, Carl and Deborah Herrin (Silver Spring,
Md.), Kay and John Benson (West Roxbury, Mass.), Glenn and
Kathy Herrin (Brattleboro), and Gregg and Chintana Herrin
(Parkesburg, Pa.); and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by
his first wife, Elberta Farrar Herrin.
TREMBLAY, SALLY J., 80, of Waitsfield, passed
away on December 18. Born in Waitsfield on Aug.
26, 1932, she was the daughter of the late Claude
and Reta Wimble. On Sept. 6, 1952, Sally married J.
Edgar Tremblay in Moretown. Edgar predeceased
Sally on Dec. 2, 1997. Sally began work part time as
an operator, while in school, at the Waitsfield
Telephone Co. Following her graduation from Waitsfield High
School, she continued in that vocation in Albany, N.Y., for two
years and then again in Waitsfield. When she and Edgar married,
they owned and operated the Verd-Mont Dairy Farm in Waitsfield
for the next 12 years before converting the large farmhouse into
the Verd-Mont Farm Ski Lodge. Sally managed the ski lodge in
addition to being the bookkeeper for Edgar's plumbing and heating
business. Always the entrepreneurs, Sally and Edgar also devel-
oped and owned the Verd-Mont Trailer Park, which was part of the
original farm. A woman of strong faith, Sally was an active and
devoted parishioner of Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Church of
Waitsfield, was a member of the Couples Club in Waitsfield, was
a member of the Mad River Valley American Legion Auxiliary
Unit 75, and most recently a member of the Harry N. Cutting
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 59. Gregarious, outgoing and a
woman with strong opinions and a willingness to share them, Sally
will be fondly remembered throughout the Mad River Valley as
someone who was always willing to help another person, no mat-
ter what the need. She embraced her entire family with love and
caring that will remain with her children, their families and her
special ones who called her "Grandma Sally." In her leisure time
she enjoyed reading, cooking and was well renowned for her deli-
cious baked beans. Sally is survived by her children, Rita Jane
Viens and husband, Stanley, of Waitsfield, Thomas Tremblay and
wife, Debra, of Waitsfield; three grandchildren; five great-grand-
children; her brother Calvin Wimble and wife, Norma, of
Waitsfield; as well as nieces, nephews and extended family. Sally
was predeceased by six brothers, Owen "Bud" Sr., Edward
"Bunker," Kenneth, Robert, Leo and Donald, and four sisters,
Sylvia, Kathleen, Caroline and Hannah.
AMBER, LOUISE, 92, died December 19 at her
home at The Gardens in Williamstown. Louise was
born on February 22, 1920 in Philadelphia, PA, the
daughter of Robert D. and Camille G. (Sirois) Joyce.
She was raised in Upper Darby, a small suburb of
Philadelphia. Many happy childhood memories
include summers spent with her brother and family
in Stone Harbor at a cottage on the Jersey Shore. Louise graduated
from Upper Darby High School in 1938 and worked at General
Accident Insurance Co. in Philadelphia. Her career was being a
homemaker. Louise married her high school sweetheart, Edward J.
Barry, in the summer of 1941, and gave birth to their daughter,
Joyce, on November 25, 1942. Her husband was killed in 1942, in
the Pacific at Guadalcanal. In the summer of 1946, Louise married
Jack Amber, a friend from their group and a close friend of Ed's
who was stationed with him in the Pacific. After the war, Jack
worked as a Branch Manager for an office supply company in
Scituate, MA where they began their family. The couple raised
their seven children in Drexel Hill, PA, where Jack continued
working with an office supply company. During these years, they
were kept busy with school, athletics and continued trips to Stone
Harbor, NJ in the summer. Upon retirement, Jack and Louise
bought a little place near Cape May, NJ, and lived there for 20
years. After Jack's death in 1986, Louise worked in the Welcome
Center and "dabbled in art." She took trips to visit Joyce and John
in Pennsylvania, Susan in Washington, Paul in Wisconsin, and
Peter, Jim & Trudy in Vermont. In the late 1990's, she moved to
Chelsea Court in Chelsea, VT, to be near three of her children and
their young children. After breaking her hip, she followed Mary
Norman to The Gardens where she could receive more care. She
is survived by three sons, Paul Amber and wife, Sue of Lake
Nebagamon, WI, Peter Amber and wife, Robin and Jim Amber
and wife, Lynn all of Chelsea; three daughters, Joyce Amber-
Messick and husband, Rich of Drexel Hill, PA, Susan Amber-
Oliver and husband, John of Stanwood, WA, Trudy Amber-Dowlin
and husband, Tom of Chelsea; 19 grandchildren; 10 great-grand-
children and one great-great-grandchild. She was predeceased by
a son, John Amber; a great-grandson Christopher Kangas; a
brother, Robert Joyce and a sister-in-law, Dot Joyce.
WATSON, J. STEVE SR., 73, of Chelsea, died
December 21 at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical
Center. He was born January 2, 1939, in Providence,
R.I., the son of Philip and Irene (Senecal) Watson.
He attended school in Providence and graduated
from high school in 1957. He moved to Vermont in
1962. On December 2, 1972, he married Lynda
Souza of Pawtucket, R.I. They moved to Chelsea where they
owned and operated The Chelsea Restaurant for over 20 years. In
1990, they started S & L Video in Chelsea and ran this business
until 2011. Steve was a member of the Chelsea Fish & Game Club
and the Frigid Frost Fighters Snowmobile Club, both of Chelsea;
and a member of the Orange County Republican Committee. He
was the trails coordinator for V.A.S.T. for Orange County for
many years. He enjoyed hunting, snowmobiling and politics. His
true love was talking to people about anything but especially, top-
ics about politics. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Lynda
Watson, a son, James Watson Jr., both of Chelsea, and a son, Philip
"P.J." Watson of Burlington; two brothers, Arthur Watson and
Tommy Watson, both of Massachusetts; a sister, Lois Sarno of
Warwick, R.I.; one granddaughter; and several nieces, nephews
and cousins.
WILSON, MARGARET S., 89, of Plainfield, died December 20
at Central Vermont Medical Center, after a short illness. A celebra-
tion of her life is being planned for late spring. The Hooker and
Whitcomb Funeral Home in Barre is in charge of arrangements.
Let Us Help You
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Bruce W. Judd, Director
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whitcombsinvt@charter.net
Lawrence R. Pryor, Director
802-476-3243 Fax 802-476-4310
hwfhinvt@charter.net
7 Academy St., Barre, VT 05641
802-476-3203
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 11
Resolve to be a better you
The New year is a great time to
make healthy lifestyle changes.
Regular physical activity for at least 30 minutes
each day, or broken up into several shorter
periods of 20, 15, or 10 minutes can improve your
energy and mood and lower your risk for heart
disease, diabetes, and some cancers.
Try some of these physical activities:
•Walking (15-minute miles or 4 miles per hour)
•Snowshoeing or Cross Country Skiing
•Skating
•Aerobic exercise classes (step aerobics,
kickboxing, dancing)
•Outdoor chores or house cleaning (mopping,
vacuuming, shoveling, stacking wood)
Take the first step toward a healthier you!
Occupational Medicine • Physical Therapy • Urgent Care
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MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:00AM TO 5:00PM
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Disorder
If you experience symptoms of
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from SAD (Seasonal Affective
Disorder). Symptoms include
changes in sleeping and eating hab-
its, weight gain, feelings of hope-
lessness or apathy and lethargy. The
cause is believed to be associated
with melatonin, a sleep-related hor-
mone. Shorter, darker winter days
seem to stimulate an increased pro-
duction of this hormone in some
people. Treatments include bright
light therapy and some antidepres-
sant medications. Discuss your
symptoms with your doctor.
Weekly
Health Tip
20 South Main Street
Barre • 479-3381
M-F 8:30am-6pm, Sat. 8:30am-1pm
by Edward Ferrari Jr., R.Ph.
for 1-2
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Disorder
for 1-9
Corns &
Callouses
for 1-16
Warning Signs of
Prostate Cancer
for 1-23
Benefits of
Aerobic Activity
for 1-30
Pulled Hamstring
A hamstring injury is character-
for 2-6
Prevent
Constipation
for 2-13
Excess Weight
and Colon Cancer
Gaining extra pounds over the
The Yankee Chef
TM
My name is James Bailey and I AM THE YANKEE CHEF! I have been cooking
since the age of 14 years, when my Dad opened his third restaurant in Maine. I
currently write food columns for several New England newspapers, The Maine
Edge (found online at themaineedge.com) and the Villager Newspaper (found
onlne at villagernewspaper.net). I have written several cookbooks and I blog at
theyankeechef.blogspot.com. Find me on Twitter and check out my youtube vid-
eos. I am also a Yankee Food Historian and a professional genealogist. Visit my
website at www.theyankeechef.com
Spiced Maple Soufflés
I refer to real maple syrup-
in many recipes and I do
realize the cost is quite
extravagant. You can use
imitation maple syrup if
desired, but the real deal is
so much more intense I urge
all to use it. I do urge you to
trod lightly when baking
though, it is true that jostling
or physical banging will collapse
these delicate desserts.
Nonstick cooking spray
4 T. sugar
3 T. real maple syrup
3 T. apple cider or juice
1/2 t. cinnamon
1 c. real maple syrup
4 egg whites
Pinch salt
1 t. baking powder
1 T. dry apple cider mix
1 T. sifted powdered sugar, optional
Preheat oven to 400° F.
Spray six 10 oz. ramekins
with cooking spray; sprinkle
the bottom with sugar.
Combine 3 T. maple syrup, 3
T.cider and cinnamon in a
small bowl; microwave for 30
seconds, or until mixture
boils. Pour about 1 T. cider
mixture into each prepared
ramekin.
Boil 1 c. syrup in a medium saucepan over
medium-high heat 3 minutes, stirring almost
constantly to keep from scorching. Meanwhile,
beat egg whites and salt until soft peaks are
almost formed. Pour hot maple syrup in a thin
stream over egg whites, beating at high speed
until stiff peaks form. Add baking powder, beat
well an additional 5 seconds. Spoon evenly into
prepared ramekins; place in a jelly-roll pan or
sheet pan and bake for 13-15 minutes or until
puffy, dark brown on top and set. Remove gen-
tly and dust with apple cider mix and/or pow-
dered sugar if desired. Serve immediately.
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104 Main Street, Suite 5 s Lancaster, NH 03584
Toll Free 866.309.4222
www.gramplyford.com
A moisturizing and healing cream devel oped by
pharmacists David and Rich Rochefort and named
for David’s grandfather, George Lyford, a Vermont
dairy farmer.
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Cracked fingers?
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grandfather, George Lyford, a Vermont
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To find other locations,
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14 Burnside Avenue • Lancaster, NH 03584
Know Why Beans Just Got Even Better?
BY MICHAEL ROIZEN, M.D., AND MEHMET OZ, M.D.
A
s if there weren’t already loads to love about
beans, these tasty and oh-so-satisfying legumes
are looking even more appealing thanks to a head-
line-grabbing new report. Eating beans regularly
knocks down high blood sugar, lowers blood pres-
sure and cuts the risk of heart disease by a respect-
able 8 percent. A healthy boost for more than 100
million North Americans who have diabetes, predia-
betes or a related health risk called metabolic syn-
drome. (Other legumes, like
peanuts and green beans, are
also good for you, but they’re
not the beans we are talking
about here.) Beans are high in
protein and can help flatten your
belly and reduce belly (omen-
tum) fat -- the toxin-filled flab
that threatens your vital organs.
That’s a stellar payday from a versatile food you can serve cold
as a salad, room temp as a party dip, warm as a comfort-food side
dish, baked into muffins or piping hot as a hearty main dish!
Inside your favorite bean -- whether it’s white, pink, red, black,
pinto, lentil or garbanzo -- is a squadron of powerful, health-
boosting compounds. A half-cup of beans gives you 6 grams of
satisfying fiber: 2 grams of blood sugar-lowering soluble fiber and
4 grams of colon-cleansing insoluble fiber. But that’s just the
beginning. Beans are a starchy food, but the type of starch they
contain digests v-e-r-y slowly. They have a low glycemic index,
which keeps blood sugar lower and steadier than faster-digesting
carbohydrates like refined flour in pasta or bread. In fact, 10 per-
cent to 20 percent of the starch in beans never gets digested at
all!
Beans are a great source of the blood pressure-controlling min-
erals potassium and magnesium. They’re also packed with chemi-
cals called phenols that protect cells throughout your body from
oxidative damage, which helps explain the mighty bean’s reputa-
tion for lowering risk for some forms of cancer and reducing odds
for heart disease. Getting into the bean habit also can cool off
chronic, bodywide inflammation -- another way they help lower
your odds for diabetes, heart disease, cancer and more.
“But how many beans do I have to put on my plate ... and how
do I deal with the, er, side effects?”
Glad you asked. One cup of beans a day delivers their health
benefits, and rinsing them thoroughly (either after
you soak dried beans or when you take them out of
the can) removes gas-generating sugars. (Dr. Mike
suggests putting Bean-O in the water you soak dried
beans in!) Still rumbling? You can take Bean-O by
mouth before you eat beans; that’ll break down
starches in your gut before gas-producing bacteria do
it for you. So now you’re ready to up your bean
intake.
Beans at breakfast. Have
beans instead of toast with your
eggs. Add a little hot sauce, gua-
camole and fat-free sour cream
for a Tex-Mex morning treat.
Take beans to the party. Mix
black beans with corn kernels,
chopped tomato, pepper, lime
juice, olive oil and seasonings
for a hearty salsa. Toss cooked white beans with olive oil and
seasonings for a great dip. Create homemade hummus, a Middle
Eastern spread with chickpeas, tahini and other ingredients. Check
www.realage.com for recipes.
Bake with beans. Trendy, gluten-free bean flour adds flavor,
protein and tenderness to muffins, quick breads, even cakes. White
bean and chickpea flour also work well in baking. Black-bean
flour is terrific as a thickener in sauces.
Serve a new comfort food. Warm beans seasoned with your
favorite spices and a dab of oil are a great replacement for mashed
potatoes. Serve skinless, herbed chicken, grilled salmon, or shrimp
skewers on a bed of white beans flavored with rosemary, garlic
and a dash of olive oil.
Try a meatless or nearly meatless bean entree. Three-bean chili,
lentil burgers, bean soups and stews -- there are plenty of ways to
harness the satisfaction of beans in a meatless meal. Or add a little
meat, like lean pork or chicken; you don’t need a lot with this
versatile all-star on board.
* * *
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen,
M.D. is Chief Medical Officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness
Institute. For more information go to www.RealAge.com.
(c) 2012 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.
Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Vermont Achieves Top Scores on
2012 Trust for America’s Health
Report: "Ready or Not?"
Vermont was one of only five states in the nation to achieve a
score of eight out of 10 in the “Ready or Not? Protecting the
Public’s Health from Diseases, Disasters, and Bioterrorism” report
by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
The annual report was released last Wednesday, the same day
more than 3,200 doses of whooping cough (Tdap) vaccine were
administered at the 12 Health Department district offices. The vac-
cine clinics were managed by Health Department’s Health
Operations Center.
“Yesterday was a great example of how our training and prac-
tice in emergency response has paid off,” said Health Commissioner
Harry Chen, MD. “This was an ‘all-hands-on deck’ effort by our
public health staff, as our district offices each moved hundreds of
people seamlessly through the process of getting protected against
a widespread outbreak of disease.”
Ten key public health preparedness indicators were measured in
the report, such as funding commitment to public health programs,
response readiness to notify and assemble a quick response to an
incident, infectious disease control, emergency management, and
extreme weather event preparedness.
The two indicators that Vermont did not earn a point for were:
“Health System Preparedness” because the state does not partici-
pate in a nurse licensure compact, and “Infectious Disease Control
and Vaccinations” because the state did not meet the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services goal of vaccinating 90
percent of 19- to 35-month-olds against whooping cough.
Vermont’s rate is 88.2 percent, 1.8 percent short of the goal.
The Health Department offered free vaccine yesterday for any-
one over the age of 11, which is among the age group with the
highest infection rate of the 568 confirmed cases to date statewide,
and the most likely to spread the disease to infants and children.
“We put out the call to Vermonters yesterday to come together
and protect infants and chil-
dren, and, once again, they
stepped up and did the right
thing,” Dr. Chen said. “We can
all be proud of that effort.”
The full TFAH report, with
state rankings is available at:
www.healthyamericans.org.
■ ■ ■

Beans are high in protein and can help
flatten your belly and reduce belly
(omentum) fat -- the toxin-filled flab that
threatens your vital organs.
TIRED?
WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGES?
POOR DIGESTION?
A personalized wellness/weight loss program
with Dr. Pam.
Packages available.
www.healingcenterofvermont.com
802-229-0784
Healing
Healing
Healing
Healing
Healing
The
H
ealing
Centre
The
HealingCENT RE
The
Healing
C E N T R E
The
Healing
C E N T R E
The
Healing
C E N T R E
The
C E N T R E
Healing
H
Th e
C E N T R E
The
CENT RE
The
Healing Healing
C E N T R E
T
H
E
Healing
C E N T R E
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H
E
Healing
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
10 11 12
Did you know?
There are a host of ways fitness-minded folks can burn a few extra calories,
even if they don’t know they’re doing it. For instance, those who can’t sit
still and tend to have a nervous personality may burn more calories than a
person who is calm. That’s because fidgeting can burn up to 350 calories
a day. Laughing more can also burn extra calories. Scientists estimate that
laughing 100 times is equivalent to a 10-minute workout on a rowing ma-
chine. Remember to get some shut-eye as well. Research has found that diet-
ers who get adequate sleep can more easily shed weight. For those who are
feeling amorous, engaging in intimate behavior can burn up to 360 calories
an hour.
page 12 The WORLD January 2, 2013
■ ■ ■
It's a Boy!
A son, Avery Alan
Roberts, was born
December 3, 2012 to
Bryant Roberts and
Shawna Plante of East
Montpelier.
Fashion Know-How is written by
Alyson Lincoln McHugh, owner of
No. 9 Boutique in Montpelier
www.shopno9boutique.com
Fashion
Know-How
Going back to
basics; Washing
basics that is.
Seems l i ke duri ng
the winter months
t he r e a r e ma ny
mo r e g a r me n t s
i n our war dr obe
that need to be dry
cleaned then there
are in our summer
wardrobe. Here’s a
couple of things to consider when
you’re wondering how to clean your
garments.
Interpret the washing label: Does
the label say Dry Clean Only, then
obey it but if it says Hand Wash in
Cold, Reshape and Lay Flat then you
have options. Consider the fabric: If
you’re cleaning silk, acetate, velvet,
wool especially lined wool should all
be brought to the Dry Cleaner. Other
fabrics like cotton, cashmere, acrylic
and nylon can be done in the machine.
Lastly, if you’re not sure about the fabric
but the label says its okay to hand/
machine wash - Do the Colorfast test.
Take a q-tip with mild detergent and
dab it in a hidden place on the garment,
if the color stays uniform then hand/
machine wash.
Catch Fashion Know-How on
WDEV (550 AM) at 7:50am
Every Saturday!
this copy is
from 1-6-10
Whoever said being
a parent is easy?
For help call
Circle of Parents
TM
1-800-CHILDREN
1-800-244-5373
Men's & Women's Full Service Hair Care
o
d
i
o
d
i
JJ
802-793-7417
Call or Text!
Happy
Birthday
Tammy Cookson
Dec. 29
40
th
Happy
Birthday 40
th
Love,
Your
Family
Flowers By Emslie & Co. and The WORLD
would like to help you wish a special
couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send
their name, address & wedding anniversary date. We’ll publish the names in
this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a Gift
Certificate from Flowers By Emslie & Co. in Barre. No obligation, nothing to
buy. Just send anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to
The WORLD, c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S.Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre,
VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize
notification.
Please Send Us Your January Anniversaries &
Be Automatically Registered
To Win A Gift Certificate
FLOWERS BY EMSLIE & CO.
“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD
c/o Happy Anniversary
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641
Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.
Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each week for a Gift Certificate from Flowers By
Emslie & Co. No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks
prior to anniversary date. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
ANNIVERSARY
DATE_______________________# YEARS_____
NAMES__________________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
DECEMBER 15
Mark & Pat Austin, 33 yrs,
Moretown
DECEMBER 18
Butch & Gail Kennison, 30 yrs,
Northfield
Don’t forget...
2-8 Bob & Connie Spaulding, 44 yrs., East
Montpelier
2-16 Rob & Sandy Salvas, 22 yrs, Barre
3-24 Gary & Carole Hass, 29 yrs, E.Montpelier
5-13 Ellen & Wayne Michaud, 40 yrs,
Bristol
5-18 Bob & Becky Hall, 53 yrs,
Greensboro Bend
6-18 Jim & Marti Elliott, 25 yrs, Barre
8-18 Shawn & Laura Kasulka, 12 yrs.,
East Montpelier
8-19 Adam & Becca Lefcourt, 7 years,
Ashburnham, MA
9-11 John & Kathy Gonet, 18 years,
Chelsea
Happy Anniversary
2 x 7.3356
LUCKY WINNING COUPLE FOR THIS WEEK:
On Dec. 30, LESLIE & BILL HAINES of WORCESTER
Will Celebrate 40 Years of Marriage
DECEMBER 23
Rodney & Elsa Maurice, 17 yrs,
Barre
DECEMBER 25
Sarah & Dick Hutchins, 15 yrs,
East Corinth
Don’t forget...
1-10 Curt McLeon, 45
1-14 Brandon McLeon, 21,
Hardwick
1-15 Peggy Zurla, 49, Mayaez,
Puerto Rico
1-15 Shawn Kasulka, E.Mplr
1-19 Kevn Sare, 31, Berlin
(no “I”)
1-31 Wayne Michaud, 65,
Bristol
2-1 Nancy Prescott, Barre
2-6 Bob Edwards, 70
2-8 Warren Lanigan
2-13 Sandy Salvas, Barre
2-14 Laura Rappold, 40, East
Montpelier
2-19 Kevin Lawson, 44, W.
Topsham
3-5 Rebecca Lefcourt, 33
3-16 Chubb Harrington, Barre
3-16 Roxie D. Gonet, 6,
Chelsea
3-17 Pat Wieja, Baltimore, MD
3-18 Kaitlyn McLeon, 11, Hyde
Park
3-22 Nicholas Salvas, 20,
Barre
3-25 Zarek Michael Gonet, 5,
Charlestown, NH
4-1 Adam Lefcourt, 33
4-12 Daisy
4-12 Meredith Page, 57,
Croyden, NH
4-30 Lillian Rose Kasulka, 3,
E.Montpelier
4-30 Darlene Callahan, 51,
Barre
5-4 Katie Hodgdon, 5,
Waterbury
5-6 Gary Villa, Washington
5-6 Jim Elliott, 46, Barre
5-13 Kristen Lee Evans, 25,
Mentor, OH
5-14 John, Chelsea
5-20 Bill Boyce, Chelsea
5-20 Mary Lefcourt, Burlington
5-22 Ruth Madigan P., Bethel
5-27 Candy McLeon
6-3 L’il Joey, Wby, 34
6-5 Rob Salvas, 51, Barre
6-6 Heather Holmes, 45,
Woodbury
7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre
7-9 Pierce Salvas, 28, Barre
7-11 Joslyn Richardson, 25,
Waterbury, VT
7-11 Marcus Hass, 24
7-12 Emily Rappold, Plainfield
7-16 Belle D. Gonet, 8,
Chelsea
7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre
7-24 Fran Houghton,
Lyndonville
7-28 Lew Perry, Lyndonville
8-2 Grace Hodgdon, 7, Jericho
8-2 Andy Fournier, Glover
8-8 Gary
8-8 Shirley Combs, Randolph
8-9 Bob Evans, 59, Clark, NJ
8-15 Dolly Fournier, Glover
8-16 CHARLOTTE EDWARDS,
BARRE TOWN
8-20 Rachel Salvas, 19, Barre
8-21 Chriiis
8-24 Terry Spaulding,
Lewiston, ME
8-26 Joshua McLeon, 23,
Hartford, CT
8-26 Darcy Hodgdon,
Waterbury
8-29 Connie Spaulding, East
Mplr.
9-5 Sally Fontaine, Walden
9-8 Arlo Benjamin Lefcourt, 3
9-15 Deborah Phillips
9-28 Jessica McLeon, 24,
Hardwick
10-4 Bret Hodgdon, Jericho
10-5 Lisa Companion,
Waterbury
10-6 Steven Lefcourt, 29,
Burlington
10-10 Chris McLeon, 43, N.
Hyde Park
10-15 Gavin Hodgdon, 5,
Jericho
10-18 KAY
10-24 Joey’s Mommy
10-29 Eric Evans, 28,
Plymouth
11-7 Karen Evans, 59,
Plymouth
11-7 Jillian Hass, 23, E. Mplr.
11-12 Chloe Labbe-
Thibouthot, 24, Barre
11-15 Tyler Hass, 26, E.Mplr.
11-15 Bob Spaulding
11-15 Becky Hall, Greensboro
Bend
11-18 Stephen Wilson, 24,
Burlington
11-19 Henry Kasulka, 9, E.Mplr
11-22 Ruth Pearce, 65,
Chelsea
11-23 Jason Lowe, 24, Wby
11-28 Neil, 24
12-3 Peter Lefcourt, 39, Barre
12-3 DOT! 60, Calais
12-7 Armour Moodie, 59,
Stannard
12-8 Thelma Forkey, Waterbury
12-16 Lonny McLeon, 47,
Hardwick
12-25 Jenna Companion, 15,
Waterbury
12-31 Chelsea Phillips, 24,
Manassas, VA
1-4 Betsy Cody, 57, Barre
Don’t forget to
change this date
to the Thursday
after issue
date...
FROM
BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.
Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone special a
Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the names in this
space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE
from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send birthday names two
(2) weeks prior to birthdate, to The WORLD, c/o BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin,
Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your name, address & phone number for prize notification.
WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) at 479-9078 and ask for
Sharon Hebert (Bakery Mgr.) or Beverlee Hutchins or Penny Millette
(Cake Decorators) by Thursday, Jan. 3 to arrange for cake pick-up.
PRICE CHOPPER
“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”
Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake
403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin
Barre, VT 05641
Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will
publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week
for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,
VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior
to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.
BIRTHDATE______________________________
NAME___________________________________
AGE (this birthday)_________________________
ADDRESS________________________________
________________________________________
PHONE__________________________________
DECEMBER 31
Chelsea Phillips, 23, Manassas, VA
Laci Simone Green, 9, Berlin
JANUARY 1
Andrew Pallas, 19, Middlesex
JANUARY 2
TWINS: Paul Gordon, 85, West Berlin
& Paula G. Kulp, 85, Barre
Frank "Chris" Sanderson IV, 31,
Fortuna, CA
JANUARY 3
Ryan Pallas, 17
JANUARY 4
Betsy Cody, 56, Barre
George L. Raymond, East Montpelier
JANUARY 6
Lauren Smith, 1, Barre
This Week’s Cake Winner:
On January 6, LUCAS ADAM ROBERTS
of PLAINFIELD will be 9 years old!
Happy Birthday!
2 x 6.2222
Sale runs January 1st through 31st OR While Supplies Last
Extended
Buy One Get One
Fish Day:
Sundays & Mondays
All Month Long
When pets talk, we listen!
(802) 479-4307
Twin City Plaza, Barre-Montpelier Rd.
Berlin VT
www.onestopcountrypet.com
Waterbury-Stowe Rd. Waterbury, VT 244-1116
46 N. Main Street, Barre 802-479-0671
At the former Boulevard Gardens location
97 US Rt. 302 Barre-Montpelier Road • 802-479-0671
and Waterbury-Stowe Rd., Waterbury • 802-244-1116
Now On Sale! Now On Sale!
RECLINERS
ARIES (March 21 to April 19)
Shutting people out to avoid
distractions, even under a dead-
line, can cause hurt feelings.
Instead, return calls and emails,
and explain why you need a
zone of privacy for now.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Although your keen Bull’s eyes
usually can discern what’s fact
from what’s faux, that upcom-
ing decision will need really
solid data before you can risk a
commitment.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
As your confidence grows, you
should be able to work toward
your goals with more enthusi-
asm. Open your mind to sug-
gestions. Some of them might
even work for you.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22)
Reconnecting with someone
from your past stirs up that old
sense of adventure. But before
you do anything else, be sure to
get answers to those still-lin-
gering questions.
LEO (July 23 to August 22)
Some people might resent the
way you plan to resolve a dif-
ficult situation. But your com-
mitment to making tough but
fair decisions soon wins you
their respect and support.
VIRGO (August 23 to
September 22) Mixed signals
could be causing that vexing
workplace problem. Before
you choose to leave the project,
ask for a meeting so you can
get things out in the open.
LIBRA (September 23 to
October 22) Your good inten-
tions could backfire if you’re
not careful with other people’s
feelings. Try using persuasion,
not pressure, to get others to
see your side of the situation.
SCORPIO (October 23 to
November 21) Your dedication
to finishing the task at hand is
laudable. But be careful not to
overdo the midnight oil bit.
Take time for relaxation with
someone very special.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22
to December 21) Although
your intuition will help you
make some tough choices in
the first half of the month,
you’ll need more facts to back
up your actions later on.
CAPRICORN (December 22
to January 19) All that hard
work and research in the work-
place finally pays off as you
hoped it would. Ignore com-
ments from jealous types who
are out to get the Goat riled
up.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to
February 18) An unfair deci-
sion creates unnecessary prob-
lems. But avoid anger and
move carefully as you work
this out. Expect to get support
from an unlikely source.
PISCES (February 19 to March
20) A fuzzy financial vista per-
sists until midmonth, when
things begin to clear up. You’ll
also gain a better perspective
on how to handle those pesky
personal problems.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have
a wonderful way of being there
for those who need your help in
difficult times.
(c) 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
CLOTHING ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
Formerly in Montpelier & Waitsfield
HAS RELOCATED TO
29 West Street, Barre
(left of Courthouse)
Patty Morse, Owner/Operator
Mon.-Fri 10AM to 5PM
476-1111
Something Sew Right Something Sew Right
Say “Gifford” and locals no doubt
think of Randolph’s long-standing hospi-
tal. Say “Dr. Gifford” and the hospital’s
founder and namesake comes to mind
for most. Except Priscilla Carpenter, that
is. To Carpenter, “Dr. Gifford” was bet-
ter known as “Uncle Pearl.”
John Pearl Gifford was the son of an
East Randolph farmer who went on to
Dartmouth College and then Dartmouth
Medical School, graduating as valedicto-
rian in 1897. A respected local physician,
he purchased a South Main Street house
in 1903 and with two nurses established
the hospital there.
Thirty years later in 1933, he nicked a
finger on his right hand while perform-
ing surgery on a patient with a then-deadly streptococcus infection
and died several weeks later.
Nearly 80 years after this death, Gifford – the hospital – still
remains at that South Main Street address, and Dr. Gifford remains
entrenched in its name and history. In fact, an oversized photo and
a biography adorn a wall at the hospital. And now beside it is a
newly created Gifford family tree.
The genealogy was created thanks to the efforts of Gifford
graphic designer Tammy Hooker; long-time hospital employee
Marilyn Sargeant, a great-niece of Dr. Gifford; and Sargeant’s
sister, Carpenter.
Carpenter, 90, of Randolph, scoured records, relying chiefly on
a genealogy created by a cousin and calling relatives to fill in the
blanks of the family history that spans six generations. Carpenter
relayed the details to Sargeant, who relayed them to Hooker, who
created the family tree.
Sargeant, 76, of Randolph Center is too young to remember
Uncle Pearl. She was born after his
death. Carpenter was 10 when he died
and remembers it well for she was suf-
fering from chicken pox at the time. “I
was bed-ridden when he died,” says
Carpenter.
Uncle Pearl had visited a sick
Carpenter at her home before he died. As
the local doctor, “he took care of us,”
Carpenter says. But in those days there
was no such thing as annual exams and
well-child visits. “You didn’t go to the
doctor’s unless you were sick.”
Dr. Gifford sought treatment for his
own hand infection at Deaconess Hospital
in Boston. The recommendation, recalls
Carpenter, was to amputate, but Gifford’s
wife, Eliza, refused to allow it because of what it would mean to
Dr. Gifford’s surgical career.
Eliza and Dr. Gifford, as the family tree shows, never had chil-
dren of their own. Eliza Gifford died in 1964.
Sargeant and Carpenter are the last surviving children of Dr.
Gifford’s nephew Edson Gifford Sr.
Sargeant has worked at Gifford for more than 40 years. She is
Medical Staff Services manager. Sargeant and Carpenter’s mother,
Loeata, was also employed by Gifford as a nurse. She graduated
from the hospital’s then-nursing school in 1917.
Carpenter remembers her parents visiting Uncle Pearl at the
hospital and sitting on an oversized wooden lounge in Dr. Gifford’s
office while she waited. That lounge is now in the hospital’s main
lobby for use by patients and visitors.
Seeing these pieces of their past, the new family tree and their
surname still so prominently displayed on the hospital is a remark-
able tribute, the sisters say. “It’s a great honor.”
Family Tree Brings Back Memories of ‘Uncle Pearl’
Randolph hospital continues to honor founder
From left, sisters Priscilla Carpenter of Randolph and
Marilyn Sargeant of Randolph Center pose with
Gifford Medical Center graphic designer Tammy
Hooker of Barre in front of a new Gifford family tree
at the hospital.
SAVE $$$$!
SATURDAYS
JONES BROS. WAY
near VT Granite Museum &
Faith Community Church
in Barre
Free Recycling ~ Limits Apply
See You 7:30AM to 1PM!
$
3.00

$
3.25
per 30 gal. and/or
25 lb. rubbish bag
for 2 or more at
a time
per 30 gal. and/or
25 lb. rubbish bag
Curt's Drop-Off Curt's Drop-Off
DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL
TOMORROW WHAT YOU
CAN SELL TODAY!
479-2582
Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753
Central Vermont’s Newspaper
CLASSIFIEDS
403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641
THANK YOU FOR SAYING
I SAW IT IN
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 13
BOY SCOUT
CHRISTMAS TREE
RECYCLING
FUND RAISER
MONTPELIER
Boy Scout Troop 709
picks up trees
to be recycled
from Jan. 1
thru Mon., Jan. 21
$10 suggested donation
Call 223-2137
for pickup

CAT SHOW

Have
you
seen
these
CATS ?

Photos by Chanan & O Silva
You just might see them or their relatives
January 5th and 6th 2013
at the
Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center
870 Williston Rd., Burlington, Vermont ( I-89 exit 14w)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Good for $1.00 Discount

on 1 Admission fee


30 gallon Bag
starting at $2.75
Hours 6:30AM to
12:00PM every Sat.
150 South Main St.
in Barre across
from Lazer Car Wash
Trash
& Recycling
C
r
a
z
y
Co-Ed Adult Floor Hockey
Barre-Montpelier League
Register Now! Starts Jan. 20
TH
bmfloorhockey@gmail.com
vermontfloorhockey.com
All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.com or
mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302, Barre,
Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00pm, Thursday preceding publica-
tion. The Ongoing section is for free/low cost community events,
which should be verified monthly. We are no longer able to include
ongoing classes.
Ongoing Events
BARRE- Barre Rotary Downtown Walk. Welcome back Main St.,
walk to the beltline & back. Meet behind City Hall, Thursdays, 8pm.
Basic Computer Skills Class. CVABE Barre Learning Center, 46
Washington St., FREE, Tuesdays 9-11am or 5-7pm. Info. 476-4588.
Free Community Spaghetti Dinner. Greater Barre Community Justice
Center, Barre Civic Center, 1st & 3rd Thursdays, 5-7pm. 456-8161.
Community Drum Circle. At the Parish house next to Universalist
Church, Fridays, 7-9pm. Info. 724-7301.
Story Hour. Aldrich Library children’s room, Mondays & Tuesdays,
10:30am.
Central Vermont Business Builders. Community National Bank, 1st
& 3rd Tuesdays, 8-9am. Info. 777-5419.
Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,
Saturdays, 10:30am. Info. 476-3114.
Medicare & You: Free workshop for those new to Medicare, 2nd & 4th
Tuesdays, 3pm, CVCOA, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200. 1-800-642-5119.
Overeaters Anonymous. Church of the Good Shepherd, Tuesdays
6pm-7pm. Info. 249-0414.
Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents welcome. Aldrich
Public Library, last Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15pm. Info 476-4185.
Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. 2nd flr Alumni Hall, next to
Barre Aud., Mondays, 6:30-9pm. www.barretonesvt.com or 223-2039.
Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level, Thursdays during
school year, 9:30-11am.
Cub Scout Pack 717. Fun for boys in grades 1-5. Barre Congregational
Church, den meetings Thursdays except last week of month when
Friday, 6:30pm. Info. 476-8399.
American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at the post, first
Thursday of each month (not Jan. or July), 6:30pm.
Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying model airplanes year-
round, visitors welcome. Info. 485-7144.
Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer St.,
3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9am. 476-3966.
Lupus Support Group. 9 Jorgensen Ln., teen meeting 3rd Wednesdays
at 6:30pm, adult meeting 4th Weds., 6:30pm. Info. 877-735-8787.
Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support group.
First Presbyterian Church, 1st Weds of month, 10am-noon. 476-1480.
Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor board-
room, 2nd Tuesday of month. Info. 476-7550.
Strong Living Exercise Program. Aldrich Library, Milne Comm.
Room, Mondays & Thursdays at 8am. Info. 433-1654.
Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and caregiv-
ers. Meets Tuesday evenings. Info. 229-5724 or 1-800-CHILDREN.
Al-Anon Spiritual Mtgs. Hedding United Methodist, Weds. 7pm.
Central VT Amateur Radio Club. Steak House, Barre-Montpelier
Rd., 1st Wednesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 496-3566 or 496-2836.
Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts, refresh-
ments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-5100
for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.
Alzheimer’s Support Group. Rowan Court Health & Rehab, 4th
Weds. of month, 3-5pm. Info/RSVP at 476-4166.
Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40 Washington
Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7pm; Free Community Supper,
Fridays 5:30-6:30pm; Community Service & Food Shelf Hours:
Weds & Thurs. 3-5pm. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly),
Wednesdays 5pm, call 371-8929.
Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St. Safe & supportive
place for individuals/families in or seeking substance abuse recovery.
Providing Recovery Coaching and other support programs. Open
Mon. - Fri. 10am-5pm, Sat. noon – 5pm. Alcoholics Anonymous–
Living Sober, Sundays, 8:30am; Making Recovery Easier, Tuesdays,
6pm; Wit’s End family support group, Wednesdays, 6pm; Narcotics
Anonymous– When Enough Is Enough, Sundays, 5:30pm &
Thursdays, 6:30pm; Life Skills Group, Mondays, noon – 1:30pm
(lunch provided). Info. or help: 479-7373.
Knights of Columbus. Pine Hill Road, Barre Town, meetings second
Tuesday of every month, 7pm.
ReUse Stop. Barre Town recycling depot, Wilson Indust. Park; Tues/
Sat, 8-3:30, for unwanted reusable items; guidelines/prices, 775-7722.
Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club. 2nd
Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.
BERLIN- Bereaved Parents Support Group: 2nd Wednesdays,
6-8pm, 793-2376; Bereavement Support Group. Meets every other
Wednesday, 11/28-4/10, 10-11:30am OR every other Monday 11/19-
4/1, 6-8pm. All at CVHHH, 600 Granger Rd. Info. 223-1878.
NAMI-VT Support Group. For families & friends of those living w/
mental illness. CVMC, Room 3, 4th Mondays, 7pm. 800-639-6480.
Survivors of Suicide. Monthly support group. CVMC Board Room,
third Thursdays, 5-6:30pm. 229-0591.
Cancer Support Group. With potluck. 3rd Wednesday of each
month, 6pm. Info. 229-5931.
Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided, 2nd
Tuesday of each month, noon-1pm. Writing to Enrich Your Life: For
anyone touched by cancer, 3rd Tuesday of each month, noon-1pm.
Both held at CVMC Cancer Center resource room. Info. 225-5449.
Bariatric Support Group. For anyone who has had or is considering
surgery. CVMC, conf. room 4, 2nd Mondays, 5-6:15pm. 371-4292.
Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members wel-
come. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mondays, 6:15pm. 229-0235.
Parkinsons Support Group. CVMC, conf. rm. #3, third Thursdays,
6:30-8pm. Info. 439-5554.
Celiac Support Group. CVMC, 2nd Wednesdays, 4:30pm. 598-9206.
Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, first Thursday of
month, 7-8pm, free. Info. 371-4152.
Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tuesdays, 6-8:30pm.
Info at 229-5193.
Al-anon/Alateen. CVMC, rm. 3, Saturdays, 7pm . 866-972-5266.
Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference
room #3, 4th Monday of month, 6:30-8:30pm. 371-4304 or -4376.
Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition. CVH,
2nd Weds. of month, 11:30am-1:30pm. Info 479-4250.
“Man to Man” Prostate Cancer Support Group. CVMC confer-
ence room, 3rd Weds. of month, 6-8pm. Info. 872-6389 or 225-5449.
Look Good... Feel Better. Program for female cancer patients.
CVMC, 4th Mon. of month, 5:30-7:30pm. Info. 496-2582.
Bible Information Class. Christ the Redeemer Lutheran Church,
Airport Rd., every Tues., 6:30pm.
Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room, Industrial
Ln., 1st & 3rd Tues., 5:30-7pm. 883-2313 or gplumb@pshift.com.
Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents, etc.
CVMC, 1st Wed. of month, 5:30-7pm. RSVP/Info. 371-4613.
Knee/Hip Replacement Orientation Class. CVMC, conf. room #3,
free, 1st Thurs. of each month, 2-3pm. Info 371-4188.
Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing Center,
1st Monday of month, 5:30-7pm. Info. 371-4415.
Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station, free, first
Friday of month, 12-4pm. Appointments required, 371-4198.
BRADFORD- Rockinghorse Circle of Support. For young women
with or w/o kids, childcare & transportation available. Wednesdays,
1-2:30pm, Grace Methodist Church. Info 479-1086.
New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, every Mon.,
7-9p.m. Info. at 1-800-564-2106.
BROOKFIELD- MOPS - Mothers of Preschoolers. Moms of kids
birth through kindergarten welcome. Meal & childcare provided. New
Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fridays, 6pm. 276-3022.
continued on next page
Some happy local kids visit with Santa at the Barre Lions Club Children's Christmas Party, held December 19th.
Comfort Foods at
Comfortable Prices
SERVED 5:00 TO 8:00 P.M. MON.-SAT.
Across from CVH on Airport Rd. • 229-6164 SuzVT@yahoo.com
Receptions•Banquets•Business Meetings
SUZANNA’S
RESTAURANT
SUZANNA’S
RESTAURANT
The Perfect Place for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
www.SuzannasRestaurantVT.com
Subject to change depending on market
Big Bob's
Breakfast
Special
Tuesday - Friday
•2 Eggs - Fried
or Scrambled
•Bacon, Toast &
Homefries
$
4
95
Owned & Operated
By the Nye Family
Since 1984
★Grilled Teriyaki Chicken 8oz breast .. $16.95
★Boneless Pork Chops ......... $9.95
★Fried Haddock ................... $12.95
★N.Y. Strip Steak ................. $14.95
THE "UNCLE MI KE' S FAMI LY"
Always Happy to Serve You
Go to UncleMikesDeli.com
for our dai l y sandwi ch & soup speci al s
WE APPRECIATE
YOUR BUSINESS!
- Wraps and Salads packed
with Fresh Veggies!
- French Roll Sandwiches,
Soups & Deli Salads!
ALL
OCCASIONS
& BUDGETS
CATERING
8 State Street
Montpelier
229-6788
Hours
M-F
11:00-2:00
Happy New Year!
From Wes, Ashley, Kimberly, Glen & Carol
page 14 The WORLD January 2, 2013
2 col x 4.25

6-15 issue
1/29 Keane // Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/9 Ruthie Foster & The Family Band // Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
4/23 Great Big Sea // Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
5/4 The Teetotallers // Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
oncert
Connections
For venue phone numbers, call
The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00
Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at www.pointfm.com
2x2.3
11/23 “Toys for Tots” benefit concert // Nectar’s - Burlington, VT
11/30 The Temptations // Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH
12/5 Judy Collins // The Flying Monkey - Plymouth, NH
12/13 thru 12/16 The Christmas Revels // Hopkins Center - Hanover, NH
1/29 Keane // Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
3/9 Ruthie Foster & The Family Band // Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
4/23 Great Big Sea // Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT
5/4 The Teetotallers // Barre Opera House - Barre, VT
Spaghetti Dinner
includes meatballs, salad,
coffee or tea and dessert
Tuesday, January 8 • 4:30 to 6:30PM
•Adults $7.00 •Kids 4-12 & Seniors 65+ $6.00
•Under 3 Free •All-You-Can-Eat $8.00
Knights of Columbus
84 Pine Hill Road, Barre Town
Benefits Local
Church Activities
Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Weds,
7-8pm; Info 276-3142; Dr. Alice Kempe.
CABOT- Alcoholics Anonymous. Beginners meeting. Weds., 8pm.
Call 802-229-5100 for info, www.aavt.org.
Preschool Story Time. Cabot Public Library, Fridays, 10am.
CALAIS- Men’s and Women’s Bible Study Groups. County Road,
Wednesdays, 7pm. Info. 485-7577 or www.thefishermenministry.org.
CHELSEA- Story Time. Songs, stories & crafts for children birth to
5 years. Chelsea Public Library, Wednesdays, 1:15pm. 685-2188.
TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United Church
of Chelsea, North Common, Wednesdays, 5:45pm. 685-2271/685-4429.
EAST BARRE- Story Hour. Ages 2-3 on Tuesdays, 10:15am; ages
3-5 10:45am; all ages Saturday, 12:30. Aldrich Library York Branch.
EAST MONTPELIER- Men’s Fellowship Grp. Crossroads Christian
Church, 1st & 3rd Tues., 7pm. Breakfast, 2nd Sat., 8am. 476-9962.
GROTON- Stories and More (S.A.M.): for ages 4 & up, Saturdays,
10:30am; YA Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 6:30pm; Book Discussion
Group: 4th Mondays, 7pm. All at Groton Public Library, 584-3358.
HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging, rear
entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs of month. 229-0308 x306.
Celebrate Recovery Groups. Touch of Grace A/G Church, Rts. 15 &
16. Women, Tues. 7pm. Men, Weds. 7pm. Men & Women, Fri. 6pm.
Info 472-8240/533-2245.
Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),
Tues., 7 pm. Info. Robin 533-2296.
Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,
6-8:30pm. Registration/info 472-5229.
MARSHFIELD- Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mondays, 11am-
12:30pm (except when school not in session).
Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common, 426-
3581. Story & Play Group, Wednesdays starting 9/19, 10am. Book
Group for Adults, stop by for copy of the book, 4th Mondays, 7pm.
Twin Valley Seniors. Mon, Wed, Fri., 11-2; meals $4 for ages 55 and
older and Meals on Wheels, 426-3447 (vol. drivers needed). Walking
Club, Weds. Old Schoolhouse Common. Info 426-3717.
MIDDLESEX- Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Saturdays,
9-10:30am.
MONTPELIER- Joyful Noise Laughter Club. Playful exercises to
get you moving, breathing & laughing. Ages 8 & up. Kellogg-Hubbard
Library, 2nd & 4th Mondays (no holidays), 6-7pm. Info. 223-1607.
Families Anonymous. For families or friends of those who have
issues with addiction, alcohol and/or mental illness.Bethany Church,
2nd floor youth room, Mondays, 7-8pm. 229-6219.
Shape-Note Singing. Singing from The Sacred Harp, no experience
needed. Tulsi Tea, 34 Elm St., 1st & 3rd Saturdays, 6-8pm. 229-4008.
Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need help w/a bike repair?
Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Mon. &
Weds. 5-7pm, Tues. 6-8pm, or by appt, donations. Info. 552-3521.
Women’s Book Club. New members welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard
Library, East Montpelier rm, 2nd Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm. 223-8067.
Free Community Meals. Mondays: Unitarian Church, 11am-1pm;
Tuesdays: Bethany Church, 11:30am-1pm; Wednesdays: Christ
Church, 11am-12:30pm; Thursdays: Trinity Church, 11:30am-1pm;
Fridays: St. Augustine Church, 11am-12:30pm. 2nd Saturdays: Trinity
Church, 11:30am-1pm; Last Sundays, Bethany Church, 4:30-6:30pm.
Trinity Teen Night. United Methodist Church, 2nd and 3rd Fridays,
5-9pm. Volunteers needed to share talents & hobbies. Info 279-3695.
Toastmasters. Montpelier “Speakeasies” held at National Life, 1st & 3rd
Wednesdays, noon-1pm. Learn the arts of speaking, listening & thinking.
No fee for guests. 229-7455 or tdensmore@sentinelinvestments.com
Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support group,
childcare provided. Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm St., 2nd
Thursday of the month, 6-8pm. Info. 476-1480.
Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome. Bethany Church,
Red Room, 2nd Saturday of each month, 1-3pm (NOT Oct. or May).
Community Meeting. Share stories & concerns about independent
living & community issues, access to health care, etc. VT Center for
Independent Living, 3rd Thursdays, 1-3pm. Info. 229-0501.
Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany Church basement,
Tuesdays, 6:30pm. Info. 229-9036.
Brain Injury Support Group. All brain injury survivors, caregivers &
adult family members welcome to attend. Disability Rights VT, 141
Main St., first Monday of month, 5:30-7:30pm. 1-800-834-7890 x106.
Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135 Main St., 223-3338.
Story Time, Tues/Weds/Fri, 10:30am. YA Nights: games, movies &
more for teens & tweens, 3rd Fridays, 6-9pm. Craftacular, 1st Tues.;
Gaming, 2nd Tues.; Lego Club, 3rd Tues.; Teen Advisory Group,
4th Tues; all Tuesdays at 3:30pm. Youth Chess Club, Weds, 5:30-
7pm. Lunch in a Foreign Language, Mon: Hebrew; Tues: Italian;
Weds: Spanish; Thurs: French; Friday: German.
CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group. Childcare not available,
please make plans for your child. Woodbury College, second Tuesday
of month, 5:30-7:30pm. Info. 498-5928.
Overeaters Anonymous. Bethany Church, Fridays at noon. 223-3079.
Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St., 595-7953. Mama’s
Circle, Thursdays, 10am-noon; Volunteer Meetings, 2nd Wednesdays,
10:30am; Babywearing Group, 2nd Thursdays, 10:30am-noon;
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Weds., 7pm. 476-3221.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Montpelier, daily. Call 802-229-
5100 for latest times & locations, www.aavt.org.
Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-7:30pm.
Info. 1-866-972-5266.
Central Vermont Support Group. Meeting at Another Way, 125
Barre St., Tuesdays 6-7:30pm. Info. 479-5485.
Community Kitchen. Unitarian Universalist, 2nd & 4th Sun., 4:30-
6pm. Info. Richard Sheir, 223-4799.
SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems. Bethany
Church, Wed., 5pm. Info. 802-249-6825.
Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany Church parlor, 115 Main
St., Mondays, 5pm, Info 229-9036/454-7822.
Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian Church, first & third Thurs.
of month, 1:30-2:30pm. Info. call toll free 1-877-985-8440.
La Leche League. Breastfeeding info & support. Unitarian Church,
3rd Tuesday, 10am. Info 454-1569.
Playgroups: Baby Play, Thursdays, 9:30-11am at St. Augustine’s
Church, lower level. Dads & Kids Playgroup, Thursdays, 6-7:30pm
and Playgroup, Saturdays, 9:30-11am, both at Family Center of
Washington County. All held during school year only.
Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support for Patients and
Caregivers. Info 1-800-652-5064 email info@vcsn.net
Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mondays, 12-1pm.
MORETOWN- Youth Group. Ages 13-18 welcome. Pastor’s House,
Community of the Crucified One, Rte 100, Mondays 7-9pm. 496-5912.
Playgroup. For kids birth to age 6 and their caregivers. Moretown
Elementary, Mondays, 9:30-11am (except when school not in session).
MORRISVILLE- Overeaters Anonymous. First Congregational
Church, 85 Upper Main St., Fridays at noon. Info. 888-2356.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Daily meetings, call 229-5100 for latest
times & locations; www.aavt.org.
NORTHFIELD- Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. For ages 12-18.
Readiness & Regional Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tuesdays,
6-8:30pm. Info. capitalcomposite@yahoo.com
Hurricane Irene Support Group. Refreshments provided. 168 Wall
St., every Wednesday, 6pm. Info. 279-8246.
Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green Mountain Cloggers, ages
8-78, donations. Sundays 5-8pm. 522-2935.
Northfield Chess Club. Casual games & speed chess. Northfield
Senior Center, $1, Tuesdays, 7pm. Info. 764-5880.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings M-W-Th. Call 802-229-5100 for
details; www.aavt.org.
continued on next page
Michael Arnowitt, one of Vermont’s most
accomplished classical and jazz musicians,
is celebrating his 50th birthday with a gala
concert to be held on Sunday, January 6, at
2pm at Montpelier High School. The event
will feature a 55-piece professional orches-
tra under the direction of internationally
celebrated conductor Scott Speck.
Michael Arnowitt is widely acclaimed for
his imagination, musical creativity, and
innovative concert programs. He has per-
formed throughout both Western and Eastern
Europe, and was the subject of an award-
winning documentary film about his life and
music, “Beyond 88 Keys,” which was
released in 2004 and broadcast twice on
public television. Arnowitt’s initiatives in
Central Vermont over the past 25 years
include major events such as the popular
Vermont Millennium Music Festival in
September 2000, which featured 24 concerts and special events
with music from the year 1000 to the year 2000.
The acclaimed late composer and flutist Louis Moyse wrote, “I
have met few really great artists and I am very pleased to name
Michael Arnowitt, pianist and musician, as one of them.” A
review in Classical Voice of New England said, “Nothing in his
playing is casual; each note has a vibrant, purposeful sound [with]
extreme rhythmic steadiness, limitless technique, and prodigious
explorations of huge portions of the piano literature.”
The conductor, Scott Speck, has conducted orchestras at the
Kennedy Center, Moscow’s Tchaikovsky Hall,
London’s Royal Opera House at Covent Garden, and
the Paris Opera. He has conducted many of today’s
leading artists, including Yo-Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman,
Evelyn Glennie, Joshua Bell, and Midori.
The concert program will feature:
- Brahms’ Piano Concerto no. 2 in B-flat major.
This concerto is considered one of Brahms’ very
best, with an uplifting French horn opening and an
exceptional cello melody.
- Prokofiev: the first movement from his Concerto
No. 2 in G minor, a powerful, deep piece with a stir-
ring piano cadenza.
- Two pieces of Arnowitt’s own: Haiku Textures, a
premiere of a new classical composition for three
cello soloists and orchestra, influenced by Japanese
haiku, featuring John Dunlop, Bonnie Thurber
Klimowski, and Rob Bethel. Then an up-tempo jazz
tune, Bulgarian Hoedown, in a special arrangement
for jazz violin, piano, bass, drums, and orchestra,
with David Gusakov, violin; Clyde Stats, Bass; and Todd Watkins,
drums.
- Bach’s Italian Concerto, which will be “reverse engineered”
from its solo keyboard form to Bach’s likely initial conception of
this piece as a concerto for piano and orchestra.
Tickets are available online at www.mapiano.com/gala.htm and
at local venues, including Buch Spieler and Bagitos in Montpelier,
Next Chapter Bookstore in Barre, and Gagnon’s Video and the
Galaxy Bookshop in Hardwick, as well as at the Montpelier
Farmers Market. Prices range from $20 to $50.
Gala Concert to Celebrate Michael Arnowitt’s 50th Birthday
Knights of Columbus
84 Pine Hill Road, Barre Town
479-0912
Friday “Knights”
Doors open 4:00 PM
Kitchen opens 5:00 PM
Past-time Games 5:45 PM
Regular Games 7:00 PM
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$$ Come - Play - Win $$
BAG GAME - WINNER TAKE ALL
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Play-by-play
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Acebo
Jan. 2 Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
Girls Hockey
Stowe @ U-32
Jan. 3 Thursday, 7:00 p.m.
Boys Basketball
Montpelier @ Spaulding
Jan. 7 Monday, 7:00 p.m.
Girls Basketball
Harwood @ U-32
GAME
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LIVE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
All Games Available At
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Play-by-play
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Carl Parton
Play-
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Jim
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Acebo
Jan. 2 Wednesday, 6:00 p.m.
Girls Hockey
Stowe @ U-32
Jan. 3 Thursday, 7:00 p.m.
Boys Basketball
Montpelier @ Spaulding
Jan. 7 Monday, 7:00 p.m.
Girls Basketball
Harwood @ U-32
GEORGE’S
WORLD
G.E. SHUMAN
For more than eighteen years now my humble column has
appeared, on a bi-weekly basis, in The WORLD, Central
Vermont’s favorite newspaper. (Note: If you looked for the
column every other week, but started on the wrong week,
you missed it completely.) This book is a collection of many
of those writings, so you have another chance. The earliest
ones are not here, as pasting stories from slate tablets onto
word documents is a difficult thing to do.
-If you find any bits of wisdom between these covers,
it’s not my fault.-
Order Today!
Call 888-795-4274 ext. 7879
Order online at www.xlibris.com
www.amazon.com
www.barnesandnoble.com
Or visit your local bookstore.
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 15
CALL FOR CURRENT SHOW TIMES
The Bashara, Cain & Golonka Families
Wish Everyone Happy Holidays!
Passes for Capitol & Paramount Theaters
($7 adults • $5 children & senior citizens)
Available at Capitol Plaza, Capitol & Paramount
Theaters, or call 223-5252

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343 • BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT: www.fgbtheaters.com
CAPITOL MONTPELIER 229-0343
Movie Listings for Tues., Jan. 1 thru Thurs., Jan. 10
THIS IS 40 --R-- Audio Descriptive ............................................ 6:20 9:00; Matinees 12:45 & 3:15
LINCOLN --PG-13--Audio Descriptive ....................................6:10 & 9:00; Matinees 12:30 & 3:20
DJANGO UNCHAINED --R-- Audio Descriptive ...................................6:00 & 9:15; Matinee 12:15
LES MISERABLES --PG-13-- Audio Descriptive ...................6:15 & 9:00; Matinees 12:15 & 3:15
PARENTAL GUIDANCE --PG-- ................................................... 6:30 9:00; Matinees 12:45 & 3:10
RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (2D) --PG-- .........................................................................Matinee 3:30
★Daily Matinees at Both Theatres from Wed., 12/26 - Tues., 1/1 ★
PARAMOUNT BARRE 479-9621
THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (Digital 3D) .......................6:00 & 9:15; Matinee 1:15
JACK REACHER --PG-13-- ......................................................6:15 & 9:00; Matinees 12:40 & 3:15
Please Call Theaters
for Current Show Times
CAPITOL 229-0343
PARAMOUNT 479-9621
BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT:
www.fgbtheaters.com
THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY
(Digital 3D)
6:00 & 9:15; Matinees at 1:15
JACK REACHER --PG-13--
6:15 & 9:00; Matinees at 12:40 & 3:15
802-476-3637
WEEKLY EVENTS!
WED: Karaoke
THURS: Original Live Bands
FRI: Drink Specials
SAT: Live DJ
SUN: Come down for our NFL
Football Package
(free munchies)
ALSO: Sun. night pool
tournament
Like us on
facebook
to follow
all upcoming
events
We now offer
catering
in-house or
off-site
Most Competitive
Prices In Town!
Making & Restoring Fine Violins
Rentals • Service • Sales
Violin • Viola • Cello • Bass
VIOLIN RENTALS
Only $14 month
Bow Rehairing & Restoration
Strings • Books • Accessories • Appraisals
Cello Rentals only $25/month
10 Hutchins Circle, Barre 476-7798
www.vermontviolinmaker.com
Gregoire’s VIOLIN SHOP
We Cater 249-7758
167 So. Main, Barre
Between Lazerwash & Days Inn
NOW OPEN EVERY DAY 11:30AM-CLOSING
TRUCK
SAMBEL'S
PRIME
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7 Days A
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DAILY SPECIALS!!!
Home of 8 oz.
MONSTER
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STARTING AT
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SAMBEL’S TRUCK
DELIVERY
SERVICE!
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Thursday, Friday & Saturday
4:30 PM - 7:30 PM
3 Mile Limit for a $15 Minimum Purchase
$3.00 Delivery Charge
167 So. Main, Barre
Between Lazerwash & Days Inn
Winter Hrs: 11:30AM on (closed Mondays)
We Cater 249-7758
167 So. Main, Barre
Between Lazerwash & Days Inn
NOW OPEN EVERY DAY 11:30AM-CLOSING
TRUCK
SAMBEL'S
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7 Days A
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DAILY SPECIALS!!!
Home of 8 oz.
MONSTER
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STARTING AT
7 DAYS A WEEK!
SAMBEL’S TRUCK
DELIVERY
SERVICE!
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Thursday, Friday & Saturday
4:30 PM - 7:30 PM
3 Mile Limit for a $15 Minimum Purchase
$3.00 Delivery Charge
Call Us
For ALL
Your
Catering
Needs
in 2013
Still Catering!
Our Truck Is Home For The
Next 3 Months, But Will Be
Returning In Spring.
Happy New Year To All!
-Bob & Brenda Sambel
C
L
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&

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&

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Sponsored Weekly Every Wednesday Evening
By Italian American Heritage, Inc.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Doors Open at 4:00PM
Bingo Early Birds 6PM - Regular Bingo 7PM
Flashball $350
1/2 Game $50
Jackpot $2,550
All Other Games $100
MUTUO CLUB
20 BECKLEY STREET, BARRE
Playgroup. United Church of Northfield, Wednesdays, 9:30-11am.
Held only when school is in session. Info. 262-3292 x113.
PLAINFIELD- Cutler Memorial Library Activities: 454-8504.
Classic Book Club: 1st Mondays, 6pm; Plainfield Book Club: 3rd
Mondays, 6:30pm; Play Group: Fridays, 10-11:30am.
Beaders Group. All levels welcome, bring your projects. The Bead
Hive, Saturdays, 11am-2pm. Info. 454-1615.
Diabetes Discussion & Support Group. Everyone welcome. The
Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thursdays, 1:30pm. Info. 322-6600.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100 for times/info, www.aavt,org.
RANDOLPH- Caregiver Support Group. Open to anyone caring
for a loved one. Gifford Medical Ctr, second Tuesdays, 11am-noon.
New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT Rte
66, 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30am-1pm. 728-9101.
Yoga Classes. All ages & levels, donations benefit Safeline. VTC
Campus Center, last Sunday of month, 2-3:30pm.
Lift for Life Exercises, Tues-Fri, 8:30am; Cribbage 9:30am &
Mahjongg 10am on Tuesdays; Art History Video Series 12:45pm &
Bridge Club 2pm Wednesdays; Foot Clinics, 1st & 2nd Weds, 10am-
noon, call to sign up. All at Randolph Senior Ctr, Hale St. 728-9324.
Quit in Person Group. Free tobacco cessation program Gifford
Conference Ctr., Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30pm. Info. 728-2118.
Cancer Support Group. For survivors, sufferers & family. Gifford
Conference Ctr, 2nd Tuesdays, 9:30-11am. 728-2270.
Al-Anon/Alateen. Gifford Hospital, Weds, 7pm and Sundays, 11am.
Storytime. Kimball Library, Wed., 11am, ages 2-5; Toddlertime, Fri.,
10:30am; Gathering for hand work, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6pm.
ROXBURY- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times &
locations; www.aavt.org.
STOWE- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times &
locations; www.aavt.org.
Green Mountain Dog Club Mtg. All dog lovers welcome.
Commodore’s Inn, 4th Thursdays. Info. 479-9843 or greenmountain-
dogclub.org
WAITSFIELD- Community Acupuncture Night. Free assessment
& treatment, donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness, 859 Old
County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., of month, 4-7pm. RSVP 272-3690.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100 for times & locations, or
www.aavt.org.
WARREN- Infant, Toddler & Preschool Story Hour. Warren
Public Library, Wednesdays, 10am. Info. 496-3913.
WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire Station,
3rd Thurs, 6:30pm.
Summer Storytime. Calef Memorial Library, Mondays, 11am.
WATERBURY- Storytimes. Toddlers n Twos, Mondays, 10am;
Baby Lap Time, Wednesdays, 10am; Preschool, Fridays, 10am.
Waterbury Public Library. Info. 244-7036.
Grandparents Raising their Children’s Children. Support group,
childcare provided. Wesley Methodist Church, Main St., 3rd Tuesday
of month, 6-8pm. Info. 476-1480.
Afternoon Knitters. Bring your latest project, crocheters welcome,
too. Waterbury Public Library, Wednesdays, 1-2pm. Info. 244-7036.
Support Group for women who have experienced partner abuse.
Info at 1-877-543-3498.
Playgroups: Open Gym, Mon-Tues-Fri, 11:05-11:35am; Story Time,
Tues, 10-11am; Music & Movement Playgroup, Weds, 10-11:30am;
Art & Exploration Playgroup, Thurs., 9:30-11:30am. Thatcher
Brook Primary School Children’s Room, during school year only.
Al-Anon. Congregational Church, Mondays 7pm, Fridays 8pm; Info.
1-866-972-5266.
WATERBURY CENTER- Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 229-5100
for times & locations, www.aavt.org.
Bible Study Group. Bring your bible, coffee provided, all welcome.
Waterbury Center Grange, Sundays, 5-6pm. Info. 498-4565.
WEBSTERVILLE- Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.
Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tuesdays, 7pm.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Knitting Goup. All handwork welcome, come
for creativity & community. Ainsworth Library, Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm.
Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church, Sun., 6pm. Info. 476-3221.
Grandparents Raising their Children’s Children. Support grp,
childcare provided. 1st Wed. of month. 6-8pm. 802-476-1480, x377.
Alcoholics Anonymous. Call 802-229-5100 for times & locations, or
www.aavt.org.
WOODBURY- Knitting Group. All hand work welcome. Library,
1st & 3rd Wed., 6:30-8pm.
Grandparents Raising their Children’s Children. Support group,
childcare provided. Woodbury Community Room, 4th Monday of
each month, 6-8pm. Info., call Evelyn at 476-1480.
WORCESTER- Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tuesdays, 6:30-
8:30
Wednesday, January 2
BARRE- Senior Day Welcomes Burr Morse. Spend an hour with
Burr Morse and enjoy hearing some of his tall tales and adventure
stories. Aldrich Public Library, 1:30pm.
CHELSEA- Open Mike. With host John Lackard. The Pines, 1
Maple Avenue, no cover, 9pm. Info. 802-685-3344.
MARSHFIELD- Classic Film Night. Tom Blachly & Rick Winston,
offer a brief introduction and optional post-film discussion. Jaquith
Library, Old Schoolhouse Common, School St, 7pm. Info. 426-3581.
MONTPELIER- Vermont, the US, and the World: How Our Health
Ties Together. A program with Dr. Nils Daulaire, Global Affairs direc-
tor of the U.S. Dept. of H&HS. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, FREE, 7pm.
NORTHFIELD- Public Meeting on Northfield Merger. Brown
Public Library Community Rm, 6pm. mergercommittee@hotmail.com
Thursday, January 3
BRADFORD- GED Testing. Writing at 11am, math at 11:30am, take
only one; social studies, science & reading at 1:30pm, take 1 or 2.
Bradford Learning Center, 24 Barton St. Pre-register 222-3282.
MONTPELIER- Assessment of Prior Learning Info. Session.
Learn how to get credit for what you know. CCV, 5:30-7pm. Info. at
828-4064 or www.ccv.edu/apl
Technique, Improvisation & Composition. Dance workshop led by
members of Montpelier Movement Collective. Contemporary Dance
& Fitness, $15, 4-5:30pm. Pre-reg. 229-4676.
WILLIAMSTOWN- Evening With Your Legislators. Discussion
forum about education topics with Sen. Mark MacDonald, Sen. Joe
Benning, Rep. Susan Davis & Rep. Phil Winters. WMHS, 7pm.
Friday, January 4
MONTPELIER- First Friday Dance Party. DJ Bay Six plays the
best in hip-hop, techno, more. No cover, 21+. Positive Pie, 10:30pm.
Reiki Clinic. With Reiki Master Lynne Ihlstrom. Walk-ins welcome.
Montpelier Senior Activity Center, $15 for 1/2 hour session, noon-
4pm. Call 522-0045 for appointment.
TUNBRIDGE- Author/Farmer Ben Hewitt. Talk on “The Salmonella
Chronicles: Exploring the relationship between humans, bacteria and
food rights.” Tunbridge Public Library, FREE, 7pm. Info. 889-9404.
Saturday, January 5
FAYSTON- Off Piste in the Alps. Multi-media slide show by pho-
tographers and adventurers Brian Mohr & Emily Johnson of Ember
Photography. Mad River Glen, $5 GMC members/$8 non, 7pm.
MONTPELIER- Winter Farmers Market. Produce, meats, chees-
es, baked goods, prepared foods, crafts and more. VT College of Fine
Arts gym, 10am-2pm.
continued on next page
Catamount Trail Association to Host Get Out
and Backcountry Ski Festival at Bolton
With over 90 kilometers of groomed and backcountry trails, the
Bolton Valley Nordic and Backcountry area hosts one of the larg-
est and most beloved Nordic trail systems in the state, and offers
outstanding recreational opportunity. The Catamount Trail runs
directly through the property, and there are connections to other
popular backcountry routes and to the Long Trail. The land is also
a critically important watershed and wildlife habitat area.
Section 22 of the Catamount Trail which crosses the Bolton
Valley Nordic and Backcountry area, also known as the Bolton to
Trapps Section, is one of the most famous backcountry skiing
trails in the East. Each year the Catamount Trail Association hosts
two major backcountry skiing events in this area to support its
work to protect the Catamount Trail, raise awareness about this
unique and spectacular environment, and spread joy and knowl-
edge of backcountry skiing.
Currently, the Vermont Land Trust is working closely with the
community to raise over $1 million in order to permanently pro-
tect the public’s access to more than 1,100 acres of Bolton Nordic
and Backcountry land that the Ski Festival utilizes and explores.
If successful, the land will be transferred to the State of Vermont
as an addition to Mt. Mansfield State Forest.
The Get Out and Backcountry Ski Festival (GOBSF) takes
place entirely on the Bolton Valley lands which Vermont Land
Trust is working to protect. This year, the 5th Annual GOBSF will
take place on January 27, 2013. This event provides guided
instruction for beginner and intermediate backcountry skiers and
allows participants to try out new equipment as they tour the
extensive backcountry trails. Participants can learn backcountry
ski basics, how to make telemark turns, how to negotiate ung-
roomed snow, and what to pack when headed out on their own
adventures. In addition, they have access to knowledgeable
guides who can show them around the wild lands of Bolton
Valley.
On March 10, 2013, the Catamount Trail Association offers the
Trapps to Bolton Backcountry Race and Tour, hosted in conjunc-
tion with the Bolton Valley Nordic Center and Trapp Family
Lodge. This event explores the celebrated Bolton to Trapp section
of the Catamount Trail. Details and registration information for
both events can be found on the Catamount Trail Association
website: www.catamounttrail.org.
The Vermont Land Trust has raised 85% of the total amount
needed to permanently conserve this land. Visit the Vermont Land
Trust’s website at www.vlt.org/bolton to learn more about the
campaign or to donate today.
BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. • 223-6611
★Enter Our Pancake Eating Contest! ★
A DELICIOUSLY TENDER SEASONED
HALF-POUND STEAK BROILED TO ORDER:
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NIGHTLY SPECIAL
★ JANUARY ★
SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY
CANADIAN CLUB
BINGO
NO BINGO
THIS WEEK
Happy Thanksgiving
from the Canadian Club Staff
THIS W
EEK'S
SPECIAL
P
A
S
T
A
&

M
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A
T
B
A
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L
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CANADIAN CLUB
BINGO
• Flash Ball: $500.
• Mini Jackpot 53#'s: $2,800.
• Jackpot 52#'s: $1,200.
THIS W
EEK'S
SPECIAL
M
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T
L
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Thursday Night
•Doors Open at 4:00 PM
•Premies at 6:00 PM
•Regular Games at 7:00 PM
CANADIAN CLUB
ROUTE 14 • 479-9090
Just outside of Barre
H
A
P
P
Y
N
E
W
Y
E
A
R
from the Bingo staff
page 16 The WORLD January 2, 2013
ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17
• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedule is subject to change without notice.
ORCA Media Channel 15
Public Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wednesday, January 2
7:00a Divine Dialogues With Donna Dia
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Zero Waste
10:00a The Struggle
10:30a Montpelier Now
11:00a For The Animals
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Senior Moments
2:00p Salaam Shalom
3:00p Freedom And Unity: The Vermont Movie
4:00p For The Animals
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show LIVE
6:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
7:00p Songwriters Notebook
7:30p Sudzin Country
8:00p Another Way
9:00p Wings of Devotion
9:30p Hour of Refreshing
10:00p Community Housing Solutions
11:00p Green Mountain Club Show
Thursday, January 3
6:00a Who Decides About War
7:30a The “Y” Connection
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a ME2 Orchestra: Strings
10:30a Talking About Movies
11:00a Awareness Theater Company
11:30a Global 3000
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00pThe Struggle
1:30p Songwriters Notebook
2:00p Vermont International Festival
2:30p Messing Around with Charlie Messing
3:00p Another Way
4:00p Vermont Countryside
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show LIVE
6:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
7:00p Green Mountain Club Show
8:00p Senior Moments
9:00p Zero Waste
10:00p Who Decides About War
11:30p Analyzing the 1 Per Cent
Friday, January 4
6:00a Jesus by John
6:30a Heavenly Sonshine
7:00a The Antenna Wilde Show
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Another Way
10:00a Who Decides About War
11:30a Abundant Living
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p Community Housing Solutions
3:00p Brunch With Bernie LIVE
4:00p Vermont Blogosphere
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show LIVE
6:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
7:00p Messing Around With Charlie Messing
7:30p Vermont Blogosphere
8:00p Vermont Countryside
9:00p Salaam Shalom
10:00p Jack Dennis on MECApps
11:00p Abundant Living
Saturday, January 5
12:00a Democracy Now!
7:00a Wings of Devotion
7:30a Hour of Refreshing
8:00a Divine Dialogues With Donna Dia
8:30a Green Mountain Club Show
9:00a Green Mountain Veterans For Peace
10:00a Bricktown
10:30a Your Hit Parade
11:30a Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
12:30p Vermont Blogosphere TV
1:00p Heavenly Sonshine
1:30p Jesus by John
2:00p An Evening At the Library
3:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
4:30p Roman Catholic Mass
5:00p Divine Dialogues With Donna Dia
6:00p Songwriters Notebook
7:00p Zero Waste
8:00p Studio Sessions
9:00p Senior Moments
10:00pTalking About Movies
11:00p Gay USA
Sunday, January 6
7:00a Heavenly Sonshine
7:30a Jesus by John
8:00a The Art of Gun Engraving
9:30a Freedom And Unity: The Vermont
Movie
10:00a Your Hit Parade
10:30a Roman Catholic Mass
11:00a Wings of Devotion
11:30a Hour of Refreshing
12:00p Green Mountain Club Show
1:00p ME2 Orchestra: Strings
2:30p Studio Sessions
3:30p Vermont Countryside
5:00p Abundant Living
5:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
6:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
6:30p Sudzin Country
7:00p An Evening At the Library
8:00pTalking About Movies
8:30p Community Housing Solutions
9:30p Divine Dialogues With Donna Dia
10:30p Montpelier Now
11:00p Here in Vermont: HIV 101
Monday, January 7
7:00a Vermont Countryside
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Songwriters Notebook
9:30a Sudzin Country
10:00a Studio Sessions
11:00a Community Housing Solutions
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00pThe Antenna Wilde Show
1:30p Montpelier Now
2:00p Green Mountain Veterans For Peace
3:00p Zero Waste
4:00p Here in Vermont: HIV 101
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show LIVE
6:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
7:00p Divine Dialogues With Donna Dia
8:00p Vermont Blogosphere
8:30p Salaam Shalom
9:30pThe Antenna Wilde Show
10:00p Another Way
11:00p An Evening At the Library
Tuesday, January 8
7:00a Messing Around with Charlie Messing
7:30a Abundant Living
8:00a Democracy Now!
9:00a Senior Moments
10:00a Global 3000
10:30a The “Y” Connection
11:30a Here in Vermont: HIV 101
12:00p Democracy Now!
1:00p An Evening At the Library
2:00pThe Struggle
4:00p Analyzing the 1 Per Cent
5:00pThe Thom Hartman Show LIVE
6:00p Al Jazeera DC Bureau
7:00p Montpelier Now
7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues
8:30pTalking About Movies
9:00p Vermont Countryside
10:00pThe Antenna Wilde Show
ORCA Media Channel 16
Education Access Weekly Program Schedule
Additional Educational Programming
Between Scheduled Shows
Wednesday, January 2
12:00p Education – JoinThe Conversation
1:00p Burlington Book Festival
2:00p Holistically Speaking
3:00pYour Next Bold Move
3:30p Healthy Living
4:00p Aralyn’s Quest
5:00p Goddard College: Bread & Puppet
7:00p Montpelier School Board
Meeting LIVE
Thursday, January 3
12:00pThe Drexel InterView
1:00p Link TV
2:00pThe Little Black Dress Lecture
3:00p Harwood School Board Meeting
6:00p First Wednesdays Lecture Series
7:30p Burlington Book Festival
8:30p CVTS Game of the Week
10:30p Education – JoinThe Conversation
11:00p RoadTo Recovery
Friday, January 4
12:00p Fresh Pickings
12:30p Graceful Aging
1:00p Road to Recovery
2:00pThe Drexel InterView
2:30p Vermont and Human Aging
3:30pTBA
4:00p Goddard College: Bread & Puppet
5:00p U32 School Board Meeting
7:00p Montpelier School Board Meeting
Saturday, January 5
12:00p CVTS Game of the Week
3:00p Stillness In Motion
3:30p Paths To Wellness
4:00p Why Fi?
4:30p New England Cooks
5:30p First Wednesdays Lecture Series
7:00p Goddard College: Bread & Puppet
8:00p Education – JoinThe Conversation
8:30p Fresh Pickings
10:00p Aralyn’s Quest
11:00pTBA
Sunday, January 6
12:00pThe Little Black Dress Lecture
1:00p U32 School Board Meeting
3:30pThe Garage
4:00p VT State Board of Education
10:00p CVTS Game of the Week
Monday, January 7
12:00p Fresh Pickings
1:00p Goddard College: Bread & Puppet
2:00p Harwood School Board
5:00p VT State Board of Education
10:00p First Wednesdays Lecture Series
Tuesday, January 8
12:00p Educational Forum MA School of Law
1:00p Paths To Wellness
1:30p Education – JoinThe Conversation
2:00pThe Artful Word
3:00p CVTS Game of the Week
5:00p Fresh Pickings
6:00p U32 School Board Meeting
9:00p Harwood School Board Meeting
ORCA Media Channel 17
Government Access Weekly Program Schedule
Wed, Jan. 2
8:00a VT Department of Public Health: Vaccine
Regulations Public Hearing
10:00a Soldiers Journal
10:30a White House Chronicles
11:00a Vermont Energy Generation Siting Policy
Commission
1:00p Vermont Workers Center
2:00p Health Care: A Driver of Economic Activity
6:30p Montpelier City Council LIVE
Thu, Jan. 3
7:30a Bethel Selectboard
11:30a Green Mountain Care Board
7:00p Montpelier Development Review Board
9:00p Montpelier Planning Commission
Fri, Jan. 4
8:00a Hunger Council of Washington County
9:30a Waterbury Selectboard
1:00p Berlin Selectboard
4:00p Montpelier Design Review Committee
8:00p Montpelier City Council
Sat, Jan. 5
7:00a Green Mountain Care Board
9:30a Randolph Selectboard
11:00a Waterbury Village Trustees
2:00p Berlin Selectboard
4:00p Bethel Selectboard
6:30p Vermont’s New Economy Conference Parts
1, 2, 3 & 4
Sun, Jan. 6
6:30a Alliance for Retired Americans
9:00a White House Chronicles
9:30a Vermont Energy Generation Siting Policy
Commission
2:00p VT Department of Public Health: Vaccine
Regulations Public Hearing
4:30p Waterbury Selectboard
8:00p Montpelier Development Review Board
Mon, Jan. 7
6:00a Vermont’s New Economy Conference Parts
1, 2, 3 & 4
12:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
1:30p Waterbury Village Trustees
4:00p Randolph Selectboard
7:00p Montpelier Development Review Board LIVE
Tue, Jan. 8
7:30a Alliance for Retired Americans
10:00a Hunger Council of Washington County
11:30a Health Care: A Driver of Economic Activity
2:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning
Commission
5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee
7:00p Montpelier Planning Commission
Community Media(802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net
CVTV Channel 23
BARRE, VT
CVTV CHANNEL 7
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
CHARTER
COMMUNICATIONS
OF BARRE
ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE
Wednesday 1/2
Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p
Williamstown Select 7p,10p

Thursday 1/3
Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p
Spaulding High School 3p,7p,10p

Friday 1/4
Spaulding High School 6a,9a,12p
Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p

Saturday 1/5
6 AM Barre Town Select
9 AM Barre Town Select
12 PM Barre Town Select
3 PM Gospel Music
4 PM Washington Baptist Church
5 PM Faith Community Church
6 PM Barre Congregational Church
8 PM St. Monica’s Mass
9 PM Gospel Music
10 PM Calvary Life

Sunday 1/6
1:00:00 AM Faith Community Church
2:00:00 AM Barre Congregational Church
4:00:00 AM St. Monica’s Mass
5:00:00 AM Washington Baptist Church
6:30 AM Calvary Life
8 AM Gospel Music
9 AM Washington Baptist Church
10 AM Faith Community Church
11 AM Barre Congregational Church
1 PM St. Monica’s Mass
3:30 PM Calvary Life
5 PM Gospel Music
6 PM Washington Baptist Church
7 PM Faith Community Church
8 PM Barre Congregational Church
10 PM St. Monica’s Mass
11 PM Calvary Life

Monday 1/7
VT State Bd of Ed 6a,9a,12p
Barre Town School 3p, 7p, 10p

Tuesday 1/8
Barre Town School 6a,9a,12p
Statehouse Programming 3-6p
Barre City Council 7p
1/2
5:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
7:00 AM GunEngraving_B1000
10:30 AM Gov. Shumlin - Press
Conference
11:00 AM Lifelines
11:30 AM New England Cooks
12:30 PM Ethan Allen
Homestead
2:00 PM 30 Odd Minutes
2:30 PM Authors
4:00 PM Lifelines
4:30 PM GunEngraving
5:30 PM Bill Doyle
6:00 PM CVTSport.net
7:30 PM HIV in Vermont
8:00 PM Governor Press
Conference
8:30 PM GunEngraving
11:30 PM 30 Odd Minutes
1/3
6:00 AM CVTSport.net
8:00 AM HIV in Vermont
8:30 AM Road to Recovery
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11:00 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM Messing Around
12:00 PM Jesus - Social Justice
1:00 PM Messing Around
1:30 PM Road to Recovery
2:30 PM Vermont Movie Update
3:00 PM Authors
4:00 PM Dartmouth Medical
6:30 PM 30 Odd Minutes
7:00 PM Judge Ben
8:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead
9:30 PM New England Cooks
10:30 PM Talking About Movies
11:00 PM Fright Night
1/4
6:00 AM Jesus - Social Justice
7:30 AM Bill Doyle
8:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11:00 AM For the Animals
11:30 AM Vermont Movie Update
12:00 PM Gov Press Conference
12:30 PM Thunder Road
2:30 PM Jesus - Social Justice
3:30 PM Messing Around
4:00 PM Dartmouth Medical
5:30 PM Thunder Road
7:30 PM VTrans Update
8:00 PM Authors
9:00 PM Messing Around
9:30 PM New England Cooks
10:30 PM Talking About Movies
11:00 PM Fright Night
1/5
6:00 AM Crown Point Bridge
7:00 AM Gov Press Conference
7:30 AM Bill Doyle
8:00 AM Jesus - Social Justice
9:30 AM Dartmouth Medical
11:00 AM For the Animals
12:00 PM Govenor Press
Conference
12:30 PM Thunder Road
3:45:00 PM Govenor Press
Conference
4:00 PM Dartmouth Medical
5:30 PM Thunder Road
7:30 PM Messing Around
8:00 PM Jesus - Social Justice
9:30 PM New England Cooks
10:30 PM Talking About Movies
11:00 PM Fright Night
1/6
8:00 AM Funny Videos
8:30 AM Jesus - Social Justice
10:00 AM Thunder Road
12:00 PM Authors
1:00 PM Judge Ben
2:00 PM Talking About Movies
2:30 PM For the Animals
3:00 PM Vermont Movie Update
3:30 PM Marty on the Move
4:30 PM Thunder Road
6:30 PM GunEngraving
8:00 PM New England Cooks
9:00 PM Fright Night
11:00 PM FTA_
DogsDeserveBetter
1/7
6:00 AM Crown Point Bridge
6:30 AM For the Animals
7:00 AM Bill Doyle
7:30 AM Talking About Movies
8:00 AM HIV in Vermont
8:30 AM CVTSport.net
10:30 AM Messing Around
11:00 AM Thunder Road
3:30 PM 30 Odd Minutes
4:00 PM Dartmouth Medical
7:00 PM Judge Ben
8:00 PM Authors
9:00 PM New England Cooks
10:30 PM Talking About Movies
11:00 PM Fright Night
1/8
7:30 AM Road to Recovery
9:45:00 AM Judge Ben
10:30 AM GunEngraving
12:00 PM 30 Odd Minutes
12:30 PM For the Animals
1:00 PM Dartmouth Medical
2:30 PM Lifelines
3:00 PM GunEngraving
4:30:00 PM Talking About Movies
5:00 PM Authors
6:00 PM Governor Press
Conference
6:30 PM New England Cooks
7:30 PM Ethan Allen Homestead
9:00 PM HIV in Vermont
9:30 PM Dartmouth Medical
11:00 PM 30 Odd Minutes
All-State Flute Class. Masterclass for students preparing for the VT
All-State Flute Audition, taught by Karen Kevra. Unitarian Church,
$45 students/$40 teachers & auditors, 10am-1pm. Pre-reg. 793-9291.
Ellis Ashbrook. Contemporary experimental rock group from
Brooklyn, N.Y. Ages 21+. Positive Pie, $5, 10:30pm.
Sunday, January 6
GROTON- Quilt Trunk Show and Thread Painting Workshop.
Master quilter Mary Schilke shares a variety of quilts and quilting
techniques. Groton Free Public Library, 2-4pm. Info. 584-3358.
MONTPELIER- Michael Arnowitt Gala Concert. The pianist cel-
ebrates his 50th birthday with a gala concert feat. a 55-piece profes-
sional orchestra directed by Scott Speck. Montpelier High School,
$20-$50, 2pm. Tix at www.mapiano.com, Buch Spieler, Bagitos.
Monday, January 7
GROTON- Red Cross Blood Drive. All are encouraged to donate.
Groton Community Building, 12:30pm-6pm. 1-800-RED-CROSS.
PLAINFIELD- Kate Engelman Book Reading & Signing. The
Goddard MFAW alumna reads from her new novel, The Stockholm
Octavo. Goddard College, Haybarn Theatre, FREE, 7-8:30pm.
Tuesday, January 8
MONTPELIER- Assessment of Prior Learning Info. Session.
Learn how to get credit for what you know. At VT Interactive
Technologies sites, including VT DOL, 5:30-6:45pm. 828-4064.
MORRISVILLE- GED Testing. Writing or math at 11am, take only
one. Morrisville Learning Center, 52 Portland St. Pre-reg. 888-5531.
Agronomy Plus Meeting. Hosted by UVM Extension to help farm
operators & managers improve their profitability. Stone Grill Pub, Rte
15, $25, 10am-3:30pm. http://2013agronomyplus.eventbrite.com
PLAINFIELD- Nikky Finney Book Reading & Signing. A National
Book Award Winner for Poetry, Finney will read from her work.
Goddard College, Haybarn Theatre, FREE, 7-8:30pm.
WATERBURY- Public Meeting on Washington Co. Flood Insurance
Options. Learn how the newly revised flood hazard maps may affect
you, and available insurance options. Thatcher Brook School, 7pm.
Wednesday, January 9
CHELSEA- Open Mike. With host John Lackard. The Pines, 1
Maple Avenue, no cover, 9pm. Info. 802-685-3344.
MONTPELIER- Community Cinema: Soul Food Junkies.
Screening of the 60-min. documentary by Byron Hurt, followed by
panel discussion. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 7pm.
Green Mtn Care Board Public Meeting. Discussion of proposed
health care spending target for FY2014, etc. Dept. of Financial
Regulation, 89 Main St., 3rd fl., 2-5pm. http://gmcboard.vermont.gov/
Thursday, January 10
BARRE- GED Testing. Writing at 3pm, math at 3:30pm, take only
one; social studies, science & reading at 5:30pm, take 1 or 2. Barre
Learning Center, 46 Washington St. Pre-register 476-4588.
MONTPELIER- Duct Tape Parenting. Author Vicki Hoefle shares
and signs her book about raising respectful, responsible and resilient
kids. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 6:30-8pm. Info. 223-4665.
MORRISTOWN- Book Discussion: The River Between by Ngugi
wa Thiong’o. Part of Vermont Humanities Council’s series on Post-
Colonial Africa. Morristown Library, FREE, 7pm. Info. 888-2616.
RANDOLPH- Agronomy Plus Mtg. Hosted by UVM Extension to
help farm operators/managers improve profitability. VT Tech Enterprise
Center, $25, 10am-3:30pm. http://2013agronomyplus.eventbrite.com
Friday, January 11
MONTPELIER- The Green Mountain Parkway Myth. Bruce Post
discusses the 1936 defeat of the proposed GMP, and its positive and
negative effects on the land, politics, and more. Capital City Grange,
Rte 12, $5 GMC members/$8 others/kids under 12 free, 7pm.
MORRISVILLE- Red Cross Blood Drive. All are encouraged to
donate. VFW, noon-6pm. 1-800-RED-CROSS.
Saturday, January 12
ADAMANT- Dave Keller. Solo performance as part of the Adamant
Winter Music Series. Adamant Community Club, $10 advance at
Coop/$15 at door, optional potluck 5:30pm, concert 7pm.
MONTPELIER- Jenke Presents Set Up City, Bless The Child,
Face One, Mavstar. Hip-hop. Ages 21+. Positive Pie, $5, 10:30pm.
WATERBURY- Waterbury Farmers Market. Thatcher Brook
Primary School, Stowe St., 10am-2pm.
Sunday, January 13
BARRE- Northeast Fiddlers Association Monthly Jam and Meet.
Fiddlers and public welcome. Knights of Columbus, donations accept-
ed, noon-5pm. Info. 728-5188.
GROTON- Wood Turning and Folk Toys. Watch local artist
Richard Montague turn a top. First 20 kids can assemble, decorate &
take home a folk toy. Groton Free Public Library, 2-4pm.
MONTPELIER- Montpelier Antiques Market. Furniture, art,
ephemera, postcards, books, more. Elks Country Club, $5 early buy-
ing at 7:30am/$2 regular admission 9am, 7:30am-1:30pm. 751-6138.
SOUTH ROYALTON- NOFA-VT Annual Direct Marketing
Conference. Workshops & speakers geared to farmers who sell their
products directly to their local communities. VT Law School, $40
NOFA members/$50 non. Pre-register www.nofavt.org/DMC
STOWE- Cross-country Ski with GMC Young Adventurers Club.
Easy 2-4 mile trip at Trapp Family Touring Center. Pass or trail fee
required. Call Lexi at 229-9810 for meeting time & place.
Gardeners Invited to Grow with
Extension Master Gardener Course
Do you love gardening and want to learn how to grow fruits and
vegetables more sustainably? Or perhaps your passion lies with
landscape design or cultivating perennials?
The University of Vermont (UVM) Extension Master Gardener
Program is now accepting registrations for a comprehensive
13-week home horticulture course. It is designed to provide gar-
deners of all levels of expertise with intensive training in a number
of areas including food production, flower gardening, rain gar-
dens, sustainable landscaping and pest and disease control, among
other topics.
The course will be offered Tuesday evenings, beginning Feb. 5,
at Vermont Interactive Technologies sites in Bennington,
Brattleboro, Johnson, Lyndonville, Middlebury, Montpelier,
Newport, Randolph Center, Rutland, St. Albans, Springfield,
White River Junction and Williston. All classes run from 6:15 to
9pm with the exception of the first class, which will start at
5:45pm.
The registration fee is $340 plus an additional $55 for the
required textbook. Registrations received after Jan. 18 will be
charged a $25 late fee.
A downloadable registration form and additional course details,
including scholarship information, may be found online at www.
uvm.edu/mastergardener. Or e-mail master.gardener@uvm.edu or
call (802) 656-9562.
Confirmation will be sent by e-mail within two weeks of receipt
of full payment along with information on class location, direc-
tions and the date course materials will be shipped. Because the
course usually fills up quickly, early registration is advised.
Anyone requiring a disability-related accommodation to par-
ticipate should notify the UVM Extension Master Gardener
Program office at (802) 656-9562 by Jan. 4.
Course graduates may earn their Extension Master Gardener
certification by completing a 40-hour internship that may include
preparing and staffing exhibits, presenting talks to local groups or
participating in UVM Extension Master Gardener service projects
in their communities. Interns, along with certified master garden-
ers, also will be invited to attend advanced gardening workshops
and private garden tours to stay current on horticultural research
and educational information pertinent to Vermont.
Ordering Fruit Plants
and Other January
Gardening Tips
Charlie Nardozzi, Horticulturist and
Leonard Perry, UVM Extension Horticulturist
C
aring for holiday plants,
checking stored crops,
and ordering fruit plants
are some of the gardening
activities for this month.
If you received a poinsettia
or cyclamen as a holiday gift,
keep it blooming by providing
proper care. Poinsettias need
good drainage, so if the pot is
still wrapped in foil, make sure
there is a hole in the bottom so
water drains out. Of course if
it’s on furniture, place a saucer
underneath to protect the finish. Keep poinsettias away from
drafts, such as near doors or windows or hot woodstoves. Keep
soil moist, but don’t overwater. Keep in bright light.
The latter applies, also, to cyclamen which can last for
weeks if kept cool (65 to 68 degrees F in day, less at night).
Too high temperatures, too little water or overwatering, or too
low light may cause leaves to yellow and drop.
When you’re finished with holiday evergreen boughs, use
them to mulch tender perennials and shrubs. They make a
lightweight but insulating layer that helps protect plants from
alternating temperatures like our typical January thaw fol-
lowed by a deep freeze. Also they help trap snow over these
plants, for a similar insulating effect.
While snow makes a good protective cover for plants, if you
use salt to melt ice on driveways or walks, be careful not to
pile snow from these areas on your plants or where melting
snow will drain onto them. Otherwise, once snow melts in
spring, flush it thoroughly with water to help dilute or wash
away any salt residue.
Potatoes, onions, carrots, turnips, and other root crops that
you have stored in your basement or root cellar should be
checked regularly for signs of decay. Any vegetables that show
any rotting should be removed and eaten (if possible) immedi-
ately so they don’t spread the disease to other vegetables. If
you’ve stored fruits such as apples, or summer bulbs such as
dahlias, check them periodically as well.
With seed catalogs arriving in the mail, these short and cold
winter days are a good time to browse through them or their
websites. By starting your own seeds you can have cultivars
(cultivated varieties) you won’t find locally, you can save
money, and it is just a fun process to watch those little seeds
grow into seedlings.
Although you’ll lean toward your favorites, why not try
something you’ve never grown before, either a cultivar or
crop. This year I plan to grow an heirloom—broom corn—
which is actually a type of sorghum grain that is both attractive
and quite tall. Last year, among other crops, I tried a new
fusarium disease-resistant basil and yes, it did make great
pesto. Consider flowers that grew best in our All-America
Selections display garden at the Burlington Waterfront Park
(perrysperennials.info/aaswp.html).
If you haven’t grown your own fruits, consider this too, with
links to sources and resources online (homefruitgrowing.info).
While it is easy to visit local growers to pick and buy quanti-
ties of fruits in summer and fall, such as for freezing or can-
ning or making jams, it’s fun to grow some of your own. You
often can grow fruits you won’t find for sale, you’ll have some
for ready picking for immediate fresh eating, and you’ll know
what chemicals, if any, have been used on them. When choos-
ing fruits, pay attention to the space they’ll need, hardiness,
and whether more than one selection is needed for cross-polli-
nation.
page 22 The WORLD January 2, 2013
JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
NURSE PRACTITIONER: 8hrs/
wk in Berlin Clinic. Provides med-
ical services, physical exams,
and follow-up on patient medical
issues for the narcotic replace-
ment therapy program. Must be
in good standing with the State
of Vermont. Send resume/cover
letter to Clinic Director, 475
Union St, Newport VT 05855 or
fax to 802-334-7280 or email to
aaiken@baartprograms.com.
WORK AT HOME AND EARN
BIG BUCKS!
Earn up to $1,000 a week at
your leisure in your own home?
The probability of gaining big
profits from this and many simi-
lar at home jobs is slim. Promot-
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a fee to teach you useless, and
unprofitable trades, or to provide
you with futile information. TIP:
If a work-at-home program is
legitimate, your sponsor should
tell you, for free and in writing,
what is involved. If you question
a program’s legitimacy, call the
ATTORNEY GENERAL’S CON-
SUMER ASSISTANCE PRO-
GRAM at 1-800-649-2424.
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-
LION$? Watch out for business
opportunities that make outra-
geous claims about potential
earnings. Don’t get fooled into
get rich quick scams. There are
legitimate business opportuni-
ties, but be cautious of any busi-
ness that can’t reflect in writing
the typical earnings of previous
employees. TIP: Investigate
earning potential claims of busi-
nesses by requesting written in-
formation from them before you
send any money, or by calling
the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-2424.
COMPUTERS/
ELECTRONICS
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CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin here,
Become an Aviation Maintenance
Tech. FAA approved training. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified, housing
available. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM (866)453-6204.
ATTEND COLLEGE Online
from home. Medical, Busi-
ness, Paralegal, Accounting,
Criminal Justice. Job place-
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www. Cent ur aOnl i ne. c om
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. Medical, Business,
Criminal Justice, Hospital-
ity. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial
aid if qualified. Call 800-494-
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SPANISH IN WATERBURY
CENTER - Our sixth year.
Classes beginning January 7-10
for 10 weeks; all levels. Lessons
for travel, private instruction, tu-
toring/AP, children. Learn from
a native speaker. For details:
www.spanishwaterburycenter.
com or call 585-1025 or email
spani shparavos@gmai l .com
PERSONALS
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING adoption? Talk with car-
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choose from families nation-
wide. Living expenses paid.
CAll 24/7, Abby’s One True
Gift Adoption, 866-413-6296.
Florida Agency#100021542
PREGNANT? CONSIDER-
ING Adoption? You choose
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One True Gift Adoptions. 866-
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FREE ITEMS
CA$H PAID $100-$300 for
Junk Cars/Trucks, Free Scrap
Metal pickup 802-322-5055
CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.
HEALTH CARE
LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE/
Lose 20 pounds in one week?
This is almost impossible!
Weight loss ads must reflect
the typical experiences of the
diet users. Beware of pro-
grams that claim you can lose
weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues
to fraudulent ads include words
like: “breakthrough,” “effortless,”
and “new discovery.” When you
see words like these be skepti-
cal. Before you invest your time
and money call the ATTORNEY
GENERAL’S CONSUMER
ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, at
1-800-649-2424.
WORLD CLASSIFIED
DEADLINE MONDAY 10AM (Display Ads Thursday at 5:00 PM)
802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com • www.vt-world.com
JOB OPPS
continued
CLASSES &
WORKSHOPS
continued
continued on page 23
FULL-TIME POLICE OFFICER
BARRE TOWN
The Town of Barre is accepting applications for a
full-time police offcer position. Candidates must
possess a high school diploma, ability to pass the
VCJTC physical ftness test, and valid drivers license.
A college degree, full-time certifcation, and police
work experience preferred. Current labor contract
provides for competitive wages and benefts. Day,
night, weekend, and holiday work required. Interested
men and women may obtain an application from the
Barre Town Managers Offce, 149 Websterville Road,
P.O. Box 116, Websterville, VT 05678, by calling
802-479-9331, by email to offces@barretown.org,
or download an application @ www.barretown.org/
PDFfles/forms/employment.pdf. Applications will be
accepted until the position is flled.
~Barre Town is an Equal Opportunity Employer ~
Only qualified applicants will receive a response. Valid driver’s license, excellent driving record and access to a safe, reliable,
insured vehicle is required. Send letter of interest and resume to: WCMHS, Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.
Contact: 802-229-1399 x261 Fax 802-223-6423 personnel@wcmhs.org • www.wcmhs.org E.O.E.
Trauma Treatment Program Manager: Full time w/ benefits. LINCS (Linking Community Supports) and the Child and
Family Trauma Treatment Program (CFTPP), the Outpatient Trauma Treatment Programs for WCMHS are seeking a Trauma
Treatment Program Manager. This position oversees and develops the LINCS and CFTTP. Staff consultation and supervision
regarding effects of trauma, trauma treatment, and community supports and resources are provided. The program manager
will interface with WCMHS staff and community partners regarding the effects and treatment of trauma. Direct clinical
services to adults, children and families affected by trauma provided. Licensed Clinical Social Worker w/ 5 years of experience
working with adults, children and families affected by trauma required. Ability to access community resources and be familiar
with the ARC model of treatment for children and families desirable.
Outpatient Clinician: Full time w/ benefits. Mental Health clinician needed to provide clinical services to adults in a
physician’s office. This position is located in a central Vermont primary care office and employed through Washington
County Mental Health Services. A Master's degree, license eligible, a collaborative approach, and at least one year experience
providing psychotherapy required for this full time salaried position. Experience and interest in behavioral psychology
desired.
Collaborative Systems Integration Project - Street Interventionist: Hourly position with potential to become full time.
Seeking a collaborative, energetic, team-oriented, creative individual to provide a complement of services to meet the support
needs of adults, children and families as part of the outpatient team. This is primarily a community based position. The Street
Interventionist will provide support services to clients that include but are not limited to outreach visits, support services,
accessing benefits, assistance with independent living skills and transportation of clients in personal vehicle when clinically
indicated. The Street Interventionist will collaborate and consult with clients, case managers, clinicians, community partners
and others involved with the treatment team on an ongoing basis. Actively participate in treatment team meetings. Bachelor's
degree in social work, human services or related field required. One year of services delivery with adults and children.
Sensitivity to the unique needs of clients with a history of trauma necessary.
Adult Access Clinician/Case Manager: Full time w/ benefits. This position will focus on providing assessment, case
management, and brief psychotherapy to adults in crisis. Services are primarily home/field based and work in collaboration
with the Emergency Screeners and Outpatient programs. The successful candidate will have therapeutic experience working
in crisis intervention; experience in home/field based services; possess excellent case management skills; create and participate
in treatment team meetings, client advocacy and behavior management consultation; demonstrate clinical interviewing and
assessment skills, both oral and written; be reliable, on time, flexible and able to work both as a team member and
independently ; and possess excellent organizational and follow-up skills. Must be able to complete documentation within
prescribed timelines. Master’s degree with relevant experience. Must be willing to work until 6-7 pm 1-2 nights per week.
Rest of schedule can be flexible.
Behavior Interventionists/Educational Support Specialists for the following programs: Full time w/ benefits.
SBBI (School Based Behavior Interventionist): Multiple positions. Full time w/ benefits. Provide direct supervision
to enrolled child or youth within a school setting. Implement behavioral programming and provide counseling in
social, recreational and daily living skills in school and community settings. Bachelor's Degree in human services,
education or psychology preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field
is required. Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors
preferred.
Crescent House Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Provide individualized support
services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will require
the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support in areas
of social skills and daily living skill development. Willingness to work flexible hours required.
ODIN Home/School Behavior Interventionist: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking individual to provide individualized
support services to assigned youth who have significant social, behavioral and emotional needs. Responsibilities will
require the ability to implement individualized behavior/reinforcement plans, provide direct supervision and support
in areas of social skills and daily living skills development. Willingness to work flexible hours required. BA in human
services, education or psychology preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward a Bachelor’s
degree in a related field is required. Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with
challenging behavior preferred.
ChOICE Behavior Intervention/Education Support Specialist: Provide direct supervision to youth (ages 12-18+)
within an integrated mental health treatment facility / educational center. Implement behavioral programming and
milieu counseling in social, emotional and recreation/leisure skills and activities of daily living in classroom, day
treatment and community settings. Provide individual and group supervision as needed.
All Behavior Interventionist positions require: Bachelor's Degree in human services, education or psychology
preferred. If degree requirements are not complete, working toward BA/BS or related field is required.
Experience providing direct instruction and therapeutic services to children with challenging behaviors
preferred. Ability to lift and carry 50 pounds and execute physical restraints required.
Residential Counselor – Segue House: Full time w/ benefits. Seeking an individual to provide for the emotional and physical
safety of residents in a group care setting experiencing mental health challenges. A residential counselor will act as a role
model and teach independent living skills, to include cooking, housekeeping and personal hygiene, assisting with medication
administration, and crisis intervention as needed. Must be willing to work a flexible schedule that will include some
overnights. BA in Human Services or related field required.
CUPS Outreach Specialist: 24 hours per week. Seeking part-time/hourly individual to develop and/or deliver ongoing
community based assessment, treatment and supports for young children, ages 0-6, experiencing or at risk for severe emotional
disturbance and their families. Master’s degree in social work, psychology or human services field required. Possession of or
eligible for a license as a psychologist, social worker, or clinical mental health worker required. Training and experience in
Early Childhood Mental Health preferred.
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403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641
479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916
www.vt-world.com • sales@vt-world.com
Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00am - 5:00pm
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 23
WANT A CURE-ALL?
Health fraud is a business that
sells false hope. Beware of un-
substantiated claims for health
products and services. There
are no “Quick Cures” - no mat-
ter what the ad is claiming. TIP:
DO NOT rely on promises of a
“money back guarantee!” Watch
out for key words such as “exclu-
sive secret,” “amazing results,”
or “scientifc breakthrough.” For
more information on health re-
lated products or services, call
the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S
CONSUMER ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM at 1-800-649-2424,
or consult a health care pro-
vider.
WorId CIass
Massage
Steamed Towels / Hot Packs
T-Jaҋs Studio / Barre
520.977.5695
802.479.2819
WANTED
CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
COIN COLLECTOR will
Pay Cash for Pre-1965
Coins and Coin Collec-
tions. Call Joe 802-498-3692
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fes, Shotguns. Top Pric-
es paid. 802-492-3339
days. 802-492-3032 nights.
WILL HAUL away for free:
Scrap metal, old appliances, car
parts, etc. Chad, 802-793-0885.
YEARBOOKS “Up to $15 paid
for high school yearbooks
1900-2012. www.yearbooku-
sa.com or 214-514-1040.”
BABY/CHILDREN
ITEMS
MISC BABY ITEMS; crib,
Play-pen, baby gate, rocking
horses, Radio Flyer Tricycle,
stuff toys, books. 802-433-5515
MISCELLANEOUS
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
**OLD GUITARS
W A N T E D ! * * G i b s o n ,
Martin,Fender, Gretsch,
Epiphone,Guild, Mosrite,
Rickenbacker. Prairie State,
D’Angelico, Stromberg, and
Gibson Mandolins/Banjos.
1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP
CASH PAID!! 1-800-401-0440.
ACR METAL Roofng/Siding
Dist. Quality Products, Low Pric-
es. Metal Roofng and Trims.
Complete Garage & Barn Pack-
ages, Lumber, Trusses. Delivery
available. Free literature. 1-800-
325-1247, www.acrmetal.com
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Financial aid
if qualifed - Housing avail-
able. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM (888)686-1704
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here-Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA ap-
proved training. Financial
aid if qualifed-Housing avail-
able. Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM 877-534-5970
ATTEND COLLAGE
ONLINE from Home.
“Medical,*Business,*Criminal
Justice,*Hospitality. Job place-
ment assistance. Computer
available. Financial Aid if quali-
fed. SCHEV authorized 877-203-
1086 www.CenturaOnline.com
AVIATION MAINTENANCE
TRAINING Financial Aid if quali-
fed. Job Placement Assistance.
Call National Aviation Acad-
emy today!. FAA Approved.
CLASSES STARTING SOON!
1-800-292-3228 or NAA.edu.
BUNDLE & SAVE on your
CABLE, INTERNET PHONE,
AND MORE. High Speed In-
ternet starting at less that $20/
mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159
CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
JUNK AUTO
PICK-UP
YOU CALL
I’LL HAUL
802-279-2595
LIKE NEW Stationary ex-
cercise bike $75. Air Walker
$50. Ab-Sculpture $50. All
three $150. 802-476-6096
LOCAL HONEY FOR SALE
From Calais, 2nd Harvest. Rea-
sonable Prices, 12oz $3.50, 1lb
$4.00, 2lb $7.50. Makes a Great
Gift For The Holidays. Call any-
time 802-223-5966
MENS, Large, Down Jacket,
Red, Brand New $40. 229-4802
REACH OVER 14 million homes
nationwide with one easy buy!
Only $1,795 per week for a 20
word classifed! For more infor-
mation, call 802-479-2582 or
go to www.naninetwork.com.
THE BARREL MAN, A Load of
Open & Closed Steel Barrels
just came in. “We have Sand
Barrels”, Call 802-439-5519
TREADMILL; ProForm CrossWalk
397, new last christmas, used
very little, $300 802-485-7277
WE CAN remove bankruptcies,
judgments, liens, and bad loans
from your credit fle forever!
The Federal Trade Commission
says companies that promise to
scrub your credit report of ac-
curate negative information for a
fee are lying. Under FEDERAL
law, accurate negative informa-
tion can be reported for up to
seven years, and some bank-
ruptcies for up to 10 years. Learn
about managing credit and debt
at ftc.gov/credit. A message
from The World and the FTC.
WORK ON JET ENGINES -
Train for hands on Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA ap-
proved program. Financial aid if
qualifed - Job placement assis-
tance. Call AIM(866)854-6156.
MUSICAL
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
CLARINET/FLUTE/ VIOLIN/
TRUMPET/ Trombone/ Ampli-
fer/ Fender Guitar, $69 each.
Cello/Upright bass/ Saxophone/
French horn/Drums, $185 ea.
Tuba/Baritone horn/ Hammond
Organ, others 4 sale. 1-516-
377-7907.
TFN-BNE
NORTH BRANCH Instruments,
LLC. Fretted Instrument Repair.
Buy and Sell used Fretted Instru-
ments. Michael Ricciarelli 802-
229-0952, 802-272-1875 www.
northbranchinstruments.com
PIANO TUNING & REPAIR
DAVID GAILLARD
802-472-3205
HOME
APPLIANCES
DIRECT TO Home Satel-
lite TV, $19.99/mo. Free in-
stallation. FREE HD/DVR
upgrade Credit/Debit card
Req. Call 1-800-795-3579.
SMALL, WHITE GE micro-
wave with turntable, $35.
Small, white Rival toaster oven,
$15. Both $45. 802-472-5236.
HEALTH CARE
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
MISCELLANEOUS
continued
continued on page 24
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED
ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:
www.vt-world.com
Kinkade Painting
Q: I have a painting by
Thomas Kinkade, the “Painter
of Light.” In addition to the
painting, I also have a teapot
he produced with the inscrip-
tion “Home Is Where the
Heart Is.” Since Kinkade died
recently, is his artwork now
worth more? -- Barbara, Alton,
N.Y.
A: Thomas Kinkade cranked
out thousands (yes, thousands)
of paintings, lithographs and
related items during his very
productive lifetime. Since he
flooded the market with his
art, when he died there was
little or no bump in values. I
spoke to several gallery own-
ers who think interest in
Kinkade has, in fact, declined.
Texas Art Depot specializes in
Kinkade’s artwork and might
be a helpful second opinion.
Contact info is 301 West Oak,
Palestine, TX 75801.
***
Q: I have an old fishing reel
that was never used and is still
in its original box. I’d like to
sell it to a collector. Could you
please publish my name and
address so interested parties
can contact me? -- Bernie,
Albuquerque, N.M.
A: When I answer a letter for
my column, it immediately
goes into my shredder. If it is
an email, it is answered and
deleted. That protects anyone
who contacts me about their
collectibles, and there are no
exceptions. You might be able
to hook a buyer by contacting
Antique & Classic Fishing
Reels, P.O. Box 7623, Jupiter,
Fla. 33468.
***
Q: My dad was one of the first
people in our Chicago neigh-
borhood to own a television. It
was a RCA Model 8T241 with
a 10-inch screen. What is it
worth? -- Carl, Pasco, Wash.
A: According to “The Antique
Trader Radio and Television
Price Guide” edited by Kyle
Husfloen, your set was made
in 1948 and is worth about
$150. For some reason, vin-
tage radios have outpaced
early televisions as far as
desirability with collectors is
concerned.
***
Q: I have a ticket to the
Democratic National
Convention of 1948. I have
been offered $50 for it. --
Steve, Palm Beach, Fla.
A: Take the offer. According
to several price guides I con-
sulted, your ticket is valued in
the $10 to $15 range.
Write to Larry Cox in care of
King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send
e-mail to questionsforcox@
aol.com. Due to the large vol-
ume of mail he receives, Mr.
Cox is unable to personally
answer all reader questions.
Do not send any materials
requiring return mail.
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274
479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916
Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER
and call 479-2582 or
1-800-639-9753
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5
¢
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3
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DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00 AM
CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM on
Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error please
notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be responsible
for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.
CLIP AND MAIL THIS HANDY FORM TODAY
CHECK HEADING:
■ Animals-Farm ......................500
■ Animals-Pet .........................430
■ Antiques/Restorations .........144
■ Baby/Children Items ............140
■ Bicycles ...............................220
■ Boating/Fishing ...................210
■ Building Materials ................300
■ Business Items ....................080
■ Business Opportunities .......060
■ Camping ..............................205
■ Childcare Service ................030
■ Christmas Trees ..................370
■ Class & Workshops .............103
■ Clothing & Accessories .......130
■ Computers/Electronics ........100
■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410
■ Free Ads ..............................108
■ Furniture ..............................180
■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145
■ Health ..................................113
■ Home Appliances ................160
■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305
■ Insurance/Investments ........090
■ Job Opportunities ................020
■ Lost and Found ...................110
■ Miscellaneous .....................150
■ Musical ................................200
■ Personals ............................105
■ Professional Services .........540
■ Rideshare ............................125
■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355
■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360
■ Sporting Equipment ............250
■ Storage................................235
■ Support Groups ..................107
■ Tools ....................................330
■ Wanted ................................120
■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350
■ Work Wanted .......................040
AUTOMOTIVE
■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845
■ Cars & Accessories ............875
■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850
■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870
■Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873
■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855
REAL ESTATE
■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630
■ Camps for Sale ...................650
■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605
■ Condominiums ....................680
■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685
■ Homes .................................690
■ Land for Sale .......................670
■ Mobile Homes .....................600
■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645
■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610
PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________
LAST NAME _______________________________________________________________________________
FIRST NAME ______________________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________
CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________
START DATE: ___________ NUMBER OF ISSUES: __________
EXACTLY HOW YOU WANT THE AD TO READ
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM
REUSE REUSE
is Trendy,
Antique Antique is Unique,
R
ECYCLE
R
ECYCLE is Earth Friendly,
Vintage Vintage is Chic!
QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS
62 Main Street • Montpelier
223-1353
Why buy new when you
can REUSE?
GO GREEN!
Salvation Army
Thrift Store
545 No. Main St.
Mon.-Sat. 9AM to 7PM
Clothes for the Whole Family
Household Items
Furniture • Toys • TVs
~All Clothing Accepted~
CLOTHING & HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
LOTS OF CLOTHING FOR THE WHOLE
FAMILY AT UNBEATABLE PRICES!
Check The WORLD for Weekly Specials
Also Many Misc. Items -
New Items Daily-Shop Often!
119 River St., P.O. Box 279, Montpelier, VT 05601
(802) 223-7735 Fax: 223-7515 • www.nwjinsurance.com
~ This message sponsored by ~
15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309
Weekdays 10 AM to 4 PM • Saturday 9 AM to 12:30 PM
Sponsored by Auxiliary
page 24 The WORLD January 2, 2013
FURNITURE
Bookcase
71”Hx28”Wx12”D
3 shelves on top.
2-door opening
on bottom with 2
shelves.
$40, o.b.o.
802-472-5236
MAPLE HUTCH, 5’LX6’.6”H,
TOP-3 Glass Doors, Bot-
tom-3 Pull out drawers & 3
Cabinet Doors, $500 Must
be Seen! 802-485-7277
STORAGE
8’X20’ STORAGE UNITS for rent.
Airport Rd, Berlin. 802-223-6252
8’x20’, 8’x40’ OCEAN
FREIGHT containers (new/
used) for sale. 802-223-6252.
+++++++++
+ + + + + + + + +
Royalton, VT
1-877-204-3054 · (802) 763-7876
FOR LEASE OR SALE...
6725$*(
&217$,1(56
DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE
PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS
& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE
Call For Prices
l·8¡¡·204·3054
Exit 3
off I-89
/($
6,1*
+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

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+

+

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+

+

YOU Store It!
Lock It!
And YOU
Keep The Key!
CaII 229-2222
Barre Montpelier Area
Mini Storage Warehouse
HUNTING/GUNS/
ARCHERY
NEW AND used guns,
muzzleloaders, accesso-
ries. Snowsville Store, E.
Braintree, 802-728-5252.
NEW AND used guns,
muzzleloaders, accesso-
ries. Snowsville Store, E.
Braintree, 802-728-5252.
WANTED: PISTOLS, Ri-
fles, Shotguns. Top Pric-
es paid. 802-492-3339
days. 802-492-3032 nights.
TOOLS/MACHINERY
TooI Warehouse OutIet, Inc.
Rt. 302 · Barre-MontpeIier
CentraI Vermont's Best
SeIection Of QuaIity TooIs
Discount Prices!
802-479-3363 800-462-7656
TOOLS REPAIRED
Air, electric, hydraulic. Tool
Warehouse Outlet, Barre-
Montpelier Rd., 802-479-3363,
1-800-462-7656.
WOOD/HEATING
EQUIP.
16” GREEN FIREWOOD,
$200/cord. Dry $350/
cord. 802-454-7798.
2 Wood stoves both take 24”
wood,1st- Volgalzane/Durango
1/4” plate steel, High effienciy w/
fan. 2nd-WonderWood-made in
the USA, w/fan auto draft control,
each $350/obo. 802-496-3984
CHOP-CHOP FIREWOOD
Service. Comfort food for your
furnace. Green firewood. $210/
cord. (2) cord deliveries pre-
ferred. 802-472-WOOD(9663).
DON’T NEED a full cord? 1/3
cord load of seasoned to dry
16” firewood $100.
802-454-8561
DRY FIREWOOD blocked 20-24
inch $290. Delivered within 10
miles of Plainfield. 802-454-1431
FIREWOOD, DRY, $325/
cord (90% hard maple). Sea-
soned, $265/cord (mixed
hardwood). Cut, split, de-
livered. 802-461-6748.
FIREWOOD, GREEN and Sea-
soned call 802-454-1062 or 272-
5316 for price, leave message.
FIREWOOD. CUT, split &
delivered. $195/cord. Ma-
ple, Ash. 802-476-9117.
FIREWOOD. FREE range or-
ganic dry. $280 per cord at the
landing in Calais. Trucking can
be arranged. 802-454-7198.
HARDWOOD KINDLING,
Meshbags $5.00/ea. Free de-
livery to Seniors. 802-279-2595
ONLY 3 CORD GREEN
WOOD LEFT For Sale. Split
in October. $200.00 per
cord Delivered in Montpelier
Barre Area. 802-223-6617
TOTAL WOOD HEAT. Safe,
clean, efficient and comfortable
OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE
from Central Boiler. Appalachian
Supply Inc. 802-748-4513.
SNOWMOBILES &
ACCESSORIES
2002 YAMAHA SXR 600
triple, mint condition, 930
miles stored indoors.
$3500/0bo. 802-461-6198.
2008 YAMAHA NYTRO
RTX, blue, 1000 miles, ex-
cellent condition, many ex-
tras, helmet, coat and gloves.
$6995 firm. 802-249-3003.
FARM/GARDEN/
LAWN
CEDAR BROOK FARM; Cedar
Fence Posts, ButterCup Squash
& Storage Potatoes $1/lb, Brush
Hogging, Pasture Renova-
tion, Rototilling, Planting, Wild-
life Food Plots. 802-456-1436
emai l -aj pal mi ero@vtl i nk.net
SIMPLICITY SNOWBLOW-
ER Model 1060 dlxe 10HP,
24”, 5-Forward, 2-Reverse,
Headlight, Snowcab, excel-
lent, $700.00. 802-249-7878
ANIMALS/
PETS
BROOKSIDE KENNELS. Board-
ing dogs. Heated runs. Located
Orange Center, 479-0466.
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DON’T WANT TO
KENNEL YOUR DOG(S)?
Have your child friendly com-
panion animal stay with us in the
comfort of our home. Call Your
Pet Nannies, Sophie 802-229-
0378 or Shona 802-229-4176,
references available.
Just One Pure GOLDEN
RETRIEVER Puppy left.
Worming, first shots 7 Start-
er pack. $625. 276-9904.
PUGS & PEEKAPOOS,
Other Small Breeds, Shots
& dewormed. 802-476-5904
ANIMALS/
FARM
BROKEN IRON Ranch. Cer-
tified organic, 1st cut $3.50/
bale, 2nd cut $5.00/bale,
out of barn. 802-839-0409
GOOD QUALITY 1ST
CUT ROUND BALES For
Sale, Stored Undercover,
$40/bale. 802-461-5215
KIDDER’S SMOKEHOUSE
CUSTOM SMOKE & CURE
WE DO CORNBEEF
ORANGE, VT
802-498-4550
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
$ CASH $
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
Paying up to $300 for junk cars
and trucks, FREE Scrap Metal
Pick-up. Call Barre, 802-917-
2495, 802-476-4815, Bob.
ACE PAINTING
& STAINING SERVICES LLC
Covering all interior/exterior and
pressure washing needs. 802-
461-7828.
ACE PLOWING/SANDING
ROOF SHOVELING 802-461-
7828
ANTIQUE & VINTAGE
CLOCKS Professional re-
paired, Adjusted, Clean. Rea-
sonable prices, Local Pickup/
Delivery. AWCI Member, Clock-
Work Wayne, 802-728-9951
BASEMENT WATERPROOF-
ING, Fully Insured, 30 Yrs
Experience, Foundation
Cracks Sealed, Free Esti-
mates. Jet Constructions Inc.
802-272-4811, 603-494-2664
BEAUDIN’S PLUMBING/HEAT-
ING. New construction. Re-
model jobs. Repairs, service.
Furnice/boiler replacements.
Furnace cleanings. Odor elimi-
nating service. Fully licensed/
insured. Leo, 802-476-3237.
BOISVERT SHOE repair also
offers a sharpening service at
200 N.Main St, Barre, VT 05641.
802-479-3478 Boisverts/802-
2 7 2 - 8 1 7 5 - G o r d o n .
CASH PAID
$75 TO $300+
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
802-522-4279.
CLEANING SERVICES: Home
or Office, One time or sched-
uled, Carpets, Clean-out, Site
Clean-ups, Real Estate Clean-
ing, Windows. 802-279-0150
DmFURNACE
MAN
·Oil Furnace Tune-Ups
·Cleanings ·Repairs
·Installations
Fully Licensed & Insured
Reasonable Rates
Call Daryl
802-249-2814
GREEN-SCAPES
Provides Year Round Services,
SNOWPLOWING, We Provide
ALL Services FROM Property
TO Indoor Maintenance. Call
Justin @ 802-883-5090/802-
595-5105
HANDYMAN SERVICES:
Repai rs.Carpentry.Fl oori ng.
Painting. Electrical/Plumb-
ing, Pressure Washing. De-
bris Removal 802-279-0150
HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFT-
ED? Contact Woodford Bros.,
Inc. for straightening, leveling,
foundation and wood frame
repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN,
www.woodfordbros.com MA-
HIC#155877, CTHIC#571557,
RICRB#22078. BNE-TFN
LOU’S APPLIANCE Repair,
36 Central Street, Randolph.
Service throughout central
Vermont. In Barre, Montpe-
lier area all week. 802-728-
4636; 802-477-2802(cell).
l ousappl i ance@comcast.net
QUALITY PAINTING, Stu-
art Morton, Interior/Exterior,
Repairs, Many Excellent Lo-
cal References. 802-229-
0681 corsica@sover.net
ROOF SHOVELING, Careful,
reasonable. Andy 802-223-5409
ROOF SNOW Removal +
Quality Full Tree Services.
Fully Insured. Call Randy @
802-479-3403 or 249-7164.
WILL HAUL away for free:
Scrap metal, old appliances, car
parts, etc. Chad, 802-793-0885.
STORAGE
continued
WOOD/ HEATING
EQUIP.
continued
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
continued
Let Us Know...
if you are not getting
your w orld each week!
If you are in the greater
Barre-Montpelier Area
Call 479-2582
Other Areas Can Call Toll Free
1-800-639-9753
FAX
US!
Now Placing Your
Classified Or
Display Ad Is
Even Easier!
Our Fax Number Is
802479-7916
Please Include Contact
Person & Payment Info
VISA, MasterCard & Discover
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
POTATO
BARN
ANTIQUES
(603) 636-2611
POTATO
BARN
ANTIQUES
Just 40 minutes East of St. J.
Route 3
Northumberland, N.H.
4 mi. North of Lancaster, NH, Fairground
(603) 636-2611
Always Buying Vintage Clothing &
Accessories, Lamps & Lighting.
7500 sq.ft. of Antiques
& Collectables, including:
•Vintage Clothing
•Costume Jewelry
•Lamps, Lighting,
Rewires & Repairs
•Official Aladdin
Lamp Dealer
•Glass •China
•Ephemera & more
NO SALES TAX!
WINTER HOURS STARTING JAN. 2013
Fri., Sat., & Sun. 10-4
WEATHER PERMITTING
$
999
95
Starting
At Only
The New
Power Max
TM
with Quick
Stick
TM
control.
•7hp to11hp engine, 26” & 28”
clearing width •Quick Stick
TM

chute control
•Power Max
TM
auger system
to reduce
clogging
•3-year
FULL
warranty
Count on it.
POWER EQUIPMENT
476-7712
81 S. Main St., Barre
M-F 8-5, Sat. 8:30-Noon
TORO
®
1800
POWER CURVE
®
•Throws snow up to 30 feet
•Maintenance free:
no gas, no oil - just
press & go
•Compact size for
easy storage -
inside or out
•2-year
FULL
warranty*
TORO
®
CCR
TM

POWERLITE
®
Ideal for small
driveways
starting at $
439
95
• Lite weight - only 37 lbs.
• Throws snow up to 25 feet
only
$
339
95
www.toro.com
With
Electric
Start
HAPPY TAILS
BOARDING
KENNEL
Jim & Shelly Roux
802-485-5296
Roxbury, VT
05699
• modern facility
• radiant floor heat
• air conditioning
• fresh air system
• indoor kennel
• outdoor exercise area
Cat boarding is also available.
GAGE
~1.5 Year Old Neutered Male Short Hair
Gage is looking for a new home for the new year!
Like all sidekicks, Gage is just plain good com-
pany. He likes attention, and he also likes his soli-
tude. He doesn’t go looking for trouble, but he’s no
scaredy-cat, either. If you’re looking for a steady
companion to travel with you on the road of life,
look no further!
1589 VT Rte 14S, East Montpelier
802-476-3811 • www.cvhumane.com
Tues.-Fri. 1PM-5PM, Sat. 10AM-4PM
Pet Resolutions
DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I’m
very excited, because we
adopted a puppy this week! Do
you have any advice for a new
pet owner? -- James C., Dallas
DEAR J AMES:
Congratulations! I recently
mentioned to the new owner of
a cat that it’s important to
schedule an appointment with
the veterinarian as soon as pos-
sible to make sure it is healthy, and to get its vaccinations.
Once that’s done, pick up a few books on training and caring
for your new dog. But with the new year, I want you to make
some new resolutions that will last beyond just this year and
the next:
--I will recognize that my pet is a “forever pet.”
--I will not abandon my pet when the novelty of being a pet
owner wears off.
--I will not discard my pet when house training gets tough, or
when it starts chewing up my shoes.
--I will take my pet for a regular annual checkup and keep its
vaccinations and licensing up to date.
--I pledge to spend time with my pet every day.
--I will teach my family to respect animals, to have compassion
for them and to care for them as they would another family
member.
--I will train my dog to respond to basic commands, and I will
socialize it with other dogs so that it is better behaved in public
or at dog parks.
These are just a few of the resolutions you should make regard-
ing your new pet. You’ll probably come up with even more on
your own. Whatever the case, appreciate that your pet is a part
of the family for the rest of its life.
Send your questions or comments to ask@pawscorner.com,
or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. For more pet
care-related advice and information, visit www.pawscorner.
com.
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 25
SNOW PLOWING
Abare Lawn Care and Property Services
Residential & Commercial
Sanding & Salting
Eric Abare 476-6941 Cell 793-7472
ALL ABOUT THE HOUSE
Handyman Services
Home Repairs Free Estimates
Residential Plowing Reasonable Rates
Roof Snow Removal
Tim Chapin
“Honey Do” Lists Welcome! (802) 595-0545
“Jobs
Nobody Else
Likes To Do!”
BIG JOHN’S
PELLET
SERVICE
•Installation
•Cleaning &
Service
802-476-0523
Fully Insured
Blue Ridge ConstRuCtion
Building and Excavation
Renovations • Additions
Site Work • Concrete • Roofing
Siding • Driveway Repairs • Septic Systems
•Custom •Modular Homes
Design Build Services
Land/Home Packages Available
Call 229-1153
for free estimates
BUILDING GARAGES
FROM FLOOR TO ROOF
Starting At
$
8,900
24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel
rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.
Garages to your specifications, any size.
House Framing & Addition Work
Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray
Fireplace, Stove & Chimney Maintenance
David Loughran
Barre, VT
•Chimney Building •Repairs •Liners •Caps
•Cleaning •Metalbestos
Also Foundation &
Brick Wall Repair (802) 479-3559
GreG’s
PaintinG & staininG
Metal Roof Painting
Call 802-479-2733
gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified
• Handpaint or Spray
• Metal Roof Painting
• Interior/Exterior
• Guarantee
• Free Estimates
• Reasonable Low Rates
• Neat, Quality Work
• References • Insured
Daniels Metal Fabrication, Inc.
Over 32 Years Experience
Custom Sheet Metal Fabrication
•Furnace Plenums
•Heat Shields
•Roof Flashing
•Ductwork: pipes & elbows in stock
•Grille Faces & Registers in stock
456 East Montpelier Road, Montpelier
802-223-2801 802-223-3789
DEMERS
AUTO
DEMERS
AUTO
COLLISION REPAIR
All Vehicles - All Makes & Models
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
3.5 miles from Montpelier roundabout toward East Montpelier (RT 2)
229-6262
We Love Vt's Old Homes!
229-8646
FAX 454-8646 LLC
Quality Remodeling and Building
•Creative Whole Home
Solutions
•Interior Finishes
•Complete Homeowner
Services
•Exterior Makeovers
~ Conscientious Contracting ~
~ EMP / RRP Certified ~ Certified Green Professional ~
DONOVAN PLUMBING & HEATING
For all your plumbing & heating
needs
New Construction,
Additions, Renovations,
Repair & Service
No Job Too Big Or Too Small
Reduced Labor Rate for Seniors
802-318-7253
802-433-1492
JPND04@YAHOO.COM
Licensed & Insured
Patrick Donovan
Master Plumber
PM4044
DRAPER ELECTRIC
John Draper
Serving Central Vermont
Since 1987
802-522-5570
N
ew
N
um
ber!
138 Mill Street • PO Box 175 • East Barre, VT 05649
476-9608 • 802-249-1175 cell
eaglefoors1@hotmail.com
Largest Hardwood Flooring Showroom
In Central Vermont!
Member of the
Home Builder &
Remodelers Assoc.
Wood - Laminate - Ceramic - Carpet - Vinyl
Sales &
Installation
Rick Johnson
Randy Eastman
CARPENTRY
"25 Years Experience"
522-5889
You Save Money Because There Is No Overhead
Free Estimates • References
Middlesex, VT
802-793-1075
Andy Emerson LLC
We do all aspects of home repair
and maintenance including:
•Roofs
•New construction
•Painting
•Replacement windows
•Brick patios
•Decks
•Siding
•Insulation
Serving Central Vermont
Garage Doors and Openers
Sales & Service
Offering prompt, professional service and
repair on all residential makes and models
Kevin Rice, Owner Cell: (802) 839-6318
Kevin’s Doors
OPENERS
Come Home To A
Clean House!
Wouldn’t it be wonderful to come home to
a clean house, without lifting a fnger?
Now, you can!
Break free from the doldrums of housework
with a professional cleaning service.
I’ll leave your home looking, smelling
and feeling freshly cleaned
for a very affordable price.
Don’t hesitate~call Beth today
802-272-5550
Montpelier & East Montpelier Area
Reliable • Dependable • Reasonable Rates
Top To BoTTom Chimney ServiCeS
Richard Dickinson
(802) 479-1811
Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps
Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning
Free Estimates/Insured
Willette’s Upholstery
Home, Auto, Boat, Recreational
Equipment, Antique Restorations
Estimates Given
Residential • Commercial
Pickup & Delivery
McLeod Road, Graniteville, VT
476-6076
Thank You For Saying
I Saw It In
SERVICES AT A GLANCE
ERVIC
DIRECTORY
S E
page 26 The WORLD January 2, 2013
Do you dream of owning your own home?
Are you tired of paying rent?
Do you want to know what you can afford?
We know just how to help you!
Come - See if homeownership is right for you and find out if you can own the
home of your dreams.
Free - 1 hr. Orientation/ Registration session , come see how we can help you.
Learn - Sign up and attend the 8-hour Realizing the American Dream
Workshop, you will gain knowledge in the step-by-step processes of buying and
owning a home. Workshops are held once per month on a Saturday and there is
an $80 per household fee.
Graduate - Receive a certification of completion for this workshop, your
lender will be very impressed!
To reserve your seat, stop by , call 476-4493 x 211, or register online
www.cvclt.org. Our offices are located at 107 N. Main St., Barre
Central Vermont Community Land Trust’s
NeighborWorks® HomeOwnership Center is offering
Homebuyer Education Workshop.
Does Your Home Need Repair? We Can Help!
Repairs include:
Energy efficient improvements
Heating systems, including
Alternative fuel heating sources

Make Your Home Safe and Accessible
Access Modifications include:

Grab bars
Barrier-free showers

If eligible* we can assist with an affordable loan or grant to address
health & safety concerns, correct code violations or make access modifications
for an elderly or disabled household.
————————————————————————-
*Homeowners in Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties who meet income eligibility
requirements may qualify, please call for these guidelines. For example, a four person
household in Washington County must have an annual income of $54k or less.
————————————————————————
Call today: 802-476-4493 ext:211 or visit our website: www.cvclt.org
or stop by our office
Central Vermont Community Land Trust NeighborWorks® Homeownership Center
107 N. Main Street, Barre, Vermont 05641
Supported by a $375,000 VCDP grant from the
Agency of Commerce &
Community Development
Wells and Septic systems
Plumbing and Wiring
Roof and Foundation repairs
Permanent or temporary wheelchair ramps
Flooring repair/replacement
1972 Hillcrest Mobile Home
2 bedroom 1 bath
48 ft by 12 ft
Includes shed and
closed in porch
Nice Lot – well
maintained with
fenced-in area
Limehurst Park,
Williamstown, VT
Affordable – make an offer
Call 802 479-2293
Direct 802 479-1154 Cell 802 224-6151
Wanda French
NMLS #101185
Wanda French Mortgage Consultant
Guaranteed Rate, MNLS #2611
164 So. Main St., Barre
Email: wanda.french@guaranteedrate.com
❚Conventional ❚VA ❚FHA ❚USDA
❚Great Personal Service
❚In-House Underwriting and Closing
Mortgage Rates are at historic lows...
Call now to lock in these amazing low rates!
MORTGAGES or
AFFORDABLE
APARTMENTS
WITH HEAT
INCLUDED
Highgate
Apartments
located in Barre, is currently accepting applications for
1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments
Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,
ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.
Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,
parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.
To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the on-site
rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
Kimberly Magoon
Mortgage Loan Originator
Cell: 802.249.2458
Email: kmagoon@remn.com
NMLS #207001
Great Customer Service
14 Years of Local Mortgage Experience!
73 Main Street, Suite 22, Montpelier, Vermont 05602
Branch NMLS #935111
Lender License 6093 Vermont
Conventional, FHA, VA and Rural Development Mortgages
WORLD REAL ESTATE
DEADLINE MONDAY 10AM (Display Ads Thursday at 5:00 PM)
802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • sales@vt-world.com • www.vt-world.com
EQUAL HOUSI NG
OPPORTUNITY
PUBLISHERҋS NOTICE
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this news-
paper is subject to the fair housing act
which makes it illegal to advertise “any
preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any such
preference, limitation or discrimination.”
Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing
and Public Accomodations Act prohibits
advertising that indicates any prefer-
ence, limitation or discrimination based
on age, marital status, sexual orienta-
tion or receipt of public assistance.
This newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law. Our read-
ers are hereby informed that all dwell-
ings advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis.
To file a complaint of discrimination, call
the Vermont Human Rights Commisson
toll-free at 1-800-416-2010 (voice
& TTY) or call HUD toll free at
1-800-669-9777 (voice) or
1-800-927-9275 (TTY).
MOBILE HOMES
RENT/SALE
CHECK OUT the wide vari-
ety of Pre-owned homes at
FecteauHomes.com or call
800-391-7488, 802-229-2721
FOR SALE By Owner (2) larg-
er 14x80 Mobile homes, each
on 2 acres of land, 3 miles
from Randolph in Braintree.
$85,000.00 each. 802-728-3602
Mobile home for sale by owner,
14x60 on ffty acres great hunt-
ing, 3 miles from Randolph in
Braintree, Price just reduced
$125,000.00. 802-728-3602
WILLIAMSTOWN
For Rent
1995 28x52
3-bed, 2-bath.
$950 per month, 1st & last.
272-9476
APARTMENTS
ROOMS/HOUSES
FOR RENT
1BEDROOM APARTMENT, very
small, 3 miles from Randolph,
No Pets, non-smoking. $600/mo
includes heat. 802-728-3602
BARRE 2 BEDROOM 2nd foor
Apartment, $675/mo. Park-
ing, No Pets, Credit Refer-
ence required, 802-476-2092
BARRE CITY: Nicely reno-
vated, 1bdrm, small room for
offce. Includes heat, hot wa-
ter, rubbish removal. Off-street
parking. $760. 802-476-0533.
BARRE MAPLE AVE 3
Bedrooms, $750, Avail-
able Jan 1. 802-229-5702,
S a l . b @my f a i r p o i n t . n e t
BARRE TOWN 2/3 BED-
ROOMS, Graniteville, Beck-
ley Hill. $685 plus utilities.
Smoke-free, No pets. Refer-
ences, deposit. 802-461-6222.
BARRE TOWN: 3-bdrm.
Heat, trash removal, park-
ing, washer & dryer included.
$1100. References, deposit
plust last month. Non-smok-
ing, no pets. 802-249-3877.
GRANITEVILLE 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENT, Washer/dryer
Hookup, high-effciency
heat and hot water, Utilities not
included, 1st & Security deposit,
references check, No Pets.
$700/mo. 249-7890
HIGHGATE APARTMENTS,
BARRE 1-, 2-, 3-BEDROOM
Apartments. Hardwood foors,
fresh paint, yard space, ample
storage, washer/dryer hook-
ups. Laundry room on-site.
Rent includes heat/hot water,
24 hour emergency mainte-
nance, parking, snow removal,
trash removal. Income lim-
its apply, call 802-476-8645
to request an application.
NORTHFIELD, Large 2
BEDROOM Apt, Upstairs,
$850 Inc. Electric, water/
sewer, Security Deposit, 1st
month. Call 802-485-3311
RULE OF THUMB......
Describe your property,
not the “appropriate” buyer or
renter, not the landlord,
not the neighbors.
Just describe the property and
you’ll almost always obey the
law.
TRAILER FOR Rent, small 2
BDR, Randolph area. $600/
month plus utilities. No pets.
No smoking. 802-728-3602.
VACATION RENTALS/
SALES
Nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo
at Heron Marsh Villas, Litchfeld
Beach, S.C., 20 miles south of
Myrtle Beach. 100 yards from
beach, quiet gated commu-
nity. $2,000 per month, $5,500
for 3 months, plus damage
deposit. Available December
through April. Call Ed, 802-485-
8396, for details and pictures.
WARM WEATHER is Year
Round in Aruba. The water is
safe, and dining is fantastic.
Walk out to the beach. 3-Bed-
room weeks available. Sleeps
8. $3500. email: carolaction@
aol.com for more information.
LAND
FOR SALE
20 Acres Free! Buy 40-get
60 acres. $0- Down, $168/
mo. Money Back Guarantee
no Credit Checks! Beautiful
Views. West Texas 1-800-843-
7537 www.sunsetranches.com
20 ACRES FREE!. Own
60 acres for 40 acre price/
payment. $0-Down, $168/
mo. Money Back Guaran-
tee, NO CREDIT CHECKS!
West Texas. 1-800-843-7537
www. Sunset Ranches. com
EAST MONTPELIER $20,000
OFF 5.1 Wooded lot on Mays
Way. 1.2 miles from Dudley’s
Store. 20,000 Reduction for sale
before 12/20/12. Now ONLY
$39,995. 802-229-4366 Nights.
GORGEOUS SIXTEEN
Acres of Meadows, Views,
and Sun. Calais. $115,000.
McCartyRE 802-229-9479
CONDOS
NEW BERLIN TOWNHOMES
Ready for Spring of 2013-Fec-
teau Homes 802-229-2721
HOMES
EAST MONTPELIER - For
Sale By Owner - 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, house on 3+/- acres with
pond. Great location and views!
Needs paint, paper and love, but
Tons of house. First white house
on left past Bragg Farm, Rte.14,
Only $149,995. Call 229-4366.
EAST MONTPELIER ...newer
2 bedroom home on 7 private
acres. Sugarbush. Owner f-
nancing possible. $279,000.
McCartyRE 802-229-9479
JUST REDUCED! $78,000.00
North Montpelier Duplex Rt
14, 7 Rooms & 4 Rooms,
Separate Large Garage/Great
Back Yard, Tons of Storage,
Low Taxes, No Owner Fi-
nancing Available. 802-454-
8635 Do Not Leave Message.
ORANGE ...MOVE in condi-
tion 8 room home. Granite
countertops. Great garage.
on three acres. $251,000.
McCartyRE 802-229-9479
RANDOLPH...fxer upper
or tear down? Old home
on beautiful acre. Owner f-
nancing possible. $84,000.
McCartyRE 802-229-9479
WORRIED ABOUT
FORECLOSURE?
Having trouble paying your mort-
gage? The Federal Trade Com-
mission says don’t pay any fees
in advance to people who prom-
ise to protect your home from
foreclosure. Report them to the
FTC, the nation’s consumer pro-
tection agency. For more infor-
mation, call 1-877-FTC-HELP or
click on ftc.gov. A message from
The World and the FTC.
LAST DOWN
LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT
Granite Hills 12/27/12 3.375% 3.526% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 522-5000 2.750% 3.019 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Merchants Bank 12/27/12 4.500% 4.520 30 yr fixed 0 20%
1-800-322-5222 3.075% 3.109% 15 yr fixed 0 20%
New England Federal 12/27/12 3.375% 3.394% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union 866-805-6267 2.750% 2.785% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
Northfield Savings 12/27/12 3.500% 3.539% 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Bank (NSB) 2.750 2.818% 15 yr fixed 0 5%
802-485-5871
VT State Employees 12/27/12 3.375 3.403 30 yr fixed 0 5%
Credit Union (VSECU) 2.750 2.800 15 yr fixed 0 5%
1-800-371-5162 X5345
Rates can change without notice.
***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as
5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not
included in the APR calculations.
Updated Weekly
Home Mortgage Rates
Rate APR Term Points
Downpayment

Granite Hills CU 3.375% 3.526% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
2.750% 3.019% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Merchants 4.500% 4.520% 30 yr fixed 0
20%
3.075% 3.109% 15 yr fixed 0 20%

NE Fed CU 3.375% 3.394% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
2.750% 2.785% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 3.500%3.539% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
2.750%2.818% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

VSECU 3.375%3.403% 30 yr fixed 0
5%
2.750%2.800% 15 yr fixed 0 5%


MOBILE HOMES
RENT/SALE
continued
APTS/ROOMS/
HOUSES FOR RENT
continued
VACATION RENTALS/
SALES
continued
HOMES
continued
NOW HERE’S A TIP
By JoAnn Derson
• “Save egg cartons for children’s painting palettes. It’s very easy
to give kids a small amount of many colors, and when they are
each in their own cup, they don’t get spread out and run together
as quickly. Plus, they are easy to carry.” -- O.L. in Utah
• Remove price-tag residue off hard surfaces with hairspray. Or
WD40 works well too.
• Make your own frozen dinners by purchasing divided trays and
using them to store leftovers. Slip each into a plastic bag and label.
On busy nights, you can take your favorite out and microwave it.
• “A beautiful but stained or worn tablecloth can find a new life at
your dinner table. Cut into napkin sizes, and give any frayable
ends a hemming.” -- A.S. in Oregon
• Here’s a great winter tip that’s double purpose: After your dish-
washer has done its job, open the door and let the dishes air dry
rather than machine dry. You’ll save on energy, while you add
warmth and humidity to your home’s air.
• A damp cloth plus baking soda should by your first weapon
against stains in the kitchen and bathroom. It’s eco-friendly and a
mild abrasive, which works without scratching!
Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or e-mail
JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com.
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
HOMES
continued
January 2, 2013 The WORLD page 27
The maps below show the extended
forecast into the first half of January
which for those of us who cherish winter
are happy about. It should remain great
for winter enthusiasts. Expect cold and
occasional snowfalls just enough to
freshen up our local slopes and keep
folks guessing on road conditions.
Snow and then Arctic Cold – Sounds like Real Winter…
Warmer weather is already on the way working across the Prairies of Canada. This appears to arrive for
the middle part of the month. Another colder shot of weather toward the end of the month was a pos-
sibility as the arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations – oscillate between warm positive phases and
colder negative phases.
On the flipside, it’s cold alright with some below zero nights and days featuring highs in the single
digits and teens. When will it change?
After last week’s first major snowfall of this season with no snow storms like this for the last two years,
the “white gold” will easily be preserved.
Check out
Weathering
Heights on
Facebook
Please contact CVCLT for more information.
107 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641
802-476-4493 ext 211
Email: cpollard@CVCLT.org
Sale Price
$86,900.00
*After purchase
assistance grant
$55,400.00*

Delightful 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home within walking distance to downtown Barre. This
desirable home has been well maintained and is located on a .08 acre lot. Home has both front
and rear entry porches, detached one car garage, eat in kitchen, and lots of other upgrades. This
home is offered at an affordable price through Central Vermont Community Land Trust’s
Homeland Program (income guidelines apply). A purchase assistance grant in the amount of
$31,500 is included in the purchase of this property.
78 Brook Street, Barre City
Please contact CVCLT for more information.
107 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641
802-476-4493 ext 211
Email: cpollard@CVCLT.org
Sale Price
$178,000
*after $60,000
down payment
assistance Grant
$118,000

Completely renovated! 3 Bedroom 2 bath home on corner lot (.30 acres). This
home offers hard wood floors, new appliances, additional insulation and fresh
paint throughout. Home is offered for sale by CVCLT with $60,000 in down-
payment assistance from VHFA’s HARP program, *income guidelines apply, the
HARP program offers expanded income limits from traditional CVCLT pro-
grams. This is a great home with a great price, don't miss this opportunity.

89 Country Way, Barre City
Please contact CVCLT for more information.
107 North Main Street, Barre, VT 05641
802-476-4493 ext 211
Email: cpollard@CVCLT.org
Sale Price
$181,000
*after $42,000
down payment
assistance Grant
$139,000

New Construction, Great Views & Energy Efficient! Newly built 3 Bedroom
1.75 bath home on 2.2 acres. This home offers hard wood floors, new appliances
and a garage. Find privacy at an affordable price. Offered for sale by CVCLT
with $42,000 in down-payment assistance from VHFA’s HARP program.
*Income guidelines apply, VHFA’s HARP program has expanded income guide-
lines from traditional CVCLT programs. Don’t miss out on this opportunity.

561 Sugarhouse Rd., Williamstown
Cleaning Up After
the Holidays
Happy New Year! While
the holidays might not quite
be over, planning for post-
holiday cleanup can help
combat the winter blues
and keep you from being
that one house on the block that has a holiday
wreath hanging on the door until July.
Here are a few tips that might help holiday cleanup
go a little easier:
--If you have a real tree, check with your local
government to find out if and when there is tree
pickup and disposal in your area. Otherwise, look
for a tree disposal service nearby. Remove and pack
away all the tree ornaments and decorations. The
night before scheduled disposal or pickup, prep the
tree. If the disposal service wants it in a tree bag,
put the bag over the tree and cover the tree fully
while it’s still in its stand. With a helper holding the
tree in place, loosen the trunk from the stand and
carefully lift away. Drain excess water from the
stand into a sink, dry and store for next year.
--When removing the tree from the stand, don’t set
the trunk down on the carpet or floor, as sap will
create a sticky mess. Don’t use the tree as firewood:
It’s not seasoned and the branches may have been
By Samantha Mazzotta
pre-treated at the tree lot with chemicals to prevent
insects.
--Use a shop vac to vacuum up pine needles, tinsel
and other small debris from where the tree once
sat.
--Put used wrapping paper into the recycling bin --
don’t burn it in the fireplace.
--Tree sap on tile or wood floors, or on protective
cloths, can be cleaned with warm water and soap.
Sap on the carpet should be dabbed with a cloth
dampened with rubbing alcohol until the sap comes
up.
--Take down outdoor Christmas lights and decora-
tions in clear weather. Work with a partner and use
a sturdy ladder for lights on the roof eaves. Some
DIYers replace burnt bulbs when they take down
the lights, but I usually don’t, as I often have to
replace burned or broken bulbs next holiday season
anyway. Wrap the strands around a piece of card-
board to keep them from tangling, and store in a
dry, cool place until next year.
HOME TIP: “To clean up tinsel stuck in the car-
pet, I put my grandkids to work by having them put
on thick socks, stick folded-over duct tape all along
the bottoms, and scoot around the floor! It works
great! -- Mary B., Watertown, Mass.
Send your questions or tips to ask@thisisahammer.
com, or write This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
page 28 The WORLD January 2, 2013
Offering
Large
Scanning
& Printing
32 Main Street, Montpelier (in the Aubuchon bldg.) 802-223-0500
39
¢
Digital Files, Email
or Hard Copy
COLOR
COPIES
•Greeting Cards •Layout & Design
•Mailbox Rentals •Packing
•Shipping - FedEx, USPS & other carriers
•Copies - Black & White or Color
•Digital Printing
•Binding
•Engineering Copies
•Laminating
•Business Cards
Trash Bag Drop
Wednesdays 9AM to 5PM
Saturdays 6:30AM to 1PM
Clean Outs • Estates • Garages • Cellars • Attics
CLEAN
COMPOST
What goes in the compost?
Edible Items: •meat & bones •fish & seafood
•fruits & vegetables •eggs & eggshells •milk, cheese
& other dairy •dressings & condiments •sauces &
soups •bread, pasta & pastries •coffee grounds
•nuts (including shells) •spices, oils & butter
Non-edible items: •paper egg cartons •coffee filters
•tea bags
NO: •floral products; paper coffee cups;
“compostable” cups, bags or utensils; cloth tea bags
DJ’s Convenience Store
56 River Street, Montpelier 229-9311
$AVE Money
With Your Trash!
FR
EE!
NEW
DAY!
VERMONT
THRUSH
RESTAURANT
OPEN NEW YEAR’S DAY!
FOR BRUNCH
11AM to 3PM
107 State Street, Montpelier 802-225-6166
An Historic Montpelier Establishment
Buy 12, Get 1 FREE!
20 lbs and 40 lbs. - Starting at $10.70!
19 Barre St., Montpelier 229-0567
Mon.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 8-5
Farm
& Yard
Green
Mountain
Orchestra
_______________
Poulin Grain has
added a new pre-
mium “high-end”
birdseed to our
birdseed line. This
new seed will be
in a clear bag so
you can see the
quality.
Green
Mountain
Harmony
Bird Seed
_______________
Awaken to the
morning songs of
our colorful feath-
ered friends! Green
Mountain Har-
mony is a premium
mix with no corn
or fillers.
Green Mountain
Symphony
Select
_______________
Create a Symphony of
bird songs all day at
your feeders!
Symphony is a mix
containing high levels
of clean black oil and
striped sunflower
seeds and safflower.
Green
Mountain Melody
Original
Wild Bird Seed
_______________
Melody has a variety
of seeds that attract all
birds. A clean, qual-
ity base mix, with clean
black oil and striped
sunflower, and safflower
make up the largest por-
tion of this mix.
Join Our
Frequent Buyers
Club!
Purchase 300 lbs. of
bird seed and receive
a $5.00 coupon to
redeem on non-feed
items and accessories
storewide!
TRUE COLORS
Home Decorating Inc.
141 River St., Montpelier • (802) 223-1616
Consider updating the look of your room with the sophisticated style of
Graber Cellular and Pleated shades. Our fashion-forward line of quality window
treatments offers the perfect solution to any decorating need. Soft, luxurious
fabrics, gorgeous colors and unique style options create incomparable views.
Style with warm comfort!
SOPHISTICATED STYLE,
STUNNING VIEW.
Free
Measuring
and
Estimate
Professional
Installation
Available
Shop Locally, Shop...
MONTPELIER

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