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name of virus (official & common names; family & genus classification) description (core, morphology) replication (sequence & site), assembly, maturation, exit pathogenisis (host, target, disease) treatment lab diagnosis (microscopic, culture [to include CM, CPEs - if applicable], serologic [if applicable])

show pictures to enhance the presentation only bulleted data are presented provide the teacher with a copy of the report before the start of the class. the classmates must, likewise, be provided with a copy of the report another 5mins is allocated for questions coming from the teacher or the listeners

Official name: Molluscum contagiosum virus Common name: Water Warts Family: Poxviridae Genus: Molluscipoxvirus Core and Morphology - largest regular-shaped viruses measuring 200360 nm. - structure is typically brick-shaped - morphology is described as 'complex'. - They have a double-stranded DNA (130375 kb) genome contained in a helical nucleocapsid (dumbbell shape). Intracellular Infectious Virion -inner part of the virion consists of a nucleoprotein core (dumbbell shape in the schematic above) -two proteinaceous lateral bodies. -Surrounding these is a lipid-containing surface membrane, outside of which are several virusencoded proteins in structures referred to as 'tubules', which form a mesh-like coat. Extracellular Infectious Virion -the extracellular enveloped virion, which has a second external lipid-containing envelope, within which are associated five other viral proteins. Replication Pathogenesis Host: Humans Direct skin contact with an infected individual Fomites (bath towels, tattoo instruments etc.) Target: Epidermis
cytoplasm of epithelial cells, producing cytoplasmic inclusions and enlargement of infected cells. initial infection in the basal layer, and the incubation period is usually 2-7 weeks.

viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and the formation of new viral particles do not occur until the spindle and granular layers of the epidermis are involved. Infection may be accompanied by a latent period of as long as 6 months. after infection, cellular proliferation produces lobulated epidermal growths that compress epidermal papillae, while fibrous septa between the lobules produce pear-shaped clumps with the apex upwards. The basal layer remains intact. Cells at the core of the lesion show the greatest distortion and are ultimately destroyed, resulting in large hyaline bodies (ie, molluscum bodies, Henderson-Paterson bodies) containing cytoplasmic masses of virus material. These bodies are present in large numbers and appear as a white depression at the center of fully developed lesions.

Infection
The molluscum contagiosum virus replicates in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells, producing cytoplasmic inclusions and enlargement of infected cells. This virus infects only the epidermis. Infection follows contact with infected persons or contaminated objects, but the extent of necessary epidermal injury is unknown. The initial infection seems to occur in the basal layer, and the incubation period is usually 2-7 weeks. This is suggested by the fact that, although viral particles are noted in the basal layer, viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and the formation of new viral particles do not occur until the spindle and granular layers of the epidermis are involved. Infection may be accompanied by a latent period of as long as 6 months. Following infection, cellular proliferation produces lobulated epidermal growths that compress epidermal papillae, while fibrous septa between the lobules produce pear-shaped clumps with the apex upwards. The basal layer remains intact.

Cells at the core of the lesion show the greatest distortion and are ultimately destroyed, resulting in large hyaline bodies (ie, molluscum bodies, Henderson-Paterson bodies) containing cytoplasmic masses of virus material. These bodies are present in large numbers and appear as a white depression at the center of fully developed lesions. Occasionally, the lesions can progress beyond local cellular proliferation and become inflamed with attendant edema, increased vascularity, and infiltration by neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes. As with other poxviruses, molluscum contagiosum virus does not appear to develop latency but evades the immune system through the production of virus-specific proteins. Cell-mediated immunity is most important in modulating and controlling the infection. Children and patients with HIV infection generally have more widespread lesions. Prevalence of molluscum contagiosum virus in patients with HIV may be as high as 5-18%, and the severity of infection is inversely related to the CD4 T-lymphocyte count. More extensive and resistant infections also are noted in patients receiving prednisone and methotrexate. The virus is not strongly immunogenic, as it infrequently induces antibody formation. Specific antibodies have been found in approximately 80% of patients and in about 15% of control subjects. A role for humoral immunity in regression of lesions is not established. Reinfection is common.

Molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) is a common pathogen causing a troublesome skin condition in many immunocompetent individuals and a widespread, disfiguring affliction in many patients with AIDS. We have successfully infected human foreskin fragments with a patient-derived isolate of MCV. This was demonstrated by exposing the foreskin pieces to a patient lesion extract and implanting the tissue under the renal capsule of athymic mice. Light and electron microscopic examination of infected implants showed the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions containing typical poxvirus particles within 23 weeks of implantation. Replication of MCV was established by demonstrating that viable virus was required to produce the cytopathologic effects, and viral DNA replication was demonstrated by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into cytoplasmic inclusions. Four additional patient extracts (representing both described MCV types) were also used to successfully infect foreskin implants. A limited number of attempts to pass virus from one infected implant to another were not successful. This system is the most rapid and reproducible for growing MCV that has been reported to date.