WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, January 6, 2013
Dr. Druffner named
Joseph Saporito Sr.
award recipient
>> PAGE 4
Check out scenes
from season’s first
big snowfall.
>> PAGE 24, 25
4-0 PA girls to
host 3-1 WA team
on Wednesday.
>> PAGE 34
A lifetime
of service
A blanket
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A swim meet
not to miss
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $394.68
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Monumental achievement
Charles A. Adonizio III conceived and spearheaded Greater Pittston's Hometown Heroes memorial
GREATER PI TTSTON PERSON OF THE YEAR GREATER PI TTSTON PERSON OF THE YEAR
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“What did Al have to say?” I
asked Joe Healey when he hung
up the phone.
“He said whenever he drives
by the memorial he honks his
horn at his son,” Joe answered
and right then and there I knew
we had the right Person of the
Year.
Joe had been talking with Al
Kridlo, father of Dale Kridlo
who was killed in Afghanistan
on Nov. 7, 2010. Dale is one of
five local fallen heroes and one
living one who are honored at
the Hometown Heroes memo-
rial which was dedicated last
July on the grounds of the
Greater Pittston Chamber of
Commerce building.
Charlie Adonizio, the force
behind the memorial, has been
selected by the Sunday Dis-
patch as 2012 Greater Pittston
Person of the Year. The award is
presented to the person who
had the greatest impact on life
in Greater Pittston during the
past year, with the emphasis on
impact. We at the paper have
the final choice but it stems
from nominations from our
readers. Quite frankly, we could
not be more pleased that they
nominated Charlie.
But in a way, he could not
have been less pleased.
It was my duty to inform him
and the news was met at first
with nothing but silence. We
were on cell phones and for a
moment I thought we had a bad
connection. “Oh,” Charlie final-
ly said and then came more
silence.
“Don’t get me wrong,” he
began again , “this is a very
nice gesture. But the memorial
isn’t about me. I just had an
idea but it was Rosemary Des-
soye (Chamber executive vice
president) and her staff that ran
with it. If anything, they de-
serve the award.”
As the process unfolded,
Charlie eventually – albeit re-
luctantly – agreed to accept but
only on behalf of all those who
were involved, from everyone at
the Chamber, to everyone who
donated money or materials or
their time, to everyone who
purchased a brick, to everyone
who attended the ceremony on
July 1, to every member of the
families of the heroes who
embraced the project from the
start, and finally to the heroes,
themselves, now memorialized
in their home town.
In this year’s recipient, we
have exactly the type of person
for which the award was in-
tended when conceived – I’ll
admit, by me – as my first year
as editor of the Dispatch con-
cluded in 2000. As I contem-
plated what stories we had for
that week’s paper, I turned to
then-managing editor Stephanie
Bombay, and said, “What do
you think of us naming a per-
son of the year and making it
Mike Lombardo?”
Lombardo was mayor of
Pittston at the time and under
his leadership, the year 2000
saw the launch of a downtown
renaissance that continues to
this day. It was the year of the
dedication of the Millennium
Clock on Main Street and
breaking ground for the new
Pittston Memorial Library. It
was a year when more than $1.5
million in grant money was
secured for downtown improve-
ments, when Lombardo talked
of a permanent location for the
Pittston Tomato Festival and
renovations on Main Street and,
yes, even a giant mural.
Stephanie, with typical Ste-
phanie Bombay enthusiasm,
agreed and the Dispatch was
suddenly in the Person of the
Year business.
The following year, with
hearts still heavy at the loss of
beloved former Pittston mayor
Atty. Joseph F. Saporito Sr., we
instituted the Lifetime of Ser-
vice Award with Atty. Saporito
the posthumous recipient. We
decided to name the award in
his honor and have been pre-
senting it ever since. If you
heard a loud noise Wednesday
evening it was the folks at the
Care and Concern Free Health
Clinic on William Street cheer-
ing when it was announced by
director Gloria Blandina that
this year’s Saporito award recip-
ient is Dr. Lewis Druffner.
Gloria, along with several
dozen others, nominated Dr.
Druffner, the most gentle of
souls, who typified the lovable,
caring family doctor during his
years in practice and for the
past few years has donated his
services to the clinic. He will
turn 79 on Jan. 15.
You can learn all about this
year’s recipients in stories that
begin on page 3 and 4.
We are still working out the
details for the reception at
which the awards will be pre-
sented. Watch for an announce-
ment on that.
In the meantime, please join
us in congratulating these two
fine gentlemen, and one of the
best ways to do that is to sup-
port their causes. The Care and
Concern Clinic can always use
donations and a campaign is
about to be launched to pur-
chase the remaining bricks
leading to the tribute to Capt.
TJ Hromisin, who was severely
wounded in Iraq, at the Home-
town Heroes memorial.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Impact indeed
Person of the Year ...........................................3
Saporito Award.................................................4
Blanket drive.....................................................5
Award winning photo ......................................6
Local chatter.....................................................7
GP Tomorrow project ......................................8
Peeking into the Past.......................................11
Editorial.............................................................14
Jack Smiles ......................................................14
Snow day in pictures ..............................24, 25
Town News ......................................................30
Sports ..............................................................34
Obituaries........................................................42
WA holiday concert .......................................2B
Faith.............................................................5, 6B
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VOL. 66, NO. 48 S
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It started out as a plan to install a
flagpole.
It turned into an outpouring of love
and community pride.
And Charles A. Adonizio III was
the man behind the vision.
Adonizio, the immediate past pres-
ident of the Greater Pittston Chamber
of Commerce, was selected as Grea-
ter Pittston’s Person of the Year by the
Sunday Dispatch for his work in
bringing the Hometown Heroes Me-
morial from idea to reality on the
lawn of the chamber.
The memorial honors the soldiers
andpolice officers wholost their lives
in the line of duty, and another who
was severely wounded, from the
Greater Pittston area in the past dec-
ade.
“Greater Pittston really has suf-
fered a disproportionate amount of
loss,” he said. “There are five men
that lost their lives and one man crit-
ically wounded from our hometown.
We needed to do something to honor
these men.”
Ed Ackerman, editor of the Sunday
Dispatch, feared Adonizio would
balkat beinghonored, but was gladhe
agreed.
GREATER PI TTSTON PERSON OF THE YEAR
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The Sunday Dispatch selected Charles A. Adonizio III as its Greater Pittston Person of the Year.
HOMETOWN PROUD
Charles Adonizio’s idea and dedication led to servicemen’s memorial
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
See ADONIZIO, Page 9
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Dr. Lewis Druffner loves
trains.
And that’s a blessing for the
Care and Concern Health Clinic.
It was on the clinic’s inaugural
Charity Train Ride to Jim
Thorpe in 2010 that Dr. John
Callahan approached Dr.
Druffner about the free health
clinic in the former Seton Ca-
tholic high school.
“John asked me, ‘Why don’t
you stop by, just to see what it’s
like?’” Druffner said.
Druffner, who will be 79 years
old on Jan. 15, did stop by the
clinic. He liked what he saw and
didn’t have to be talked into sign-
ing on as a volunteer.
“I wouldn’t have retired if I
didn’t have Marty (Dr. Marty
Moran) to take over my practice,
so I did feel I still had something
to offer,” he said.
Druffner has been volunteer-
ing at the clinic ever since. He is
also a volunteer at the Leahy
Clinic, a similar clinic for the in-
digent uninsured, at The Univer-
sity of Scranton.
For his volunteer work and for
decades of work as a legendary
family physician in Avoca, Dr.
Lewis Druffner is the Sunday
Dispatch Joseph A. Saporito
Lifetime of Service Awardselec-
tion for 2012.
He learned he was the selec-
tion on Wednesday evening at
the clinic during a break between
JOSEPH SAPORI TO L I F ETI ME OF SERVI CE AWARD
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Care & Concern Free Health Clinic Director Gloria Blandina, left, congratulates Dr. Lewis Druffner after announcing himas the recipient of the Joseph Saporito Lifetime of
Service Award Wednesday night.
A doctor in the house
About to turn 79, Dr. Lewis Druffner volunteers at free health clinic
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
See LIFETIME, Page 12 S
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at Our New Location
46 South Main St., Pittston
377 Wyoming Ave.
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Kingston
Cole Cherkas remembers his
grandmother well.
Cole’s grandmother, Geor-
gianna “Ginger” Gelsleichter,
was ill with pancreatic cancer.
“When my grandmother was
sick, she always had a blanket,”
he said. “Even in the summers
she would get a chill and have
that blanket.”
She passed away on Dec. 4,
2010, at the age of 71, but Cole
wanted to keep her memory
alive.
Blankets, he figured, was the
way to go.
To date, Cole, 11, a Pittston
resident and a fifth-grade stu-
dent at St. Nick’s/St. Mary’s in
Wilkes-Barre, has collected al-
most 200 blankets and $350 for
two hospices, including the one
that cared for his grandmother in
her final days.
The blanket drive started as
part of Baseball State Academy
in Scranton, run by Phil Rossi,
who is also a scout for the Miami
Marlins Major League Baseball
team.
The first two years, Cole do-
nated the blankets to the Hospice
of the Sacred Heart in Scranton.
But this year, that facility didn’t
run a blanket drive
This didn’t deter Cole.
He found another facility to
collect blankets for, the facility
that took care of his grandmoth-
er, Celtic Health Care in King-
ston.
Cole’s parents, Kevin and Ma-
ria Cherkas, couldn’t be prouder.
“He’s the love of my life,” his
mom, Maria said. “I’m so proud
of him, how considerate he is,
how loving he is.”
“Cole had a great relationship
with his grandmother,” Kevin
said. “She was always around.
She’d help us out when we didn’t
have a babysitter. He really want-
ed to honor her.”
Celtic Health Care was happy
to receive the donations.
“Cole’s generous act of love
and remembrance will keep
many more terminally ill pa-
tients warmand comfortable this
winter,” said Jodi McKinney,
Celtic Healthcare’s Director of
Corporate Communications.
Cole saidhis favorite subject is
math and his favorite teacher is
Sister Marion. He enjoys base-
ball year round and plays for Mi-
nooka in the Cal Ripken baseball
league. The Minooka 10-year-
old all-star team won the 2012
Forest City Old Home Week
baseball tournament this past
season and Cole was named
MVP of the tournament.
Cole’s grandfather, William,
also passed away from pancreat-
ic cancer in 2001.
Warm memories of grandma
Youth’s blanket drive for
hospice patients a tribute
to his late grandmother
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Cole Cherkas, pictured here with Celtic Hospice employees Sharon Mastri, Marietta Minelli, and Gail
Blaum, is collecting blankets in memory of his late grandmother.
Cole has set up a blanket bin in the
lobby of the Sunday Dispatch at
109 New Street in Pittston, PA,
18640. Drop off or send any new
blankets in care of this newspaper
and we’ll make sure Cole gets
them for his 2013 blanket drive.
HOW TO HEL P:
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Attorney
John J. Terrana
400 Tird Avenue, Kingston
283.2990
We’ ll All Miss Father Paul
Our entire community was
saddened by the news that our
beloved Father Paul McDonnell
is leaving for California in a few
days.
For me personally, many fine
priests have influenced my life,
both at my boy-hood parish, St.
Rocco’s, at my high school, St.
John’s, and at my college, King’s.
Few, however, made me happy
to see them the way Father Paul
always did. As was written in The
Dispatch recently, Father Paul
always made you feel as though
you were the only one in the room
when he was speaking to you. His
attention was only eclipsed by his
sense of humor. You never knew
what he was going to say when
he had a microphone in his hand.
But, whatever it was, it always
showed a very keen sense of not
only humor, but intelligence, and
keen comedic timing.
Father Paul certainly made his
mark in Greater Pittston. When
did you ever see a lawyer’s ad
devoted to a priest?
Nurses □ Aides □ Handyman
Home Health □ Hospice □ Medical Supplies
(570) 881-9716
www.CareGiversAmerica.com
When Bill Tarutis earned a
Ph.D. in Ecology from Penn
State University he always saw
himself with a career as a college
educator. And he achieved that
becoming a full-time professor
of natural sciences at Lackawan-
na College.
Along the way, he developed
(no pun intended) an interest in
photography which he said he al-
ways thought would be a hobby.
Then in May of 2007, he shot a
Memorial Day parade in Dupont
for the SundayDispatchandnow
photographs close to a thousand
events a year. Some hobby.
Tarutis, who is still a full-time
professor, won a National Press
Photographers Association first
place award for the month of Au-
gust. It was his fourth NPPA
award but first for a Sunday Dis-
patch photo.
The winning photo, shown
here, captures what television’s
Wide World of Sports used to
call “the thrill of victory and the
agony of defeat.”
Tarutis said he did not realize
until later that sitting on second
Dispatch photographer gets national award
Dispatch staff report
BILL TARUTIS /FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
This photo won a national first place award for photographer Bill Tarutis. In it, Loyalsock celebrates its 14-7 victory over West Point to
earn the Pennsylvania 10-11 state little league championship while a player from the losing team displays the proverbial 'agony of de-
feat' at Fred DeSanto Stadium in Pittston Township.
See PHOTO, Page 20
LOCALCHATTER
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What are you chattin’ about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
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For
Those in scientific research
knowthat it takes a special mind-
set and personality to persevere
through hundreds of studies and
hours of painstaking experi-
ments to reach an answer to one
particular hypothesis.
Likening it to solving a large
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puzzle, and the process repeats
itself as answers are uncovered
around the world.
It is a love of that challenge
that has drawn Misericordia se-
nior Danielle Monelli Yurko
’06,’13, a 1999 graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School, toward a
career in biochemistry research.
The 30-year-old, who is ex-
pecting twins in July, is also just
months away from finishing her
second undergraduate degree at
Misericordia.
Her perseverance and dedica-
tiontoher newfieldhave already
brought her honors.
Born in Duryea, Yurko is the
first Misericordia student to pre-
sent at an annual meeting of the
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ogy (ASCB), the largest gather-
ing of experts in that particular
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Presents at cell biology gathering
Danielle Monelli Yurko, right, with her mentor Angela Asirvatham, Ph.D.
PA grad, Misericordia
student Danielle Yurko
expecting twins in July
See CHATTER, Page 27
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Aproject group called Greater
Pittston Tomorrow, a Leadership
Wilkes-Barre Class of 2013
community group, is taking on
several projects in the Greater
Pittston area. They are refurbish-
ing the Montgomery Avenue
Park in West Pittston damaged
by the 2011Flood; renovating the
after-school room at the Pittston
YMCA; and helping the City of
Pittston in purchasing a band
shell.
On Jan. 19, GP Tomorrow is
having a fundraiser at Brews
Brothers East on River Road
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Tickets are $20 and can be
purchased at the door the day of
the event or at the Greater Pitt-
stonChamber of Commerce, 104
Kennedy Boulevard.
The ticket cost includes do-
mestic draft beer, non-alcoholic
beverages and appetizers.
There will also be live music
and raffle tickets available for
sale.
The park in West Pittston was
significantly impacted by the
flood and in its current state isn’t
safe.
The Y after school program
roomis badly in need of supplies
for the children, infrastructure
and improvements (flooring,
desks, closets, shelving, etc.).
The mobile band shell can be
used by organizations in the
Greater Pittston community.
Greater Pittston Tomorrow is
on facebook for those wanting
more information.
L EADERSHI P WI L KES- BARRE PROJECT
A project group called Greater Pittston Tomorrow, a Leadership Wilkes-Barre Class of 2013 commu-
nity group, is taking on several projects in the Greater Pittston area. Members of the group, left to
right, Rob Rolland, Chris Glemboski, Rob Belza, Mark Carpentier, Matt Carmody, Amanda Yakus,
TomCampenni, Jon Martineau, Jeff Distasio, and Chris Hetro.
GP Tomorrow
in leadership role
Fundraiser on Jan. 19 to help
pay for several local projects
WHAT Fundraising event for Greater Pittston tomorrow
WHEN January 19
WHERE Brew Brothers EAST
TICKETS $20 at GP Chamber of Commerce or at the door
I F YOU GO S
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Honored to serve
Greater Pittston for
Over Two Decades
“When nominations for Char-
lie start coming in, I couldn’t
help but smile,” Ackerman said.
“The scene downtown on the day
of the dedication of the Home-
town Heroes Memorial was un-
forgettable. An entire communi-
ty turned out to honor its heroes
and provide whatever comfort it
could to their surviving families.
And that Captain T.J. Hromisin
was included as a local surviving
hero indicates that the project
was well conceived as well as
well executed.
“The award is about impact
and this project had enormous
impact,” Ackerman said.
Adonizio was reluctant to ac-
cept the award alone because his
team at the chamber contributed
so much to the project.
Rosemary Dessoye, executive
vice president of the Greater Pitt-
ston Chamber of Commerce, Of-
fice Manager Brandi Bartush
and Administrative Assistant
Shirley Bartos all deserve praise
and kudos, Adonizio said.
“It really was a team effort,”
Adonizio said. “They supported
my idea and encouraged me to
move on. They all worked tire-
lessly.
“Rosemary Dessoye shared
my every thought on this and she
added to it and enhanced it with
her own ideas.”
Started with flagpole
Adonizio said he’s traveled
around the country and visited
various chambers of commerce,
including ones in Vermont, Flor-
ida, Arizona and Colorado.
“The one thing that all the
chambers had was a flag,” he
said.
In November of 2010, Dale
Kridlo was killed in Afghanis-
tan. The Pittstonmayor sent out a
memo to all businesses to lower
their flag to half mast.
“We couldn’t because we
didn’t have one,” Adonizio said.
“That really drove the whole
thing home. That linked the flag-
pole and the memorial in my
mind.”
Kridlo’s death hit the commu-
nity so hard and Adonizio saw
the community outpouring at his
funeral at St. John the Evangelist
Church.
“It stirred so much emotion in
everyone,” Adonizio said. “It
was profound sadness for the
loss of Dale. And a prideful
thing, the way the community
came out to support the family. It
really galvanized the communi-
ty. It was sadness mixed with
pride.”
He said the original plan was
to place the memorial in the
small yard on the side of the
building, until the devastation of
tropical storms Lee and Irene.
“We had three beautiful flo-
wering pear trees in the front
lawn,” he said. “Two of the trees
were snapped off and the other
tree was damaged.”
None of the trees were worth
keeping and all of themhad to be
removed.
“Not to be corny, but it was
like God’s hand came down and
cleared the pallet for us,” Adoni-
zio said. “It cleaned the way for
us to put it in the front yard,
where it belongs.”
“We have one of the best loca-
tions in Greater Pittston,” he
said. “You can get a view from
the West Side coming over the
bridge. You can get a view com-
ing down on William Street.”
Adonizio said once they pre-
sented their plan to the families
of the fallen officers and solid-
ers, there was no turning back.
“We had a meeting and un-
rolled this to the families and
they were so touched,” he said.
“Once we unrolledthe idea tothe
families, we had a commitment,
we knewwe had to keep pushing
forward.”
Jeff Deprimo’s father, Joseph,
told Adonizio something like
this memorial was all he ever
wanted for his son.
“They want their children and
spouses to be remembered,”
Adonizio said.
Dedicated July 1
The memorial was officially
dedicated on July1, 2012, to U.S.
Army Cpl. Dale Justin Kridlo,
33, who was killed in action.
Nov. 7, 2010 in Afghanistan;
U.S. Navy and PAArmy Nation-
al Guard Lt. Col Richard Joseph
Berrettini, 52, who died Jan. 11,
2008, as a result of injuries sus-
tained in Afghanistan; Pennsyl-
vania State Trooper Joshua Da-
niel Miller, 34, who was killed
June 7, 2009, in Monroe County;
Virginia Beach Police Depart-
ment Officer Rodney F. Pocces-
chi, 33, was killed on June 23,
2003, inVirginia Beach, Va.; and
Pennsylvania Army National
Guard First Lt. Jeffrey Frank De-
Primo, 33, who was killed May
20, 2008, in Afghanistan. A liv-
ing memorial on the side yard
was also dedicated to Capt. T.J.
Hromisin, who was critically in-
jured in Iraq.
BILL TARUTIS
Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce administrative assistant Shirley Bartos, left, executive vice
president Rosemary Dessoye, office manager Brandi Bartush, and immediate part president Charles
A. Adonizio, III.
Adonizio
Continued from Page 3
See ADONIZIO, Page 10
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Albert Kridlo, father of Dale,
honks his horn ever time he
drives past the memorial.
“You can’t go down Kennedy
Boulevard and stop at the light
and not see my son looking at
you,” he said. “That means a lot
to me.”
He pointed to the Firefighters’
Memorial just down the street
and revitalization going on in the
downtown.
“It’s a lively area,” he said. “It’s
all tied in. And Charlie and the
Chamber were spearheads.”
Kridlo credited the forward
thinking and determination of
Adonizio and all of the Chamber
team that helped make the me-
morial a reality.
“I’m happy and thankful,” he
said. “Why wouldn’t people
want to honor a bunch of young
men who are heroes?”
Dessoye praised Adonizio’s
relentlessness. “He stayed fo-
cused on his goal,” she said. “He
was able to bring a lot of enthusi-
asm to the project.”
She said the memorial is im-
portant to different people for
different reasons. “Each brick in
that memorial tells a story,” Des-
soye said.
She said local funeral director
Paul Leonard bought several for
his family members who served
in the armed forces many years
ago. JimTigue, a Vietnamveter-
an, suggested they fly the black
POW/MIA flag beneath the
American flag. State police
troopers from the Tunkhannock
barracks, where Trooper Miller
was stationed, bought bricks in
memory of their fallen comrade.
Dessoye bought a brick in honor
of her parents.
They spoke of a group of el-
derly ladies that walked down
from Our Lady of the Eucharist
Church and bought bricks for
DePrimo, a member of their con-
gregation.
“When the little old ladies
from the church came down to
buy bricks, we knew we had
something,” Adonizio said. “It
was so heartwarming.”
“Everybody came together,”
Dessoye said. “Everybody was
so receptive because there was
such a personal touch.”
Mammoth undertaking
Adonizio, whose one-year
term as the Chamber’s president
ended in July, said he averaged
about 20 hours a week working
on planning and organization.
He and his team met every
Tuesday at 9 a.m., each time with
a different person contributing to
the final outcome, including the
design artist, the landscaper, the
mason, the contractor.
He said “in kind” donations
significantly lowered the cost of
the project. In all, about $40,000
was raised and $10,000 is kept in
a fund to for upkeep, mainte-
nance and Memorial Day servic-
es and wreaths, which, he said, is
planned to be a yearly event.
He said the in-kind donations
were what put the project over
the top. They included All Ser-
vice Rite Inc., Balloon Works
Inc., The Banana Hammocks
Band, Sharon Carfora, Cilberto
Masonry LLC, the Coffee Table
Café, Coon Industries Inc.,
Cooper’s Seafood on the Water-
front, Dente’s Catering&Rental,
Dupont Developers Inc., Dupont
Monument Shop, First National
Community Bank, The Flower
Tent, Mark Kowalczyk of Mark’s
Landscaping, Joseph Makar-
weicz of Everest Business Ser-
vices LLC, The Music Scene,
Northeast Sign Service, Rexel,
R.K. Lawn Sprinkler Inc., Jen-
nifer Robinson of SEVEN De-
sign, Rolling Thunder National -
PAChapter 3, Eric Sperazza, Pa-
tricia Stella, Susquehanna Brew-
ing Company, The Sunday Dis-
patch, the Times Leader and The
Citizens Voice.
He said efforts will now focus
on rededicating the Capt. T.J.
Hromisin Walkway on the side
of the building. A fundraiser is
beginning and bricks and blocks
will be available for $150 and
$1,000 respectively.
Adonizio said he was met with
some opposition early on. Some
asked why a Chamber of Com-
merce, a traditionally pro-busi-
ness organization, got involved
in the construction a memorial.
“My answer to that is if we
didn’t have brave men like these,
that gave their lives for freedom,
we don’t do any business,” he
said. “We don’t have a free coun-
try to do business in. These fall-
en heroes are the reason we’re
here.”
“And I ask, why not the cham-
ber?” he said “We have the per-
fect venue for this.”
Other critics noted the memo-
rial is not honoring any fallen
veterans from past wars. Adoni-
zio said the plan was always to
BILL TARUTIS/FILE PHOTO
Members of the DePrimo, Hromisin, Kridlo, and Miller families listen to a presentation by Greater
Pittston Chamber of Commerce President Charles Adonizio during a planning session for the Home-
town Heroes Memorial.
Adonizio
Continued from Page 9
See ADONIZIO, Page 16
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Question #1
Joseph Mor-
gan and Bob
Dunnigan, of
Pittston, served
as co-captains of
what high school
team in 1960?
1950 – 63 Years Ago
George Shannon, of West
Pittston, parked his loaded
Biscontini Coal Company truck
at the top of Crooked Alley just
off Parsonage Street and pre-
pared to make a delivery. Just
then the truck began to roll
backward down the hill.
Shannon tried the brakes and
they failed.
As the truck picked up speed,
Shannon jumped from the vehi-
cle that was now headed toward
the 248 Parsonage St. home of
Anthony Rubin.
Moments later, the truck
crashed through the front of the
home, stopping a few feet from
little Antoinette Rubin who
had just sat down in the fam-
ily’s dining room to enjoy a
book.
Neighbors witnessing the
aftermath originally thought the
house had been swallowed by a
mine cave.
The Rubin family and the
driver escaped serious injury,
but damages to the home were
estimated at $3,000.
Mrs. Reginald Evans, of
West Pittston, traveled to New
York to complete a 10-day
training course for Welcome
Wagon Inc. She planned to
bring the social service to the
Pittston area to promote good-
will among residents, mer-
chants and civic leaders.
Welcome Wagon Service was
founded in 1928 by Thomas
Briggs and was built on the
pioneer tradition of settlers
greeting incoming wagon trains
with fresh water, food and sup-
plies. Mrs. Evans met with
other “hostesses” from Nanti-
coke, Plymouth, Forty Fort and
Kingston to discuss the pro-
gress of Welcome Wagon in the
region. In 2009, Craig Swill
and Steve Goodman, veterans
of the marketing and publishing
industries, acquired Welcome
Wagon and now utilize mail
and the internet to welcome
new residents to communities
across the country.
The Sunday Dispatch In-
quiring Photographer asked
Pittston residents this very
controversial question, “Some
men often wish they were
women and some women wish
they were men. Has the thought
ever occurred to you and under
what circumstance?”
Alice Riley answered, “I
would wish I was a man be-
cause men can get away with
more than women.”
Carmen Lobrutto stated, “I
often wish I was a woman,
because as a woman you have
the fellows chasing after you
while as a man you have to do
all the chasing.”
Walter McGraw said, “I
often made that statement.
Women have nothing more to
do than sit around all day and
make themselves look pretty.
When they get bored with that,
they listen to soap operas.”
Catherine Dorbad added, “I
might have thought I wish I was
a man while driving a car and a
man pulls out in front of me or
if I was married and had to stay
home all the time while my
husband was gadding about the
town.”
Pete Adonizio said, “I often
said that I wish I was a woman
because I don’t think they have
the worries and responsibilities
a man has.”
1960 – 53 Years Ago
After a series of burglaries at
Angelo’s Grocery Store, Co-
cetti’s Drug Store, Miller’s
Junk Yard, Frank’s Lunch-
room and Falcone’s and Rob-
ert Ash Service Stations, Pitt-
ston City police officer Joseph
Delaney, in cooperation with
the state police, had a piece of
evidence that cracked the case.
Fingerprints were found on a
tool used in one of the burglar-
ies and those prints matched
ones on file at the Wyoming
State Police Barracks.
The match led to the appre-
hension of three young men
who, by accounts, were “just
warming up” for two larger
robberies, one being East End
Bank in Wilkes-Barre.
Fingerprint identification
emerged as an important sys-
tem within police agencies in
the late 19th century.
Co-workers at the Pittston
Post Office gave retirees Jo-
seph Maughan, Oscar Renfer
and Arthur Renfer a hearty
send-off after presenting them
with commendations and
checks on behalf of the post
office employees Goodwill
Club. Assistant Postmaster
Maughan retired after 41 years,
Foreman of Mails Renfer after
46 years and his brother Arthur,
a letter carrier, after 28 years of
service.
1970 – 43 Years Ago
In January 1970, David Yon-
ki posted the top 10 tunes of
1969 in his Teen Record Revue
column of the Sunday Dispatch.
“You Made Me So Very Hap-
py” – Blood Sweat and Tears
“Put Your Bellbottoms on” –
Mel Wynn Trend
“The Raven” - Glass Prism
“Come Together” – Beatles
“Lodi” – CCR
“Worst That Could Happen”
– Brooklyn Bridge
“Get Back” – Beatles
“Proud Mary” – CCR
“Easy to be Hard” – 3 Dog
Night
“Soul Deep” – Boxtops
In his weekly Dispatch arti-
cle, Gene Zambor asked the
question, “Is that old gun a
firearm or an antique?”
The question was one of
many gun collectors wrestled
with after the passage of the
Federal Gun Control Law of
1968. Under the law, any gun
other than fully automatic made
prior to 1899 was an “antique”
and was not subject to the re-
quirements of the act. A study
made by Franklin E. Zimring
for the Journal of Legal Studies
stated, “In 1968, after five years
of debate on firear
ms control, Congress passed
a Gun Control Act designed to
provide support to federal, state
and local law enforcement
officials in their fight against
crime and violence. This paper
reports on an effort to study the
impact of the Gun Control Act
on the problems that prompted
its passage.”
Zimring went on to state,
“The study is of possible in-
terest for two reasons. In recent
years, the rate of gun violence
in the United States has man-
aged to grow to alarming pro-
portions without the benefit of
sustained academic attention
and gain some perspective on
the difficulties and promise of
empirical studies of the legal
impact.”
Zimring’s study was publish-
ed in 1975. To read the history
of gun control and his full re-
port, log on to http://
www.saf.org/lawreviews/zimr-
ing68.htm.
Question #2
What did Mrs. Joseph Gen-
tile, of Pittston, have in her
possession in 1970 detailing an
event that would be coming for
the first time to the Pittston
Area?
1980 – 33 Years ago
Judge Patrick Toole swore
in West Pittston’s first council-
woman, Mrs. Irene Campbell.
The Sunday Dispatch In-
quiring Photographer feature
was a staple of the paper begin-
ning in 1948. Publisher Wil-
liam A. Watson insisted it be
in every week in its usual posi-
tion on the back page.
In 1980, some of the best
questions and answers of the
previous decade were published
in an article entitled “Philoso-
phy of the Seventies.” In 1972,
the question was posed, “Do
you believe that you are never
too old to learn something?” to
which Tony Demark, of Du-
pont, answered, “Of course, I
recently learned to keep my
mouth shut.”
In 1979, the photographer
asked, “If you were President
Carter, how would you handle
the situation in Iran?” Bill Mul-
len, of Pittston, answered, “I
would place a call to Soviet
Premier Brezhnev and ask him
what he would do. You don’t
see anybody fooling around
with the Russians.”
In 1972, the photographer
asked, “Do you feel that men
are more or less romantic than
women on Valentine’s Day?” Al
Kridlo, of Pittston, answered
with a question, “What’s Valen-
tine’s Day?”
Answer 1
Two St. John’s High School
seniors Joseph Morgan and
Bob Dunnigan served as co-
captains for the school’s basket-
ball team. Morgan, a four-year
member guard, and Dunnigan,
a three- year veteran, looked
forward to their first game of
the Catholic League season.
Answer 2
In 1970, The Northeastern
Runaway truck on Parsonage St. in ’50
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
See PEEKING, Page 15
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patients when center director
Gloria Blandina made the an-
nouncement in front of the clinic
staff, setting off a round of spon-
taneous applause.
“I’m flattered,” Druffner said.
“I never expected something like
this.”
“This was not the first time Dr.
Druffner has been nominated for
this award,” said Dispatch editor
Ed Ackerman. “His name has
been submitted each of the past
twoyears but this year there were
literally dozens
of emails,
hand-written
letters and
phone messag-
es suggesting
him for the
honor. He real-
ly is a perfect
choice and not
just because of
his volunteer
work at the
clinic. As a
full-time doc-
tor, his career
was one of ser-
vice as well. He
was that old-
fashioned doc-
tor who was
more like one
of the family.
Dr. Druffner
was and is
loved by his pa-
tients.”
Druffner said
after being re-
tired for 10
years he was a
bit apprehen-
sive when he
agreed to vol-
unteer at Care
and Concern.
“Between the
time I retired
and I started at
the clinic, medications had
changed a lot.”
Proving he may be old, but not
old-fashioned, to catch up he
downloaded the medication app
epocrates to his iPhone. “It’s
been a blessing,” he said.
Now in his third year volun-
teering at Care and Concern,
Druffner said the clinic helps
himas well as his patients. “I en-
joy it. I look forward to it. I get
satisfaction. The patients are ve-
ry appreciative and I appreciate
them.”
Druffner grew up in Avoca,
graduated fromScranton Prep in
1951, The University of Scranton
in 1955 and Jefferson Medical
College in Philadelphia. He was
the primary physician for three
ships while serving with the U.S.
Navy. One night in the Straits of
China, he was high-lined in a
boatswainchair toone of the oth-
er ships to treat a captain. “They
put a little red light on your life
vest in case and they pulled you
over. It was in a squall and it was
dark and the destroyers, they
rock and roll.”
After his Navy hitch, he took
over his father’s family medical
practice in Avoca, where Druffn-
er is a legendry name in family
medicine as Druffner and his fa-
ther birthed generations of fam-
ilies in Avoca and surrounding
towns.
JOSEPH SAPORI TO L I F ETI ME OF SERVI CE AWARD
Lifetime
Continued from Page 4
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Dr. Lewis Druffner listens to a patient at the Care & Concern Free Health Clinic.
“He really
is a per-
fect choice
and not
just be-
cause of
his volun-
teer work
at the clin-
ic. As a
full-time
doctor, his
career was
one of ser-
vice as
well. He
was that
old-fash-
ioned doc-
tor who
was more
like one of
the fam-
ily.”
Ed Ackerman
Dispatch editor
See LIFETIME, Page 13 S
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In a way, Druffner is different
than past Saporito recipients in
that he is being honored not just
for volunteer work, but for his
career as a family doctor which
was, like his father’s, as much
about service to the community
as it was work.
Druffner’s father was a doctor
to hundreds of miners and his of-
fice is an exhibit at the Anthra-
cite Museum in Scranton, where
the tour guide might tell the story
of Druffner’s father leaving
shoes for poor children on the
porch of their home or the family
that found the fee they had paid
the doctor returned to them in a
Christmas fruit basket.
“He had a main waiting room
and around the hall a smaller one
we called the miners’ waiting
roombecause if these guys came
in from work, they’d be pretty
dirty,” Druffner said.
“I remember my father would
get homemade breads and things
like that. I remember people
coming in with a jar of dimes to
payfor a maternity. There was no
appointment schedule. He didn’t
have an office nurse. He’d see
them in order. You’d have lacer-
ations coming in, broken arms.
You did what was necessary.”
Things weren’t all that differ-
ent when Druffner took over the
practice in an office in a home he
built behind his father’s home.
Office visits were $3. House
calls were $5. Maternity was
$75, including pre and post-natal
care.
Druffner recalls being paid
with a double barreled shotgun
by the brother of a man he saved
after he collapsed on the side-
walkoutside Druffner’s home of-
fice.
“There was very little insur-
ance,” he said. “It was basically a
cash business; that’s why the cost
was low, because that’s what peo-
ple could afford.”
Asked to describe his practice
in the early years, Druffner said,
“Really, you were on call all the
time. There were no emergency
rooms in the area. If the patient
went to the hospital as an emer-
gency, they called the family
doctor anyway. The ambulance
was basically a second-hand
hearse with an oxygen tank
aboard. There weren’t any
trained EMTs. Oftentimes, I was
the one who called the ambu-
lance.
“The mornings were devoted
to hospital visits and house calls.
In the afternoon, you’d be in the
office, then come out for supper
then go back in the office. You’d
get finished about 10, 10:30.
You’d work 75 hours a week.”
Druffner and his wife, Cathe-
rine, have six children: Eliza-
beth, of Avoca; Kathleen and
Carl, both of Harrisburg; Mi-
chael, of Dayton, Ohio; Tommy,
of Michigan; and Edward, of
Downingtown. They also have
five grandchildren.
JOSEPH SAPORI TO L I F ETI ME OF SERVI CE AWARD
Joseph Saporito Lifetime of Service Award recipient Dr. Lewis
Druffner writes a prescription for a patient at the Care & Concern
Free Health Clinic.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Dr. John Callahan, left, congratulates Joseph Saporito Lifetime of Service Award winner Dr. Lewis
Druffner at the Care & Concern Free Health Clinic in Pittston Wednesday night.
Lifetime
Continued from Page 12
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On page 17 of today’s paper you will
find the first announcement of a candi-
date for the 2013 primary election.
Atty. Alexandra “Sciandra” Kokura
makes it official that she is running for
district magistrate. We expect she will not
be the only one.
With that in mind, we believe it is im-
portant to spell out how the Sunday Dis-
patch handles all things political.
For starters, note that Atty. Kokura’s an-
nouncement does not contain the dis-
claimer “paidpolitical ad.” That’s because
it is not. The Dispatch makes space avail-
able free of charge for a candidate’s an-
nouncement.
There are ground rules. With the free
announcement we offer to run a one-co-
lumn black and white photo. We allowthe
candidate to list biographical information
and a comment or two about reasons for
running but we do not allowany claims or
comments about opponents. We also re-
serve the right to edit the text as we see fit.
We will publish free of charge small an-
nouncements about meetings and rallies.
All other political items will only ap-
pear as paid political ads. If a candidate
holds a rally and wishes to publish a full
page of photos to indicate the level of sup-
port for his or her campaign, fine. But it
will be in the form of a paid ad.
Also beginning this year, we will not
publish letters to the editor supporting
candidates.
The Dispatch encourages letters from
readers on any and all topics but reserves
the right to reject letters and/or edit con-
tent. All letters must be signed and in-
clude contact information for verification
purposes.
And
they’re
off
OUROPINION
There has been talk that the success of
the Notre Dame football team this season
has something to do with Fightin’ Irish
fan extraordinaire Richard B. Cosgrove
exerting influence in the highest of all
places … Heaven.
When he passed away last year some
saidNotre Dame lost its greatest fan. Now
they are saying maybe he just became
even more powerful.
We’ll see Monday night.
Go, Irish!
I made fun of the Wyoming Area school district for hiring a
cop. It doesn’t seem so funny now.
When NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre said all schools should
have armed guards and that “the only thing that can stop a bad
guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun” liberals went, well,
ballistic.
NBC’s David Gregory was one of them. While grilling and
mocking LaPierre about his idea Gregory waved around a
30-round magazine for an assault rifle on national TV. So if
Gregory thinks LaPierre’s idea is extreme, why does Gregory
send his kids to Sidwell Friends School, a private school in D.
C. that employs 11 armed guards?
Obama’s kids go there, too, but that’s not the reason for the
armed guards. They are employed by the school whether pres-
idents’ kids go there or not.
Don’t expect Gregory to explain. Like most liberals he’s a
do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do guy.
Ever heard of Nick Meli? No, I didn’t think so. You never
heard of him because the left wing media doesn’t want you to
know about him. Meli may have saved scores of lives on De-
cember 11 at the Clackamas Town Center near Portland, Ore-
gon, when a shooter with a so-called assault rifle shot and
killed two people and seriously wounded a third before killing
himself.
Why do you suppose the shooter, armed as he was, killed
only two in a crowded mall?
It was reported that he stopped shooting when his gun
jammed and then he ran down a hallway and killed himself.
Since he shot himself he must have unjammed the gun. So
why did he kill himself once he unjammed the gun?
Police speculated he killed himself when he heard their
sirens. Or did Nick Meli, a legally armed off-duty security
officer, have something to do with it?
Meli was near the shooter that day and pointed the Glock he
legally carries at the shooter as the shooter worked on his
jammed gun. Meli, who said he did not fire because innocents
were behind the shooter, believes the shooter saw him pointing
the gun. Is that why the shooter ran down the hallway and then
killed himself?
Either way, or both – the shooter saw Meli’s gun and/or
heard the sirens and then killed himself – there could be a
lesson there and in two other public shootings in 2012
It’s said the shooter in the Sandy Hook School heard the
sirens and killed himself.
In the Aurora, Colorado Cinemark Theater shooting the
shooter didn’t kill himself, but he did stop shooting and sur-
rendered passively when the cops arrived.
Why did he pick that Cinemark Theater? It was not the
closest theater to his apartment showing Batman, but it was
the only one where guns were banned. In Colorado, individu-
als with permits can carry concealed handgun in malls, stores,
movie theaters and restaurants, except where the business
owners ban them.
Most movie theaters allow permit holders carrying guns.
But at the theater where the shooter went off Cinemark banned
guns and had a sign posted at the entrance to that effect.
JACKSMILES
jsmiles@civitasmedia.com
Gun ban won’t help
See SMILES, Page 26 S
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Soup, something so simple,
yet many people feel it’s easier to
buy it than make it.
The main ingredient in soup is
broth, which is mostly water.
Eating soup before our lunch or
dinner may keep our hunger
pains away and our urges to re-
ach for snack foods within that
first hour of eating.
If you have enjoyed a bit too
much of munches and desserts
this past holiday season, soup
might be the answer to your
weight loss prayers.
Soups are not all alike in the
world of weight loss. Cream
soups are at the top of the high-
calorie list andshouldbe enjoyed
in small quantities. Cream of
broccoli, cream of potato, New
England clamchowder, crab bis-
que are all made with cream and
a thickeningagent that boosts the
calories.
Other soups such as minestro-
ne, chicken, turkey, and black
bean fill us up, but with lower
calorie ingredients.
Commercially-made soups
may contain more sodium and
calories than homemade soups.
Be savvy when reading the label.
Making soups at home can be
lowin cost and convenient if fro-
zen in individual containers to be
enjoyed at a later date.
The key to losing weight by
adding soup to your diet is to
first find a soup that contains
lower calorie ingredients. Sec-
ond, enjoy eating the soup with-
out noodles andcrackers andjust
before your main entree at lunch
or dinner. You should find that
you are less apt to have seconds
at meals and are not looking for a
high-calorie snack in an hour or
so after eating.
Below are two soup recipes
2 cups low sodium canned to-
matoes
1(15.5ounce) canredor north-
ern beans (rinsed and drained)
1 cup whole kernel corn, fro-
zen or 1 (15.5 ounce) can corn,
(rinsed and drained)
1 cup of peeled and chopped
carrots
Heat oil ina large pan. Addon-
ion and cook in oil until tender.
Add all remaining ingredients,
except salt and pepper. Bring to a
simmer and cook, covered, for
30 minutes at medium-low.
Source: This recipe is slightly
adapted from SNAP-Ed Nutri-
tion Program Recipe Finder.
Chicken coup
6 cups low sodium chicken
broth (purchased or homemade)
1 cup cooked chicken
1/2 cup barley or quinoa
2 cups vegetables (sliced cab-
bage, diced carrots, cut green
beans, sliced zucchini squash)
1/2 teaspoon garlic
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 Tablespoon dried parsley
Place cooked chicken, barley
or quinoa and broth into a large
saucepan. Cover. Bring mixture
to a boil. Reduce heat. Stir and
simmer for 15 minutes. Add veg-
etables and seasonings. Simmer
for 10-15 minutes until vegeta-
bles are tender. Enjoy!
that can be made on the stove top
in less than 20 minutes. The first
is the popular Brunswick stew
which is a bit thicker than a soup.
Virginia and North Carolina
both feel that the recipe originat-
ed in their state and varies with
the type of meats added as ingre-
dients.
Most also add a barbeque fla-
voring, although this recipe does
not. Beans thicken this stew. If
you want to hide the beans, puree
them first before adding to the
stew.
The second recipe uses pre-
pared chicken. You can use ei-
ther leftover chicken that you
have or canned chicken. The sec-
ond choice, however, boosts the
sodiumcontent of the soup. Note
that the ingredients are lower cal-
orie vegetables rather than star-
chy vegetables such as potatoes,
corn and lima beans.
Brunswick stew
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped pepper, red,
green or a combination (option-
al)
2 cups chicken broth, low so-
dium
1/2 teaspoon dried leaf thyme
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 cups cooked, diced and
boned chicken or turkey
NUTRITION
CORNER
Lose holiday pounds with
homemade soup and stews
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D.,
L.D.N., is with Penn State Coop-
erative Extension, Luzerne Coun-
ty, 16 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston,
Pa., 18643. (570) 825-1701/602-
0600. Fax (570) 825-1709.
mre2@psu.edu.
Band Festival was held for the
first time in the Pittston Area
School District. Mrs. Joseph
Gentile, of Pittston, produced a
newspaper article detailing the
1939 festival held in Sayre
which listed Regina Gentile,
clarinet; Dorothy Ermel, coro-
net; Robert Pace, flute; Leo-
nard Ermel, French horn; and
Michael Salvo, flat bass horn,
as five members of the Pittston
High School Band who won
major honors.
Peeking
Continued from Page 11
We would like to take the op-
portunity to say thanks to the
public servants of Exeter Bor-
ough. To the Police Department,
the volunteer fire andambulance
personnel, and especially the
Street Department. Exeter resi-
dents are very fortunate to have
such a hard working and dedicat-
ed staff of men and women that
provide our residents with front
line, important and most vital
services. During a time when
dysfunctional government is the
norm, Exeterites pay a small
price for the first rate quality ser-
vice they provide us. The first re-
sponders are always there in
emergencies. The police are ever
vigilant. The emergency people
are timely and ever present. If
you have ever had an emergency,
you know what we mean.
The four-man street depart-
ment led by Vince Ninassi is
available twenty-four seven in all
weather to make Exeter clean
and safe. Our recycling program
is secondtonone anda model for
the state. Street maintenance, as
the recent snowfall can attest, is
ever present, timely and most
times taken for granted. Not
many communities can com-
pare. We say thanks for the yeo-
man effort put forth to keep our
streets and alleys clear. With
help and patience from all resi-
dents we all must admit that they
put most county communities to
shame as to their work ethic and
dedication.
From our family and the resi-
dents of Exeter Borough, we say
thanks and God bless you and
what you do. The next time you
see them doing their job in your
area, say thanks, they deserve
more.
Barb and Phil Russo
YOUR OPI NI ON
Kudos to Exeter Borough workers
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take a “snapshot in time.”
“It’s for the men from Greater
Pittston who lost their lives in the
line of duty in the last decade,” he
said.
Greater Pittston roots
Adonizio’s roots in the Greater
Pittston area run deep.
Adonizio was born in Pittston,
the fourth child of Helen Adonizio
of Butler Street in Pittston and the
late Charles “Cugsy” Adonizio Jr.
His siblings are Judy Yanchek,
Gloria Blandina, the late Christine
Thompson, Jane Lucas and Dr. Pa-
trick Adonizio.
He attended St. Mary of the As-
sumption School and graduated
from Pittston Area High School.
He attendedthe Universityof Pitts-
burgh and graduated with a bache-
lor’s degreeinbusiness administra-
tion from the University of New
Haven in Connecticut.
After traveling for several
months, he returned home. He
eventually took over the family in-
surance company, Atlas Insurance
Group in 1982, from his father,
who founded it in 1938.
Helater addedaseparatecompa-
ny, Atlas Realty Inc., in 1988, and
the two companies are headquar-
tered on state Route 315, in the
Keystone section of Plains Town-
ship.
He married the former Karen
Delaney of Hughestown and they
have two children. Kristie Adoni-
zio, 22, is student at Champlain
College in Burlington, Vt., and
Chad Adonizio, 21, a student at
Drexel University in Philadelphia.
Both are studying business admin-
istration.
The family resides on Westmin-
ster Road on the Plains Township
end, Adonizio noted.
In his spare time, Adonizio is an
award-winning vintner. He recent-
ly won a gold medal for his caber-
net sauvignon in Wine Maker
Magazine’s International Amateur
Wine Competition. In addition, he
won a bronze medal for a merlot
entry and a bronze medal for a
Malbec entry. Adonizio and
friends have been making wine for
the last 14 years and to date have
wonnumerous contests andawards
for their efforts.
He has several professional des-
ignations and has received the
Pennsylvania Association of Real-
tors “PAR Excellence Club
Award” four times in the past six
years. That award is given to less
than100of PAR’s 25,000members
annually.
In2004, bothof Adonizio’s busi-
nesses receivedthe Small Business
of the Year award fromthe Greater
Pittston Chamber of Commerce.
He is president of the Greater
Wilkes-Barre Association of Real-
tors, past director and president of
the Greater Pittston YMCA and a
founding director of Landmark
Community Bank.
Huge impact
Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley, the
sister of fallen Virginia Beach Po-
lice Department Officer Rodney F.
Pocceschi, a Pittston Township na-
tive, said Adonizio made a huge
impact on the whole Greater Pitt-
ston community.
“He’s genuinely full of care and
concern,” she said. “His goal was
to honor those fallen heroes and
make the families proud. Well,
mission accomplished.”
She said tears of sadness were
shed because of the loss of their
lovedone, but tears of joywerealso
shed to see a community rally
around such a worthy project.
“He has made a difference in all
the families and the Greater Pitt-
ston family as a whole,” she said.
Adonizio said the award, like the
memorial, is somethingthat theen-
tirecommunityshouldbeproudof.
“This is aninstitution,”Adonizio
said of the award. “The Greater
Pittston Chamber of Commerce is
oneof theinstitutions, liketheSun-
day Dispatch, the Greater Pittston
YMCA, the Pittston Memorial Li-
brary. These institutions are part of
who we are. It represents our com-
mitment to the community. The
overwhelming support we’ve re-
ceived fromthe community proves
that we are vital and strong. We’re
just soproudthat wehadtheoppor-
tunity and the privilege to demon-
strate the strength, love and com-
mitment that this community
shares.
“This evolved froma flagpole to
a monument to Greater Pittston,”
Adonizio said. “And everything
that we’ve had to sacrifice.”
Adonizio
Continued from Page 10
Mrs. Karen (Bastek)
Frantz, 52, of Dallas, passed
away Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012,
in Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Born in Duryea, she was a
daughter of Joan (Nazarek)
Yesnowski of Duryea and
the late Robert Yesnowski
Sr.
She was a graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School, class
of 1978, and was formerly
employed by Tobyhanna Ar-
my Depot. Karen loved life
and the outdoors. She loved
auto racing and to fish. She
also loved taking her dog,
Mini, for walks through the
countryside to enjoy the
scenery and the serenity.
In addition to her father,
she was preceded in death by
grandparents Andrew and
Valeria
(Nazarek)
Nazarchuk;
grandpar-
ents Victor
and Marie
Yesnowski;
brother Robert Yesnowski
Jr.; uncles Paul Nazarek and
Stanley Zazarek; and her
aunt Connie Thompson.
Surviving in addition to
her mother are her husband,
Raymond Frantz, Dallas;
son, David Bastek Jr. of Del-
tona, Fla.; brother Andrew
Yesnowski and his wife,
Kristene, Haymarket, Va.;
sisters, Gayle Haduck, and
her husband, Daniel, Pittston
Township, and Hope Meran-
ti and her husband, Joseph,
Jenkins Township; nieces
and nephews, Megan and
Alicia Haduck, Amy and
Robert Yesnowski III, Ryan
and Bobbie Meranti, Lola
and Roman Yesnowski;
great-nieces and great-neph-
ews, Amira and Aaron Mo-
hammed, Logan Meranti;
stepsons, Richard and Jo-
seph Frantz; mother-in-law,
Helen Frantz; numerous
aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends; former husband, Da-
vid Bastek Sr., and his wife,
Marie; sister-in-law, Kath-
leen (Yesnowski) Hoban.
Funeral services and in-
terment will be held at a later
date at the convenience of
the family. Arrangements
are by the Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. To leave
the family an online condo-
lence, please visit
www.piontekfuneralhome-
.com.
Karen (Bastek) Frantz
December 30, 2012
OBITUARIES
Audrey E. McCullough,
55, of Mountain Top, passed
away Sunday, Dec. 30, 2012,
at Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center.
Born on Aug. 8, 1957 in
Sumter, S.C., she was a
daughter of Ander and Gla-
dys (Sanders) McCoy.
She was a member of Per-
spective Church, Pittston,
where she was an Elder, she
was a licensed Evangelist.
Audrey was Past Worthy
Dean of 9th District of the Or-
der of the Eastern Star and
was a Past
Worthy Ma-
tron of Har-
riett Tub-
man No. 64
Order of the
Eastern
Star, Easton. She was previ-
ously employed as a home
health aide by Comfort Keep-
ers No. 488, Hazleton.
Surviving is her husband of
31 years, Curtis McCullough
Sr.; sons, Todd McCullough,
Westbury, Long Island; Taw-
rance McCullough, Pittston;
stepdaughters, Carolyn J.
Smith and Michelle McCul-
lough; five sons, Curtis
McCullough Jr., Rashad A.
McCullough and Curtis
McCullough III; numerous
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
Home going Services were
Saturday at Kniffen O’Malley
Funeral Home Inc., 465 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, with
Pastor Samuel Washington
officiating.
Send condolences at
www.BestLifeTributes.com.
Audrey E. McCullough
December 30, 2012 S
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JEFFREY JAMES
BAND WITH PITTSTON’S OWN
TONY GARUBA
Attorney Alexandra “Scian-
dra” Kokura, a court appointed
Special Master presiding over
Family Court, announced
Wednesday her candidacy to run
for Magisterial District Judge.
Alexandra is running for the seat
formerly held by Judge Fred A.
Pierantoni, III.
Alexandra, a Dupont native,
has never before sought elected
office. In her full-time role as
Special Master, Alexandra has
held hundreds of evidentiary
hearings, issued hundreds of
court orders and recommenda-
tions to the Court of Common
Pleas. Prior to her appointment
as a Special Master, Alexandra
served as a lawclerk and was re-
sponsible for conducting com-
prehensive legal research and
participating in the judicial proc-
ess of resolving legal issues.
Alexandra also volunteers as
Chairwoman of the Pittston Area
Youth Aid Panel, a program
comprised of members of the
community who volunteer to
monitor first-time juvenile crim-
inal offenders. With community
input, the Youth Aid Panel gives
successful juvenile candidates a
chance to expunge criminal re-
cords.
Alexandra remarked, “I have
lived in Dupont my whole life. I
want to bring my experience as a
judicial officer to serve the com-
munity where I live and was
raised, and where my family has
resided for generations.”
Alexandra’s roots in the grea-
ter Pittston community influen-
ced her decision to run for Ma-
gisterial District Judge. Her
grandfather, Joseph “Polack”
Sciandra, operated dress facto-
ries in both Dupont and Duryea
and Alexandra’s mother, Made-
lyn Sciandra Kokura, was the
owner of two businesses, Made-
lyn’s Bridal Salon and the Du-
pont Sweater Outlet.
Alexandra continued, “As a
Special Master, presiding over
Family Court, I am required to
make difficult decisions that im-
pact the lives of families. Para-
mount to every decision I make
is what is in the best interest of
the children. I will bring this ex-
perience to our community as a
District Judge. I have a detailed
plan for public protection and
safety, and will continue to be a
proactive member of our com-
munity.”
Alexandra is a graduate of Le-
high University and the Widener
University School of Law.
Alexandra resides in Dupont
with her husband, Nicholas F.
Kravitz, Esq., formerly of Pitt-
ston.
An announcement party will
be held on Wednesday, January
9, 2013 from6 to 8 at the Dupont
VFW. All are welcome to attend.
PRI MARY EL ECTI ON 201 3
Kokura candidate for magistrate
Atty. Alexandra
"Sciandra" Kokura
The Jenkins Township Senior
Citizens’ will hold their regular
monthly meeting on Tuesday, Ja-
nuary8, at 6:30pmat the Jenkins
Township Hose House.
Dues will be collected.
Refreshments will be served.
Hostesses are Eileen Burns and
Ann Marie Clark.
Following the meeting, bingo
will be played. New members
are always welcome.
Boy Scouts plan
Board of Review
A meeting to determine the
schedule for a Board of Review
for the Ad Altare Dei and Pope
Pius XII religious emblems will
take place on Sunday, Jan. 20 at 2
p.m. at St. John Lutheran
Church, 410 S. River St. Wilkes-
Barre.
Representing the Diocese of
Scranton at the meeting will be
Mary Anne Malone, Diocesan
Director for Word and Lifelong
Faith Formation. Counselors for
the religious emblems are invit-
ed to attend.
For more information call Ky
Lazzari at 825-2648.
Pastie sale
The First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston will
hold a pastie sale on Thursday,
Jan 17.
Pasties offered are meat with
or without onion, vegetable with
cheese, sausage and pepper. Or-
ders can be made to 655-1083
Monday through Friday from
8:30 a.m. to12:30 p.m. or to Ann
Alaimo at 654-3850 or Warren
and Nancy Pollard at 654-4745.
Orders must be in by Tuesday,
Jan 15.
No orders will be taken on day
of the sale. Cost of the pasties is
$5.
Anthracite Labor
Wars is topic
The Lackawanna Historical
Society will host authors Dr.
Robert Wolensky and William
“Bill” Hastie on Wednesday, Ja-
nuary 16 at 7 p.m. at the Catlin
House to discuss their newbook,
Anthracite Labor Wars.
Dr. Wolensky is the author of
several books and an adjunct
professor of history and sociol-
ogy at King’s College.
Hastie is an anthracite histori-
an and former mineworker for
the Knox Coal Company.
Their program, “Anthracite
Labor Wars in the Wyoming-
Lackawanna Coal Field, 1890-
1935,” will focus on labor strug-
gles between the Pennsylvania
Coal Company and their em-
ployees in the company’s Lacka-
wanna County collieries.
For more information about
the program, contact the Lacka-
wanna Historical Society at 570-
344-3841 or email lackawanna-
history@gmail.com.
EVENTS, MEETI NGS, BRI EFS
Jenkins seniors
to meet Tuesday
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Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Jill Andes • 970-7188 Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• FIRE & ICE
• JUNIOR’S PASTA HOUSE
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
DECEMBER
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
GERTRUDE MALECKI
of Exeter
Now Taking Valentine’s Day
Reservations, Serving A Special Dinner Menu
Thurs., Feb. 14th From 5- 10pm
Old Forge-Style
PIZZA
Available Every
Fri. & Sat.
EAT-IN OR TAKE-OUT
Don’t Miss Our
“TAPAS and WINE Event”
Tuesday, Jan. 29th at 6pm
Featuring 3 wines paired
with 3 appetizers
$
19.95
Call Early for Reservations
204 Broad Street, Pittston • 299-7814
Pasta House &
Rustic Cuisine
Check us out on Facebook S
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SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
Check Out Our Breakfast Specials:
• Mon. - Fri. only
$
3.99 incl. FREE COFFEE
• Sat. & Sun. Reg. FREE COFFEE with breakfast special
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 • www.dentescatering.com
DENTE’S CATERING
TABLE TALK
Dente’s Tent
and
Rental Co.
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
JUNIOR’S
Pasta House & Rustic Cuisine
204 Broad Street, Pittston • 299-7814
Check out Junior’s Bar on Facebook
NOW TAKING
VALENTINES’S DAY
RESERVATIONS
SERVING A SPECIAL
DINNER MENU
THURS., FEB. 14TH
FROM 5 - 10 PM
Rt. 11 Pittston By-Pass, Pittston Commons
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon-Thurs 11-9
Fri & Sat 11-10 • Sun 12-9 655-0001
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT IN COUPONS
THRU SUPER SUNDAY FEB. 3RD
WHILE WATCHING THE GAME ON OUR
GIANT TV SCREENS
12 CUTS OF PIZZA ONLY $9.99
CHICKEN WINGS ONLY 40¢ Each
Sold in 6 or 12 pieces only
• Miller Lite & Coors Light Buckets
(5 Bottles only $7.00)
• Frosted Mugs - only $1.25
• 16 oz. Drafts - only $2.00
EAT IN ONLY
50th Anniversary
Celebrating Our
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
When you celebrate post holiday parties, think
outside the normal cheese and cracker platter,
prepare hot appetizers, such as spring rolls,
spicy bite size meatballs, or different cold treats
such as shrimp cocktail, lettuce wraps.
Preparing a cheese fondue will be an alternative
for your cheese display.
OLD FORGE
STYLE PIZZA
Every Fri. and Sat.
Eat-in or Take-out
Get 12 Cuts of Pizza For
Only
$
4.99
When You Buy 12 Cuts at
the Regular Price
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined with other specials.
Good for our red pizza only.
Expires 1/31/13
Get 12 Cuts of Pizza For
Only
$
4.99
When You Buy 12 Cuts at
the Regular Price
Price does not include sales tax, cannot be combined with other specials.
Good for our red pizza only.
Expires 1/31/13
ALL THIS WEEK
COOPER’S SEAFOOD HOUSE
WATERFRONT • 304 KENNEDY BLVD. • 654-6883
EVERY SUNDAY & MONDAY
(No coupon needed. Sorry, we don’t deliver these specials)
Buy 12 Cuts Of Pizza Get 1 Giant Hot Dog FREE
or Buy 24 Cuts And Get 3 Giant Hot Dogs FREE
Buy 18 Cuts Of Unbaked Pizza Get 6 Cuts FREE
or Buy 24 Cuts Unbaked Pizza Get 12 Cuts FREE
3 DOZEN STEAMED CLAMS...... $5.99
50 STEAMED MUSSELS............ $5.99
Captain’s Feast
Shrimp Cocktail,
Petite Lobster Tails
and fried Gulf Shrimp
$
15
99
MONDAY & TUESDAYS
MARTINIS ONLY $4.99
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The office of the Lackawanna
County District Attorney, An-
thony Jarbola, recently donated
funds to help purchase another
new bulletproof vest for a local
police officer. The recipient of
the new body armor was Officer
Bryan Besecker, Moosic Police
Department.
The donation was made possi-
ble from drug forfeiture funds
and was donated to the Adopt A
Cop program created by the
founders of Fallen Officers Re-
membered to help purchase this
valuable, life-saving equipment.
Kranson Uniform was also in-
strumental withthe purchase and
fitting of the vest.
Sponsors and donations are
still needed to help keep the mis-
siongoing. Alarge percentage of
Luzerne County and Lackawan-
na County lawenforcement offi-
cers are not provided with bullet-
proof vests, as well as local
K-9’s, and veterans and military
officers who are also law en-
forcement officers.
If youwouldlike tosponsor, or
donate any amount, or if you are
a law enforcement officer in
need, contact Jaclyn Pocceschi
Mosley by phone at 570-760-
9034 or emailfalof-
frem@aol.com, or send your
check payable to Fallen Officers
Remembered, PO Box 2299,
W-B, PA, 18703.
Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley, Fall-
en Officers Remembered, Presi-
dent &Co-Founder, dedicated to
organization and its efforts to
provide bulletproof vests to the
memory of her brother, VA
Beach Fallen Officer Rodney F
Pocceschi, EOW 6/23/03), who
is one of those honored at the
Hometown Heroes Memorial in
Pittston. Fallen Officers Re-
membered is committed to
bringing law enforcement offi-
cers home safely to their fam-
ilies. For more, visit www.falle-
nofficersremembered.org or
Making A Difference Minis-
tries/Unity by Music at www.un-
itybymusic.org.
I N MEMORY OF OF F I CER POCCESCHI
Bulletproof vest donated to Moosic policeman
Fallen Officers
Remembered
continues mission
The office of the Lackawanna County District Attorney, Anthony Jarbola, recently donated funds to help purchase another new bullet-
proof vest for a local police officer. Shown, left to right: Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley (FOR, President & Co-Founder), Ryan Kranson (Kran-
son Uniform, Vice President),Officer Bryan Besecker (Moosic Police Dept.), Doug Kranson (Kranson Uniform, President), Gina Poc-
ceschi Boyle (FOR ,Vice President & Co-Founder).
The members of the Knights
of Lithuania of Council 143, Pitt-
ston will have a regular meeting
on Sunday, Jan. 13, at noon at St.
Johnthe Evangelist ChurchHall,
William Street Pittston. The hall
is handicapped accessible.
New members are welcome.
Topics of discussion will be
the Flag Raising Ceremony, and
The St. Casimir’s Day Celebra-
tion.
On the serving committee will
be Peggy Yanklunas, Ron Vove-
ris and Mary Clair Voveris.
The new President of C143
Helen Roeber will preside.
Knights of Lithuania
to meet next Sunday
base while the winners celebrat-
ed was the boy who made the fi-
nal out of the game. “I was just
looking for a jubilation shot,” he
said.
Tarutis, who has become well
known throughout Greater Pitt-
ston, says he sometimes shoots
as many as 20 assignments in a
week.
“My wife Mary Ann thinks
I’m crazy,” he said.
Sunday Dispatch Editor Ed
Ackerman said the newspaper
congratulates Tarutis, but no-
body is surprised by the award.
“We are quite fortunate at the
Dispatch that Dr. Bill Tarutis en-
joys photojournalism so much
that he is willing to spend a good
deal of his time when he is not
teaching at Lackawanna College
shooting photos for the Sunday
Dispatch,” Ackerman said. “Bill
takes his photography most seri-
ously, keeps working to enhance
his skills, and never seems in a
hurry. He is always willing to
stick around at an event until he
has the shots he is looking for.
All of which is a great benefit to
Dispatch readers.”
Tarutis won a first place Keys-
tone Press Award for 2011 for a
photo essay he did for the Dis-
patch on the opening mass of
Our Lady Queen of the Apostles
Church in Avoca. He won a na-
tional first place award for a pho-
to which appeared in the Times
Leader and was taken outside of
the federal courthouse in Scran-
ton during the Judge Mark Cia-
varella trial.
According to its mission state-
ment, “The National Press Pho-
tographers Association is dedi-
cated to the advancement of vi-
sual journalism – its creation,
practice, training, editing and
distribution – in all news media
andworks topromote its role as a
vital public service.”
Photo
Continued fromPage 6
“Bill takes his photography most seriously, keeps
working to enhance his skills, and never seems in a
hurry. He is always willing to stick around at an
event until he has the shots he is looking for. All of
which is a great benefit to Dispatch readers.”
Ed Ackerman
Dispatch editor S
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595 Market St. • Kingston • 288-4508
601 Cedar Ave. • Scranton • 343-1121
304 N. Main St. • Moscow • 842-4668
APPLIANCE &
SERVICE INC. Vac–Way
Vacuum Cleaner Service
Includes:
Belt, Bulb, Brushes,
Electrical Check-up,
Lubricating,
Cleaning
SPECIAL
$
69.
95
Some Models Higher - Pick-up & Deliver y Available - Expires Jan 31, 2013.
Market Street Pub
29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
570-655-8091
Owen Street Pub
245 Owen St., Swoyersville
570-287-6074
TREAT YOURSELF
TO LUNCH!
New Menu and Nightly Specials Coming
Soon to Both Locations
MARKET ST OPENFOR
LUNCHFRI. - SUN.
OWENST. OPENFOR
LUNCHWED. - SUN.
The Hughestown Borough
fire department announced that
it has begun its Inaugural Fire
Truck Fund Drive.
This drive replaces the former
fire department fund drive that
boroughresidents receivedinthe
past.
The purpose for this truck
drive is so residents know exact-
ly what their donations are going
to be used for by the department.
All donations collected in this
drive will be used to pay for the
new 2012 American LaFrance
Custom Rescue Pumper.
Each year, the department
works tirelesslytoraise the funds
needed to sustain the depart-
ment.
The support of the Good Fri-
day Fish Dinner, Pigapalooza,
and recent Santa Breakfast go a
long way towards helping the
firefighters make ends meet.
However, these funds are uti-
lized to pay for the utilities and
other daily expenses required to
provide fast and efficient emer-
gency services.
The hose company is request-
ing that each residence contrib-
ute at least $25 towards the cost
of the new rescue pumper.
A donation letter was recently
sent to each residence and busi-
ness.
Residents and businesses are
reminded that the 2013 Ambu-
lance Subscription Drive is
scheduled to begin in the spring.
The ambulance drive is a sep-
arate donation drive which
serves to reduce the costs associ-
ated with the operation of the
borough’s ambulance service.
As a reminder, if youare a resi-
dent, you do not need to donate
to any other ambulance service
that is outside of the borough.
FOR NEW RESCUE PUMPER
Hughestown fire department launches fund drive
PHOTO PROVIDED
Hughestown firefighters are conducting a fund drive to pay for
this 2012 American LaFrance CustomRescue Pumper.
First time drive has a specific purpose
The Greater Pittston YMCAis
committed TO its community.
The mission of “putting Chris-
tian principles into practice
through programs that build a
healthy spirit, mind and body for
all” is what drives the Yto offer a
wide variety of programs to up-
hold its mission.
The Healthier CommunityIni-
tiative is built on the concept that
local communities can work to-
gether to give all community
members healthy choices and
support the pursuit of healthy
lifestyles
We all knowwellness whenwe
experience it. It’s an overall feel-
ing of health and wholeness; a
sense of belonging, the energy to
live our fullest life, the desire to
continually learn newthings and
improve our skills, and the
chance to contribute and help
someone else.
Being healthy means more
than simply being physically ac-
tive. It’s about maintaining a bal-
anced spirit, mind and body.
The Yis a place where you can
work toward that balance by
challenging yourself to learn a
new skill or hobby, fostering
connections with friends
through lifelong learning pro-
grams, or bringing your loved
ones closer together through the
Y’s many family-centered activ-
ities.
At the Y, it’s not about the ac-
tivity you choose as much as it is
about the benefits of living
healthier on the inside as well as
the outside.
At the Y, a supportive commu-
nity is a big part of wellness. At
every age and every level of ac-
tivity, you’ll find people just like
you looking to live a little bit
healthier. Members and program
participants often cite the sup-
port and enthusiasm of fellow
participants and staff as some of
the key factors in their achieve-
ment of greater well-being.
One member sums up her fa-
vorite class this way: “This is a
great program, I’ve learned so
much about how to eat healthier
and I love the classes. I’m here 3
- 4 times a week nowto work out
and I love the new me!”
Family Time
Serving families has always
been at the heart of the Y.
The YMCA is a place where
they can find respite fromsocial,
economic and educational chal-
lenges, and learn how to over-
come them.
The Y has a fundamental de-
sire to provide opportunities for
every family to build stronger
bonds, achieve greater work/life
balance, and become more en-
gaged with their communities.
Group Activity Classes
The Yoffers classes for all ag-
es, all levels and all interests.
From low-impact exercise and
chair classes, stretching and
strength training to indoor cy-
cling, water exercise, and yoga,
you’ll find a group class that’s
fun, supportive and keeps you
moving.
Healthy Lifestyles
Living healthy is about spirit,
mind and body at every age and
stage. The Y offers classes and
programs for those dealing with
chronic disease, joint and injury
rehabilitation, stress and preg-
nancy, in addition to health as-
sessments and wellness coach-
ing.
Personal Wellness Training
Everyone needs the advice of
an expert sometimes, as well as
the personal attention that comes
with a trainer or coach. The Yof-
fers personal training and coach-
ing to help you set and meet your
specific goals in order to live
healthier.
Water Activities
What would the Y be without
water? Water exercise, adult
swim lessons (it’s NEVER too
late) and adapted exercise for
those with disabilities or in reha-
bilitation are some of the water-
based activities you’ll find at the
Ywhere we believe if you can do
it on land, you can do some ver-
sion of it in the water.
Expanded hours
Starting in the New Year, the
Greater Pittston YMCA will be
extending its hours; 5 a.m. to 10
p.m. Monday thru Friday, 5 a.m.
to 9 p.m. on Fridays, 7:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. on Saturdays, and 10 a.m.
to 7 p.m. on Sundays.
The Pittston YMCA is all
GREATER PI TTSTON YMCA
Striving for a Healthier Community
See YMCA, Page 26
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570.655.7701
www.rowedoor.com
77 Foote Ave., Duryea, PA 18642
L
awmakers representing
the Greater Pittston area
were sworn in to office in
Harrisburg and Washington,
D.C. last week.
Longtime State Rep. Phyllis
Mundy, D-Kingston, was sworn
in to her 12th term in the state
House of Representatives. She
defeated political newcomer Aa-
ronKaufer inthe November gen-
eral election.
Freshman U.S. Rep. Matt
Cartwright was sworn in to his
first term in Congress.
He defeated longtime Demo-
crat Congressman Tim Holden
in the primary and Old Forge
nurse Laureen Cummings in the
general.
Mundy will continue in her
post as Democratic chairman of
the House Finance Committee.
The 120th Legislative District
includes the Greater Pittston
communities of Exeter, Wyom-
ing, West Pittston, West Wyom-
ing and Exeter Township.
Joining Mundy for the swear-
ing-in ceremony was Cartwright
whose 17th Congressional Dis-
trict includes part of Luzerne
County and his son, Jack Cart-
wright.
“I am humbled that the people
of the 120th Legislative District
have once again entrusted me to
be their voice in Harrisburg,”
Mundy said in a news release.
“I will continue working hard
on their behalf each and every
day.”
Among Mundy’s priorities are
adequate funding for public edu-
cation and programs that support
Pennsylvania’s most vulnerable
citizens, particularly senior citi-
zens and at-risk youth, the cre-
ation of family sustaining jobs
and clean air and water.
She also emphasized the need
for greater tax fairness for se-
niors and working families, add-
ing too much attention has been
paid by the governor and the ma-
jority party in the General As-
sembly to the needs of multi-
state corporations at the expense
of everyday taxpayers.
Mundy said the staff at her
constituent service office, locat-
ed in Suite113 of the Park Office
Building, 400 Third Ave., King-
ston, stands ready to help resi-
dents with state-related pro-
grams and issues. The office is
open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
The phone number is 283-
9622.
Also sworn in at the state Cap-
itol was state Rep. Mike Carroll,
D-Avoca, and state Rep. Sid Mi-
chaels Kavulich, D-Old Forge.
Carroll ran unopposed and re-
mains chairman of the House
Northeast caucus. His district
takes in much of Greater Pitt-
ston, including the city of Pitt-
ston, Avoca, Dupont, Duryea,
Hughestown, Laflin and Jenkins
Township.
Kavulich also ran unopposed.
His district compasses Pittston
Township and Yatesville in the
Greater Pittston region.
Republicans control both
chambers with a sizeable 111-91
margin in the House with one va-
cancy and 27-23 margin in the
Senate.
Cartwright toed the Demo-
cratic line with his first congres-
sional vote Thursday shortly af-
ter being sworn in.
In keeping with the partisan-
ship and gridlock that dominated
the House in recent years, the
113th Congress voted largely
along party lines to re-elect Re-
publican John Boehner as speak-
er of the House over Democrat
Nancy Pelosi by a vote of 220-
192. Twelve Republicans voted
for other people.
Cartwright, D-Moosic, cast
his ballot for Pelosi, while U.S.
Reps. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton,
and Tom Marino, R-Lycoming
Township, voted for Boehner.
Cartwright said he can’t wait
to get to work. He was address-
ing supporters at his hotel and
then at his office in the Long-
worth Building.
He said three busloads of peo-
ple made the trip to the nation’s
capital to witness him taking the
oath of office.
Times Leader staff writer
Bill O’Boyle contributed to
this report
State Rep. Phyllis Mundy, U.S. Rep. Matt Cartwright among lawmakers sworn in last week
Area lawmakers take the oath
PHOTO PROVIDED
State Rep. Phyllis Mundy, D-Kingston, right, takes the oath of office on Jan. 1 at the state Capitol
Building in Harrisburg on Jan. 1.
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com S
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OBITUARIES
Gervase Castner, 86, of
Pittston, passed away Sun-
day, Dec. 30, 2012, at Heri-
tage House Common-
wealth Hospice, Wilkes-
Barre.
He was born in Dupont,
on March 28, 1926 and
was the son of the late Ger-
vase and Ann McCrone
Castner.
Gervase was a member
of Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Church, Dupont. He was a
graduate of Dupont High
School, and upon graduat-
ing from high school he
joined the U.S. Navy and
served during World War
II. After the war, Gervase
graduated from East
Stroudsburg University
with a degree in education.
He retired from the Para-
mus New Jersey School
District. Gervase enjoyed
weightlifting and all types
of exercise; he also en-
joyed
photog-
raphy
and the
outdoors.
He was a
loving
husband, father, grandfa-
ther, brother and friend,
and he will be deeply mis-
sed.
Inadditiontoparents, he
is preceded in death by his
wife of 60 years, Veronica
(Orzech) Castner, who
passed away Dec. 3, 2012;
his brother, Raymond, and
his sister Loretta Graham.
He is survived by his
daughter, Patricia Barrett,
and her husband, Thomas,
of Oak Ridge, N.J.; her
sons, James Castner of
Pittston and Kenneth
Castner of Lake Stock-
holm, N.J. Also surviving
are his grandchildren, Da-
na Russell, Kathleen Bar-
rett and Timothy Barrett;
great-grandchildren, Tia-
na Russell and Davis Rus-
sell; his sister Catherine
“Lil” Hahn and nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services were
held Wednesday, Jan. 2,
2013, from Kiesinger Fu-
neral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea,
with a Mass of Christian
Burial at Sacred Heart Of
Jesus Church, Dupont,
with Fr. Joseph Verespy
officiating. Interment was
held at the parish cemete-
ry.
In lieu of flowers memo-
rial contributions may be
made to Commonwealth
Hospice, 80 E. Northamp-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18701.
Online condolences
may be made to www.kie-
singerfuneralservices-
.com.
Gervase Castner
December 30, 2012
William D. (Whip)
McDonnell, 73, of Pittston
Township, went on his fi-
nal journey January 5,
2013 at St. Luke’s Villa,
Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Pittston Town-
ship, he was the son of the
late Joseph and Martha
Poston McDonnell.
He was a 1957 Graduate
of Pittston Township High
School.
He belonged to the IU-
OE Local 542 and was a
heavy equipment operator
for 35 years.
He was preceded in
death by Brothers Paul,
Marty, Leo, and Bobby.
Sisters Margret McHugh,
Rosemary Moran, Martha
Connors, and Rita Vilano.
He is survived by his
wife, Theresa Koza
McDonnell; a son William
P.
McDon-
nell; a
daughter,
Karen
Bloom;
stepchil-
dren, Michael Koza, Mary
Lou
Koza and Tracy Shupp;
son-in-law, Bryan Shupp;
three grandchildren, the
love of his life, Michael
Munykowski, Katie Wynn,
and Bryan Shupp; a broth-
er, Joseph and wife Joan
McDonnell; sisters, Alma
Devlin, Helen Coyle and
husband David, and Alice
Bokanoski; sister-in-law,
Wanda, and brother-in-
laws
Billy Vilano and Jerry
Connors; many nieces, ne-
phews, great nieces and
great nephews; his best
friends, Apollo, Ajax, and
Neo.
The family offers sincere
thanks to Dr. Mauer Bis-
cotti, Six Floor East staff of
Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital, and staff of the
Inpatient Hospice Unit at
St. Luke’s Villa of Wilkes-
Barre.
Funeral arrangements
are being handled by Gra-
ziano Funeral Home 700
Township Blvd., Pittston
Township.
There will be no calling
hours. AMass of Christian
Burial will be held on a lat-
er date at the families’ con-
venience.
For further information
on services for William or
toexpress youcondolences
to his family please Vis-
itwww.GrazianoFuneral-
Home.com
William D. (Whip) McDonnell
January 5, 2013
Dora Giovannini, 97, formerly of
Exeter, passed away Wednesday, Janu-
ary 2, 2013 in Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital surrounded by her family.
Born in Jessup on October 25, 1915,
she was the daughter of the late Sebas-
tiano and Guiseppina Vispi Nardelli.
She was a graduate of Old Forge
High School, Class of 1934.
She was a member of St. Barbara’s
Parish, Exeter.
She was a loving mother, grand-
mother, great-grandmother, sister and
aunt and will be greatly missed.
She was preceded in death by her
husband Joseph (Pete) Giovannini in
1989; siblings, Tina Ferretti; Raymond
Nardelli; Anna Abbott and Anthony
Nardelli; son-in-law, William Heapps.
Surviving are her children, Flora
Heapps, Port Washington, NY; Frances
Scatena and her husband, Louis Ro-
nald, Phoenix, Arizona; Atty. Joseph
Giovannini, Jr. and his wife, Joanne,
Kingston; and Diana Giovannini and
her husband Ralph Scafuro, Yatesville;
12 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchil-
dren; sister, Rena Sa-
lerno, Jenkins Town-
ship; numerous niec-
es and nephews.
The family would
like to thank the care-
givers at Mercy Cen-
ter, Dallas; the nursing staff at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital and Dr. James
Bruno for the excellent and compas-
sionate care they provided to Dora.
Funeral services will be Tuesday,
January 8, 2013 at 8:45 a.m. from the
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
WilliamStreet, Pittston with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30am in St. Bar-
bara’s Parish, Memorial Avenue, Exe-
ter. Entombment will follow in Mount
Olivet Cemetery, Carverton. Friends
maycall Monday, January7, 2013from
5 to 8 p.m. at the Funeral Home. Me-
morial donations may be made to Mer-
cy Center, 301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA
18612.
Online condolences may be made
atwww.peterjadoniziofuneralhome-
.com
Dora Giovannini
January 2, 2013
Charles A. Giunta, 93, of Exeter,
died Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at Wesley
Village.
He was a son of the late Joseph and
Bridget Latona Giunta; he was the ol-
dest of six siblings.
He was preceded in death by sib-
lings, Mary Supplee, recently de-
ceased on Nov. 30, 2012; Estelle Spe-
ziale, James Jiunta, Patrick Jiunta and
Martin Jiunta, also deceased in 2012.
He was a graduate of Pittston High
School, Class of 1937. He also attend-
ed Wilkes College. He served for four
years in the U.S. Army in WWII, and
later was recalled to serve in the Ko-
rean Conflict. He attained a rank of
Lieutenant Colonel ultimately through
many years of service in Army Re-
serves.
He was a longtime operator of the
Flat Iron Hotel with his parents and lat-
er owned and operated Charlie’s Sup-
per Club, with his wife, in Wilkes-
Barre. In 1972, he joined Junior Colo-
ny serving as Controller, retiring in
1987. He was very active in Unico,
serving as president, and for many
years participated in their annual Char-
ity Football Game.
He was the First
Commander of the
Italian American War
Veterans at its incep-
tion and past presi-
dent of the Columbus
League in Pittston.
He is survived by his wife of 68
years, the former Nancy Berto; sons,
Joseph and wife Marty, Dallas; Sam
and wife Renee, Dallas; Charles and
wife Terri, Bellefonte; grandchildren,
Joseph Giunta and wife Lori, Bridget
Giunta Husted and husband Steve;
great-granddaughter, Amanda Giunta.
Funeral services with Military
Honors were performed by AMVETS
Honor Guard Post 189 of Pittston on
Saturday Jan. 5, 2013, from Graziano
Funeral Home Inc., Pittston Township
with a Mass of Christian Burial was St.
Barbara’s Parish (St. Anthony of Padua
R.C. Church), Exeter.
Interment was in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Hanover Township.
To share a fond memory you have of
Charles or to submit online condolenc-
es to his family, please visit www.gra-
zianofuneralhome.com.
Charles A. Giunta
January 3, 2013
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Joey Saunders, 8, left, and Christian Manganiello, 9, are hard at
work digging a snow tunnel in a West Pittston snow bank.
John Azarovich operates a snow blower to clear the front of his
home on Main Street in Pittston last Saturday night.
Dominick Ridley, 8, of West Pittston carries his equipment.
The five-inch snowfall Saturday weighs down the branches of the
city Christmas tree in downtown Pittston. S
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I TTSTON’ S
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Five-year-old Amanda Azarovich slides backwards down a hill next
her her house on Main Street in Pittston on Saturday night. Pittston's freeze-dried tomato.
The Pittston mule is draped by a snow blanket last Saturday night.
Jefferson Park on New Street in Pittston last Saturday night.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
T
hree-year-old Audrina Martin slides down a
hill backwards in West Pittston last Sunday af-
ternoon after the first major snowfall hit the
region. The snow started last Saturday morning and
roads were slick headed into the Sunday Dispatch of-
fice. As the day progressed, the snow piled up. The
official total was five inches, but it seemedlike nearly
a foot here at the Dispatch office on New Street,
straddlingthe border of PittstonandHughestown. On
our way out the door, as we put the paper to bed, we
sent out trusty photographer Bill Tarutis to capture
the wonder of Mother Nature in Greater Pittston.
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Th e Villa Foglia
Restau ran tan d C aterin g
“ Fea tu ring Th e Bes tin Ita lia n/Am erica n Cu is ine”
Prou dly Serving th e W yom ing Va lley For Over 40 Yea rs
H ou rs :M onda y-Sa tu rda y from 4:30 p.m .til ?
1 1 33W yo m in gAven u e,Exeter•654-1 20 6
Ca ll for Berea vem entL u nch eon info.
FUL L D INNE R M E NU
Pa s ta • Ch icken • Vea l
Sea food • Stea ks
& M ore!
Tu es da y D inner Specia l:
EGGPLA NT ROLLA NTINI
W ednes da y D inner Specia l:
BEEF & REEF
NY Strip A nd Sh rim p Scam pi
Th u rs da y D inner Specia l:
Risotto
E very Frida y Specia l:
12 Cu tsRed orW h itePizza
Eat-In orTak e-Ou t
FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
Lawmakers in Utah recently mandated that school
districts allow high school students to take online
courses from state-approved providers. In Florida,
large districts must give students online-course
options from at least three different providers.
Recent legislation in Georgia altered the funding
structure for students who take virtual courses;
the action provides an incentive for districts to
encourage students to try online classes.
***
A federal district judge in the Southern District of
NewYork has ruled that the law, passed as part
of the National Defense Authorization Act, that
permits the U.S. government to detain indefnitely
people who are part of or substantially support Al
Qaeda, the Taliban or associated forces engaged
in hostilities against the U.S., impinges on First
Amendment rights and violates due process.
***
School districts in Texas are now required to adopt
and adhere to policies regarding students with food
allergies. Texas became the 15th state to require
such guidelines.
***
A new law in Connecticut makes it a class A
misdemeanor to knowingly fail to report the
disappearance of a child under age 12. The duty to
report applies to any parent, guardian, or person
who has custody or control of, or is supervising,
the child and who either does not know the child’s
location or has not had contact with him or her for
a 24-hour period.
about families in 2013. The Y
will be introducing new events
and programs that are strictly for
the families in the area.
“We are introducing amazing
programs that our kids and fam-
ilies can enjoy together. Family
swim times, Parent’s Night Out,
Special Needs family night and
programs for families to partici-
pant in together,” said Craig Lu-
katch, CEO, Greater Pittston
YMCA.
More information can be
found at the Greater Pittston
YMCA regarding the 2013
Healthy Community Initiative
and all of the other programs be-
ing introduced for the New Year.
You can also call the Y at 570-
655-2255.
About the YMCA
The Y is a nonprofit like no
other. That’s because in 10,000
neighborhoods across the na-
tion, we have the presence and
partnerships to not just promise,
but deliver, positive change.
The Yis community centered.
For nearly 128 years, we’ve
been listening and responding to
the Greater Pittston’s needs. The
Y brings people together.
The YMCA connects people
of all ages and backgrounds to
bridge the gaps in community
needs.
The Y nurtures potential.
The folks at the YMCA be-
lieve that everyone should have
the opportunity to learn, grow
and thrive.
The Y has local presence and
global reach.
The Y mobilizes local com-
munities to effect lasting, mea-
ningful change.
With a mission to put Chris-
tian principles into practice
through programs that build a
healthy spirit, mind and body for
all, the Y’s impact is felt when an
individual makes a healthy
choice, when a mentor inspires a
child and when a community
comes together for the common
good.
YMCA
Continued from Page 21
So the shooters picked a
school, a mall and a theater
where guns were banned in a
concealed-carry state. Why do
you suppose they didn’t pick a
police barracks, or an armory,
or a gun store or a shooting
range?
Because they were cowards
who wanted to kill people in an
place where it was highly likely
only they would have guns and
where there was no threat to
them.
Then as soon as there was a
threat to them – a citizen with a
gun or cops – they killed them-
selves or surrendered.
You know, the Riverside
School District is putting
trained armed security guards
in its schools. If all schools did
the same, as LaPierre suggest-
ed, it would work. It would
work, not because when the
mass shooter came to the
school the armed guard or po-
lice would be there to stop him,
it would work because the mass
shooter, remember they are
cowards, wouldn’t go to a
school where he knew there was
a trained armed guard that was
a threat to him.
Why is it when polls show we
think our government is dys-
functional, do we now clamor
for the government to “do
something.” Of course doing
something will start gun bans.
No ban that will come out of
Washington will save a single
life, but the bans will give the
politicians something to crow
about. Oh look how compas-
sionate we are.
Let’s hope Washington’s gun
ban works better than its ban on
cocaine and heroin.
The so-called assault weap-
ons like the AR-15 are not bat-
tlefield weapons, they just look
like military weapons. Of the
300 million guns owned by
Americans, three million are
AR-15s. A survey of AR-15
owners shows the ARs are most
commonly used for marks-
manship competitions.
Here I quote David Keene
writing at humanevents.com:
“Nearly 90% of those who own
an AR-15 use it for recreational
target shooting; 51% of AR
owners are members of shoot-
ing clubs and visit the range
regularly. The typical AR owner
is not a crazed teenage psycho-
path, but a 35+ year old, mar-
ried and has some college edu-
cation. Nearly half of AR own-
ers are veterans, law enforce-
ment officers, or both.”
Furthermore, contrary to
what the left wing media would
have you believe, the semi-
automatic .223 Bushmaster rifle
the Sandy Hook shooter used
was less powerful than the 9mm
Glock and the Sig Sauer hand-
guns he had.
Each handgun had 10-round
clips and he could have done
just as much or more damage if
he used them.
One more point: Between
1982 and 2008, 9,633 people
were killed in ATV accidents,
2,588 of them kids under 16
and 1,100 of them under 12.
No one can explain to me
why the families of these kids,
or anyone else, needs an ATV.
So let’s ban them.
Smiles
Continued from Page 14
Luzerne County Community
College will offer non-credit
cooking classes during the
spring at the College’s Joseph A.
Paglianite Culinary Institute in
downtown Nanticoke.
Cooking Light will introduce
participants to heart healthy, fla-
vor-packed alternatives to the
traditional high fat, sodium, and
cholesterol of today’s cooking.
Participants will learn tech-
niques in lowering daily calorie
andfat content without skimping
on flavor.
The two-sessioncourse will be
held on Saturdays, Feb. 2 and 9,
from1 to 4 p.m.
Cake Decorating provides an
introduction to the basics of cake
decorating including torte, fill-
ing, and decorating. Special
techniques also will be covered
including piping borders, floral
sprays, and flower creation. Two
sections of the two-session
course will be held on Saturdays,
Feb. 2 and 9 and Saturdays, April
6 and 13, from 9 a.m. to noon.
Home Entertaining will give
students an overview of how to
entertain in the setting of their
own homes and enjoy doing it.
Participants will be shown the
most creative, safest, and cost ef-
fective ways to celebrate any oc-
casion. The two-session course
will be held on Saturdays, March
2 and 9, from1 to 4 p.m.
Mediterranean Cuisine will
allowparticipants to prepare and
sample foods and ingredients
from Italy, Spain, Portugal, and
Greece. By the end of course,
participants will have a better
understanding of what the Medi-
terraneandiet has tooffer andthe
health benefits it encompasses.
The two-sessioncourse will be
held Saturdays, April 6 and 13,
from1 to 4 p.m.
Outdoor Grilling will teach
students to grill like profession-
als and will explore the latest
outdoor cooking methods and
techniques including the use of
marinades and dry rubs. The
two-session course will be held
on Saturdays, May 11 and 18,
from9 a.m. to noon.
All recipes created will be pro-
vided and take home samples
will be plentiful.
For more information, or to
register, call the LCCC Contin-
uing Education Department at
740-0477 or (800) 377-LCCC,
extension 7477.
PAGL I ANI TE CUL I NARY I NSTI TUTE
Non-credit cooking
classes slated at LCCC
• Cooking Light
• Cake Decorating
• Home entertaining
• Mediterranean Cuisine
• Outdoor Grilling
CL ASSES
OF F ERED
The January Dinner Meeting
of the Italian American Associ-
ation of Luzerne County will be
held on Thursday, Jan. 17, at Ge-
netti’s Hotel and Convention
Center.
Arrival time is 6 p.m. with din-
ner served at 6:30.
Price is $25 per person.
Music for dancing will be pro-
vided by Gary Dee with dancing
to 10:15 p.m.
Reservationdeadline is Friday,
Jan 11, 2013.
For reservations and member-
ship information, call Judy
Deice at 654-7600 or Louise
Castellani 654-6454. President
James Deice will preside.
Italian-Americans set dinner S
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OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP.
654-1112
EVERY WED.
LINE DANCE
EVERY THURS.
TONES
FUTURE LIVE BANDS
FRI. JAN. 11th
STEALING NEIL
SAT. JAN. 12th
JEFFREY JAMES
BAND WITH PITTSTON’S OWN
TONY GARUBA
FRI. JAN. 18th
ASHLEY & THE TALENTS
SAT. JAN. 19th
IRON
COWBOY
5TH ANNIV. BASH
FRI. JAN. 25th
GROUP DU JOUR
SAT. JAN. 26th
WITZ END
w/ MIKE GUARILIA FROM CADILLACS
DONATE TO SPCA
Calif., in December and drew
more than 6,000 participants, in-
cluding esteemed researchers
from around the world.
Accompanied to San Francis-
co by her research mentor Ange-
la Asirvatham, Ph.D., associate
professor of biology, Yurko was
one of 300 scientists to present at
the undergraduate session and
one of 3,000 presenters at the
graduate, postdoctoral and fac-
ulty level.
Dr. Asirvathamalso presented
at the event, as she has for the
past seven years.
The research the pair is doing
is ultimatelydedicatedtofinding
a faster way to repair nerve cells
damaged by spinal cord injury
and multiple sclerosis.
By finding a way to speed up
the growthrate of Schwanncells,
the scientists hope to find ways
to make neurons regenerate fas-
ter and ultimately create new
nerve paths that will speedupthe
recovery process.
The tests are being done on rat
Schwann cells in collaboration
with Dr. David J. Carey’s lab in
the Sigfried and Janet Weis Cen-
ter for Research at Geisinger
Medical Center, Danville.
“Danielle is extremely hard
working, and would be an asset
in any field. Yet, she has shown
the inquisitiveness, perseverance
and patience required to do the
often mundane and repetitive
tasks that are a part of scientific
research,” Dr. Asirvatham said.
“Not every day is a ‘Eureka!’
day in science, and the research
that we are doing is one tiny, tiny
part of a much bigger puzzle. It
may take dozens of people
around the globe years of work
before we find the answers we
seek.”
Yurko admits her career path
has been much like a science ex-
periment, full of stops and starts
and changed directions.
She earned her first under-
graduate degree in communica-
tions at Misericordia in 2006 as a
non-traditional student, taking
classes at night and on weekends
while working full time.
An interest in medicine and
healthcare –andinparticular the
new physician assistant program
– drew her back to campus in
2009.
Yet, it was in her first organic
chemistry class where she found
a passion for lab experimenta-
tion.
Her interest in medical re-
search led her to Dr. Asirvatham,
whose doctoral research in-
volvedautoimmune disease. The
two have been working on this
one particular portion of
Schwann cell research since Ja-
nuary 2012.
Yurko’s poster presentation,
“The Expression between Ex-
pression of A-Kinase Anchoring
Protein and Phosphorylation of
AKT/PBK in Neonatal Rat
Schwann Cell Proliferation,”
was co-authored by Dr. Asir-
vatham, with Richard Stahl, a se-
nior scientist, and Dr. David .J.
Carey, director, both of the Sig-
fried and Janet Weis Center for
Research.
It was well received.
“This was a really great honor
for a Misericordia student to
have the opportunity to interact
with students and faculty from
much larger programs and career
researchers from around the
world at the ASCB meeting,”
said Dr. Asirvatham.
“This experience will be key
as Danielle is evaluated by grad-
uate schools.”
Yurko hopes to earn a Ph.D. in
biochemistry and molecular ge-
netics and plans a career in bio-
medical research specializing in
autoimmune and multi-drug re-
sistant diseases.
“I have found a way I can help
people. It took me a while, but I
now know it is what I want to
do,” added Yurko, the daughter
of Diane McKinneyof Mountain
Top, and Ronnie Monelli of Old
Forge.
Elizabeth Scatena
Receives White Coat
ElizabethScatena receivedher
White Coat in the Transition
Ceremony held at New York
Chiropractic College, Senaca
Falls, New York.
She received one of three
scholarships that were awarded
during the ceremony.
She graduated from Penn
State University in 2010.
Elizabeth is the daughter of
Rosaleen Scatena, Pittston
Township, and Bob Scatena,
Hughestown.
She has two brothers Rob and
Danny.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday wishes go to
Joe Lizza of Pittston, celebrat-
ing Jan. 9; Pat Lizza of Exeter
celebrating Jan. 10; Dr. Charles
Gorey, Hughestown, celebrat-
ing Jan. 10; Hughestown Coun-
cilwoman Marie Griglock, cel-
ebrating Jan. 11; and Sherri
Dougherty, West Pittston, cele-
brating on Jan 12.
Dorothy Strubeck, Hughes-
town, celebrated her birthday on
Jan. 3.
Chatter
Continued fromPage 7
Elizabeth Scatena
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The annual Breakfast with
Santa and borough-wide food
collection in Hughestown was
held on Sunday, Dec. 23, just in
time for Christmas.
Breakfast with Santa was
available all morning, from 7
a.m. until noon, at the Hughes-
town Hose Company on Center
Street.
Immediately after breakfast,
when the last little tyke sat on his
knee and rattled off his list, Santa
climbed aboard the fire truck
and rode through the streets
helping the firefighters collect
donated food for the needy.
A toy raffle was held in con-
junction with the annual break-
fast and Mrs. Claus also made an
appearance much to the delight
of the children.
Must be Santa
Annual
Breakfast
with Santa
and food
collection in
Hughestown
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Four-year-old Alexis Gushanas is a little shy sitting on Santa's lap in Hughestown.
Hughestown EMS Lt. Brandon Collins, right, takes the name card fromAyla Samano of Hughestown
after she drew the winning ticket at the annual Breakfast with Santa event.
Danielle Acernese of Dupont, right, holds her 11-month-old niece
Sophia Matys of Jenkins Township at the Breakfast with Santa
event in Hughestown.
Volunteer Ayla Samano of
Hughestown cleans up after
Breakfast with Santa. S
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9
OBITUARIES
Sarah Jane (Jones) Butcofski,
66, of Laflin, passed away peace-
fully in her home Wednesday, Jan.
2, 2013.
Born April 29, 1946 in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of Mar-
garet Jones of Forty Fort and the
late Glen Jones.
Sarah was a graduate of Meyers
High School, in 1964. Her heart
was full of gold, andshe was a lov-
ing and devoted mother, grand-
mother and the most compassion-
ate nurse’s aide and activities di-
rector at RiversideAdult DayCare
and Wesley Village.
She was preceded in death by
her son, Michael Glen Butcofski,
and also her sis-
ter, Glenda
“Rene” Jones.
Surviving be-
sidesher mother
are her daugh-
ter, Jamie Lynn
Berry, husband, Michael; grand-
daughter, Kinzley Berry, Harris-
burg; loving companion, Peter
Yourglivch, Laflin; Michael But-
cofski, life-longfriendandJamie’s
father, Scranton; sisters, Peggy
and her husband, Frank Merrick,
Moosic; Carol and her husband,
William Harbester, Shavertown;
Beth and her husband, Eugene
McKeown, Kingston; many niec-
es and nephews.
Her funeral was on Saturday,
Jan. 5, 2013, from the Hugh B.
Hughes&SonInc. Funeral Home,
1044 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort,
with the Rev Dr. Philip Wanck,
pastor of the Forty Fort United
Methodist Church, officiating.
Theinterment will beinMemorial
Shrine Cemetery, Carverton.
Memorial contributions, if de-
sired, canbemadetotheAmerican
Diabetes Association.
For any information, or to send
the family an online message of
condolence, you may visit the fu-
neral homewebsiteat hughbhugh-
es.com.
Sarah Jane (Jones) Butcofski
January 2, 2013
Irene D. Migliore, 80, of West
Wyoming, passed away peace-
fully on Friday afternoon, Dec.
28, in her home, surrounded by
her family.
Born in the Hudson section of
Plains Township, she was a
daughter of the late Dominick
and Josephine Ritter Beganski.
She was a graduate of Plains
HighSchool, Classof1950. Irene
workedmost of her lifeinthegar-
ment industry for Small Town
Manufacturing Co. of West
Wyoming, which later relocated
to Pittston. She also was a gradu-
ate of the Veterans Administra-
tion Medical
Center’s nurs-
ing program,
where she re-
ceived her
LPN. She was
employed for a
time at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital. She was a member of
Our Lady of Sorrows Church in
West Wyomingandwas involved
for many years in the Girl Scout
Troop of West Wyoming.
Irene played a very active and
vital role in the lives of her fam-
ily, and she will be missed tre-
mendously by all who knew and
loved her.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, JosephW. Migliore,
and her daughter, Linda Lee
Mascioni.
Surviving are daughters, Judy
Ann Migliore, West Wyoming;
Debra Jean Joyce, Plains Town-
ship; andgrandchildren, Cynthia
Rinish, Mark Migliore, Melissa
Ford, Tanya Gelb, Ryan Wil-
liams and Sarah Williams.
Funeral services were from
the Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza Fu-
neral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming. Interment was
inSt. Rocco’sCemetery, Pittston.
Irene D. Migliore
Dec. 28, 2012
Elmer W. Roxby, 86, of Pittston,
passed away on Thursday, Jan. 3,
2013, at the Geisinger South
Wilkes-BarreHospiceCommuni-
ty Care Inpatient Unit.
BorninPittston, he was a sonof
the late George and Lily Mae Eu-
stice Roxby.
Mr. Roxby attended Jenkins
Township schools and was a U.S.
Navy veteran, serving during
World War II. Prior to his retire-
ment, he had worked as the main-
tenance director of the Granite
Hotel inKerhonkson, N.Y. Hewas
a member of the Kerhonkson
VFW and the Rescue Squad, the
Accord Fire Department and also
was a Cub Scout leader.
Elmer was
preceded in
death by his
brothers, Ge-
orge, Arlington,
John, Jamesand
Raymond Rox-
by; by sisters, Anna Wistrich, Lil-
lian Sorrento, Leona Taber and
Beatrice Kahn.
Surviving are his wife, the for-
mer Elizabeth Countryman, with
whom he would have celebrated
their 60th wedding anniversary;
children, Kevin and his wife, Su-
san Roxby, Olivebridge, N.Y.;
John Roxby, Pittston; Paul and his
wife, Cathy Roxby, Olivebridge,
N.Y.; Laurie Roxby, Avondale,
Ariz.; grandchildren, Jason,
Jaime, Justin, Andrew, Robin, Ni-
chole Brown, James, Jessica; six
great-grandchildren; numerous
nieces and nephews; and a broth-
er, Arthur Roxby, Phillipsburg, Pa.
Relatives andfriends areinvit-
ed to a visitation today, Sunday,
Jan. 6, 2013, from2 until 4 p.m. at
theGubbiotti Funeral Home,1030
Wyoming Ave., Exeter. The Rev.
James Thyren, pastor of the First
Presbyterian Church, West Pitt-
ston, will officiate at the services
following visitation.
To send the family an expres-
sionof sympathyor anonlinecon-
dolence, please visit www.gub-
biottifh.com.
Elmer W. Roxby
January 3, 2013
Kenneth Francis Brown II, 60,
of Avoca, died Thursday, Dec.
27, 2012, surrounded by his lov-
ingfamilyafter abrief battlewith
pancreatic cancer.
He and his wife, Loretta Ellis
Brown, would have celebrated
their 35th anniversary on Jan. 14.
Born in Scranton on Oct. 27,
1952, son of the late Kenneth F.
andDaisyKimler Brown, hewas
a 1971 graduate of Pittston Area
High School. He proudly served
in the Marine Corps and owned
and operated Brown’s Cleaning
Service. Kenwas a proudformer
member of the Avoca Ambu-
lance and Avoca Fire Depart-
ment.
He will be dearly missed but
will remain in the hearts of all
who knewhim.
Also surviving are his chil-
dren, Kenneth F. Fuller, Moosic;
Christine E. Thomas and hus-
band, Seth, Harding; Kenneth F.
Brown III and fiancée, Jacki
Slater, Duryea; Amy M. Brody
and husband, James, Avoca; Jen-
nifer L. Brown Winburn, Avoca;
Damian M.
Brown, Avoca;
Jonathan R.
Brown and
wife, Nichole,
West Wyom-
ing; Marybeth
D. Brown, Avoca; sister, Jean M.
Brown, Exeter; brothers-in-law,
Robert Ellis and wife, Francine;
William Ellis and wife, Sharon;
18 grandchildren who adored
him; and nieces and nephews.
A memorial Mass was cele-
bratedSaturday, Dec. 29, 2012, in
Queen of the Apostles Parish,
715HawthorneSt., Avoca, bythe
Rev. Philip J. Sladicka, pastor.
MarineCorpshonorswill follow.
Arrangements are by the Vic-
tor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522
Fallon St., Old Forge.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that memorial contribu-
tions are directed to Christine E.
Thomas c/o Highway Federal
Credit Union, 1843 Highway
315, Pittston, PA18640. To leave
an online condolence, visit
www.ferrifuneralhome.com.
Kenneth Francis Brown II
December 27, 2012
Leroy R. Pesotine, 77, of
Harding, passed away Sunday,
Dec. 30, 2012 in Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter, Plains Township.
Born in Duryea on May 1,
1935, he was the son of the late
Henry and Josephine Kosior Pe-
sotine.
He was a graduate of Duryea
High School, class of 1953.
Prior toretirement, hewasem-
ployed as a teamcoordinator for
Procter &Gamble, Mehoopany.
He was a member of the Dal-
las Congregation of Jehovah’s
Witnesses.
His hobbies included travel-
ing, gardening, cooking, sports
and spending time with his be-
loved family.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by a son,
Sean Pesotine, and a brother,
Sidney Pesotine.
Surviving are his wife of 52
years, FeliciaAdonizioPesotine,
sons, Lee Pa-
trick Pesotine,
Pittston;
Christopher
Pesotine and
his wife, Col-
leen, Inker-
man; daughter, Donna Lukasav-
age, Harding; brothers Henry
(Sonny) Pesotine, Duryea; Alan
Pesotine and his wife, Lin, Du-
ryea; sister, Joan Doran, and her
husband, Henry, Duryea; broth-
er-in-law, Kenneth C. Pesotini
Sr., Springbrook; numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013 in the Pe-
ter J. Adonizio Funeral Home,
251 William St., Pittston, with
Congregation Elder Frank Tibus
officiating. Private interment
took place in Mountain View
Burial Park, Harding.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Leroy R. Pesotine
December 30, 2012
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In the towns
DELI
201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
Hatfield Cooked Ham ........................... $4.99 lb.
Hard Salami .......................................... $4.99 lb.
Clearfield American Cheese .................. $3.99 lb.
Bottom Round Roast ............................. $2.99 lb.
Rump Roast .......................................... $2.99 lb.
Eye Round Roast ................................... $3.99 lb.
Eye Round Steaks ................................. $4.59 lb.
Extra Lean Stewing Beef ....................... $3.59 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Fresh & Smoked Kielbasi
With a new year upon us, the
Rev. Carmen Bolock, pastor of
St. Mary’s Polish National Ca-
tholic Church, Duryea, is offer-
ing to bless homes.
If you would like to have your
home blessed, call Father Car-
men at 457-2291. The invitation
is open to the entire community.
Little League
The Duryea Little League will
have its monthly meeting at 7
p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 6 at the
V.F.W. Post 1227, 492 Stephen-
son St. Preparations for the 2013
season will be discussed. Sign-
ups for the 2013 season will be
held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Jan. 21,
22, 23, 28, 29 and 30 at the Du-
ryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St.
Sewer Authority
The reorganization meeting of
the Duryea Borough Sewer Au-
thority will be held at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 7 at the municipal
building. The public is invited.
Borough Council
The Duryea Borough Council
will have its monthly meeting
and work session at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 8 in the Duryea
Municipal Building, 315 Main
St.
Legion Sons
The Sons of the American Le-
gion (S.A.L.s), Squadron 585,
will have its monthly meeting at
3 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 13 at the
Brennan Regan post home, 329
Main St. Fundraising ideas for
2013 will be discussed at this
time. All members are urged to
attend.
Eagle Scout reception
There will be an Eagle Scout
reception for Ryan Burdick of
Boy Scout Troop 285 at 2 p.m.
on Saturday, Jan. 19 at the Amer-
ican Legion Brennan Regan Post
585, 329 Main St.
Scouts are reminded to wear
full dress uniforms to this event.
Garbage stickers
Garbage stickers for 2013 are
on sale now.
The price of the stickers re-
mains the same as last year.
Stickers canbe purchasedfrom7
a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m.
Monday through Friday at the
Duryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St. Stickers can also be
purchased from5 to 8 p.m. Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday
evenings at the municipal build-
ing.
Prices of the garbage stickers
are one bag, $80; two bags, $135;
three bags, $175; and four bags,
$215.
Residents are asked to remove
their old garbage sticker when
they place their new one in the
window. New garbage stickers
must be displayed by Feb. 1.
Garbage will not be collected
from homes that do not have the
2013 garbage sticker displayed.
Duryea website
The webmasters of the Duryea
website, www.duryeapa.com,
have added over 5,000 newitems
to the site, including more than
4,500 articles and photos from
the archives of the Sunday Dis-
patch from1946 to 1964.
Website volunteers are always
attempting to obtain old photos
and documents about Duryea,
but they are specifically seeking
photos of the Phoenix Colliery
which was located at the end of
Chittenden Street, the Columbia
Breaker which was located near
the viaduct area by the current
Village Shopping center and the
Warnke Washery which was lo-
cated in back of Newton Street.
The website team would also
love to obtain images from the
Pennsylvania National Guard’s
occupation of Duryea in the fall
of 1902 due to the coal strike
which swept the anthracite coal
region.
Anyone who would like to
share photos or documents about
these or any other Duryea histo-
ry up to 1964 may contact Faith
at 457-2517, Diane at 457-4791,
Mike at 655-8336 or Bernie at
(973) 838-7126.
All items will be copied and
promptly returned.
Blessing of homes taking place
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
Patty McDonald, borough
manager, encourages all busi-
nesses currently recycling
throughprivate haulers tosubmit
their tonnage which will be used
to obtain grants. For more infor-
mation, contact Patty at 655-
6216.
Sermon, soup & sandwich
Sermon, Soup & Sandwich
second is a series of enlightening
social event will be held at noon
on the Saturday, Jan. 12 at Holy
Mother of Sorrows Church, 212
Wyoming Ave., Dupont. Dr. Jim
Ploskonka will have a presenta-
tion entitled “God & Finances.”
He will speak on the subject of
personal finances, specifically
providing documented insights
into how God has provided us
means to be at peace with money
and its use.
Ploskonka is a graduate of
Mansfield University where in
2012 he was honored to be in-
ducted into the Hall of Fame for
Distinguished Educators. He re-
ceived his a master’s degree from
the Boston Conservatory, his
PhDfromthe University of Ken-
tucky in Policy Studies and Eval-
uation and was recognized as the
recipient of the Sagan Scholar-
ship for the Dissertation of the
Year.
Most recently, he has complet-
ed additional studies at Harvard
University in the College of Edu-
cation’s Management Institute
specifically focusing on critical
issues in higher education.
Fellowship with soup and
sandwich will follow in the par-
ish hall.
All are invited for this event
free of charge.
ANS installation dinner
Holy Mother of Sorrows ANS
will hold its annual installation
dinner at noon today, Jan. 6 at
Agolino’s in West Pittston. To
make reservations, contact Carol
Bondurich at 654-8991.
Holy Mother of Sorrows will
hold its Parish Committee meet-
ing at 7 p.m. on Jan. 14 in the rec-
tory’s conference room.
Holy Mother of Sorrows YMS
of R annual installation meeting
and dinner will be held at 6 p.m.
on Jan. 15 at in the parish hall. To
make reservations, call Paul
Kaspriskie at 655-0981or e mail
him at Paul.Kaspris-
kie@wilkes.edu
Council meeting
The Dupont Borough Council
will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 8 in the James Cocco Coun-
cil Chamber.
Garbage bags on sale
Garbage bags for 2013are now
on sale.
Fees for refuse bags are resi-
dential, $105; seniors, $75; and
commercial, $150.
The Dupont Municipal Office
will have extended hours for the
month of January and will re-
main office until 6 p.m. on
Thursdays and from 1 to 3 p.m.
on Saturdays.
Businesses asked to report recycling tonnage
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
407-0231
dupont.news@comcast.net
See DUPONT, Page 31 S
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Garbage stickers for 2013 can
be purchased from Therese
Wrubel at the Avoca Municipal
Building, 752 Main St., begin-
ning Tuesday, Jan. 15. The office
will be open from9 to11a.m. on
Tuesdays and from5 to 6 p.m. on
Fridays.
The fee schedule for purchas-
ing the window sticker in order
to have up to three bags collected
weekly is as follows: $160 if pur-
chased by Feb. 20; $165 if pur-
chased between Feb.21 and
March 20; $175 if purchased be-
tween March 21 and April 20;
$185 if purchased between April
21 and May 20 and $195 if pur-
chased between May 21and June
21.
Delinquent accounts will be
referred to district court after
June 21. All Avoca homeowners
and renters are obligated to pur-
chase a garbage sticker.
Extra stickers for additional
bags of garbage can be pur-
chased for $3 each.
Residents unable tostopbythe
municipal building to purchase a
garbage sticker can mail a check
made payable to Avoca Borough
and a self-addressed stamped en-
velope to Avoca Borough, c/o
Therese Wrubel, 129 Factory St.,
Avoca, PA18641.
If you have any other ques-
tions, call Wrubel at 457-4891.
Queen of the Apostles
The Rev. Phil Sladicka, pastor
of Queen of the Apostles Parish,
is available tobless homes for the
New Year. To schedule a conve-
nient time to have your home
blessed, call the parish office at
457-3412.
The social concerns / respect
life committee will meet at 7
p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 10 in the
rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
The pastoral council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14 in
the rectory.
The worship committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, Jan.
21 in the rectory.
The building and grounds
committee will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Monday, Jan. 28 in St. Mary’s
School auditorium, 742 Spring
St.
The parish will host an appre-
ciation dinner at 5:30 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 2 in St. Mary’s
School auditorium. Anyone who
has worked for or volunteered
for the parish during 2012 is in-
vited to attend. To make your
reservation, call the parish office
by Jan. 28. The snowdate is Feb.
9.
VFW Auxiliary
The Avoca V.F.W. Ladies Aux-
iliary Post 8335 will not have a
regular monthly meeting in Ja-
nuary. Instead, there will be dis-
trict meeting at 2:30 p.m. on
Sunday, Jan. 20 at St. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St. with De-
partment President Sandra Bren-
ner present.
Refreshments will be servedat
the post home at 915 Main St.
following the meeting.
Garbage sticker sale begins Jan. 15
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
AMVETS calendars available
The AMVETS Post 189 2013
calendars are nowavailable from
any post member or by contact-
ing Post Commander Bernie
McDonald at 817-4858.
Donation is $30 and will bene-
fit 16 VA hospital and homes in-
cluding the Wilkes Barre VA
Medical Center and the Gino J.
Merli Veterans Center, Scranton.
Lions news
Rick Hansen, chairperson of
the Dupont Lions Adopt a High-
way project, announces the next
cleanup will be held on Jan. 19.
Members will clean the area
roadway north and south of
Route 315 starting from Pilot to
Petro and from Petro and from
Petro back to Pilot.
The Lions will meet at 6:30
p.m. on Monday, Jan. 14 at the
VFW Post 4909.
Sacred Heart meeting
schedule
Women’s Society will meet at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8 in
the church hall.
The Parish Pastoral Council
will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 8 in the lower level meeting
room.
Senior Outreach Committee
will meet at 6 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 15 in the rectory lower level
meeting room.
Eco-tip
Here is Joey Jones’ eco-tip of
the week: If you have an aerosol
can (like for whipped cream),
check for the recycling symbol
on the can before throwing away.
Steel is recyclable.
Gas service applications
Applications for gas service
Father Joseph Verespy has had an idea for a few years about changing the back drop of the picture
of Bethlehemon the Nativity Scene placed every Christmas season at the front altar of Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church in Dupont. And with the help of parishioner Stan Warunek of Montage Studio his
vision became a reality. If you look closely at the back of the manger you will see pictures of down-
town Dupont: Holy Mother of Sorrows Church, Dupont Municipal Bldg., the Polish Club, VFW, Ceb-
ula's plus pictures of the CCD students, parishioners and scenes fromour parish picnic. Rev. Ve-
respy in his Christmas homily said the purpose was to remind parishioners that Jesus is worldwide,
not only Bethlehembut Dupont.Above, Father Verespy shows Ann Paddock the many pictures of
Dupont. Top right, Father Verespy with the display. Bottomright, photos visible behind the infant.
Dupont
Continued from Page 30
See DUPONT, Page 32
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are available at the Dupont Mu-
nicipal offices during regular
business hours; UGI Represen-
tative Mike Trussa states, that in
order for the company to have
program approval for placement
of gas lines, residents’ applica-
tions must be filedwithUGI. For
more information, contact Trus-
sa at 829-8664.
VFW meeting Monday
Dupont V.F.W. Post #4909 will
meet at 7:30 p.m. on Monday,
Jan. 7 at the post home. Com-
mander Gary Carwardine will
preside. The Home Association
meeting will follow. Nomination
of Home Association Officers
will be held for 2013. Refresh-
ments will be served after both
meetings.
Crime Watch meeting
The Dupont Neighbor Crime
Watch will meet at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 29 in the municipal
building
VFW Post 4909 to meet
The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW
Post 4909 will meet at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 8 . at the post
home. President Elaine Healey
will preside.
Hostesses for the meeting are
Elaine Hoffman and Emily De-
Nardi.
Borough service schedule
Borough service schedule for
the week of Jan. 6:
Monday, Jan. 7 - Refuse
Wednesday, Jan. 8 - Yard
waste and Christmas trees
Thursday, Jan. 9 – Recycling,
mixed paper
Dupont Public Works Depart-
ment announces that recycling
and yard waste pick- ups may be
disrupted due to plowing and
winter road maintenance.
Every effort will be made to
maintain the service schedules.
If scheduled recyclables or
yardwaste are not pickedup, res-
idents are asked to hold themun-
til the next scheduled pick-up.
Dupont
Continued from Page 31
The 2013 refuse stickers are
nowonsale at the boroughbuild-
ing, 1101 Wyoming Ave. The
price is $150 and $110 for senior
citizens pay until Feb. 28.
FromMarch1to March 31, the
price will be $180 and $130 for
senior citizens. Starting in April,
the stickers will be in the penalty
phase and will cost $250 for ev-
eryone. For more information,
call Lynda at 654-3001 ext 2.
Hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mon-
day thru Friday. The office will
be open until 7 p.m. on Wednes-
days.
Payment can also be made by
mail. Send a self-addressed
stamped envelope with a check
or money order to Refuse, 1101
Wyoming Ave, Exeter. Pa18643.
Make checks or money orders
payable to Exeter Borough.
Lauren’s Foundation
Now that the season is over,
Joe Erzar, a senior member
Wyoming Area football team,
has begun accepting payments
for his pledge drive for the Lau-
ren’s First & Goal Foundation,
which supports pediatric brain
tumor research. All money re-
ceived will go directly to the
foundation.
The Warrior football team
scored 460 points this past sea-
son. Please multiply your pledge
amount by 460 and mail your
check to: LF&G PLEDGE
DRIVE, c/o 31 W. Brady St.,
West Wyoming PA 18644. One-
time donations are still being ac-
cepted. If you forgot your pledge
amount or need to have your
pledge picked up, call 693-3163
after 5 p.m. or e-mail jerzar@ve-
rizon.net.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday
Jan. 8 in St. Anthony Center,
Exeter. Dues will be collected.
Host/hostesses are Theresa Be-
kanich, Rose Gunsior, Marie
Mantione, Jane Mikolosko and
Marie Sperazza.
The club is open to all adults
age 50 and over, regardless of re-
ligious affiliation and residence.
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on
Wednesday, Jan. 9 with pickups
in Exeter and Pittston. Non-
members are welcome. Details
can be obtained from Johanna at
655-2720.
Borough notes
Exeter residents may pick up a
2013 recycling calendar at the
following businesses along
Wyoming Avenue: Turkey Hill,
Uni Mart, Sabatini’s Pizza, Mod-
ern Market and Donut Connec-
tion. The calendar can also be
picked up any time in the white
mailbox to the right of the front
door at the Exeter Borough
Building, 1101 Wyoming Ave.
Recycling must be placed
curbside for pick-up on Mon-
days.
All refuse is to be placed in
garbage bags and put in a gar-
bage can and placed curbside by
6 a.m. on Wednesdays. Loose
garbage in garbage cans will not
be taken.
Christian Women
St Barbara’s Christian Women
will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan 8 at the church hall.
Plans will be finalized for the
parish Mardi Gras dance which
will be heldonSaturday, Feb. 9at
the church hall.
Refuse sticker prices good through February
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
West Wyoming recycling con-
tainers are located behind hose
company No. 1. Recycling can
be dropped off any day of the
week.
The following is the list of ac-
ceptable items for recycling:
commingled food and beverage
containers, plastic containers (all
number recyclables are accept-
ed), cardboard, newspaper and
office paper.
Legion to meet
The West Wyoming American
Legion Morning Star Post 904
will meet at 6:30 p.m. on Thurs-
day, Jan. 10 at the West Wyoming
Hose Co. No. 1 meeting room
with Commander Jerone Dom-
koski presiding.
Plans for the coming year will
be discussed.
Borough survey
Representatives West Wyom-
ing Borough will conduct a
phone and mail survey of resi-
dents of West Brady, English and
FairviewStreets. The purpose of
the survey is to gather informa-
tion essential for an application
for a federal Community Devel-
opment Block Grant funding
through Luzerne County for
street improvements on the sur-
veyed streets. All information
will be kept confidential.
Sanitation stickers
Sanitation stickers are now on
sale at the town wall between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. week-
days. All residences in West
Wyoming must purchase a stick-
er. The cost remains the same as
last year, $200. If stickers are
purchased before Jan. 31, senior
citizens (65 and older) will re-
ceive a $25 rebate ($175), all oth-
ers receive a $15 rebate ($185). If
stickers are purchased from Feb.
1-28, the full price will be
charged, $200.
After Feb. 28, the cost will be
$300 for the year and citations
will be filed with the district ma-
gistrate for non-compliance with
the ordinance.
Stickers are also available
through the mail: West Wyom-
ing Borough Building, 464 W.
8th St., P.O. Box 4035, West
Wyoming, PA 18644. For the
added convenience of residents,
Visa, MasterCard and Mac are
accepted. Stickers can also be
purchased through the borough
website www.westwyomin-
g.org.
Website
Visit the West Wyoming Web-
site at www.westwyoming.org.
Residents interested in receiving
a monthly e-newsletter from the
borough are asked to visit the
website for more details.
Recycling containers available
WESTWYOMING
During the Hughestown Bor-
ough Council session, it was de-
termined there will be no new
taxes.
Improvements to borough
streets will continue and prob-
lem properties have been ad-
dressed.
Residents using Pittston city
for garbage collection have until
Jan. 7 to use their current stick-
ers.
Christmas trees placed at
curbside will be collected until
Feb. 4.
Residents who would like to
read the budget may obtain a
copy at the borough building.
Anyone needing information
on gas service is asked to call 1-
800-652-0440, ext. #7.
Council member Wayne
Quick has been appointed chair-
man of council.
Robert Gable was appointed
vice chairman, Angela Acierno
is secretary/ treasurer and Moon
Copp has been appointed street
chairman. Meetings are held at
7:30 p.m. on the second Monday
of each month in the borough
building.
Girls softball
Hughestown Girls Softball
League will meet at 2 p.m. today,
Jan. 6 in the borough building.
Parents interestedinassistingthe
league are encouraged to attend.
For more information, contact
Joanne at 457-3761.
Council holds line on taxes
HUGHESTOWN S
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There will be an important
meeting at 7 p.m. on Monday,
Jan. 7 for parents of members of
the Wyoming Area Class of
2013in Ms. Aritz’s classroom
(room 164 next to the library in
the Secondary Center). Impor-
tant information will be dis-
cussed regarding the Nite at the
Races fundraiser set for Satur-
day, Feb. 16 at St. Barbara Parish
Center.
WA drama meeting
The Wyoming Area Drama
Club Parents Association is
holding its annual Nite at the
Races on Jan. 26 at the West
Wyoming Hose Company No. 1,
Shoemaker Avenue, West
Wyoming.
Doors will open at 6 p.m. and
post time is 7 p.m. Horses are
$10 and include one free admis-
sion. Theyare available fromany
drama parent or by contacting
Jen at 903-9450. Funds raised
will benefit the Wyoming Area
Drama Club and its spring pro-
duction of “Seussical.”
Night at the Races
Preliminary plans are being
made for a Night at the Races
scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 9.
Look for further details soon.
Column deadline
A reminder that submissions
for the West Pittston news co-
lumn will be no later than
Wednesday mornings at 10 a.m.
Birthday notes
Celebrating this week: Maryjo
Hetro, Dana Philips, Jan. 6; Nick
Mozal, Jan. 7; Brittney Eramo,
Jordan Johnston, Kendra Radle,
Jan. 8; Erica Peck, Jan. 9; Eddie
Martin, Alyssa Belotti, Nancy
Janczewski, Ahmed Bouie, Jan.
10; Jerry Yakobitis, Linda
Schartzer, Tom Campenni, Jan.
11, Meredith Mead, Jan. 12.
Thought for the week
The absolute good is not a
matter of opinion but of nature.
Quote of the week
“Aperson who, no matter how
desperate the situation, gives
others hope, is a true leader.” –
Daisaku Ikeda, Japanese peace
activist.
Bumper sticker
Chance favors the prepared
mind.
Wyoming Area senior parents meeting Monday
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Seniors will meet at 1:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 8 at St Monica’s
meeting center. Servers are Stan-
ley Mulesky, George Yurek and
Vicky Mecklavage. Dues will be
collected for the year 2013 by
Membership Chairman Angie
Mastruzzo. There will be re-
freshments after the short busi-
ness meeting and Bingo will be
played.
Newly-elected officers who
will serve for 2013-2014 are
Frank Perfinski, president; Sam
DeSalvo, vice president; Joann
Kwasny, secretary; and Irene Ze-
linski and Donna Pocceschi,
treasurers.
Newmembers 50years andol-
der are welcome. Non-residents
are also welcome.
Hose Company fund drive
Wyoming Hose Company No.
1 recently began its 2013 fire
drive. Everyone is asked to
please donate to the department.
It is residents’ generosity that al-
lows the firefighters the safety
equipment necessary to respond
when needed. A second remind-
er will be sent to residents short-
ly. If corrections are needed on
the form, mark the appropriate
area and list the updated infor-
mation.
Anyone who has not received
a donation request is asked to
call the station at 693-1371 and
leave a message for John Maria-
nacci, 2013 fund drive chairman.
New members are welcome to
apply and our hall is available for
rental by calling the same num-
ber for information.
WA senior parents
There will be an important
meeting at 7 p.m. on Monday,
Jan 7 for the parents of the
Wyoming Area Class of 2013 in
Ms. Aritz’s classroom (Room
164 next to the library in the Sec-
ondary Center). Important infor-
mation will be discussed regard-
ing the Nite at the Races fun-
draiser set for Saturday, Feb. 16at
St. Barbara Parish Center.
Sanitation stickers
Garbage stickers for 2013 are
nowon sale from9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Monday through Friday at the
Wyoming Municipal Building.
Full year stickers are $200 and
$190 for seniors. Stickers may be
purchased through two pay-
ments, each for half a year. Gar-
bage stickers may also be pur-
chased through the mail by send-
ing a self-addressed/stamped en-
velope to Wyoming Borough,
277 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming,
PA 18644. The sticker fee in-
cludes garbage pickup, curb-side
recycling collection and season-
al yard waste removal. Amonth-
ly bulk item pickup is also of-
fered at $5 per item (limited to
one per month.)
St. Monica’s news
A Night at the Races benefit-
ing St. Monica’s Parish, 363
West Eighth St., will be held on
Friday, Feb. 8. Master of ceremo-
nies is Magic 93’s Frankie War-
ren. Doors open 5:45 p.m.; post
time is 7 p.m. Admission is $10
and seating is limited to 175.
Complimentary food and bever-
ages will be served. Horses will
be sold after each weekend mass
for $10. Winning horses received
a $50 cash prize. Contact Tom
Tomsak at 237-2188 for more in-
formation.
APro-Life March will be held
in Washington, DC on Friday,
Jan. 25. Buses will leave from
the Knights of Columbus Hall in
Luzerne at a time to be an-
nounced. If interested, call the
Rectory at 693-1991.
Books and CDs are available
from the parish library in the
back of the church hall. Feel free
to take, read, pass on or return
but enjoy reading. The CDs are a
good way to growin your knowl-
edge of the Faith. They are locat-
ed in a special holder near the en-
trance of the church and a dona-
tion of $3 is asked.
Library news
The Friends of the Wyoming
Free Library have launched a
brand new web-based store on
Etsy.com, You can buy unique
handcrafted items such as cat
toys and sachets as well as pil-
lows, pet coats and many other
crafts for the holidays. Go to
“The Crafty Ant” store on Etsy-
.com. All proceeds benefit the
Wyoming Free Library.
Friends of the Wyoming Free
Library invite you to bring your
knitting, crocheting, needle-
point, embroidery, or sewing to
the library from10 to 11:30 a.m.
on the first and fourth Wednes-
days of every month. Call the li-
brary at 693-1364 to register.
Seniors of the Wyomings elect 2013 officers
WYOMING NEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Randy Willauer of West Pittston, pulls his daughter Caylee, 17
months, up a hill last Sunday afternoon following the previous
day's snowfall. More snow photos on pages 24 and 25.
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Sports
The Pittston Area and Wyom-
ing Area swim teams both won
their only meets last week, set-
ting up a head-to-head meet
Wednesday in the PA pool. The
Lady Patriots – 4-0 in Division 3
and two-time defending champs
– are on top of the division again.
WA is only one meet behind at
3-1 and could claim a share of
first place by upsetting PA on
Wednesday.
A Bridge point is also on the
line.
Pittston Area swimmers
stayed unbeaten at 4-0 by over-
whelming winless Dunmore on
Friday in the PApool 144-39. PA
took first in nine of 10 events.
Kate Musto, Addison Hazlet,
Emily Seamen, Shelby Hoff-
man, won the 200 medley relay.
Musto, Hazlet, Antoinette Anto-
nacci, Liz Scialpi won the 200
free relay. Scialpi, Kassity
Roche, Shannen Brady and Mia
Nardone won the 400 relay.
Roche won the 200 and 500
free; Nardone won the 200 IM
and 100 fly; Scialpi, the 50 free;
Theresa, diving; Brady, back-
stroke and Antonacci, breast-
stroke.
Scoring seconds and third for
PAwere Cassie Wilczewski, Ha-
zlet, Brady, Seaman, Kaycee
Langan, Sierra Williams; Ashley
Beers, Christine Riggs and Mus-
to.
WA 95, Coughlin 81
Amy Alder won the individual
500 free and 200 free to help
GI RL S SWI MMI NG
TONY CALLAIO FOR THE DISPATCH Sierra Williams placed second in diving for PA in the Dunmore meet.
Warriors-Patriots meet Wednesday at PA
Kassity Roche won the 200 freestyle for PA against Dunmore.
See SWIM, Page 41 S
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E
ven though it’s been al-
most 60 years since Jim
Francioso was named the
starting point guard for the
Hughestown High school bas-
ketball team, he still thinks about
the coach who trusted him
enough to give him the position.
That’s why when he saw a sto-
ry in the Dispatch on Dec. 23
about WyomingArea school dis-
trict paying tribute Simon “Si”
Bernosky,
Francioso dug
out his scrap-
book of the
’53-’54 Hugh-
estown High
School season
when the team
won the East
Anthracite
League and
District 2 Class
C champion-
ships under
Bernosky.
Though Ber-
nosky, who
died in 2000,
carved out a
Pennsylvania
Hall of Fame
Career at Mon-
trose High
where his
teams were
342-43, won 88
consecutive
Susquehanna
League games,
55 consecutive overall games
and went to four state title games
winning one, the winning started
here in tiny Hughestown in the
1953-’54 season in the East An-
thracite League.
The league teams were Hugh-
estown, Jenkins and Pittston
Townships, Moosic, Avoca, Du-
pont and Duryea. Hughestown
was 10-2 in the league that sea-
son, with both losses to Duryea
in what was eventual Boston
Celtic Gene Guarilia’s senior
year.
Duryea was the only class B
team in the league, the other six
were class C, and so while Du-
ryea won the overall league title
at 12-0, Hughestown was the
class Cchamp having beaten the
other class C teams twice.
Though Hughestown had won
the EA class C title the year be-
fore, they accomplished much
more in the 1953-54 season. Af-
ter the season they won the B di-
vision championship of the an-
nual Greater Pittston Junior
Chamber of Commerce, or Jay-
Cee, Tournament. Then they
beat Fairview and Harter high
schools at Wyoming High in the
District 2 Class C tournament.
After a bye week in the state
tournament, the season came to
an end for “Bernosky’s Bucket
Bombers” when they lost to
Newton-Ransom in a state play-
off game.
Fittingly Hughestown won the
first round District 2 game over
Fairview 57-55 on two free
throws by George Litz in the fi-
nal seconds.
That was fitting because get-
ting to the free throw line was
one of Bernosky’s emphasized
coaching points.
With speedy little guards,
Francioso and Jimmy Barrett,
Bernosky like to run the floor on
offense and take the ball to the
hoop leading to free throw op-
portunities. The statistics are
startling. In all but two of their 10
league wins Hughestown was
outscored from the floor. In all
the games they shot up to four
times as many free throws as
their opponents.
In the District championship
game, Hughestown shot 18-
of-26 free throws, while Harter
made 5-of-17. In a league game,
Jenkins outscored Hughestown
from the field while Hughes-
town made 25 of 40 free throws
and Jenkins made 7.
That game was more typical
than unusual.
And according to Francioso, it
was by plan. The team worked
on pushing the ball and free
throw shooting.
FranciososaidBernoskywas a
disciplinarian. “He was strict.
We didn’t fool around. We al-
ways had to be on time. And he
watched our grades. I think only
one guysmokedandwhenhe got
caught, we all paid the price.”
The price was running, which
they did regularly, smoking or
not, on the track above the Pitt-
ston YMCAgym, which was the
team’s home court.
LOCAL SPORTS HI STORY
What Simon said, they did
Little Hughestown High won the Anthracite League crown in ’53-‘54
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
DISPATCH ARCHIVES
Simon Bernosky, standing at left, coached the Hughestown high school basketball teamto the East Anthracite League and District 2
championships in 1954. Also pictured are, seated fromleft, JimFrancioso, John Hensley, John Moss, Bill Hintze and Jimmy Barrett.
Standing, Bernosky, Anthony Gitkos, John Andrews, George Litz and Nick Rucco.
“He was
strict. We
didn’t fool
around. We
always had
to be on
time. And
he watched
our grades.
I think only
one guy
smoked
and when
he got
caught, we
all paid the
price.”
JimFrancioso
Team member
See BERNOSKY, Page 38
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The Lady Patriots unbeaten
string is over. After opening the
season with eight preseason
wins and one in the WVCopener
on Wednesday at home against
Berwick, the girls lost in over-
time to Hazleton in Hazleton on
Friday night.
Down by three heading into
the fourth quarter they tied it up,
but only scored tow in the OT.
Mia Hopkins scored24for PA,
Liz Waleski, 17; Eastin Ashby, 9;
Ali Barber, 6 and Ali Brady, 4.
The LPs shot pretty well from
the line hitting 16-of-21 free
throws, but not as well as the La-
dy Cougars who were 23-for-26.
Alyssa Sitch’s scored 23 for
Hazleton Area picked up the win
in overtime.
Angie Marchetti had 14.
Waleski hit two threes and
Ashby, 1 for PA.
The game was tight all the way
with Hazleton leading by two af-
ter the first, PA by three at the
half, and Hazleton by three after
the third.
Nanticoke 52, WA 30
Nanticoke rolled at home with
Kayley Schinski’s getting a
game-high 15 points.
Abby Thornton led Wyoming
Area with 10 points. Nicole
Turner scored 6 and Serra Deg-
nan, 4.
The Lady Warriors were 2-
of-12 shooting free throws. Nan-
ticoke was 10-of-16.
It was the LWs only game of
the week.
It was the fifth consecutive
loss for the Lady Warriors, who
haven’t won since they defeated
Coughlinina preseasongame on
GI RL S BASKETBAL L
Patriots win streak stopped at nine
Liz Waleski drives to the basket against Berwick.
BILL TARUTIS
Wyoming Area's Serra Degnan, left, looks to pass out of the corner as Nanticoke Area's Brittany
Sugalski applies pressure in Nanticoke on Thursday night.
BILL TARUTIS
Wyoming Area's Nicole Wright, left, makes a move around Nanti-
coke Area's Heidi Kile Thursday night in Nanticoke.
See GIRLS, Page 37 S
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Stephanie Jallen had two great
days of racing at the U.S. Nation-
als at Winter Park, Colorado
from January 1-3. The 16-year
old Wyoming Area student from
Harding had a break-through
event in the Super G with two
Silver Medals while grabbing
two Gold Medals, one in the Gi-
ant Slalom and one in Slalom.
Prior to the U.S. Nationals,
Stephanie was ranked 11th in the
World in Slalom and 2nd in the
U.S.; 17th in the World in Giant
Slalom and 3rd in the U.S.; 15th
in the Would in Super Combined
and 3rd in the U.S.; 18th in the
World in Super G and 3rd in the
U.S.; and 13th overall in the
World in Women’s Downhill and
3rd in the U.S.
With the great showing at
Winter Park, Stephanie should
gain valuable point in Nationals
and possibly improve on her
World rankings. Jallen has qual-
ified for one event out of five for
the Paralympic Games in Sochi,
Russia in2014, but she has a long
way to go before she can actually
go to Russia. She said she prob-
ably needs to qualify for at least
three of the five disciplines.
Stephanie is scheduled to par-
ticipate in the IPCAlpine Skiing
NORAMCup at Kimberly, Can-
ada on January 28-31.
PARALYMPI C GAMES
Jallen makes
medal haul at
U. S. Nationals
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Stephanie Jallen, center, with her gold medal at the U.S. Nationals in Colorado.
Two golds, two silvers for
local Paralympic hopeful
By TONY CALLAIO
For the Dispatch
December 14.
They are 2-8 over all and 0-1in
the WVC D-II.
PA 53, Berwick 46
Pittston Area outscored Ber-
wick 12-6 in the third quarter to
break away from the Bulldogs.
Waleski scored a game-high 16
points for the Patriots, while Mia
Hopkins scored 14 and Allie
Barber, 12.
Ashby had 8 with a three and
5-of-6 free throws. The teamwas
18-of-26.
Kelly Sheptock’s 16 points led
Berwick, which also got 11
points from Gabby Kishbaugh.
The Patriots are 9-1overall and
1-1 in the WVC D-I.
Lady Patriots
defend tourney crown
Going back to last Sunday
Hopkins scored a game-high 25
points and Waleski, 16 points,
with two threes, as the Patriots
defended their Pittston Area Ho-
liday Tournament title beating
Holy Redeemer 51-46 in the title
game.
The game had been scheduled
for Saturday, December 29 but
was postponed by snow.
Alexis Lewis scored 18 points
to lead the Royals.
The consolation game,
Wyoming Area and Valley View,
was not played because Moun-
tainview couldn’t travel because
of road conditions.
The teams agreed to schedule
a game on a date to be an-
nounced.
This week
Monday
Wyoming Area at Hanover
Dallas at Pittston Area
Thursday
PA at Tunkhannock
Lake Lehman at WA
BILL TARUTIS
WA's Abby Thornton, right,
shoots ahead of Nanticoke
Area's Sara Higgins in WVC
girls basketball action Thurs-
day night in Nanticoke.
Girls
Continued from Page 36
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kees come to town they sell
more tickets. Some teams even
charge more for Yankees
games.
I looked at attendance for the
last 12 seasons from 2001 –
2012. The Yankees were the top
road draw in 10 of those sea-
sons, topped only by the Red
Sox in 2007 by a
little over 1,000 per
game and by the
Giants in 2001,
when Bonds hit 73
home runs, by 500
per game.
I looked at Kan-
sas City attendance
for last season. The
Yankees only played
one series in KC. It
was the best attended series of
the season in KC. The Saturday
game drew 29,121, almost
8,000 over average, and the
fourth highest single game of
the season. The only games that
drew more were the home
opener, the home closer and a
game on a Friday in July when
the Royals came home from a
long road trip and there was a
fireworks promotion.
The Yankees are also the
highest rated TV team.
I don’t “hate” the Yankees, I
just like to root against them.
It’s a family tradition, except
for my sister. But it was no fun
The last time I rooted for
Notre Dame was in 1988 when
they played no. 1 Miami and
some clever Notre Dame stu-
dent nicknamed the game
“Convicts versus Catholics.”
I’ve never rooted for Alaba-
ma. As I write this Notre Dame
is pulling me in as a fan for
tomorrow.
It’s weird because as much as
I rooted against Notre Dame
this year, especially against
Stanford and Pitt, I’m glad at a
certain level that they are in the
game tomorrow. When Notre
Dame is relevant, it’s good for
college football.
Same deal with the Yankees.
While I root against the Yan-
kees, at the same time I want
them to be relevant because
that’s good for baseball.
Let’s face it, the Yankees
made baseball, historically.
Baseball wouldn’t be what it is,
if the Yankees weren’t what
they are.
The Yankees are the most
recognizable sports franchise in
the world. “The Yankees” is a
brand.
Do you think the other MLB
teams hate the Yankees? Think
again. The players may hate to
play them because more often
than not they lose, but the fran-
chises sure as heck don’t hate
them, because when the Yan-
Here’s a prediction. Tomor-
row’s game will be the highest
rated college football TV game
ever.
Yeah, Notre Dame, just like
the Yankees. They sell more
tickets, they sell more gear,
they get more eyes on the TVs.
Heck, they make movies about
the Yankees and Notre Dame.
But here’s where I get in
trouble. Here’s where the Yan-
kees are different from Notre
Dame: the Yankees aren’t over-
rated.
I don’t mean Notre Dame is
overrated this year, I mean in
general. No team has been in
the preseason top 10 and wound
up out of it than Notre Dame.
And I cite Powlus. Remember
Todd Light? He was vastly
overrated as a defensive back.
Take their linebacker this
year – Manti Te’o. Great player.
Great kid. Great story. I love
him. But a Heisman finalist?
He had 103 tackles in 12
games, 5.5 for loss and 1.5
sacks. Why is he any better
than Penn State linebackers
Gerald Hodges, 109 and 8.5 for
loss in 12 games and Michael
Mauti 95 and 4.0 and 2.5 sacks
in 10 1/2 games?
Granted seven picks by Te’o
is impressive, but Mauti had
three in 10 1/2 games.
Anyway, Go Irish, but not too
far.
But those connections are not
why there are a lot of Notre
Dame fans around here. There
are a lot of Notre Dame fans
around here because there are a
lot of Notre Dame fans every-
where.
I tend to think locally when I
get in discussions over beers
with Notre Dame fans, when I
should be thinking
globally. Discus-
sions like that hap-
pen everywhere
college football
fans gather.
In Northeast
Ohio or Northeast
Hawaii, just like in
Northeast PA, there
are fans in bars
talking about Notre
Dame. Penn State has a reach,
Ohio State has a reach, but not
like Notre Dame which is tiny
by comparison.
Notre Dame is like the Yan-
kees in that they are the greatest
draw. In Oklahoma they have
been playing football at Memo-
rial Stadium since 1923. The
biggest crowd ever? This year
on October 27 when Notre
Dame came to town.
In 2011 Pitt played eight
home games at Heinz Field.
Seven of the games drew
40,000 plus. One drew 65,000.
A Steelers crowd. A sell out.
Guess who was the opponent?
rooting against them from1990
to ’92 when they were 67-95,
71-91 and 76-86.
I feel the same about Notre
Dame. I don’t “hate” Notre
Dame. I just like to root against
them. But it was no fun rooting
against them when they were
3-9, 7-6 and 6-6 in the last three
Weiss seasons.
Notre Dame is like the Yan-
kees in that the “Fightin’ Irish”
is a brand known around the
world and that most fans either
love ‘em or hate ‘em.
Here in NEPA a lot of loyal-
ties are devoted to Penn State or
Notre Dame, rarely both. I get
in discussions with Notre Dame
fans over beers a lot. There are
a lot of Notre Dame fans
around here. Yeah, there are a
lot of Irish-Americans and ND
alumni around here and there
are connections like Ron Pow-
lus, Rocket Ismail, Tim Ruddy,
Jim Crowley and even Joe Cos-
grove.
THESMILES FILES
Jack smiles
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
My love/hate
relationship
It’s weird because as much as I rooted
against Notre Dame this year, especially
against Stanford and Pitt, I’m glad at a cer-
tain level that they are in the game tomor-
row. When Notre Dame is relevant, it’s good
for college football.
The high school didn’t have a
gym. The Y accommodated
scheduling Hughestown’s home
games, but not regular practice
time.
When the team couldn’t get
the Yfor practice, they’dpractice
wherever Bernosky could ar-
range it.
Bernosky would pile eight
players in his ’48 Chevy and
drive them to practice at the a
community center on Suscon
Road, Wyoming high school,
Scranton and, at least once, all
they way to St. Michael’s in Ho-
ban Heights.
At practice in addition to free
throw shooting, Bernosky em-
phasized defense. “Hands up,”
Francioso said. “Get a hand in
their face. Watch the belly but-
ton.”
Francioso said Bernosky
wasn’t rigid. “We’d try different
things,” he said. “Zone, man-to-
man, double-team, but we were
always prepared.”
Bernosky, 5-8, was a Hughes-
town native.
He set a single-game school
scoring record of 33 points in
1943 shooting mostly 20-foot
two-handed set shots. In that
1953-54 season he sawhis player
John Andrews, 6-3, break the re-
cord with 36 points.
That was okay with Bernosky,
though typically he preferred
balanced scoring. A good player
was a good player, but he didn’t
encourage “stars.”
Bernosky was also the Hugh-
estown baseball coach. Francio-
so was a pitcher and once when
he pitched poorly and got
knocked out of the game, Ber-
nosky made himrun laps around
the field – during the game.
While coaching baseball and
basketball, Bernosky also played
both sports in high-caliber adult
leagues.
That 1953-’54 basketball sea-
son was Bernosky’s last at Hugh-
estown. After that school year he
moved on to Montrose.
Francioso said his high school
class tried the arrange a reunion
and have Bernosky back, but
with only 22 class members and
many of them out of town it was
tough to pull off.
Francioso never saw or talked
to Bernosky again after the last
day of school in 1954.
Francioso, 76, is a retired
PennDOT Pavement Marker
Manager.
He played baseball and bas-
ketball as an adult with the Red
Devils and he still bowls. He and
his wife, Louise Musto, who
died in 2007, have one daughter,
Terese Ginocchetti, and one
granddaughter, Lauren, a high
school soccer andtrackathlete in
Upstate New York.
Bernosky
Continued fromPage 35
Bernosky would pile
eight players in his
’48 Chevy and drive
them to practice at
the a community cen-
ter on Suscon Road,
Wyoming high school,
Scranton and, at least
once, all they way to
St. Michael’s in Hoban
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The Pittston Area Patriots
shared the ball and took turns
withthe responsibilityof leading
the offense.
The result Thursday night was
a balanced effort and a comfort-
able win in the Wyoming Valley
Conference Division 1 boys bas-
ketball opener.
Mason Gross scored15 points,
grabbed seven rebounds and
blocked three shots while lead-
ingfour players indouble figures
in scoring during a 65-49 victory
over Berwick.
Tyler McGarry added 13
points while Michael Schwab
and James Tobisch had 11 points
each.
Jayson Crawford contributed
six assists, including five in the
first half, and three steals.
Schwab added five assists and
three steals.
The Patriots connected on bet-
ter than 50 percent of their shots
from the floor by getting the ball
into prime shooting areas.
“A lot of it is the guards mov-
ing the ball,” Patriots coach Alan
Kiesinger said. “A lot of it is big
guys getting into position.”
Pittston Area outscored Ber-
wick, 44-27, by taking advan-
tage of the shots when they had
them.
“In our past games, we gave up
some open looks, especially in-
side the lane,” Kiesinger said.
The win moved Pittston Area
back above .500 overall at 5-4
and got the league schedule off
to a positive start.
“Everybody in the last week
and a half has been trying to get
ready for the start of league
play,” Kiesinger said. “Berwick
is always tough on the defensive
end.”
The Patriots handled pressure
from the Bulldogs, turning the
ball over just eight times in the
first three quarters before the
contest became a little more
sloppy once it was decided.
Gross got the offense started.
Emmett and McGarry provided
the surge that put the Patriots in
front. Gross and Schwab then
helped put Berwick away.
Berwick had three leads in the
first quarter, but Gross had six
points in the first 4:32 while his
teammates were struggling of-
fensively.
Emmett put Pittston Area
ahead to stay with a 19-footer
fromthe right side with a second
left in the first quarter. He had
five more points when Pittston
Area added the first nine of the
second quarter for a 22-12 lead.
McGarry converted a rebound
to end that outburst. He finished
the second quarter 4-for-4 for
nine points, helping the Patriots
to a 33-22 halftime lead.
Gross made his last three shots
from the floor and his last three
from the line while scoring nine
more points in the second half.
Schwab hit his only two second-
half shots from the floor and his
last three free throws while add-
ing seven points.
Zach Ladonis led the Bulldogs
(1-7) with12 points and seven re-
bounds.
The Patriots played at home
last night versus Hazleton. That
game was too late for our dead-
line.
Nanticoke 44, WA 31
Tyler Myers scored 11 points
andNanticoke pulledawayinthe
second half to defeat Wyoming
Area, 44-31, Friday night in the
WVCDivision 2 opener for both
teams.
The Trojans led 19-18 at half-
time.
Bart Chupka led Wyoming
Area with 11 points. Jordan Zez-
za added eight.
The Warriors were just 3-for-9
from the line and did not hit a
shot from 3-point range.
This week
Tuesday
PA at Dallas
Hanover at WA
Friday
Tunkhannock at PA
WA at Lake Lehman
BOYS BASKETBAL L
Patriots open WVC season with a road ‘W’
By TOM ROBINSON
For the Sunday Dispatch
TONY CALLAIO FOR THE DISPATCH
Wyoming Area's Evan Musto backs in against Nanticoke's Tyler Meyers.
TONY CALLAIO FOR THE DISPATCH
Tony Romanelli shoots a jump shot for the Warriors against Nanti-
coke Friday.
Six local wrestlers reached
championship finals bouts last
night in the Wyoming Valley In-
dividuals Tournament at Lake
Lehman. At 120 it was PA’s Tyler
Lutecki against John Lagoski of
Valley West. At 126 WA’s An-
drew Schutz wrestled Kyle Kre-
savage of Valley West. At 138
WA’s Nick Heck wrestled Nath-
an Cheek of Valley West. At 160
PA’s Angelo Lussi wrestled Lo-
gan Brace of Dallas. At 195 PA’s
John Minch wrestled Andrew
Muckin of Tunkhannock. And at
220 PA’s Jake Vaxmonsky wres-
tled Zachary Faust of GAR
In the consolation round yes-
terday afternoon, Wyoming Ar-
ea’s PatrickHeckwonthirdplace
at 106 with a 3-2 win over Nick
Yankoski of Coughlin; PA’s Jus-
tin Wilk won third at 152 with a
win over Dan Bove of Hazleton;
PA’s Sam Falcone took third at
170 with a win over Derek Drag-
on of Lake Lehman and WA’s
Jude Polit-Moran lost to Steve
Longazel of Hazleton for third at
182.
WA’s Carmen Mauriello fin-
ished fourth at 132. At 145 PA’s
Kevin Wesoloski was fifth and at
285 PA’s Brian Modzienski was
in the fifth place bout at press
time.
Buckskin Classic
Last weekend the Pittston Ar-
ea wrestlers were in the Buck-
skin Classic at Conestoga High
School where they were15th in a
field of 25th out of 25 teams
from wrestling hot bed South-
eastern PAand teams fromDela-
ware and Virginia.
Dallas and Crestwood were al-
so entered finishing 17th and
23rd.
The Patriots crowned one
champion. AngeloLussi wonthe
title at 152 pounds. In the semis
Lussi decisioned Adam Moser
from Owen J. Roberts high
school, 3-1. OJR from Chester
County won the team title.
In the championship Lussi de-
feated Max Wilt of Ceasar Rod-
ney High School in Delaware. In
earlier rounds he defeated wres-
tlers fromhost Conestoga Valley,
8th in the team standings and
Westfield Virginia, third in the
team standings.
PA’s Tyler Lutecki reached the
third place bout at 120 against
Pat Callaghan (Marple New-
town, Newtown Square, Dela-
ware County) and lost 5-4 to fin-
ish fourth.
Tunkhannock Kiwanis
Tournament
Last weekend WA’s Andy
Schutz won the 126-pound title
in the Tunkhannock Kiwanis
Tournament. Schutz defeated
Wyalusing’s Brandon Kelley 6-1
in the title bout.
Also for WA, Nicholas Heck
tookthirdplace at 138, Freshman
Pat Heck took fifth at 106 and
Carmen Mauriello took sixth at
132.
The Warriors were 11th in the
21 team field with 71 points.
This week
Tuesday
Wyoming Area at GAR
Wednesday
Pittston Area at Coughlin
Saturday
Pittston Area at Valley West
WRESTL I NG
Four PA and two WA wrestlers reached WVC finals
PETE G. WILCOX/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pittston Area's Tyler Lutecki (top) has Coughlin's Mike Brown nearly pinned before the clock runs out in the 120lbs. bout in Friday's
WVC Wrestling Tournament quarterfinal at Lake Lehman HS.
PETE G. WILCOX/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Area's Carmen Mauriello (left) looks for escape in his match against Dan Ritz of Crestwood
in the 132lbs. bout in Friday's WVC Wrestling Tournament quarterfinal at Lake Lehman HS.
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@civitasmedia.com S
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Wyoming Area post a 95-81 vic-
tory over Coughlin in Wyoming
Valley Conference girls swim-
ming Friday.
Alder was a four-time winner
as she also swama leg or the La-
dy Warriors winning 200 and
400free relays. CaitlynKraynak,
Melissa Kazmerick, Maria Pesta
swam the 200 relay with Alder
and it was Katy Dymond, Gabby
Albergi and Kraynak on the 400.
Dymond also won the100 free
for WA. Scoring seconds and
thirds for WA were Alberigi,
Kraynak, Maria Pesta, Megan
Bonomo, Dymond, Emily She-
manski and Amanda Bialy.
This week
Wednesday
Wyoming Area at Pittston Ar-
ea
D-3 Standings
Pittston Area ...................4-0
Wyoming Area ................3-1
Meyers ..............................2-1
Nanticoke.......................... 1-2
Coughlin ...........................1-3
Dunmore .......................... 0-4
Swim
Continued from Page 34
TONY CALLAIO FOR THE DISPATCH
Mia Nardone was a triple winner for PA, including in the IM.
Registration for the Hughes-
town girls softball league is to-
day, Sunday, January 6 at 2 p.m.
at the Hughestown Borough
Building. Parents or other adults
who are interested in volunteer-
ing should attend. For more info
call Joanne at 457-3761.
Avoca Basketball League
Registrations are being ac-
cepted for the 2013 Avoca Bas-
ketball League in the Avoca
Community Center located on
Main Street for boys and girls in
grades Kthrough6beginningto-
day, Sunday, January 6 from 7
p.m. to 8:00.
Registrations continue the
next two Sundays, Jan. 13 and 20
from 7 p.m. to 8:00. The ABL is
sponsored by the Borough of
Avoca and the Avoca Jolly Boys
and is played in honor of Mi-
chael Joyce. For ABL informa-
tion call Stan Waleski at 457 -
1206 or e mail stanwaleski@ya-
hoo.com
Duryea Little League
The Duryea Little League will
meet today, Sunday, January 6 at
7 p.m. at the VFW on Stephen-
son Street. Preparations for the
2013 season will be discussed.
Sign-ups for the 2013seasonwill
be held on January 21, 22, 23, 28,
29and30from6p.m. to8p.m. at
the Duryea Borough building lo-
cated on Main Street.
Pittston Area wrestling
The Pittston Area Wrestling
Booster Club will meet Monday,
January 7 at 6 p.m. at Pittston
Area High School cafeteria.
Pittston Area cheer boosters
The PA Cheerleading Booster
Club will meet on Tuesday, Janu-
ary 8 at 7 p.m. at Savo’s.
Wyoming Area basketball
parents
The Wyoming Area Girls Bas-
ketball Parents Association will
have a meeting on Tuesday , Ja-
nuary8, 7p.m. inthe highschool
in room133.
Parents of players fromgrades
7th thru 12th are encouraged to
attend.
PA Baseball boosters
Pittston Area Baseball Parents
Booster Club will meet at the
Red Mill Tavern on Wednesday
January 9 at 7 p.m. Items to be
discussed are the annual fund
raisers which include Pizza Sale
and the senior breakfast. Senior
parents are asked to attend
With questions call Pat
McGinty at 313-1350.
WA field hockey
The Wyoming Area Field
Hockey Parent’s Association
meeting on January 10 at 7 p.m.
at the high school.
Dupont Softball/Teeball
Dupont Softball/Teeball will
have an organizational meeting
on Thursday January 10 at 6:30
p.m. in the Dupont Borough
Building.
Coaches are asked to attend.
Also parents or anyone interest-
ed in coaching this year or help-
ing the organization are also
asked to attend. For more info
call Bob Cappelloni, 881-8744
County Line Girls Softball
The County Line Girls Soft-
ball League will have its kickoff
meeting on Thursday, January17
at 6:30 p.m. in the Dupont Bor-
ough Bldg.
All town/team reps are asked
to attend. Any town/team/orga-
nization that wants to join the
league for this season, after a ve-
ry successful inaugural season,
is welcome to attend. For more
info call Bob Cappelloni at 881-
8744.
K of C free throw contest
Boys and girls ages10 to14 are
invited to participate in the local
level 2013 Knights of Columbus
Basketball Free Throw Cham-
pionship. Entry is free.
Winners progress through lo-
cal, district and state competi-
tions.
Participants will compete in
their respective age groups. Last
year more than 120,000 sharp-
shooters participated in over
3,600 local competitions.
This year’s local event will be
held on Feb. 9 in the gymnasium
of the former Seton Catholic
high school on William Street in
Pittston.
Start time will be 9a.m.. Every
contestant will be recognized for
their participation.
Participants are required to
furnish proof of age and written
parental consent to compete. For
entry forms or additional infor-
mation contact either Don Mac
Rae at (570) 815-4454 or Mitch
Megliola at (570) 335-3002.
Rock Solid Basketball tryout
Tryout for the 2013 AAUGirls
season at Rock Solid Basketball
at the Rock Rec Sports Com-
plex, 340 Carverton Road, are
Sunday, January 6 and 20 from
1-2:30 p.m. for girls in grades 9
and 10; 2:30 - 4 p.m for girls in
7th and 8th grades and 4 - 5:30
p.m for girls in 5thand 6th
grades.
Try outs for the boys are Sun-
day, January 13 and 27. Boys in
grades 9 and10 will try out from
1-2:30 p.m.; boys in 7th and 8th
grades will try out from 2:30-4
p.m.; and boys in 5th and 6th
grade will try out from 4-5:30
p.m.
The tryout fee is $10 per play-
er. A player may attend both
tryouts at no additional cost.
Adult women’s league at GP
YMCA
The Pace Setter Athletic Club
of Northeastern Pa. is currently
organizing an Adult Open Wom-
en’s Basketball League at the
Greater Pittston YMCA . Inter-
ested women players and teams
from the Scranton, Wilkes-
Barre, Pittston, and Hazleton are
welcome.
For further information con-
tact Pace Setter A.C. at P.O. Box
189, West Scranton Pa. 18504 or
phone 575-0941 or 347-7018.
You may also e-mail to paceset-
terbasketball@verizon.net
SPORTS BRI EFS
Signups today for Hughestown girls’ league
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OBITUARIES
Frank A. Slapar, 81, of Ft. Wal-
ton Beach, Fla., beloved husband
to his “Schatz” Anna Slapar for
54 years, passed away peacefully,
at home, on Friday, Dec. 21, 2012,
surrounded by the ones he
laughed with, lived for and loved.
If love could have saved him, he
would not have died, but he will
be remembered for his heart of
gold, selfless ways and the love
and generosity he showed to oth-
ers.
He was born on Feb. 27, 1931,
in Luzerne, to the late John and
Lena Slapar.
He also was preceded in death
by his sisters, Antoinette, Mary,
and his brother, Joseph.
Besides his wife, Anna, Frank is
survived by his daughter, Theresa
(Glen) Pappas, Ft. Walton Beach,
Fla.; grandchild, Stephanie; great-
grandchild, Sophia; as well as
brothers, John Slapar, Luzerne;
Rudy (Ann) Slapar, West Wyom-
ing; sister, Helen Gallagher, Shali-
mar, Fla., and sister Dolores (Al-
bert) Urbanovich, Wayne, N.J.,
nieces, Helene and MaryAnn; and
nephew, Tony.
He proudly served in the U.S.
Air Force for 20 years and retired
with the rank of senior master ser-
geant. While stationed in Munich,
Germany, Frank met and married
the love of his life, Anna.
Frank was a recipient of numer-
ous awards and medals, including
the Bronze Star for his 12 months
of service in Thailand during the
Vietnam War. Upon his retirement
from the Air Force, Frank worked
at Mercy Hospital, in Wilkes-
Barre, for 20 years before relocat-
ing to Teresa Village in Fort Wal-
ton Beach to be near his daughter
Theresa.
Frank would like to be remem-
bered as a civic-minded person
who took joy in helping others and
serving his community. He will be
remembered for championing the
development of three softball
fields and a recreational park that
bears his name in West Wyoming.
He will be most remembered for
his work with the Air Force En-
listed Village, where he organized
resident trips, special events and
other activities for which he was
honored with the Frank Willis
Award for Volunteer of the Year.
Frank was a loving and gener-
ous man who always had a smile
and a joke for everyone he met.
He will be missed beyond mea-
sure by his family and friends, and
we thank God for the gift of his
life and blessing of the time we
spent with him. His singing of
“You are My Sunshine” will for-
ever be in our memories.
The family would like to ex-
press its gratitude to the members
of Emerald Coast Hospice for the
support over the last five months.
A memorial service was held
at the Emerald Coast Funeral
Home, Fort Walton Beach, Fla.,
on Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012, fol-
lowed by a memorial service and
burial with military honors in
Beal Memorial Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, Frank requested contri-
butions be made to one of the do-
nation opportunities for the Air
Force Enlisted Village; visit
www.afenlistedwidows.com or
call 1-800-258-1413.
Frank A. Slapar
December 21, 2012
Mrs. Geraldine P. “Gerry” Bed-
well, age 85, of Newark, Delaware,
passed away on Friday, December
28, 2012.
Formerly of West Wyoming,
Gerry was the daughter of the late
Joseph Pace and Romilda Zamponi
Pace.
As Valedictorian of her West
Wyoming High School graduating
class in1944, she was awarded a 4-
year scholarship to College Miser-
icordia, now Misericordia Univer-
sity, in Dallas, where she earned
her Bachelor of Arts degree and
graduated Summa Cum Laude in
1948.
She was also awarded a 4-year
scholarship to Fordham University
in New York. Gerry was one of six
women to be admitted into Kappa
Gamma Pi, the Honor Society of
the International Federation of Ca-
tholic College Alumnae. She also
served as President and Secretary
of the Wilmington Chapter of Mi-
sericordia Alumni.
From1948 to1954, Gerry taught
mathematics and English at the
Henry C. Conrad High School
where she servedas senior class ad-
visor.
For the next 15 years, she was
proud to be a stay-at home mom to
her four children.
Then from 1969 to 1990, she re-
turned to her teaching career and
was a frequent substitute at the
John R. Downes Elementary
School where she enjoyed teaching
her kindergarten classes.
Gerry delighted in the academic
achievements and musical talent of
her beloved grandchildren. She
herself loved to sing and was a
member of the St. John’s-Holy An-
gels choir for many years.
An avid Phillies fan, she also fol-
lowed the progress of University of
Delaware Blue Hens football and
the women’s basketball program.
Gerry is survived by her beloved
husband and best friend, John E.
“Gene” Bedwell,with whom she
would have celebrated 60 years of
marriage on June 20, 2013.
Children, Neal E. Bedwell of
South Carolina; Maureen “Mo”
Buckworth and husband Judge
Mark Buckworth of Newark, N.J.;
Eileen L. Bedwell of Newark; and
Lynne P. Latino and husband Ken
Latino of Daleville, Va.; grandchil-
dren, Christina Bedwell, Alexis
Bedwell, Matthew Buckworth and
Hunter Buckworth; a brother, Ger-
ald “Jerry” and wife Lucy, Old
Forge; a sister Aldine Kriso, Den-
ver Colo.
Mass of Christian Burial was
offered on Friday, January 4, 2013
at Holy Angels R.C. Church 82
Possum Park Road, Newark, N.J.
Interment will follow in All
Saints Cemetery, 6001 Kirkwood
Highway, Wilmington, Del.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the Misericordia
University Scholarship Fund, 301
Lake Street, Dallas, Pa. 18612-
1090: or Little Sisters of the Poor,
185 Salem Church Road, Newark,
De. 19713-2997.
Geraldine P. “Gerry” Bedwell
December 28, 2012
Richard S. Kolman, 62,
of Exeter and Wyoming,
passed away Friday, Dec.
28, 2012, at the Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township,
where he had been in the
intensive care unit since
Dec. 11, 2012.
Richard lived in Exeter
and Wyoming until Janu-
ary 2012, when he became
a resident at the Mountain
City Nursing Home, in
Hazle Township.
Born in Kingston, on
Aug. 3, 1950, he was a son
of the late John and Helen
Mesaros Kolman.
Richard attended St.
John the Baptist School,
Pittston, and St. Cecilia’s
School in Exeter. He was a
1968 graduate of Wyom-
ing Area High School and
also attended Valley Voca-
tional and Technical
School.
He worked for Marval
Kitchens and later for the
Celotex Corp., Harding
plant, for 23 years. He
served for many years as
the secretary of the Oil,
Chemical and Atomic
Workers Union Local and
was a member of the union
contract negotiations
team. More recently, he
worked at the Office De-
pot Distribution Center, in
Mountain Top.
He was a member of the
Fraternal Order of Eagles
and served as a secretary
and chaplain for the
Wyoming Eagles, and also
as a district secretary. He
was an active member of
the Slovak League of
America, Branch 474, and
the North End Slovak Citi-
zens Club, of Wilkes-
Barre. The Slovak League
named him Man of the
Year in 2009.
In recent years, he vol-
unteered at the Wyoming
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 396. He was a great
supporter of veterans,
since each of his brothers
served in the Air Force,
Navy and Army respec-
tively.
Surviving are brothers,
Leonard, Maryland; John,
Florida, and Michael,
Stowell, Pa.; five nephews
and one niece.
A Memorial Mass was
on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013,
at St. John the Evangelist
Church, 35 William St.,
Pittston.
Interment was in St.
John the Baptist Slovak
Cemetery, Exeter.
Funeral arrangements
are by the Bednarski Fu-
neral Home, 168 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
Richard S. Kolman
December 28, 2012
Ann Marie Doughtery,
80, of Rockville, Md.,
passed away Tuesday, Ja-
nuary1, 2013 in Maryland.
Beloved daughter of the
late Louis B. and Clara
McHale Dougherty; sister
of Harry Dougherty and
the late Eugene, William,
and Louis Dougherty. Al-
so survived by 17 nieces
and nephews, 40 great
nieces and nephews and
30 great-great nieces and
nephews.
The funeral mass was
held Saturday, Jan. 5,
2012, in Maryland. Bless-
ing Service will be held
Monday, January 7, 2013
at 11:30am in the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home,
251 William Street, Pitt-
ston. Interment will follow
in St. John the Evangelist
Cemetery, Pittston.
Friends may call Monday
from10 a.m. until the time
of service at the funeral
home.
Ann Marie Doughtery
January 1, 2013
OBITUARIES
Joseph ‘Peppy’ Falcone, 91, of
Washington Square Apartments,
Wilkes-Barre, passed away on
Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at Com-
monwealth Hospice at St. Luke’s
Villa in Wilkes-Barre.
He was born in Pittston on
Aug. 29, 1921, a son of the late
Angelo and Pauline Baiera Fal-
cone. He attended Pittston High
School. Joseph was formerly
employed by the United Pants
Factory, in Swoyersville, and he
was later employed for 25 years
as a school crossingguardfor the
Wilkes-Barre Area School Dis-
trict.
Joseph was a former member
of Holy Rosary Church in
Wilkes-Barre, where he served
as the head usher and as a mem-
ber of the Holy Name Society.
He also was a member of the St.
Paolina Club in Wilkes-Barre.
Peppy was a loving and devot-
ed father, grandfather and great-
grandfather. He loved to dance,
especially the
Jitterbug. Last
summer he
dazzled and de-
lighted his
family and
friends with his
dancing skills at the wedding of
his grandson, Tony Decker Jr.
He was preceded in death by
his wife of 63 years, Amelia Ma-
rino Falcone, in 2005, and by a
son, Angelo, in 1999. He was al-
so preceded in death by his
brothers, John, Angelo; by his
sisters, Ann Marocco, Pauline
Jones, Francine Bryk, Jenny Fal-
cone and Carrie Guilano.
Survivingare daughters, Paula
Decker and her husband, Tony,
Plymouth; Kimberly Paddock
and her husband, Mark, Ply-
mouth; grandchildren, Carla
Kozick, Tony Decker Jr., Mark
Paddock Jr., Tina Najera, Keith
and Tony Falcone; great-grand-
children, Angelo Najera, Karly
Kozick, and Jayden, Casey and
Danny Falcone; brother, Samuel
Falcone and his wife, Theresa,
Dupont; sisters, Josephine Fal-
cone, Pittston, Mary Lagguitar,
Geneva, N.Y.; nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral Services will be held
on Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, at 9
a.m. from the Nat & Gawlas Fu-
neral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of
Christian Burial to followat 9:30
a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, 226
S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be in St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call to-
day, Jan. 6, 2013, from2 to 5 p.m.
at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be made at the fu-
neral home to Commonwealth
Hospice. Online condolences
may be sent by visiting Joseph’s
obituary at www.natandgawlas-
funeralhome.com.
Joseph ‘Peppy’ Falcone
January 3, 2013
Michael W. Ortalano, 50, of
Vienna, Va., formerly of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away Wednesday,
Jan. 2, 2013, at home.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
a son of Michael and Carol Stah-
ley Ortalano. He was a graduate
of E.L. Meyers High School,
Wilkes-Barre. He furthered his
education, earning a bachelor’s
degree from Wilkes University,
a master’s degree fromUniversi-
ty of Delaware and a doctoral
degree from the University of
Maryland. He worked in the in-
formation technology field,
serving for several years as a
software engineer with AARS,
Vienna, Va. Michael was an avid
reader, enjoyed cooking and, be-
ing mechanically inclined, he al-
ways was building and tinkering
with some kind of appliance.
He was preceded in death by
his grandparents, Ruth and John
Stahley, and Lillian and Michael
Ortalano.
In addition to his parents, he
survived by a sister, Susan Sher-
man, Wyoming; two nieces, Jus-
tine and Janelle Sherman; sever-
al aunts, uncles and cousins.
Funeral services will be held
Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, at 10 a.m.
from the Daniel J. Hughes Fu-
neral & Cremation Service, 617
Carey Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with
the Rev. Barbara Pease of the
Firwood United Methodist
Church officiating. Interment
will follow in Mt. Greenwood
Cemetery, Trucksville. Friends
may call today, Jan. 6, 2013, at
the funeral home from 2 to 4
p.m.
Michael W. Ortalano
January 2, 2013
Angela Biagiotti, 67, Pittston,
passed away Monday, Dec. 31,
2012, at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born in Kingston on July 27,
1945, she was a daughter of An-
thony Scarantino, Pittston, and
the late Gertrude Occipenti Sca-
rantino.
Surviving, in addition to her fa-
ther, is her husband, Thomas; son,
Anthony Biagiotti, West Pittston;
daughter, LeslieBiagiotti, andher
companion, Michael Hoban, Du-
pont; sister, MaryTheresaFrance,
Pittston; two granddaughters, Sa-
mantha and Sabrina Hoban; and
caregiver, Tammy Hoban.
Funeral was held Friday, Jan.
4, 2013 with a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Barbara’s Parish/St.
Anthony’s Church, Exeter with
the Rev. Philip Massetti, OSJ, as
celebrant.
Arrangements entrusted to An-
thony Recupero Funeral Home,
West Pittston.
Angela Biagiotti
December 31, 2012
Mal Limongelli Sr. passed
away Thursday morning, Dec.
27, 2012, at home at the age of
91.
Born and raised in the Old
Boston section of Pittston, he
was a sonof RoccoandVirginia
Limongelli and was educated in
the Old Boston schools. He was
a lifelong member of Sacred
Heart Church in Plains Town-
ship. He served in the United
States Army during World War
II, during which time he was
stationed in Germany as a para-
trooper in the Over Sea Special
Service Unit.
He was the founder of Li-
mongelli Trucking and co-
founder of Limongelli Broth-
ers, a new car Studebaker dea-
lership. In1960 he formed Mid-
vale Auto Sales on River Road
in Plains Township and was the
owner-operator until he retired
in 2010.
He was preceded in death by
his wife of 55 years, Anna Ku-
nec Limongelli; son, attorney
Malcolm; sis-
ter, Carmella
Ardo; and
brothers, Jo-
seph, James
and Anthony.
Surviving
are son, attorney Adam, and
Deborah; grandson, A.J.; nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
The family would like to give
special thanks to the Visiting
Angels Agency and everyone
whotookcare of Mal Sr. andhis
son, Malcolm, over the previ-
ous years.
Funeral services were Mon-
day, Dec. 31, 2012, from the
Yeosock Funeral Home, 40 S.
MainSt., Plains Township, with
Mass of Christian Burial in St.
Ignatius Church, Kingston. In-
terment was in Sacred Heart
Cemetery, Dallas.
In lieu of flowers, the family
would appreciate monetary do-
nations to be made in his mem-
ory to the S.P.C.A., Plains
Township.
Mal Limongelli
December 27, 2012
Lisa (Miller) Kneller, 46, of
Luzerne, passed away after a
lengthy illness Monday, Dec.
31, 2012, at the Gesinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township.
She was born in Dupont
March 3, 1966 and was a
daughter of the late John and
Bertha (Jumper) Miller.
She was a graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School. Lisa
was a very gifted artist and
loved to draw and create art-
istic pieces; she was also very
mechanically inclined. She
was a loving mother, grand-
mother, baby sister and
friend, and will be deeply
missed.
In addition to her parents,
she is preceded in death by
her brother Walter.
She is survived by her chil-
dren, Richard Kneller, Larks-
ville; Jesse Kneller, at home,
and Amber Kneller, at home;
her siblings, Florence Kresge,
Duryea; Bertha Earlley, Pitt-
ston; Mary Brown, Dupont;
John Miller, Pittston; William
Miller, Exeter; Margaret
McGrath, Pittston, and Susan
Shannon, Pittston. Also sur-
viving are her grandchildren,
Chase Kneller and Parker
Kneller, and several nieces
and nephews.
A blessing service was
held Friday Jan. 4, 2012, at
Kiesinger Funeral Services
Inc., 255 McAlpine St., Du-
ryea, with the Rev. Guy Gior-
dano of The Slocum Apostol-
ic Chapel, Exeter, officiating.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Lisa Kneller Fund UFCW
Federal Credit Union, 377
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, PA
18644.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuner-
alservices.com.
Lisa (Miller) Kneller
December 31, 2012
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OBITUARIES
Cynthia Washko Bogdon, 71,
loving mother, grandmother
and great-grandmother, passed
away Dec. 28, 2012, at her
home, surrounded by her fam-
ily.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, Cyn-
thia was a daughter of the late
Irene Marconi.
She was a graduate of Mat-
mount High School and was
formerly employed by the Vis-
iting Nurses of Kingston.
Cynthia was a member of St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton Church,
Swoyersville. She loved to read
and watch
game shows.
Cynthia also
loved going to
the casino and
spending time
with her fam-
ily.
Cynthia was formerly mar-
ried to Robert Bogdon and was
preceded in death by her late
husband, Robert Washko.
Surviving are daughter, Su-
zanne Cooper, of Philadelphia;
sons, Robert Washko Jr., of
Avoca; James Washko, of
Swoyersville; grandchildren,
Angelina Sargent, Justin and
Christopher Cooper, Jordan and
Paige Washko; great-grandchil-
dren, Delaney and Teagan Sar-
gent; brother, Donald Marconi,
of Philadelphia.
Funeral for Cynthia was
Monday, Dec. 31, 2012, from
the Lehman-Gregory Funeral
Home Inc., 281 Chapel St.,
Swoyersville, with a Mass of
Christian Burial in St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Church, Swoyers-
ville. Interment was in Holy
Trinity Cemetery, Swoyersville.
Cynthia Washko Bogdon
December 28, 2012
Frances Micnicoski Grochal,
70, longtime resident of Duryea,
enteredher eternal rest onDec. 31,
2012, with her family by her side,
after a brief illness.
Frances was a daughter of the
late Frank and Stella Micnicoski.
She was a graduate of Duryea
High School and Empire Beauty
School. She was employed at
Schott Optical until herretirement.
Frannie, nicknamed Freida by
her children, was a world traveler
who loved airplanes, cruising and
road trips. She drove across coun-
try four times exploring the USA.
Some of her favorite spots includ-
ed Las Vegas,
The Poconos,
London, Albu-
querque, Aruba
and the Queen
Mary in Long
Beach, Calif.
She was a fiery red head with a
fun sense of humor and a friendly
smile who loved spending time
with her family. Her granddaught-
ers, Emma and Olivia, were a joy
in her life. Frannie was an avid
reader who enjoyed mysteries and
ghost stories. She was also a fan-
tasticcookwhomadethebest Pol-
ish food in the world!
She was preceded in death by
her husband, John Grochal; sister,
ChristinaJordan; andbrother Tho-
mas Micnicoski.
She is survived by daughters,
Sherri andJustineCupplo; son, Jo-
sephGrochal; daughter-in-law, Jo-
di Grochal; granddaughters, Em-
ma and Olivia Grochal; brother
Frank Micnicoski; sister-in-law,
Shirley Micnicoski; and numer-
ous nieces and nephews.
Shewill begreatlymissedbyall
her family and friends.
Memorial services will be held
at the convenience of her family.
Frances Grochal
December 31, 2012
Edward P. Casterline, 84, of
Exeter, passed away Sunday,
Dec. 30, 2012, in Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital, surrounded by
his family.
Born on April 24, 1928, in the
Old Boston Section of Jenkins
Township, he was a son of the
late Harry and Matilda Yayo
Casterline.
He attended Jenkins Township
schools. He was a self-employed
trucking contractor and owner,
along with his son, of Casterline
Trucking Co. He was a member
of St. Barbara’s Parish, Exeter.
He was a mason, a member of
the George M.
Dallas Lodge
531.
In addition to
his parents, he
was preceded
in death by his
wife, Anna Marie Kostisock
Casterline, in 2011; a grand-
daughter, Jennifer Casterline;
and a brother, David Carpenter.
Surviving are son, Ronald
Casterline, and his wife, Rae
Ann; daughter, Joyce, and her
husband, Cleon Boyer, all of
Exeter; five grandchildren; nine
great-grandchildren; three sis-
ters, Louise Benfante, Minneso-
ta; Ruth DeAntonio, Carbon-
dale; Ida Rossi and her husband,
Guy, Old Boston; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were Friday,
Jan. 4, 2013, from the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
William St., Pittston, with a
Mass of Christian burial in St.
Barbara’s Parish, Memorial Ave-
nue, Exeter. Interment followed
in St. John the Baptist Cemetery,
Schooley Avenue, Exeter.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Edward P. Casterline
December 30, 2012
Reverend Harry Joseph Le-
wis, pastor emeritus of St.
Therese’s Church, Wilkes-
Barre, and a resident at Little
Flower Manor, Wilkes-Barre,
died on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, at
101 years of age.
Father Lewis, son of the late
Daniel W. and Bridget Ann
Callahan Lewis, was born in
Miners Mills on Sept. 19, 1911.
He was a graduate of Sacred
Heart High School, Plains
Township, and completed his
undergraduate studies ineduca-
tionat St. Thomas College, now
the University of Scranton, re-
ceiving his B.A. in June 1936.
He entered the military ser-
vice in April 1942, serving with
the Sixth Armored Division,
Third Army, in Europe from
Feb. 1944 until Oct. 1945. In
1944 the division landed in En-
gland and later in France. At
this time, the future priest was
assigned to Gen. George Pat-
ton’s Third Army, with the divi-
sion eventually meriting five
Battle Stars while inEurope. He
was in combat at the Battle of
the Bulge, the last major Nazi
offensive in World War II. After
his honorable discharge from
the service with the rank of cor-
poral technical, he entered
Mount St. Mary’s Seminary,
Emmitsburg, Md., where he
completed his studies for the
priesthood. Father Lewis was
ordained on June 3, 1950, in St.
Peter’s Cathedral, Scranton, by
the Most Rev. WilliamJ. Hafey,
D.D., late Bishop of Scranton.
Father Lewis served as an as-
sistant pastor at St. Therese’s,
Shavertown; St. Andrew’s,
Blossburg; St. Francis of Assisi,
West Hazleton; St. Patrick’s,
Scranton, and as administrator
of St. Charles, Sugar Notch. He
was named founding pastor of
St. Maria Goretti parish in La-
flin on Sept. 14, 1967. He then
served as pastor of St. Therese’s
Church in Wilkes-Barre, where
he is credited with restoring the
church after the devastating
flood caused by Hurricane
Agnes in1972. Father remained
at St. Therese, serving for 17
years until his retirement and
appointment as pastor emeritus
on Sept. 9, 1987.
Father Lewis celebrated his
100th birthday
in 2011 with a
special Mass
celebrated by
Bishop Jo-
seph C. Bam-
bera, D.D.,
J.C.L. He was described by his
parishioners as exhibiting “a
joyful presence, kind demeanor
and humble, faithful ways.”
Bishop Bambera told Father
Lewis his greatest blessings
over the years were “all the
blessing that you have given
away.” The parishioners told
Bishop Bambera how Father
Lewis was “there for them, not
only to rebuild the church after
Agnes but to help them rebuild
their lives.”
After his retirement, Father
Lewis remainedinactive minis-
try helping at various parishes
in the diocese. He was a charter
member and the spiritual advi-
sor for the Wyoming Valley
Chapter of Pennsylvanians for
Human Life. Before they were
able to open the Pro-Life Cen-
ter, Father Lewis invitedthemto
use St. Therese’s Church Hall
for their meetings and attended
the bus trip to the “March for
Life” each year.
Hewas precededindeathbya
sister, Sister Irma Lewis,
R.S.M., andthree brothers, Rev.
Raymond P. Lewis, C.M., Fran-
cis Lewis and John L. Lewis
Father Lewis was one of eight
children, three of whomentered
religious life. He is survived by
one brother, Daniel Lewis,
Ph.D., Pittsburgh, and two sis-
ters, Kathleen Kutish, Forty
Fort, and Jane Lloyd, Harris-
burg, and several nieces and ne-
phews.
Vigil Mass was celebrated at
Villa Saint Joseph on Friday,
Jan. 4, withtheMost Rev. James
C. Timlin, D.D., Bishop Emer-
itus of Scranton, presiding.
A Pontifical Mass of Chris-
tian Burial was celebrated by
the Most Rev. Joseph C. Bam-
bera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of
Scranton, on Saturday, Jan. 5,
2013 in St. Peter’s Cathedral,
Scranton. Interment was in St.
Catherine’s Cemetery, Moscow.
Funeral arrangements pro-
vided by the Frank M. Regan
Funeral Home, Scranton.
Reverend Harry Joseph Lewis
January 1, 2013 S
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OBITUARIES
Regina H. “Jeanie” Dean of
Port Griffith, Jenkins Town-
ship, passed away on Saturday,
Dec. 29, 2012 at Smith Health
Care Ltd., Mountain Top.
She is survived by her be-
loved husband of 52 years,
John S. Dean.
Born in Port Griffith, she
was a daughter of the late John
and Helen Levandoski Mon-
dlak. She was a graduate of
Jenkins Township High School,
College Misericordia with a de-
gree in Business Administra-
tion and earned a master’s cer-
tificate from Temple University
in Vocational Education. She
retired from public school
teaching as the business depart-
ment chairperson of the Pitt-
ston Area School District. She
also taught at Wyoming High
School, Northeast High School
and was a member of the
American Federation of Teach-
ers. Some of her many accom-
plishments included receiving a
certificate of merit from New
York Governor Nelson Rocke-
feller for her work in teaching
migrant work-
ers basic En-
glish in Rome,
New York.
Jeanie was
also a partner
for 22 years in
the family business, John
Dean’s Auto Sales and Service
in Port Blanchard. She had also
worked in the business office
of GMAC. Additionally, Jeanie
served as secretary/treasurer of
Jenkins Township American
Legion Post 938 and was a
member of the Legion Auxilia-
ry. She served as church audi-
tor of St. Joseph’s parish in Port
Griffith during Fr. Walter Skur-
ski’s tenure. For 26 years, Jea-
nie was the Democratic com-
mittee woman for the 4th Dis-
trict of Jenkins Township.
Surviving, in addition to her
husband, are her children, atty.
Jack Dean and his wife, Dr.
Lisa Dean, of Mountain Top;
Dr. James Dean and his partner,
Dr. Joseph Montella, of Phila-
delphia; granddaughters, Taylor
and Noah Dean, and grandson,
Matthew John Dean of Moun-
tain Top; brother, Jerry Mon-
dlak, and his wife, Ellen Mon-
dlak, of Port Griffith; nephew,
atty. John Mondlak and his
wife, atty. Michele Mondlak, of
Philadelphia; niece, Susan
Fenske of Kingston Township,
and numerous cousins.
In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by
her grandson, John Matthew
Dean, and her godson/nephew,
Dr. Jerry Mondlak.
The family wishes to send
special thanks to the staff at
Smith Health Care, Ltd. in
Mountain Top and visiting an-
gel, Hazel Shelhamer.
The funeral was held Thurs-
day, Jan. 3, 2013, from Baloga
Funeral Home Inc., 1201 Main
Street, Pittston (Port Griffith),
with a Mass of Christian Burial
at St John the Evangelist
Church, William Street, Pitt-
ston. Interment was in Mount
Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
To send an online condo-
lence, please visit www.Baloga-
FuneralHome.com.
Jeanie Dean
December 29, 2012
Dorothy Drugan, 90, of S.
Grant St., Wilkes-Barre, passed
away Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, at
Mercy Center in Dallas.
Born Feb. 11, 1922, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the
late James and Hattie Drugan.
Dorothy was very civic-mind-
ed and took great interest in the
community. She was an organiz-
er of the Heights Little League
and served as secretary for 12
years, and also organized the
Grant Street School and Home
League, serving as its first presi-
dent. She served as city chair-
person of numerous heart and
cancer fundraising efforts.
Dorothy was active in local
politics and served as chairper-
son of the Wilkes-Barre City
Democratic Committee, chair-
person of the Sixth Legislative
District Democratic Committee
and vice chairperson of the Lu-
zerne County Democratic Com-
mittee. She
was a Demo-
cratic commit-
teewoman in
the Sixth Ward
for 54 years.
Dorothy was
preceded in death by her hus-
band, Joseph A. Drugan; daugh-
ter Aileen Miller; son, Joseph A.
Drugan Jr.; sisters, Mary
Adams, Nellie Hall, Margaret
McGlynn and Loretta Gattuso;
and brothers, Michael, George,
William and Edward Bryce.
She will be greatly missed by
her daughter Kathleen and her
husband, Harry Vogt, Bear
Creek Village; grandchildren,
Joseph Drugan III and Kaelie
Drugan, Va.; Harry Vogt III of
Ark.; Eric Vogt, Mountain Top;
Aileen Taylor, Bear Creek Vil-
lage; Cathie Mault, Philadel-
phia; Lauren Miller, Plains
Twp.; Kristen Martinelli, Du-
pont, and Amy Yenason, Dallas;
great-grandchildren, Evan, Ar-
den and Ryan Taylor, Bear
Creek; Eric Jr., Julia and Justin
Vogt, Mountain Top; Madison
and Connor Vogt, Ark.; Nola
and Desmond Mault, Philadel-
phia; Timmy Moore, Plains
Twp.; Aileen Overman and
Gianna Martinelli, Dupont, and
Isabelle Albert, Bear Creek.
Celebration of Dorothy’s
Life was held Friday, Jan. 4,
2013, from McLaughlin’s – The
Family Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with Funeral Mass in the Church
of St. Mary of the Immaculate
Conception. Interment was in
St. Mary’s Cemetery in Hanover
Township.
Permanent messages and me-
mories can be shared with Do-
rothy’s family at www.celebrate-
herlife.com.
Dorothy Drugan
January 1, 2013
Nancy Lee Thomas Newell,
68, of Harveys Lake, passed
away Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013,
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal.
She was born in Kingston,
daughter of the late Evan (Yant)
and Victoria Wallace Thomas
and was a graduate of Edwards-
villeHighSchool, Class of1961.
Nancy was in the custodial
department with the Lake-Leh-
man School District, retiring in
2004. She was a member of The
Ladies Auxiliary of Columbia
Hose Company #3, Edwards-
ville, and a member of Bethesda
Congregational Church, Ed-
wardsville. She sang in the
church choir and helped in
many church projects.
Nancy was preceded in death
by a brother, Ronald Thomas, in
2010. Sheis survivedbyher hus-
band, Edward, Harveys Lake;
daughters, Beth Ann Smith,
Myersville, Pa.; Leslie Newell,
Harveys Lake; sisters, Betty
Lamoraux, Edwardsville; Vicki
Davenport, West Wyoming;
granddaughters, Bethany John-
son, Courtney Stash, Maurisa
Hallock, Dezare Dunbar, Ma-
riah Mitchell;
grandsons,
Matthew
Mitchell,
Luke Smith
and Logan
Smith; great-
grandsons, Tyler, Taylor, Chase,
Caleb Johnson, Brayden Popp,
and Larry Hallock III; great-
granddaughters, Hannah John-
son, Alexis Popp; along with
numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, at 11 a.m.
from Bethesda Congregational
Church, Edwardsville, with the
Rev. Edward Gospodinsky, pas-
tor, officiating. Friends may call
at the church Monday, Jan. 7,
2013, from5to7p.m. Interment
will be in Chapel Lawn Memo-
rial Park, Dallas.
Donations, if desired, may be
made to the Bethesda Congre-
gational Church, 37 Zerby Ave.,
Edwardsville, PA18704, or to a
charity of the donor’s choice.
Arrangements are being con-
ductedbytheRichardH. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Me-
morial Highway, Dallas.
Nancy Lee Thomas Newell
January 2, 2013
Virginia T. Foglia, 83, of
Long Beach and Palm
Springs, Ca., passed away on
New Years Eve, Dec. 31,
2012 at her home in Long
Beach.Ca.
Surviving are her brothers,
Bernard and his wife Karen
Foglia, Exeter, and Richard
and his wife Dana Foglia,W-
est Pittston and Harveys
Lake. Funeral arrangements
are pending and will be an-
nounced at a later date from
the Gubbiotti Funeral Home,
1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter.
To send the family an ex-
pression of sympathy or an
online condolence, please
visit www.gubbiottifh.com
Virginia T. Foglia
December 31, 2012
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OBITUARIES
East Joseph Berti, affection-
ately known as Jibber, 92, a resi-
dent of Swoyersville, passed
away peacefully on Friday eve-
ning, Dec. 28, 2012, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital,
following a brief illness.
His beloved wife was the late
Tillie G. (Gallagher) Berti, who
passed away on Feb. 7, 2009. To-
gether, Joe and Tillie shared 63
years of marriage.
Born on June 3, 1920, in
Swoyersville, Joe was a son of
the late John and Eugenia
(Piere) Berti. He was the last
surviving child in his family of
10 children.
A lifelong resident of
Swoyersville, Joe received his
education at the former Dicks-
ville Grade School, Swoyers-
ville, and the former Swoyers-
ville High School.
A U.S. Army veteran, Joe
honorably served his country
during World War II. During his
time of service, Joe participated
in the campaigns of Normandy,
Northern France and the Rhine-
land. He was decorated with the
European-African-Middle East-
ern Service Medal with three
bronze stars, the American De-
fense Service Medal and the
Good Conduct Medal. Upon his
honorable discharge on Oct. 19,
1945, Joe had attained the rank
of tech sergeant.
Prior to his retirement in1988,
Joe was employed for 11years by
the Tenavision Corp. A plaster
man by trade, Joe was also em-
ployed by local contractors Stan-
ley Susek and Frank Coslett.
Joe was a faithful Catholic
and longtime
member of the
former Holy
Trinity Roman
Catholic
Church,
Swoyersville,
where he was a past member of
the parish’s Holy Name Society.
For many years, Joe was actively
involved with the parish’s annual
bazaar and was best known for
selling the “instant bingo” tick-
ets.
Following the consolidation
of his church in June, Joe be-
came a member of St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Parish, Swoyersville.
A proud veteran, Joe was one
of the original members of the
American Legion, AndrewLaw-
rence Post 644, Swoyersville.
Additionally, he a member of the
Italian-American Citizens Club,
Wilkes-Barre, and a charter
member of the Swoyersville Ki-
wanis Club. One of his favorite
things to do was going to exer-
cise at STAR Fitness in Ed-
wardsville, where had the op-
portunity to make many new
friends.
Joe was a loving and devoted
husband, a supportive father, a
proud grandfather and a gentle
great-grandfather. He will be
sadly missed but will always be
fondly and lovingly remembered
by all his family, friends and ac-
quaintances.
In addition to his parents, John
and Eugenia Berti and his wife,
Tillie, Joe was preceded in death
by his brothers, Norti Berti, Sy
(Sud) Berti, Kelly (Columbo)
Berti, Toib (Estofio) Berti, Al-
bert Berti and Lindy Berti; his
sisters, Americia (Mary) Vasta,
Columba (Connie) Tomascik
and Elizabeth Shendock.
Joe is survived by his four
children, Marie E. Kittle and
son-in-law Jim, Dallas, Texas;
Deborah Walsh and son-in-law
Joe, West Pittston; Corinne
Craig and son-in-law Michael,
Cedar Hill, Texas; Dale Berti,
Plano, Texas; his grandchildren,
Joseph Walsh, West Pittston;
Kyle Walsh, New York City;
Kelly Walsh Pacelli and her hus-
band, Frank, Wyoming; and
MatthewBerti, Plano, Texas; his
great-grandson, Frank Joseph
Pacelli; numerous nieces, neph-
ews and friends.
The funeral was conducted on
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, from the
Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc.,
1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort,
followed by a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Elizabeth Ann Set-
on Parish, 116 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville, with Joe’s dear
friend, the Rev. Richard J. Cirba,
officiating.
Interment with the Rite of
Committal followed in Holy
Trinity Roman Catholic Ceme-
tery, Swoyersville, where Mili-
tary Honors were accorded by
the U.S. Army.
To send the family an online
message of condolence, you
may visit the funeral home web-
site www.wroblewskifuneral-
home.com.
Memorial Contributions may
be made in Joe’s memory to St.
Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, 116
Hughes St., Swoyersville, PA
18704
East Joseph Berti
December 28, 2012
Robert W. Robbins, 94, of
Wyoming, passed away Tues-
day, Dec. 25, 2012 at St.
Luke’s Villa, Wilkes-Barre. He
was born in Pittston, son of the
late Sidney and Elizabeth She-
pard Robbins and was a gradu-
ate of Wyoming Area High
School. Robert was a plumber
with St. Frances Slocum Treat-
ment Plant, Wyoming. He is
survived by his wife, the for-
mer Doris May Luce, and a
daughter, Sandy, and her hus-
band, Anthony Yagloski, Hard-
ing; granddaughter, Kimberly,
and her husband, Bob Forrest,
Tunkhannock; grandsons, Tony
Yagloski, Harding, and Jeffrey
and his wife, Rachael Yaglos-
ki, Wyoming; two great-grand-
children, Kyle and Kaylee Ya-
gloski, Wyoming.
Funeral services were held
privately at the convenience of
the family. Arrangements are
being handled by The Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home Inc.,
2940 Memorial Highway, Dal-
las.
Robert W. Robbins
December 25, 2012
Ms. Mary Catherine Petro-
ziello, 65, of Raspberry Road,
Duryea, passed away Friday,
Dec. 28, 2012, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township.
She was born in Pittston.
She was the daughter of the
late Carl (Hoodsie) and Mary
Theresa Estock Petroziello.
She was a graduate of Pitt-
ston High School and Miser-
icordia University. Prior to her
retirement, she was employed
by Pittston Area High School.
She was a member of St.
John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston. She was currently
the Director of Religious
Education at St. John the
Evangelist Church, Pittston.
She also volunteered at the
Care and Concern Clinic,
Pittston.
She was proceeded in death
by her sister-in-law Deborah
Gilroy Petroziello.
Surviving are brother Brian
Petroziello and his wife, Ka-
ran, of Clayton, Ohio; nephew
Michael Petroziello and his
wife, Dawn; niece Kathleen
Petroziello; nephew Matthew
Petroziello; niece Melissa Pe-
troziello; great-niece, Ysabel
Hazyl White.
Funeral was held Friday,
Jan. 4, 2013, from the Ber-
nard J. Piontek Funeral Home
Inc., 204 Main St., Duryea,
with the Mass of Christian
Burial in St. John the Evange-
list Church, Pittston, with
Msgr. John Bendik officiat-
ing.
Interment was in Mt. Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
St. John the Evangelist
Church Religious Education
Fund or the Care and Con-
cern Clinic, both of Pittston.
To leave the family an on-
line condolence or for further
information, please visit
www.piontekfuneralhome-
.com.
Mary Catherine Petroziello
December 28, 2012
Grace C. Rowan Janosky,
97, of Pittston, died Mon-
day, Dec. 31, 2012, at Allied
Skilled Nursing Facility,
Scranton, surrounded by
her family.
Her husband was John J.
Janosky, who died Decem-
ber 1985.
Born in Pittston, daughter
of the late Patrick J. and
Mary McNulty Rowan, she
resided in Pittston, attended
St. John the Evangelist
School and was a member
of St. Casmir’s Church,
Pittston.
She worked for several
years at the Swanee Paper
Mill in Ransom.
Surviving are a daughter,
Eileen Brutico, Taylor; a
son, John P. Janosky, and
wife Ann Marie, Scott
Township; grandchildren,
Dr. Anthony J. Brutico and
wife Dr. Carla, Flanders,
N.J.; Michele Dooley and
husband Richard, Green-
f ield Township; Melanie Ja-
nosky, Eynon; and John F.
Janosky and wife Heather,
Greenf ield Township; eight
great-grandchildren.
She was also preceded in
death by a son, Neil; sisters,
Esther Roche and Mary Co-
limar and brothers, Francis
and Joseph Rowan.
The family would like to
thank the nurses and staff at
Allied Skilled Nursing Fa-
cility for their exceptional
compassion and care.
The funeral was private
with interment in St. Cas-
mir’s Cemetery, Pittston.
Funeral arrangements are
entrusted to the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home,
251 William St., Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadoni-
ziofuneralhome.com.
Grace C. Rowan Janosky
December 31, 2012 S
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OBITUARIES
John L. Just, 83, of Dupont
passed way Tuesday, January 1,
2013 in the Wilkes-Barre Veter-
ans Medical Center, Wilkes-
Barre.
Born in Dupont on April 5,
1929, he was the son of the late
Louis and Josephine Rubico
Just.
John was a graduate of Du-
pont High School, class of 1946.
He was a United States Army
veteran and served during
World War II. He continued his
education with a degree from
the University of Scranton in
1957 where he also excelled at
football.
John was a member of St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish, Pittston.
He was preceded in death by
his son, John
Just in 1993
and his wife,
Louise M. Just
in 2011.
Surviving
are his daugh-
ters, Denise Cross, Florida;
Cheryl and her husband John
Faulkner, Florida; Anna and her
husband, Joe Joyce, Hughes-
town; grandchildren, Lawrence
Cross; Christina Faulkner; John
Faulkner; Alexandra Faulkner;
Joe Joyce III; John Joyce; Brent
Joyce; Kahli Joyce and Aidan
Joyce; great grandchildren, An-
nabel Joyce; Joseph Anthony
Joyce; Adeline Joyce and Ava
Maria Cross; brother, Sam Just,
Florida; sisters-in-law, Pat Ar-
none, California and Janette
Jones, New Jersey; numerous
nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated on Thursday,
January 10, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in
St. Joseph Marello Parish, Wil-
liam Street, Pittston.
The family will receive
friends and relatives in the
church from 8:30 a.m. until the
time of mass in the church. In-
terment will be at the conve-
nience of the family. Funeral ar-
rangements are entrusted to the
Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William Street, Pitt-
ston.
Online condolences may be
made atwww.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com
John L. Just
January 1, 2013
Paul A. Weiss, 74, of West Pitt-
ston, passed away Monday eve-
ning, Dec. 31, 2012, in Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter, Plains Township.
BorninWest Pittston, he was a
son of the late Michael Weiss Sr.
andAnna Marie Kacsmar Weiss.
He was a graduate of Exeter
High School, Class of 1956. Pri-
or to his retirement he was em-
ployed as a supervisor for 24
years at Standard Coated Prod-
ucts, formerly Hughestown,
which later relocated to Hazle-
ton.
Preceding
him in death
was his brother
James P. Weiss.
Surviving is
his wife of 52
years, the for-
mer Charlotte J. Shive; son, Paul
Weiss, and his partner, Russell
Peltier, Bayou Sale, La.; daugh-
ter; Deborah Monelli, and her
husband, Leo, West Pittston;
grandchildren, Richard White
and Leo Monelli; sister; Ann L.
Ellis, andher husband, Bud, Exe-
ter; brothers Michael J. Weiss;
Thomas J. Weiss, West Pittston;
WilliamP. and his wife, Theresa,
Orange; nieces and nephews.
A Blessing service was held
Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, in the
Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funer-
al Home Inc. 504 Wyoming Ave.
Wyoming with the Rev. Leo
McKernan of St. Monica’s Par-
ish officiating. Interment was in
the Mount Olivet Cemetery,
Carverton.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions maybemadetothe
American Cancer Society 712 S.
Keyser Ave., Taylor, PA18517
Paul A. Weiss
December 31, 2012
Robert G. Helme, 50, of West
Pittston, passed away Friday,
Dec. 28, 2012 in Kingston Com-
mons surrounded by his family.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre
on Oct. 17, 1962, a son of John
and Jacqueline Foersch Helme
of West Pittston.
He was a graduate of West
Side Technical School, Pringle,
class of 1981. He had been em-
ployed at Thomson Consumer
Electronics, Dunmore, and re-
cently at Valley Tennis and
Swim Club in the maintenance
department.
Robert was
an avid Har-
ley-Davidson
motorcycle
owner and rid-
er. He also was
a Philadelphia
Eagles football fan.
He was preceded in death by a
nephew, John J. Helme III.
Surviving, in addition to his
parents, are sons, Robert Helme
and Ryan Helme, both of Hard-
ing; grandson, Doyle, andgrand-
daughter, Hanna; brothers, John
J. Helme II and his wife, Gigi,
Raleigh, N.C.; James Helme,
West Pittston; former wife,
Sandy Kusma, West Wyoming;
numerous nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013
in Corpus Christi Parish, Lu-
zerne Avenue, West Pittston. In-
terment followed in Mount Ol-
ivet Cemetery, Carverton. Ar-
rangements are by the Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home, 251
William Street, Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Robert G. Helme
December 28, 2012
Elizabeth Savino, 97, of
Wyoming, passed away peace-
fully at home, on Sunday, Dec.
30, 2012, with her daughter and
son-in-law, Florence and George
Bures, by her side.
Born in Tyler, she was a
daughter of the late Joseph and
Anne Celinski. She was a mem-
ber of St. Joseph’s Church of St.
Monica’s Parish, Wyoming.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Raymond A. Savi-
no Sr.; brothers, John, Walter
and Stanley; sisters, Bernice and
Stella.
Surviving are her daughter,
Florence Bures, and her hus-
band, George, with whomshe re-
sided; son, Raymond Savino Jr.,
Martinsburg, Pa.; eight grand-
children; several great-grand-
children and great-great-grand-
children; numerous nieces and
nephews.
The family
would like to
extend their
sincere appre-
ciation to Rev.
Leo McKer-
nan, Dr. Fariba
Modares, and the staff of Hos-
pice of the Sacred Heart and Sil-
ver Care, especially Michelle
Dente, for their great deal of
kindness, care and compassion
given to Elizabeth.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was on Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at
St. Joseph’s Church of St. Mon-
ica’s Parish, 97 E. Sixth St.,
Wyoming, with the Rev. Leo
McKernan officiating. Inter-
ment was in St. Michael’s Ceme-
tery, DuBois.
Funeral arrangements are by
Bednarski Funeral Home, 168
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming.
Elizabeth Savino
December 30, 2012
Paul Edward Duke, 83, of
Bayonet Point, passed away
on Dec. 12, 2012 while in
HPH Hospice Home Care.
He was born in Pittston, on
Jan. 15, 1929.
After serving in the U.S.
Army, 20th Infantry as a
Browning Automatic Rifle-
man, he attended the Univer-
sity of Scranton, University
of Detroit and graduated
from University of Michigan
with a BA in Sociology and
Economics.
Paul was employed by the
Social Security Administra-
tion for 33 years, and moved
to Florida in 1990.
He is survived by his wife
of 54 years, Joan; his daugh-
ter, Laura A. Jewell (Ken);
grandson, Matthew; siblings,
brother, James, sister, Sister
Jane Mary Duke IHM; and
aunt, Lenore Dickinson.
A Memorial Service was
held at Spirit of Grace Luth-
eran Church (Hudson) on
Friday, Jan. 4, 2013.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may be made
to Spirit of Grace Lutheran
Church Good Samaritan
Fund.www.PrevattFuneral-
Home.com
Paul Edward Duke
December 12, 2012
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SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
Schools ......................2, 3, 4
Birthdays............................3
Faith...............................5, 6
Classified......................7-12
S E C T I O N B
➛ S O C I A L
Hugh and Dorothy Corcoran, of Jenkins Township, celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary on Dec. 29, 2012. They were mar-
ried at St. Peter and Paul Church in Plains.
Mr. Corcoran is the son of the late Hugh and Marie Corcoran,
of Plains. He is a retired teacher from the Wilkes-Barre Area
School District where he served as an English teacher for over 35
years.
Mrs. Corcoran is the daughter of the late Anthony and Mary
Magdalinski, of Plains. She is a retired domestic engineer who
raised a family and maintained a household for over 48 years.
They have been blessed with three children, Marge Krueger
and her husband, Garett, Plains; Mary Doran and her husband,
Gary, Etters; Melissa Styczen and her husband, Alex, Plains.
Theyhave alsobeenblessedwithsixgrandchildrenwhoare the
center of their world, Kara and Kyle Krueger, Gary and Nikki
Doran and Sophie and Kolton Styczen.
To mark the occasion, a small family celebration took place at
Leggio’s Restaurant.
Hugh and Dorothy Corcoran
Note Golden Anniversary
Brianne Waldner and Joseph Maheady, together with their
families, announce their engagement and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Kenneth and Sharon Waldn-
er, of Washington, NewJersey. She is the granddaughter of Wer-
ner Waldner and the late Evelyn Waldner of Union, New Jersey;
and the late William and Lesia Schreck, of New Jersey.
The groom-to-be is the sonof Thomas andCatherine Maheady,
of Wyoming. He is the grandson of Josephine Yozwiak and the
late Joseph Yozwiak, of Wyoming; and Donald and Katherine
Maheady, of Kingston.
Miss Waldner is a 2005 graduate of Warren Hills Regional
High School in Washington, New Jersey. She graduated with a
Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology from the Pennsylva-
nia State University in 2009 and earned a Doctorate of Physical
Therapy degree in 2012 from Emory University in Atlanta, Ge-
orgia. She is employed as a physical therapist at Sinai Hospital in
Baltimore, Maryland.
Mr. Maheady is a 2005 graduate of Wyoming Area High
School. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in
Chemical Engineering fromthe Pennsylvania State University in
2009 and is currently working on a Master of Sciences degree in
Systems Engineering from Johns Hopkins University in Balti-
more, Maryland. He is employed as a chemical engineer at Aber-
deen Proving Grounds in Maryland.
The couple will exchange vows at St. Ann’s Church in Hamp-
ton, New Jersey on June 15, 2013.
Joseph Maheady and Brianne Waldner
Select June wedding date
HolyRosarySchool inDuryea
announces the following:
• Catholic Schools Week in-
formation
Holy Rosary School, along
with all Catholic Schools across
the nation, will celebrate our an-
nual Catholic Schools’ Week
from Jan. 27 to Feb. 1. Informa-
tion on the Opening Mass and
Open House, along with the oth-
er activities that celebrate the
Catholic faith, academics and
service, will be sent home within
the next few weeks.
• Registration
Holy Rosary is currently in the
process of registering students
for the 2013-2014 academic
school year. The deadline for all
re-registration materials is Jan.
23 and all materials must be re-
ceived for re-registration to be
complete. Registration will be-
gin for new students for grades
that are not yet filled on Sunday,
Jan. 27.
• Gift certificate news
Vouchers will be sold from 8
to10 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 10 in
the Holy Rosary Church base-
ment. Just a reminder: school
families may send in orders on
Wednesday to be filled on
Thursday.
• PTO meeting
There will be a PTO meeting
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, Jan. 8. Sixth-grade parents
are asked to bring refreshments
to the meeting.
• Recycling
In addition to cartridge recy-
cling HR also has cell phone re-
cycling. Select cell phones can
be dropped off in the same loca-
tion and recycled for credit. For
more information or for a list of
qualifying cartridges, visit
www.fundingfactory.com or
contact Mrs. Skutack at 457-
2553.
• Labels and box tops
Campbell’s Soup labels and
Box Tops for Education are be-
ing collected at Holy Rosary
School. These programs enable
HR to provide educational re-
sources that may be unaffordable
through the regular budget. They
offer merchandise like comput-
ers, software, sports equipment,
reference materials, science and
art items, even musical instru-
ments. Parents are asked to con-
tinue their support of these pro-
grams by sending in labels to the
school office or by placing them
in the church vestibule. If you
have any questions, please con-
tact the school’s office.
HOLY ROSARY NEWS
School, students ready for Catholic Schools Week
The Holy Rosary School Marketing and Publicity Committee, led by Principal Kathleen Gilmartin,
met throughout the fall to plan Holy Rosary School's upcoming Open House set for Sunday, Jan.
27. Fromleft, are Gilmartin, Erin Berlew, Joleen Lazecki, Joe Nealon, Donna Cole and Joanne Gor-
ski.
The YMCA in Pittston an-
nounces the following:
• New extended hours:
Monday through Thursday, 5
a.m. to10 p.m.; Friday, 5a.m. to 9
p.m.; Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 5
p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
•Free swim lessons for third-
graders
Children currently enrolled in
third grade can sign up for a free
session of swim lessons. Ses-
sions are held monthly and con-
sist of four lessons.
• Special needs family swim
time
The Pittston Yis committed to
making the lives of others better.
One way to do this is through the
Y’s free Special Needs Family
Swim Time from 5 to 6 p.m. on
Fridays. The pool is open for
families with special needs child
(ren), members and non-mem-
bers of the Y.
•Special Needs Family Night
at the Y
• The Greater Pittston Y will
host a Family Night for families
who have special needs children.
For $10 per family, the YMCA
will open the pool, gymnasium
and provide everyone with pizza
and drinks and time to socialize.
This event is open to members
and non-members.
Family Nights will take place
the first Friday of the month. The
first Family Night will be Feb. 4.
• Guest passes
Members will have an addi-
tional 12 guest passes to use over
the year, bringing your total
guest passes to 24.
• Family swims
Eachweekthe Greater Pittston
YMCA pool is reserved for
those with family memberships.
Take this time to spend togeth-
er from 6 to 8 p.m. on Fridays
and from 2:30 to 3:30 on Satur-
days and Sundays.
• Parents Night Out
Enjoy a free Parents Night Out
once a month.
Free for family members and
$10 per child for youth members
or non-members.
Extended hours, special events at YMCA
Misericordia University an-
nounced the dean’s list for the
fall 2012 semester. A student at
Misericordia University quali-
fies for the dean’s list with a
3.55 grade point average or
higher.
Students from the Greater
Pittston area named to the
dean’s list are:
Stephanie Allen, West Pitt-
ston; Joseph Ardo, Hughes-
town; Jessica Armillay, Old
Forge; Jillian Balberchak, West
Pittston; Bethany Baranski,
Moosic; Matthew Berlew, Pitt-
ston; Sean Bieski, Forty Fort;
Julia Boyd, Laflin; Angela
Brennan, Old Forge; Maria
Brogna, Pittston; Terri Bugel-
holl, West Pittston; Tamara
Chesneak, Duryea; Sarah
Church, West Wyoming; Mi-
chael Cislo, Duryea; Bridget
Clarke, Pittston; Jaime Cola-
russo, Exeter.
Also, Andria Dalley, Forty
Fort; Lori Dantone, Pittston;
Brian Delaney, Yatesville; Ro-
semarie Delucca, West Pittston;
David Dorbad, Exeter; Shae-
lynn Dragon, Inkerman; Chris-
topher Evans, Exeter; Danielle
Fereck, Pittston; Marisa Feren-
chick, Duryea; Dennis Ferretti,
Exeter; Kristi Gabriele, Plains;
Katlyn Gabriele, Plains; Mar-
ley Gozick, Plains; Anthony
Grasso, Old Forge; Andrew
Gromelski, Duryea; Elizabeth
Gromelski, Duryea; Bridget
Guarnieri, Pittston.
Also, Robert Hallock, Tay-
lor; Morgan Harding, Exeter;
Kearston Healey, Avoca; Kris-
tine Hilstolsky, Wyoming;
Maggie Hoskins, Plains; Eileen
Houghtlin, Duryea; Kristen
Kabacinski, Duryea; Josh
Krall, West Pittston; Kristen
Kucharski, Duryea; Katie Ku-
gler, Wyoming; Ann Lavelle,
Avoca; Alexander Lebiak, Tay-
lor; Heather Marsico, Duryea;
Chelse Martin, Exeter; Travis
Mcroy, West Wyoming; Victo-
ria Mihal, Wyoming; Brianna
Mikolaichik, Exeter; Kevin
Miller, Pittston; Abbey Mitch-
ell, Hughestown; Nick Mor-
reale, Pittston Twp.
Also, Sarah Nowalis, Forty
Fort; Melinda Orkwis, Duryea;
Kara Pawloski, Plains; Maura
Pellegrini, Pittston Twp.; Vin-
cent Pepe, Exeter; Amanda Per-
lock, Pittston; Stacey Perrins,
Dupont; James Ranieli, West
Wyoming; Cristy Rathbun,
West Pittston; Nicholas Rem-
sky, Pittston.
Also, Leah Santucci, Laflin;
Jennifer Sciandra, Harding;
Joyce Sciandra, Pittston; Gayle
Sekel, Harding; Justin Shules-
ki, Duryea; Lauren Smicherko,
Old Forge; Sarah Solano, Hard-
ing; Tia Spagnuolo, Wyoming;
Leo Sperrazza, Pittston; Desir-
ee Spindler, Pittston; Samantha
Stanton, Old Forge; Molly
Stone, West Wyoming; Lindsay
Sutkowski, Pittston; Nicholas
Svab, Laflin.
Also, Mary Thole, Laflin;
Alyssa Timinski, Harding;
Kayla Turonis, Pittston; Megan
Velehoski, Duryea; Sean Vi-
tale, West Pittston; Caitlin Vi-
tale, West Pittston; Kimberly
Walsh, Laflin; Caitlynn Wat-
kins, Pittston; Kyle White,
Hughestown; Eric Yashinski,
Pittston; Stephen Young, Pitt-
ston; Jessica Zaborny, Exeter;
Emily Zielinski, Dupont; and
Bradley Zurla, Wyoming.
MI SERI CORDI A UNI VERSTI Y
MU unveils
dean’s list
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
Trumpetsoloist Nick Granteed
gets ready to perform.
Sarai Sabatelli with a big smile. Trumpet soloist Joe Buczynski
acknowledges applause.
Theresa Mitten smiles between
songs.
Alto sax soloist Greg Cajka
performs.
Julia Patts plays during "God
Rest Ye Merry Mallet."
Holiday notes at Wyoming Area
Santa hats, green bow ties and red antlers add to festive annual holiday concert
KIP ALDER PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Akira Condry shows holiday spirit with a pair of antlers
Miranda Jones and Laura Sachaczenski.
Director Joyce Becker plays oboe with the band.
Director Joyce Becker bows with the band. The band gives director Shea Riley flowers after the concert.
Kaleigh Shission and Alyssa Vikara play the clarinet.
Directors Joyce Becker and Shea Riley congratulate one another.
Angela Fanelli plays the flute.
Allison Houck and Amdis Felker play the clarinet.
TomRose and Ray Hopkins play the tenor sax.
Meghan Mahle tunes a timpani drum.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 3B
➛ B I R T H D A Y S , S C H O O L S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Liliana Catherine
Hintze, daughter of Scott
and Alicia Hintze, of
Hughestown, will cele-
brate her fifth birthday on
Jan. 7.
She is the granddaught-
er of Donna Kutchkus
and the late George
Kutchkus, of Hughes-
town; and WilliamHintze
and the late Catherine
Hintze, of Pittston.
Liliana has a sister,
Cassandra.
Liliana Hintze
Shane Pepe, son of Jeff
and Kelly Pepe, celebrat-
ed his fifth birthday on
Jan 4.
He is the grandson of
Dave and Patti Pepe and
Peggy Morgantini, West
Pittston; and Lou Mor-
gantini, West Wyoming.
He is the great-grandson
of John Stefanelli, West
Pittston.
Shane attends pre-
school at the Apple Tree
Nursery School. He has a
brother, Jaden, 8; and a
sister, Malina, 2.
Shane Pepe
Lilly Nevaeh Spathelf,
daughter of Robert Jr. and
Ellen Spathelf, of Du-
ryea, celebrated her fifth
birthday on Friday, Jan 4.
She is the granddaughter
of Robert Sr. and Joyce
Spathelf, of Scranton;
and the late Louis and
Eleanor Mancini, of Du-
ryea. Lilly attends Cookie
Corner in Wyoming,
practices ballet and jazz
at MYCSchool of Dance,
Moosic, bowls in the pee-
wee league at Modern
Lanes in Exeter and plays
t-ball for the Dupont Lit-
tle League.
Lilly Spathelf
District News
• January Act 80 Day/Martin
Luther King Jr.’s Birthday
Friday, Jan. 18, is an Act 80
Day.
District students will be dis-
missed according to the follow-
ing schedule:
High School – 12:30 p.m.
Middle School – 1 p.m.
Intermediate, Primary, &Kin-
dergarten Centers – 1:30 p.m.
The Pittston Area School Dis-
trict will then be closed on Mon-
day, Jan. 21, in observance of
Martin Luther King Jr.’s birth-
day.
District schools will reopen on
Tuesday, Jan. 22, according to
the regular schedule.
• Parenting with Pizzazz!
On Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 6:30
p.m., Linda Burns will share sto-
ries, insights and strategies to
help you be the best parent you
can be.
Parents can learn how to iden-
tify their child’s learning styles,
create a literacy rich environ-
ment at home, nurture communi-
cation and language skills, as
well as develop their child’s cru-
cial thinking skills.
This program will be held for
students and parents in grades
K-5 at the Primary Center, locat-
ed at 210 Rock St.
Snowdate is Thursday, Jan. 10.
Middle School News:
• Math Club / MATH-
COUNTS
There will be a very important
meeting of the Math Club on
Tuesday, Jan. 8, from3-3:45p.m.
in room 243 with Dr. Keska.
The In-school MATH-
COUNTS competition will be
given at this meeting, and all
members MUST attend in order
to be considered for placement
on the Middle School MATH-
COUNTS team.
The local MATHCOUNTS
Competition will be held in Feb-
ruary.
Students must provide their
own transportation home, and
rides must be at the front of the
middle school no later than 3:45
p.m.
• Spelling Bee Practice
The next practice for the spell-
ingbee will be heldMonday, Jan.
7 after school in Mrs. Brady’s
room. Students are responsible
for their own transportation
home.
Please see Mrs. Brady or Mrs.
Noone if you are unable to at-
tend.
The in-school spelling bee
will be held on Monday, Jan. 28.
• Science Olympiad
There will be a Science Olym-
piad meeting Thursday, Jan. 3 af-
ter school from3-4 p.m. in room
145 with Ms. Quinn.
Students are responsible for
their own transportation home,
and all rides must be in front of
the middle school no later than 4
p.m.
Please note this meeting is for
members of the Science Olym-
piadonlyandnot members of the
Science Club.
• Builder’s Club
The next meeting of the Build-
er’s Club will be held on Tues-
day, Jan. 8, after school in room
206 with Ms. Donahue and Mrs.
Martin. Students are responsible
for their own transportation
home.
Kindergarten Center
In the days leading up to the
Holiday Break, the students in
the Ben Franklin Kindergarten
Center were very busy.
On Tuesday, Dec. 18, the Pitt-
ston Area PTO, sponsored a
Breakfast with Santa.
Each child received pancakes,
sausage, juice and milk. While
they ate, Santa made a special
appearance andvisitedwitheach
table of students.
After breakfast, each student
had the opportunity to have their
picture taken with Santa and he
gave thema Patriots Magnet as a
gift.
The cafeteria was decorated
beautifully and the students
looked great wearing Santa/Elf
hats given to themby their teach-
ers.
On Wednesday, Dec. 19, the
students of the Kindergarten
Center had their annual Polar
Express day!
The students, teachers and
staff came to school dressed in
their favorite pajamas and each
classroom watched the movie
The Polar Express using the
classroom SMART boards.
The teachers treated their stu-
dents to special snacks of hot co-
coa, chocolate milk, cookies,
and marshmallows.
In the afternoon of Thursday,
Dec. 20, the classrooms were all
abuzz with Holiday Spirit as the
students had their Holiday par-
ties.
Treats, snacks and drinks were
provided by the families of the
students.
The students listened to holi-
daymusic andplayedgames. Ev-
eryone had a great time.
PI TTSTON AREA NEWS
Time off for Act 80, MLK Day
Primary Center students use math, reading skills to make snacks
Students in Miss Vitek's, Mrs. Richard's and Mrs. Ferentino's
classes at the Pittston Area Primary Center made magical rein-
deer food. Students used reading and math skills to estimate,
predict, measure and read a recipe. Above, making magical rein-
deer food are Mrs. Ferrentino, left, and Jaden Stoudt. At right,
Pittston Area Primary Center students who made magical rein-
deer food are, fromleft, Ashley Rivera, Samantha Thomas, Cadin
Rutkowski, Catelyn Feeney, Marissa Calogero, Isabella Krashnak,
Evan Ryder, Nicoda Dorsa and Alexis Heffley.
High School chorus performs at Primary Center
Members of the Pittston Area High School Chorus, under the direction of AdamE. Burdett, performed Christmas songs for the first
and second-grade students at the Pittston Area Primary Center. Fromleft, first row, are Chaz Sciandra, Jake Mills, Kyle Santee, Eden
Savoy, Cadin Rutkowski, Konnor Polt, Kelsey Williams, Evan Ryder, and Alyssa Ramirez. Second row, Tyra Winters, Teagan Norconk,
Josiah Smith, Jamie Lee Rezykowski, Jagger Shearer, Kyle Sarfine, Ryan Starr, A.J. Scalpi, Makaila Posluszny, Taylor Tharaldsen
and Connor Remsky. Third row, Alyssa Bukevicz, Elizabeth McDermott, Miranda Romanofski, Kiera Wells, Angelina Reed, Taylor
Roberts, Mrs. Janet Joyce. Fourth row, Mr. AdamE. Burdett, Mrs. Becky Burdett, Patrick Cadden, Kristen Santey, Lisa Karp, Lisa
Yeager, Steven Molinaro, Miss Noelle Imbrogno and Mrs. McAndrew, Primary Center principal.
Santa visits students in PA’s Kindergarten Center
On Tuesday December 18,
the Pittston Area PTO,
sponsored a Breakfast
with Santa. Each child
received pancakes, sau-
sage, juice and milk. While
they ate, Santa made a
special appearance and
visited with each table of
students. Pictured is Santa
stopping to talk to Ann
Mitchell, of Mrs. Luvenders
class, while other students
look on.
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ S C H O O L S
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Students from Wyoming
Area’s Tenth Street School
participated in a fundraiser to
benefit the American Red
Cross. The project was to
showsupport and provide re-
lief to those recovering from
Hurricane Sandy. Fourth,
fifth and sixth grade classes
participated. The sixth grad-
ers in Mrs. Michelle Har-
den’s homeroomcoordinated
the sale of Red Cross "But-
tons" that the children pur-
chased and then decorated.
These were hung in the hall
and on display during parent
conferences. The children
raised $300 in four-days. In
addition, another $225 was
collected from parent dona-
tions. Representatives from
the Wilkes-Barre chapter of
the Red Cross visited the
school to thank the students
for their efforts.
WYOMI NG AREA NEWS
Students help with Sandy relief
Tenth Street School students participate in fundraiser for the American Red Cross
Fourth graders fromWyoming Area's Tenth Street School participated in a fun-
draiser to benefit the American Red Cross.Pictured are first row, left to right:A-
manda Misson, Morgan Chedister, Lydia Pealer, Kyra Britzke, Brooke Evelock,
Raiden Dzoh, AdamWisnewski, Jacob Katulka, Nathan Winnick, Robert Carroll,
AdamFrederick. Second row: Steven Start, SamSupey, Sierra Smith, Grace
Ross, OliviaDobbs, Kristina Taddei, Grace Washney, Elle Bailey, Matthew Fauntle-
roy, Christian Esposito Third row: Nelson, Matthew Lewis, Cael Heck, Nelson,
Ashley Carter, Maria Amato, Lily Harden, Jenna Moore, Sydney Kruzska, Christi-
na Kosco, Michael, Stanczyk, Tyler Harden.
Coordinating sixth graders fromWyoming Area's Tenth Street School participated in a
fundraiser to benefit the American Red Cross. First row, left to right: Nick Wido, Tyler
Babinski, Abby Kolessar, Ayla Eckersley, Ethan Rash, Nicholas Rubino. Second row:
Olivia Chedister, Iliana McCloe, Kirsten Briggs, Connor Ardoline, Meghan Shulde,
Grace Jeffery, Colin Kwiatkowski. Back row: JoAnna Gunning, Jaimee Kupiec, Ilana
Cunningham, James Gashi, Jeremy Harman, Jorge Trilla, Shayne Lukasavage, Justin
Navedo. Absent: Matt Benton and Jared Laviska.
Fifth graders fromWyoming Area's Tenth Street School participated in a fundraiser to benefit the
American Red Cross. Pictured, first row, fromleft, are Grace Zurn, Gabrielle Andario, Sadie Knect,
Neal Wanko, Nick Belles, Skylar Brown, Emma Sands, Nicole Selinskie, Alyson Lynch, Samantha
Mazeroski, Vinnie Maltese. Back row: Hannah Novakowski, Riley Rusyn, Jade Nace, Breanna Mis-
son, Jack Dileo, Evan Freeman, Cassidy Orzel, Charlie Jackson, Mackenzie Nocchi, Jonathan
Greiner, Shyann Smith, Marissa Kovaleski, Brenna Johnson, Ryan Petrucci, John O'Brien, Dylan
Williams, Robert Semyon, Dante Bovani, Amarah Scott, Thomas Wycoski.
Sixth graders fromWyoming Area's Tenth Street School participated in a fundraiser to benefit the
American Red Cross . Front row, left to right: Peter Calimeres, WilliamFauntleroy, J.C. Gordon.
Second row: John Angelella, Zach Nossavage, Tierre Rhodes, Bret Bednarski, Matt Gilpin, Greg
McDade, Nathan Victor, Jaden Cordero, Daniel Wiedl, Andrew Janosky, Nicholas Perry. Back row:
Steven Bonomo, Jenna Chackan, Kayla Taddei, Abby Gober, Lauren Kelly, Aubrey Mytych, Aleah
Kranson, Kendall Williams, Marianne Chipeleski, Zoe Winnstaffer, Brandi Sorokin, Kylee Ritchie,
Amdis Felker, Kate Tomlinson.
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 5B
➛ R E L I G I O N
The Oblates of St. Joseph in
Laflin bid a fond farewell to the
seminary rector, Rev. Paul A.
McDonnell, OSJ, who has been
named temporary Administrator
of St. Joseph Marello Parish,
Granite Bay, CA.
Fr. Paul leav-
es this Thurs-
day, Jan. 10 and
will serve for
an indefinite
period of time
until more per-
manent deci-
sions are made
by the future
provincial superior of the USA
province. The appointment of
the new provincial superior by
the Oblate Superior General in
Rome is expected in a few
weeks.
Local Oblate fathers and their
parishioners wish Father Paul a
safe trip to the West coast and
many blessings in his priestly
ministry as he serves the people
of Granite Bay.
Bethel United Methodist
532Main St. Avoca
(570) 457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday – Worship Service -
11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected.
Mondays – Bible study – 6 p.m.
alternating each week with Brick
UM Church, Duryea.
1st Thursday of each month –
food give-away 4 to 6 p.m. for
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Brick United Methodist
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
(570)457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz
(570) 282-0104
Sunday Worship Service 9:45
a.m. Sunday School – 10:15 a.m.
during morning Worship Servic-
es for ages 3-12
Communion first Sunday of
each month – non perishable
food items will be collected.
Mondays – Bible study – 6
p.m. alternating each week with
Bethel UMChurch, Avoca; Mir-
acle of Awareness – coffee time
– 6 p.m. meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday – New beginnings
meeting 7 p.m. Third Thursday
of each month – United Metho-
dist Women – 6:30 p.m.
Christian and Missionary
Alliance
317 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Meals will resume on January
7 at the Breaking Bread Soup
Kitchen at the church.
Christ Community Clothes
Closet will be open Mondays
from 5- 6:30 p.m., Tuesday and
Thursdays from 3 to 5 p.m., and
Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m.
Gently used clothing can be
donated at any time by placing
the items in the clothing shed in
the church parking lot.
Both of these community ser-
vices are offered to the general
public free of charge.
For additional information or
details contact the church office
at 654-2500.
First Baptist Church
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
Praise Service/Children’s Sun-
day School, Adult/Teen Sunday
School immediately following
service.
Wednesday 7:15 p.m. Bible
Study
First Congregational UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Sunday, 11a.m. Morning Wor-
ship Service
The Rev. Gordon Wilson will
lead the service today.
First Presbyterian Church
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
United Methodist Church
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts. Pittston
Rev. Susan Hardman-Zimmer-
man
Sunday Worship Service 9:30
a.m.
Children’s Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursdays at
7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday unless told other-
wise
Websitewww.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340 leave mess-
age
Next Hoagie Sale is Tuesday,
Jan. 8.Choices are ham, salami
and cheese or turkey and cheese
with or without onion.
Price of hoagies are $4 each.
To place an order call 654-
3936 or 693-1572 by Sunday,
Jan. 6.
Ad Council meeting will be
held on Wednesday, Jan. 16 at 7
p.m.
All members are welcomed
and encouraged to attend.
First United Presbyterian
Church
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren 654-8121
The Sessionof the First United
Presbyterian Church of West
Pittston announces the following
schedule for the week of Jan. 6:
Sunday, Jan. 6: 10 a.m., Sun-
day School; 11 a.m., worship,
Holy Communion and ordina-
tion/installation of new officers;
12:05 p.m., choir rehearsal.
Tuesday, Jan. 8: 7 p.m., dea-
cons.
Wednesday, Jan. 9: 9 a.m.,
Morning Circle at the home of
Shirley Todd.
Thursday, Jan. 10: 7:30 p.m.,
Session.
Services are being held at St.
Cecilia’s Roman Catholic
Church on 1700 Wyoming Ave,
Exeter as we recover from the
flood of September 2011.
There is parking on Wyoming
Avenue and in the parking lot be-
hind the church.
First United Methodist
Church
West Pittston
Jan 6 – 10 a.m. Worship, Sun-
day School
Full Gospel Chapel
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.
Glendale Gospel Church
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township.
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
Harding Church
of Christ
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10 a.m. Sun-
day School and 11 a.m. Church
Service. Call 388-6534
Holy Mother of Sorrows PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Masses
8:00 a.m. Traditional Mass
9:00 a.m. School of Christian
Living (SOCL), Confirmation
Class, and Coffee Hour.
10:30 a.m. Traditional High
Mass
Daily Mass
9:00 a.m. Tuesday through
Saturday
4:45 p.m. Thursday Jan. 10,
First Holy Communion Class.
Home Blessing and Visitation
will be upon request or invitation
only.
You can sign up by calling the
rectory at 654-4262. or email
hmsc.pncc@verizon.net or fill
out a request formand drop it in-
to the box in the church’s vesti-
bule.
Or you can mail a request to
the rectory at 212 Wyoming
Ave., Dupont, PA18641.
The parish will be having an-
other Sermon, Soup and Sand-
wich event. It will be held on Ja-
nuary 12, Saturday at Holy
Mother of Sorrows at noon. Dr.
Jim Ploskonka will have a pre-
sentation "God & Finances" in
our church.
All are invited for this event
free of charge.
Independent Bible Church
328 Main Street, Duryea, PA
18642.
(570) 451-0346 Home/Office.
JLaCava@TheBibleChurch.org
Inkerman Presbyterian
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 9 a.m.
Langcliffe Presbyterian
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday Morning worship
11:15 am with Rev Joyce Warner
The Langcliffe Church is
handicap accessible. Nursery is
provided for children.
Moosic Alliance Church
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-
6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
Nativity Of Our Lord
Stephenson St., Duryea
SCHEDULE OF MASSES
• Sunday, Epiphany of the
Lord, Jan. 6:
8 a.m., Holy Rosary Church
9:30 a.m., Holy Rosary
Church
11 a.m., Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church
All CCD grades will return to
class on Sunday, Jan. 6, from
10:30-11:30 a.m. in Holy Rosary
School.
Oblates of St. Joseph
Highway 315, Laflin
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7 a.m. (Mon-
day – Friday) and on Saturday
mornings at 8 a.m. There are no
weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9 a.m. – noon and from 3 –
6 p.m.
Office hours are Monday –
Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., eve-
nings and weekends by appoint-
ment. Office phone number is
654-7542. Facebook:
www.Facebook.com/OBLATE-
SOFSTJOSEPH; Twitter: @Ob-
latesStJoseph
Every Wednesday evening
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. in
conjunction with the Novena to
St. Joseph &St. Joseph Marello.
Novena prayers and the blessing
of the first-class relic of St. Jo-
seph Marello, Founder of the
Oblates of Saint Joseph Congre-
gation, immediately follow the
Mass.
All are welcome toparticipate.
The Josephite-Marellian Laity
Association will hold their
monthly meeting on Wednesday,
Jan. 9, following the 7 p.m.
Mass/Novena to St. Joseph.
Plans will be made for the up-
coming feast of the Holy Spous-
es (Wed., Jan. 23).
Fr. McDonnell will speak to
the members before his depar-
ture the following day for CA.
New members are always most
welcome.
Feast of the Holy Spouses,
honoring the Blessed Virgin Ma-
ry & St. Joseph, will be held on
Wednesday evening, Jan. 23, at 7
p.m. in the seminary chapel.
Principal celebrant will be Most
Rev. James C. Timlin, D.D.,
Bishop Emeritus of Scranton.
Alight receptionwill followin
the seminary community room.
The public is invited to partici-
pate at the Mass and the recep-
tion, whichis beinghostedbythe
Josephite-Marellian Laity of the
PA province.
For more news and informa-
tion about the Oblates of Saint
Joseph locally and around the
world, go to www.oblates-stjo-
seph.com.
St Joseph Marello
William St., Pittston
HOLYNAMESOCIETYwill
meet on Monday, January 7, at 7
p.m. in the Parish Center. All
menandyoungmenof the Parish
are encouraged to attend.
Couples celebrating their 25th
or 50th year of marriage are in-
vited to participate in the Dio-
cese of Scranton’s Wedding An-
niversary Celebration scheduled
for June 16.
Eligible couples should give
their names and a February mail-
ing address to their pastor by
February 8. The Most Rev. Jo-
seph C. Bambera, D.D., J.C.L.,
Bishop of Scranton, will cele-
brate the 2:30 p.m. Mass on June
16inSt. Peter’s Cathedral, Scran-
ton, where couples will renew
their vows.
After Mass the Diocese will
host a reception for the couples
at the former Holy Cross High
School Building.
The parishis closingthe finan-
cial year of 2012. If you still have
Church envelopes for 2012,
please use them by January 13.
After this date all envelopes 2012
will be posted as a donation for
2013.
If you need your individual fi-
nancial statement for your tax
purposes call the Rectory 654-
6902 and it will be prepared for
you.
CHURCH ENVELOPES
2013 These envelopes come
through the mail every other
month. Thankyoufor your gene-
rosity and dedication to the
Church.
If you do not receive the enve-
lopes, please call the rectory
654-6902.
CHILDREN’S ENVELOPES
will be given to the children
when they come for classes. En-
velopes for teen-agers are avail-
able at the entrances of the
Church.
Please fill out the formlocated
on the table BEFORE taking a
set.
Religious Education classes
will resume on Wednesday, Ja-
nuary 9 for all the students, kin-
dergarten to grade 4. For the 5th
& 6th graders
Classes will resume on Sun-
day, January 6.
The weekend Mass schedule
is: onSaturday, Masses at 4and6
p.m. On Sunday, Masses at 8:00,
9:30 and 11:15 a.m. The Holy
Rosary is recited before all
Masses.
Any home-bound parishioner
who would like to receive the
Sacraments for Christmas, call
the Rectory at 654-6902 and a
priest will visit them.
The Mass Book for 2013 is
available accepting Mass Offer-
ings for the months of January
and February ONLY. Due to the
large number of families, offer-
ings are on a first come, first
serve basis by coming into the
office during the hours of 9 a.m.-
5 p.m. Contact the rectory at
654-6902 for more information.
The Volunteer Christmas par-
ty will be held on Friday, January
11 at 6:30 p.m. in the parish hall
for lectors/commentators, choir
members, Eucharistic Ministers,
ushers, Religious Education
teachers/aides, Festivals/Picnic
volunteers For reservations
please call the rectory 654-6902
before January 7.
Anyone who is having diffi-
culty coming to the altar to re-
ceive Holy Communion may sit
in the first pew. The Priest or the
Eucharistic Minister will come
to you.
Anyone interested in renting
the Parish Banquet Hall or Meet-
ing Room should call Christine
Silinskie, Hall Manager at 704-
8861 for details and/or a tour of
the facility.
Great for wedding receptions,
bridal showers, graduations, be-
reavements, seminars, birthday
parties, etc. Some 2013 dates are
still available.
Corpus Christi Parish
Immaculate Conception and
Holy Redeemer churches
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
Youth Choir
The Youth choir meets for
practice on Sundays at 5 p.m.
Our Lady of the Eucharist
535 N Main Street, Pittston
www.eucharist-pittston.org
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Daily Mass: 8 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
School of Religious Educa-
tion
Religious Education Classes,
grades 1-6 are held on Sunday
mornings from 9:30 to 10:30
a.m.
Classes in preparation for the
celebration of the Sacrament of
Confirmation are held on Sun-
day evenings from5 to 6:30 p.m.
Parents are reminded of their
obligation to see that children at-
tend weekly Religious Educa-
tion classes.
If you have any questions with
regard to the program, call Sister
Mary Ann at 654-0263.
All Religious Education
Classes resume this Sunday, Ja-
nuary 6.
Lucky number calendar
Letters have beenmailedtothe
sponsors of last year’s calendar
as well as to those who participa-
ted in the 23rd Annual Lucky
Number Calendar.
This is a major fundraiser for
the parish. Please be advised that
payments may be made in in-
stallments. If you would like and
are able to participate this year,
please fill out the formand place
it in the collection basket or call
the parish office.
Our Lady of the Eucharist Par-
ish Community will offer Little
Rock Scripture Study: Galatians
and Romans.
Galatians and Romans are piv-
otal for those seeking to under-
stand the faith and teaching of
the Apostle Paul. Galatians ad-
dresses Paul’s understanding of
Christian freedom and justifica-
tion by faith. Justification comes
through faith in Christ, who
achieved our salvation by his
sacrifice on the cross. Romans
addresses the universal reality of
sin in the world and the need for
salvation in Jesus Christ.
Paul examines the new life at-
tained in the Holy Spirit as God’s
gift and proclaims the mystery of
God’s plan to save Israel. The
study will be broken into two
programs, one for four weeks on
Galatians and then resuming in
the Spring with the section on
Romans.
BeginningTuesday, Jan. 8, and
continuing until Jan. 29, there
will be two sessions, one in the
morning from 8:30 a.m. until 10
a.m. and one in the evening from
7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Both pro-
grams will be held in the Parish
Hall. Father Thomas J. Maloney
will direct the program. In order
to be able to order the necessary
materials, call the parish office
(654-0263) or e-mailolepitt-
ston@gmail.comto register. The
program is open to all.
Night at the Races
The parish will be sponsoring
a Night at the Races on Saturday,
Feb. 9. Audra Casper and Cindy
Vough will serve as chairper-
sons.
The gates will open at 5:30
p.m. with post time at 6:30 p.m.
Dinner will be served. There will
be an organizational meeting for
volunteers on Thursday, Jan. 10,
at 7 p.m. in the parish hall.
All parishioners are invited.
More information will follow.
Children’s Offertory Enve-
lopes
The parish’s children have
been very faithful in their use of
Offertory Envelopes during this
past year.
The newChildren’s Envelopes
for 2013 are available for pickup
in the back of the Church.
OBLATE PRIEST WILL ADDRESS JOSEPH-MARILLIAN LAIETY WEDNESDAY EVENING
Father Paul departs Thursday
See FAITH 6B
Concert planned before Penguins game
The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins along with the Making A Difference Ministries will host a pre-
game concert at 6 p.m. March 2, featuring national recording Artist William Doney. The game, at the
Mohegan Sun Arena on Highland Park Boulevard in Wilkes-Barre Township, begins at 7 p.m. To
purchase tickets, which are limited, or form more information, please call Chris Sipsky (570) 970-
3607 or e-mail Chris at csipsky@wbspenguins.com. Cost for Red Zone is $23, Gold Zone is $21 and
Blue Zone is $18. All these tickets include a hat and food voucher for day of game, seats at the
game and concert and a chance to win prizes. You must buy a group-rate ticket to have a chance to
win. The Penguins will donate part of the ticket price to Making A Difference Ministries for future
events. Discounted tickets can't be purchased at the door for this event. Shown in the photo, from
left, are Chris Sipsky,a Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins Account Executive; Stephen L. Perillo
President of Making A Difference Ministries; and Jason Jarecki of the General Manger of Ice Rink
Facility with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins.
McDonnell
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
➛ C O M M U N I T Y
Liturgical Ministry Sched-
ule
The new schedule for January
13 through April 28, 2013 has
been mailed to all Liturgical
Ministers and will be posted on
the parish webpage.
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
This week’s mass schedule is:
Monday through Friday at 7
a.m., Saturday at 7:30 a.m. and 4
p.m. and Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and
10:30 a.m.
Calendars for parishioners
will be available in the church
lobby following all weekend
masses.
St. Barbara Parish
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday – Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
St. John the Evangelist
Parish Community
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston.
Knitting Ministry – Jan. 6
from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Altar and rosary Society meet-
ing will be held Jan. 7 at 1 p.m.
Refreshments will be served.
Tickets are available at the Par-
ish Center for Feb. 2013 lottery
tickets Monday through Friday 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. and in the vesti-
bule of the church.
Lottery tickets are $10 each.
Proceeds benefit the Holy Name
Society projects.
Return before Jan 31 in order
to register all tickets.
Baptismal Instruction Tues-
day, Feb 12
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, first come first serve.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet
celebrating its third anniversary
provides new and gently used
clothing. Hours are Wednesday
from 9 to 11:30 a.m. and 5 to 7
p.m.
Pediatric Health Clinic is open
on the first and third Thursday of
the month.
Registration is held in the Set-
on building from 4:30 to 5:30
p.m.
Bringchild’s immunizationre-
cords. All services are free.
St John’s Lutheran
7 Wood St., Pittston
570-655-2505, stjohnspitt-
ston@verizon.com
Pastor John Castellani
Organist Marcia Colleran
Acolyte Justin Peterson
Sunday Service 9:30 a.m.
First Quarter Portals of
Prayers are available in the rear
of the Church, while supplies are
available..
Bulletin and Votive candle
openings January 27. Please
leave a message for Doris if in-
terested.
Joe Mersincavage is trying to
get a Saturday blood drive to
come to St. Johns after the Holi-
days.
One of the stipulations is tosee
how many Church members and
other donors the church can get
to sign up before the Red Cross
will come down to the Church
and do a drive.
You can call the number listed
belowfor your name to be added
to our list or if you have any
questions for Joe he will get back
to you as soon as possible.
Facebook: wwwface-
book.com/StJohns Lutheran-
ChurchPittstonpa
Guests are welcomed to attend
and perhaps join this family, If
you have any questions, com-
ments or suggestions please call
655-2505 and leave your name
number and your message and a
member of the church will get
back to you and soon as possible.
St. John’s P.M. Church
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor Rev. Dale E. Pepper
570-780-9587
Sunday Service 10 a.m.
Bible Study every other
Thursday 6 p.m.
All are welcome.
St. Maria Goretti
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
Pastor: Monsignor Neil Van
Loon
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
CCD class will resume Janu-
ary 6, at 9:30 am.
· February 10 - CCD and Par-
ents Meeting for Reconciliation
9:30 a.m.
· March 5 & 7 - Practice for
Reconciliation at 7 p.m. in the
Church
· March 9 - Reconciliation will
take place at 11 a.m. in the
Church
· In case of bad weather, your
teachers will be informed and
they, in turn, will call you the
night before or the morning of
class.
Holy Redeemer high School
Grade 8 Placement/Scholar-
shipTest Result Night and Regis-
tration Night for incoming fresh-
men will be held on January 23
at 7 p.m. in the auditorium.
Appointments for class sched-
uling for new students for the
2013-2014 school year will be
held from February 4 to Febru-
ary 7 from3 to 6 p.m.. Call Holy
Redeemer High School’s Guid-
ance Department at 829-2424 to
set up and appointment.
Blood drive
The American Red Cross will
hold its annual Blood Drive on
Sunday, January 27, in the Parish
Center from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m.
Night at the races
Night at the Races will be held
at Holy Redeemer High School
on Saturday, February 2 with
dinner at 6 p.m. and post time at
7:15 p.m.
All guests must be 21 years of
age or older. Call Holy Redeem-
er High School at 829-2424 to
sponsor a race ($100), buy a
horse ($10).
St. Mary’s Polish National
Catholic Church
200 Stephenson St. Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor Phone: 457-2291
Email: padre@saintma-
ryspncc.org
Website: saintmaryspncc.org
Holy Mass: Sunday 9:30 a.m.
Weekdays: 8 a.m.
Holy Days: 8 a.m. & 7 p.m.
St. Monica’s Church
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. – Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
www.stmonicanepa.com.
Father Leo McKernan, Pastor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Serving the Catholic Commu-
nities of Wyoming/West Wyom-
ing
Regular Mass Schedule:
Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m. @
OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. @ STJ; 11
a.m. @ OLOS
New Daily Mass Schedule:
Daily Mass at OLOS – Tues,
Wed., Fri. – 7 a.m.
Mon. & Thurs. – 7 p.m.
Adoration of the Blessed Sac-
rament – Friday after morning
Mass until 11 a.m.
First Friday Adoration – after
7 p.m. Mass until Midnight.
Miraculous Medal Novena –
after Monday Evening Mass
Rosary and Chaplet of Divine
Mercy - Before Morning &Eve-
ning Masses at OLOS site.
Something New in the Year of
Faith: Beginning on Thursday,
January 10 until March 21 there
will be a time of prayer and
teaching held in the Church Hall
after the 7 p.m. Mass.
Each Thursday evening there
will be a Catechesis (instruction
be question & answer) on some
foundation aspects of the Chris-
tian Faith. All are welcome.
Sweepstake Winners An-
nounced: Congratulations and
thanks to all who purchased tick-
ets. 1st week: $50 – Phyllis Bella,
Linda Hyzenski, $100 – Diane
Jones, Ginger Menta, Dorothy
Kanarr. $1000 – Dorothy Matani
& Cynthia Sentigar. 2nd week:
$50 – Jerome Silvi, Mike Podwi-
ka, Rosalie Kazokas, B & G
Lawler, Donna Coles & Janet
Wasson. $100 – Mary Hronich &
Fred Matani. Two more weeks to
be announced.
Men’s Retreat: At Mount Sav-
ior Monastery the weekend of
Feb. 1-3.
The number attending is limit-
ed so anyone interested should
contact Father as soon as possi-
ble for all details. Information is
available from Fr. McKernan at
693-1991.
Monica Parish Web Site:
www.stmonicanepa.com. There
is a lot of information on the web
and it’s growing daily. Keep
posted on all the events of the
Parish. Recently added was Fa-
ther McKernan’s Pastoral letter
on the Year of Faith.
The Deacon’s Nook has also
been updated. Read the “Gift of
Faith”, an article by Bishop Wil-
liam E. Lori.
There is also a site to request
your own personal prayer re-
quests.
There are links to the follow-
ing: The Guild, JMJ Radio,
EWTN Global Catholic Net-
work and www.catholic.com.
“Like us” on Facebook.
Google St. Monica of NEPA.
St. Peter’s Evangelical
Lutheran Church
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
Sunday School 9 am
Worship service Sundays at 10
a.m.
Confirmation Classes Sun-
days at 9 a.m.
Jan. 13, at 10 a.m. Special ser-
vice which is the beginning of
the parish’s 150 Anniversary
Celebration.
Following the service a pot-
luck dinner.
If youplantoattendplease call
the church, leaving your name
and the number of people attend-
ing and what you will bring for
the pot-luck or there is a sheet in
the back of the church where you
can sign.
Queen of the Apostles Parish
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Daily Masses: 8 a.m.
(Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tues-
days from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and
11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
Prayer Chain: 457-5867
The Rev. Phil Sladicka will be
available to bless people’s homes
for the New Year.
Please call the parish office at
457-3412 to arrange for a conve-
nient time to have your home
blessed.
The parish has exposition of
the Blessed Sacrament and holy
hour prayers every Tuesday at St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St., following the 8 a.m. Mass.
Throughout the Year of Faith, the
chaplet of Divine Mercy will al-
so be prayed.
At 7:30 p.m. the rosary is
prayed before benediction and
reposing of the Blessed Sacra-
ment.
Anyone who can spend one
hour weekly at adoration on a
regular basis is asked to call Ann
Jake at 457-3521or the parish of-
fice.
Eucharistic Adoration will re-
sume on Jan. 8.
Second Presbyterian
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-1411
Trinity Episcopal Church
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: “To live and
build holy community.”
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion: ‘We believe
in one holy, Catholic apostolic
church.”
Web of information and links
at www.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.organdwww.dio-
beth.org.
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11
a.m. every Sunday.
Food Pantry: January items
needed are pasta and sauces, in-
stant oatmeal and cereals.
Gerrity’s gift cards, cash dona-
tions and other non-perishable
foods also accepted.
Prayer network. Open To Pub-
lic. Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port.
Start Prayer network at parish
office 654-3261.
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday. Weekday special
events andservice projects as an-
nounced.
Faith Forum for Adults: En-
richment for adults seeking spir-
itual renewal and opportunities
for ministry and volunteerism.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-
monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday.WOT Ministry Invita-
tion.
The Women of Trinity have
undertaken a ministry to help
support Good Shepherd Episco-
pal Church of Scranton in their
outreach to the homeless of the
region.
Each month after enjoying a
home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may “shop” for necessities like
clothing, shoes, and toiletries in
a store-like setting in the
church’s refurbished basement
of donated items.
The Woman of Trinity has
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOT will continue to collect
trial size and hotel toiletries and
invites the parish community to
join with themin helping the less
fortunate.
Donations of trial size and
sample size toiletries are wel-
come.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen.
All Day Rental $100.
Reservations at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Winter semester of Music To-
gether begins January 8.
or registration information
call 6543261.
Visitwww.musictogether-
.comfor information on Music
Together.
FAITH
Continued from page 5B
Chuck’s Auction Service held
its annual benefit tree project on
Dec. 14. Santa’s elves collected
donations for the purchase of the
tree during the last several sales
of the year. Chuck’s Friday Fam-
ilies gave generously to help
make the project a success. CEO
People Helping People and the
U.S. Marine Corp Toys for Tots
each received $4,100 to help
families with children in need
this holiday season. The Christ-
mas tree was given to a needy
family who would not otherwise
have had one. From left, first
row, are Jared Morris, Jacklyn
Scott, Audrey Beleski and Tyler
Atherholt representing Chuck’s
Friday Families. Second row,
Don “Santa” Gross, Dave Ritter,
CEO; Tom Parry, Charles Be-
leski, Lance Corporal Guiller-
moBenitez, Lance Corporal Le-
onard Moulton, U.S. Marine
Corp; and Linda Lewis of
Chuck’s Auction Service.
Auction service holds benefit tree project
The Luzerne County Community College Bookstore recently cel-
ebrated the second annual National Student Day. The day is dedi-
cated to celebrating and promoting social responsibility by college
students. The bookstore held a raffle to honor and applauded stu-
dents for their efforts throughout the year. Michelle Gitkos, of West
Pittston, was the raffle winner of a MachSpeedPro9Internet Tablet.
Fromleft, are Grace Garlan, Wilkes-Barre, clerk, LCCCBookstore;
Gitkos, and Cheryl Baur, Shavertown, director, LCCC Bookstore.
Gitkos wins LCCC
bookstore raffle
Wyoming Area Key Club will
host an all-night dance-a-thon
“Warrior Rave” in the Wyoming
Area gymnasium from 8 p.m. to
8 a.m. on January 26-27.
The event will benefit Eric
Speicher, an 8th grader at
Wyoming Area who has been di-
agnosed with a brain tumor
called, ependymoma.
This is a type of malignant
brain tumor that has reoccurred
requiring several surgeries and
continued treatments.
Net proceeds from the dance
marathon will go to Eric and his
family to help defray the cost of
medical treatments and other ex-
penses.
The “Warrior Rave” is open to
all Wyoming Area students in
grades 7 to12. Tickets will be on
sale during lunch periods – ad-
mission is $20, which includes a
T-shirt.
Rules must be signed by the
student and parents to attend.
To help with the cost of T-
shirts, refreshments, door prizes
etc. the Key Club is asking local
businesses to make donations to
this cause.
Any amount donated is wel-
come. All donors of $50 or more
will be listed on a donor board
displayed at the event. Donors of
$100 or more will be listed on the
back of the T-shirt given to every
event attendee.
If a donor gives $250 or more,
an hour of the event will be dedi-
cated to that specific business —
during that hour special recogni-
tion will be given to that busi-
President, at (570) 362-2619 or
emailing Wyoming Area Key
Club atwyomingareakey-
club@gmail.com.
In order for the shirts to be
completed in time for the event
donations must be received by
January11. Donations after Janu-
ary11will certainly be appreciat-
ed, but will not be able to have
names on the T-shirts.
ness.
Businesses or individuals who
wish to donate to this event can
send money to Wyoming Area
Key Club at Wyoming Area
High School, 20 Memorial
Street, Exeter PA 18643. Dona-
tions can also be picked up by
contactingKeyClubadvisor Juel
Anne Klepadlo, at (570) 430-
1470; Leo Skoronski, Key Club
Wyoming Area Key Club seeks sponsors for fundraiser
All-night dance-a-thon ‘Warrior Rave’ to benefit Eric Speicher, who has brain tumor
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 7B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y
Pittston Senior Center
2013 Membership renewals are now due.
Requested donation is $5. Members are
asked to update the center on any changes
they may have had since their last renewal.
New members are always welcome to come
aboard. For further information or questions
contact Connie Andrews, Center Director, at
655-5561.
Calling all bingo lovers. Beginning in Ja-
nuary, in addition to Tuesday and Friday
mornings from 9:30 to 11:30 bingo will also
be added to the schedule on Wednesday af-
ternoons from1to 3 p.m. Not a morning per-
son? Come for a fun afternoon of bingo.
On Tuesday, Jan. 8 the Pittston Library
Bookmobile will be at the center at 11:30
a.m. with a nice variety of books for mem-
bers to choose from.
On Thursday, Jan. 10, at 11:15 our guest
speaker will be fromGriswold Home Care to
talk about staying safe and warm in the cold
weather.
The Pittston Senior Center 2013 Mixed
Bowling League is nowforming. The league
will begin on Friday, Jan. 25, and continue
for 14 weeks. Cost of the bowling per week is
$7. This is a fun league and is open to any
senior 60 years of age or older. You do not
need to be an experienced bowler to join this
league. Bowling will take place at Elko
Lanes in Dupont and begin at 1p.m. To regis-
ter for this league contact Connie Andrews at
655-5561. A special meeting to set up the
teams and go over the rules will take place on
Friday, Jan. 18, at 1p.m. at the Senior Center.
Aspecial luncheon will take place at the end
of the season.
“Learn to Crochet” classes are held each
Monday at 10 a.m. with Katherine.
The following classes will resume for
2013:
Mondays – Line dance class with Sue at 10
a.m. & Polka Dance Group at 1 p.m. w/Ron
& Sharon
Tuesdays - Chair exercise at 11:15; Pitch
Group w/Tom at 1 p.m. & Zumba Gold w/
Anita at 2 p.m.
Wednesdays – Ceramic Classes at 10 a.m.
and 1 p.m. with Ann Pisano
Thursdays – Needlepoint Craft Class w/
Mary
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 9
a.m. Weight Resistance Classes with Ruth
and Catherine.
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors next meeting
will be on Tuesday Jan. 8, at 1p.m. in St. An-
thony Center, Exeter. Dues will be collected.
Host/hostesses are: Theresa Bekanich, Rose
Gunsior, Marie Mantione, Jane Mikolosko
and Marie Sperazza.
The club is open to all adults age 50 and
over, regardless of religious affiliation and
residence. Prospective members are invited
to attend a meeting and enjoy a friendly so-
cial afternoon with your peers.
Travel coordinator Johanna is accepting
reservations for a trip to Mount Airy Casino
on Wednesday January 9. Pickups in Exeter
and Pittston. You do not have to be a member
to come on these trips. Details can be ob-
tained from Johanna at 655-2720.
Falls Senior Center
The Falls Senior Center sponsored by the
Area Agency on Aging for Luzerne/Wyom-
ing counties invites anyone 60+ to the fol-
lowing activities:
Wed. Jan.9, at 10 a.m. Skin Care Clinic on
Maintaing Healthy Skin during all Seasons
by Patti Gregorio
Thurs. Jan.10 at 11:15 a.m. Free Blood
Pressure Screening by Susan Anderson from
Golden Living Center
Fri. Jan.11 at 1 p.m. there will be a singing
presentation by Ronnie Schoonover, com-
poser and singer of Country Gospel Music
Mon. Jan.14 at10 a.m. Falls Senior Center
Wii Bowling teamplays at Tunkhannock Se-
nior Center
Every Mon.& Fri. from 11 a.m. to 11:45
a.m. there will be body stretch exercises us-
ing weights and bands
Every Mon. at 1p.m. there will be crochet-
ing class from1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Every Wed. at 10 a.m. there will be walk-
ing (weather permitting)
The Center offers daily activities such as
Wii bowling, cards, scrabble and shuffle-
board
Anyone wishing to join us for a hot meal at
noon for a suggested donation of $2 should
RSVPto Twila at 388-2623 by12:30 p.m. the
day before.
Newmembers are always welcome. Mem-
bership for the year is a suggested donation
of $4
The Center is open from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Mon. thru Fri.
It is located on SR92
SENI ORS NEWS
Membership
dues due at
Pittston center
Family and
Consumer Sci-
ences students
fromRiverside
High School
recently paid a
visit tothe resi-
dents of Oak-
wood Terrace
memory care
community in
Moosic.
The students
“decked the
halls” and gar-
dens of the
community
and distributed
handmade
scarves to each
of the resi-
dents.
Riverside students visit Oakwood Terrace
Family and Consumer Sciences students fromRiverside High School who recently visited residents of Oakwood Terrace are, fromleft,
first row, Gustavo Valentin, Brittney Natale,Amanda Talipski, Mia Connell, Alyvia Ralston, SamTheriault BethanyTaylor. Second row, Sara
Maros, Carleen Ramirez, Lexi Scott,Katie Tisdel, Jess Reber, Hannah Miller, Emily Banks, Sammi Sulkowski. Third row, Gabby Furman,
Nadia Davies, Ana Davis, SelenaGonzalez, Steph Evans, Vanessa Grzyboski. Fourth row, Cookie Jackson, John Bannon, Carl Pugliese,
EdMartz, Kayla Siminski, Crystal Phillips, Andrew Sheridan. Fifth row, Brandon Copp, Ryan Abbott, Emily Reber,Danielle Powell, Bobby
Quinlan, Dave Coolbaugh, Matt Derenick,Casey Holman and Tyler Steele.
The Jacquelines, the ladies
auxiliary of the JFK Council
372 Knights of Columbus, re-
cently enjoyed its annual
Christmas party at the Coun-
cil home. Co-chairpersons for
the event were Jean Goham
andKathyMasulis. Entertain-
ment was provided by DJ Jim
Collins. From left, seated, are
Joan McFadden, president;
and Ann Nardone, corre-
sponding secretary. Standing,
Missy Dougherty, program
chairperson; Debbie Muros-
ky, vice president; Elaine De-
Marco, treasurer; Melanie
Murosky, recording secreta-
ry; and Jean Goham. Absent
at the time of the photo was
Kathy Masulis.
Jacquelines enjoy
Christmas party
Students at Humpty Dump-
ty Kollege welcomed the
Hughestown and Pittston Fire
Departments during Fire Pre-
vention Week. The firemen
gave a presentation on fire
safety and gave tours of their
fire engine. Students learned
about Stop Drop and Roll and
practiced what they should do
during a fire drill. Students in
the morning class are, from
left, kneeling, Ella Rosiak,
Marcus Collins, Abigail
Price, Camryn Karp, Chase
Krogulski. Second row, Mia
Shovlin, Giavonna Edwards,
R.J. Dolan, Finley Norconk,
Gain Feeney, Caden Boettger,
Emmy Norconk and Anthony
Lydon.
Humpty Dumpty students learn about fire prevention
Nicole VanLuvender, principal
of the Old Forge Elementary
School, announces December
Devil Pride Students.
The students were chosen based
on their recognition for outstand-
ing demonstrations of Devil
Pride. Pride stands for Prepared,
Respectful, Independent, De-
pendable and Example to others.
From left, first row, are Mi-
chael Samony, Grade 2; Nicholas
Novak, Grade 1; Ava Beviglia,
kindergarten; Second row, Sean
Donovan, Grade 4; Jessica Mu-
sick, Grade 5; Ryan Skoranski,
Grade 6; Mrs. VanLuvender.
OF Devil Pride
students named
Members of the Old Forge High
School Leo Club volunteered their
time at the Gino Merli Veterans Cen-
ter where they distributed Christmas
gifts and visited with residents. Stu-
dents assisted the Red Cross during
this event. From left, first row, are
Peyton Neishman, Hannah Shurtleff,
Anne Cherundulo, Kierstyn Brieg,
Lily Bilbao, Kayla Grasso and Erica
Stolan. Second row, Paul McCool,
Meredith Giglio, Taylor Nemetz,
Cameron Read, Gena Cadwalder,
Santa, Marissa Zambetti, Chelsea
Cadwalder, Bryonna Aldubayan,
Melanie Wylam and David Chromey.
Old Forge High’s Leo Club visits veterans
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 8
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The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
TRAVEL
Tues. &Wed., Jan. 8 & 9
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Taj Mahal!
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Affordable Prices
PA008322
PRESSURE WASHING
ADVANCED PRESSURE WASH SYSTEMS
We Clean Gutters, Inside and Out
Leaf Removal
Get black and green mold & moss removed
from your roof • Pressure Wash Homes
570-212-8390
Prompt Service
7 Days a Week
1-800-273-7130 for Local Pros
Kung Fu & Tai Chi FREE
Kung Fu is a face-paced workout geared
toward self-defense and Tai Chi is a slow-paced
workout for relaxation and stress relief.
• Do you need to Relieve Stress?
• Do you need better strength & flexibility?
• Do you need better balance & muscle tone?
• Does your child need more discipline?
• Does your child need more concentration?
• Does your child need to be more responsible?
Then Try: 2 Free Lessons
Rothrock’s Kung Fu &Tai Chi
Call: (570) 457-2591
See more at: rothrockskungfu.com
ROOFING
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
STORE MANAGER & SALES ASSOCIATES
We Offer A Great Benefts Package!!!!
Qualifes candidates can apply in person at our
Marshall Rousso Store in Mohegan Sun Casino, on-line at
www.marshallretailgroup.com
or fax your resume to 609-317-1126
EXCLUSIVE CASINO RESORT
RETAILER IS LOOKING FOR MRG
A PHENOMENAL
PLACETOWORK!
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of DORIS
H. CHARNEY, a/k/a
DORIS CHARENY,
late of the Borough
of Exeter, who died
October 15, 2012.
All persons indebted
to said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the
same,without delay,
to the Executrices,
K A T H L E E N A .
JAMES and JANICE
PHILLIPS and their
Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 N. Main Street
Pittston, PA 18640
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters of
Administration have
been granted in the
Estate of MARY R.
HADDOCK, late of
the Borough of
Avoca, who died
September 14,
2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the Admin-
istrator, JAMES L.
HADDOCK and his
Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO
& FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
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ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of EVA M.
NAPLES, late of
the Borough of
Exeter, who died
December 9, 2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the Execu-
tors, PAUL
NAPLES and
GARY NAPLES
and their Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the City
Council of the City
of Pittston, at a
meeting to be held
on Wednesday,
January 16, 2013 at
7:00 P.M. in Council
Chambers, City
Hall, 35 Broad
Street, Pittston,
Pennsylvania to
consider the follow-
ing Ordinance (of
which this is only a
summary) on sec-
ond and final
reading.
File of Council
No. 20 {2012}
“AN ORDINANCE
OF THE CITY OF
PITTSTON,
LUZERNE COUN-
TY, PENNSYLVA-
NIA, PROVIDING
FOR A CHANGE
IN THE TRAFFIC
PATTERN ON
BUTLER ALLEY.”
The full text of File
of Council No. 20
{2012} is available
for public inspection
at the Office of the
City Clerk, City Hall,
35 Broad Street,
Pittston, Pennsylva-
nia, during regular
office hours of 9:00
A.M. to 4:00 P.M.,
Monday thru Friday
except on holidays.
Any person with a
disability requiring
special accommo-
dation to attend this
meeting should
notify the City
Clerk’s office at
570-654-0513, as
early as possible,
but not later than 3
to 5 work days prior
to this meeting.
Joseph Moskovitz,
Pittston City
Administrator
145 Prayers
PRAYER TO THE
SACRED HEART
May the Sacred
heart of Jesus be
praised, adored &
glorified throughout
the world forever
and ever, Amen.
Say this prayer 6
times a day for 9
days and your peti-
tion will be granted,
no mater how diffi-
cult. Don’t forget to
thank the Sacred
Heart and promise
to publish. C.F.
150 Special Notices
FOSTER PARENT(S)
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570)
342-8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
310 Attorney
Services
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS’ COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Exp.
Joseph M.
Blazosek
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
NOW $4,295
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER ‘03
PT CRUISER
Dark Red,
Black interior.
Very clean, 100K
miles. Auto, Air,
power steering,
power brakes,
CD/Cassette.
Great Car! $3,200
Call 570-212-1046
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$1,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
INTERNATIONAL `05
4300 BOX TRUCK
18’, automatic, lift
gate. GVW 17,000.
Unladen weight
9,100. $15,500.
570-760-3226
570-735-4788
Shopping for a
new apartment?
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you compare costs -
without hassle
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457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
ACCOUNTANT
Local Construction
Company has an
immediate need for
an Accountant. This
is a newly created
position. Primary
Responsibilities
include: Financial
Statement Prepara-
tion for Multiple
Companies
-Monthly Balance
Sheet Account
Reconciliations
-Monthly Cost
Reconciliations
and Reporting
-Sales Tax Prepara-
tion -Back Up for
AR, AP, PR.
Requirements:
-Bachelor Degree
with Accounting
Major
-Five or More
Years Experience
-Ability to Handle
Multiple Tasks
-Strong Excel Skills
-“Roll Up Sleeves”
Mentality, Can-Do
Attitude, Strong
Work Ethic. Salary
Dependent On
Experience. Please
email cover letter
and resume to
Karen.Paine@
amerasphalt.com
American Asphalt
Paving Co.
500 Chase Rd
Shavertown, PA
18708
EOE/M/F
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
BMW Service
Technician
Expanding! Start
Immediately. Busy
Shop, Top Pay /
Benefits. High-Line
Experience a Plus.
Contact:
Dave Yeakel Mgr.
dyeakel@
tomHesser.com
Tom Hesser BMW
Scranton
FORKLIFT MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc.,
located in Pittston,
PA, is the exclusive
dealership for
Crown and TCM
forklifts for NEPA.
We are seeking a
full time forklift
mechanic to trou-
bleshoot, repair and
diagnose Crown
and other makes of
lift trucks. Good
written and verbal
communication
skills, as well as
customer care skills
are necessary. A
valid driver’s license
and the ability to
safely operate lift
trucks are required.
Previous forklift
mechanical experi-
ence or technical
school graduate will
be considered. We
offer an excellent
wage and benefits
package, as well as
401K Retirement
Savings Plan, paid
holidays, paid vaca-
tion and much
more.
Apply by e-mail
mike.phelan@action
liftinc.com or call
570-655-2100 x115.
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
TRUCK DRIVER
Immediate open-
ings for experi-
enced class B with
tanker endorse-
ment. Must be able
to work flex sched-
ule including some
nights & weekends.
Clean MVR req.
No DUI’s. Excellent
pay, benefits and
sign-on bonus.
Must have stable
work record.
Leave message.
570-298-0924
554 Production/
Operations
TRAFFIC
COORDINATOR
Cornell Iron Works,
a leading and grow-
ing manufacturer of
Security Closure
Products, is seeking
an experienced
Traffic Coordinator
at our facility in
Mountaintop.
Duties include
obtaining truck
quotes, assisting in
truck planning, and
responding to cus-
tomer inquiries.
The successful can-
didate will have two
or more year’s
experience in traffic
and transportation.
International experi-
ence is a definite
plus. Must also have
proficiency in
Microsoft Office, be
highly organized,
able to prioritize,
and work well in a
team environment.
Cornell Iron Works
offers a great work
environment with a
competitive benefit
program including
health insurance,
dental, vision,
401(k), life insur-
ance, tuition reim-
bursement, paid
vacation and most
of all, opportunity for
advancement and
great work environ-
ment.
Interested candi-
dates should apply
in person, email
their resume and
salary history to
janiney@cornell
iron.com, or mail to:
Cornell Iron Works
Crestwood
Industrial Park
24 Elmwood Ave.
Mountaintop, PA
18707
www.
cornelliron.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Doyouneedmorespace?
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566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Experienced Outside
Sales professional
(Commissioned) to
offer our no-cost
financial services.
We are a growing
company with huge
upside potential.
Must have strong
people skills and be
comfortable building
relationships with
senior executives.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690,
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
PERSONAL
TRAINING CENTER
FOR SALE
570-592-2458 for
details
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (25)
1928-1980, GAR,
(22) 1928-2006,
MEYERS, (22) 1957-
1981, WYOMING
VALLEY WEST, (11)
1970-1992. NANTI-
COKE, (2) 1971-
1979, PITTSTON, (11)
1967-1981HANOVER
(6) 1951-1981 MINT.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details
and additional
school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
732 Exercise
Equipment
ELLIPTICAL TRAIN-
ER, vision fitness
X61 00, excel l ent
condition, LCD
screen, programs
foldable, quiet, stur-
dy 19.75” stride
length. $700.
570-654-5737
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER, carbon
fiber, infrared, heats
up to 250 sq. ft.,
wall mountable or
free standing. New
in box. $49.
570-636-3151
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
OIL TANKS (2)
275 gallon indoor oil
tanks. Very good
condition. Convert-
ed to gas. $125.
each. Call
570-760-2793
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
MERCHANTSVILLAGE.COM
(Former Walmart
Building)
Oak St., Pittston
Come Shop
With Us!
NOW
ACCEPTING
Food
Stamps
Access
Card, Cash
Assistance”
3 Acres Inside
Air Conditioned
Huge, Huge
Inventory
• FOOD ITEMS
Huge Selection
1/2 Price!
• BABY ITEMS
diapers by the
case
• BEAUTY ITEMS
Make-Up
• CLEANING ITEMS
• ELECTRONICS
• HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
• HEALTHCARE
• TOOLS
Food Court
570-891-1972
762 Musical
Instruments
PIANO
BALDWIN SPINET
with bench.
Excellent condition.
Walnut finish.
No stairs. Easy
removal. $500
Call 570-455-1471
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
CAMCORDER VHS C
with a side view
monitor.
570-824-3903
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
ELECTRONICS WANTED
ham radio equip-
ment, (vintage/mod-
ern), vacuum tubes,
tube audio, test
eqipment Call Ethan
@ 775-313-2823
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES
AKC registered.
Mom & dad on
premises. Around
cats & kids. Ready
01/01/13. Asking
$750. Call Ashlie
570-441-7448
GERMAN
SHEPHERD PUPS
White. Born Nov.
27, 2012. Ready to
go January 8, 2013.
$500 females,
$550 males. Shots
and worming
included.
570-558-1476
SHELTIE PUPPY
Male, vet checked,
1st shots, ACA
papers. Available
01/10/13. Parents on
premises. $400.
570-899-9723
YORKIE PUPS
AKC. 12 weeks,
Teacup female,
$1,100. I male,
$800. Very love-
able. Home raised,
shots & wormed.
Hypo-allergenic.
570-436-5083
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
modern country
kitchen with Corian
counters, family
room with fireplace,
wet bar & walkout
to patio, multi-level
decks. All appli-
ances included.
$217,000.
570-675-0446
evenings.
EXETER
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom
home in mint metic-
ulous condition, with
2 full baths, and a 2
car garage, hard-
wood floors, tile
floors, exterior com-
posite wood deck,
fully finished lower
level family room,
large closets, up-
graded kitchen with
stainless steel appli-
ances, granite
countertops, gas
heat, excellent
neighborhood.
$174,900
Bob Stackhouse
654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
$34,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential in
quiet neighborhood.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
$129,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18’
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. $389,900
Directions: Rt 315
to Laflin Rd., right
onto Oakwood Dr.,
right onto Fordham
Rd, left onto Fair-
field Dr., home is on
the right. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL RD
For Sale By Owner
Beautiful
Custom Built.
Minutes from I-81
Turnpike & Casino.
Move In Condition!
3 to 4 bedroom
Tri-level, Master
bath, 2 full baths &
1 powder room,
central vacuum
system. Living &
dining rooms, fam-
ily room with fire-
place. Gas heat,
central air, large
basement, deck,
three car garage
& 2nd large lot
included.....
$395,000
570-237-0101
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch. Pro-
fessionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
ORANGEVILLE
SALE BY OWNER
3 bedroom, 2 bath
Farm House on 12
private acres. Horse
ready. $234,900.
570-458-6837
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 9 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
$25,990
*
TO CHOOSE FROM
$12,990
STARTING AT
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
VISIT US AT WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
*As Traded vehicles are sold AS IS with no warranty. Tax and tags extra. Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford
is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends JANUARY 31, 2012.
$25,990
$16,990
$13,990
$13,990
$13,490
$15,990
$13,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE
FROM
$12,990
$13,990
$8,990
$23,990
$9,790
TO CHOOSE FROM $21,990
STARTING AT
TO CHOOSE FROM $14,990
STARTING AT
$45,990
$13,990
$10,990 TO CHOOSE FROM
STARTING AT
$11,990
$16,990
TO CHOOSE FROM $19,990
STARTING AT
1
.
9%
AVAILABLE
FOR UP TO
APR60
*ON CERTIFIED VEHICLES ONLY
$11,990
$17,990
$16,990
$15,990
$7,990 $8,990 $11,990 $7,990
$16,990
$11,990
$17,990
$25,990
$25,990
$23,990
$18,990
$9,990
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 10
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
CIVIC LX SEDAN
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2012 CIVIC LX COUPE
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $10,667.25
Per Mo.
Lease
ase 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per M Per M
LLeas
* *
• Model #FG3B5CEW • 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission • Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
• Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
• Cruise Control • Remote Entry •
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers • ABS
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $14,427.40
• Model #CR2F3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection •
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA
®
)
with Traction Control • Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
• 16-Inch Alloy Wheels • Dual-Zone
Automatic Climate Control with
Air-Filtration System • Rearview
Camera with Guidelines • Blu-
etooth
®
HandsFreeLink
®
• Pandora
®
Internet Radio Compatibility • USB
Audio Interface • MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack • i-MID with 8-inch
WQVGA (480x320) Screen and
Customizable Feature Settings
2013 HONDA CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 3/4/2013.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
*1.9% for 36 mos/ 2.9% for up to 60 mos on Certifed Hondas thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C.
Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
‘S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ODYSSEY
10 ODYSSEY EX Slate, 24K.....................NOW $22,500
ACCORDS
08 ACCORD EXL SDN Green, 70K.....................NOW $14,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Silver, 74K.........................NOW $15,750
10 ACCORD EX SDN Burgandy, 19K ....................NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EXL CPE Blue, 19K........................NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 41K .......................NOW $18,500
10 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 18K ..............NOW $18,950
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 23K......................NOW $19,500
11 ACCORD EXL SDN Navy, 20K.......................NOW $21,750
12 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 11K ......................NOW $22,950
1.9
%
for 36 mos. 2.9
%
for 60 mos.
On All Certified
Hondas
1.9%
for 36 mos
CIVICS
07 CIVIC LX SDN White, 60K................................NOW $12,500
10 CIVIC EX SDN White, 69K................................NOW $13,950
09 CIVIC EX SDN Silver, 40K................................NOW $15,250
12 CIVIC LX CPE Silver, 16K.................................NOW $16,950
CRV 4WD
10 CRV EX Black, 63K...............................................NOW $18,750
10 CRV EXL Black, 26K............................................NOW $23,500
10 CRV EXL-NAVI Sage, 30K...............................NOW $23,500
YEARBEGINNINGSALE
Now In Progress!
RIDGELINE 4WD
09 RIDGELINE RTL NAVI Black, 59K ..............NOW $24,750
PILOT 4WD
11 PILOT LX Gray, 48K............................................NOW $22,500
10 PILOT EXL DVD Silver, 39K............................NOW $27,500
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 25K .......................................NOW $28,950
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 32K ........................................NOW $29,500
11 PILOT EXL Mocha, 14K......................................NOW $29,950
11 PILOT EXL DVD Silver, 25K............................NOW $28,950
12 PILOT TOURING NAVI/DVD White, 18K..NOW $37,500
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
Gray, 90K, Was $7,950
Now $6,950
05 DODGE
STRATUS CPE R/T
08 VW PASSAT
2.0T S/W
Black, 53K, Was $15,950
Now $15,250
Red, 35K, Was $15,750
Now $14,350
10 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Navy, 71K, Was $9,850
Now $7,950
07 CHRYSLER
SEBRING TOURING
Club Cab, Black, 26K, Was $19,950
07 DODGE DAKOTA
SXT 4X4
Now $18,750
06 RT, Blue, 72K
08 RTS, White, 87K
Choice $14,900
HONDA
RIDGELINE 4WD
Black, Soft Top, 47K, Was $15,950
Now $14,950
06 JEEP WRANGLER
X 4X4
Green, 77K, Was $10,500
Now $9,950
06 FORD ESCAPE
XLT 4WD
White, 53K, Was $10,950
Now $10,750
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LT SEDAN
Red, 23K, Was $14,950
Now $14,500
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SEDAN
Navy, 41K, Was $24,950
Now $23,500
10 BMW 328Xi
SEDAN
HONDA
CRV 4WD
01 EX, 5 Spd, Silver, 119K
$6,950
06 EX, Silver, 96K
$11,950
Silver, 38K, Was $10,950
Now $9,999
07 KIA OPTIMA
LX SDN
Blue, 14K, Was $12,950
Now $12,500
08 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LX SDN
Black, 32K, Was $15,750
Now $14,950
10 CHEVY MALIBU
LT SDN
Silver, 26K, Was $15,900
Now $15,500
09 PONTIAC
VIBE AWD
Gray, 38K, Was $15,750
Now $12,950
10 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS SDN
5 Speed, Silver, 65K
Now $9,750
09 CHEVY COBALT
LS CPE
Silver, 14K
Now $14,950
10 NISSAN SENTRA
2.0 SDN
Red, 47K
Now $15,950
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4WD
Red, 82K
03 HONDA CIVIC
LX SDN
Now $8,250
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
06 EX, Black, 102K
$11,950
HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS SEDAN
10, Red, 25K
$12,500
09, Silver, 35K
$11,500
Silver, 5 Speed, 55K
Now $13,500
09 SUBARU
IMPREZA AWD
Gray, 72K
Now $10,950
06 SUBARU
FORESTER AWD
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,365.10
Per Mo.
Lease
*
• Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed Automatic Transmission • Air Conditioning
with Air-Filtration System • Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors • Cruise Control • Remote Entry • 160-Watt AM/FM/
CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Per Mo.
Lease
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,856.00
• Model #RM4H3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine • Automatic Transmission
• Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
• Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA
®
) with Traction
Control • Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
• Bluetooth
®
HandsFreeLink
• USB Audio Interface
• Remote Entry System
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
• Pandora
®
Radio Compatibility
• Bluetooth
®
Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
*Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
PAGE 11 SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
• High School Diploma/GED
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benefits Available *
Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
JOB FAIR!
EVERY
THURSDAY
12-4
AT THE
TUNKHANNOCK
LIBRARY
Ring in the New Year by joining the
Jewish Home of Eastern Pa!
Currently seeking an
RN Supervisor:
Full-time, 3 p.m.-11:30 p.m.
Supervisory experience, long-term care
experience, and BSN preferred.
Every other weekend and rotating
holidays are required.
Excellent wage and benefit package.
Apply online, or send resume to:
Colleen Knight, Nursing HR Coordinator
The Jewish Home
1101 Vine St.
Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: 344-6177/Fax: 344-6859
Jhep.org
EOE
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906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
35 STARK ST
Completely
Remodeled 3 bed-
room. Home in a
great neighbor-
hood. Includes
refinished hard-
wood and new tile
floors, new bath-
room and kitchen
with stainless steel
appliances and
granite counter-
tops. Gas heat, nice
yard and porches.
$74,900
Call (570)654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON TWP.
$175,000
110 Front St.
Great price and
great location.
This well-maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths bilevel home
is in move in condi-
tion. Spacious eat-in
kitchen with custom
cabinets, tile floor
and counters.
Unique lower level
family room with
wood burning fire-
place, office space.
laundry/bath combo.
Plenty of storage
including an 8X6
cedar closet. Out-
door space has
covered patio,
columned carport
and well manicured
partially fenced
yard. Detached
large garage.
For more info &
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS# 12-2053
Call Angie at
570-885-4896
Terry at
570-885-3041
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
70 McLean Street
Very nicely updated
& maintained 2
story home, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 4-
season sunroom
with huge backyard
& deck. Newer car-
peting, off street
parking & security
system. ONE YEAR
HOME WARRANTY.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2886
Keri Best
570-885-5082
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WYOMING
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
Open House
Sun. Jan 13
1-3pm
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
$185,000
570-885-6848
912 Lots & Acreage
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 13-23
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
938 Apartments/
Furnished
DUPONT
SPACIOUS APT.
Convenient loca-
tion to Scranton &
Wilkes-Barre.
2 bedrooms,
1 bath. appliances
included l washer/
dryer. $625/mo.
includes water,
sewer call text
570-441-4807,
cmdraus@ptd.net
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
SENIOR APTS
222 Schooley
Ave. Exeter
Accepting
applications for
1 bedroom apt.
on second floor.
Quality apart-
ments for ages
62 and older.
Income limits
apply. Rent only
$465 month.
*Utilities Included
*Laundry Facilities
*On Site
Management
*Private parking
*Elevator
CALL FOR APP’T
570-654-5733
Equal Housing
Opportunity
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, wall to
wall, 3 rooms, $450
+ utilities & deposit.
No pets. No smok-
ing. 570-335-3157
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HANOVER/GREEN
3 room, 2nd floor,
small back porch,
enclosed front
porch. Stove &
fridge included.
Heat, water,
garbage and
sewer included.
Washer & dryer
hookup. Attic for
storage. Non
smoking, no pets.
$550 + 1 month
security. Call
(570) 824-2602
Leave Message
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun-
room, bath, 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets, built-in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood & car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included. 1
year lease + securi-
ty. $950
570-283-4370
LUZERNE
BENNETT BENNETT APTS APTS
*FIVE STAR*
ManageD soley
America Real-
ty. Stunningly
remodeled with
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
glass enclosed
porch, private
entrance with
carport, gas fire-
place, more. 2
YEAR SAME
RENT $750. +
utilities. NO PETS
/NO SMOKING
/EMPLOYMENT/
APPLICATION
570-288-1422
LUZERNE
1st floor, modern 4
rooms & bath. Car-
peting, stove &
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer hook up.
$500 + utilities. No
pets. 570-406-2789
570-675-3864
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apt.
2nd floor, stove &
refrigerator, off
street parking.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Non smokers & no
pets. $550/month.
570-655-2567
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
152 Elizabeth Street
Spacious 2 bed-
room apartment with
ample closet space.
Off street parking.
All utilities and appli-
ances included. No
pets. $795 + lease &
security. Call
570-510-7325
PITTSTON
2nd floor, large and
modern. 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
computer room,
laundry room with
washer & dryer. Full
bath, kitchen with
stove, fridge and
dish washer. Fresh
paint and carpet.
Water and trash
incl. No smokers,
no pets. $550/mo
plus security.
570-881-9789 after
6PM
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
Brand new, remod-
eled, 1st floor, 1 bed-
room. Coin-op laun-
dry on premises.
Extra storage in
basement. $495
/month + heat &
electric. Call
570-287-9631 or
570-417-4311
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-
BARRE
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
*DELUXE* *DELUXE*
General Hospital
area. Brand new
remodeled on
FIRST FLOOR.
$625 + utilities,
maple kitchen,
appliances, mar-
ble aesthetic
fireplace, 1 bed-
room. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT. NO
PETS/NO SMOK-
ING/EMPLOY-
MENT/
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
CHARMING & SPACIOUS
6 room, 2 bed-
room duplex,
includes 2nd &
3rd floor. Ample
closets. Washer /
dryer hook-up.
$575 / month +
utilities, security
& lease. No Pets.
570-793-6294
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PLAINS
SPACIOUS
Victorian charm, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
hardwood floors,
neutral decor,
stained glass win-
dow, large kitchen
Washer/ dryer
hook-up, off street
parking. No pets.
Reduced $675.
month + utilities,
security & lease.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths. New carpet-
ing. $675 + utilities.
All appliances.
Water & sewer
paid. Fenced back
yard. No pets.
Security required
Section 8 OK.
Call Steve at
570-592-5764
953Houses for Rent
BEAR CREEK
Modern 2 bedroom,
kitchen, dining
room, laundry, new
carpeting. Deck,
storage area.
$550/month. No
pets. 570-947-5113
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DUPONT
7 room house with
3 bedrooms, 1 full
tile bath. Large
kitchen with beau-
tiful oak cabinets,
new stove,
fridge, carpeting,
flooring, draperies
& windows.
Washer/dryer
hook up on 1st
floor. Single car
detached garage.
Large yard. Gas
heat. Pets OK, no
smoking. $900/
month + utilities &
security. Close to
airport, I-81
& casino.
570-762-8265
953Houses for Rent
EXETER
Beautiful magnifi-
cent Cape Cod style
home. 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, finished
lower level, 2 car
garage with a rear
deck area. Master
bedroom and bath
on first floor, new
carpets, recently
painted, hardwood
& tile floors, granite
counters & stainless
steel appliances in
kitchen. Gas heat.
$1500 per/ month.
570-479-6722
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Wash-
ers, Dryers, Refrig-
erators, Dishwash-
ers, Compactors.
Most brands. Free
phone advice & all
work guaranteed.
No service charge
for visit. 706-6577
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, JANUARY 6, 2013 PAGE 12

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