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ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY

HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT MANUAL OF CODES OF PRACTICE VOLUME 4 : SAFETY

CODE OF PRACTICE ON WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL


ADNOC-COPV4-02

HSE MANAGEMENT CODES OF PRACTICE Volume 4: SAFETY COP ON WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL Document No: ADNOC-COPV4-02

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RECORD OF REVISION Revision No. Date Section / Page Reason

Copyright The copyright and all other rights of a like nature in this document are vested in Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This document is issued as part of the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice (the Manual) and as guidance to ADNOC, ADNOC Group Companies and independent operators engaged in the Abu Dhabi oil & gas industries. Any of these parties may give copies of the entire Manual or selected parts thereof to their contractors implementing HSE standards in order to qualify for award of contracts or for the execution of awarded contracts. Such copies should carry a statement that they are reproduced by permission of ADNOC, and an explanatory note on the manner in which the Manual is to be used. Disclaimer No liability whatsoever in contract, tort or otherwise is accepted by ADNOC or any of its Group Companies, their respective shareholders, directors, officers and employees whether or not involved in the preparation of the Manual for any consequences whatsoever resulting directly or indirectly from reliance on or from the use of the Manual or for any error or omission therein even if such error or omission is caused by a failure to exercise reasonable care.

All administrative queries should be directed to the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice Administrator in:

Environment Health & Safety Division (SPC), Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, P.O. Box : 898, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Telephone : (9712) 6023782 Fax: (9712) 6668089 Internet site: www.adnoc.com E-mail: hse@adnoc.com

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE I. PURPOSE ............................................................................................................... 5 II. DEFINITIONS.......................................................................................................... 5 III. EXISTING LAWS .................................................................................................... 8 1. INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................... 9 2. CONTROL OF WORK EQUIPMENT: GENERAL PRINCIPLES......................... 10 3. WORK EQUIPMENT (GENERAL) ....................................................................... 12 3.1 Equipment Selection................................................................................... 13 3.2 Maintenance ................................................................................................ 13 3.3 Inspection .................................................................................................... 13 3.4 Provision of Instructions on Use of Work Equipment ............................ 14 3.5 Provision of Training .................................................................................. 14 3.6 Access to Hazardous Parts of Machinery ................................................ 14 3.7 Protection Against Specific Hazards ........................................................ 15 3.8 Protection Against High or Very Low Temperature ................................ 15 3.9 Provision of Control Systems.................................................................... 16 3.10 Isolation........................................................................................................ 16 3.11 Stability ........................................................................................................ 16 3.12 Markings and Warnings ............................................................................. 16 3.13 Mobile Work Equipment ............................................................................. 16 4. LIFTING EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................... 18 4.1 Strength and Stability ................................................................................. 18 4.2 Lifting Equipment for Persons .................................................................. 18 4.3 Positioning and Installation ....................................................................... 18 4.4 Marking of Lifting Equipment .................................................................... 19 4.5 Organisation of Lifting Operations ........................................................... 19 4.6 Examinations and Inspection of Lifting Equipment................................ 20 4.7 Crane/Forklift Operator competence ........................................................ 21 4.8 Lifting Supervisor competence ................................................................. 21 4.9 Banksman/Signaller competence.............................................................. 21 5. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT ................................................................................. 23 5.1 TOOLS, APPLIANCES AND MOBILE EQUIPMENT.................................. 23 5.1.1 General Requirements..................................................................... 23 5.1.2 Plugs and Socket Outlets................................................................ 23 5.1.3 Leads and Extension Cords............................................................ 24 5.1.4 Power Tools ...................................................................................... 24 5.1.5 Appliances ........................................................................................ 25 5.1.6 Mobile Generator Sets ..................................................................... 25 5.1.7 Electric Welding Machines.............................................................. 25 5.2 Electrical Hazards and Preventative Action............................................. 26 5.3 Inspection and Testing of Electrical Tools and Portable Equipment.... 27 5.4 Suitability of Electrical Equipment............................................................ 28 5.5 Siting of Electrical Equipment in Adverse or Hazardous Environments28 5.6 Insulation, Protection and Placement of Conductors............................. 28

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5.7 Earthing and Other Precautions................................................................ 28 5.8 Integrity of Referenced Connectors.......................................................... 29 5.9 Excess Current Protection......................................................................... 29 5.10 Isolation of Electrical Equipment .............................................................. 29 5.11 Precautions for Working on Equipment Made Dead............................... 30 5.12 Work on or Near Live Conductors ............................................................ 30 5.13 General Precautions ................................................................................... 30 ACCESS EQUIPMENT ......................................................................................... 32 6.1 Preventing Falls from a Height .................................................................. 32 6.2 Work Platforms............................................................................................ 33 6.3 Personal Suspension Equipment.............................................................. 33 6.4 Ladders ........................................................................................................ 34 6.5 Installation and Inspection of Access Equipment................................... 34 6.6 Falling Objects or Materials ....................................................................... 35 EQUIPMENT SUITABILITY AND PERSONNEL COMPETENCY ...................... 36 7.1 Equipment Specifications .......................................................................... 36 7.2 Operators ..................................................................................................... 36 EQUIPMENT REGISTER, INSPECTION, TESTING AND MAINTENANCE....... 37 8.1 Equipment Register .................................................................................... 37 8.2 Inspection and Testing ............................................................................... 37 8.3 Maintenance ................................................................................................ 38 OPERATOR COMPETENCY AND TRAINING .................................................... 39

10. PROTECTION SYSTEMS AND WARNINGS ...................................................... 40 11. PERSONAL PROTECTION AND SAFETY ......................................................... 41 12. RISK ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................ 42 13. REFERENCES...................................................................................................... 44 APPENDIX 1 TYPES OF EQUIPMENT, POWER SUPPLIES AND APPLICATION 46 APPENDIX 2 MINIMUM VALUES OF INSULATION RESISTANCE........................ 48 APPENDIX 3 WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE ................... 50

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I.

PURPOSE
This Code of Practice addresses the requirements for safe use of work equipment by Group Companies, including selection, use, maintenance, inspection, and examination and testing. The purpose of this document is to ensure that all work equipment used in ADNOC Group operations is fit for purpose, properly maintained and serviceable, and that any associated risks in using the equipment are identified and removed, or adequately controlled.

II.

DEFINITIONS
Accident See incident. Within the ADNOC Group it has been agreed that terms accident and incident are synonymous. ADNOC Abu Dhabi National Oil Company. Authorised Electrical Person An Authorised Electrical Person is an Appointed Person over 21 years of age and must have clearly demonstrated that he has sufficient electrical technical knowledge, training and experience to carry out duties under the authority of the Electrical Safety Rules Class I Tool An electric tool in which protection against electric shock does not rely on basic insulation only, but which includes an additional safety precaution in such a way that means are provided for the connection of accessible conductive parts to the protective (earthing) conductor in the fixed wiring of the installation in such a way that accessible conductive parts cannot become live in the event of failure of the basic insulation. (Refer IEC 745-1) Class II Tool A tool in which protection against electric shock does not rely on basic insulation only, but in which additional safety precautions, such as double insulation or reinforced insulation, are provided, there being no provision for protective earthing or reliance upon installation conditions. (Refer IEC 745-1) Class III Tool A tool in which protection against electric shock relies on supply at safety extra low voltage (SELV) and in which voltages higher than those of SELV are not generated. (Refer IEC 745-1) Competence The ability to perform a particular job in compliance with performance standards. This will usually require the necessary blend of skills, training and experience.

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Competent Electrical Person A Competent Electrical Person is an Appointed Person who has clearly demonstrated that he has sufficient knowledge, training and experience to avoid danger from live electrical equipment and to carry out duties under the authority of the Electrical Safety Rules. Contractor Any person or company employed under contract (irrespective of period of contract or employment). Employee Any individual who carries out duties or actions specified by an employer for which the individual receives remuneration from the employer. Extra Low Voltage A voltage normally not exceeding 50 Vac or 120 Vdc ripple free, whether between conductors or to earth. Hazard An object, physical effect, or condition with potential to harm people, property or the environment or affect the company reputation. High Voltage A voltage exceeding 1000 Vac or 1500 Vdc. HSE Management System (HSEMS) The company structure, responsibilities, practices, procedures, processes and resources for implementing health, safety and environmental management. IEC International Electrotechnical Commission. Low Voltage A voltage normally exceeding Extra Low Voltage but not exceeding 1000 Vac or 1500 Vdc between conductors, or 600 Vac or 900 Vdc between conductors and earth. Incident An event or chain of events which has caused or could have caused fatality, injury, illness and/or damage (loss) to assets, the environment, company reputation or third parties. Injury Physical harm or damage to a person resulting from traumatic contact between the body of the person and an outside agency, or from exposure to environmental factors.

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Lifting Equipment All equipment used for lifting operations by an employee or contractor including, but not limited to, fixed lifting equipment, portable lifting equipment, other mechanical handling equipment, lifts and equipment used for carrying personnel. Occupational Illness Any work-related abnormal condition or disorder, other than an injury, which is mainly caused by exposure to environmental factors associated with the employment. It includes acute and chronic illness or diseases that may be caused by inhalation, absorption, ingestion or direct contact. Whether a case involves a work-related injury or an Occupational Illness is determined by the nature of the original event or exposure which caused the case, not by the resulting condition of the affected employee. An injury results from a single event. Cases resulting from anything other than a single event are considered Occupational Illness. Restrictive Conductive Location A location comprised mainly of metallic or conductive surrounding parts, within which it is likely that a person will come into contact through a substantial portion of his body with the conductive surrounding parts, and where the possibility of preventing this contact is limited. Inside a steel storage tank or vessel is considered to be a Restrictive Conductive Location. Risk Risk is the product of the measure of the likelihood of occurrence of an undesired event and the potential adverse consequences which this event may have upon: People injury or harm to physical or psychological health Assets (or Revenue) damage to property (assets) or loss of production Environment water, air, soil, animals, plants and social Reputation employees and third parties. This includes the liabilities arising from injuries and property damage to third parties including the cross liabilities that may arise between the interdependent ADNOC Group Companies.

Risk = Frequency x Consequences. Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV) An Extra-Low Voltage system which is electrically separated from earth and from other systems in such a way that a single fault cannot give rise to the risk of electric shock. Site Manager The ADNOC (or Group Company) appointed Manager at a particular work site. Work Equipment Any item of equipment, tool or machine used at or around the work place.

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Further detail on definitions is provided in the document ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice Guideline on HSE Definitions and Abbreviations [Ref. 22].

III.

EXISTING LAWS
Current legislation of relevance to the subject of this Code of Practice is: Federal Law No. 8, 1980, Regulation of Labour Relations and Order Issued in Implementation Thereof.

[22] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline to HSE Definitions & Abbreviations, ADNOC-COPV1-05.

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1.

INTRODUCTION
This Code of Practice establishes the requirements and responsibilities of ADNOC and its Group Companies, and any associated parties (including contractors), with regards to the safe use of work equipment, including the requirement to undertake appropriate risk assessment. The objective of this document is to reduce the risks to personnel from use of inappropriate or faulty work equipment and thereby minimise cases of fatal accidents, injury or ill health resulting from such use. This Code of Practice draws on international best practice in the safe use of work equipment and in particular the following UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations / Guidelines: Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER) [Ref. 1]. Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER) [Ref. 2]. Five Steps to Risk Assessment [Ref. 3]. Using Work Equipment Safely [Ref. 4]. Safe Use of Work Equipment, Approved Codes of Practice [Ref. 5]

The general principles for safe use of all work equipment are given in Section 2. Section 3 of this document describes the requirements for general work equipment safety. Specific controls for the use of lifting equipment, electrical equipment and access equipment are detailed in sections 4, 5 and 6 respectively. Compliance with this Code of Practice requires that a risk assessment be carried out when using work equipment. The approach to be taken for risk assessment is described in Section 12. The provisions of this Code of Practice apply to all work equipment used at Group Company premises, whether by Group Company personnel, contractors or by third parties.

[1] Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717624595. [2] Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER), UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717624641. [3] Five Steps to Risk Assessment, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717615650. [4] Using Work Equipment Safely, UK Health and Safety Executive, 2002, ISBN 623890. [5] Safe Use of Work Equipment Approved Codes of Practice and Guidance, L22, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717616266.

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2.

CONTROL OF WORK EQUIPMENT: GENERAL PRINCIPLES


Workers must be protected from hazardous equipment and any parts that could cause injury. All Group Companies must therefore develop safe systems of work to ensure that any work equipment used is appropriate for its intended use, suitably safe and adequately maintained and tested, as required. In addition, where there are hazards in the use of work equipment, Group Companies must ensure that users are properly informed of the hazards and resulting risks, that any risk control measures are properly implemented (e.g. guards fixed to the equipment) and that personnel working with and around hazardous work equipment have received appropriate training in using the equipment. 'Use' of equipment refers to any activity involving work equipment, including setting it up, carrying out a work task using the equipment and maintaining it. As general principles, Group Companies must ensure that: The correct equipment is selected for the job. It must be designed or properly adapted to be suitable for the intended purpose, including consideration of any existing conditions in the work place and any additional risks posed by use of the particular work equipment. Only correct equipment is used on the job and the equipment must only be used for operations for which it is intended. An initial risk assessment is carried out to evaluate if the equipment should be considered hazardous or not, and to identify the safe systems of work that are required to manage the hazards. Equipment that is initially not considered hazardous may become hazardous if it is not used for its intended purpose or through lacking maintenance. Such circumstances should be considered in the initial assessment of risk

As a general rule for all hazardous work equipment Group Companies must ensure that: The equipment is maintained in a safe state and where appropriate, a service log is maintained. The equipment is inspected and periodically tested and the results recorded. Due consideration must be given to installation and operating conditions and that inspection intervals are spaced accordingly. Responsibilities for inspection must be identified and documented. Adequate health and safety information is available to all persons using or supervising the use of hazardous equipment. This must include instructions on the conditions in which, and methods by which, the equipment is to be used. It must also include any foreseeable abnormal situations and the action to be taken in such events. Any conclusions that have been made, based on past experience in using the equipment, must also be made available. Adequate training is provided to all persons using or supervising the use of hazardous equipment.

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The remainder of this document does not distinguish between non-hazardous and hazardous equipment i.e. it assumes that the distinction has already been made via the initial and possibly subsequent risk assessments.

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3.

WORK EQUIPMENT (GENERAL)


Work equipment is defined as any machinery, appliance, apparatus or tool and includes, but is not limited to, powered and non-powered equipment, fixed and portable equipment, and hand tools. Examples of types of general work equipment include: Machine tools (e.g. lathes, radial drilling machines, milling machines). Air powered tools (e.g. air impact wrenches, air drills, air screwdrivers). Portable powered tools (e.g. angle grinder). Hydraulic tools. Petrol/diesel engines (e.g. for generators, portable cutting / pressing equipment, vehicles). Standard maintenance and fitting tools (e.g. hammers, screwdrivers, pliers, hack saws).

For all work equipment, Group Companies must ensure that: It is suitable for the intended use. It is adequately maintained. It is inspected at regular intervals. Instructions on the safe use of the equipment are provided to all those who use the equipment. Adequate training is provided in the use of the equipment. Measures are taken to prevent access to hazardous parts of any machinery. Protection against specific hazards is provided. Protection against very high or very low temperatures is provided. Suitable control systems are provided. Where appropriate, means of isolating the equipment from electricity is provided. Equipment is adequately stabilised. Equipment can be safely maintained. The equipment is suitably marked with warning signs where appropriate. An appropriate risk assessment is carried out on the equipment prior to use.

Where work equipment is being supplied/used by a contractor, Group Companies must satisfy themselves that all the above requirements have been met. This will most easily be achieved by an audit of the contractors facilities, procedures and documentation, prior to permitting work to commence. Contractors must not be

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allowed to proceed with work until the requirements of this Code of Practice are fully complied with. 3.1 Equipment Selection Group Companies must ensure that all work equipment is suitable for the intended use. In selecting work equipment, account must be taken of the working conditions and the risks to health and safety of workers from both the equipment and the operations involved. Relevant standards, commensurate with the HSE risk involved, must be in place to ensure that only suitable equipment is purchased. 3.2 Maintenance All work equipment must be adequately maintained and in sound working order. A maintenance log must be kept detailing the maintenance history of the equipment. Where an item of equipment is likely to involve specific health and safety risk, Group Companies must ensure that repairs, modifications, maintenance or servicing of the equipment is restricted to those who have been specifically trained and designated to do this. 3.3 Inspection Where the safety of a piece of equipment depends on its installation, an inspection must be carried out after the installation and before the equipment is used for the first time, or after its assembly at a new site or location. For equipment that may be used under conditions that could result in deterioration, inspections must be carried out at regular intervals. A tagging system on the appliance is to be recommended, which cross-references the inspection test routine and last inspection date. This allows the user to readily check before use. All persons charged with carrying out inspections must be competent to do so and the results of inspections must be recorded. Information that must be recorded in the inspection documentation will include: The type and model of the equipment. Identification mark or number. The normal location at which the equipment is used. Date of inspection. Name of inspector. Faults identified. Any actions taken. To whom the faults have been reported. Date that repairs were carried out.

See also Sections 5.2 and 8 of this document.

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3.4

Provision of Instructions on Use of Work Equipment Health and safety information regarding the use of work equipment must be provided to users and supervisors. Where appropriate, written instructions must be provided on: The conditions under which and the methods by which, the equipment must be used. Any foreseeable abnormal situations and the action that must be taken if such situations arise. Any conclusions to be drawn from experience of using the equipment.

As a minimum, the information must be provided in English and be formulated in such a way that it is comprehensible to the user/supervisor. In addition, and depending on local circumstances and HSE risk involved, the information must be provided in any other language as appropriate to the user/workforce. Where an item of equipment is likely to involve specific health and safety risk, Group Companies must ensure that the use of the equipment is restricted to the persons who are given the task of using it. 3.5 Provision of Training All personnel required to use or supervise the work equipment must be provided with adequate training. Such training must include the methods of use of the equipment, the associated risks and the precautions that must be taken during use. For further information on competency of personnel see Section 9 of this document. 3.6 Access to Hazardous Parts of Machinery Controls must be in place to: Prevent access to any hazardous part of machinery or any rotating stockbar. Stop the movement of any hazardous part of machinery or rotating stockbar before any person enters the danger zone.

As far as practicable these measures must consist of guards and protection devices, which must be affixed according to the following hierarchy: 1. Fixed guards enclosing all hazardous parts. 2. Other guards or protection devices. 3. Jigs, holders, push sticks or similar protection appliances. 4. Information, instruction, training and supervision.

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All guards and protection devices must: Be suitable for the purpose for which they are provided. Be of good construction, sound material and adequate strength. Be maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair. Not give rise to any increased risk to health and safety. Not be easily by-passed or disabled. Be situated at a sufficient distance from the danger zone. Not unduly restrict the view of the operation of the machinery. Be so constructed that maintenance of the machine can be carried out without removing them.

For further information on protection systems and warnings see Section 10 of this document. 3.7 Protection Against Specific Hazards Group Companies must take measures to ensure that exposure of a person using work equipment to any risk to health or safety from any of the hazards listed below is either prevented, or, where this is not reasonably practicable, adequately controlled. The specific hazards referred to above include: Any article or substance falling or being ejected from work equipment. Rupture or disintegration of parts of work equipment. Work equipment catching fire or overheating. The unintended or premature discharge of any article, gas, dust, liquid, vapour or other substance which, in each case, is produced, used or stored in the work equipment.

The required measures must: Be measures other than the provision of personal protective equipment, information, training and supervision, as far as this is reasonably practicable. Include, where appropriate, measures to minimise the effects of the hazard as well as to reduce the likelihood of the hazard occurring.

3.8

Protection Against High or Very Low Temperature Measures must be taken to ensure that personnel do not come into contact with parts of the work equipment which may be at a high or very low temperature, so as to prevent burns, scalds or searing.

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This may be achieved through the use of guards, by providing lagging to exposed parts of the equipment, or by ensuring high or very low temperature items are kept within the confines of the machine where personnel cannot be exposed. Provision must also be made to ensure that maintenance personnel do not come into contact with hot or very low temperature parts of the equipment. 3.9 Provision of Control Systems Work equipment must be fitted with suitable control systems including, as appropriate, e.g.: 3.10 Controls for starting or significantly changing operating conditions. Stop controls. Emergency stop controls.

Isolation Where appropriate, work equipment must be provided with a suitable means of isolating from its source of energy. The means of isolation must be clearly identifiable and accessible. Steps must also be taken to ensure that on reconnection of the energy source, this does not expose personnel to any risk to their health and safety.

3.11

Stability Where necessary, all work equipment must be stabilised i.e. resting on all mountings/wheels/supports as designed and not tilted in any direction.

3.12

Markings and Warnings All work equipment must be clearly marked as necessary with warnings to safeguard health and safety. Warnings must be clear, unambiguous and in appropriate languages so that users can easily understand their meaning.

3.13

Mobile Work Equipment Mobile equipment includes any work equipment that can be moved from place to place and includes but is not limited to: Self-propelled mobile equipment such as fork lift trucks. Towed equipment. Remote controlled equipment.

Group Companies must ensure that: People are not carried on mobile equipment unless it is specifically designed for this purpose.

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Risks to personnel from roll over are reduced to a practical minimum. Where there is a risk of crush injury in the event of a roll over, then a suitable restraining system must be provided. All self-propelled work equipment that could present a risk incorporates: Devices to prevent it being started by unauthorised personnel. Appropriate facilities for minimising the consequences of collisions. A device for braking and stopping. Where necessary, emergency facilities for braking and stopping the equipment should the main system fail. Adequate devices for improving drivers vision, if his direct field of vision is impaired. Appropriate fire fighting equipment if it is carrying anything that constitutes a fire hazard.

Any equipment used by ADNOC (or Group Company) personnel or contractors must be suitable to do the job for which it is being used. Equally important, the persons using the equipment must be deemed to be competent to do so. For further information on correct use of work equipment, see Section 7. A vital part of ensuring that equipment is kept in a safe working condition is proper maintenance. For further information on equipment maintenance, see Section 8.3. In order to ensure that equipment used is fit for purpose, correctly maintained and therefore safe, it is necessary to carry out inspection and testing. For further information on equipment inspection and testing see Section 8.2.

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4.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT
All equipment used for lifting operations at an ADNOC (or Group Company) work site by an employee or contractor is defined as lifting equipment. This includes but is not limited to fixed lifting equipment, portable lifting equipment, other mechanical handling equipment, lifts and equipment used for carrying personnel. Examples of types of lifting equipment are listed below: Fixed cranes. Portable cranes. A-Frames. Winches. Forklifts. Hydraulic jacks. Air bottle jacks. Axle jacks.

4.1

Strength and Stability All lifting operations undertaken must only be done so with lifting equipment that is of adequate strength and stability for each load, having regard in particular to the stress induced at its mounting or fixing point.

4.2

Lifting Equipment for Persons Lifting equipment for persons must incorporate features that: Prevent a person using it from being crushed, trapped, struck or falling from the carrier. Prevent a person using it, while carrying out activities from the carrier, from being crushed, trapped, struck or falling from the carrier. Prevent the risk of the carrier falling and, if the risk cannot be prevented for reasons inherent in the site and height differences, the carrier must have an enhanced safety coefficient suspension rope or chain which is inspected by a competent person every working day.

4.3

Positioning and Installation All lifting equipment must be installed in such a way as to reduce to as low as reasonably practicable, the risk of the lifting equipment or the load striking a person. Loads must be secure and prevented from: Drifting. Falling freely. Being released unintentionally.

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Outriggers must be supported on the firm and leveled ground in order to give an acceptable ground bearing pressure. Approved suitable material bearers such as steel plate bearers or similar for load distribution under outriggers must be used. Provisions must be made to prevent anyone from falling down a shaft or hoist way. 4.4 Marking of Lifting Equipment The following provision must be made for all lifting equipment: Machinery and accessories for lifting loads are clearly marked to indicate their safe working loads. Where the safe working load of machinery for lifting loads depends on its configuration, either the machinery must be clearly marked to indicate its safe working load for each configuration, or information that clearly indicates its safe working load for each configuration is kept with the machinery. Accessories for lifting are also marked in such a way that it is possible to identify characteristics necessary for their safe use. Lifting equipment that is designed for lifting persons is appropriately and clearly marked to this effect. Lifting equipment that is not designed for lifting persons, but could be mistakenly so used is appropriately and clearly marked to the effect that it is not designed for lifting persons. All the lifting appliances, hoists, lifting gears (such as winches, pulley blocks, chain/rope slings, links, hook, shackles, swivel/eyebolt, spreader bars, etc.) used in the lifting must be certified and color coded (as visible evidence) based on periodical inspection and certification by an approved agency.

For further information see Section 10 of this document. 4.5 Organisation of Lifting Operations Lifting operations must only be undertaken upon conducting a risk assessment in order to determine typical safe working conditions and safeguards, acceptability limit of each lift and the level of supervision required. Specific attention is required for lifting operations that involve moving loads over live (pressurised) or otherwise energised (electrical) equipment. Lifting operations must only be undertaken when: they are appropriately supervised, the lifting equipment is certified and has been inspected before use by a competent person, the job has been properly planned by a competent person,

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all safeguards are in place that have been defined during the preceding risk assessment.

In addition to above, the following special precautions must be taken for critical lifts in live hydrocarbon handling/processing facilities: Approved lifting plans must be available. Lifting operations that require a load to be swung/slewed over any vessel or pipe or container containing hydrocarbons or other flammable or hazardous material, must be subject to written approval by the facilities operations function. Emergency service departments (Fire, Medical and Security Departments) have been informed of such critical lifts. A lifting supervisor and banksman/signaler must be present at the location of lift.

4.6

Examinations and Inspection of Lifting Equipment All lifting equipment must be certified. General information on inspection and testing is given in Section 3 of this document. In addition all lifting equipment must be examined and inspected as follows: Before lifting equipment is put into service for the first time, it must be thoroughly examined for defects. Where the safety of lifting equipment depends on the installation conditions, it must be thoroughly examined after installation and before being put into service at a new site or location, to ensure that it has been correctly installed and is safe to operate. Examination and inspection must ensure that health and safety conditions are maintained and that any deterioration in lifting equipment can be detected and remedied in a timely manner. Lifting equipment must be inspected for defects before use. Lifting equipment that is exposed to conditions causing deterioration which is liable to result in hazardous situations must be thoroughly examined: At least every six months if the equipment is used for lifting persons. At least every six months in the case of other lifting equipment. Always in accordance with the manufacturer's examination schedule. Whenever exceptional circumstances have occurred that are likely to jeopardise the safety of the equipment. Always by an independent competent person. Such independent persons may be provided by internal Inspection Departments, provided that these are of proven competency and are sufficiently remote from the organisations that have to operate the lifting equipment.

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Further information on the requirements for lifting operations can be found in UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations on Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment [Ref. 4]. 4.7 Crane/Forklift Operator competence In addition to the general competency requirements as detailed in Section 9, specific competency tests must be applied to all crane/forklift operators. These must be in possession of valid training certificates for the specific equipment that they are tasked to operate. Also, it must be verified if they are competent to perform safe load calculations. In addition, crane operators must be able to communicate verbally in the language spoken by the lifting supervisor and the banksman/signaler. This may require multi-language skills. 4.8 Lifting Supervisor competence Persons tasked with the supervision of lifting operations must be able to demonstrate: That they are fully familiar with the lifting equipment in use i.e. physical capabilities and limitations In depth knowledge of lifting equipment certification requirements In depth knowledge requirements of lifting equipment operator competency

Competency to conduct Job Hazard Analysis and risk assessment (see Section 4.6). Ability to communicate verbally in the language spoken by the equipment operator, banksman/signaller as well as plant operations supervision. This may require multi-language skills.

Especially for critical lifts in facilities that contain hydrocarbons, the lifting supervisor must be familiar with: 4.9 The potential hazards and their risk potential in the immediate vicinity of the ongoing lifting operations The immediate emergency response requirements if loss-of-containment where to occur during lifting operations.

Banksman/Signaller competence A banksman/signaler is essentially the eye of the lifting equipment operator on the ground. Minimum competency requirements for this key job include: Ability to demonstrate full understanding of principles weight-movementforce and s clear understanding of dangers of moving loads.

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If lifting operations without radio contact (with crane operator), detailed knowledge of hand signal communication method. If lifting operations using radio (for communication with crane operator) ability to use radio and communicate with clear instructions/signals. Ability to communicate verbally in the language spoken by the equipment operator and lifting supervisor. This may require multi-language skills.

Especially for critical lifts in facilities that contain hydrocarbons, the lifting supervisor must be familiar with: The potential hazards and their risk potential in the immediate vicinity of the ongoing lifting operations The immediate emergency response requirements if loss-of-containment where to occur during lifting operations.

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5.

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
All electrically powered equipment used at ADNOC (or Group Companies) work sites by an employee or contractor is defined as electrical equipment. This includes, but is not limited to, fixed and portable systems and hand tools. Examples of types of electrical equipment used at Group Company sites include: Welding tools (e.g. MIG welder). Portable lighting. Mains powered (e.g. drills, saws, press, grinder). Cordless, battery powered (drills, screw drivers). Hand held detectors. Office equipment (e.g. computers, photocopiers). Catering equipment (kettles, microwave oven).

5.1

TOOLS, APPLIANCES AND MOBILE EQUIPMENT

5.1.1 General Requirements A reputable manufacturer must construct all electrical tools, mobile equipment to a recognised international standard. designed for the supply voltage and frequency with which they The rated voltage and frequency must be clearly identified on equipment. appliances and They must be are to be used. the body of the

The inspection, testing and use of electrical tools and mobile equipment must be in accordance with section 5.2 5.1.2 Plugs and Socket Outlets Plugs and socket outlets used outdoors or in industrial or semi-industrial environments must be to IEC 309, BS EN 60309 or an equivalent standard. Plugs and socket environments must They must have a manually switched. outlets used indoor in domestic, office or commercial be to BS 1363, BS EN 60307 or an equivalent standard. minimum current rating of 13 A, and must be individually, The plugs must be impact resistant.

Plug and socket pin configurations must be such as to prevent inadvertent use of the tools, appliances or equipment with the wrong supply voltage. Multi-socket outlet boxes may be used to provide additional socket outlets when required, but must be provided with no more than four socket outlets in each box. The use of socket outlet adaptors is prohibited.

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5.1.3 Leads and Extension Cords Leads and extension cords used outdoors or in industrial or semi-industrial environments must be rubber insulated and sheathed with heavy-duty neoprene. Leads and extension cords used in domestic, office or commercial environments must be PVC or rubber insulated and sheathed with heavy-duty PVC. Conductors used in leads and extension cords must have a cross-sectional area providing a current rating no less than the rating of the circuit protection device, but must in any case not be less than 1.5 mm2. Extension cords must not be more than 50m long. They must not be used to extend more than one level above or below the worksite and as far as is practical must be protected or kept clear of the floor or ground. 5.1.4 Power Tools The term power tools covers the following electrically operated equipment: hand lamps hand held power tools such as drills and grinders fixed power tools such as drill presses bench saws and large moving tools such as plate grinders and polishers

Power tools are classified in accordance with IEC Standards as follows: Class I: Tools having basic insulation and which include a means of connection of exposed metal parts to a protective conductor. Class II: Tools, which are double insulated or which have reinforced insulation, and which are not intended to be earthed. Class III: Tools, which receive supply at Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV). The use of Class II or Class III power tools is always preferred, and is mandatory for hand lamps and hand held power tools. Fixed power tools such as drill presses, and bench saws, and large moving power tools such as plate grinders and polishers, may be Class I type if no suitable Class II or Class III power tool is available. Class I power tools must only be used with a power supply connected via either a 30mA Residual Current Device, or an isolating transformer. The earth connection to the Class I power tool must preferably be located externally and be easily visible for inspection. Details of the various types of Portable Equipment, their permissible voltages and their applications are provided in Appendix 1.

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5.1.5 Appliances The term appliances covers items such as urns, kettles, vacuum cleaners and other domestic or commercial equipment. The use of Class II appliances is preferred wherever possible. Class I appliances may be used where Class II appliances are not available. Class I appliances must only be used with a power supply connected via either a 30mA Residual Current Device, or an isolating transformer. Care should be taken to ensure that the earth connection is in sound condition and that the appliance lead is not damaged. 5.1.6 Mobile Generator Sets Mobile generator sets may be required when no suitable permanent mains supply is available. The frame and neutral of mobile generator sets must be connected to earth. The maximum acceptable resistance to earth is 4 ohms. Mobile generator sets must be provided with over-current devices to protect the distribution switchboard and connecting cables. In addition, mobile generator sets with ratings of 50kVA and above must be provided with earth-fault protection devices. For large mobile generator sets the protection devices may be located in the distribution switchboard; for small units they must be located on the generator skid. Where the protection devices are located at the distribution switchboard, the cables from the generator to the switchboard must be mechanically protected and must be as short as possible. Mobile generators sets must be provided with a means of isolating the generator supply from the distribution system. The means of isolation may be installed either at the generator, or at the point where the incoming generator supply connects to the distribution switchboard. 5.1.7 Electric Welding Machines Electric welding machines must be the DC type. AC welding machines may only be used if approved, in writing, by the Contract Holder. A return cable must always be connected between the work piece and the welding machine, with the connection to the workpiece being as close as possible to the point of work. The return cable must be an integral part of the machine. Steel structures and pipelines must not be used as return paths. Diesel engine driven welding machines that provide auxiliary power supplies must be earthed in accordance with the requirements for mobile generator sets. GTAW (TIG) welding machines must be provided with a remote control switch which controls the gas flow and DC output of the machine. The switch must be a

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non-latching type which, when released, cuts off the DC and HF output. GTAW welding machines must be provided with weather protection enclosures. When using the HF starters of GTAW welding machines in operational areas, care must be taken to minimize potential interference with instrumentation and communication equipment. The following precautions are recommended: The welding machine should be installed as close as possible to the work piece. The welding machine casing earth terminal should be connected to the local earth. The welding machine frequency generator should not be operated within 15m of communication and/or instrument circuits. Where this is not possible, the operator of the facility should be advised of the potential for interference within the circuits and must agree to the placement of the equipment.

5.2

Electrical Hazards and Preventative Action Electrical hazards may arise from: Incorrect selection of equipment for the task and/or location in which it is being used, for example, the use of Domestic tools, cables or sockets in an Industrial environment. Inadequate design and/or substandard construction or installation of electrical equipment Inadequate standards of protection or maintenance or from inappropriate use of the equipment.

Such hazards can lead to electric shock, electric burns or can result in damaged equipment, an explosion or fire. Preventative actions against the risks associated with electrical hazards must cover the following: Selection of the most appropriate equipment for the environment in which it is being used and for the task being undertaken Inspection of all electrical equipment, particularly portable hand-held tools. Checking suitable equipment is installed for circuit protection and testing this equipment. Avoidance of work near live conductors. The use of proper systems and methods of working. Ensuring that those using electrical equipment are competent to do so.

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5.3

Inspection and Testing of Electrical Tools and Portable Equipment All electrical tools and mobile equipment must be inspected and tested prior to first use and at recommended intervals not exceeding six months thereafter. In addition, all mobile electrical equipment must be inspected each time the equipment is relocated. On successful completion of testing and inspection, it is recommended that an inspection tag must be fixed to the tool or item of equipment. It is the responsibility of the owners of tools and equipment to ensure that testing and inspection is carried out correctly and in a timely manner. Each owner of tools and equipment must maintain an Inspection Register. The Inspection Register must include: the serial number, type of equipment, last inspection date, next scheduled inspection date for every tool and item of equipment owned.

Tools and equipment owned by the Company must be inspected and tested by an Authorised Electrical Person. Tools and equipment owned by Contractors must be inspected and tested by a Qualified Electrical Person with experience and qualifications at least equivalent to an Electrical Foreman. Electrical tools and mobile equipment for which the due inspection date has passed must not be used until re-inspected. Where the due inspection date has passed without re-inspection, a Do Not Use tag must be attached to the tool or equipment. The inspection and testing of electrical tools and mobile equipment must include: A visual check of the external condition for physical damage or deterioration. Inspection of power and earth connections. Inspection of the supply cable or lead. Insulation resistance test of equipment and leads. (Minimum acceptable values are given in Appendix 2) Checking the polarity of plug and socket connections. Checking the operation of protection devices including shutoff switches, Residual Current Devices and protection relays.

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In addition to the formal inspection and testing conducted in accordance with the above requirements, it is the responsibility of all users of tools and equipment to ensure that the tool and/or equipment is in sound condition prior to each use. 5.4 Suitability of Electrical Equipment No electrical equipment must be used where the strength and capability of the equipment may be exceeded in such a way as may give rise to danger. When selecting portable equipment, domestic types of equipment such as power tools, cables and sockets must not be substituted for industrial types in industrial environments. This must be followed at all times, irrespective of whether risk is foreseeable. Before electrical equipment is used, it must be properly selected and adequately rated for the work to be carried out by a competent person. 5.5 Siting of Electrical Equipment in Adverse or Hazardous Environments Electrical equipment must be constructed or protected in such a way so as to prevent danger from exposure to the following conditions: 5.6 Mechanical damage. The effects of weather, natural hazards, temperature or pressure. The effects of wet, dirty, dusty or corrosive conditions. The effects of any flammable or explosive substances, including dusts, vapours and gases.

Insulation, Protection and Placement of Conductors All electrical conductors must be suitably placed in such a manner as to prevent danger to persons and ideally should be suitably covered with insulating material. If it is not possible to insulate fully, live conductors must be placed out of reach and therefore in a safe position. In this event, if conductors are likely to come within reach occasionally, e.g. when a ladder is used, then a safe system of work must be used to limit or control access.

5.7

Earthing and Other Precautions Precautions must be taken, either by earthing or other suitable means, to prevent danger arising when it is reasonable to assume that any conductor (other than a circuit conductor) will become charged. This might occur when a system is misused or there is a fault in the system. Precautionary measures include earthing the conductive parts that can be touched by connection to the earth. This includes metal-cased equipment. Risks can be reduced when using electrical equipment by the following methods: Cross bonding (equipotential bonding). Use of a residual current device (RCD) or ground fault circuit interrupter.

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Reduction of voltage, e.g. 110-volt centre-tapped transformer, current limiting devices. Ensuring work is carried out in an earth-free environment, e.g. when testing electrical equipment.

In a Restrictive Conductive Location, only Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV) portable equipment is to be used. See Appendix 1, Table of Power Supplies and Applications. 5.8 Integrity of Referenced Connectors If a circuit conductor is connected to earth or to any other reference point, nothing which might reasonably be expected to give rise to danger, by breaking electrical continuity or introducing high impedance, should be placed in that conductor, unless suitable precautions have been taken. This requirement is especially important in the case of three-phase supplies, where the neutral conductor is connected to earth at source in the distribution system, so that phase voltages are not adversely affected by unbalanced loading. This does not mean that certain electrical devices, like joints or bolted links, cannot be connected in referential circuit conductors, as long as suitable precautions have been taken to ensure that no danger is caused from their use, or from their installation or removal. Fuses, thyristors, transistors and the like must not be installed in this way, as they could give rise to danger if they become open circuit. Every joint or connection in a system must be both mechanically and electrically suitable for use. This requirement includes the connections to plugs, sockets and other means of joining or connecting conductors. 5.9 Excess Current Protection Efficient measures must be provided for protecting every part of a system from excess of current as may be necessary to prevent danger. Faults may occur in electrical systems and as such protective devices, such as fuses or circuit breakers, must be installed to ensure that all parts of an electrical system are safeguarded from potential fault conditions. The main fault conditions are overloads, short circuits and earth faults. In all cases the protective device aims to detect the abnormal current flowing and then to interrupt it before damage or injury is caused. 5.10 Isolation of Electrical Equipment Suitable means must exist for cutting off the electrical supply and isolating all electrical equipment. Isolation means the disconnection and separation of electrical equipment from every source of electrical energy in such a way that this disconnection is secure.

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5.11

Precautions for Working on Equipment Made Dead Adequate precautions must be taken in respect of electrical equipment which has been made dead or Zero Energy State in order to ensure that, while work is being carried out on or near that equipment, there is no danger of the equipment becoming directly or indirectly electrically charged. This must include precautions for stored charges in inductive or capacitive circuits. Accidents can easily occur when working on a de-energised system which inadvertently is still live or becomes live whilst work is being carried out. A safe system of work must therefore be used. This must include the following: Isolation from all points of electrical supply. Securing each point of isolation, e.g. by locking off. Earthing the equipment being worked on, preferably using separate standard earthing devices and with normal earthing disconnected from the main plant earthing system(s). Testing and thereby verifying that the equipment is dead before commencing work. Creating a safe working zone only accessible to authorised persons. Safeguarding from other live conductors in proximity, e.g. by screening. Issuing a permit to work.

5.12

Work on or Near Live Conductors No person must carry out work on or near live conductors (other than one suitably covered in insulating material) unless: It is unreasonable for the conductor to be dead. Suitable precautions, including the provision of suitable protective equipment, are taken to prevent injury.

There are some circumstances where it is permitted to carry out live work, such as where it is not practicable to carry out work with the equipment dead (e.g. during testing), or where making the equipment dead may endanger other users of the equipment. In such cases, strict systems of safe work must be adopted. 5.13 General Precautions Live work must only ever be carried out by competent persons who are in possession of adequate information about the nature of the work and the system. Appropriate insulated tools, equipment and protective clothing (e.g. rubber gloves or rubber mats) must be used as well as screens. Such work must only be carried out with another competent person present, if this is required to minimise the risk of injury, positioned at a safe distance for monitoring the work as well as giving assistance as/when needed. In addition, access to the work area must be restricted and earth-free work areas established.

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No person must engage in any work activity where technical knowledge or experience is necessary to prevent danger or injury, unless they possess such knowledge or experience or they are under strict supervision by a suitably experienced, competent person. For further information on the safe use electrical equipment, refer to UK Health and Safety Executive publication on Electricity at Work, Safe Working Practices [Ref. 6] and Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations [Ref. 7]. Additional information on testing electrical equipment can be found in UK Health and Safety Executive publication on Safety in Electrical Testing at Work [Ref. 8].

[6] Electricity at Work, Safe Working Practices, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1993, ISBN 071760442X.. [7] Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1994 No. 3260. [8] Safety in Electrical Testing at Work, UK Health and Safety Executive, 2002, ISBN 0717622967.

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6.

ACCESS EQUIPMENT
All equipment used for the purposes of access or egress at ADNOC (or Group Company) work sites by an employee or contractor is defined as access equipment. This includes, but is not limited, to fixed and portable access equipment. Examples of types of access equipment are listed below: Ladders. Trestles. Scaffolding. Suspended access cradles. Personal suspension equipment). equipment (boatswain chairs and abseiling

Mast elevated work platforms. Power operated mobile work platforms.

6.1

Preventing Falls from a Height So far as is reasonably practicable, suitable and effective measures must be taken to prevent: Any person falling a distance likely to cause personal injury. Any person being struck by a falling object likely to cause personal injury.

Any area from which this might happen must be clearly indicated, particularly in the case of pits and tanks. Suitable and effective preventative measures are: Fencing - this should prevent persons falling from edges or objects falling on to them and must be sufficiently high to prevent falls over or through it. Covering - this should prevent persons from falling into pits, tanks, vats, sumps, kiers etc. and must be sufficiently strong to support the loads imposed on them. Fixed ladder - this must only be used when a staircase is impractical and must be of sound construction, properly maintained and securely fixed. For further information on ladders see Section 6.4 below.

In addition to the above, the risk of falls occurring must be minimised by ensuring that all access equipment is properly and regularly maintained. Consideration must also be given to fragile materials. No person must pass or work on or from fragile material unless suitable platforms, coverings or other means of support are used so that the weight of the person is securely supported. Where fragile materials exist and there is a possible risk of persons not being aware of this, clear warning signs must be posted. As a general rule, any work to or with fragile material must be covered by Permit To Work procedures.

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6.2

Work Platforms A working platform is defined as any platform used as a place of work or as a means of access or egress to a place of work. Working platforms must conform to the following standards: They must be of sufficient strength and rigidity for the intended use. They must be erected under the supervision of a qualified person and tagged after completion. They must be used in a manner that prevents accidental displacement. They must remain stable at all times, including during and after modification. They must be of sufficient dimensions to permit free passage of persons and safe use of equipment and materials. They must be at least 600 millimetres wide. They must be constructed so that the surface has no gap likely to cause injury or through which an object could fall on to any person below. They must be used and maintained to prevent slipping or tripping. They must be provided with guardrails, toe boards, handholds and footholds, as necessary, to prevent any person from slipping or falling. They must only be sited on surfaces which are stable and attached to structures which are secure and of sufficient strength and rigidity. Larger platforms must have more than one means of safe access/egress for escape purposes.

6.3

Personal Suspension Equipment Personal suspension equipment is defined as equipment used by an individual for suspended access purposes (e.g. abseiling equipment or boatswain chair). Personal suspension equipment must be inspected by a competent person before each use (in addition to the inspection requirements stated in 6.5). It must only be used by personnel who have received specific training in its use and who have formally demonstrated their competence. Personal suspension equipment must be: Well above sufficient strength with regards to the work being carried and the load it will bear, so that a measure of safety is included. Securely attached to a structure or plant and the structure or plant must be well above sufficient strength to support the load, so that a measure of safety is included. Installed or attached so as to prevent uncontrolled movement of equipment or impact loading.

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In addition: Suitable steps must be taken to prevent any person falling or slipping. Suitable steps must be taken to ensure, in the event of a fall, the equipment can bear the additional stresses and that the equipment does not cause injury to a person.

6.4

Ladders Owing to the large number of fatalities and serious injuries to persons using ladders, they must not be used as a place of work or a means of access or egress to or from a place of work unless it is unreasonable not to do so. Ladders must be: Of sufficient strength for their intended purpose and maximum permitted load must be posted visibly on the ladder. So erected as to avoid displacement and based on a stable and firm surface. If more than three metres in height, secured, or where not secured then supported by an additional person. Where the top of the ladder is used as means of access to another level, extended to a sufficient height (one metre as a minimum) above that level so as to provide a safe handhold. Where a ladder or run of ladders rises vertically nine metres or more above its base, it must be provided with a safe landing area or rest platform at suitable intervals.

6.5

Installation and Inspection of Access Equipment The installation of access equipment must always be carried out by, or under the supervision of, a competent person. General information on inspection and testing of access equipment is given in Sections 3 of this document. In addition, access equipment must be inspected by a competent person: Before being used for the first time. After any substantial addition, dismantling or alteration. At regular intervals not exceeding seven days.

Inspection records must be kept that show: Name and position of person carrying out inspection. Location of equipment. Description of what is inspected.

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6.6

Date and time of inspection. Details of anything that could cause risk. Details of any consequent action. Details of any further action considered necessary.

Falling Objects or Materials In order to prevent danger to any person, suitable steps must be taken to prevent the fall of any material or object. Where it is not reasonably possible to introduce preventative measures to prevent falling objects or material, suitable steps must be taken to prevent any person from being struck by a falling object or material e.g. protective barriers/covers. Under these circumstances, consideration must also be given as to not permitting simultaneous work at multiple levels. In addition: No material or object must be thrown or tipped from a height where it is likely to cause injury. Material or equipment must be stored so as to prevent danger to any person from: Collapse. Overturning. Unintentional movement. For further information on the safe use of access equipment see UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations on Workplace (Health and Safety and Welfare) [Ref. 9] and Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) [Ref. 10].

[9] Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1992 No. 3004. [10] Construction (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1996 No. 1592.

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7.

EQUIPMENT SUITABILITY AND PERSONNEL COMPETENCY


Any equipment used by ADNOC (or Group Companies) personnel or contractors must be suitable to do the job for which it is being used. Equally important, the persons using the equipment must be deemed to be competent to do so.

7.1

Equipment Specifications The Site Manager must ensure that specifications are laid down in writing for all equipment that is used at or around the work site. Specifications will normally be based upon manufacturer's recommendations and must include the following: Equipment Type. Equipment Use. Capacity/Limitations. Operator Training. Maintenance/Testing. Protection Systems. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Special Rules

Any type of equipment that has an operator must be subjected to this type of specification; examples include drills, cutting devices, vehicles, lifting equipment etc. Regular audits must be conducted by the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) to ensure that equipment is being used only as specified. 7.2 Operators It is the responsibility of the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) to ensure that all personnel operating equipment on or around an ADNOC (or Group Company) worksite are competent to do so and that the correct protection is in place when equipment is being operated. For further information on protection see Sections 10 and 11. A system of competency management / assurance must be maintained for every work site. For further information on competency of personnel see Section 9 - Operator Competency and Training.

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8.
8.1

EQUIPMENT REGISTER, INSPECTION, TESTING AND MAINTENANCE


Equipment Register In order to ensure that equipment used is fit for purpose, correctly maintained and therefore safe, it is necessary to keep a register and, where applicable, regularly inspect and test all equipment used on site (see section 5.3 on Inspection and Testing of Electrical Tools and Portable Equipment). The Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must ensure that all equipment used on site has been recorded on the site equipment register. The register must record the following information: Type of equipment. Serial number. Location of equipment on site.

In addition, the equipment register will record all inspection and testing requirements as follows: 8.2 Type and frequency of inspection/test required. Date last inspected/tested. Date next inspection/test due.

Inspection and Testing Inspection and testing must be in accordance with manufacturer's guidelines and/or particular site conditions. If any piece of equipment fails an inspection and/or test, it must be immediately removed from service until it has been repaired and re-inspected/retested. Alternatively, it may be decommissioned and permanently removed from service. Inspection and testing of equipment is required in addition to routine planned maintenance (see Sections 8.2 and 8.3). Where contractors bring their own equipment onto an ADNOC (or Group Company) worksite, they must provide evidence that effective inspection and testing has been carried out. It may be necessary for additional inspection and testing to be carried out, before equipment is permitted to be used on site. The Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must ensure that this process is adhered to. Logbooks must be kept to demonstrate that all of the above has occurred

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8.3

Maintenance A vital part of ensuring that equipment is kept in a safe working condition is proper maintenance. Maintenance must always be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer's recommended schedule. Maintenance records must be kept up to date and stored for all work equipment. In some cases, where a site has a particularly large amount of equipment requiring maintenance, it will be necessary to introduce a maintenance management system (MMS). In this event the MMS will control maintenance by automatically issuing planned maintenance routines in accordance with requirements inputted for each item of equipment. Whether a MMS is used or not, as a minimum, maintenance for site equipment must be controlled as follows: All equipment must be maintained in accordance with manufacturer's schedule. The date maintenance is carried out must be recorded. The type of maintenance undertaken must be recorded (e.g. minor / major service). The date the next maintenance requirement is due must be recorded. The above recorded information must be kept safely stored, and must be made available to the operator if required. Regular audits must be carried out to ensure maintenance schedules are being followed.

Equipment must never be used if it is past its maintenance service due date. All operators and their supervisors must have access to service records to ensure this. Where contractors bring their own equipment on to an ADNOC (or Group Company) worksite, provision must be made to see evidence that effective maintenance is being carried out. The Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must ensure that this process is adhered to.

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9.

OPERATOR COMPETENCY AND TRAINING


At every ADNOC (or Group Company) worksite, the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must ensure that personnel records are kept on every employee or contractor. As a minimum requirement, an individual's record must show the following: What equipment they are trained to operate (e.g. lifting equipment). Evidence of training undertaken (e.g. training certificate showing duration of validity). That they have been instructed in the use of minimum required personal protective equipment whilst on site (e.g. hard hat, eye protection, overalls etc.). See Section 11. That they have been trained to use special safety equipment where applicable (e.g. suitable eye protection when welding, protective guards when cutting etc.). That they have undergone site safety induction and any other site specific training requirements (e.g. H2S Awareness Training). That they have undertaken the correct materials handling training. See Section 11.

The Site Manager must ensure that no person operates equipment unless they are correctly trained to do so and that evidence of this exists within their personnel file. It is likely that the Site Manager will delegate this responsibility to Site Supervisors.

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10.

PROTECTION SYSTEMS AND WARNINGS


All work equipment where operation poses hazards must have the correct protection systems fitted and, where appropriate, warnings must be clearly posted. Protection systems fitted must, as a minimum, adhere to manufacturer's stated recommendations. Examples of protection systems include the following: Guards for powered equipment to protect the operator from flying objects, dust etc. Guards may be fixed or movable, or in some cases interlocking, whereby equipment will not operate until the guard is correctly in place. Seat belts fitted to all moving vehicles to protect driver and passengers from vehicle impact. Emergency shutdown (stop) facility for any high-powered tools or machinery (power saw, drill, grinder etc.). Automatic trip device, protecting from injury caused by physical contact or electric shock.

Protection systems must be subjected to the same level of maintenance as the equipment to which they are fitted. Warnings posted must clearly state the nature of the risk and any appropriate action, for example 'High Noise Level - Ear Protection Must Be Used'. Warning signs must use simple, clear graphics to support the written message, (e.g. a picture of someone wearing ear protectors). Warnings must also be translated into sufficient languages that operators/employees can read/understand. In some cases it may be necessary to paint certain parts of machinery in a highly visible colour to highlight where danger exists. Further information is available from the EC Safety Signs Directive [Ref. 11].

[11] EC Safety Signs Directive (92/58/EEC).

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11.

PERSONAL PROTECTION AND SAFETY


When working on any work site there are always unforeseen hazards that can be protected against by use of personal protective equipment (PPE). It is the responsibility of the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) to enforce the use of PPE that is appropriate for the types of hazards found on a worksite. Site policy will dictate a minimum level of mandatory PPE normally based upon the following: Safety helmet. Protective overalls. Steel capped boots or equivalent (e.g. safety shoes). Approved eye protection.

In addition, the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) will determine on the use of the following: Hearing protection. Protective gloves.

For further information on and standards to be applied for PPE see ADNOC Code of Practice on PPE [Ref. 12] and UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations on PPE at Work [Ref. 13]. In addition, where workers are exposed to high levels of noise, further information can be found in the UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations on Noise at Work [Ref. 14] and in the ADNOC Guideline on Hearing Conservation and Noise Control [Ref. 15]. The Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must ensure that persons involved in manual handling or who handle or transport hazardous materials are properly trained, which includes training for the use of respiratory protection equipment if applicable. For further information on manual handling and hazardous materials see UK Health and Safety Executive Regulations on Manual Handling Operations [Ref. 16] and COSHH [Ref. 17].

[12.ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Personal Protective Equipment, ADNOC-COPV4-04. [13] Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1992, ISBN 0118863347. [14] Noise at Work Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1989, ISBN 0717615111. [15] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline on Noise Control and Hearing Conservation, ADNOC-COPV3-10. [16] Manual Handling Operations Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1992, ISBN 0118863355, HSE. [17] The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1994 No. 3246 (COSHH).

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12.

RISK ASSESSMENT
In order that all the hazards associated with work equipment are fully understood and effectively managed, a risk assessment must be carried out prior to use. Risk assessment must not be limited to examining work equipment. Equally important are the conditions in which the work is to be carried out and other personnel that might be affected by the work. It is the responsibility of the Site Manager (or his nominated designate) to ensure that regular risk assessments are carried out on site in accordance with the requirements/expectations of ADNOC HSEMS [Ref. 18] and/or equivalent Group Company HSEMS. Risk Assessments must be in accordance ADNOC Guideline on Risk Assessment and Quantitative Risk Assessment [Ref. 19] and/or equivalent Group Company procedures for risk assessment. The Site Manager (or his nominated designate) must appoint a suitably qualified Competent Person to carry out work site risk assessments. The following steps should be used to assist in this process: Look for the hazards. The appointed competent person must walk around the work site and look at what could reasonably be expected to cause harm. In particular, they must concentrate on significant hazards that could result in serious harm to people. The competent person must ask personnel at the work site what they think - they may have noticed things that are not immediately obvious to the competent person. Manufacturers instructions or data sheets can help to identify hazards and put risks in their true perspective. Accident / incident records will also give a good indication of a work site's past history. Decide who might be harmed and how. The competent person must identify who is most at risk (for example new employees, trainees). Evaluate the risks and decide whether existing precautions are adequate or more must be done. The competent person must consider how likely it is that any hazard could cause harm. This will determine whether or not it is necessary to do more to reduce the risk. Even after all precautions have been taken, some residual risk will always remain. The competent person must decide for each identified hazard whether the residual risk is significant and whether further action is required. The main objective is to make all risks as low as reasonably practicable, by adding to existing precautions as necessary. Work must not proceed until all additional mitigation measures are in place and verified. In controlling risks, the competent person must apply the following principles: Verify that existing precautions being properly used (e.g. is permit to work system being followed correctly). Try a lower risk option to prevent access to the hazard (e.g. by guarding). Organize work to reduce exposure to the hazard.

[18] ADNOC Group Guideline: Health, Safety and Environmental Management System (HSEMS), January 2002.

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Issue appropriate personal protective equipment. Provide welfare facilities (e.g. emergency washing facilities for removal of contamination, first aid facility etc.). The competent person must record significant findings of the assessment. This means writing down the significant hazards and actions taken. For example: Electrical installations: insulation and earthing checked and found sound. Fumes from welding: local exhaust ventilation provided.

Where findings are likely to affect any person at the worksite, they must be informed of relevant details. All assessment records must be stored and kept available for future reference. At some point, it is likely that new equipment, substances and procedures will be introduced to the work site that could lead to new hazards. If there is any significant change, the assessment must be reviewed to take account of any new hazards. If necessary carry out a new assessment. Appendix 3 provides a suitable template for carrying out the risk assessment. (Note: If hazardous chemicals are being used at the work site, ADNOC Guidelines on use of Hazardous Chemicals must be followed). For more detailed information on Risk Assessment see ADNOC Guideline on Risk Assessment and Quantitative Risk Assessment [Ref. 19], ADNOC Framework COP on Management of Occupational Safety Risk [Ref. 20], ADNOC HSE Risk Management Guidelines [Ref. 21].

[19] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline on Risk Assessment and Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA), ADNOC-COPV5- 03. [20] ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Framework of Occupational Safety Risk Management, ADNOC-COPV4-01. [21] ADNOC Group Guideline: HSE Risk Management, March 2000.

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13.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

REFERENCES
Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations (PUWER), UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717624595. Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER), UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717624641. Five Steps to Risk Assessment, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717615650. Using Work Equipment Safely, UK Health and Safety Executive, 2002, ISBN 623890. Safe Use of Work Equipment Approved Codes of Practice and Guidance, L22, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1998, ISBN 0717616266. Electricity at Work, Safe Working Practices, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1993, ISBN 071760442X. Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1994 No. 3260. Safety in Electrical Testing at Work, UK Health and Safety Executive, 2002, ISBN 0717622967. Workplace (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1992 No. 3004. Construction (Health, Safety & Welfare) Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1996 No. 1592. EC Safety Signs Directive (92/58/EEC). ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Personal Protective Equipment, ADNOC-COPV4-04. Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1992, ISBN 0118863347. Noise at Work Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1989, ISBN 0717615111. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline on Noise Control and Hearing Conservation, ADNOC-COPV3-10. Manual Handling Operations Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, 1992, ISBN 0118863355, HSE. The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations, UK Health and Safety Executive, SI 1994 No. 3246 (COSHH). ADNOC Group Guideline: Health, Safety and Environmental Management System (HSEMS), January 2002.

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19. 20. 21. 22.

ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline on Risk Assessment and Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA), ADNOC-COPV5- 03. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Code of Practice on Framework of Occupational Safety Risk Management, ADNOC-COPV4-01. ADNOC Group Guideline: HSE Risk Management, March 2000. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice: Guideline on HSE Definitions & Abbreviations, ADNOC-COPV1-05.

Useful International Standards BS 7671 Requirements for Electrical Installations (IEE Wiring Regulations) BS EN 60309 Plugs, Socket Outlets and Couplers for Industrial Purposes BS 3535 / EN 60742 Isolating Transformers and Safety Transformers Part 1 : General Requirements Part 2: Specification for transformers for reduced system voltage BS 4363 Specification for Distribution Assemblies for Electricity Supplies for Construction and Building Sites BS EN 60439 Low Voltage Switchgear and Control gear Assemblies IEC 745 Safety of Hand Held Motor Operated Electric Tools 'Maintaining Portable and Transportable Electrical Equipment', UK Health and Safety Executive, ISBN 0 7176 2805 1, HSG107

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APPENDIX 1 TYPES OF EQUIPMENT, POWER SUPPLIES AND APPLICATION

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Appendix 1 Types of Equipment, Power Supplies and Applications


Location * Item Class Voltage Phase Special Provisions
Domestic Office Commercial Industrial Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Construction Site Restrictive Conductive Location Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Note 3 Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No No No No No No No

Hand Lamp

III III II I

25V 50V 110V 240(254)V 25V 50V 110V 240(254)V 110V 240(254)V 110V 240(254)V 110V 240(254)V

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 3 3

Safety isolating transformer Safety isolating transformer Safety isolating transformer 30mA RCD protection Safety isolating transformer Safety isolating transformer Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 100mA RCD protection Double wound transformer, secondary centre point earthed 30mA RCD protection 100mA RCD protection 100mA RCD protection

Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Note 1,2 Yes Note 1,2 Yes Note 1,2 Yes Note 1,2 Yes Yes Yes Note 1,2 Yes Note 1,2 Yes Yes

Hand held power tool

III III II II

Fixed Power tool

II or I II or I

Moving power tool

II or I II or I

Mobile lighting

Fixed lighting

110V 240(254)V

Small mobile equipment to 3.75 kW

110V 415(440)V

Small fixed equipment to 3.75 kW

110V 240(254)V

Mobile equipment 3.75 kW Mobile equipment 3.75 kW

415(440)V 415(440)V

Note that operational controls may be needed to be in place before the introduction of any electrically operated equipment into an area where flammable substances may be present.

Note 1: Acceptable when connected to a permanent electrical distribution system. Note 2: The use of these items when connected to a temporary electrical installation will be prohibited from 1st January 1998 Note 3: Prohibited from 1st January 1998.

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APPENDIX 2 MINIMUM VALUES OF INSULATION RESISTANCE

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Appendix 2 Minimum Values of Insulation Resistance The following recommended values for insulation Resistance are according to the IEE Wiring Regulations (BS 7671)
Nominal Voltage Extra Low Voltage Circuits supplied from a Safety Isolating Transformer 0 500V (Except as above) 500V 1000V Between SELV and associated LV circuits Test Voltage 250 Vdc 500 Vdc 1000 Vdc 500 Vdc Minimum Insulation Resistance 0.25 megohms 0.5 megohms 1.0 megohms 5.0 megohms

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APPENDIX 3 WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE

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WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT Item of work equipment Plant Register No. . Operations for which the work equipment used ... Frequency of use (regular / irregular) . Date of assessment ... Assessor ..
Yes, No, N/a Suitability It is constructed or adapted as to be suitable for the purpose for which it is used. It was selected taking into account working conditions, health risks and any additional risks posed by its use. It is only used for operations for which, and under conditions for which it is suitable. Maintenance It is maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair. The maintenance log, where used, is kept up to date. Specific Risks Where it is likely to involve a specific risk: (a) its use is restricted to designated trained users; (b) any repairs modifications or servicing are undertaken by specifically designated people. Information and Instructions Adequate health and safety information and where appropriate, written instructions, are available to users, managers and supervisors. The information and, where appropriate, the written instructions for use, include: the conditions in which, and the methods by which it may be used; foreseeable abnormal situations and the action taken if such a situation were to occur; any conclusions to be drawn from experience in using it. Information and instructions are readily comprehensible to users of the equipment. Level of Risk Low Med High

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Yes, No, N/a Training All people who use the equipment, managers and supervisors have received adequate training in the methods that may be adopted when using it, any risks its use may entail and precautions to be taken. Hazardous parts of machinery In the case of machinery, effective measures are taken: to prevent access to any part of machinery or rotating stock-bar; to stop the movement of any hazardous part of machinery or rotating stock-bar before anyone enters the danger lone. the provision of fixed guards: the provision of other guards or protection devices; the provision of jigs, holders, push sticks or similar protection appliances used in conjunction with the machinery; the provision of information on instruction, training and supervision. All guards and protection devices: are suitable for their purpose; are of good construction, sound material and of adequate strength; are maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and in good repair; do not give rise to increased health and safety risk; are not easily by-passed of disabled; are situated at sufficient distance from any danger zone; do not unduly restrict the view of the operating cycle of the machinery, where such a view is necessary; are so constructed or adapted that they allow operations necessary to fit or replace parts and for maintenance work, restricting access so that work allowed only to the area where it is to be carried out and if possible, without having to dismantle the guard or protection devices.

Level of Risk Low Med High

The above measures consist of:

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Yes, No, N/a Inspection If the answer to any of the following questions is yes then an inspection is required by a competent person to identify whether the equipment can be operated adjusted and maintained safely. Is there any risk from equipment being installed incorrectly and has the equipment been recently installed or re-installed? Is there a risk from deterioration of the work equipment? Are there any exceptional circumstances that could affect the safe running of the machine? Specified hazards: Measures listed below are taken to ensure that the exposure of the user to any of the under-mentioned risks to his health and safety are either prevented or adequately controlled, namely: measures other than the provision of the personal protective equipment or of information, instruction, training and supervision; include where appropriate, measures to minimise the effects of the hazard as well as the likelihood of the hazard occurring, with particular reference to: i) any article or substance falling or being ejected from the work equipment;

Level of Risk Low Med High

ii) rupture or disintegration of parts of the work equipment; iii) the work equipment catching fire or overheating; iv) the unintended or premature discharge of any article or of any gas, dust, liquid, vapour or other substance, that, in each case, is produced, used or stored in the work equipment; v) the unintended or premature explosion of the work equipment or any article or substance produced used or stored in it High or low temperature The work equipment, its parts and any article or substance produced, used or stored in it that, in each case, is at high or very low temperature has protection where appropriate, so as to prevent injury to any person by burning, scalding or searing.

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Yes, No, N/a Controls for starting or making a significant change in operating conditions Where appropriate, equipment is provided with one or more controls for the purposes of: starting it, including restarting after a stoppage; controlling any change in the speed, pressure or other operating conditions where such conditions after the change result in risk to health and safety that is greater than, or of a different nature to, such risks before the change. Where the above control is required, it is not possible to perform any operation above except by a deliberate action on such control. Stop controls Where appropriate, equipment is provided with one or more' readily accessible controls, the operation of which will bring it to a safe condition in a safe manner. Any control which brings the equipment to a complete stop where this is necessary for reasons of health and safety. If necessary for reasons of health and safety, any of the above controls switches off the power supply after stopping the functioning of the equipment. The above controls have priority over any control that starts or changes the operating conditions of the equipment. Emergency stop controls Where appropriate, it is provided with one or more readily accessible emergency stop controls unless it is not necessary due to the nature of the hazards and the time taken for the work equipment to come to a complete stop as a result of the action of any stop control. The control operates in priority to a stop control. Controls The controls are clearly visible and identifiable, including by appropriate marking where necessary. No control is in a position where any person operating the control is exposed to risk. Where appropriate: the operator of any control is able to ensure from the position of that control that no person is in a place where he could be exposed to a risk as a result of the operation of that control; contd

Level of Risk Low Med High

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Yes, No, N/a systems of work are effective to ensure that, when the equipment is about to start, no person is in a place where he would be exposed to risk; an audible, visible or other suitable warning is given when the equipment is about to start. Appropriate measures are taken to ensure that any person who is in a place where he would be exposed to risk as a result of the starting or stopping of work equipment has sufficient time and suitable means to avoid that risk. Control systems All control systems are safe that: their operation does not create any increased risk; they ensure that any fault in or damage to any part of the control system or the loss of supply to any source of energy cannot result in additional or increased risk; they do not impede the operation stop control or emergency stop control. Isolation from sources of energy Where appropriate, the equipment is provided with suitable, clearly identifiable and readily assessible means to isolate it from all sources of energy. Appropriate measures are taken to ensure that reconnection of any energy source does not expose the user to risk. Stability Where necessary, the equipment or any part of it, is stabilised by clamping. Lighting Suitable and sufficient lighting, which takes account of the operations to be carried out, is provided at the places where the equipment is used. Maintenance operations Appropriate measures are taken to ensure that the equipment is constructed or adapted in such a way that maintenance operations which involve a risk can be carried out while the equipment is shut down or, in other cases. Maintenance operations can be carried out without exposing the maintenance operator to risk; appropriate measures can be taken for the protection of any maintenance operator exposed to a risk.

Level of Risk Low Med High

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Yes, No, N/a Markings The equipment is marked in a clearly visible manner with any marking appropriate for health and safety. Warnings The equipment incorporates any warnings or warning devices appropriate for the reasons of health and safety. Warnings given by warning devices are unambiguous, easily perceived and easily understood. Mobile Work Equipment Does the equipment carry people (operator, driver or passenger)? If so: Is there protection against people falling from the equipment? Is a suitable seat required? Are cabs, operator stations and work platforms designed correctly with side, front and rear guard rails or barriers? Is a restraint system needed? Is equipment operated within safe speeds? Are guards/barriers fitted to wheels/tracks and do these adequately prevent contact? Is the equipment stable? Is protection against roll over required? Can the work equipment be started by unauthorized persons? Is there any risk of collision? Does the equipment have devices for braking and stopping? Is an emergency stop, or automatic stopping systems required? Does the driver have a clear direct line of vision whilst operating the work equipment? If not, are devices in place that will improve his vision? Is the equipment operated in dark places or at night? If so, is adequate lighting provided? Are any flammable substances carried by the work equipment? If so, is suitable fire fighting equipment on board? Is the work equipment remote controlled? If so: does it stop automatically once it is out of range of control range?; are measures in place to reduce the risk of crushing or impact? Is there a risk to safety from the seizure of the drive shaft?

Level of Risk Low Med High

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WORK EQUIPMENT RISK ASSESSMENT SUMMARY

Equipment Description: ... ... Principal Risks (Hazards/Consequences from general use): .. .. Specific Risks (Hazards/Consequences from use in specific operation/circumstances): ... ... Remedial Action: 1. 2. Immediate ... ... Short term (28 days) . Medium term (6 months) . Long term (over 12 months) .

3.

4.

Maintenance requirements: .. . Information, instruction, training and supervision requirements: . Date of next review:

Name / Signature / Date: ..