2

Monday, January 7, 2013
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Number of death row inmates
declines in Ohio, p3

Lady Wildcats, Jays fall
in non-league play, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Announcement 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
Mostly sunny
Tuesday.
Highs in
the upper
30s. Lows
in the lower
30s. See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Relay team offers
taco dinners
The Franklin Elementary
Relay for Life team will
offer Taco Dinners from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. On
Jan. 27 at the school.
Meals are carry-out only
and include 3 tacos, rice,
chips and salsa and a cookie.
Tickets can be purchased
by either contacting Shelly
Kroeger at 419-692-2409;
Joyce Wiechart at 419-303-
2443; or at the school office.
Proceeds go to the
Delphos Relay for Life.
Veterans Council
meets Thursday
The Delphos Veterans
Council will hold its win-
ter meeting at 7 p.m. on
Thursday at the VFW on
Fourth and Canal streets.
The meeting will be to
discuss Memorial Day activi-
ties and any other business
that may be brought up.
All veterans are wel-
come to attend.
Club to replace bridge at Waterworks Park
Information submitted
DELPHOS — The
Delphos Stadium Club will
take delivery of a rated 5-ton
walk bridge at Waterworks
Park at 8 a.m. on Tuesday.
The purchase of the pre-
engineered bridge was made
possible by generous contri-
butions from area founda-
tions, businesses and individ-
uals. They also received assis-
tance from National Lime &
Stone and K & L Ready Mix
through discounted prices on
foundation materials.
Several years ago, flood-
ing in the park put the exist-
ing bridge under water by
about 18 inches and at that
time, the embankments were
eroding badly. A minor fix
when the creek was cleaned
allowed a couple more years
of use but now is the time for
a new bridge. The old bridge
will be removed Tuesday
morning after the new bridge
has been installed.
The new 40-foot bridge
sports a 7-foot-wide walking
surface. It is being elevated on
par with State Route 66 to pre-
vent water from endangering
the bridge. The abutments are
wrapped with a rip rap stone
to stop erosion of the embank-
ments. Approach walks will
be built up and ground hauled
in to gently slope away from
the walkways.
“We are thrilled with the
overwhelming support from
our many volunteers who
make the park improvement
projects possible. We are also
thankful for funding from
local businesses, individuals,
organizations, the Arnold C.
Dienstberger Foundation, the
Mueller-Scherger Foundation
and the City of Delphos,”
John Nomina, Delphos
Stadium Club trustee, said.
The club will also work
with the Senior Citizen
Board and the City Parks
Department to design a walk-
way system connecting with
the Senior Citizens’ Center
to make the park more acces-
sible to seniors. The plans
will also include the addition
of benches and landscaping
in the park to allow leisurely
walks and opportunities to
relax and visit.
The $85,000 project
also includes landscaping
and concrete enhancements
around the rest rooms and
shelter houses.
The Delphos Stadium
Club’s goal is to keep
Delphos’s parks functional
and beautiful; the parks pro-
vide the community with
both recreational and edu-
cational opportunities. For
more information, to volun-
teer or send a contribution,
call 419-692-2731, email
Del phos St adi umCl ub@
yahoo.com or send to PO
Box 250, Delphos OH
45833.
First court
appearance
today for
Rockford
murder
suspect
BY ED GEBERT
Times Bulletin Editor
CELINA - The next step
in the murder case involving
Rockford resident Melinda
Shinn will happen this after-
noon in Celina. Suspect
Daniel Charles Martin, 40,
will make an initial appear-
ance in Mercer County Court
of Common Pleas.
The charge against Martin
is murder with firearms spec-
ifications. No plea is expect-
ed from Martin during the
appearance.
The 26-year-old Shinn
was found shot to death on
the morning of Nov. 8 in
the Rockford house trailer
she shared with Martin. By
the time police arrived at the
scene, there was no sign of
Martin and his vehicle was
also gone. That 1998 red Ford
Explorer was later found
abandoned in Fort Wayne.
Martin himself was eventu-
ally also located by authori-
ties in Fort Wayne. He was
apprehended on Jan. 2 after
nearly two months in hid-
ing. He had been followed by
investigators for several days
before his arrest.
A possible motive has
not officially been offered
but Mercer County Sheriff
Jeff Grey has noted that the
couple had been arguing the
night before Shinn’s body was
found. Text messages were
received by family members
indicating an argument was
ongoing that night.
Grey also revealed that
Shinn’s 9-year-old son had
been present in the mobile
home at the time of the shoot-
ing. He was not injured.
The investigation was
referred to the Mercer County
Sheriff’s Office at the request
of Rockford Police Chief
Paul May. According to May,
the shooting is the first such
case within the Village of
Rockford.
The body of Melinda Shinn was found Nov. 8 in this
mobile home on the north side of Rockford, shown here
on the day after the murder. (Times Bulletin file photo/Ed
Gebert)
Martin
NBC execs say it’s not a
‘shoot-’em-up’ network
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — NBC executives said Sunday they
are conscious about the amount of violence they air in the wake of
real-life tragedies like the Connecticut school shooting, but have
made no changes in what has gone on the air or what is planned.
NBC isn’t a “shoot-’em-up” network, said network entertain-
ment President Jennifer Salke.
The level of violence on television, in movies and video games
has been looked at as a contributing factor — along with the avail-
ability of guns and a lack of mental health services — in incidents
such as the Dec. 14 attack in a Newtown, Conn., school where 20
first-graders and six educators were killed.
Like many in Hollywood, NBC questioned a link between what
is put on the air and what is happening in society.
“It weighs on all of us,” said NBC Entertainment Chairman
Robert Greenblatt. “Most of the people at this network have chil-
dren and really care about the shows that we’re putting out there.
It’s always something that’s been on our mind but this brought it
to the forefront.”
NBC hasn’t needed to take any tangible steps like minimizing
violence in its programming or deemphasizing guns, Salke said,
because NBC didn’t have much violence on the air. It might be dif-
ferent “if we were the ‘shoot-’em-up’ network, she said.
She didn’t name such a network, but said violence might be an
issue on a network that airs many crime procedural shows. That’s
a staple of CBS’ lineup. Greenblatt, who was head of Showtime
when the “Dexter” series about a serial killer was developed, said
CBS’ “Criminal Minds” is “worse than ‘Dexter’ ever was.”
Within an hour after both executives spoke, NBC showed
reporters at a news conference highlights of its show “Revolution”
that included a swordfight, a standoff between two men with guns,
a bloodied man, a building blown up with a flying body and a
gunfight.
Later clips of the upcoming series “Deception” featured several
shots of a bloodied, dead body.
NBC also is developing a drama, “Hannibal,” based on one of
fiction’s most indelible serial killers, Hannibal Lecter. An airtime
for the show hasn’t been scheduled, but it could come this spring
or summer.
Salke said there is more violence in Fox’s upcoming drama
“The Following,” also about a serial killer, than there will be in
“Hannibal.” Much of the violence in the upcoming NBC show,
created by former “Heroes” producer Bryan Fuller, is implied and
not gratuitous.
“We respect the talent and like what he is doing, so we are
standing behind him,” Salke said. She said there’s been a spate of
programs about creepy killers because they’ve been such indelible
characters.
Greenblatt said he wasn’t trying to be glib, but one of the best
tonics for people upset about real-life violence is to watch an
episode of NBC’s “Parenthood.” He said it’s a great example of a
family that loves each other and grapples with many issues.
“Ultimately, I think you feel good at the end of the day,” he said.
Some gun shows canceling
after Conn. mass shooting
BY CHRIS CAROLA
and MICHAEL HILL
The Associated Press
SARATOGA SPRINGS,
N.Y. — Several gun shows,
all about an hour’s drive from
Newtown, Conn., have been
canceled.
A show in White Plains,
N.Y. — brought back a few
years ago after being called
off for a decade because of
the Columbine shooting — is
off because officials decid-
ed it didn’t seem appropri-
ate now, either. In Danbury,
Conn. — about 10 miles west
of Newtown — the venue
backed out. Same with three
other shows in New York’s
Hudson Valley, according to
the organizer.
Gun advocates aren’t back-
ing down from their insistence
on the right to keep and bear
arms. But heightened sensi-
tivities and raw nerves since
the Newtown shooting have
led to toned-down displays
at gun shows and prompted
some officials and sponsors to
cancel the well-attended exhi-
bitions altogether.
Some of the most popular
guns will be missing from
next weekend’s gun show in
Saratoga Springs, N.Y., after
show organizers agreed to bar
the display and sale of AR-15
military-style semiautomatic
weapons and their large-clip
magazines.
“The majority of people
wanted these guns out of the
city,” said Chris Mathiesen,
Saratoga Springs’ public safe-
ty commissioner. “They don’t
want them sold in our city,
and I agree. Newtown, Conn.,
is not that far away.”
The mayor of Barre, Vt.,
wants a ban on military-
style assault weapons being
sold at an annual gun show
in February. Mayor Thom
Lauzon says he supports
responsible gun ownership
but is making the request “as
a father.” The police chief
in Waterbury, Conn., just a
few miles from Newtown, has
halted permits for gun shows,
saying he was concerned about
firearms changing hands that
might one day be used in a
mass shooting.
In White Plains, in New
York’s suburban Westchester
County, Executive Rob
Astorino had brought back the
show in 2010 after a ban of
more than a decade following
“I don’t think it’s
fair that we’re
taking the brunt
of the prob-
lem but I can
understand the
reaction of people
in doing so.”
— David Petronis,
Gun show organizer,
New Eastcoast Arms
Collectors Associates
See SHOWS, page 2
Landeck Elementary School spelling bee winner is
Trysten Smith, right, with Lauren Mox runner-up.
Smith will compete at the Allen County Spelling Bee on
Feb. 2 at Rhodes State College in Lima. (Delphos Herald
file photo/Nancy Spencer)
Smith wins Landeck bee
Wildcats, Jays selling
cage tickets
Jefferson is selling pre-
sale tickets for its girls games
at Miller City (Tuesday)
and at LCC (Thursday) and
boys home games vs. LCC
(Friday) and Wayne Trace
(Saturday) at all four build-
ings and the Administration
Building. Tickets are $5 for
adults and $4 for students; all
tickets at the gates are $6.
St. John’s is selling tix
for its girls game at Minster
(Thursday) and boys home
games vs. Minster (6:30
p.m. Friday) and Shawnee
(6 p.m. Saturday) in the
HS office until 3:30 p.m.
Thursday and 1 p.m. Friday
(boys games) for $6 for
adults and $4 for students;
all tix at the gates are $6.
TODAY
Girls Basketball:
Continental at
Crestview, 6 p.m.
Wrestling: St. John’s
at Elida tri, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY
Girls Basketball (6 p.m.):
Jefferson at Miller City; Elida
at Fort Jennings; Ottoville at
Bath; Lincolnview at Kalida.
Wrestling: Lincolnview
at Cory-Rawson, 6
p.m.; Spencerville at
Coldwater, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
Wrestling: Columbus
Grove at Riverdale, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY
Girls Basketball (6
p.m.): St. John’s at Minster
(MAC); Jefferson at LCC
(NWC); Miller City at Fort
Jennings; Continental at
Ottoville (PCL); Bluffton
at Spencerville (NWC);
Crestview at Lincolnview
(NWC); Elida at Van Wert
(WBL); Columbus Grove
at Paulding (NWC).
Wrestling (6 p.m.):
WBL Quad at Elida.
The Stadium Club will replace a damaged walk bridge over Flat Fork Creek in
Waterworks Park on Tuesday. The new concrete bases can be seen above just north of
the existing walk bridge, which will be torn down once the new one is in place. (Delphos
Herald/Stephanie Groves)
22
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419-692-2388
1875 E. Fifth St. Delphos
SilverSneakers Club!
2 – The Herald Monday, January 7, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CorreCtions
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 148
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
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Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
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lages where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
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POSTMASTER:
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Jefferson freshman trey
smith was in saturday’s
game photo on page 6, not
junior ross thompson.
robert e. Hilvers
June 30, 1940
Jan. 6, 2013
Robert E. Hilvers, 72,
of Ottoville died 5:39 a.m.
Sunday at The James Cancer
Center, Columbus.
He was born June 30, 1940,
in Ottoville to Stephen and
Veronica “Fronie” (Beining)
Hilvers, who preceded him
in death.
On May 18, 1968, he mar-
ried Alice M. Trentman, who
survives.
Survivors also include
his children, Steve (Rhonda)
Hilvers, Mike (Jodi) Hilvers
and Lori (Jeff) Mills of
Ottoville; five grandchildren,
Abigail and Dru Hilvers and
Aiden, Kiley and Treyton
Hilvers; three brothers, John
(Annette) Hilvers, Dick (Jan)
Hilvers and Tom (Karen)
Hilvers of Ottoville; a sister,
Ruth (Richard A.) Schroeder
of Leipsic; and sister-in-law,
Jean Hilvers of Ottoville.
He was also preceded in
death by two brothers, Donald
Hilvers and Jim Hilvers.
Mr. Hilvers retired from
Unverferth Manufacturing
after 40 years, where he had
been a sales representative. He
served in the National Guard
for 6 years. He was a mem-
ber of Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
and a member of the Ottoville
Knights of Columbus. He was
a 35-year board member of the
Ottoville Mutual Telephone
Company; social member
of the Ottoville VFW and
Delphos Eagles; and member
of the Delphos Country Club.
He had been a charter mem-
ber of the Ottoville Jaycees/
OACCS. He enjoyed farming,
woodworking, and his morn-
ing coffee gang. He was espe-
cially fond of golfing, fishing
and looked forward to spend-
ing time with his grandkids.
He was a proud supporter of
the Ottoville Big Green and
the Ohio State Buckeyes.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be 10:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, the Rev.
John Stites officiating. Burial
will follow in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
2-8 p.m. Tuesday at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township, where a
scripture service will be held
at 2 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the Hilvers
Family requests donations
be made to Putnam County
Home Care and Hospice or
to the Putnam County Cancer
Assistance Program.
Condolences may be
expressed at www.lovefuner-
alhome.com.
Corn $6.95
Wheat $7.22
Soybeans $13.73
Fast-food robber
suspect returns
to eat, is nabbed
PONTIAC, Mich. (AP)
— Officials say a suspected
robber of a suburban Detroit
restaurant who apparently
returned months later to get
some food is under arrest after
being recognized by employ-
ees.
The Oakland County sher-
iff’s department says workers
at a McDonald’s in Pontiac
spotted the 40-year-old man
Saturday in the drive-thru.
Sheriff’s deputies respond-
ed and took the Pontiac man
into custody. He was being
held at the Oakland County
Jail pending charges.
The robbery happened Oct.
5.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $47 M
Pick 3 evening
9-1-9
Pick 3 Midday
2-2-8
Pick 4 evening
2-8-4-1
Pick 4 Midday
5-8-8-6
Pick 5 evening
0-2-4-3-1
Pick 5 Midday
8-4-6-9-3
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $70
million
rolling Cash 5
04-15-17-22-26
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
shows
(Continued from page 1)
the 1999 Columbine High
School shooting in Colorado,
but he said the show would be
inappropriate now. The shows
in the Hudson Valley and
Danbury were listed as can-
celed on the website for Big
Al’s Gun Shows. A man who
answered the site’s contact
number said it was the venues
that canceled the shows, not
the promoter.
In Houston, transportation
officials temporarily stopped
using electronic freeway
signs to give directions to gun
shows amid complaints fol-
lowing such a show the day
after the Dec. 14 school shoot-
ing. State-level transportation
officials overruled the deci-
sion. The signs are routinely
used to direct traffic or tell
visitors where to exit freeways
for rodeos, sporting events and
gun shows.
On Wednesday, the City
Council in Saratoga Springs
urged organizers of a down-
town gun show Jan. 12-13
not to display military-style
weapons and the high-capacity
magazines “of the type used in
the Newtown tragedy.” About
a dozen people gave impas-
sioned pleas at the meeting.
Show organizer David
Petronis of New Eastcoast
Arms Collectors Associates
agreed to the limit.
“I don’t think it’s fair that
we’re taking the brunt of the
problem,” Petronis said, “but I
can understand the reaction of
people in doing so.”
Petronis said his group is a
“nice, clean family-oriented ...
arms fair” that brings in thou-
sands of visitors and a lot of
money for the city. He stressed
that buyers at his show under-
go background checks, as per
New York state law.
The gunman in the Sandy
Hook Elementary School
shooting in December used an
AR-15 to kill 20 first-grad-
ers and six educators in the
school. The gun belonged to
the shooter’s mother, but it’s
not clear where it was bought.
The shooting has led to calls
for stricter regulation of assault
weapons, though the National
Rifle Association has stead-
fastly opposed such measures.
Jefferson’s Zach ricker
was misidentified as seth
ricker in saturday’s
Jefferson/Ada boys basket-
ball game.
WeAtHer ForeCAst
tri-county
the Associated Press
toniGHt: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 20s. Southwest
winds 10 to 15 mph.
tUesDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the upper
30s. South winds 10 to 15
mph.
tUesDAY niGHt:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 30s. Southwest Winds
10 to 20 mph.
eXtenDeD ForeCAst
WeDnesDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs around 40. West
winds 10 to 20 mph.
WeDnesDAY niGHt:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 20s.
tHUrsDAY: Partly
cloudy. Slight chance of rain
in the morning, then chance
of rain in the afternoon. Highs
in the lower 40s. Chance of
measurable rain 50 percent.
tHUrsDAY niGHt:
Cloudy. Rain likely through
midnight, then chance of rain
after midnight. Lows in the
mid 30s. Chance of rain 60
percent.
FriDAY: Mostly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
rain. Highs in the lower 50s.
Prosecutors to outline
evidence in theater deaths
BY DAn eLLiott
the Associated Press
CENTENNIAL, Colo. —
Nearly six months after a
bloody rampage in a Colorado
movie theater left 12 people
dead, prosecutors will go to
court today to outline their
case against the suspect,
James Holmes.
Holmes is charged with
more than 160 counts includ-
ing murder and attempted
murder.
Investigators say he was
wearing body armor and a
gas mask when he tossed
two gas canisters and then
opened fire in a theater in the
Denver suburb of Aurora on
July 20. A midnight showing
of the Batman movie “The
Dark Knight Rises” had just
begun.
In addition to the 12 dead,
70 were wounded.
Many of the survivors
and family members of the
dead are expected to attend
the preliminary hearing, and
court officials expect an over-
flow crowd of reporters and
spectators.
The preliminary hearing
that starts today is expected
to last all week. The official
purpose is to allow the judge
to determine whether the
prosecution’s case is strong
enough to warrant a trial, but
legal analysts say it’s rare for
a judge not to order a trial if a
case gets this far.
For Holmes, the hear-
ing could set the stage for a
negotiated plea agreement by
allowing each side to assess
the other’s strength, the ana-
lysts say.
The hearing will be the first
extensive public disclosure of
the evidence against Holmes.
Three days after the shoot-
ing, District Judge William
Sylvester forbade attorneys
and investigators from dis-
cussing the case publicly, and
many court documents have
been filed under seal.
It took this long to get
to the preliminary hearing
because lawyers have been
debating what physical evi-
dence should be made avail-
able one side or the other,
whether a psychiatrist who
met with Holmes is barred
from testimony by doctor-
patient privilege, who was
responsible for leaks to the
media, and other issues.
Police say Holmes, now
25, started stockpiling weap-
ons, ammunition, explo-
sives and body armor in the
spring of 2011. He was a
first-year student in a Ph.D.
neuroscience program at
the University of Colorado,
Denver, but he failed a year-
end exam and withdrew in
June 2011, authorities have
said.
The shootings came six
weeks later.
Federal authorities have
said Holmes entered the
theater with a ticket and is
believed to have propped
open a door, slipped out to
his car and returned with his
weapons. Police arrested him
outside the theater shortly
after the shootings ended.
Holmes’ mental health
could be a significant issue
— and possibly a contentious
one — in the preliminary
hearing.
His attorneys have told
the judge Holmes is mentally
ill, but they have not said
whether they plan to employ
an insanity defense. He had
seen a university psychiatrist,
and his lawyers have said he
tried to call the psychiatrist
nine minutes before the kill-
ing began.
Defense lawyers have said
they plan to call at least two
witnesses who could testify
about Holmes’ mental health.
Prosecutors asked Sylvester
to block the witnesses, but he
refused.
Hearings, trial closed in Indian rape case
BY AsHoK sHArMA
the Associated Press
NEW DELHI — An Indian
magistrate ruled today that
the media will not be allowed
to attend pre-trial hearings
or the trial of the five men
accused of raping and killing
a young student in the Indian
capital, a police official said.
Magistrate Namrita
Aggarwal upheld the prose-
cutor’s request that the media
be barred from attending
the proceedings, according
to police spokesman Rajan
Bhagat. Hundreds of jour-
nalists, lawyers from other
cases and curious onlookers
had crowded the courtroom
where the five were to appear.
Outside the courthouse com-
plex, more than a dozen TV
satellite trucks jammed the
streets, and dozens of report-
ers — from India, the U.S.,
Japan and elsewhere — were
waiting for news.
The hearing was expected
to result in the case being
sent to a special “fast-track”
court. Indian courts are noto-
riously slow, with some cases
dragging on for decades. The
trial is expected to begin in
the coming days. Indian rape
trials are normally closed to
the media.
Authorities have charged
the men with murder, rape
and other crimes that could
bring them the death penalty.
The crime caused nationwide
outrage, leading to massive
protests.
A sixth suspect, who is
17 years old, is expected to
be tried in a juvenile court,
where the maximum sentence
would be three years in a
reform facility.
Prosecutor Rajiv Mohan
said last week that a DNA
test confirmed that the blood
of the victim matched blood
stains found on the clothes of
all the accused.
On Sunday, two of the
defendants offered to become
“approvers,” or informers
against the others, accord-
ing to reporters present at
the hearing. The two were
presumably seeking lighter
sentences.
The companion of the stu-
dent recounted in a television
interview last week how the
pair was attacked for 2 1/2
hours on a New Delhi bus
before being thrown on the
side of the road, where pass-
ersby ignored them and police
debated jurisdiction issues
before helping them. The
student died at a Singapore
hospital weeks after the Dec.
16 attack.
Indian law prohibits the
disclosure of victims’ iden-
tities in rape cases. While
neither the companion nor
the TV network, Zee News,
identified the woman, police
opened an investigation into
Zee News after the interview
was broadcast, saying too
many details about the attack
had been revealed.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP)
— Police say U.S. Sen. Rand
Paul’s son was arrested after a
flight from Kentucky to North
Carolina.
The Charlotte Observer reports
19-year-old William Hilton Paul
was arrested Saturday morning at
Charlotte Douglas International
Airport and charged with alcohol-
related offenses.
The newspaper quotes
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police
Lt. Blake Hollar as saying
it’s possible Paul was served
alcohol on the flight from
Lexington, Ky., to Charlotte.
When the plane landed
shortly before 11 a.m., the son
of the Republican senator from
Kentucky and grandson of for-
mer presidential candidate Ron
Paul was charged with con-
suming beer/wine underage,
disorderly conduct and being
intoxicated and disruptive.
In a brief statement, Sen.
Paul’s office said “as many
parents with teenagers would
understand,” the family request-
ed their privacy be respected
“in a situation such as this.”
Son of US Sen. Rand
Paul arrested at airport
Tuesday, Jan. 8
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today was 46, low was 32.
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Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
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Learn how you can redefne your savings approach
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419-695-0660

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Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
Monday, January 7, 2013 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
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DAYTON (AP) — The
number of prisoners on
Ohio’s death row is decreas-
ing as new death sentences
are outnumbered by inmates
who are executed or die from
other causes or are freed
through clemency or appeals.
Ohio courts handed down
just three new death sen-
tences in 2012, while there
were three death row inmates
executed last year, another
died in prison and one had his
death sentence vacated, the
Dayton Daily News report-
ed. Two inmates received
clemency and life sentences
from Gov. John Kasich and
one was released on appeal
because of prosecutorial mis-
conduct in his case, leaving
the number now on death
row at 142, down from 204 in
January 2003.
Nationwide, there were
77 new death sentences in
2012, according to the Death
Penalty Information Center
of Washington, D.C. That
compares with the record 315
new death sentences U.S.
courts handed down in 1996.
Ohio’s three new sentences
in 2012 were down from the
record 24 in 1985.
Experts attribute the drop
in recent years in the number
of new death sentences in
Ohio and other states with
capital punishment to vari-
ous factors, the newspaper
reported.
Ohio Public Defender
Tim Young said those factors
include “evolving societal
values” and a change in “the
idea of what ‘the worst of the
worst’ is.”
Also, the option of life
without parole gives prosecu-
tors more options in charging
defendants and negotiating
plea deals and gives juries the
option of ensuring that killers
are taken off the streets per-
manently without being exe-
cuted. The cost to the public
of prosecuting and defending
death cases also is becom-
ing harder to justify amid
tighter budgets, and more
survivors of murder victims
feel life without parole allows
for quicker “closure” than a
death sentence that involves
years of appeals, Young said.
Michael Gmoser, the pros-
ecutor in southwest Ohio’s
Butler County, said there’s
no question that the death
penalty is used more rarely
than in the past.
The law has become more
specific about what elements
are required for a death ver-
dict, and prosecutors with
tight budgets and limited
staffing are being more selec-
tive about seeking the death
penalty, he said.
Gmoser said he and his
assistants carefully review
the facts of every potential
new death case to determine
the likelihood of a death sen-
tence.
The call on whether to
seek the death penalty is
“probably the most serious
and important decision I ever
make in this office,” he said.
“The case has to shock the
conscience of this commu-
nity.”
Ohio juries have had the
option of sentencing defen-
dants to life without parole
in death penalty cases since
1998, and prosecutors have
had the option of seeking life
without parole instead of the
death sentence since 2005.
Previously, life with the pos-
sibility of parole in 30 years
was the harshest punishment
short of death.
The option of life without
parole keeps killers off the
streets and is a strong punish-
ment, without the costs and
“seemingly never-ending”
appeals involved in death
cases, Gmoser said.
“As far as society is con-
cerned, that person might just
as well be dead,” he said.
Number of death row
inmates declines in Ohio
Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Ian Weber
Kristen Elizabeth Miller and Ian Albert Weber were
united in marriage Oct. 27, 2012, at St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Jacob Gordon
officiating.
The bride’s parents are John and Lynn Miller of
Delphos. The groom’s parents are Sid and Kathy Weber
of Delphos.
Nuptial music was provided by vocalists Lauren and
Lindsay Grothouse, organist Linda Schmit and trumpet-
eer Bill Massa.
Maids of honor were Kaiti Miller and Brittany Miller
of Delphos, sisters of the bride.
Bridesmaids were Kayla Weber of Toledo, cousin of
the groom; and Alyssa Klausing and Valerie Morris of
Delphos, friends of the couple.
Flower girl was Cheyenne Weber of Delphos, niece of
the groom. Ring bearer was Logan Weber of Springfield,
cousin of the groom.
Best men were Seth Thitoff of Cincinnati, friend of
the couple; and Adam Weber of Delphos, brother of the
groom.
Groomsmen were Corey Weber of Delphos and Zach
Weber of Lima, brothers of the groom; and Brandon
Violet of Delphos, friend of the couple.
The bride’s grandparents are Roger Miller, who
attended the wedding but is now deceased, and Jim
Lauer.
The groom’s grandparents are Nancy Eitniear and
Gene and Posey Weber.
A reception was held at the Delphos Knights of
Columbus hall. Following a wedding trip to Riviera
Maya, Mexico, the couple reside in Delphos.
The bride is a St. John’s High School and Rhodes
State College graduate. She is employed with OBGYN
Specialists of Lima.
The groom is a St. John’s High School and Rhodes
State College graduate. He is employed with St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
CLEVELAND (AP) — A
clinical trial at a northeast
Ohio hospital is using a new
device to identify diabetes in
children based on changes in
their skin.
Children as young as 7
can have brownish-gray
patches on their necks or
elbows that are early predic-
tors of the disease. Now a
clinical trial at University
Hospitals Rainbow Babies
& Children’s Hospital in
Cleveland is using a new
device to get ahead of the
visual clues the skin can
offer.
The (Cleveland) Plain
Dealer reports that it’s a
noninvasive light device that
identifies biochemical mark-
ers of diabetes in the skin of
children or teens.
Diabetes occurs when
the body doesn’t properly
convert glucose to energy,
which leaves excess glucose
in the body. Byproducts of
incomplete glucose (sugar)
metabolism register on the
scan.
Ohio hospital
tests device to
fnd diabetes
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Ohio gas prices are lower to
start the new work week.
The average price for
a gallon of regular gas in
Ohio was $3.19 in today’s
survey from auto club AAA,
the Oil Price Information
Service and Wright Express.
That’s 13 cents lower than
a week ago, and reverses
two straight weeks of rising
prices at the pump.
Ohio’s prices are well
below the national average
of $3.30, which is about the
same as last week.
The lowest average price
in Ohio today was $3.10 in
the Toledo area.
Experts say that eco-
nomic worries related to the
fiscal cliff deal could keep
gasoline demand down and
lead to lower fuel consump-
tion — and prices — in
January.
Ohio gas prices
on the way
down again
Your
Community
News Source.
From sports stats to
business news, the
Delphos Herald keeps
you in the local loop.
The Delphos Herald
www.delphosherald.com | 419-695-0015 ext. 122
405 N. Main St. | Delphos, OH 45833
2
“I do not believe that sheer suffering teaches. If suffering alone taught, all the world would be
wise. To suffering must be added mourning, understanding, patience, love, openness and the
willingness to remain vulnerable.” — Anne Morrow Lindbergh, American author (1906-2001)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Monday, January 7, 2013
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Neither teams’ shooting was exceptionally good Thursday
night at Jefferson High School due to the pressure defense
applied by both Jefferson and Ada. The host Lady Wildcats
had to rally from five points down in the third period with an
18-5 span and held on to come out on top 47-41 to pick up the
Northwest Conference girls basketball victory.
25 Years Ago — 1988
• At Fort Jennings Council meeting Tuesday the first busi-
ness of the new year was the swearing in of two re-elected long
time village council members. Roger Broecker with 24 years in
as a councilman and Charles Murphy, with 12 years, were both
sworn in for four more years on the council. Taking his seat as
mayor for the first time was Mayor John Hanf.
• Deana Schmersal, a senior at Jefferson High School,
was honored recently as “Youth of the Month.” The
daughter of Tom and Sandy Schmersal of Delphos, Deana
was recognized for her academic excellence as well as
her extra-curricular activities. She was honored by the Lima
Exchange Club at a luncheon and given a plaque at the Elk’s
Club Annex.
• Ottoville Catholic Ladies of Columbia recently held
a party at the Dew Drop Inn, Ottoville. Door prizes were
drawn every half hour. Winners were Dorothy Ruen, Sylvia
Horstman, Barb Landin, Judy Altenburger, Ginger Shilling,
Millie Bendele, Fronny Hilvers and Mary Winhover.
50 Years Ago — 1963
• Paul Wright of Lima has announced that he will build a
coin-operated laundry and dry cleaning firm at the intersection
of Fifth and State streets. Wright said the most modern self-
service equipment will be installed. He tentatively plans to
have the business open 24 hours a day seven days a week, and
it will have an attendant on duty during the morning, afternoon
and early evening hours.
• St. John’s Blue Jays breezed past the Wapakoneta
Redskins Saturday night at Wapak, to come up with a 96-54
victory and their fifth win of the season. Four Blue Jays made
the double figure scoring column headed by Dan Grothouse
with 26, and Captain Gene Klaus with 22. Roger Pothast and
Jim Carder shared honors with 12 points each.
• Child Conservation League Clubs in Columbus Grove
opened their 1963 meetings when Child Study met in the home
of Mrs. Lynwood Smith, with Mrs. Clarence Doty assistant
hostess. Fourteen members were present and listened to a
record on “Positive Thinking.”
75 Years Ago — 1938
• Giving a conclusive demonstration of the adage, “there’s
some life in the old boys yet,” the cage representation of St.
John’s high school took the Lima St. John’s quintets into
camp Wednesday night by comfortable margins. The varsity
encounter ended with a 30-18 score and the reserves secured
their revenge to the tune of a 20-10 count.
• W. H. Taylor, former Delphos mayor, has been commis-
sioned as Justice of Peace of Washington Township, Van Wert
County. T. B. Wagoner, retired city patrolman, will serve as
his constable. Taylor announced that for the time being he will
have his office in the Washington Township house on West
Third Street but plans to open an office of his own in the near
future.
• In a practice game with Van Wert High School Wednesday
afternoon in the Van Wert gymnasium, the Jefferson High cag-
ers annexed the contest in six eight-minute quarters by the
score of 45 to 30. All the Jefferson regulars scored at least five
points or more. Friday night the Jefferson varsity will meet the
Alumni in what is predicted to be a razzle-dazzle contest of
pass work and shooting.
By JULIE PACE
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama today
will nominate Chuck Hagel as
his next defense secretary and
counterterrorism adviser John
Brennan to lead the Central
Intelligence Agency, two
potentially controversial picks
for his second-term national
security team.
Hagel, even before being
nominated, has faced tough
criticism from congressio-
nal Republicans who say the
former GOP senator is anti-
Israel and soft on Iran. And
Brennan, a 25-year CIA vet-
eran, withdrew from consid-
eration for the spy agency’s
top job in 2008 amid ques-
tions about his connection to
enhanced interrogation tech-
niques during the George W.
Bush administration.
Administration officials,
speaking on condition of
anonymity, say Obama will
announce both nominations
at a White House event this
afternoon. Along with sec-
retary of state nominee Sen.
John Kerry, D-Mass., Hagel
and Brennan would play key
roles implementing and shap-
ing Obama’s national security
priorities in a second term.
All three men must be con-
firmed by the Senate.
In nominating Hagel,
Obama signaled he is will-
ing to take on a tough con-
firmation fight. Once Hagel
emerged as Obama’s likely
nominee, GOP lawmakers
began sharply questioning his
commitment to Israel and his
willingness to take a hard line
with Iran over its disputed
nuclear program.
Hagel, a 66-year-old mod-
erate Nebraska Republican,
has criticized discussion of a
military strike by either the
U.S. or Israel against Iran.
He also irritated some Israel
backers with his reference
to the “Jewish lobby” in the
United States. And he has
backed efforts to bring Iran to
the table for future peace talks
in Afghanistan.
White House officials say
Hagel’s positions on Israel
and Iran have been misrepre-
sented. They cite his Senate
votes for billions in military
assistance to Israel and his
support for multilateral sanc-
tions on Tehran.
Ben Rhodes, Obama’s
deputy national security
adviser, said Hagel will be
“completely in line with the
president” on both issues.
“The president has a record
of unprecedented security
cooperation with Israel and
that’s going to continue no
matter who the defense secre-
tary is,” Rhodes said.
Hagel has also been criti-
cized by some Democrats for
saying in 1998 that a nominee
for an ambassador post was
“openly, aggressively gay.”
He has since apologized for
those comments.
Hagel is the second straight
Obama favorite for a top
national security post to face
criticism from Capitol Hill
even before being nominated.
United Nations Ambassador
Susan Rice withdrew her
name from consideration for
secretary of state amid charg-
es from GOP senators that she
misled the public in her ini-
tial accounting of the attacks
on Americans at a diplomatic
post in Benghazi, Libya.
Obama returned to the
White House on Sunday after
a truncated family holiday in
Hawaii. His week will also
include a visit from Afghan
President Hamid Karzai. And
there’s a bruising fight with
Congress over spending and
the federal deficit on the hori-
zon, just days after Obama
and Congress averted the fis-
cal cliff with a last-minute
deal over the New Year’s
holiday. But rounding out his
national security team in his
first project.
By EILEEN
SULLIVAN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — In
Connecticut and Colorado,
scenes of the most deadly
U.S. mass shootings in 2012,
people were less enthusiastic
about buying new guns at the
end of the year than in most
other states, according to an
Associated Press analysis of
new FBI data. The biggest
surges in background checks
for people who want to carry
or buy guns occurred in states
in the South and West.
The latest government fig-
ures reflect huge increases
across the U.S. in the number
of background checks for gun
sales and permits to carry guns
at the end of the year. After
President Barack Obama’s re-
election, the horrific school
shooting in Connecticut and
Obama’s promise to support
new laws aimed at curbing
gun violence, the number of
background checks spiked.
In Georgia, the FBI pro-
cessed 37,586 requests during
October and 78,998 requests
in December; Alabama went
from 32,850 to 80,576 during
the same period.
Nationally, there were
nearly twice as many more
background checks for fire-
arms between November and
December than during the
same time period one year
ago.
“It’s a fear there will be
a crackdown,” said Thomas
Wright, who runs Hoover
Tactical Firearms near
Birmingham, Ala. Wright
said he took on more employ-
ees to handle the sales crush
after 20 children were killed
in Newtown, Conn. “We used
to have what was called our
wall of guns. It’s pretty much
empty now.” Every high-
capacity magazine in Wright’s
store was sold out.
The government’s figures
suggested far less interest
in purchasing guns late in
the year in Connecticut and
Colorado, where background
checks also increased but not
nearly as much as most other
states. Twelve people died in
July in a shooting at a Colorado
movie theater. The numbers
of checks in Colorado rose
from 35,009 in October to
53,453 in December; checks
in Connecticut went from
18,761 to 29,246 during the
same period. Only New Jersey
and Maryland showed smaller
increases than Colorado in
December from one month
earlier.
In Connecticut, people
were having second thoughts
about whether it’s a good idea
to have a gun in the home
after the Newtown shooting,
the governor’s criminal jus-
tice advisor, Michael Lawlor
said. The gunman, 20-year-
old Adam Lanza, shot and
killed his mother inside their
home using weapons she had
legally purchased before he
drove to the school. Lanza
shot his way into the building
and carried out the massacre
before committing suicide as
police arrived.
Lawlor also said that,
in Connecticut, it can take
months to obtain a permit to
buy a handgun.
A federal background
check doesn’t always indi-
cate a new gun is purchased,
but the firearms industry uses
these numbers as an indicator
of how well the gun business
is doing.
Background checks typi-
cally spike during the holiday
shopping season, and some
of the increases in the most
recent FBI numbers can be
attributed to that. But the
number of background checks
also tends to increase after
mass shootings, when gun
enthusiasts fear restrictive
measures are imminent.
After the Colorado shoot-
ings, the FBI conducted 1.5
million background checks
across the country during
August, compared to 1.2
million checks in June. Yet
the Connecticut shootings
energized gun buyers more:
Background checks surged in
December to nearly 2.8 mil-
lion, compared to 1.6 million
in October.
By ANNE FLAHERTY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Struggling for the upper hand
in the next round of debt talks,
Republicans and Democrats
this weekend drew lines in the
sand they said they’d never
cross when it comes to the
U.S. debt limit.
The tough talk on the
Sunday morning talk shows
doesn’t bode well for vot-
ers who are frustrated by the
political gridlock.
“I believe we need to raise
the debt ceiling, but if we
don’t raise it without a plan
to get out of debt, all of us
should be fired,” said Sen.
Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.
Last week’s deal to avert
the combination of end-of-
year tax increases and spend-
ing cuts known as the “fis-
cal cliff” held income tax
rates steady for 99 percent
of Americans but left some
other major pieces of business
unresolved.
By late February or
early March, the Treasury
Department will run out of
options to cover the nation’s
debts and could begin default-
ing on government loans
unless Congress raises the
legal borrowing limit, or debt
ceiling. Economists warn that
a default could trigger a glob-
al recession.
Also looming are deep auto-
matic spending cuts expected
to take effect at the beginning
of March that could further
erase fragile gains in the U.S.
economy. Then on March 27,
the temporary measure that
funds government activities
expires, and congressional
approval will be needed to
keep the government running.
That’s one more chance to
fight over spending.
Republicans say they are
willing to raise the debt ceiling
but insist any increase must
be paired with significant sav-
ings from Medicare, Medicaid
and other government benefit
programs. President Barack
Obama has said he’s will-
ing to consider spending cuts
separately but won’t bargain
over the government’s bor-
rowing authority.
“One thing I will not com-
promise over is whether or
not Congress should pay the
tab for a bill they’ve already
racked up,” Obama said in
his weekly radio and Internet
address.
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi made a similar
remark Sunday in insisting the
two issues — raising the debt
ceiling and reducing spending
— shouldn’t be coupled.
“Right now we have to
pay the bills that have been
incurred,” Pelosi said. “And
if you want to say cut spend-
ing for what we do next, fine,
but don’t tie it to the debt
ceiling.”
But Senate Republican
Leader Mitch McConnell said
spending cuts would have to
be part of the equation if the
proposal was to get any kind
of GOP support.
McConnell on Sunday
suggested Republicans were
prepared to see the nation
default on its spending obli-
gations.
“It’s a shame we have to
use whatever leverage we
have in Congress to get the
president to deal with the big-
gest problem confronting our
future, and that’s our exces-
sive spending,”
Meanwhile, Democrats
said further tax increases for
the wealthiest Americans
were still possible as Congress
looks to close the gap between
revenues and expenditures.
They say Obama has already
agreed to significant spending
cuts, and that the latest deal
only gets the nation to about
half of the revenue it needs to
resolve the red ink.
“Trust me, there are plenty
of things within that tax code
— these loopholes where peo-
ple can park their money in
some island offshore and not
pay taxes. These are things
that need to be closed. We
can do that and use the money
to reduce the deficit,” said
Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin,
the second-ranking Senate
Democrat.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Speaking out for the first time
since he resigned, retired Gen.
Stanley McChrystal takes the
blame for a Rolling Stone arti-
cle and the unflattering com-
ments attributed to his staff
about the Obama administra-
tion that ended his Afghanistan
command and army career.
“Regardless of how I
judged the story for fairness or
accuracy, responsibility was
mine,” McChrystal writes in
his new memoir, in a carefully
worded denouncement of the
story.
The Rolling Stone arti-
cle anonymously quoted
McChrystal’s aides as criti-
cizing Obama’s team, includ-
ing Vice President Joe Biden.
Biden had disagreed with
McChrystal’s strategy that
called for more troops in
Afghanistan. Biden preferred
to send a smaller counterter-
rorism and training force — a
policy the White House is now
considering as it transitions
troops from the Afghan war.
McChrystal adds the choice
to resign as U.S. commander
in Afghanistan was his own.
“I called no one for advice,”
he writes in “My Share of the
Task,” describing his hasty
plane ride back to Washington
only hours after the article
appeared in 2010, to offer
his resignation to President
Barack Obama. McChrystal
was immediately replaced
by his then-boss, Gen. David
Petraeus.
McChrystal devotes a scant
page-and-a-half to the inci-
dent that ended his 34-year
military career and soured
trust between the military and
media. The book, published by
Portfolio/Penguin, an imprint
of Penguin Group USA, comes
out Monday.
The closest McChrystal
comes to revealing his regret
over allowing a reporter weeks
of unfettered access with few
ground rules comes much ear-
lier in the book. “By nature I
tended to trust people and was
typically open and transpar-
ent. ... But such transparency
would go astray when others
saw us out of context or when
I gave trust to those few who
were unworthy of it.”
McChrystal does try
to explain the tensions that
helped lead to Obama’s deci-
sion to accept his resignation.
At the center was the wrangle
over McChrystal’s recommen-
dation for 40,000 more U.S.
troops in Afghanistan — and
conflicting guidance.
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates told McChrystal to
request the number he thought
he needed. White House staff
signaled that the newly elec-
tion president wanted to keep
the levels down.
McChrystal describes how
he presented his war goal to
the White House as “defeat the
Taliban” and “secure the pop-
ulation,” and was advised to
lower his sights to “degrade”
the Taliban.
Obama approved the addi-
tion of 30,000 troops, while
simultaneously announcing
a withdrawal date of 2014.
McChrystal did not challenge
those decisions, though he
says he worried the timetable
would embolden the Taliban.
“If I felt like the decision
to set a withdrawal date would
have been fatal to the success
of our mission, I’d have said
so,” he writes.
McChrystal
takes blame
for Rolling
Stone article
Obama taps Hagel for
Pentagon, Brennan for CIA
Fewer excited gun-buyers in Colo. and Conn.
White House, GOP draw red lines in debt debate
21
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419-692-0055
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Monday, January 7, 2013 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
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City Building
To Be Published
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2013
DEADLINE IS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6, 2013
(Please Print )
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IT’S TIME TO SHOW OFF YOUR PICTURES!
Enclose check for $13.00 per single
child and $20.00 for group picture
Mail to:
BRAGGING TIMES
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Delphos, Ohio 45833
ALL CHILDREN ARE ELIGIBLE.
(Price includes return of your picture by mail)
Twins/Triplets may be submitted in one picture for
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(maximum of 3 per picture) will be $20.00, 4 $30.00, 5 or
more $35.00 and will be an enlarged size.
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BRAGGING TIMES
2
0
1
3

B
R
A
G
G
I
N
G

T
I
M
E
S
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and Recreation
board meets at the recreation
building at Stadium Park.
Washington Township trust-
ees meet at the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the may-
or’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge, 1600
Fifth St.
8 p.m. — The Veterans of
Foreign Wars meet at the hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7:30 p.m. — Ottoville
Emergency Medical Service
members meet at the munici-
pal building.
Ottoville VFW Auxiliary
members meet at the hall.
Fort Jennings Local School
District board members meet
at the high school library.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
8:30 p.m. — Elida vil-
lage council meets at the town
hall.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
4 p.m. — Delphos Public
Library board members meet
at the library conference
room.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
enter on East First Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
JAN. 8
Logan Kortokrax
Nikki Conley
Kelsey Berelsman
Shellie Kundert
JAN. 9
Barry Eickholt
Alexander Miller
Kristy Siefker
Brooke Brinkman
Jefferson pair
to chosen for
Honors Choir
and Band
Festival
Jefferson High School
sophomore and instru-
mentalist Emma Wurst
and senior and vocalist
Tony Wiechart have been
selected for the District III
Honors Choir and Band
Festival at 3 p.m. Jan.
20 at the NPCA in Van
Wert. Wurst is under the
direction of David Stirns.
Wiechart is under the
direction of Tammy Wirth.
(Photo submitted)
ONU names fall
dean’s list
Ohio Northern University
has announced students named
to the fall semester dean’s list.
The deans’ list includes stu-
dents who attain a grade point
average of 3.5 or better on a
4.0 grading system.
Local students include:
Lindsey M. Faurot, daugh-
ter of Gregg and Lisa Faurot
of Delphos. She is a sixth-year
pharmacy major.
Amanda R. Hoersten,
daughter of Arnold and
Rosanne Hoersten of Delphos.
She is a sixth-year pharmacy
major.
Jared L. Horstman, son of
Jerry and Lisa Horstman of
Fort Jennings. He is a junior
majoring in accounting.
Lynn M. Lindeman,
daughter of Kevin and Lisa
Lindeman of Ottoville. She
is a senior majoring in phar-
macy.
Gabrielle Metzner, daugh-
ter of Joseph and Barbara
Metzner of Delphos. She is a
sophomore majoring in envi-
ronmental and field bio.
Aaron V. Schnipke, son of
Vincent and Cheryl Schnipke
of Fort Jennings. He is a fresh-
man majoring in electrical
engineering.
Shayla N. Siefker, daughter
of Thomas and Cheryl Siefker
of Ottoville. She is a junior
majoring in pharmacy.
Bradley J. Trentman, son
of Roger and Diane Trentman.
He is a sophomore majoring in
marketing.
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THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE
Visit www.delphosherald.com
ANDY NORTH
1122 Elida Ave.
(East Towne Plaza)
DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
Bus. (419) 695-0660
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Call or stop by today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
6 – The Herald Monday, January 7, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
St. John’s junior Eric Clark evades the block attempt of
LCC’s Sam Huffman and shoots over Martyce Kimbrough
to bring the Jays within two early in the third period at
Arnzen Gymnasium. However, the T-Birds grabbed the
8-point victory Sunday afternoon in the annual renewal
of this boys basketball archrivaly. (Delphos Herald/Tom
Morris)
Jefferson junior Katie Goergens drives the baseline
against Edgerton defender Kennedy Flower Saturday
night at Jefferson, drawing a foul and connecting on 1-of-2
free throws on the play. However, the Bulldogs took the
8-point road victory. (Delphos Herald/Tom Morris)
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — St. John’s
and Lima Central Catholic
have been involved in many a
classic boys basketball strug-
gle over the many years of
their archrivalry.
Sunday afternoon at Robert
A. Arnzen Gymnasium was
another in the series.
The Thunderbirds were
just too quick and athletic for
the Blue Jays to handle as
the T-Birds grabbed a 56-48
victory.
“That kind of speed, quick-
ness and athleticism is dif-
ficult to simulate in practice.
They can make it very dif-
ficult for your offense,” St.
John’s coach Aaron Elwer
noted. “We shoot for 12 turn-
overs or less as a goal and our
first eight games, we were
under that figure. Part of our
turnovers was their quickness
and part of it was being a little
loose with the ball. We will
focus on that in practice this
week.”
LCC head man Frank Kill
gave a lot of credit to his
defense.
“They were hurting us with
penetration the first half; we
went to a 3-2 zone the second
half to try and force them to
the perimeter. We also tried
to simply take the ball out
of (Curtis) Geise’s hands,”
he explained. “He is one of
the better players in our area
and he will get his points.
We just tried to force him to
give up the ball and make
others beat us over the top.
Forcing turnovers really helps
us offensively because we’re
getting transition looks or free
throws.”
The rivals traded the lead
three times in the opening
period as both were looking
to push the tempo. LCC (10-
1) used some full-court trap-
ping pressure to try and get
the pace faster, while the Jays
(6-3) used their matchup zone
to try and slow down the quick
visitors. St. John’s senior
Geise (game-high 18 markers,
5 boards, 5 steals, 3 assists,
2 blocks) netted 10 of the
team’s 13 first-period points,
while six different LCC play-
ers scored at least a bucket.
They took the lead at 8-7 on a
follow shot by Jake Williams
at 3:20 and led 14-10 on a
3-point play by Trey Cobbs at
49.8 ticks before Geise buried
a trifecta from the left wing
with 33 seconds left to reduce
the deficit to 14-13.
Senior Ryan Buescher
(12 counters, 3 treys) gave
the Jays the lead again early
in the second period with a
triple and his trio gave them
another 3-point lead. Their
last lead was 20-18 as he hit
a free throw at 3:46. Tre’on
Johnson (10 counters) fired in
a 3-ball at 3:25 to give LCC
the lead at 21-20 and the visi-
tors built their lead to 27-21
edge on an inbounds layup by
Darius West (14 markers, 9
rebounds) with 40 seconds to
go. Two Geise singles at the
25-second mark reduced that
to 27-23.
LCC junior Cory Stewart
rolled his ankle at 4:38 and
hobbled off the court.
The offenses slowed down
in the third, with each team
getting off seven shots. The
Jays had the better of the pro-
ceeding in the first half of
that canto, tying the score at
29 on a Geise jumper at 4:25.
West’s freebie at 4:00 gave
the guests a lead they would
not relinquish and they slowly
built a 37-32 spread on a layin
at the horn by Sam Huffman.
Try as they might, the
Jays simply could not find
the needed spark for a rally in
the finale. They could only hit
6-of-14 shots in the span (16-
of-40 for the game for 40%,
including 7-of-24 downtown).
They also struggled with six
huge turnovers (18 for the
game versus 16 by LCC),
several leading to baskets or
free throws at the other end.
The closest they could get
was five four times. LCC was
6-of-10 from the field (21-of-
40 for the game, 2-of-7 long
range, for 52.5%) and 7-of-12
at the line (12-of-21 overall
for 57.1%) in the finale.
LCC finished with 27
boards (8 offensive) and 15
fouls.
St. John’s totaled 9-of-12
at the line (75%), 19 boards
(4 offensive) and 16 fouls.
They host Minster 6:30 p.m.
Friday.
“Curtis and Ryan are our
two main guys and they scored
all but one of our 23 points
the first half. Obviously, they
made adjustments at the half
to try and slow them down,”
Elwer added. “That meant that
we need our other three guys
to step up and make some big
plays. Again, that will be a
continued focus for us.”
In junior varsity action,
Nick Taflinger’s 13 and 12 by
Dantez Walton paced LCC to
a 54-32 victory.
Sophomore Alex
Odenweller topped the Jays
with 11.
T-Birds fly past Jays
in annual Sunday tussle
VARSITY
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC (56)
Xavier Simpson 2-3-7, Jarren
Crawford 0-0-0, Sam Huffman 1-0-
2, Tre’on Johnson 4-1-10, Martyce
Kimbrough 2-2-7, Trey Cobbs 1-3-5,
Darius West 6-2-14, Jake Williams 4-1-
9, Tom Judy 0-0-0, Cory Stewart 1-0-2.
Totals 19-2-12/21-56.
ST. JOHN’S (48)
Andy Grothouse 1-0-3, Ryan
Buescher 4-1-12, Eric Clark 3-0-8,
Ryan Koester 1-1-3, Curtis Geise 6-5-
18, Evan Hays 0-0-0, Tyler Conley
0-0-0, Seth Bockey 1-2-4. Totals 9-7-
9/12-48.
Score by Quarters:
Lima CC 14 13 10 19 - 56
St. John’s 13 10 9 16 - 48
Three-point goals: Lima Central
Catholic, Johnson, Kimbrough; St.
John’s, Buescher 3, Clark 2, Geise,
Grothouse.
----
JUNIOR VARSITY
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC (54)
Trey Cobbs 3-0-6, Nick Taflinger
5-0-13, Jacob Judy 0-0-0, Landus
Thompson 0-0-0, Aidan O’Connor 0-0-
0, Liam Stolly 1-0-3, Dantez Walton
6-0-12, Dimitri Floyd 0-0-0, Garrett
Thomas 1-0-2, Ethan O’Connor 1-0-2,
Cameron White 4-1-9, Brad Stolly 3-1-
7. Totals 20-4-2/4-54.
ST. JOHN’S (32)
Aaron Hellman 3-0-9, Ryan
Hellman 0-0-0, Ben Wrasman 3-0-
6, Nick Bockey 0-0-0, Eric Gerberick
0-0-0, Tyler Ledyard 0-0-0, Gage
Seffernick 0-0-0, Jake Csukker 2-2-6,
Austin Heiing 0-0-0, Alex Odenweller
5-0-11. Totals 9-4-2/6-32.
Score by Quarters:
Lima CC 17 9 16 12 - 54
St. John’s 8 4 8 12 - 32
Three-point goals: Lima Central
Catholic, Taflinger 3, L. Stolly; St.
John’s, A. Hellman 3, Odenweller.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
FORT JENNINGS — If
one is a fan of defensive bas-
ketball, then Saturday after-
noon’s St. John’s at
Fort Jennings girls
hardwood clash was
your cup of tea.
The Lady Blue
Jays held the Lady
Musketeers to under
15-percent shooting
and did just enough
for a 32-22 victory
inside The Fort.
“It was hard-fought
all the way. You know with
our schedule when you hit
the road, it’s going to be a
tough game,” St. John’s coach
Dan J. Grothouse noted. “Fort
Jennings is pretty quick and
athletic and they made things
rough for us. We tried to take
advantage of our size inside
but we also gave up way too
many second shots.”
The Musketeers (4-7)
shot a polar 7-of-47 from
the floor (1-of-15 triples) for
14.9 percent and 7-of-13 free
throws (53.8%). Senior Macy
Schroeder was a 1-girl wreck-
ing crew with 16 markers (3
steals).
“We put up a good number
of shots; that’s about the num-
ber we like. We just didn’t
shoot well,” Fort Jennings
coach Kevin Horstman said.
“We sometimes get too quick
with our shots, though, and
get a little out of control. We
miss the first few and then
you can see our confidence
drop; we then look to Macy
too much.”
St. John’s (6-4) wasn’t
exactly on fire, hitting 11-of-31
(3-of-10 downtown)
for 35.5 percent and
7-of-12 sin-
gles (58.3%).
Senior Katie
Vorst put
in a double-
double with
11 points and
11 boards
and classmate
Jessica Recker added
10 markers (4 assists).
The trend toward an off-
night scoring-wise was set
from the word go. The hosts
were 3-of-14 as they couldn’t
find the range, even helped by
five offensive boards. The Jays
were 3-of-8. When sophomore
Rebekah Fischer hit a basket
with 25 ticks on the clock, that
gave the Blue and Gold the lead
for good at 7-6.
Though the Jays didn’t get
a lot of shots in the second
period (3-of-6), they were
5-of-8 at the line. That scor-
ing was enough for them to
slowly build up their mar-
gin — especially as the Lady
Musketeers remained chilly
from the field. When Vorst
finished off her 8-point period
with two free throws with 8.0
ticks on the clock — get-
ting the third foul on Jennings
sophomore Erin Osting — the
guests led 18-11.
The Musketeer offense
remained in the doldrums
in the third canto (2-of-9),
though they hit 4-of-6 freebies.
The Jays grabbed their biggest
lead of the game at 26-12 on
a 3-ball from right of the key
by Fischer at 5:11. Schroeder
led the Musketeers back
to within 28-20 with an
8-point quarter, finished
by two charity tosses
with 28.1 seconds to
go on junior Emilie
Fischbach’s fourth foul.
Schroeder (6:30)
and 5-1 waterbug junior
Ashley Gable (6:00) hit a free
throw each to get the Orange
and Black within 28-22.
However, they could get no
closer as they didn’t score
the rest of the way, miss-
ing their final 11 shots. A
Recker 3-ball (5:34) and a
Vorst single (1:05) were the
only points by the Jays.
In toto, St. John’s nabbed
37 caroms (8 offensive) as
freshman Sydney Fischbach
added nine; 16 errors; and
14 fouls. St. John’s heads to
Minster Thursday (6 p.m.
junior varsity tip).
“Defensively, we didn’t
give up a lot of easy shots and
played pretty well,” Grothouse
added. “We’ve played defense
pretty well all season. We did
just enough offensively to get
the win.”
Fort Jennings finished with
28 rebounds (15 offensive)
as Gable and senior Gabbi
German grabbed five each; a
mere six miscues; and 16 fouls.
They host Elida Tuesday.
“We did most everything
else pretty well,” Horstman
added. “We rebounded with
them pretty well and handled
the ball well. We just couldn’t
put the ball in the basket.”
In JV action, the Lady
Musketeers moved to 5-6 with
a 37-23 triumph.
Sophomore Jenna
Calvelage was high scorer for
the hosts with 11, while fresh-
man Olivia Kanny paced the
Lady Jays (4-6) with eight.
St. John’s girls beat Musketeers in defensive gem
VARSITY
ST. JOHN’S (32)
Tara Vorst 0-1-1, Emilie Fischbach
0-0-0, Brooke Zuber 1-1-3, Rebekah
Fischer 2-0-5, Katie Vorst 3-5-11,
Erica Saine 1-0-2, Jessica Recker 4-0-
10, Amanda Boberg 0-0-0, Sydney
Fischbach 0-0-0. Totals 8-3-7/12-32.
FORT JENNINGS (22)
Alyssa Schimmoeller 0-0-0, Macy
Schroeder 5-5-16, Hannah Clay 0-0-0,
Ashley Gable 1-2-4, Cassie Lindeman
0-0-0, Gabbi German 1-0-2, Erin
Osting 0-0-0, Gabby Clippinger 0-0-0,
Emily Kehres 0-0-0, Alyssa Louth 0-0-
0. Totals 6-1-7/13-22.
Score by Quarters:
St. John’s 7 11 10 4 - 32
Ft. Jennings 9 9 4 4 - 26
Three-point goals: St. John’s, Recker
2, Fischer; Fort Jennings, Schroeder.
-----
JUNIOR VARSITY
ST. JOHN’S (23)
Rachel Pohlman 1-1-3, Emilie
Grothouse 1-3-6, Olivia Kahny 3-2-8,
Maddie Pohlman 0-0-0, Ashlyn Troyer
0-0-0, Sam Kramer 0-0-0, Samantha
Wehri 0-0-0, Colleen Schulte 3-0-6.
Totals 7-1-6/16-23.
FORT JENNINGS (37)
Kelsey Klausing 1-0-2, Min Metcalfe
0-0-0, Alyssa Louth 3-0-8, Erin Osting
0-0-0, Gabby Clippinger 2-0-4, Hannah
Clay 1-1-3, Jenna Calvelage 4-3-11,
Keri Eickholt 0-0-0, Jessica Young
1-1-3, Kasidy Klausing 1-4-6, Kylie
Jettinghoff 0-0-0, Madison Grote 0-0-0.
Totals 11-2-9/11-37.
Three-point goals: St. John’s,
Grothouse; Fort Jennings, Louth 2.
K. Vorst
VARSITY
EDGERTON (46)
Shelby Herman 0-0-0, Devin Stark
2-2-6, Jaime Newman 1-1-3, Laurel
Schroeder 3-0-6, Lindsey Wheeler 2-0-
4, Brenna LaLonde 0-0-0, Kennedy
Flower 4-3-11, Hannah Griffin 5-2-13,
Mallorea Landel 0-2-2, Hannah Wheeler
0-1-1. Totals 16-1-11/18-46.
JEFFERSON (38)
Heather Pohlman 0-0-0, Brooke
Culp 0-3-3, Katie Goergens 3-3-
9, Rileigh Stockwell 4-3-11, Hannah
Sensibaugh 2-1-5, Gabby Pimpas
1-3-5, Shelby Koenig 0-0-0, Makayla
Binkley 0-0-0, Brooke Hesseling 2-1-5,
Jasmine McDougall 0-0-0. Totals 12-0-
14/27-38.
Score By Quarters:
Edgerton 10 9 11 16 – 46
Jefferson 12 10 12 4 – 38
Three-point goals: Edgerton, Griffin;
Jefferson, none.
------
JUNIOR VARSITY
EDGERTON (30)
Keisha Carlin 0-0-0, Kyli Purk 0-0-0,
Molly Miller 0-0-0, Hannah Herman 3-1-
7, Lindsi Blair 0-0-0, Madison Nickells
1-0-2, Sarah Fritch 2-1-5, Kaelyn Sack
2-2-6, Maddie Sullivan 0-1-1, Autumn
Rowe 2-0-4, Natalee Landel 0-2-2,
Shayla Sleesman 1-1-3. Totals 11-0-
8/14-30.
JEFFERSON (20)
Taylor Stroh 0-0-0, Heather
Pohlman 1-2-4, Lindsay Deuel 0-2-2,
Brooke Gallmeier 0-0-0, Shelby Koenig
1-0-2, Jessica Pimpas 0-1-1, Bailey
Gorman 0-0-0, Brooke Hesseling 0-0-0,
Jasmine McDougall 1-2-4, Brooke Culp
1-0-3, Katie Goergens 1-0-2, Hannah
Sensibaugh 0-0-0, Makayla Binkley
0-2-2. Totals 4-1-9/14-20.
Score by Quarters:
Edgerton 11 6 7 6 - 30
Jefferson 4 9 3 4 - 20
Three-point goals: Edgerton, none;
Jefferson, Culp.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Jefferson’s
girls basketball team had
had a week to simmer over
its last game, a 48-22 loss
to Lincolnview in the Chatt
Insurance Holiday Tournament
at Parkway, when they returned
to the court Saturday night
versus Edgerton at Jefferson
High School.
The Lady Wildcats had a
much better effort this time
but were outscored 16-4 in the
fourth period to fall 46-38 in
non-league action.
The Wildcats (4-8) led
34-30 at the start of the fourth
but then their proclivity to have
that one bad period came to the
fore. Junior Katie Goergens (9
counters) fouled out at 7:33 for
Delphos. The Lady Bulldogs
(9-2) rode Hannah Griffin (13
markers) and her nine points
in the period, including the
lob from Lindsey Wheeler (3
assists, 4 steals) for a layup at
5:01 to take the lead for good
at 39-37 in the midst of a 9-0
spurt. They claimed a 44-37
edge on a triple by Griffin
— the game’s only trifecta
— at the 4-minute mark. The
Lady ’Cats only scored four
points in the stanza — a toss
by junior Rileigh Stockwell
(7:04), her basket at 5:40 and a
freebie by sophomore Brooke
Culp at 3:44.
“We’ve had that problem
all year about playing good
for three quarters and then
having that one bad quarter.
We were hanging in but that
3 by Griffin was huge; that
broke our backs,” Jefferson
mentor Dave Hoffman said.
“We struggled with turnovers
all game but we had them far
too often in stretches; we held
them down but couldn’t take
advantage because we turned
it over too many times.”
Both teams had trouble
with turnovers throughout the
game — 26 by the Red and
White and 24 by the visitors.
They combined for 15 in the
first period alone, as well as
combining for 8-of-23 shoot-
ing. Jefferson scored the first
10 points — with four each
from Stockwell and Goergens
— and Stockwell’s two singles
at 3:20 gave them a 12-4 edge.
The Bulldogs tallied the last
six of the period, including a
14-footer from the right side
by Laurel Schroeder at 1:13,
to get within 12-10.
The Wildcats broke their
drought with a free toss by
junior Gabby Pimpas at 6:56
and Goergens added a fielder
for a 15-10 edge. The Bulldogs
answered with an 8-2 spurt to
take its first lead at 2:34 on two
singles by Mallorea Landel
but it was short-lived. The
hosts rallied with a 5-1 clos-
ing span, including a layup off
a steal at the horn by Pimpas,
for a 22-19 halftime bulge.
The third period saw four
lead changes and one tie as
neither team could get more
than a 5-point lead — 28-23
on a single by Pimpas at 5:02.
The Red and White scored the
last six markers of the canto,
including a free toss by junior
Brooke Hesseing (5 markers)
with 11.3 ticks to go, for a
34-30 margin.
In sum, Edgerton downed
17-of-47 shots (1-of-10 trios)
for 36.2 percent and 11-of-
18 at charity (61.1%); secured
34 misses (13 offensive) as
Kennedy Flower (11 counters)
led with six; and added 20
fouls.
Jefferson netted 12-of-34
(0-of-6 beyond the arc) for
35.3 percent and 14-of-27
from 15 feet (51.9%); seized
28 caroms (8 offensive) as
Stockwell led with eight and
Pimpas five; and added 17
fouls. They visit Miller City 6
p.m. Tuesday.
“We had a lot better effort
tonight; we played with a lot of
energy, especially on defense,”
Hoffman added. “Last year,
(Devin) Stark scored 14 on
us; tonight, we held her to
six. Offensively, we just seem
to get in too big of a hurry at
times shooting the ball; that
has been a struggle for us, too,
and we just need to slow down
and not go too fast.”
In junior varsity action,
Edgerton moved to 10-1 with
a 30-20 win.
Hannah Herman led
the Lady Bulldogs with
seven, while junior Jasmine
McDougall and sophomore
Heather Pohlman led the Lady
Wildcats (3-8) with four each.
Fourth quarter
dooms Lady Wildcats
Jefferson matmen
4th at Plymouth
PLYMOUTH — The
Jefferson wrestling team
finished in fourth place at
Saturday’s 13-team Plymouth
Invitational.
Placing for the Wildcats,
who finished with 202 team
points, were:
First place: Colin
McConnahea at 195 pounds
— he was also voted most
valuable wrestler of the tour-
nament; and Geoff Ketcham
at 285.
Second: Tyler Foust at 182
and Quinten Wessell at 220.
Third: Gaige Rassman at
126 and Tanner Vermule,
138.
Sixth: Blake Kimmet, 120;
Chris Truesdale, 152; and
Lane Bennett, 170.
Jefferson is next in
the Lima Senior Spartan
Invitational starting 9 a.m.
Saturday.
Team scores: Upper Sandusky
256, Margaretta 233, Mapleton 226,
Jefferson 202, Independence 177,
Plymouth 172.5, Keystone 111.5,
Buckeye Central 93.5, South Central
93, Edison 86.5, Arcadia 82.5, Sidney
Lehman 30.5, Columbiana 15.
-----
Lady Green
demolishes Grove
By DAVE BONINSEGNA
The Delphos Herald
zsportslive@yahoo.com
OTTOVILLE — When
you are facing the top-ranked
team in the state, it can be a
bit overwhelming.
That is how it must have
been for the Columbus Grove
Lady Bulldogs as they trav-
eled to Ottoville to take on
the top-ranked (Division IV)
Lady Green Saturday after-
noon.
Ottoville controlled the
tempo and the game from the
tip; Rachel Beining (6 points)
hit the first bucket of the
game just 20 seconds in and
the Lady Green never looked
back on their way to a 57-14
victory.
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Monday, January 7, 2013 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
Jefferson’s Tanner Vermule works to pin Noah McBride of Columbiana in the 138-
pound weight class at the Plymouth Invitational. He came in third in his division and the
Wildcats fourth as a team in the 13-team meet. (Photo submitted)
The Associated Press
Wild-card weekend is
over in the NFL playoffs and
Seattle’s Russell Wilson is
the lone rookie quarterback
remaining.
And Wilson’s Seahawks
made a pretty good case that
they might be here a
while.
Wilson teamed with
Marshawn Lynch to
lead Seattle to a 24-14
comeback win over the
Washington Redskins,
who finished the game
without Robert Griffin III —
their star rookie quarterback
who reinjured his right knee.
“It was a tremendous
game,” Wilson said. “We were
fortunate enough to come out
with a win. It was a battle, we
kept playing. One play at a
time, that’s what I kept telling
the guys.”
The Seahawks (12-5) over-
came a 14-0 first-quarter hole
— their biggest deficit this
season — and will visit the
top-seeded Atlanta Falcons
(13-3) next Sunday. Seattle
has a 6-game winning streak
and ended the stigma that it
couldn’t win on the road in the
playoffs — ending an 8-game
skid away from home in the
postseason.
“It was a huge win,” Wilson
added, “and we’re excited
about the opportunities.”
In Baltimore, Ray Lewis and
the Ravens eliminated Andrew
Luck, the No. 1 overall pick,
and the Indianapolis Colts with
a 24-9 win. The victory delayed
Lewis’ retirement for at least
another week as Baltimore (11-
6) heads to top-seeded Denver
(13-3) next Saturday.
“I knew how it started but
I never knew how it would
end here in Baltimore,” said
Lewis, who played his final
home game. “To go the way it
did today, I wouldn’t change
nothing.”
The other playoff games
next weekend are Green Bay
at San Francisco on Saturday
and Houston at New England
on Sunday.
The Packers (12-5) set
up the showdown with the
49ers (11-4-1) after beating
the Minnesota Vikings in the
wild-card round Saturday.
The teams met in the season
opener, a 30-22 victory by San
Francisco.
Houston gets another
chance against New England
after beating Cincinnati 19-13
on Saturday in quarterback
Matt Schaub’s first postseason
start. The AFC East champion
Patriots trounced the Texans
42-14 at Foxborough on Dec.
10, the first of three
losses in four games for
Houston to end the regu-
lar season.
At Landover, Md.,
Griffin’s knee buckled
as he tried to field a bad
shotgun snap, leaving the
Redskins an offseason
to worry about their franchise
player’s health.
Griffin was playing in his
third game since spraining his
right knee about a month ago
against Baltimore and had been
looking gimpy since tumbling
backward following an ill-
advised sidearm throw in the
first quarter.
Nevertheless, he stayed
in the game. Redskins coach
Mike Shanahan said he didn’t
pull Griffin because the quar-
terback wanted to continue.
“I think I did put myself at
more risk,” Griffin added. “But
every time you get on the field,
you’re putting yourself on the
line.”
Griffin was scheduled for
an MRI to determine the extent
of the injury.
Lynch ran for 132 yards
and Wilson completed 15-of-
26 passes for 187 yards and ran
eight times for 67 yards for the
Seahawks.
Ravens 24, Colts 9
Anquan Boldin set a franchise
record with 145 yards receiving, includ-
ing the clinching touchdown in the
Ravens’ victory. It set up a rematch
with Denver and Peyton Manning, who
cruised past Baltimore 34-17 three
weeks ago.
“I wanted Denver,” Boldin said,
“because they beat us. We’ll make it
different.”
Lewis, who made 13 tackles,
ended his last home game in Baltimore
at fullback for the final kneel-down. He
then went into a short version of his
trademark dance before being mobbed
by teammates. He followed with a vic-
tory lap, his right arm, covered by a
brace, held high in salute to the fans
after playing for the first time since
tearing his right triceps on Oct. 14
against Dallas.
The loss ended the Colts’ turn-
around season in which they went from
2-14 to the playoffs in coach Chuck
Pagano’s first year in Indianapolis (11-
6). Pagano missed 12 weeks while
undergoing treatment for leukemia and
returned last week.
Indy’s only points came on three
field goals by Adam Vinatieri. Luck
completed 28-of-54 passes, the most
attempts by a rookie in a playoff game,
for 288 yards.
Seahawks’ Wilson last
rookie QB left in playoffs
(Continued from Page 6)
Nine of the 15 Ottoville
players on the roster found
their way into the scorebook,
led by Abby Siefker’s 17
points. Taylor Mangas tal-
lied 11 and Tonya Kaufman
just missed double digits with
nine points.
The Lady Green held
their guests to just one point
in the first stanza and one
basket from the field in the
first half as the hosts went on
a long run in the span. They
went up 29-1 on a Siefker
bank shot with 2:00 left in
the first 16 minutes of play.
Sammi Stechshulte hit a
long ball late in the half,
breaking a long drought from
the field for the 31-1 ’Dogs;
however, the hosts continued
to have their way with their
Putnam County League foe,
taking a 31-4 lead into the
break.
Obviously, there wasn’t
much adjusting to be done
for the home team in the
second half as they picked up
where they left off from the
first 16 minutes. They went
on a 16-0 tear, taking a 47-4
advantage with 2:53 to go in
the third.
Rachel Schumacher hit her
lone basket of the game with
2:46 to go in the frame, mak-
ing it a 47-6 contest. If things
weren’t going bad enough
for the Bulldogs, the third
stanza ended when one of
the Columbus Grove players
received a technical for run-
ning into one of the Ottoville
players. The result ended in
missed shots but nonetheless,
the Lady Green took a 50-6
lead into the final frame.
Renee Karhoff added a
lone bucket from the field
for the Lady Bulldogs in the
last frame. Ottoville scattered
three buckets in the final eight
minutes to finish off the rout.
The junior varsity contest
went to Columbus Grove
35-31.
Ottoville visits Bath for
a 6 p.m. Start (JV) Tuesday,
while Grove visits Paulding
Thursday.
Columbus Grove (14)
Sydney McCluer 1-0-2, Sammi
Stechshulte 1-0-3, Rachel Schumacher
1-0-2, Renee Karhoff 1-1-3, Kyrah
Yinger 0-3-3, Brooke Hoffman 0-1-1,
Megan Verhoff 0-0-0, Melissa Amstutz
0-0-0, Hope Schroeder 0-0-0, Aubrey
Fruchey 0-0-0, Danielle Schramm 0-0-
0. Totals 3-1-5/8-14.
Ottoville (57)
Rachel Turnwald 1-1-3, Nicole
Kramer 0-0-0, Chelsey Boecker 0-0-0,
Taylor Mangas 4-1-11, Nicole Vorst
2-2-6, Tonya Kaufman 4-0-9, Monica
Sarka 1-0-2, Kendra Eickholt 0-0-0,
Courtney Von Sossan 0-1-1, Haley
Landwehr 0-0-0, Annie Lindeman
0-0-0, Rachel Beining 2-2-6, Lexie
Wannemacher 0-0-0, Lyndsey
Wannemacher 1-0-2, Abby Siefker
5-7-17. Totals 17-3-14/20-57.
Score by Quarters:
Col. Grove 1 4 3 6 - 14
Ottoville 14 22 14 7 - 57
Three-point goals: Columbus
Grove, Stechschulte; Ottoville,
Mangas 2, Kaufman.
JV score: 35-31 (Columbus
Grove).
-----
Hot-shooting Bulldogs
rout Musketeers
in PCL boys
COLUMBUS GROVE —
The Columbus Grove boys
basketball team grabbed
a 14-12 lead after one and
kept building a lead as the
Bulldogs routed Fort Jennings
69-41 in Putnam County
League action Saturday night
at Grove High School.
Will Vorhees set the
pace for the hot-shooting
Bulldogs (6-3, 2-0 PCL)
with 19 — to go with five
boards and two steals — and
Jace Darbyshire added 14 (5
assists, 3 steals). They fin-
ished a stellar 29-of-44 from
the field (7-of-15 long range)
for 65.9 percent and 4-of-8
from the line (50%). They
added 18 boards, 11 turn-
overs and 19 assists.
Brandon Kohli paved the
way for the Musketeers (1-9,
0-2 PCL) with 12 and Austin
Kehres added 12. They
canned 17-of-37 shots (2-of-
9 beyond the arc) for 45.9
percent and 5-of-9 singles
(55.6%). They finished with
16 boards, 15 errors and 12
assists.
Jennings hosts Kalida 6
p.m. Friday, while Grove vis-
its Paulding.
FORT JENNINGS (41)
Nick Von Sossan 3, Connor
Wallenhorst 4, Josh Wittler 7, Austin
Kehres 8, Kurt Warnecke 7, Brandon
Kohli 12, Dylan Eldridge 0, Tyler Ricker
0, Mark Metzger 0, Nathan German 0,
Drew Stechschulte 0, Logan Sickles 0.
Totals 15-2-5/9-41.
COLUMBUS GROVE (69)
Derek Rieman 6, Collin Grothaus
7, Brady Shafer 7, Will Vorhees 19,
Blake Hoffman 9, Clay Diller 5, Riley
Brubaker 0, Jace Darbyshire 14, Elisha
Jones 0, Joey Warnecke 2, David
Bogart 0. Totals 22-7-4/8-69.
Score by Quarters:
Fort Jennings 12 11 9 9 - 41
Col. Grove 14 17 21 17 - 69
Three-point goals: Fort Jennings,
Von Sossan, Warnecke; Columbus
Grove, Hoffman 3, Darbyshire 2, Diller,
Shafer.
----
Big Green boys
subdue Wildcats
OTTOVILLE — The
Ottoville boys basketballers
overcame a slow first quarter
versus Minster Saturday night
at L.W. Heckman Gymnasium
and rallied for a 47-39 non-
league win.
Ryan Honigford netted 16
(10 in the fourth period) and
Derek Schimmoeller 15 for
the Big Green (5-7), who hit
10-of-16 free throws in the
fourth period. Honigford led
the floor game with five assists
and Luke Schimmoeller was
the top rebounder with six
boards.
Devon Poeppelman led the
Wildcats with 13.
Ottoville hosts Pandora-
Gilboa 6:30 p.m. (starting
with a half of a junior varsity
game) Saturday.
MINSTER (39)
Stechschulte 2-0-4, Hoyng 1-0-3,
Knapke 2-1-7, Niemeyer 3-0-7, Devon
Poeppelman 5-0-13, Thobe 0-0-0,
Brown 1-0-3, Wolf 1-0-2, Otting 0-0-0.
Totals 7-8-1/4-39.
OTTOVILLE (47)
Brendan Schnipke 0-0-0, Derek
Schimmoeller 5-4-15, Ryan Honigford
5-6-16, Tyler Roby 0-0-0, Austin
Honigford 1-1-3, Brandt Landin
2-0-4, Matt Turnwald 0-0-0, Luke
Schimmoeller 4-1-9, Rudy Wenzlick
0-0-0, Cory Fischer 0-0-0, Austin
Trenkamp 0-0-0. Totals 16-1-12/19-
47.
Score by Quarters:
Minster 11 5 12 11 - 39
Ottoville 6 12 15 14 - 47
Three-point goals: Minster,
Poeppelman 3, Knapke 2, Hoying,
Niemeyer, Brown; Ottoville, D.
Schimmoeller.
-----
Indians whip
Lancer boys
By NICK JOHNSON
DHI Correspondent
sports@timesbulletin.com
MIDDLE POINT — The
Lincolnview Lancers wel-
comed the Fort Recovery
Indians to Lincolnview High
School on Saturday night for
boys basketball action and the
Indians defeated the Lancers
64-45.
Lincolnview jumped
out to a 6-2 lead off of two
Justis Dowdy 3-pointers. The
Indians then went on a 6-0
run to end the first quarter
to put the score at 10-8, Ft.
Recovery.
The Indians got two points
from Wade Gelhaus and two
from Ben Dilworth.
Ft. Recovery blew the
game open in the second
quarter when both Gelhaus
and Elijah Kahlig got hot
from the field and the Indians
outscored the Lancers 18-7 in
the second. Gelhaus had six
in the second and Kahlig went
3-of-4 from behind the arc to
help push the Indians over
the Lancers. Lincolnview
got a 3-pointer from Kyle
Williams to help try and keep
pace with Ft. Recovery but it
wasn’t enough as the Indians
went into the half leading
28-15.
Fort Recovery got a
3-pointer from Kahlig to
start the third quarter but
the Lancers countered with
two layups from Nick Leeth.
Later on in the third, Kahlig
connected on yet another
3-pointer but Lincolnview
got a 3-point play from Kade
Carey to make the score
38-23, Ft. Recovery. The
Indians ended the quarter with
a 3-pointer from Kahlig to
give Ft. Recovery a 19-point
lead, 46-27.
The Lancers came out in
the fourth quarter still fight-
ing as Williams started it with
four points. After two Leeth
foul shots and two Williams
foul shots, Lincolnview had
the lead down to 12 with the
score of 47-35.
The Lancers could never
cut the lead to single digits,
however, as the Indians
leaned on Gelhaus and
Kahlig late to finish the vic-
tory.
The Indians were led by
Kahlig, who shot over 50 per-
cent from behind the arc and
tallied 28 points on the night.
Gelhaus went 8-of-13 from
the field and 6-of-8 from the
charity stripe for his 22 points
on the night.
Lincolnview spread out
its scoring as Williams had
16, Leeth 12 and Carey and
Dowdy had eight each.
“We knew coming in the
challenge we were going
to have, going over the
scouting report before the
game. We know how good
the players were that they
were bringing in - Kahlig
and Gelhaus are pretty good
players,” said Lancer coach
Brett Hammons. “Looking
at the book and the stats, I
thought we played hard
and we executed. We had
one bad quarter, the second,
where we really got out-
scored. We can’t have 15
turnovers in the first half
and I told them that at
halftime. We did a better job
in the second half with just
three turnovers.”
Hammons felt his team
will benefit from the qual-
ity of teams it has seen
recently.
“We need to step up. We
had some guys get in foul
trouble but we have played
two pretty good teams the last
two days,” he added. “They
have pushed us defensively
and we just need guys to step
up. Like I tell them, every
player has a role and when
they are called, they need to
step in and play to their best
of their ability.”
The victory improves the
Indians’ record to 9-2 on the
season. The Lancers’ record
at the midpoint of the season
stands at 3-7.
Fort Recovery (FG, FT, 3PT):
Kyle Schroer 0-2 0-0 0-0 0, Kent Retz
0-1 3-4 0-0 3, Ben Dilworth 1-1 3-4
0-1 5, Wade Gelhaus 8-11 6-8 0-2
22, Alex Kaiser 0-1 2-4 0-0 2, Elijah
Kahlig 3-4 4-5 6-11 28, Mason Evans
1-3 2-6 0-0 4, Totals: 13-23, 20-31,
6-14, 64.
Lincolnview (FG, FT, 3PT): Nick
Leeth 3-7 6-9 0-0 12, Kade Carey
2-6 4-5 0-2 8, Kyle Williams 3-5 4-6
2-5 16, Logan Miller 0-1 0-0 0-0 0,
Justis Dowdy 1-2 0-0 2-3 8, Conner
McCleery 0-3 1-2 0-0 Eli Farmer 0-0
0-0 0-1 0, Brooks Ludwig 0-0 0-1 0-0
0, Totals: 10-24, 15-12, 4-11, 45.
-----
Lady Spartans
eke by ’Dawgs
ELIDA — Lima Senior’s
girls basketball team out-
scored Elida 11-7 in the fourth
period Saturday afternoon to
eke past the Lady Bulldogs
60-58 in non-league action at
the Elida Fieldhouse.
Stacia Allen and Indiya
Benjamin led the Lady
Spartans with 18 points each
and Caterrion Thompson
added 12.
Osha Owens led the Lady
Bulldogs with 21, while
Torie McAdams added 12
and Kylie Downton 11.
Elida visits Fort Jennings
Tuesday.
LIMA SENIOR (60)
Stacia Allen 18, Indiya Benjamin
18, Caterrion Thompson 12,
Shaquayla Johnson 6, Imara Haynes
3, Briana Griffin 2, Jayla Washington
1. Totals 24-6-60.
ELIDA (58)
Osha Owens 21, Torie McAdams
12, Kylie Downton 11, Carly Stetler
6, Ashley Lowry 4, Sabrina Kline 2,
Cassidy Slusher 2. Totals 24-7-58.
Score by Quarters:
Lima Sr. 17 17 15 11 - 60
Elida 16 18 17 7 - 58
Three-point goals: Allen 5,
Benjamin; Elida, Owens 3.
----
Eagles soar past
Elida boys
BENTON RIDGE —
Despite 22 points from
junior Dakota Mathias, the
Elida boys basketball team
fell 55-50 to Liberty-Benton
Saturday night at L-B.
Max Stambaugh added 10
for the Bulldogs (7-3).
Mitch Linhart led the
Eagles (7-1) with 16, while
Adam Cytlak added 14 and
Ryan Geise 14.
Elida entertains Van Wert
6 p.m. Friday.
ELIDA (50)
Dakota Mathias 22, Max
Stambaugh 10, Aric Thompson 7,
Austin Allemeier 6, Louis Gray 2,
Trent Long 2, Ebin Stratton 1. Totals
20-5-50.
LIBERTY-BENTON (55)
Mitch Linhart 16, Adam Cytlak 14,
Ryan Geise 14, John Darnall 9, Zach
Garver 2. Totals 19-13-55.
Score by Quarters:
Elida 13 13 11 13 - 50
Lib.-Ben. 12 15 14 14 - 55
Three-point goals: Elida, Mathias
2, Stambaugh 2, Thompson; Liberty-
Benton, Geise 2, Cytlak 2.
Roundup
Got an interesting
sports story?
CALL JIM METCALFE,
Sports Editor, 419-695-0015
or email:
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.
8 – The Herald Monday, January 7, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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www.delphosherald.com
Tree Service
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping
& Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
AMISH
CARPENTERS
All types of construction
Build or Remodel
For all your metal siding and
roofing needs contact us.
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
260-585-4368
Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is Your Ad
Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
The new Ruler Foods store in
Van Wert, OH is currently accepting
applications for manager positions.
Interested candidates should
submit their resume to:
thomas.hocker@jay-c.com
Jay C Food Stores is an equal opportunity employer and does
not discriminate against any applicant on the basis
or characteristic that is protected by law.
11I125
LT pkg.
4 cyl.
Local trade
CHEVROLET • BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
2009 Ford Focus
12E65.
4 Cyl.
Automatic,
great full
economy,
A/C, bright blue
NOW
$
10,900
2011 Buick Regal CXL
12G20.
carbon
metallic,
lots of
luxury &
fuel economy
Was
$
20,995
NOW
$
19,475
Was
$
12,500
2004 Chevy Silverado
12H74A
1/2 ton,
4x4, WT pkg.,
local trade
NOW
$
11,400
Was
$
12,700
2004 Chevy TrailBlazer
12E59
4x4
LS pkg.
Sunroof
NOW
$
9,950
Was
$
11,500
2010 Chevy Equinox
12F71. Local
trade. 1LT
pkg., 32
mpg EPA
estimate.
NOW
$
17,825
Was
$
19,900
2011 Chevy Malibu
NOW
$
13,750
Was
$
14,500
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It’s easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you. No
other classified ad buy is
simpler or more cost effec-
tive. Call 419-695-0015
ext. 138
125 Lost and Found
FOUND: CALICO Cat on
Southworth Rd., last week
of December . Cal l
419-692-7261
FOUND: LAB mix, blonde
female. Found Sunday
12/30 on Euclid St. Call
419-692-1512
210 Child Care
ARE YOU looking for a
child care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1- 800- 992- 2916 or
(419)225-5465
WOULD YOU like to be
an in-home child care pro-
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1- 800- 992- 2916 or
(419)225-5465
320 House For Rent
DELPHOS 2-3 Bedroom
house for rent with ga -
rage. $450/month. Ph.
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 6 7 4 1 o r
419-692-1890.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951
577 Miscellaneous
FREE PHONE, No Activa-
ti on fee, No Credi t
Checks, No Hassles, No
Contract Phone, $45 Best
Value Unlimited Talk, Text
and Mobile Web.
Van Wert Wireless the
Alltel Store, 1198 West-
wood Drive, Suite B, Van
Wert, Ohio 419-238-3101
583
Pets and
Supplies
LOTS OF new sweaters
and fancy collars with
bling. Fun Toys! Hava -
nese, Maltese, Poodles.
Garwick’s The Pet People.
(419)-795-5711.
garwicksthepetpeople.com
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist in
the investigation of these
businesses. (This notice
provided as a customer
service by The Delphos
Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
805 Auto
1995 JEEP Wrangler, soft
t op, 4x4, 4-cyl i nder
5-speed. Runs & looks
good. $2950. Cal l
419-439-5557
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
080 Help Wanted
CARRIERS WANTED
DELPHOS ROUTES
AVAILABLE NOW
Route 14
N. Main & N. Washington
Route 28
N. Franklin St.
No Collecting
Call the Delphos Herald
Circulation Department at
419-695-0015 ext. 126
FULL- TI ME ROUTE
Driver and Full-time Ware-
house/Back-up Route
Driver needed. Must be
21, have valid DL and
good driving record, able
to learn tire knowledge
and lift up to 75 lbs. Send
resume/application to:
K&M Tire
965 Spencerville Road
Delphos, OH 45833
Attn.: Rachel
RachelM@kmtire.com
Fax: 419-695-7991
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
Benefits available. 99% no
touch freight! We will treat
you with respect! PLEASE
CALL 419-222-1630
HIRING PART-TIME ex-
perienced Floral Designer.
Apply at Flowers On Fifth,
940 E. Fifth St., Delphos
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends, & most nights.
Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
080 Help Wanted
THE UNION Bank Com-
pany is now accepting re-
sumes for a full-time
Trai ner i n Col umbus
Grove. The position will
develop as well as con-
duct training sessions for
all staff. The individual will
also stay up to date on
bank regulations to update
the training program. The
ideal candidate will be a
high energy level individ-
ual that has excellent writ-
ten and oral communica-
tion skills. Training experi-
ence as well as 3 to 5
years of experience in a fi-
nancial institution is pre-
ferred. The bank is an
Equal Employment Oppor-
tunity Employer. Please
send resume, along with
cover letter and salary re-
quirements to:
hrresumes@theubank.com
ATTN: (TCG) or
The Union Bank Com-
pany, P.O. Box 67, Co -
lumbus Grove, OH 45830,
ATTN: Human Resource
Manager (TCG)
UNION BANK Company
Would you like to be a part
of a winning team and
serve your community? If
so, The Union Bank Com-
pany has a full-time Loan
Processor position open in
Columbus Grove. The in-
dividual will assist the
Loan Department with a
variety of functions with
constant efficiency and
confidentiality. This posi-
tion requires the ability to
complete tasks such as
loan input, preparing and
maintaining loan files,
sending approval letters,
ordering and reviewing ap-
praisals, title searches,
etc. Candidates should
have Excel and Word ex-
perience as well as good
customer service skills.
Commercial, consumer,
and mortgage loan docu-
mentation experience is
preferred. The bank is an
Equal Employment Oppor-
tunity Employer. Please
send your resume, along
with cover letter and sal-
ary requirements to:
hrresumes@theubank.com
ATTN: (LP) or
The Union Bank Com-
pany, PO Box 67, Colum-
bus Grove, OH 45830,
ATTN: Human Resource
Manager (LP).
Is Your Ad
Here?
Call Today
419 695-0015
Dear Annie: I have been
married to “Barry” for 20
years. Even though we live
several hours from his mother,
she controls many of our
family’s decisions.
My mother-in-law is our
only living parent.
I have tried many
times to please her,
without success. I
often have the family
over to our home and
invite them to our
summer cottage. I
plan outings and shop
for gifts. She doesn’t
drive, so I take her
to the grocery and
wherever else she
needs to go. But in
her eyes, I cannot do
anything right.
Barry jumps when she asks
him to do anything. If she
needs a light bulb changed, he
immediately goes to fix it. She
has always been his “boss” in
terms of what he does, how
he does it and when he does
it. And she is his confidante
when it comes to our marriage,
which does not help.
For the past several
years, Barry has been very
uninterested in me. He’s
angry all the time and blames
me for everything that goes
wrong in his life. I’ve been
to counseling, but Barry
(and his mother) feels this is
nonsense and says there must
be something wrong with me.
I have been an outsider in
Barry’s family for my entire
marriage and see no hope
of changing it. Where do I
go from here? Is divorce my
only answer? I truly love my
husband, but I don’t like our
life with his family, and he is
unwilling to make changes.
— Sad in the North
Dear Sad: Your
mother-in-law sounds
difficult, but your real
problem is Barry. If
he would back you
up, it would give
you an opportunity
to change the
dynamics within the
relationship. But his
family doesn’t show
you respect because
Barry doesn’t
demand it, and worse,
he makes them
believe they can treat you
poorly. And while his family
deserves his consideration, as
well, it shouldn’t come at your
expense.
Tell Barry that your
marriage is in serious trouble,
not only because of the way
his family treats you, but
because he is angry and
uninterested. If he refuses to
go for counseling, go back
on your own and figure out
what’s best for you.
Dear Annie: A year ago,
I approached my aunt about
something she did that hurt
my family. I tried to do so
with gentleness and respect.
However, not only did she
not apologize, but she also
completely rationalized her
behavior.
Now she acts as if I did
something wrong, and she is
ignoring me. We used to be
quite close and corresponded
frequently. I still write to her,
but get no response. She sends
texts to everyone but me. She
even writes my wife and
kids, but it’s as if I no longer
exist. How should I deal with
this situation? — The Silent
Treatment
Dear Silent: You caught
your aunt behaving poorly.
Instead of being mature about
it, she became defensive. Now
she is punishing you as a way
to avoid taking responsibility
for her actions. If you are
willing to forgo the apology,
you can simply tell her you
miss her and the closeness
you once had. It’s also
possible that in time she will
begin including you again, as
long as you don’t mention the
previous unpleasantness. We
hope she will grow up soon.
Dear Annie: “Worried
Papa” said his teenage
daughter wants to get her
navel pierced. I got mine
pierced in my 20s because
everyone else was doing it,
so of course I thought it was
cool, too.
In my 30s, I got pregnant
and removed the ring.
Now I have an ugly hole
that was stretched during
two pregnancies. Tattoos
also stretch with aging and
pregnancy, and some of them
look like gross ink blobs as
your skin loses its elasticity.
— Should Have Thought
Twice
Hubby the problem,
not the mother-in-law
Annie’s Mailbox
ACROSS
1 Sea swallows
6 City near Syracuse
11 Stronger-tasting
12 Warehoused
13 Rust and water
14 Stopped
15 Exhausted
16 Velvety plant
17 Barred
19 Art colony town
23 PIN prompter
26 Ancient tale
28 “Simpsons” bartender
29 Groupie welcome
31 Pool table surface
33 Fix a manuscript
34 Bellyached
35 Give it the gas
36 Woeful cry
39 Coal scuttle
40 Iran’s locale
42 Prevail upon
44 Rats!
46 Newspaper, often
51 Lock horns with
54 Winner
55 Seizes the throne
56 Acropolis locale
57 Enjoys a repast
58 Leitmotif
DOWN
1 Kind of stand
2 Sheik colleague
3 Fair offering
4 Requires
5 Almost-grads
6 Sporty vehicles
7 Breakfast order
8 Form 1040 sender
9 Passing grade
10 Calculate
11 Understood
12 “Ivanhoe” author
16 Very, in Veracruz
18 Sound of deep thought
20 Protein-building acid
21 Seeped
22 Nursery buy
23 Zeniths
24 Fountain in Rome
25 Hubbies
27 Cinemax rival
29 Immunity shots
30 Dentist’s org.
32 Murmur of content
34 Chow mein additive
37 Entices
38 Aleta’s son
41 Love intensely
43 Sitwell or Wharton
45 Vipers
47 Exercise aftermath
48 List unit
49 Isolated
50 Birthday no.
51 Belly dance instrument
52 Greek letter
53 Wordplay
54 Cistern
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
Answer to
Puzzle
Real Estate Transfers
Van Wert County
Secretary of Housing
& Urban Development
to Creative Home
Buying Solutions,
portion of inlot 193,
Van Wert.
Estate of Mary M.
Schram to Richard J.
Schlereth, inlots 279,
294, Delphos.
Estate of Charles W.
Waterman, estate of
Charles B. Waterman
to Nicole Renee Barna,
Mindi Lee Koczot,
portion of inlot 217,
Ohio City.
Estate of Norma L.
Wollet (Norma Wollet)
to Ginger L. Rahrig,
Gloria H. Hundley,
inlot 144, Middle Point.
Don O. Hutchison,
Ireta A. Hutchison
to George L. Webb,
of sections 11, 15, 2
Willshire Township.
Brian Schaffner,
Lisa A. Schaffner to
Gregory B. Schaffner,
inlot 31, Van Wert.
Ruth E. Pease to
Ruth E. Pease, Richard
E. Mottinger, portion
of section 20, Liberty
Township.
Lori McHugh,
Sheriff Stan D. Owens
to Brenda K. Smith,
Franklin D. Smith Jr.,
inlot 1835, Van Wert.
Thomas S. Buzard,
Sheriff Stan D. Owens
to JPMorgan Chase
Bank, inlot 2641, Van
Wert.
Shirley Webb, outlot
4-1, Scott.
Van Wert County to
Roy E. Phlipot, Mary
Jo Phlipot, inlot 619,
Van Wert.
PNC Bank to Secre-
tary of Housing & Urban
Development, portion of
inlot 187, Delphos.
412 S. Market Trust
to Kirsten Barnhart,
portion of inlot 1165,
Van Wert.
Estate of Harland
Doyle Schmid to
Margaret Jean Schmid,
Jane E. Poling, Keith
A. Schmid, Kent J.
Schmid, inlots 3, 4,
5, Glenmore, portion
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening January 8, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Mod Fam Middle Happy Apt. 23 Private Practice Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS NCIS NCIS: Los Angeles Vegas Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC Betty Betty Go On Normal Parenthood Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Raising Ben-Kate New Girl Mindy Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint Flashpoint
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC Jerry Maguire Jerry Maguire
ANIM Frozen Planet Frozen Planet River Monsters Frozen Planet Frozen Planet
BET Soul Plane 35 & Ticking Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Real Housewives Real Housewives Decorators Happens Real Housewives Miami
CMT Reba Reba Blue Collar Blue Collar Comedy Tour
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Work. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The Burn Daily Colbert Tosh.0 The Burn
DISC Dual Survival Dual Survival Africa Dual Survival Africa
DISN The Lion King ANT Farm Jessie Good Luck Jessie ANT Farm Wizards Wizards
E! Kardas Kardas Kardas Kardashian Kardas Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN College Basketball College Basketball SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 College Basketball NBA Coast to Coast NFL Live SportsNation
FAM Pretty Little Liars The Lying Game Pretty Little Liars The 700 Club The Lying Game
FOOD Chopped Chopped Chopped Chopped Chopped
FX Iron Man 2 Justified Justified Justified
HGTV Love It or List It Property Property Hunters Hunt Intl Scoring Scoring Property Property
HIST Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens
LIFE Dance Moms Dance Moms America's Supernanny To Be Announced Dance Moms
MTV Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki Snooki & JWOWW Snooki & JWOWW BUCKWILD
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Shutter Island Amityvl Horror
SPIKE Dodgeball: Underdog The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show The Joe Schmo Show
TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Cougar Big Bang Conan Cougar Office
TCM Ocean's Eleven Seven Thieves Bob Flamb
TLC Totally T-Boz The Sisterhood Best Funeral Ever The Sisterhood Best Funeral Ever
TNT Castle Castle Castle CSI: NY CSI: NY
TOON Level Up Adventure King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Bizarre Foods Extreme Yachts Extreme Yachts Dangerous Grounds Extreme Yachts
TV LAND Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
VH1 Black Ink Crew Mob Wives Making Mr. Right Love & Hip Hop Black Ink Crew
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO Puss in Boots The Three Stooges George Lopez Margaret
MAX Troy Fast Five Sex Games Cancun 2
SHOW Brake The Samaritan The Black Dahlia
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Monday Evening January 7, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC The Bachelor Castle Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS How I Met 2 Broke G 2 Broke G Mike Hawaii Five-0 Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC The Biggest Loser Deception Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX Bones The Mob Doctor Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
Cable Channels
A & E The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of...
AMC The Green Mile Fargo
ANIM Finding Bigfoot Gator Boys Finding Bigfoot
BET Friday After Next Big Momma's House 2 Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Real Housewives Real Housewives Happens Vanderpump Rules Real
CMT Reba Reba Redneck Island Redneck Island Redneck Island Redneck Island
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Brickle. South Pk Daily Colbert South Pk South Pk
DISC Amish Mafia Amish Mafia Amish Mafia Amish Mafia Amish Mafia
DISN Tinker Bel Austin Good Luck Good Luck Jessie ANT Farm Wizards Wizards
E! Studio E! E Special Ice-Coco Ice-Coco Ice-Coco Ice-Coco Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN Pregame BCS Nat'l SportsCenter
ESPN2 College B NFL Live ProFILE Profile ProFILE SportsCenter NFL Live
FAM Switched at Birth Bunheads Switched at Birth The 700 Club Bunheads
FOOD Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Mystery D Mystery D Diners Diners
FX Hancock Hancock
HGTV Love It or List It Love It or List It Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It Love It or List It
HIST Pawn Pawn American Pickers Pawn Pawn American Pickers Pawn Pawn
LIFE An Amish Murder Willed to Kill An Amish Murder
MTV Catfish: The TV Show Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 Catfish: The TV Show Teen Mom 2
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Being Human Dawn of the Dead Zombie Apocalypse
SPIKE Scarface Scarface
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Cougar Cougar
TCM Juliet of Spirits Spirit-Beehive Californi
TLC Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss Cake Boss Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss Cake Boss
TNT The Mentalist The Mentalist The Mentalist CSI: NY CSI: NY
TOON Regular MAD King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV The Layover The Layover Hotel Impossible No Reservation The Layover
TV LAND Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King King The King of Queens
USA WWE Monday Night RAW NCIS: Los Angeles CSI: Crime Scene
VH1 Love & Hip Hop Black Ink Crew Love & Hip Hop Black Ink Crew Love & Hip Hop
WGN NBA Basketball News/Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO The Rundown Joyful Noise Day-Tomorrow
MAX The Descendants Varsity Blues
SHOW Untold History Lara Croft-Life Goon Final Cut
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Monday, January 7, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2013
The probability of good material
growth in the year ahead will be a bit
stronger than usual for you. However,
don’t be surprised if you have to
make a number of adjustments along
the way, to meet your goals.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- It’s important to be astute
regarding touchy situations, because
if you’re not, you could easily allow
yourself to be dominated by another.
Don’t let it happen.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Frivolous social pursuits
should not be permitted to interfere
with your more serious affairs. Put
anything of that sort at the bottom of
your agenda until you complete your
duties.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
When you are unable to achieve your
objectives, don’t look for scapegoats
to blame. The fault will easily be
traced back to you should you bite
off more than you can chew.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- If you’re given important
information to relay to another, don’t
trust it to memory. Your recall might
not be as accurate as you think.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- It’s important to prevent emotion
from dominating your thinking. If
you don’t, what you let yourself
believe about a financial matter
might not be in line with reality.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Do not let a reckless companion
inspire you to act in a similar manner.
If you should, together you might do
something quite foolish and costly
that you’ll later regret.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Some big problems could arise
if you foist onto co-workers certain
jobs that you should be taking care
of yourself. Strive to be industrious
instead of manipulative.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Normally, you’re a pretty good judge
of people, yet your instincts could
unexpectedly fail you. Unfortunately,
you could place your trust in someone
who has no intention of living up to
it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Objectives you establish for yourself
are likely to be achieved. However,
the targets you’re striving to meet
will turn out be of little consequence
to you or anybody else.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
You might not be as mentally sharp
as you think. It’s one of those days
when you should avoid trying to
match wits with anyone who has lots
of knowledge and expertise.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Guard against inclinations to count
your chickens before they hatch.
Be a little optimistic, but, first and
foremost, let your common sense
prevail.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Try not to let your indifference
put you in a position where you
have no input in important decisions
being made about your life. Others’
thinking could easily work against
you.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 2013
In the year ahead, you could get
involved in an enterprise that you’ll
need to be quite secretive about.
Your project could be coveted by the
opposition and easily copied if they
got wind of it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- None among your group of friends
will have a knack for organizing like
yours. Appoint yourself director and
start putting some plans together that
everyone will enjoy.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- That burning feeling in your ears
is likely to be due to so many friends
saying nice things about you. You
have far more boosters than you
realize.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- When socializing, don’t merely
mingle with people looking for polite
chitchat -- circulate with persons
whom you can learn from.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- A coveted goal can be achieved
if you’re willing to work for it. Put
aside any trivial endeavors and go for
that special something that you’ve
wanted for a long time.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Generally, it’s wise to avoid
discussions on religion and/or
politics, but if a friend should offer a
friendly, fresh perspective, you might
find it interesting.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- This might be the day to put an
idea to the test regarding a financial
arrangement. The least you could
do is try it out; the payoff could be
substantial if things work out.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Conditions that influence you
both physically and mentally can
be exceptionally harmonious if you
handle things in a warm, friendly
manner. Play life light and easy.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
When you expend your energies
on labors of love, you’ll be amazed
at how much you can accomplish,
and the enjoyment you’ll derive
from the process. You deserve such
a day.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- After being subjected to a couple
of hectic days, you’re entitled to
let yourself go and relax a little.
You don’t need any social fanfare
-- just time alone with your special
someone.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
You should take prospective clients
to your favorite haunt rather than to a
fancy place. You’ll achieve more in a
convivial, homey atmosphere.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Having too structured a schedule
might find you much too restless and
champing at the bit. Leave yourself
some space in which to move about
and be able to do as your impulses
direct.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- Friends or relatives who
truly believe in you could serve
as a springboard to success. Their
suggestions on how to handle your
troubles should take the strain off.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
22
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10 – The Herald Monday, January 7, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan, who
joined the high court in 2010, was shown holding
a gavel and wearing a judge’s black robe in a high-
school yearbook student government photo.
The top handicap attained by England’s Prince
Charles on the polo field, where the highest rating
is a 10-goal handicap, was a respectable four goals.
Beginning players start with a handicap of -2.
Today’s questions:
How many times has Otto Man, the boozed-up,
burned out school bus driver on TV’s The Simpsons,
crashed his bus?
U.S. Highway 50 is known as Constitution Avenue
in Washington, D.C. What is it known as in Dodge
City, Kansas?
Answers in Wednesday’s Herald.
Guard: inmates allowed to watch graphic movies
BY RYAN J. FOLEY
The Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Iowa — Administrators let
offenders at one of Iowa’s most dangerous prison
units watch violent and sexually explicit movies
and TV shows for years, despite repeated com-
plaints from a female officer who said it encour-
aged inmates to sexually harass her.
Murderers, sexual predators and other men
housed at a unit for mentally ill inmates at
the maximum-security state prison in Fort
Madison were allowed to watch movies such as
“Deranged,” a horror film that includes a scene
in which a woman is beaten, raped, hung upside
down and skinned. Among other movies inmates
watched were “Delta of Venus,” an erotic film;
“Coffey,” which shows sadism and attempted
rape; and “Cruel Intentions,” records show.
Despite correctional officer Kristine Sink’s
complaints, administrators told her not to turn off
the movies or shows. When she did, they accused
her of insubordination, according to department
records that Sink provided to The Associated
Press. One warden blamed Sink for causing
problems by complaining, and another supervisor
suggested her outfits — a standard-issue uniform
— were enticing inmates.
Sink said she has fought a lonely battle under
four wardens against movies that caused inmates
to become sexually aggressive — through “10
years of misery.” She filed a lawsuit Nov. 30
against prison officials alleging sexual harass-
ment, discrimination and workplace retaliation,
seeking an unspecified amount of damages.
“It’s inconceivable. If I had not lived through
it myself, I wouldn’t believe this,” she said.
Sink, who started at the prison in 2003 after
the factory where she had been working shut
down, said the movies played multiple times a
day for a week on a television in a common area
where 45 inmates could watch. Some inmates
would openly masturbate and make sexually
harassing comments to her.
Sink said that when prison officials finally
acted on her complaints in September 2011 by
largely barring movies with sexually explicit
content, inmates blamed her and subjected her to
a torrent of insults and threats to beat or even kill
her. One threw urine on her. Despite the threats,
Sink said her supervisors refused to move her
to a job where she wouldn’t be in contact with
inmates for more than a year. She was finally
moved to a desk job last month, after she filed
her lawsuit.
Sink’s attorney, Brooke Timmer, said the
lawsuit is aimed at forcing changes to allow
employees to file complaints without retaliation
and be free from sexual harassment by inmates.
“No private employer could get away with
this,” she said.
Sink said she began complaining about the
practice of allowing inmates to rent or purchase
graphic movies to be shown to the unit soon after
she went to work there. She filed a formal com-
plaint in 2007 after the showing of “Deranged.”
“What are we saying to the sex offenders that
are already convicted of these crimes and then we
provide them visual viewing to fantasize about
or to act upon,” Sink wrote to then-Warden John
Ault. She told him she has been waiting for man-
agement “to fix this wrong and make it right for
over four years.”
Sink told Ault, who retired in 2010, that
inmates were accusing her of trying to eliminate
their movies and suggested a supervisor had let
them know she complained.
Ault responded that he took “umbrage” with
her claim that management identified her, and
said “you, and you alone, have put yourself out
there” by turning off movies and complaining.
He said it was her who got upset and filed the
complaint, even though steps were being taken
to select more appropriate movies.
“I question who here has created a ‘more
hostile environment to work in’ or an ‘unse-
cured environment to work in’, as you call
it,” Ault wrote. “I cannot disagree with you
that some of the scenes in movies have shown
sexual violence, especially those involving
females, and should not have been shown, and
we believe we have tightened up the process
to lessen the likelihood of such movies being
shown. We must remember, however, that we
are an institution of adult males, and much of
what we show can be seen on general televi-
sion broadcasts.”
Sink claims a male supervisor then told her
the department had received a complaint from
an inmate that her clothes were too tight. Sink
says she was humiliated when she was directed
to turn around so the supervisor could inspect
her uniform.
Weeks later, Ault dismissed Sink’s complaint,
saying officials determined the movies didn’t
violate the state’s violence-free workplace policy.
“As always, we encourage you to continue to
report any inappropriate behaviors you may
encounter while performing your job duties,” he
wrote.
Months later, Sink wrote that she turned off
another movie after it showed sexual violence
and she found one inmate masturbating in his
cell. Another inmate said, “No offense but some
women like it that way,” she wrote to superiors.
She said such movies jeopardized staff security
and hurt the goals of sex offender treatment.
Department spokesman Fred Scaletta said
he couldn’t comment on Sink’s allegations. He
said the agency prohibits the showing of NC-17
films and requires any R-rated videos to have
a “redeeming value.” Unrated shows must be
reviewed to ensure they are appropriate, he
said.
New Lego robotics
kit talks to iPhones
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Lego bricks are getting cozy with the
iPhone and other Apple devices in the latest incarnation of the
Mindstorms robotics kit.
Lego is set to announce today that a new, $350 Mindstorms
EV3 kit will have the ability to talk to iPhones, iPads and iPod
Touches through Bluetooth wireless connections. That means
Lego builders can use the devices as remote controls for their
robots, or create simple programs that are then sent to the
robots to control their actions.
Lego said the kit will go on sale in the second half of the
year. It was announced as the International CES gadget show
begins in Las Vegas this week.
Remote control was already possible with Android smart-
phones and the most recent Mindstorms kit, the NXT. Apple
devices didn’t work because the “brain” of the kit — a juice-
box-sized electronic brick — lacked a chip that would identify
the Lego gadget to Apple devices.
Also new in the Mindstorms EV3 kit is a “two-eyed” infra-
red sensor that can pick up signals from a small infrared remote
and locate it. In the kit, Lego includes the blueprints for a snake
robot that uses its eyes to sense if someone is close to its head,
in which case it strikes.
The EV3 will also be the first Mindstorms kit to be avail-
able in Chinese, Korean, Spanish and Russian. Previous kits
have been in English, Japanese and a few other European
languages.
As with earlier kits, the EV3 includes four motors and five
different sensors. The new brick is compatible with earlier sen-
sors and motors and is “more hackable than ever,” according to
Lego. The first Mindstorms came out in 1998.
Suggested age for the EV3 is 10 and up.
Man attacked
by bobcat
in his garage
B R O O K F I E L D ,
Mass. (AP) — A man in
Massachusetts says all he
heard was a hiss before a
bobcat pounced on him in his
own garage, sinking its teeth
into his face and its claws in
his back.
Roger Mundell Jr. went into
the garage in Brookfield on
Sunday morning to fetch some
tie-down straps for a friend
when the animal attacked.
It then ran out of the garage
and bit Mundell’s 15-year-
old nephew on the arms and
back.
Mundell and his wife
pinned the cat to the ground
and shot it dead.
Mundell, his nephew and
his wife, are being treated for
rabies. His wife wasn’t bitten,
but got the animal’s blood on
her.
State Environmental Police
took the bobcat to have it
tested for rabies, which they
think is likely given its unusu-
al behavior.
D
ELPH
O
S
H
E
R
A
L
D
THE
If you want to see your kids read more,
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‘Chainsaw 3-D’ carves out No. 1 debut with $23M
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
It took Leatherface and his
chainsaw to chase tiny hobbit
Bilbo Baggins out of the top
spot at the box office.
Lionsgate’s horror sequel
“Texas Chainsaw 3-D” debuted
at No. 1 with $23 million,
according to studio estimates
Sunday. The movie picks up
where 1974’s “The Texas
Chainsaw Massacre” left off,
with masked killer Leatherface
on the loose again.
Quentin Tarantino’s revenge
saga “Django Unchained”
held on at No. 2 for a second-
straight weekend with $20.1
million. The Weinstein Co.
release raised its domestic total
to $106.4 million.
After three weekends
at No. 1, part one of Peter
Jackson’s “The Hobbit” tril-
ogy slipped to third with
$17.5 million. That lifts the
domestic haul to $263.8 mil-
lion for “The Hobbit.” The
Warner Bros. blockbuster
added $57.1 million over-
seas to bring its international
earnings to $561 million and
its worldwide total to about
$825 million.
Also passing the $100 mil-
lion mark over the weekend
was Universal’s musical “Les
Miserables,” which finished
at No. 4 with $16.1 million,
pushing its domestic total to
$103.6 million.
Like other horror fran-
chises, “Texas Chainsaw
Massacre” has had several
other remakes or sequels, but
the idea always seems ripe
for a new wave of fright-
flick fans. Nearly two-thirds
of the audience was under
25, too young — or not even
born — when earlier “Texas
Chainsaw Massacre” movies
came out.
“Texas Chainsaw” drew a
hefty 84 percent of its busi-
ness from 3-D screenings.
Many movies now draw 50
percent or less of their rev-
enue from 3-D screenings, but
horror fans tend to prefer pay-
ing extra to see blood and guts
fly with an added dimension.
In narrower release, Matt
Damon’s natural-gas frack-
ing drama “Promised Land”
had a slow start in its nation-
wide debut, coming in at No.
10 with $4.3 million after
opening in limited release a
week earlier.
Released by Focus
Features, “Promised Land”
stars Damon as a salesman
pitching rural residents on
fracking technology to drill
for natural gas. The film wid-
ened to 1,676 theaters, aver-
aging a slim $2,573 a cin-
ema, compared with $8,666
in 2,654 theaters for “Texas
Chainsaw.”
Hollywood began the year
where it left in 2012, when
business surged during the
holidays to carry the industry
to a record $10.8 billion at
the domestic box office.
Overall business this week-
end came in at $149 million,
up 7 percent from the same
period last year, when “The
Devil Inside” led with $33.7
million, according to box-
office tracker Hollywood.
com. But with strong busi-
ness on New Year’s Day last
week, Hollywood already has
raked in $254.2 million, 33
percent ahead of last year.
Box-office results ebb and
flow quickly, so that lead
could vanish almost over-
night. But with a steady
lineup of potential hits right
through December, studios
have a chance at another rev-
enue record this year.
“The month that we had at
the end of last year that led
us to a record year continued
right through New Year’s
and on now to the first offi-
cial weekend of 2013,” said
Hollywood.com analyst Paul
Dergarabedian. “We’re look-
ing for an even stronger year
this year. That’s in the realm
of possibility. But we have 51
weekends to go.”
Estimated ticket sales for
Friday through Sunday at U.S.
and Canadian theaters, accord-
ing to Hollywood.com. Where
available, latest international
numbers are also included.
Final domestic figures will be
released today.
1. “Texas Chainsaw 3-D,”
$23 million.
2. “Django Unchained,”
$20.1 million.
3. “The Hobbit: An
Unexpected Journey,” $17.5
million.
4. “Les Miserables,” $16.1
million.
5. “Parental Guidance,”
$10.1 million.
6. “Jack Reacher,” $9.3
million.
7. “This Is 40,” $8.6 mil-
lion.
8. “Lincoln,” $5.3 mil-
lion.
9. “The Guilt Trip,” $4.5
million.
10. “Promised Land,” $4.3
million.

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