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Beginner 1 Level 1: Beginner English Audio Lessons - Hello, can I speak to Peter Bradshaw, please?

- This is Peter Bradshaw speaking. - Hi, Peter, its Sally here. - Hello? - Hi, can I speak to Mary, please? Its Jane here. - Im sorry Jane, but Mary is out. - Can I leave a message for Mary, please? - Yes, of course. - Please tell her that I will call her tonight. Level 2: Elementary English Audio Lessons - Do you come from a big family? - Yes, I do. I have so many uncles, aunts and cousins in different parts of the world. - Do you ever see them? - Yes, I sometimes do. - How many uncles and aunts do you have? - My mother had three brothers and one sister, and my father had four sisters. So in total, I have three uncles and five aunts. - Are your grandparents still alive? - Three of them are. My mothers parents are both alive, but unfortunately my grandfather on my fathers side died two years ago. - Im sorry to hear that.

Level 3: Low Intermediate English Audio Lessons

- Hi, Im David Harper. - Im Melanie Cooper. Nice to meet you. - You too. Are you enjoying the party? - Yes, I am. Are you? - Yes, its great. And how do you know Peter and Kate? - Well, I was at school with Kate. We have known each other for years. How about you? - I work with Peter. - Oh really? How long have you two worked together? - Oh, it must be about seven years now.
. Situation: David and Melanie meet at a party and make conversation. Style: friendly and quite informal . Notes: 1. Im David Harper = My name is David Harper. 2. Nice to meet you. = It is nice to meet you / it is a pleasure to meet you (more formal) 3. Yes, I am. Are you? (using only the auxiliary) = yes, I am enjoying it. Are you enjoying it? 4. its great (stronger) = its very good 5. how do you know Peter and Kate? = How did you first meet Peter and Kate, the hosts of the party? 6. I was at school with Kate = Kate and I went to the same school / Kate and I were at school together 7. for years = for many years 8. I work with Peter. = Peter and I work at the same company 9. you two = you and Peter 10. it must be = I think it is / I believe that it is 11. about seven years now = approximately seven years now (more formal) / roughly seven years now

- Do you live locally? - No, I dont. I live about ten (10) miles away. - Whereabouts do you live? - I live in a place called Finchley. - Oh, I know Finchley. My sister used to live there about five years ago. Its a lovely part of town, not too close to the centre, but not too far away either. - Yes, I love living there. Its an easy commute to work.
. . Situation: David and Melanie make conversation after meeting at a party. Style: friendly and quite informal . Notes: 1. Do you live locally = Do you live near here? / Do you live nearby? 2. I dont. (using only the auxiliary) = I dont live locally 3. about ten (10) miles away = approximately ten miles from here (more formal) 4. Whereabouts? = Where exactly? 5. in a place called Finchley = a place that is called Finchley 6. I know Finchley = I am familiar with Finchley 7. My sister used to live there = My sister lived there in the past 8. about five years ago = approximately five years ago 9. Its a lovely part of town = it is a very nice area of this town / It is a lovely part of London (note: we sometimes say a nice part of town or in the centre of town, without the article the before town, when we know which town we are talking about. But we do not say in the centre of city or in the centre of village for these phrases, we always need to use the definite article (the) or demonstrative adjective (this/that) , so we say in the centre of the city or a lovely part of this village.) 10. not too close to the centre = it is not too near to the centre of town 11. not too far away either = not too far from the centre either 12. I like living there = I enjoy living in that place 13. Its an easy commute to work (note: here commute is a noun.) = it is easy for me to commute to work (note: here commute is a verb.) / commuting to work is easy from there (note: here commuting is a gerund.) 14. to work = to the place where I work / to the office (if Melanie works in an office!.

- Who did you come here with?

- I came here with my colleague, Sam. Im not sure if you know him. Hes over there wearing the red shirt. - Oh Sam! I used to work with him. - What a coincidence! It is a small world, isnt it? - Yes, it is! I havent seen Sam for years. We got on really well when we worked together. I must go and say hello in a moment.

.. Situation: David and Melanie realise that they have an acquaintance in common in other words, that they both know the same person. Style: friendly and quite informal . Notes: 1. Who did you come here with? = With whom did you come here? (much more formal we never say it like this!) 2. did you come here = did you come to this place 3. with my colleague, Sam. = with someone who I work with, who is called Sam / with someone from my workplace, and his name is Sam 4. Im not sure if you know him = I dont know whether you know him 5. Hes over there = He is there, some distance from us 6. wearing the red shirt = in the red shirt 7. I used to work with him. = I worked with him in the past 8. What a coincidence! = That is such a coincidence! 9. a coincidence = an occasion when two or more similar things happen at the same time, especially in a way that is unlikely and surprising 10. It is a small world (idiom), isnt it? (note: we say its a small world when we want to show your surprise that people or events in different places are connected.) 11. I havent seen Sam for years = The last time I saw Sam was many years ago 12. I must go and say hello = I strongly intend to go and say hello to him (note: we never actually say it like this!) 13. in a moment = very soon / in a minute

- Who did you come here with? - I came here with my colleague, Sam. Im not sure if you know him. Hes over there wearing the red shirt. - Oh Sam! I used to work with him. - What a coincidence! It is a small world, isnt it? - Yes, it is! I havent seen Sam for years. We got on really well when we worked together. I must go and say hello in a moment.

. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text .. Situation: David and Melanie realise that they have an acquaintance in common in other words, that they both know the same person. Style: friendly and quite informal . Notes: 1. Who did you come here with? = With whom did you come here? (much more formal we never say it like this!) 2. did you come here = did you come to this place 3. with my colleague, Sam. = with someone who I work with, who is called Sam / with someone from my workplace, and his name is Sam 4. Im not sure if you know him = I dont know whether you know him 5. Hes over there = He is there, some distance from us 6. wearing the red shirt = in the red shirt 7. I used to work with him. = I worked with him in the past 8. What a coincidence! = That is such a coincidence! 9. a coincidence = an occasion when two or more similar things happen at the same time, especially in a way that is unlikely and surprising 10. It is a small world (idiom), isnt it? (note: we say its a small world when we want to show your surprise that people or events in different places are connected.) 11. I havent seen Sam for years = The last time I saw Sam was many years ago 12. I must go and say hello = I strongly intend to go and say hello to him (note: we never actually say it like this!) 13. in a moment = very soon / in a minute

- What do you do for a living? - I am an English teacher. I work for a school in Covent Garden. - Have you worked there long? - Not really. Ive worked there for about six (6) months. Most of my students are taking exams at the moment so its a busy time for me. Im looking forward to when the exams are over! How about you? What do you do?
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text .. Situation: David and Melanie make conversation at a party. Style: friendly and quite informal . Notes: 1. What do you do for a living? = What is your job? 2. I am an English teacher = I work as an English teacher 3. I work for a school = I am employed by a school (much more formal we never say it like this!) 4. in Covent Garden = in an area of London called Covent Garden 5. Have you worked there long? = Have you worked there for a long time? / Have you worked there for long? 6. Not really = No, I have not worked there for long 7. Ive worked there for about six (6) months = I started working there about 6 months ago 8. about six (6) months = approximately 6 months ago (more formal) / roughly 6 months ago 9. Most of my students = The majority of my students (more formal) / Most students of mine 10. are taking exams = are sitting exams (note: there is a difference between passing an exam and taking an exam. If you pass an exam, you are successful in it, and you get a good enough grade not to fail it. If you take an exam, or sit an exam, it just means that you do the exam, and then you have to wait for the results.) 11. at the moment = at present (more formal) / currently (more formal) 12. so its a busy time for me. = and therefore it is a busy period for me 13. Im looking forward to (phrasal verb) = I am anticipating with pleasure (note: we never actually say it like this!) 14. the exams are over (phrasal verb) = the exams have finished 15. How about you? (note: there is extra stress on you because this is a return question. In other words, the speaker is asking the same question in return.) = What about you? 16. What do you do? = What do you do for a living? / What is your job?

Level 4: High Intermediate English Audio Lessons

- Hello, Fosters Limited (Fosters Ltd). - Hello, Im calling to speak to Barry Craven in Graphics. - One moment please, Ill just put you through. Im afraid his lines busy. Would you like to hold? - No thanks, I would prefer not to as Im a bit pushed for time at the moment. Could you put me through to his answer machine, please? - Im afraid its not working right now. Weve just had the department refurbished and were having a few teething problems with the new telephone set-up. - OK, in that case could you please put me through to someone else in his department?
. . Situation: Karen calls Fosters Ltd to speak to Barry but he is talking to someone else on another line and the answer machines are broken so she cant leave a voice message. Style: Professional and quite formal . Functions: 1. Opening a telephone call: Hello, Im calling to speak to Barry Craven in Graphics. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Dealing with a business telephone call: One moment please, Ill just put you through. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Requesting a telephone connection: Could you please put me through to someone else in his department? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Introducing unwelcome information : Im afraid its not working right now. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Responding to a negative reply with a different request: OK, in that case could you please put me through to someone else in his department? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) . Notes: 1. Im calling to speak to = I would like to speak to 2. in Graphics = in the Graphics department 3. Ill just put you through (phrasal verb) = I will connect you now 4. Im afraid his lines busy. = I am sorry but his telephone is engaged on another call (more formal) 5. Would you like to hold? = Would you like to wait on the telephone? (note: we never actually say it like this!) 6. Im afraid (more professional) = Im sorry, but 7. right now = at this moment 8. Weve just had the department refurbished = We recently got someone to refurbish the department

9. refurbished = modernised and redecorated 10. teething problems (idiom) = start-up (phrasal noun) problems / problems that arise when something is very new. (note: the origin of this idiom is that babies having teething problems when their first teeth appear and cause them pain. When a babys first teeth are appearing, the baby is teething. Note that in the pronunciation of teething, the /th/ sound in the middle is soft ( ), as in the, but in the noun teeth, the /th/ sound is hard (), as in think.) 11. the new telephone set-up (phrasal noun) = the new telephone system 12. in that case = taking into account what you have just told me / in view of the information that I have just been given (much more formal) 13. put me through to (phrasal verb) = connect me to 14. someone else = another person

- Hello, Graphics. - Hi, I was trying to get in touch with Barry Craven but I understand hes on the phone. Could I leave him a message please? - Sure, go ahead. - Could you please tell him that Karen from Smiths and Sons Ltd called, and ask him to call me back on 0203 778 4922? - Of course. Could I ask what the call is about? - Im sure its nothing that Barry wont be able to figure out. Its just that he emailed me some files and I havent been able to open them on any of our office computers. - Oh. I see. Well, Barrys the expert. Ill get him to call you back.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: During her business telephone call to Fosters Ltd., Karen decides to leave a message with someone else in Barrys department, leaving her name and number so that he can call her back. Style: Professional and quite formal . Functions: 1. Giving permission: Sure, go ahead. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Leaving a telephone message: Could you please tell him that Karen from DailyStep .called, and ask him to call me back on 0203 778 4922? 3. Making polite enquiries: Could I ask what the call is about? 4. Giving an explanation: Its just that he emailed me some files and I havent been able to open them... (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Saying that you have understood: Oh. I see. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Saying that you will ask someone to return a call: Well, Barrys the expert Ill get him to call you back. . Notes: 1. I was trying to get in touch with (idiom) = I wanted to contact (but I now realise that this is not possible at the moment) 2. hes on the phone = he is speaking to someone on the telephone 3. Could I leave him a message please? = Can I leave him a message? (more direct) / Would it be possible for me to leave him a message, please? (more formal) 4. Sure, go ahead = Please, begin (much more formal we never say it like this.) 5. Could you please tell him that...? = Can you tell him that...? (more direct) / Would you mind telling him that...? (more formal) 6. call me back (phrasal verb) = return my call (more formal) 7. to figure out (phrasal verb) = to investigate and resolve / to understand

8. Its just that = The thing is that (more emphatic) / the issue is that (more formal) 9. he emailed me some files = he sent some files by email 10. Barrys the expert = Barry knows everything about this subject 11. Ill get him to = Ill ask him to 12. to call you back (phrasal verb) = to return your phone call (more formal)

- Hi, Karen, its Barry here, returning your call. - Hi, Barry. Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. The reason I was calling is that theres a mix-up with the proofs you emailed me the other day. I cant open them. - Oh, dear! Ill look into it straightaway. Didnt we come across this problem once before? - Now that you mention it, I do remember. It was something to do with a virus and corrupted files. - I took steps to make sure that couldnt happen again. So, it cant be anything to do with that. Ill look into it and get straight back to you.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: Barry returns Karens call, and she explains the problems that shes been having with the computer files that he sent her. Style: Friendly but business-like. . Functions: 1. Telephoning: its Barry here, returning your call. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Thanking: Thanks for getting back to me so quickly (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Reacting: Oh, dear! Ill look into it straightaway. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Asking if a problem has occurred before: Didnt we come across this problem once before? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Realising during conversation: Now that you mention it, I do remember it was something to do with a virus... (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Saying that action has been taken: I took steps to make sure that couldnt happen again. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 7. Saying that something is unrelated: So, it cant be anything to do with that. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 8. Promising to investigate and respond to a query as soon as possible: Ill look into it and get straight back to you. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) . Notes: 1. Its Barry here, returning your call. = It is Barry speaking, and I am calling because you called me earlier. 2. getting back to me (phrasal verb) = contacting me after I asked you to do so 3. a mix-up = some confusion / a problem 4. the proofs = the sample documents or pictures

5. the proofs you emailed me (omitting the relative pronoun that or which)= the proofs that you sent to me by email 6. the other day (idiom) = very recently 7. look into it (phrasal verb) = investigate it 8. straightaway = immediately 9. Didnt we come across (phrasal verb)...? =Didnt we experience...? / Didnt we find...? (note: a negative question expects a positive answer and is therefore often used as a way of checking or confirming information.) 10. Now that you mention it, I do remember = Now that you have said that, I do recall 11. it was something to do with (phrasal verb) = it was something related to 12. a virus = a computer problem that can be passed from one computer to another (like an virus is from one person to another) 13. corrupted files = computer files which are damaged so that the files cannot be open or read 14. I took steps (idiom) to make sure that couldnt happen again = I took action to ensure that the problem could not re-occur (more formal) 15. to make sure (phrasal verb) = to ensure that (more formal) 16. it cant be anything to do with that = it is not possible that it is related to that (phrasal verb) 17. Ill look into it (phrasal verb) = I will investigate it (more formal) 18. and get straight back to you (phrasal verb) = and speak with you again very soon / and call you back very soon (phrasal verb)

- Karen, I have a feeling the mix-up with the proofs must have been something to do with the file naming protocols. It appears the ones we sent through had the extension .mcw rather than .doc. - That would explain it. We use PCs, not Macs. No wonder I couldnt open them! - Its a problem we come across fairly often. I do hope it doesnt set back the release date for the new book youre publishing. - No, dont worry. It shouldnt affect it as we havent even agreed a provisional launch date for the novel yet with the author.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: Barry and Karen get to the bottom of the problem that Karen had with opening the computer files, and she assures Barry that so far it hasnt caused any serious delays in the project release date. Style: Friendly but business-like . Functions: 1. Giving an opinion: Karen, I have a feeling the mix-up with the proofs (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here. 2. Identifying the cause of a problem: . must have been something to do with the file naming protocols. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here. 3. Accepting an explanation: That would explain it. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Prefacing a very unsurprising statement: No wonder I couldnt open them! (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Emphasising: I do hope it doesnt set back the release date for the new book youre publishing. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Giving reassurance: No, Dont worry. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 7. Expressing expectation: It shouldnt affect it... . Notes: 1. I have a feeling = my view is (more formal) 2. the mix-up = the confusion / the problem (more formal) 3. must have been something to do with = was, I assume, something to do with (more formal) 4. something to do with (phrasal verb) = something connected with / something related to 5. the file naming protocols = the system by which the computer files were named 6. It appears the ones we sent through (omitting the relative pronoun that or which) = It seems that the files that we sent through 7. sent through (phrasal verb) = sent by fax or email (in this case, by email)

8. That would explain it = what you have just said explains the cause of the problem (note: we never actually say it like this!) 9. PCs = Personal Computers. This terms is often used for describing any computer that is not made by Apple Computers 10. Macs = Apple Macintosh computers. The term Mac is often used for describing any computer that is made by Apple computers 11. No wonder! (more emphatic) = Its not at all surprising that! 12. we come across (phrasal verb) = we experience / we find 13. I do hope (more emphatic) = I hope that 14. set back (phrasal verb) the release date = delay the launch date 15. the new book youre publishing (omitting the relative pronoun that or which) = the new book that you are releasing / the new book that you are bringing out (phrasal verb) 16. It shouldnt affect it = I dont think that it will have any effect on it / I do not expect it to affect it 17. a provisional launch date = a proposed but as still unconfirmed release date 18. the novel = the fictional story (novel = book containing a long story about fictional characters and events) 19. the author = the writer (of books)

- Hi Barry, Karen here again. Im just calling to thank you for getting to the bottom of the proofs problem so quickly. I really appreciate it. - I was relieved that we could sort it out because when you first mentioned it, I went into a bit of a panic. - Why? - I was really worried that someone had hacked into our computer system again. Im in charge of keeping the companys anti-virus and firewall software updated. - Well, it all worked out fine in the end. Thanks a lot. - Any time! Glad I could help. Any more problems, just give me a call.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: Karen calls Barry to thank him for getting to the root of the problem so quickly, and he tells her why he was relieved that it turned out to be a simple issue. Style: Friendly but business-like . Functions: 1. Thanking on the telephone: Im just calling to thank you for getting to the bottom of the proofs problem so quickly. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Thanking: I really appreciate it. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Expressing relief: I was relieved that we could sort it out... (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Expressing concern: I was really worried that someone had hacked into our computer system again. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Describing earlier alarm: ... when you first mentioned it I went into a bit of a panic. 6. Expressing relief: Well, it all worked out fine in the end. 7. Accepting thanks: Any time! Glad I could help. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) . Notes: 1. Im just calling to = My reason for calling is to (more formal) 2. getting to the bottom of (idiom) = resolving / getting to the root of (idiom) 3. the proofs problem = the problem with the proofs 4. the proofs = the sample documents or pictures 5. I really appreciate it.= I am very grateful for your help 6. I was relieved that = I was happy and less worried because 7. sort it out (phrasal verb)= resolve the problem 8. when you first mentioned it = when you first told me about it 9. I went into a bit of a panic = I started to become very worried and anxious 10. I was really worried that = I was very concerned that

11. someone had hacked into (phrasal verb: this word is only used in connection with computers. A hacker is a person who hacks into or illegally enters someone elses computer) our computer system = someone had illegally entered or taken information from our computer system 12. Im in charge of (phrasal verb) = I have the responsibility for / I am responsible for 13. anti-virus software = software that protects the computer from viruses 14. firewall = software that prevents hackers from entering your computer system 15. keeping the companys anti-virus and firewall software updated = making sure that the companys computers are maintained free from viruses, and that the firewall contains defence against the latest threats 16. it all worked out (phrasal verb) fine = Im pleased that everything was OK, after previous problems 17. Any time! = no problem! / Ill help you any time! (note: we never actually say it like this!) 18. Glad I could help. (very friendly) = I am glad that I could help you. (more formal) 19. Any more problems, just give me a call. (very friendly) = If you have any more problems, please call me (more formal) .

Level 5: Advanced English Audio Lessons

- Sorry, Im late David but the cars been playing up again. - Surprise, surprise. Ive told you you want to get rid of that heap of scrap. Its been on its last legs for years and its a death trap. - What do you mean? Ive just had a new radiator put in it and it passed its MOT last year with flying colours. I reckon its got a few more years in it yet. - Oh come on, get real! Ill give you a rundown of why in my opinion it should have been condemned to the scrap heap years ago. - Why should I get rid of a perfectly roadworthy car.? - Well, firstly its a rust bucket, its bad for the environment, and Ive seen it kangarooing down the high street pumping out clouds of toxic exhaust fumes like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, leaving the unfortunate shoppers who happen to be in the vicinity coughing and spluttering in its wake and besides that, your work is suffering as a result. Youre late again. - Oh, Im sorry. It wont happen again.
. Situation: Martha apologises to David for arriving late at work but she is having problems with her old car. He tries to persuade her that the car should be scrapped. Style: Informal and between friends.

. Functions: 1. Apologising: Sorry, Im late David but the cars been playing up again. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Giving an opinion: I reckon its got a few more years in it yet. 3. Asking someone to face reality (strong and informal): Oh come on, get real! (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Giving an opinion about a series of things: Ill give you a rundown of why in my opinion it should have been condemned to the scrap heap years ago. 5. Expressing indignation or reluctance: Why should I get rid of a perfectly roadworthy car? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Adding a further point: and besides that, your work is suffering as a result. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 7. Apologising: Oh, Im sorry. It wont happen again. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) . Notes: 1. the cars been playing up (phrasal verb: to play up = to not work properly or to behave badly) again = the car has not been working very well again 2. Surprise, surprise (here the speaker is using sarcasm he means that it is not a surprise at all.) = What a surprise! 3. to get rid of (phrasal verb) = to dispose of (more formal) 4. heap of scrap (idiom) = old car that is very bad condition 5. Its been on its last legs for years (idiom: to be on its last legs = to be ready to die) = It has been ready to be replaced for years 6. a death trap (idiom) = a very dangerous thing that could cause a fatality 7. Ive just had a new radiator put in it = I got the mechanic to replace the old radiator 8. radiator = water storage container (in the cooling system of a car) 9. it passed its MOT last year with flying colours (idiom) = it passed its MOT with good marks 10. MOT = Ministry of Transport compulsory annual test (to prove the roadworthiness of a vehicle) 11. I reckon its got a few more years in (phrasal verb) it yet = I think it will work for a few more years still 12. get real (informal and strong. Be careful with this expression as it could cause offence. It is fine between friends, or in strong arguments) = you need to face reality 13. Ill give you a rundown of why (more emphatic) = Ill explain to you a series of reasons why 14. it should have been condemned to the scrap heap years ago (stronger) = it should have been taken to the scrap yard years ago 15. the scrap heap = scrap yard (place were cars are broken up after they are no longer useful) 16. Why should I get rid of (phrasal verb) = Why should I dispose of (more formal) 17. a perfectly roadworthy car = a car that is in good enough condition to be used on the road 18. a rust bucket (idiom) = a rusty old car 19. kangarooing down the high street (idiom) = moving down the high street with very erratic jumping movements (like a kangaroo) 20. pumping out (phrasal verb) = emitting (more formal) 21. toxic exhaust fumes = poisonous waste products (the waste products of a petrol engine) 22. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (note: this expression is onomatopoeic, in other words, it sounds like its meaning. If you say Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, it is a bit like the sound

of a car with its engine backfiring!) = a famous flying car (from the childrens film of the same name, based on the novel written by Ian Fleming) 23. who happen to be in the vicinity = who are by chance in the area 24. coughing and spluttering = making erratic engine noises 25. in its wake = after it has gone past (note: the white water left in the sea after a ship has passed is called the ships wake.)

- Anyway, whats wrong with the car this time? - Well, I was just driving over the East Hill bypass when I noticed that the red light was flashing on the temperature gauge, but as I had just had the radiator replaced, I thought it couldnt be overheating and just assumed that the gauge must be giving a faulty reading. - And was it? - Unfortunately not. When I got to the traffic lights on Long Lane they were on red. Thats when I realised that steam was pouring out of the bonnet. I released the bonnet catch and got out of the car to take a look under the bonnet. As I opened it, a huge cloud of steam billowed out, almost scalding my face. I thought, Blasted thing, why do you keep doing this to me? and in my frustration I kicked the passenger door and the wing mirror fell off. - Ive told you to get rid of it. If you were to do any more repairs on it, youd just be throwing good money after bad.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: Martha explains how even though the car has just had a new radiator, it still overheated at some traffic lights. Style: Informal . Functions: 1. Returning to the main subject: Anyway, so whats wrong with the car this time? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Giving an unavoidable negative answer: Unfortunately not. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Expressing frustration: I thought, Blasted thing, why do you keep doing this to me? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Giving an opinion: If you were to do any more repairs on it, youd just be throwing good money after bad. . Notes: 1. bypass = road that goes past a town or city 2. the red light was flashing = the red light was going on and off (phrasal verb) intermittently (as a warning) 3. the temperature gauge = the instrument for indicating the temperature of the engine 4. I had just had the radiator replaced = Somebody had recently replaced the radiator for me 5. overheating = getting too hot 6. the gauge must be giving a faulty reading = the gauge cant be working properly

7. the traffic lights = the traffic signals, with 3 lights (red, amber and green) 8. they were on red = the red light was on (phrasal verb) 9. steam was pouring out (phrasal verb) of = a large amount steam was coming out (phrasal verb) of 10. steam = water vapour 11. the bonnet = the cover to the engine compartment 12. a huge cloud of steam billowed out (phrasal verb - more descriptive) = a huge cloud of steam came out (phrasal verb) 13. scalding = burning (with a hot liquid) 14. Blasted thing (expressing frustration) = Stupid thing / Useless thing 15. In my frustration = because I was so frustrated 16. I kicked the passenger door = I hit the passenger door with my foot (note: we never actually say it like this!) 17. the wing mirror = the side mirror (on a car) 18. fell off (phrasal verb) = became detached / separated and fell to the ground 19. get rid of it (phrasal verb) = throw it away (phrasal verb) 20. throwing good money after bad (idiom) = wasting even more money on something that you have already wasted money on

- So, if the car broke down, how did you manage to get to work? - Well, I had a bottle of water stored in the boot as a provision for just this type of emergency, but when I tried to take the cap off the thing where you top up the water, the blasted thing had melted and fused to the lid of the container. - Ha ha, sorry, but its like a comedy of errors. Please do continue - I could do with a laugh. - Well, youre going to enjoy this then! I took my tool box out of the boot, which consists of a hammer and a rusty old spanner. As the adjustable spanner had rusted to the point where it was useless, I thought Id give the cap on the water container a gentle tap with the hammer. - Oh, no! Which school of mechanics did you go to? - Its not funny! The water container split open and I realised that I would have to get the local garage to tow the car away. The recovery driver gave me a lift to work. - They must love you down at the local garage. You are probably keeping them in business!
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: David finds Marthas story about trying to fix the car very funny and also makes fun of her skills as a mechanic. Style: Informal Functions: 1. Asking how somebody was able to do something: So, if the car broke down, how did you manage to get to work? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Asking someone to continue speaking after an interruption: Please do continue (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Asking someone to be more serious: Its not funny! (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Making an assumption: They must love you down at the local garage. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) . Notes: 1. the car broke down (phrasal verb) = the car stopped working 2. how did you manage to..? = how were you able to..? 3. the boot = the luggage compartment (normally at the rear of the car)

4. as a provision for = just in case of 5. to take the cap off (phrasal verb) = to remove the top 6. top up (phrasal verb) = to fill to the top 7. the blasted thing = the stupid thing / the useless thing 8. had melted = had turned to liquid (when a solid changes to liquid as the result of heat, this process is called melting) 9. fused to the lid of the container = become stuck to the top of the container 10. its like a comedy of errors (here the speaker is referring to a comedy of the same name written by William Shakespeare) = it is a very funny story, with one error after another 11. I could do with (phrasal verb) a laugh (here the speaker is making fun of the other speaker) = I need a laugh 12. tool box = container for tools (such as hammers, spanners, drills and screwdrivers) 13. consists of = is made up of (phrasal verb) 14. a hammer = a tool for knocking in nails 15. adjustable spanner = tool for turning nuts and bolts. This tool can be made larger or smaller depending on the size of the bolt 16. rusted = oxidised (metal) 17. a gentle tap = a soft hit 18. Oh, no! Which school of mechanics did you go to? (here the speaker is using sarcasm) = Where did you learn to fix cars? 19. Its not funny = It is not a laughing matter (much more formal) 20. split open (phrasal verb) = cracked 21. to tow the car away (phrasal verb) = to take the car away (phrasal verb) with a truck that has a crane on the back 22. The recovery driver gave me a lift (idiom) to work = The driver of the tow truck took me to work in his truck 23. You are probably keeping them in business (here the speaker is joking) = You are probably providing them with enough income to maintain their business .

-Ok, thank you Ill get back to you. Bye. That was the mechanic about the car on the phone. - Oh yes, and what was their diagnosis. Dont tell me! Let me guess. They want you to throw a bit more money at it? - Yes, how did you know? - Lets call it an educated guess! Well, whats the damage? - They reckon they can have it back on the road for about two grand. - Two grand? The head gasket is gone so water is getting into the engine, which in turn caused the radiator to crack. When I asked the mechanic if it was a big job, I got the usual sucking of air through the teeth and humming and harring and he said, Oh, its a huge and very fiddly job, love, well have to get it up on the ramp, blah-di-blah-di-blah. - So, at last youre coming round to the idea that its time to say goodbye for once and for all to the old banger. - Oh, I cant bear to think of her being pulled apart in some scrap yard.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: After finding out how much it would cost to fix her car, Martha finally starts to think that it is time to scrap it. Style: Informal . Functions: 1. Promising to call again: Ok, thank you Ill get back to you. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Saying you want to guess the answer: Dont tell me! Let me guess. They want you to throw a bit more money at it? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Saying very subtly that you already knew: Lets call it an educated guess! (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Asking how much something costs: Well, whats the damage? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Talking about the gradual acceptance of a situation: So, at last youre coming round to the idea that its time to say goodbye for once and for all to the old banger. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Expressing revulsion or displeasure: Oh, I cant bear to think of her being pulled apart in some scrap yard. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.)

. Notes: 1. Ill get back to (phrasal verb) you = I will call again later (on the phone) 2. the mechanic = the person who repairs cars 3. diagnosis = analysis of the problem 4. to throw a bit more money at it (idiom) = to spend even more money on it 5. an educated guess (idiom) = a guess based upon a combination of common sense and the facts 6. whats the damage? (informal) = how much will it cost? 7. They reckon = They think 8. they can have it back on the road for about two grand = They can repair it for two thousand pounds 9. two grand (informal) = 2000 10. The head gasket is gone = The head gasket is broken / worn out (phrasal verb) 11. The head gasket = A gasket or seal that sits between the engine block and the cylinder head 12. water is getting into (phrasal verb) the engine = water is entering the engine 13. which in turn = which as a result 14. the radiator = water storage container (in the cooling system of a car) 15. to crack = to fracture / to brake 16. I got the usual sucking of air through the teeth and humming and harring (sometimes this tactic can be used to confuse and intimidate the customer) = The mechanic behaved in the typical way a British mechanic would when he is trying to give the idea that the job will be very difficult and therefore very expensive 17. humming and harring (informal) = emitting strange sounds (that indicate deep thought) 18. fiddly job = difficult and time consuming job 19. love = (sometimes men refer to women as love but this can be seen as quite condescending.) 20. to get it up (phrasal verb) on the ramp = to raise it on the access platform 21. blah-di-blah-di-blah (informal and quite rude)= and so on, and so on 22. at last youre coming round to (phrasal verb: to come round to something = to gradually accept an idea or argument) the idea that = you are finally beginning to accept the idea that 23. for once and for all (more emphatic) = finally 24. the old banger = the old car that is in a bad state of repair 25. I cant bear to think of (more emphatic) = I really dont like to think of 26. to think of her being pulled apart (note: even though we do not have masculine and feminine objects in English people sometimes refer to vehicles or ships as feminine) 27. pulled apart (phrasal verb)= dismantled / broken up (phrasal verb) 28. scrap yard = place where used cars are dismantled (and their raw materials are recycled)

- Wow, youre early today! What happened? - I had to get the bus. - Are you alright? You look a bit upset. - Its nothing really. - Come on, whats wrong? - Well, on the way to work the bus passed by Sandyford Rd car breakers and I saw my old car behind the wire fence perched on top of a pile of twisted old cars and rusty vans. It was such a shame to see it in that state, its windscreens were shattered, theyd taken the tyres off and stolen parts from the engine. Then, just as the bus pulled up level with it, a huge iron claw hanging from a crane sunk its teeth into the roof of my faithful old car, hoisted it into the air then dropped it into the crusher. A sickening screech of straining, splitting metal filled the air and then it was gone. - Well, dont get too upset. Bear in mind that todays scrap metal dealer is now something of an eco warrior, recycling old cars and then the raw materials are used to manufacture new ones. Try to imagine that a little bit of the spirit of your old car lives on in every new car that you see pass by.
. How to see the text: Click on black to show text: click again to hide text . Situation: On the way to work, Martha sees her car being crushed at the scrap yard and after realising how upset she is, David offers some words of comfort. Style: Informal . Functions: 1. Enquiring about somebodys state of mind: Are you alright? You look a bit upset. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 2. Asking what is the matter: Come on, whats wrong? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 3. Describing a sad sight: It was such a shame to see it in that state, its windscreens were shattered... (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 4. Talking about the moment something happened: Then, just as the bus pulled up level with it, ...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 5. Consoling: Well, dont get too upset. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully here.) 6. Making a point: Bear in mind that todays scrap metal dealer is now something of an eco warrior... .

Notes: 1. upset = emotionally sad 2. car breakers = scrap merchants (people who break up (phrasal verb) old cars) 3. perched on top of (in the way that a bird sits on its perch) = sitting on top of 4. a pile of = a mound of / a heap of 5. twisted = distorted 6. rusty = oxidised (metal) 7. vans = light commercial vehicles 8. a shame (stronger) = a pity 9. in that state = in that bad condition 10. windscreens = windows (of a vehicle) 11. shattered = broken and cracked 12. theyd taken the tyres off (phrasal verb) = theyve removed the tyres 13. as the bus pulled up (phrasal verb) level with it = as the bus stopped next to it 14. claw = hand (of a bird or other animal) 15. a crane = a lifting machine 16. sunk its teeth into (more descriptive and dramatic) = bit into 17. my faithful old car (idiom) = my car that has served me well for years 18. hoisted it into the air = lifted into the air 19. the crusher = the machine for smashing and compressing the old cars 20. A sickening screech of straining, splitting metal (more descriptive) = a horrible metallic noise 21. Bear in mind that = Remember that 22. scrap metal dealer = person who recycles (old metal and machines) 23. an eco warrior (idiom) = a person who fights to protect the environment 24. recycling = reusing 25. raw materials = basic materials (such as metal, wood etc.) 26. lives on (phrasal verb) = continues living 27. pass by (phrasal verb) = go past .

Hello, Im Jane at DailyStep English and welcome to my Audio Blog.

. This week, I want to tell you about something unexpected that happened to me last week. On Friday morning, about nine oclock, I received a telephone call from BBC Radio 2 asking me to be a guest on one of their programmes, speaking about Government proposals about English learning. I was pretty surprised, of course, but it was great to be asked, and I had to really rush to get there, very its about one hour from where I live but I had quite a lot of things to do before going, so it was a busy day. But it was also a really interesting experience and a very interesting subject. . So my Audio Blog today is about that and you can also hear the interview as well. And, also, of course, you can find out what is coming soon in the DailyStep Audio Lessons. And finally, I just hope you have all had a wonderful 2012 this is my last blog of the year and Im really looking forward to doing more blogs and more courses and everything with you next year. . So, lets move on now and look at the subject of learning English in the UK.