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944 E. Fifth St.
419-692-2202
Delphos
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Thursday, January 10, 2013
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Putnam names Ag Night, p7

Hall of Fame voting, p7
Upfront
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Farm 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
www.delphosherald.com
YOUR WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK
FRIDAY
EXTENDED
FORECAST
SATURDAY SUNDAY
Mostly
cloudy.
Showers and
isolated thun-
derstorms in
the morning, then chance
of showers in the after-
noon. Highs in the upper
50s. Lows around 50.
Partly
cloudy in
the morn-
ing then
becoming
mostly
cloudy. Highs in the upper
50s. Rain in the evening.
Lows in the upper 30s.
Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower
30s. Lows in the lower 20s.
Rain likely in
the morning,
then chance
of rain in
the after-
noon. Highs in the lower
40s. A 40 percent chance
of snow in the evening.
Lows in the mid 20s.
Library closed
Tuesday,
Wednesday
The Delphos Public
Library will be closed
Tuesday and Wednesday
due to the migration of the
computers to a new system.
The new system will bet-
ter serve patrons when the
library re-opens on Thursday.
4-H club sets
frst meeting
The Delphos Livestock
4-H Club will hold its first
meeting for 2013 at 1:30 p.m.
on Feb. 3 at St. John’s Annex.
Anyone 9 years old as of
Jan. 1, 2012, is eligible to join.
For more informa-
tion, contact Todd Gable
at 419-204-2974 or John
Noonan at 419-234-3143.
Storytime,
Toddlertime
sign-up set
The Delphos Public
Library has set its winter/
spring session of Storytime
and Toddlertime where
the children will “Get
Ready! Get Set! Grow!”
Early literacy is the focus
of the programs, through sto-
ries, music, motion, rhyming,
puppets and just plain fun.
Toddlerttime is designed
for children 18 months
to approximately 3 years,
accompanied by a caregiver.
It is held at 10 a.m. and 11
a.m. every other Thursday
morning beginning Jan. 24
through April 4. Each group
is limited to 15 children and
registration is required.
Storytime is aimed at chil-
dren ages 3-6. It is held at
10:30 a.m. every Tuesday and
at 6:30 p.m. every Thursday
beginning Jan. 22 and end-
ing April 11. Registration is
also required for this group.
Call the library at 419-
695-4015 to register.
Help Me Grow
offers screenings
Putnam County Help
Me Grow Early Childhood
Specialists will be available
to screen Putnam County
infants, toddlers and pre-
schoolers free of charge
from 1-4 p.m. Jan. 22.
Developmental screen-
ings that are available
include: hearing, vision,
physical development
(crawling, walking, etc.),
speech and language, behav-
ioral and play skills.
Screenings are by
appointment only. Call
419-523-6059 or toll-free
at 1-877-738-1866.
Delphos backdrop for Osting’s first novel
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — You could
say Heather Lynn Osting has
always been an aspiring writer
— as a kid she wrote for fun
and then later in 2005, she
developed a blog as an outlet
for sanity which had approxi-
mately 200 followers — and
has since elevated her creative
self-expression into the reach
of a whole new audience.
Since its release on
Amazon.com on Dec. 6, there
have been 150 e-books for
Kindle readers and 163 paper-
backs sold. Customer reviews
posted on Amazon’s site have
been affirming.
“There have been no bad
reviews,” Osting explained.
”Eighty-year-old grandmoth-
ers love it!”
Even after prodding by
friends suggesting that she
write a book, Osting never
thought she could be a suc-
cessful author. Her creative
interest peaked while search-
ing for something to read
after finishing “Water For
Elephants,” and at that point,
she still considered the chal-
lenge of writing fun. Then it
happened. She was driving
home on a typical day and
experienced self-actualization
evoking the passion to realize,
explore and develop her talent
and ability.
“I was driving home from
Ottawa with the sun shining
through the car window on my
face,” Osting reflected. “That
was the beginning premise of
the book: a girl beaten up,
coming to with sunshine on
her face but waking up to a
harsh reality.”
Osting’s own personality
and personal experiences have
been embedded within the
character Vivienne Taylor,
whose name was spawned
by her fond attachment to a
character from the TV series
90210 and a unique given
name. The majority of the
character’s thought processes
are a reflection of her own and
accounts of parental warn-
ings during her childhood fed
her imagination and enabled
“worst-case scenario” events
in the storyline.
The original version of the
novel took 2 - 3 weeks to write
and then it was another 2 1/2
- 3 years of polishing, editing
and revising before the piece
was published. Osting worked
hard on presenting a realistic
storyline and perfecting the
ending before the deadline.
“Writing a surprising end-
ing is harder than people
think,” Osting explained.
Osting is looking forward
to her upcoming book sign-
ings. The first will be held
from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. on Jan.
19 at Baked to Perfection in
Delphos and the second, a
wine-tasting, will take place
from 5-9 p.m. on Feb. 7 at
Vino Bellissimo in Lima.
Copies of the paperback will
be available at both events.
At this time, Osting and her
entourage — editors Rachel
Graham and Debra Grothouse,
whom are cousins to the
author, — are concentrating
on the revisions of her next
installment in the series. The
footwork for the cover of the
new chapter is in the works
and the cover girl, Sammy
Klint, a freshman cheerlead-
er at Jefferson Senior High
School, has been chosen.
What does the future hold
for Vivienne? Osting offered
some insight into the new
chapter of the rejuvenated
heroine’s life, “The Ordeal,”
where she sets out to make
something of herself explor-
ing a new adventure outside
the confines of Delphos.
“So far, this is my favor-
ite,” Osting explained with
enthusiasm. “It has the same
feel. It’s more creepy and the
character is more developed.”
Otoville senior Audrey Rieger left, presents school board member Kevin Landin with
a certificate noting January as School Board Member Recognition Month as senior Cory
Fischer presents Barb Hoersten with the same. (Delphos Herald/Nancy Spencer)
Ottoville Schools receive
notification of casino funds
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — Ottoville
Local Schools Treasurer
Bob Weber shared his good
news with the school board
Wednesday, noting the dis-
trict will receive $9,423.55
in casino revenues from
the Ohio Department of
Taxation.
Weber said of the
$37,953,632 in casino rev-
enues, 34 percent went to
schools.
“I received the notification
this afternoon,” Weber said
Wednesday. “When we will
receive the actual money? I
don’t know.”
School board members
performed annual duties that
fall at the beginning of the
year including electing Sue
Bendele as president and Barb
Hoersten as vice president.
Meetings will remain at 7:30
p.m. on the third Wednesday
of each month and will be
held in the board of educa-
tion conference room in the
elementary school with the
exception of the July meet-
ing, which will be held in
Cloverdale at St. Barbara’s
Parish.
Board member Kim
Wannemacher will serve as
the board’s internal audit rep-
resentative and Wannemacher
and Kevin Landin will serve
as Finance Committee mem-
bers along with the superin-
tendent and treasurer.
Board member Craig
Byrne is the board’s edu-
cation liaison and will
attend the Ohio School
Boards Association Capital
Conference with Landin as an
alternate. Wannemacher will
serve as the board’s student
achievement liaison.
The board also accepted
$832.10 in the Box Tops for
Education reimbursement
program.
Weber also presented vari-
ous financial reports on the
district’s first six months of
the 2012-13 school year as
compared to past years. He
reported the building costs
85 cents per square inch to
operate.
Members of Ottoville’s
senior class presented each
board member with a certifi-
cate acknowledging School
Board Recognition Month
and thanked each member for
their time and effort.
The next meeting is ten-
tatively scheduled for 7:30
p.m. Feb. 20. Girls basket-
ball playoffs may change the
meeting date.
Library board welcomes
new director Rist
BY STACY TAFF
staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The
Delphos Public Library Board
of Trustees met for its first
meeting of 2013 to install
officers and welcome a new
director.
Kelly Rist, who came to
the Delphos library from
Brumback Library in Van
Wert, stepped into former
director Nancy Mericle’s
shoes when she retired at the
beginning of the month. Rist
said Delphos has made her
feel very welcome.
Board President Leila
Osting, Vice President
Pat Poling, Secretary Jane
Rutledge and Fiscal Officer
Janet Bonifas were all re-
installed in their posts. It was
recommended that a request
be submitted to the Delphos
City Schools Board of
Education for the renewal of
Brad Rostorfer’s 7-year term
with the library board.
The board also passed a
motion to submit a request to
the board to place a renewal
of the library’s 0.6-mill levy
on the primary ballot on May
7.
During her report, Rist
announced that she and her
staff are getting everything
ready for the library’s integra-
tion into the SEO Consortium,
which will greatly increase the
number of materials patrons
will have access to.
“The SEO migration starts
on Tuesday and we won’t be
able to check anything out
that day,” Rist said. “After
we’ve joined, I think you’ll
see a real increase in our cir-
culation numbers, especially
with access to the e-Books.”
The library will be closed
Jan. 15 and 16 for staff train-
ing, and will be online with
the SEO Consortium starting
Jan. 17.
In other news, the board
approved the purchase of a ST
ViewScan Microfilm Viewer-
Scanner Library System
from BP Imaging Solutions
in Kettering. The equipment
will be purchased with the
$14,000 donation from the
Dienstberger Foundation,
which was earmarked for the
project.
New Library Director Kelly Rist, left, gives her report as
board members Jim Looser, Ron Elwer and Susan Kapcar
look on. (Delphos Herald/Stacy Taff)
22
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant: fnancial indepen-
dence and providing for family. Striking a balance between saving
for goals, such as education and retirement, and allocating
money for daily expenses can be challenging. But you can do it.
Learn how you can redefne your savings approach
toward education and retirement. Call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

Few things are as stressful as worrying about work. Because
it’s easy to feel like things are out of control, it’s essential to
consider any fnancial decision carefully. This is especially true
when it comes to your retirement savings.
Edward Jones can help. We’ll start by getting to know your
goals. Then we’ll sort through your current situation and work
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Keep Your Retirement
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To make sense of your retirement savings alternatives,
call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
NEW YEAR
NEW STYLE
NEW LOCATION
403 N. CaNal Street • DelphoS
Jessica a. Jettinghoff
Cell: 419-203-2045
Salon: 419-692-9881
TueSday - WedneSday - SaTurday
or by appoinTmenT
Come See me at
CAMEO!
2 – The Herald Thursday, January 10, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
BIRTH
LOTTERY
VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 150
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or villag-
es where The Delphos Herald
paper carriers or motor routes
provide daily home delivery for
$1.48 per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Corn $7.09
Wheat $7.21
Soybeans $13.96
Delphos weather
Arthur Norman
Ladd
Charles Diller
Moeller
High temperature
Wednesday in Delphos was
43 degrees, low was 35. High
a year ago today was 48, low
was 29. Record high for today
is 60, set in 1975. Record low
is -15, set in 1982.
ERHART, Thomas J,, 86,
of Kalida, Mass of Christian
Burial will begin 10:30 a.m.
Friday at St. Michael’s Catholic
Church, Kalida, the Rev. Mark
Hoying officiating. Burial will
follow in the church cemetery,
with military rites by Ottawa
VFW and Ottawa American
Legion. Visitation will be
and 2-8 p.m. today at Love-
Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township. Memorial
contributions may be made
to Diocese of Toledo Office
of Vocations or Wounded
Warriors. Condolences may
be expressed at www.lovefu-
neralhome.com.
Feb. 17, 1931
Jan. 5, 2013
Arthur Norman Ladd, 81,
of Leland, died Saturday at
SECU Hospice House of
Brunswick.
He was born Feb. 17,
1931 in Delphos to Lawrence
Andrew Ladd and Velma May
Ladd, who preceded him in
death.
He is survived by his wife,
Ruth Fisher Ladd; three
children, Pam Green, Todd
Ladd, and Jennifer Corbin;
one sister, June Dunlap; two
brothers, Kenneth Ladd and
Dale Ladd; five grandchil-
dren and three great-grand-
children.
He was also preceded in
death by a son, David Ladd.
Arthur was a veteran of the
US Marine Corps.
A memorial service will
be 11 a.m. on Saturday at
Wilmington Funeral &
Cremation Village Road
Chapel in Leland.
March 28, 1927
Jan. 8, 2013
Charles Diller Moeller
of Spencerville, Ohio, dis-
tinguished entrepreneur and
beloved father and grandfa-
ther, passed into eternity on
January 8, 2013, at St. Rita’s
Medical Center. He was 85
years old.
Born on a humble farm
outside Columbus Grove,
Ohio, on March 28, 1927,
Charles was the son of Roy
and Frances Moeller who
preceded him in death. He
married Phyllis Snavely, now
deceased, in 1949. He later
married Francis Jarvis in 1960
and later divorced.
Charles is survived by
his five children, Theresa
L. Moeller, of Lima,
Marcia L. (John) Elliot, of
Lima, Charlene A. (Bruce
“Shorty”) McCullough, of
Spencerville, Charles L.
Moeller, of Lima, Candace
S. Moeller, of Lima; a step-
daughter, Cheryl Steinwedel,
of Lima, a stepson, Jeffrey
(Lori) Jarvis; grandchildren
Christi McGuire, Corrie Doty,
Kasey Doty, Justin Elliot,
Holly Elliot, Jordan Elliot,
Broderick McCullough,
Chandler McCullough,
Sydney Moeller; five great
grandchildren; stepgrandchil-
dren Jennifer Burt, Jessica
Spiers, Jillian Jarvis, Jaclyn
Jarvis, Mark Steinwedel; and
eight stepgreat-grandchildren.
Charles was preceded in
death by a sister, Mary Alice
Neuman Roof; a brother,
Richard Roy Moeller; and a
grandson, Craig Martin Doty.
Charles served in the U.S.
Navy for two years. At the
age of 23, he founded Ohio
Decorative Products, Inc.,
Spencerville, specializing in
zinc die casting and plating. He
later expanded with Edgerton
Metal Products in Edgerton,
Ohio, and Ken-Dec, Horse
Cave, Ky. In 1971, he started
in the polyurethane industry
with Flexible Foam Products,
Inc., supplying flooring, fur-
niture and bedding industries.
In 2012 he celebrated 62 years
of success in maintaining the
family business. Flexible
Foam Products, Inc. operates
nationally with 13 locations
and is currently expanding in
Las Vegas, Nevada.
Charles also endeavored
in farming operations, includ-
ing dairy, livestock and grain
farming. Current farms are in
Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana.
He enjoyed being actively
involved and was civic mind-
ed in the many communities,
including his hometown of
Spencerville. Charles was a
proud member and supporter of
the Republican Party and attend-
ed many presidential dinners.
Charles led an inspiration-
al life defined by family and
faith. He was a member of the
Shawnee Alliance Church.
There will be visitation today
and Friday from 2 to 4 and 6 to
8 p.m. at Thomas E. Bayliff
Funeral Home, Spencerville.
Funeral Services will be at
1 p.m. Saturday at Shawnee
Christian Missionary Alliance
Church, 4455 Shawnee Rd.,
Lima, where there will be
viewing one hour prior to the
service.
Saturday morning, at
approximately 10 a.m., Charles
will be carried in a horse
drawn hearse leaving Bayliff
Funeral Home and proceeding
left on Elizabeth Street past
Ohio Decorative Products and
then make the loop through
downtown Spencerville.
In lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to: (Customer and
Suppliers) Huntington National
Bank, C/O Charles D. Moeller
Memorial Fund, 102 N. Broadway,
Spencerville, Ohio 45887 or
(Friends and Family) Fifth Third
Bank, C/O Charles D. Moeller
Memorial Fund, 225 Northwest
St., Lima, Ohio 45801.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Rain through
midnight, then rain and iso-
lated thunderstorms after
midnight. Lows in the upper
30s. Southeast winds 10 to
20 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy.
Showers and isolated thun-
derstorms in the morning,
then chance of showers in
the afternoon. Not as cool.
Highs in the upper 50s.
Southwest winds 10 to 20
mph. Chance of precipita-
tion 90 percent.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Warmer. Lows
around 50. Southwest winds
10 to 15 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SATURDAY: Partly
cloudy in the morning then
becoming mostly cloudy.
Highs in the upper 50s.
Southwest winds 10 to 15
mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Rain. Lows in the upper 30s.
Chance of rain 90 percent.
SUNDAY: Most l y
cloudy. Rain likely in the
morning, then chance of
rain in the afternoon. Highs
in the lower 40s. Chance of
rain 60 percent.
SUNDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 40
percent chance of snow.
Lows in the mid 20s.
MONDAY THROUGH
WEDNESDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the lower
30s. Lows in the lower 20s.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
1 2 - 1 8 - 2 8 - 3 1 - 3 9 - 4 5 ,
Kicker: 3-1-7-3-9-6
Estimated jackpot: $25.6 M
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $55 M
Pick 3 Evening
1-7-6
Pick 3 Midday
4-6-6
Pick 4 Evening
9-3-9-3
Pick 4 Midday
8-1-0-1
Pick 5 Evening
7-0-4-8-5
Pick 5 Midday
0-7-2-9-1
Powerball
1 1 - 1 3 - 2 0 - 2 7 - 5 9 ,
Powerball: 26
Estimated jackpot: $70 M
Rolling Cash 5
15-20-21-34-37
Estimated jackpot:
$130,000
The following individu-
als appeared Wednesday
before Judge Charles
Steele in Van Wert County
Common Pleas Court:
Arraignments
William Crutchfield, 40,
Van Wert, pled not guilty to
having weapons under dis-
ability, a felony of the third
degree. His case will be set
for pretrial after an evalua-
tion is completed for another
pending case. He is being
held on a cash bond in the
other case and the same bond
was set in this case.
Dallas Fortner, 18,
Mendon, pled not guilty to
two charges: burglary, felony
second degree; and theft, a
felony of the third degree.
His bond was set at
$50,000 cash and a pretrial
was set for Wednesday.
Joel Crawford, 24, Van
Wert, was arraigned on a
charge of theft from an elder-
ly person, a felony of the fifth
degree.
He was released on a sure-
ty bond and his case set for
pretrial on March 6.
Beth McCarthy, 43,
Convoy, pled not guilty to
possession of heroin, a felony
of the fourth degree; and pos-
session of heroin, a felony of
the fifth degree.
She was released on a
surety bond and pretrial was
set for Wednesday.
Tiffany Wolford, 22, Van
Wert, was arraigned and pled
guilty to possession of drugs,
a felony of the fifth degree.
The court ordered a pre-
sentence investigation and set
sentencing for March 6.
Changes of pleas
Daniel Myrick, 23,
Delphos, entered a plea of
guilty to a charge of traffick-
ing marijuana, a felony of the
fifth degree. He then request-
ed and was granted Treatment
in Lieu of Conviction.
All further proceedings
were stayed pending com-
pletion of the treatment pro-
gram.
Brittnie Garwood, 24,
Van Wert, changed her plea
to guilty to two counts of
trafficking drugs, both felo-
nies of the fifth degree. Three
other similar charges were
dismissed for her plea to
these two.
The court ordered a pre-
sentence investigation and set
sentencing for March 6.
Casey McMillen, 28, Van
Wert, entered a plea of guilty
to possession of drugs, a fel-
ony of the fifth degree. The
Court ordered a Pre-sentence
investigation and set sentenc-
ing for Jan. 23.
Violations
Ryan Schaadt, 28, Van
Wert, appeared on a proba-
tion violation for associat-
ing with known felon, testing
positive for controlled sub-
stance, failing to report to
probation, failing to pay court
costs, and failing to complete
his assessment and treatment.
He admitted the violations
and was sentenced to nine
months in prison with credit
for 143 days already served.
Stephanie Farmer, 31,
Van Wert, appeared for a
bond violation for failing to
report to probation and failing
to provide an address where
she was living. A violation
was found by the court and
she was ordered re-released
on her surety bond until her
pretrial scheduled for next
Wednesday.
Patricia Bigham, 29, Van
Wert, appeared for a bond
violation for not reporting to
probation. She was found in
violation and re-released on
surety bond until a pretrial
Jan. 16.
Sentencing
Kenneth Michael Imler,
33, Ohio City, was sentenced
for violating a civil protec-
tion order, a felony of the
fifth degree.
He received three years
community control, 100 hours
community service, anger
management assessment and
treatment, two years inten-
sive probation, abide by all
Juvenile Court orders con-
cerning visitation, pay court
costs and partial appointed
counsel fees. A nine-month
prison sentence was deferred
pending completion of com-
munity control.
Time waiver
Kyle Caldwell, 33, Van
Wert, waived time and was
granted a continuance of a
jury trial scheduled for today.
Continuance was granted.
This case involves an alleged
armed robbery at Klosterman
Pizza in Van Wert.
CLUB WINNERS
Delphos Fire Assoc.
300 Club
Jan. 2 — Dana
Steinbrenner
Jan. 9 — Mary German
2 men indicted in Ohio
murder-for-hire plot
COLUMBUS (AP) —
A central Ohio grand jury
has indicted two men in an
alleged murder-for-hire plot
targeting the ex-wife of one
of the suspects.
A prosecutor said
Wednesday that the Franklin
County grand jury in
Columbus charged 59-year-
old Daniel Lytle with con-
spiracy to commit aggravated
murder and related crimes.
He is accused of conspir-
ing with 26-year-old Brad
Fickenworth over several
months to kill his 43-year-
old ex-wife Tammy Lytle.
Fickenworth also was indict-
ed on a charge of conspiracy
to commit aggravated mur-
der.
The Columbus Dispatch
reports that Daniel Lytle alleg-
edly recruited Fickenworth to
hire a third person to kill his
ex-wife.
Their attorney information
wasn’t immediately avail-
able.
A boy, Adam James, was
born Dec. 26 in St. Marys to
Sue and Danny Wiseman of
Delphos.
He was welcomed home by
a brother, Tyler.
Grandparents are Carlene
Gerdeman of Delphos and the
late Irvin Gerdeman, Robert
Wiseman Jr. of Delphos and
John and Martha Anders of
Fort Jennings.
From Ethiopia to Chile:
Day 1 of a 7-year walk
BY JASON STRAZIUSO
The Associated Press
NAIROBI, Kenya — On
the eve of an unimaginably
long walk — one that starts
in Africa, winds through the
Middle East, across Asia, hops
over to Alaska, goes down the
western United States, then
Central and South America
and ends in Chile — one ques-
tion nagged journalist Paul
Salopek: Should he take his
house keys?
Salopek departed a small
Ethiopian village today and
took the first steps of a planned
21,000-mile (34,000-kilome-
ter) walk that will cross some
30 borders, where he will
encounter dozens of languag-
es and scores of ethnic groups.
The 50-year-old’s quest is to
retrace man’s first migration
from Africa across the world
in a go-slow journey that will
force him to immerse himself
in a variety of cultures so he
can tell a global mosaic of
people stories.
The Ethiopia-to-Chile walk
— which took human ances-
tors some 50,000 years to
make — is called Out of Eden
and is sponsored by National
Geographic, the Knight
Foundation and the Pulitzer
Center for Crisis Reporting. A
two-time Pulitzer Prize win-
ner, the American plans to
write one major article a year
with periodic updates every
100 miles or so.
“Often the places that we
fly over or drive through, they
aren’t just untold stories, but
they are also the connective
tissues between the stories of
the day,” Salopek told The
Associated Press by satel-
lite phone from the village of
Herto Bouri, his starting point,
late Wednesday.
Those fly-over places
explain how environment or
education are connected to the
economy — stories that are
more nuanced and complicat-
ed “that take slowing down to
explain,” he said.
Though Salopek’s planned
walk may be among the longest
in modern times — Guinness
World Records doesn’t track
“longest walk” because such
a feat can’t be standardized —
such long, investigative walks
have been done before.
Rory Stewart, now a
British parliamentarian,
walked across Iran, Pakistan,
Nepal, and then circled back
to post-Taliban Afghanistan
to walk from Herat to Kabul,
a journey chronicled in the
2005 book “The Places In
Between.” Stewart’s walk
took 21 months.
“The best thing about it for
me was simply that it gave
me access to people and com-
munities. It forced you to stop
every 20 or 25 miles. It forced
you to spend nights in village
homes,” said Stewart, who
spends six weeks every year
walking through his political
district. “For me the real great
thing about this kind of jour-
ney is that we live in a world
which is very focused on des-
tinations, a city or a tourist
site, which ignores 99 percent
of the country.”
Stewart’s advice to Salopek
is that he find people to be with
at night. Long days of endless
walking leave you tired, hun-
gry and wanting solitude, but
Stewart said the best hours
of Salopek’s journey will not
be during daylight, but in the
evening hours around a dinner
table or fireplace.
That’s what Salopek plans
to do. He hopes to walk with
local people throughout his
journey, learning new lan-
guages or finding English
speakers along the way. He
says the journey will slow
down his own process of writ-
ing, and he hopes he can also
slow down readers who live
in a world flooded with infor-
mation.
Salopek won the 1998
Pulitzer Prize for explana-
tory reporting and the 2001
Pulitzer for international
reporting, from Africa,
both while he wrote for the
Chicago Tribune. On a per-
sonal level, Salopek wanted
to see if the trip will help him
slow down and enrich his
own work.
2 killed in fatal Akron fre
AKRON (AP) — Police
say that two people have died
in a northeast Ohio house fire
overnight.
Akron police tell WEWS-
TV that the fire started about
2:30 a.m. today at a home on
the north side of the city.
The victims are believed
to be a mother and daughter.
Police said the fire start-
ed in the basement or first
floor, and the victims were
found on the second floor.
Fire officials said there were
no smoke detectors in the
house, which was a total
loss.
21
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Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
E - The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk: How is
it that climate change is neg-
atively affecting the health
of rivers and, by extension,
the quality and availability
of fresh water?
— Robert Elman, St.
Louis, MO

Global warming is no
doubt going to cause many
kinds of problems (and,
indeed, already is), and riv-
ers may well be some of the
hardest hit geographical fea-
tures, given the likelihood of
increased droughts, floods
and the associated spread of
waterborne diseases.
For one, rivers are already
starting to lose the amount of
water they channel. A 2009
study at the National Center
for Atmospheric Research
(NCAR) found that water vol-
ume in the Columbia River in
the Pacific Northwest declined
by 14 percent since the 1950s.
This trend is similar in major
rivers all over the world.
“Many communities
will see their water supplies
shrink as temperatures rise
and precipitation patterns
shift,” reports the nonprof-
it American Rivers, adding
that a rise in severe storms
will degrade water quality
and increase the risk of cata-
strophic floods. “Changes in
the timing and location of
precipitation combined with
rising levels of water pollu-
tion will strain ecosystems
and threaten the survival of
many fish and wildlife spe-
cies.” These shifts will have
dramatic impacts, threaten-
ing public health, weakening
economies and decreasing the
quality of life in many places.
In the U.S., the number of
storms with extreme precipita-
tion has increased 24 percent
since the late 1940s—and the
trend is expected to continue.
Another certain impact on
rivers is more pollution as
more frequent and powerful
storms increase runoff from
urban and agricultural areas
that contain fertilizers, pes-
ticides, chemicals and motor
oil. “In older communities
where storm water and sew-
age are transported together
in one pipe, heavy storms can
overwhelm the system and
send raw sewage and pol-
luted storm water into near-
by streams and rivers,” says
American Rivers. “These
combined sewer overflows
will grow more frequent as
extreme storms increase.”
Lower water flows and ris-
ing temperatures compound
problems caused by more run-
off. “More frequent droughts
and shifting precipitation
patterns lower water levels
in rivers, lakes and streams,
leaving less water to dilute
pollutants,” says the group.
“Higher temperatures cause
more frequent algal blooms
and reduce dissolved oxygen
levels, both of which can
cause fish kills and do signifi-
cant harm to ecosystems.”
American Rivers reports
that the health of our riv-
ers in the face of increasing
warming will depend large-
ly on community prepared-
ness. Municipalities that fail
to address aging infrastruc-
ture “will experience great-
er increases in storm water
runoff and sewer overflows.”
And communities that have
damaged their wetlands, for-
ests, streams and rivers will
have fewer natural defenses
to protect against the effects
of climate change.
There is much we can
do to protect rivers besides
reduce our carbon footprints.
American Rivers is promot-
ing green infrastructure—an
approach to water manage-
ment that protects, restores
or mimics the natural water
cycle—as the way to bolster
the health of rivers. “It means
planting trees and restoring
wetlands rather than building
a new water treatment plant.
It means choosing water effi-
ciency instead of building
a new water supply dam. It
means restoring floodplains
instead of building taller
levees.”

EarthTalk® is written and
edited by Roddy Scheer and
Doug Moss and is a regis-
tered trademark of E - The
Environmental Magazine
(www.emagazine.com). Send
questions to: earthtalk@
emagazine.com. Subscribe:
www.emagazine.com/sub-
scribe. Free Trial Issue: www.
emagazine.com/trial.
Rivers may well be hard hit by climate change, given the
likelihood of increased droughts, floods and the associated
spread of waterborne diseases. Pictured: The Columbia
River in the Pacific Northwest, which has lost 14 percent
of its water volume since the 1950s due to higher tempera-
tures and shifting precipitation patterns. (iStockPhoto)
Information submitted
COLUMBUS – State
Senator Keith Faber
(R-Celina) today was sworn
in as President of the Ohio
Senate during opening day
ceremonies at the Statehouse,
which marked the start of the
130th General Assembly.
Serving the residents of
the 12th Ohio Senate District,
President Faber is the first
Senate President to serve
from Mercer County. As
President, Senator Faber will
oversee the 33-seat chamber.
“I am honored to lead such
a talented and dedicated cau-
cus as well as provide lead-
ership for the entire Senate
membership,” President
Faber said. “The state budget
will be the focus of the first
six months of this General
Assembly, with government
efficiency, economic recov-
ery and jobs continuing to be
our number one priority.”
The Senate Majority
Caucus new leadership was
also sworn in at today’s ses-
sion. The team includes:
Senator Chris Widener
(R-Springfield) as president
pro tempore, the number
two in the Senate; Senator
Tom Patton (R-Strongsville)
continues as majority floor
leader, and Senator Larry
Obhof (R-Medina) as major-
ity whip.
Senator Faber was elected
to the Ohio Senate in 2007
and has served on the Senate
leadership team since 2009
when he was elected Majority
Floor Leader. The 130th
General Assembly will run
through Dec. 31, 2014.
Faber sworn in
as president of
Ohio Senate
State Senator Keith Faber (R-Celina) was sworn in
Monday as president of the Ohio Senate. He was joined
in the Senate Chamber by his wife, Andrea and their two
children.
Information submitted
COLUMBUS —
Successful hunters checked
21,555 white-tailed deer
during the 2013 muzzle-
loader season, according
to the Ohio Department of
Natural Resources (ODNR).
Muzzleloader season con-
cluded on Tuesday.
The 2013 harvest total rep-
resents a 12 percent increase
over the 2012 season, when
hunters checked19,251 deer.
The muzzleloader harvest
was 17,375 deer in 2011.
Counties reporting the
highest number of deer
checked during the 2013
muzzleloader season include:
Guernsey (821), Coshocton
(813), Tuscarawas (784),
Muskingum (751), Belmont
(739), Carroll (683), Harrison
(677), Licking (675), Jefferson
(619) and Knox (520).
Deer-archery sea-
son remains open through
Sunday. More information
provided by ODNR Division
of Wildlife about Ohio deer
hunting can be found in the
2012-2013 Hunting and
Trapping Regulations or at
wildohio.com. Hunters can
also share photos by click-
ing on the Photo Gallery tab
online.
Hunters are encouraged
to donate any extra venison
to organizations assisting
Ohioans in need. The ODNR
Division of Wildlife is col-
laborating with Farmers and
Hunters Feeding the Hungry
(FHFH) to help pay for the
processing of donated veni-
son. Hunters who donate deer
are not required to pay the
processing cost as long as the
deer are taken to a participat-
ing processor. To see which
counties are involved in this
program, go to fhfh.org.
ODNR ensures a balance
between wise use and pro-
tection of natural resources
for the benefit of all. Visit
ohiodnr.com.
Editor’s Note: A list of white-tailed
deer checked by hunters during the
2013 muzzleloader hunting season,
Jan. 5-8, is shown below. The first
number following the county’s name
shows the harvest numbers for 2013,
and the 2012 numbers are in paren-
theses.
Adams: 347 (336); Allen: 88 (77);
Ashland: 310 (294); Ashtabula: 422
(374); Athens: 510 (457); Auglaize:
51 (87); Belmont: 739 (577); Brown:
305 (273); Butler: 110 (131); Carroll:
683 (418); Champaign: 118 (132);
Clark: 61 (75); Clermont: 212 (239);
Clinton: 78 (76); Columbiana:
441 (331); Coshocton: 813 (722);
Crawford: 95 (103); Cuyahoga: 6 (5);
Darke: 62 (62); Defiance: 107 (140);
Delaware: 152 (140); Erie: 56 (42);
Fairfield: 211 (216); Fayette: 27 (26);
Franklin: 44 (46); Fulton: 50 (58);
Gallia: 337 (333); Geauga: 126 (154);
Greene: 95 (67); Guernsey: 821
(612); Hamilton: 79 (89); Hancock:
102 (111); Hardin: 110 (141);
Harrison: 677 (569); Henry: 34 (68);
Highland: 318 (278); Hocking: 445
(384); Holmes: 406 (388); Huron: 177
(173); Jackson: 361 (282); Jefferson:
619 (465); Knox: 520 (470); Lake: 59
(41); Lawrence: 230 (220); Licking:
675 (639); Logan: 182 (179); Lorain:
197 (162); Lucas: 41 (31); Madison:
35 (50); Mahoning: 197 (154); Marion:
54 (65); Medina: 159 (146); Meigs:
482 (466); Mercer: 48 (52); Miami: 65
(61); Monroe: 511 (422); Montgomery:
57 (41); Morgan: 460 (340); Morrow:
150 (143); Muskingum: 751 (638);
Noble: 444 (389); Ottawa: 40 (37);
Paulding: 83 (122); Perry: 375 (333);
Pickaway: 83 (71); Pike: 217 (216);
Portage: 158 (176); Preble: 131
(87); Putnam: 30 (56); Richland: 360
(290); Ross: 362 (388); Sandusky:
66 (72); Scioto: 268 (276); Seneca:
149 (142); Shelby: 101 (95); Stark:
268 (192); Summit: 56 (52); Trumbull:
321 (231); Tuscarawas: 784 (581);
Union: 94 (92); Van Wert: 41 (91);
Vinton: 392 (309); Warren: 142 (139);
Washington: 442 (462); Wayne: 177
(139); Williams: 110 (166); Wood: 57
(40) and Wyandot: 126 (136). Total:
21,555 (19,251).
Muzzleloader deer hunters harvest more
than 21,000 deer during ’13 season
Ohio village
reaping big
bucks with
speed cameras
ELMWOOD VILLAGE
(AP) — An attorney challenging
the use of traffic speed cameras
says a southwest Ohio village
has reaped some $700,000 from
tickets.
Attorney Mike Allen says the
speed cameras are “nothing more
than a money grab.” He wants a
Hamilton County judge to shut
down the system in Elmwood
Village, near Cincinnati.
Using traffic cameras for
enforcement has been upheld
in Ohio courts. The Cincinnati
Enquirer reports that Allen is
challenging the way the cameras
were put into use last year, say-
ing people’s due process was
violated by insufficient notice
and signage.
Business owners and a
church pastor have said the
speeding ticket blitz is deterring
people from coming to the vil-
lage. Police and others say it has
made the village safer.
Closing arguments in the
lawsuit are scheduled Jan. 24.
School reaches
out in rape case
STEUBENVILLE (AP) —
School officials in the eastern
Ohio city where a rape case
involving high school football
players has garnered national
attention are reaching out to
students and parents about the
ordeal.
The Steubenville Board of
Education released a statement
today saying officials are in the
process of communicating with
students and parents in the after-
math of two boys being charged
with raping a 16-year-old girl in
August. The students have denied
the charges.
The statement says the district
is encouraging other students with
information to come forward. It
also says security measures have
been increased in the schools, and
education programs expanded to
raise further awareness of sexual
harassment, bullying, date rape
and other issues.
2
“In order to go on living one must try to escape the death involved in perfectionism.”
— Hannah Arendt, American author and historian (1906-1975)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Thursday, January 10, 2013
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year ago
• City council met in its first regular meeting of 2012 on
Tuesday evening, chaired by Council President Kim Riddell.
Also in attendance for their first meeting were Councilman
Josh Gillespie and City Law Director Clayton Osting.
25 Years Ago — 1988
• Delphos Fire Chief Donald Schimmoller is retiring after
32 years with the Delphos Fire Department. Schimmoller
began working with the department in 1955, as a volunteer.
He continued as a volunteer and worked the extra board from
1956 until 1959 under the late chief Carl Imber. Schimmoller
took over as fire chief in October 1964.
• American Legion Post 268 has announced the winners of
its Americanism and government program. Cindy Houdeshell,
a sophomore at Jefferson High School, is a county winner.
Other winners were seniors Travis Roxlau and Gary Shaffer,
both of St. John’s High School, juniors Julie Mosier and Shelly
Baker, both of Jefferson Senior High School, and sophomore
Tracy Sterling of Jefferson.
• From history’s standpoint, the St. John’s-New Bremen
game was expected to be an interesting ball game. The last
time the Blue Jays battled the Cardinals the game turned out
to be a close affair. Friday night things didn’t go that way,
especially for New Bremen. St. John’s blew the Cardinals
away 102-47.
50 Years Ago — 1963
• Psi Chapter, Alpha Delta Omega National Sorority, met
Tuesday evening in the home of Janice Wanamaker, with the
president, Mrs. Dean Molenkopf, in charge. During the session,
plans were discussed for the chapter’s principal project of the
year, a Sweetheart Ball, to be co-sponsored by Tau Chapter.
The dance will be held Feb. 9 at the Knights of Columbus club
with Tommy Ross and his orchestra providing the music.
• Trinity Methodist Church’s Woman’s Society of Christian
Service met Wednesday afternoon in the social rooms of the
church with Mrs. Paul Rozelle, president, opening the ses-
sion by extending New Years greetings to the members. This
was the society’s first meeting of the new year. Mrs. Neil
Leininger, program chairman, introduced those taking part in
the program, Mabel Clark, Mrs. Howard Sadler, Mrs. Harry
McCue and Mrs. Louis Mueller.
• JoAnn Pitsenbarger was hostess to the members of Club
’58 Tuesday evening in her home on West First Street. During
a business session, the members elected Judy Kundert as presi-
dent of the club and named Linda Point secretary and reporter
and Mrs. Joyce Teman as treasurer. The next meeting of the
club will be at the home of Mrs. Kundert with Carol Brewer
serving as assistant hostess.
75 Years Ago — 1938
• Middle Point is now in undisputed first place in the Van
Wert County basketball league as the result of the second
straight hoop victory Friday. Middle Point defeated Union by
a score of 29-19. The winners led by quarters: 5 to 4, 12-8, 21
to 13. B. Johnson scored 18 points for Middle Point.
• A large group of members of the Women’s Bible Class
of the Methodist Church and guests met Friday evening at
the home of Mrs. John Wolfe, West Fifth Street. The annual
election was held and resulted in the following: Mrs. Fred
Allemeier, president; Bertha Davies, vice president; Mrs.
Joseph Foltz, secretary; Mattie Alexander, assistant; Mrs.
George Gilpin, treasurer; and Mrs. Ed. Falke, pianist.
• The Delphos Aerie, Fraternal Order of Eagles, will make
plans for a local initiation which will be staged here on Jan. 16,
when the members meet in regular session Monday night. The
class will be initiated in observance of the birthday anniversary
of Conrad H. Mann, for many years a prominent leader in the
Eagle organization.
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Tickets
to President Barack Obama’s
inauguration are supposed to
be free, but they’re being ped-
dled on eBay and Craigslist for
up to $2,000 apiece.
Congressional offices and
the Presidential Inaugural
Committee, which are both
distributing tickets to inaugu-
ral events, are trying to clamp
down on the black market.
So far, their efforts haven’t
stopped online entrepreneurs.
“These tix are going like
hot cakes, and for FAR more
than I am listing them for on
here,” boasted one anonymous
seller in a post Wednesday on
the website Craigslist.
The seller, who did not
return an email from The
Associated Press, offered two
seats to the Jan. 21 swear-
ing-in at the Capitol for
$4,000. Those tickets are sup-
posed to be free from con-
gressional offices. The Joint
Congressional Committee on
Inaugural Ceremonies issued
some 250,000 for lawmakers
to dole out however they see
fit.
Scalping the tickets is
not illegal. But the commit-
tee’s chairman, Sen. Chuck
Schumer, says he is encourag-
ing members of Congress to
distribute them fairly and to
discourage scalpers. Schumer
said he conducted a lottery
for the tickets his own office
received.
“Any constituent who wins
tickets in the lottery that my
office holds is required to
pledge not to scalp the ticket
to turn a profit,” the New York
Democrat said. “When the
tickets are released this year,
I’d encourage my colleagues
in the House and Senate to take
similar measures to discourage
ticket holders from using those
tickets to make a quick buck.”
Some members have
already seen their tickets — or
at least the promise of them
— show up online. The actual
tickets don’t get handed out
until a few days before the
inauguration.
The Hill, a Capitol Hill
newspaper, reported that one
seller on Craigslist offered two
tickets for $2,000 “from Senator
Nancy Pelosi’s office.” The
ad, which erroneously listed
Pelosi, the House Democratic
leader, as a senator, has since
been taken down.
Pelosi’s spokesman, Drew
Hammill, said her office is tak-
ing steps to ensure none of its
tickets are scalped.
“Our office has implement-
ed a number of procedures to
ensure that no one is able to
do such a thing with tickets
through our office,” she said.
“We will continue to monitor
such websites and ask that any
posts be taken down immedi-
ately.”
Unlike congressional tick-
ets, tickets distributed by
the Presidential Inaugural
Committee can’t be resold
without permission of the com-
mittee.
Although tickets for the
swearing-in ceremony are free,
some other inaugural events
charge admission.
The presidential commit-
tee is sold out of $25 tickets
to the inaugural parade down
Pennsylvania Avenue and $60
tickets to one of its two inaugu-
ral balls. (Tickets to a second
ball, for members of the armed
services, are being distributed
for free.) The committee says
it’s contacting ticket brokers
and websites where tickets are
being sold and asking that they
be alerted to scalping efforts.
By JIM KUHNHENN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Jack Lew, President Barack
Obama’s nominee for treasury
secretary, is a premier federal
budget expert who would take
the helm of the government’s
main agency for economic
and fiscal policy just as the
administration girds itself for
a new confrontation with con-
gressional Republicans over
the nation’s debt and deficits.
Obama will nominate
Lew on Thursday afternoon,
continuing to put a second-
term imprint on his Cabinet
by choosing yet another close
ally to a key government
post.
A year ago, almost to the
day, Obama appointed Lew
as his chief of staff, taking
him from his perch as director
of the Office of Management
and Budget into the White
House’s tight inner circle.
In selecting Lew to replace
Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner, Obama not only
picks an insider steeped in
budget matters but also a tough
bargainer. Some Republicans
complain that Lew has been
unyielding in past fiscal nego-
tiations.
If confirmed, Lew would
assume the post in time for
the administration to tangle
anew with Republicans over
a confluence of three looming
fiscal deadlines — raising the
$16.4 trillion federal borrow-
ing limit, averting automatic
spending cuts to defense and
domestic programs, and the
expiration of a congressional
resolution that has been keep-
ing the government operat-
ing. Those three events, if
unresolved, would have a far
greater negative effect on the
economy than the “fiscal cliff”
that Obama and Congress
avoided a week ago.
Lew, 57, has often been
described as a “pragmatic lib-
eral” who understands what it
takes to make a deal even as
he stands by his ideological
views.
“He’s a political guy. He
didn’t get where he is today by
being a shrinking violet,” said
Paul Light, a public policy pro-
fessor at New York University
and an acquaintance of Lew’s.
“But he’s really a doer. He’s
the kind of guy you want at the
table if you want to get some-
thing done.”
One senior Republican
senator, Alabama’s Jeff
Sessions, voiced opposition
to Lew. Though Lew may
face a tough confirmation in
the Senate, he’s not likely
to encounter the type of stiff
opposition that is already
mounting against former Sen.
Chuck Hagel, a Nebraska
Republican whom Obama
has tapped to be his defense
secretary.
“We need a secretary of
treasury that the American
people, the Congress and the
world will know is up to the
task of getting America on the
path to prosperity not the path
to decline,” said Sessions, the
top Republican on the Senate
Budget Committee. “Jack
Lew is not that man.”
White House press secre-
tary Jay Carney praised Lew
during Wednesday’s press
briefing. “Over the past more
than quarter of a century, Jack
Lew has been an integral part
of some of the most impor-
tant budgetary financial and
fiscal agreements, bipartisan
agreements in Washington,”
Carney said.
Lew’s nomination is
the fourth major personnel
change in the administration
since Obama’s re-election.
Obama tapped Sen. John
Kerry, D-Mass., for the State
Department, Hagel to lead the
Pentagon and White House
counterterrorism adviser John
Brennan for the CIA’s top
job.
One prominent woman
in Obama’s Cabinet, Labor
Secretary Hilda Solis, resigned
her post Wednesday. No suc-
cessor has been named.
By MATTHEW DALY
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
Obama administration is sit-
ting down with gun own-
ers groups — including the
National Rifle Association —
as officials look at ways to
curb gun violence.
Vice President Joe Biden,
who is leading an administra-
tion-wide review of gun safety
laws, has vowed urgent action
in the wake of last month’s
massacre at a Connecticut
elementary school.
The meeting with the NRA
is one of three Biden has
scheduled today, as he pre-
pares to make recommenda-
tions on gun policy by the
end of the month. Besides
the NRA, Biden and other
officials are meeting with
sportsmen and wildlife inter-
est groups, as well as people
from the entertainment indus-
try.
The NRA, the nation’s
largest gun-rights group, has
blocked gun-control efforts in
the past and is opposing any
new ones.
Shortly after last month’s
shooting in Newtown, Conn.,
President Barack Obama
tasked Biden with heading a
commission to come up with
recommendations on gun
policy by the end of January.
Obama supports steps includ-
ing reinstating a ban on assault
weapons and high-capacity
ammunition magazines and
closing loopholes that allow
many gun buyers to avoid
background checks.
Biden, who met with rep-
resentatives of victims groups
and gun-safety organizations
Wednesday, said officials are
considering steps that could
“take thousands of people out
of harm’s way” and improve
the safety of millions more.
“I want to make it clear
that we are not going to get
caught up in the notion that
unless we can do everything,
we’re going to do nothing,”
Biden told groups includ-
ing the Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence. “It’s
critically important we act.”
Biden faces a tougher
audience when the NRA
joins other gun-owner groups
and retailers including Wal-
Mart. NRA officials didn’t
return messages for comment
Wednesday, but the group’s
executive vice president,
Wayne LaPierre, has dis-
missed the assault weapons
ban as “a phony piece of
legislation” and has recom-
mended putting armed guards
in all schools as a way to stop
another school shooting.
Biden said he wanted to
hear from “all parties, on
whatever side of this debate
you fall.”
In a nod to political reali-
ties that could imperil sweep-
ing gun-control legislation,
Biden said the administration
is weighing executive action
in addition to recommending
legislation by Congress.
Recommendations to the
Biden group include making
gun-trafficking a felony, get-
ting the Justice Department to
prosecute people caught lying
on gun background-check
forms and ordering federal
agencies to send data to the
National Gun Background
Check Database.
The Brady Campaign says
that some 40 percent of gun
sales are made without back-
ground checks, such as at gun
shows and over the Internet.
The shootings in Newtown,
in which 20 children and six
adults were killed by a man
with a military-style semiauto-
matic rifle, have prodded the
administration to act. Obama
had remained largely silent
on gun control after the 2011
shootings in Tucson, Ariz., that
killed six people and wound-
ed 12, including then-Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords, and the
Colorado movie theater killing
of a dozen people and wound-
ing of many more last July.
Biden, referring to the
Newtown shootings, said at
the White House, “Every once
in a while, there’s something
that awakens the conscience
of the country, and that tragic
event did it in a way like noth-
ing I’ve seen in my career.”
By KIMBERLY DOZIER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
attack on a U.S. diplomatic
outpost in Libya last year
has become a factor driving
the White House decision on
how large a force to leave in
Afghanistan after 2014 — and
a specter hanging over talks
between the Afghan president
and the U.S.
Afghan President Hamid
Karzai has publicly called for
a near-total drawdown of U.S.
forces, with a surge of U.S.
and international aid to make
up for their exit.
But after losing a U.S.
ambassador and three other
Americans in Benghazi, Libya,
U.S. officials insist they need
enough troops to protect their
diplomats, and the legal author-
ity to target those who might
come after them, a senior U.S.
official said.
The State Department
wants five diplomatic posts
in Afghanistan, but U.S.
planners are weighing every
potential post against how
many troops would be needed
to guard it and, if need be, get
personnel out, said one cur-
rent and one former U.S. offi-
cial. They spoke on condition
of anonymity because they
were not authorized to discuss
the White House deliberations
publicly.
The administration does
not want to risk another
Benghazi situation, the senior
official said, where diplo-
matic posts are only lightly
guarded by U.S. contractors
and local forces and the host
country can deny the U.S. the
right to send in troops. The
Libyans denied U.S. special
operations teams entry to hunt
al-Qaida-linked militants sus-
pected in the killings of U.S.
Ambassador Chris Stevens
and three other Americans on
Sept. 11.
The same security con-
cerns also apply to U.S. drone
bases used to launch attacks
against al-Qaida targets next
door in Pakistan.
“If the mission is to defeat
al-Qaida, then you need
a base to operate from and
Afghanistan is the only place
to do that,” said former CIA
officer Bruce Riedel, who
advised the Obama White
House on its Afghan war
strategy. “Where Benghazi
comes in is, Do we want to
rely on Afghan security, or a
contractor, or on U.S. Marines
to protect a drone base?”
Pentagon calculations
call for roughly three to five
troops to guard each U.S.
civilian in a conflict zone like
Afghanistan. Without suffi-
cient numbers of troops, the
U.S. will have to curtail its
diplomatic mission, the senior
U.S. official said, which could
spell reduced aid and support
to Afghanistan without the
U.S. manpower to manage the
programs.
White House officials say
President Barack Obama will
explain that quid pro quo
when he meets with Karzai
at the White House on Friday,
the culmination of a series
of meetings with Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta,
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton and other
U.S. officials and lawmakers
this week in Washington.
Karzai has publicly called
for U.S. troops to return to
their bases, saying Afghan
troops could take over this
year, but he has also asked for
the U.S. to help him build his
own army and air force.
Only after Obama and
Karzai reach a meeting of the
minds on what the Afghans
will allow the U.S. to do
after 2014 can Obama decide
whether to leave U.S. person-
nel in Afghanistan after 2014
— and, if so, how many and
what they role they’ll play,
said Ben Rhodes, a deputy
national security adviser for
the White House.
There are 66,000 U.S.
troops in Afghanistan. Those
troops are already turning over
territory or handing off many
combat missions to Afghan
security forces, with a goal
of having Afghans leading all
combat missions by the end
of 2013.
Inauguration
tickets peddled
online
Biden to meet with NRA to discuss gun safety
Obama turns a page at
Treasury in picking Lew
Specter of Benghazi drives US-Afghan talks
21
Have more GO in the Snow!
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502 N. Main St. • Delphos
419-695-1060
Visit us at our improved webpage
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This position requires an individual to sell multi-media
products including print,
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The right candidate will sell our products to a diverse
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a plus.
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Interested applicants should email a cover letter and
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REPRESENTATIVE
Thursday, Janaury 10, 2013 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
Columbus Grove
City Building
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
enter on East First Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
Cloverdale recycle at vil-
lage park.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
7 p.m. — Marion Township
trustees at township house.
Middle Point council meets
at town hall.
8 p.m. — Delphos City
Schools Board of Education
meets at the administration
office.
Delphos Knights of
Columbus meet at the K of
C hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Area
Visiting Nurses offer free
blood pressure checks at
Delphos Discount Drugs.
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
7:30 p.m. — Elida School
Board meets at the high school
office.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
Fort Jennings Village
Council meets at Fort Jennings
Library.
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
JAN. 10-12
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez. Sandy Hahn, Kay Meyer,
Martha Etzkron, Valeta Ditto and Ruth Calvelage.
FRIDAY: Mary Jane Watkins, Mary Ann Lisk, Judy
Kundert and Kay Meyer.
SATURDAY: Ann Schaffner, Deloris Knippen, Valeta
Ditto and Rita Nesbitt.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday.
Anyone who would like to volunteer should contact
Catharine Gerdemann, 419-695-8440; Alice Heidenescher,
419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene
Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331.
If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.
WEEK OF JAN. 14-18
MONDAY: Sub sandwich with lettuce and tomato, maca-
roni salad, fruit, coffee and 2% milk.
TUESDAY: Chicken and dumplings, broccoli, slaw, roll,
pumpkin pie, coffee and 2% milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked ham, sweet potatoes, cabbage,
bread, margarine, pineapple, coffee and 2% milk.
THURSDAY: Beef pot pie, green beans, roll, margarine,
raspberry whip, coffee and 2% milk.
FRIDAY: Baked fish with tartar sauce, redskin potatoes,
Cole slaw, bread, margarine, Mandarin oranges, coffee and
2% milk.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 13,390.51 +61.66
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 3,105.81 +14.00
S&P 500 INDEX 1,461.02 +3.87
AUTOZONE INC. 349.60 +1.35
BUNGE LTD 74.40 +0.49
EATON CORP. 55.77 +0.75
BP PLC ADR 44.27 +0.87
DOMINION RES INC 52.20 -0.17
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 43.16 +0.01
CVS CAREMARK CRP 50.28 +0.43
CITIGROUP INC 42.04 -0.42
FIRST DEFIANCE 20.53 +0.05
FST FIN BNCP 14.76 -0.42
FORD MOTOR CO 13.47 +0.12
GENERAL DYNAMICS 70.68 +0.27
GENERAL MOTORS 29.97 +0.60
GOODYEAR TIRE 14.36 +0.30
HEALTHCARE REIT 61.49 -0.19
HOME DEPOT INC. 63.17 -0.05
HONDA MOTOR CO 37.35 +0.97
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.58 -0.07
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 71.73 +0.32
JPMORGAN CHASE 45.47 -0.03
KOHLS CORP. 41.95 +0.14
LOWES COMPANIES 34.88 +0.10
MCDONALDS CORP. 90.81 -0.13
MICROSOFT CP 26.70 +0.15
PEPSICO INC. 70.01 +0.35
PROCTER & GAMBLE 68.88 +0.37
RITE AID CORP. 1.37 +0.04
SPRINT NEXTEL 5.88 -0.09
TIME WARNER INC. 49.63 -0.52
US BANCORP 33.27 +0.30
UTD BANKSHARES 10.25 +0.00
VERIZON COMMS 43.00 -0.10
WAL-MART STORES 68.57 -0.02
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business January 9, 2013
JAN. 11
Art Miller
Kristi Schlatter
Shiann Kraft
Recipes to make
for a quick night
in the kitchen.
Pepperoni Pizza Soup
1 tablespoon oil
1 cup sliced fresh mush-
rooms
1 cup chopped green
bell pepper
1/2 cup chopped onion
1 can (15 ounces) pizza
sauce
1 can (14-1/2 ounces)
chicken broth
1 cup water
3 ounces sliced pep-
peroni
1 teaspoon dried oreg-
ano
1 cup (4ounces) shred-
ded mozzarella cheese
Croutons
Heat oil in large sauce-
pan over medium heat.
Add mushrooms, bell pep-
per and onion. Cook, stir-
ring frequently, 7 minutes
or until vegetables are ten-
der. Stir in pizza sauce,
broth, water, pepperoni
and oregano. Bring to a
boil. Reduce heat and sim-
mer 5 minutes. Serve with
cheese; sprinkle with crou-
tons. Makes 4 servings.

Boston Cream Pie
on the Lite Side
1pkg. (1.0 oz.) JELL-O
Vanilla Flavor Fat
Free Sugar Free Instant
Pudding
1-1/2cups cold fat-free
milk
1cup thawed Cool Whip
Lite Whipped Topping,
divided
1 prepared round angel
food cake (10 oz.), cut hor-
izontally into 3 layers
1square Baker’s Semi-
Sweet Chocolate, chopped
Beat pudding mix and
milk in medium bowl with
whisk 2 minutes. Stir in 1/2
cup Cool Whip. Stack cake
layers on serving plate,
spreading pudding mixture
between layers.
Microwave chocolate
and remaining Cool Whip
in microwaveable bowl on
high 30 seconds; stir until
chocolate is completely
melted and mixture is well
blended. Spoon over cake.
Refrigerate 1 hour, or up
until 4 hours, removing
from refrigerator 30 min-
utes before serving.
Dessert can be made
up to 4 hours in advance.
Remove from refrigerator
30 minutes before serving.
If you enjoyed these
recipes, made changes or
have one to share, email
kitchenpress@yahoo.com
Alliance offers scholarship
The Lima and Allen
County Medical Alliance will
offer a scholarship of up to
$1,000 to a deserving high
school senior who will be
entering college for the first
year of studies.
Scholarship qualifi-
cations are as follows:
Applicant must be attend-
ing high school in Allen,
Auglaize or Putnam
County; applicant must be
enrolled in or have applied
to an Ohio school of higher
education; applicant must
enter into a human health/
human science based field
of study; applicant must
have maintained at least a
3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale in
high school; applicant must
demonstrate financial need;
applicant must provide the
following information: leg-
ibly completed and signed
application form, letter of
recommendation, official
high school transcripts,
standardized test scores, a
typed and signed one-page
personal statement from the
student as described on the
application form.
Applications will be
evaluated on the student’s
academic record, financial
need, activities/involve-
ment, written communica-
tion skills and letter of rec-
ommendation.
Applications are avail-
able at all local high school
guidance offices and may
be requested before Feb.20,
by sending a self-addressed
stamped envelope to LACMA
Scholarship, P.O. Box 1647
Lima OH 45802.
Completed applications
must be postmarked by March
1.
GOBA set
June 15-22 in
Western Ohio
The 25th Annual Great
Ohio Bicycle Adventure
(GOBA), owned and oper-
ated by Columbus Outdoor
Pursuits, will take place
June 15-22 and will feature
a route in Western Ohio.
The expected 2,500 rid-
ers will start gathering on
June 15 at the Champaign
County Fairgrounds in
Urbana. Cycling will begin
on June 16, covering an
average of 50 miles per
day and will overnight
in Troy, on Sunday and
Monday; Greenville on
Tuesday; New Bremen on
Wednesday and Thursday;
Sidney on Friday; and will
return to Urbana on June
22.
Attractions featured
include the Bicycle Museum
of America, Cedar Bog,
Johnny Appleseed Museum,
Great Miami River Trail,
plane rides at WACO
Airfield, Garst Museum
and Annie Oakley Center,
Kitchenaid Experience,
Maria Stein Shrine of Holy
Relics, Miami & Erie Canal,
Johnston Farm & Indian
Agency, Lake Loramie
State Park and other his-
toric sites, covered bridges
and nature areas.
Those interested in
receiving registration infor-
mation and tour details
can request a brochure by
calling 614-273-0811 or
by visiting the website at
www.goba.com. Brochures
will also be available by
February in many Ohio
bicycle shops. Advance
registration is required by
May 15.
YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST
BUY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
In today’s world, fifty cents
doesn’t buy a heck of a lot —
except of course, when it comes
to your newspaper.
For less than the cost of a soda,
you can get word from across town
or across the nation. For less than
the price of a cup of coffee, you can
get your fill of local news, politics,
or whatever else is your cup of
tea. With something new to greet
you each day, from cover to cover,
your newspaper is still the most
“streetwise” buy in town!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 ext. 122
James Buchanan was the
only president never to marry.
Five presidents remarried after
the death of their first wives
- two of whom, Tyler and
Wilson, remarried while in the
White House. Reagan was the
only divorced president. Six
presidents had no children. Tyler
- father of fifteen - had the most.
2
6 – The Herald Thursday, January 10, 2013
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
It’s good work if you can get it
Why would they move?
I am referring to the recent job over-
tures from National Football League
teams to some of the best college foot-
ball coaches in America.
To me, why would a Chip Kelly,
Nick Saban, etc., leave their cocoons
where they are fabulously successful
and well compensated, adored, loved,
etc., to go to the NFL where many of
the players will make more than they
will and all of a sudden, he won’t be
able to have near the influence as he
did before and probably won’t be lis-
tened to as much anyway?
Just look at the National Basketball
Association and how players can seem-
ingly get coaches hired and fired seem-
ingly at a moment’s notice. The pow-
ers-that-be deny this but they almost
have to.
In the pros, you have such things
as the salary cap and such that makes
it more difficult to build a great team
year after year, whereas in college,
these guys can get almost anyone they
really want and they don’t have to
worry about resources.
Plus, you can almost bet — for
those of us that occasionally do such
a thing — they received a nice little
incentive package to stay. Those guys
probably knew that this was going to
happen if they went through the process
of being interviewed or having their
name out there; they become an ever
hotter item to their present teams, so,
hey, go for it.
I can’t blame them for listening to
see what’s out there; it might be like a
pat on the back, just more lucrative.
The same thing with some other
names that have been bandied about
recently, like Jon “Chuckie” Gruden
going to Philadelphia and Bill
Cowher?
Gruden is having wayyyy too much
fun doing what he is doing — that is
pretty easy to tell — and he hasn’t
lost a game since he was fired by the
Buccaneers. He is in his environment
and comfort zone and still making a
pretty good living.
Cowher has already been quoted
as saying he will return to coaching
someday; he just doesn’t know when
or where.
These guys do have egos — per-
haps the understatement of the year
— and they somewhat need them to
be successful; they want to measure
themselves at the top echelon of their
sport and maybe they like a little bit
of “danger” in their lives. Maybe they
don’t mind being booed and called all
kinds of names when and if their team
goes to pot.
At the same time, they’re pretty
doggone successful where they are at
and most are doing what they love and,
hopefully, shaping these men into first-
class gentlemen on and off the field.
After all, how many of these play-
ers are going to end up in profes-
sional football, so they’d better be
good human beings more than good
football players.
It’s a dog-eat-dog atmosphere at
that level; just as the Pat Shurmurs,
Rob Ryans, etc. It’s win at all costs and
win NOW.
Obviously, there is pressure to win
in college because of boosters, endow-
ments and such — let’s face it, people
like to be associated with winners —
but since the NFL is a much smaller
commodity, the focus is more laser-
like.
For example, 49ers kicker David
Akers made the claim that he received
death threats on Twitter before closing
the account. I take him for his word.
I wonder if it was some fantasy foot-
ball owner whose team lost because he
missed a kick or something?
That’s just crazy that someone
would do that. If they try to make that
out to be a joke, it’s not very humor-
ous.
This is a football game, for crying
out loud. It sure as hecklydarn is not
worth a life.
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Grove splits pair
of wrestling matches
COLUMBUS GROVE —
The Columbus Grove wres-
tlers split a pair of matches
Wednesday at Riverdale.
The Bulldogs bested
Arcadia 66-6, while they fell
49-16 to the
hosts to move
to 10-3 in
dual meets.
Grove is
in the Van
Buren Invitational Jan. 18.
COLUMBUS GROVE 66,
ARCADIA 6
106: Tregg Keysor (C) pin
Tristan Lowe, 2:59.
113: Double void.
120: Jared Bowman (A) pin
Garrett Hauenstein, 2:42.
126: Double void.
132: Eli Schroeder (C), void.
138: Christian Stechschulte
(C), void.
145: Tyler Schroeder (C),
void.
152: Andrew Burgei (C), void.
160: Alec Gladwell (C), void.
170: Brandon Benroth (C),
void.
182: Adam Johnson (C), void.
195: Will Selhorst (C), void.
220: Eli Wiswasser (C), void.
285: Alex Shaffer (C) pin Gabe
Johnson, 1:10.
RIVERDALE 49, COLUMBUS
GROVE 16
106: Double void.
113: Kolten Meyer (R) major
dec. Tregg Keysor 10-0.
120: Mitchel Matheny (R) pin
Garrett Hauenstein, 1:46.
126: Caleb Hicks (R), void.
132: Austin Miller (R) technical
fall Eli Schroeder 16-0.
138: Austin Clark (R) major
dec. Christian Stechschulte 11-1.
145: Tyler Schroeder (C)
major dec. Luke Berman 17-3.
152: Paul Frey (R) dec.
Andrew Burgei 12-11.
160: Seth Knall (R) dec. Alec
Gladwell 6-4.
170: Brandon Benroth (C) pin
Evan Gladden, 1:11.
182: Tre Headington (R) pin
Adam Johnson, 2:52.
195: Will Selhorst (C) pin
Caleb Tracy, 1:52.
220: Dillen Welker (R) pin Eli
Wiswasser, :29.
285: Justin Pfiester (R) pin
Alex Shaffer, 5:15.
-----
Bluffton offense explodes
in 82-61 win at Earlham
By Ryan Schadewald
Sports information assistant
RICHMOND, Ind. - The
Bluffton University men’s
basketball team earned their
first win in HCAC play on
W e d -
n e s d a y
with a
convinc-
ing 82-61
road vic-
tory at Earlham College.
The Beavers improved to
5-9 overall and 1-6 in HCAC
play. Bluffton was led by
senior Josh Johnson (Ottawa-
Glandorf) who scored a
career-high 19 points on 5-of-
7 shooting from beyond the
arc while also pulling down
six rebounds.
The Beavers took their first
lead at 6-4 on a layup by Josh
Fisher (Rockford/Parkway).
After an Earlham deuce by
Marty Broderick tied it at six,
Bluffton used a 6-0 run for a
12-6 lead at the 13:47 mark.
Earlham cut the Beaver lead
to 13-12 before the visitors
responded with a 7-0 spurt,
capped by a Johnson deep
ball. Bluffton led the Quakers
20-12 with 9:52 remaining in
the half.
Bluffton went on a 15-4
spurt to push the lead into dou-
ble digits. With the Beavers
up 23-17, junior standout
Dustin Kinn (Alvada/New
Riegel) kick started the run
with a layup, followed by
a Will Pope (Somerville/
Preble Shawnee) layin which
put Bluffton on top by 10.
Then, Ryan Ebbeskotte (Fort
Jennings/Delphos Jefferson)
drained a big three and Pope
converted the hoop-and-
harm, making the score 35-21
with just over three minutes
to play in the first stanza.
There was plenty of back-
and-forth action for the first
nine minutes of the second
half, with neither team scor-
ing more than four straight.
However, the Beavers broke
through at the 10:26 mark.
The Beavers led 58-46 before
a 7-0 run put the game out
of reach. The run started
with layins from Pope and
freshman Thayne Recker
(Arlington). Those hoops were
followed by an old-fashioned
3-point play from freshman
Billy Taflinger (Lima/Central
Catholic).
The Bluffton advan-
tage ballooned to 25 points
after two free throws from
Johnson at the 3:57 mark. The
Quakers were unable to get
the lead back under 20 points
the rest of the way as Bluffton
wrapped up its 82-61 victory.
The Beavers had four
players in double figures, led
by Johnson. Pope added 13
points and six boards, while
Fisher chipped in with 11
points. Kinn finished his sec-
ond double-double in three
games with 10 points and 10
rebounds.
Earlham was led by Dustin
Rusk who scored 15 points in
a losing effort.
Bluffton won the rebound-
ing battle decisively (43-
22), including 14 offensive
boards. The Beavers’ key to
victory, however, was their
shooting. Bluffton drilled
30-of-58 (51.7 percent) from
the floor, including 9-for-17
(52.9 percent) from beyond
the arc. The visitors domi-
nated the paint to the tune of
a 32-14 advantage.
The Beavers will return
home on Saturday when
they welcome the Anderson
University Ravens for a
Heartland Conference dou-
bleheader. The men’s game
will begin at 4 p.m. following
the women’s contest at 2 p.m.
Come out and support the
Beavers!
-----
Four Lady Beavers hit
for double digits in
72-64 win over Earlham
By Evan Skilliter
Sports information assistant
BLUFFTON — The
Beavers snapped a 3-game
conference losing skid
after defeating Earlham
College 72-64 at home on
Wednesday.
The win moved the
Beavers to 7-7 overall and 2-5
in the Heartland Conference.
Earlham fell to 2-12 and 1-6
in the HCAC
Bluffton stormed out to
a 9-2 lead after layups from
Rachel DeBord (Lebanon),
Taylor Knight (Perrysburg),
and Brooke Ruffer (Stryker),
along with a Taylor Whitaker
(Mansfield/Lexington) long
ball. After a quick Earlham
run made the score 9-7, fresh-
man Kaitlyn Pennekamp
(Hamilton/Ross) controlled
an offensive rebound and put
it up for two while increasing
the spread to four.
A chip shot by JaLissa Watt
made the score 11-9 before a
DeBord layin sparked a 13-4
Bluffton spurt that extended
the lead to 24-13 at the 9:33
mark in the half. Earlham
trimmed the deficit to nine
with seven minutes to play
but back-to-back deuces from
Brenna Kurilec (Mt. Gilead/
Gilead Christian) and two
layups each from DeBord and
Ruffer kept the Quakers from
getting any closer as the half-
time buzzer sounded with the
Beavers up 42-33.
Kurilec opened the scoring
in the second half with her
13th and 14th points of the
game on a fast break after a
DeBord steal and assist. The
sophomore converted again
after Ruffer found her to make
the score 46-33. Earlham nar-
rowed the deficit to 11 at the
14:25 mark but Whitaker put
the Beavers up 14 with her
second trifecta of the game.
Bluffton maintained the
double-digit lead until Emily
Sells hit a jumper that made
the score 56-48 with 10 min-
utes to play. The Quakers
pulled within six when Kasin
Spay hit a three at the 5:17
mark to make the score 64-58
but that was as close as the
visitors would get as the
Beavers held them off.
Kurilec finished the game
with a career night, includ-
ing career highs of 20 points,
nine rebounds and six assists.
Ruffer finished with her fourth
double-double after tallying 13
points, 12 boards, six assists
and three steals. Whitaker and
DeBord both added double-
figure performances as well
with 12 points apiece.
Bluffton shot a blistering
51.6 percent from the field
(32-of-62), including 4-of-
8 (50 percent) from behind
the arc, and 4-of-7 at the
free-throw line. They out-
rebounded Earlham 36-33 but
committed one more turnover
(17-16) than the visitors.
The Beavers return to
action on Saturday at home
when they host HCAC oppo-
nent Anderson. The women’s
game is slated to tip at 2 p.m.
in the Sommer Center.
LOCAL ROUNDUP
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Chris Paul had 19 points and
16 assists and the Los Angeles
Clippers held on to beat the
Dallas Mavericks 99-93 on
Wednesday night, extending
their franchise-record home
winning streak to 13 games.
Matt Barnes added 19
points off the bench and Blake
Griffin had 15 points and 13
rebounds for the Clippers (29-
8), who took sole possession
of the NBA’s best record from
Oklahoma City with their third
straight win overall.
Darren Collison scored 22
points for Dallas. O.J. Mayo
added 17 and Dirk Nowitzki
had 15. At 13-23, the Mavs
fell 10 games below .500 for
the first time since March
30, 2000, two months after
Mark Cuban bought the team.
They’ve lost four in a row
overall and three straight on
the road, where they are 5-16.
THUNDER 106, TIMBERWOLVES 84
OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant
scored 26 points and Russell Westbrook
added 23 to help Oklahoma City over-
power outmanned Minnesota.
After losing its last game on a
buzzer-beater against a last-place
Washington team saddled by injuries
to its three top players, Oklahoma
City left nothing to chance with the
Timberwolves missing All-Star forward
Kevin Love and four others.
The Thunder stretched the lead
to 24 before pulling the starters with
5:44 to go.
Alexey Shved scored 18 points for
Minnesota, which announced earlier
in the day that Love would miss 8-10
weeks after breaking his right hand for
the second time.
SPURS 108, LAKERS 105
SAN ANTONIO — Tony Parker
scored 24 points to help San Antonio
hand slumping Los Angeles to its fifth
straight loss.
Manu Ginobili added 19 points and
Tiago Splitter and Stephen Jackson
had 14 each for San Antonio, which
has won 11 straight at home.
Kobe Bryant had 27 points, Metta
World Peace added 23 and Earl Clark
22 for Los Angeles. Bryant was 10-for-
24 from the field, missing a 3-pointer
on his final attempt that would have
tied the game. Clark missed a follow-
up 3 off a long rebound.
Coming off a 125-112 loss at
Houston on Tuesday, the Lakers
fought until the final buzzer.
CELTICS 87, SUNS 79
BOSTON — Jeff Green scored 14
points, rookie Jared Sullinger added
12 points and 16 rebounds and Boston
recovered from a dreadful third quarter,
rallying in the fourth to beat Phoenix.
The Celtics survived a scoring
drought that spanned almost half of
the third quarter, scoring just 14 in the
period before regaining the lead and
taking command against the road-
weary Suns, who fell to 2-16 away
from home with their 11th straight
road loss.
Jason Terry added 13 points as
Boston’s reserves outscored Phoenix’s
47-16. Kevin Garnett was the only
Boston starter to score in double fig-
ures, finishing with 10 points and five
rebounds.
Jared Dudley scored 14 points and
Marcin Gortat had 12 points and 14
rebounds for the Suns.
BUCKS 104, BULLS 96
CHICAGO — Brandon Jennings
scored 20 of his 35 points in the third
quarter and Milwaukee beat Chicago
for its second consecutive victory
under interim coach Jim Boylan.
Mike Dunleavy had 16 points
and Monta Ellis finished with 14 for
Milwaukee, which made 10-of-22
3-point attempts.
Carlos Boozer had 22 points and
11 rebounds for the Bulls. Boozer has
recorded a double-double in six con-
secutive games.
HORNETS 88, ROCKETS 79
NEW ORLEANS — Roger Mason
scored 15 of his 17 points in the fourth
quarter to rally New Orleans to a vic-
tory over Houston.
Greivis Vasquez and Jason Smith
each scored 17 points for the Hornets,
who have won three in a row for the
first time this season. Robin Lopez
added 14 points for New Orleans.
James Harden scored 25 points for
the Rockets, who had won 10-of-12.
Harden, who was held to three points
in the final quarter when the Rockets
were outscored 28-10, was the only
Houston player in double figures.
Eric Gordon struggled with five
points on 2-of-12 shooting for the
Hornets.
GRIZZLIES 94, WARRIORS 87
OAKLAND, Calif. — Zach Randolph
had 19 points and 12 rebounds, Rudy
Gay scored 18 points and Memphis
completed a 3-0 road trip with a victory
over Golden State.
Mike Conley added 16 points and
Marc Gasol finished with 12 points
and nine rebounds to help Memphis
make its quick West Coast swing
more memorable. The Grizzlies (23-
10) also won at Phoenix on Sunday
and at Sacramento on Monday.
Stephen Curry scored 24 points
and Klay Thompson had 20 points,
seven rebounds and seven assists as
the Warriors (22-12) lost back-to-back
games for only the second time this
season.
NUGGETS 108, MAGIC 105
DENVER — Kenneth Faried scored
19 points and grabbed 19 rebounds to
help Denver rally for a win over slump-
ing Orlando.
Ty Lawson also finished with 19
points, including a 3-point play with
1:27 remaining that gave the Nuggets
the lead for good and sent them to
their third straight win.
Orlando just can’t get on track since
Glen Davis went out with a sprained
left shoulder, dropping a 10th straight
game in the big man’s absence. He
currently isn’t with the team but it was
hoped he might rejoin them at some
point during the current 4-game trip.
Jameer Nelson led the Magic with
20 points and Arron Afflalo added 12
against his former team.
JAZZ 112, BOBCATS 102
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Al Jefferson
had 26 points and eight rebounds
to lead Utah to its fourth win in five
games with a victory over Charlotte.
The Bobcats had no answer for
the 6-10 Jefferson, who went 11-of-15
from the field. Paul Millsap chipped in
with 19 points and Gordon Hayward
was 4-of-5 from 3-point range for 14
points as the Jazz made light work of
the Bobcats’ zone defense, shooting
54 percent from the field.
Ben Gordon led six Bobcats in dou-
ble figures, scoring 20 points. Michael
Kidd-Gilchrist had 15 points and eight
rebounds, while Gerald Henderson,
Ramon Sessions and Kemba Walker
each had 14 points for Charlotte.
RAPTORS 90, 76ERS 72
TORONTO — Amir Johnson had
19 points and 12 rebounds, Jose
Calderon added 14 points and 11
assists and Toronto beat Philadelphia,
sending the slumping 76ers to their
fifth straight loss.
Landry Fields set season highs with
10 points and 11 rebounds. DeMar
DeRozan scored 19 and Ed Davis had
17 for the Raptors.
Jrue Holiday and Thaddeus Young
each scored 16 points and Evan
Turner had 10 as the Sixers lost for
the 13th time in their last 16 games.
Philadelphia has played 12 of its past
16 on the road, winning just twice.
CAVALIERS 99, HAWKS 83
CLEVELAND — Kyrie Irving scored
18 of his 33 points in the third quarter
to lead injury-riddled Cleveland over
Atlanta.
Irving’s big night came at a per-
fect time for Cleveland, which had
lost 5-of-6 overall and six straight at
home. Alonzo Gee scored 15 points
for Cleveland, while Tristan Thompson
added 11 points and 14 rebounds.
Rookie Tyler Zeller scored 11 points
and had a career-high 12 rebounds.
Josh Smith scored 17 points to lead
Atlanta, which has lost a season-worst
four straight. Jeff Teague added 15
points and Al Horford scored 14.
NBA CAPSULES
The Associated Press
PRO FOOTBALL
PHILADELPHIA — The Philadelphia
Eagles interviewed Notre Dame coach
Brian Kelly for their coaching vacancy,
a person familiar with the meeting told
The Associated Press.
Kelly was the third college coach
Philadelphia interviewed since firing
Andy Reid on Dec. 31. The person,
speaking on condition of anonym-
ity because he wasn’t authorized to
release the information, said the Eagles
met with Kelly on Tuesday.
Penn State’s Bill O’Brien and
Oregon’s Chip Kelly interviewed with
the Eagles last week but chose to stay
at their schools.
The Eagles have interviewed six
candidates and plan to meet with four
others.
Kelly recently called coaching
Notre Dame his “dream job” but he
wouldn’t be the first to explore his
options, perhaps even to get a raise
to stay put.
WASHINGTON — Robert Griffin III
had reconstructive knee surgery and
faces a challenging rehab if he is to
return for the start of next season.
The Washington Redskins quarter-
back had his lateral collateral ligament
repaired and his ACL in his right knee
reconstructed for a second time. The
surgery was performed in Florida by
orthopedist James Andrews, who was
optimistic that Griffin would be back on
the field this fall.
NEW YORK — The Jets are
expanding their search for a new gen-
eral manager, setting up interviews
with Miami assistant GM Brian Gaine
and Pittsburgh executive Omar Khan.
The Daily News also reported, citing
an anonymous source, that the Jets will
meet with former Chicago general man-
ager Jerry Angelo today. NFL Network
reported that Seattle vice president of
football administration John Idzik will
interview for the job on Friday.
SAN DIEGO — The San Diego
Chargers hired Tom Telesco from the
Indianapolis Colts to replace fired gen-
eral manager A.J. Smith.
Telesco, 40, spent the last 15 sea-
sons with the Colts, most recently as
vice president of football operations.
INDIANAPOLIS — The agent
for Colts offensive coordinator Bruce
Arians said that his client has been
released from an Indianapolis hospital
and that they are finalizing details to
begin interviewing for head coaching
jobs.
Earlier in the day, a league source
familiar with the situation told The
Associated Press that doctors were
still trying to determine the extent of a
health problem that forced one inter-
view to be pushed back.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Carolina
Panthers hired New York Giants senior
pro personnel analyst David Gettleman
as their new general manager.
NEW ORLEANS — New Orleans
Saints coach Sean Payton signed a
5-year contract extension that will run
through the 2017 season.
The team announced the exten-
sion but did not release financial details
of the deal. Payton had agreed to the
deal in principle on Dec. 29.
PRO HOCKEY
NEW YORK — NHL Commissioner
Gary Bettman secured unanimous
ownership support for the pending
labor deal, then apologized to every-
one hurt by the long lockout and said
he isn’t going anywhere.
The league’s board of governors
met in a Manhattan hotel and over-
whelmingly approved the agreement
that was reached early Sunday on the
113th day of the lockout.
Bettman felt the full brunt of
anger, especially from fans, during the
4-month dispute that kept hockey off
the ice and was contrite in announc-
ing the latest step by the owners. He
added he wants to look forward and
not back at the mess created by the
work stoppage.
TORONTO — Brian Burke’s brash
and outspoken style wasn’t a good fit
for the new corporate owners of the
Toronto Maple Leafs.
The Maple Leafs fired their general
manager with the NHL season set to
resume this month following a tentative
settlement ending the lockout.
PRO BASKETBALL
NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony
was suspended one game by the NBA
for confronting Kevin Garnett after the
New York Knicks’ loss to Boston on
Monday.
Anthony, who was angry about
Garnett’s choice of words during a
fourth-quarter altercation, went toward
the Celtics’ locker room after the game
and later waited for Garnett outside
Boston’s team bus.
Anthony didn’t believe he would
be suspended because he said he
was just looking to talk to Garnett, not
fight. But NBA executive vice presi-
dent of operations Stu Jackson ruled
otherwise.
SEATTLE — Investor Chris Hansen
has contacted the Maloof family about
buying the Sacramento Kings, setting
up the possibility of the NBA’s return
to Seattle.
Hansen’s interest was confirmed by
people with knowledge of the situation.
They spoke on condition of anonymity
to The Associated Press because no
deal has been reached.
One person said the Kings could
sell for more than $500 million. The
Kings’ future in Sacramento has been
uncertain because the Maloofs and the
city haven’t been able to come up with
a long-term arena solution.
CYCLING
Lance Armstrong recently met
with the head of the U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency to explore a “pathway to
redemption,” according to a report on
“60 Minutes Sports” dealing with the
investigation that cost the cyclist his
Tour de France titles.
USADA CEO Travis Tygart, in an
interview that aired during the show’s
premiere on Showtime, didn’t discuss
the meeting on camera and provided
no details, including when it was held
and where. The only mention, with no
elaboration, came at the end of the
segment.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
DURHAM, N.C. — Duke announced
senior forward Ryan Kelly is out indefi-
nitely with a right foot injury.
The 6-11 Kelly was hurt late in the
first half of the top-ranked Blue Devils’
68-40 win over Clemson on Tuesday
night. He had 12 points in the first half
but did not play in the second.
TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia — John
Isner has withdrawn from the Australian
Open with bone bruising in his right
knee, leaving No. 22 Sam Querrey as
the highest-ranked U.S. man at the
season’s first Grand Slam tournament.
SPORTS BRIEFS
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE —
Suspended Houston 2B Jonathan
Singleton 50 games after a second
violation of the Minor League Drug
Prevention and Treatment Program for
a drug of abuse.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—
Agreed to terms with RHP Matt Palmer,
C Eliezer Alfonzo, C Ramon Castro;
INFs Alfredo Amezaga, Brian Barden,
Omar Luna and Dallas McPherson and
OF Jerome (Jeremy) Moore on minor-
league contracts.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS —
Assigned RHP Arcenio Leon outright
to Nashville.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Traded
OF Quincy Latimore to Cleveland for
RHP Jeanmar Gomez.
Frontier League
FRONTIER LEAGUE — Declared
RHP Jonathan Kountis a free agent.
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES — Named
Zach Borowiak hitting coach. Signed
INF Vladimir Frias to a contract exten-
sion.
JOLIET SLAMMERS — Named
Eric Coleman pitching coach and Dave
Garcia hitting coach.
RIVER CITY RASCALS — Traded
RHP Tony Marsala to Wichita (AA)
for future considerations. Received 3B
Steve Carrillo from Wichita for a player
to be named.
ROCKFORD RIVERHAWKS —
Signed LHP Andrew Armstrong, RHP
Cody Hallahan, C Greg Van Horn and
INF Trevor Whyte to contract exten-
sions and RHP Jon Gulbransen.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Suspended N.Y. Knicks F
Carmelo Anthony one game for con-
fronting Kevin Garnett after Monday’s
game.
MIAMI HEAT — Signed F Jarvis
Varnado to a 10-day contract.
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS —
Recalled G Nolan Smith and G Will
Barton from Idaho (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CAROLINA PANTHERS — Named
David Gettleman general manager.
CHICAGO BEARS — Signed TE
Brody Eldridge to a reserve/future con-
tract.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed
P T.J. Conley and CB Greg McCoy to
reserve/future contracts.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS —
Named Tom Telesco general man-
ager.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Placed
DE Chris Clemons and PK Steven
Haushka on injured reserve. Signed
DE Patrick Chukwurah and PK Ryan
Longwell.
Canadian Football League
MONTREAL ALOUETTES —
Signed PK William Dion to a 3-year
contract.
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS
— Agreed to terms with F Jack Combs
and F Chad Costello on contracts
through the remainder of the season.
CONNECTICUT WHALE —
Signed F Shayne Wiebe.
HERSHEY BEARS — Loaned F
Alex Berry and F Matt Pope to Reading
(ECHL).
PROVIDENCE BRUINS —
Recalled F Justin Courtnall from South
Carolina (ECHL). Signed F Tyler
McNeely and D Eric Baier to profes-
sional tryout agreements.
TORONTO MARLIES — Signed D
Corey Syvret to a professional tryout
agreement.
WORCESTER SHARKS — Signed
F Pat Rissmiller and D Michael Wilson
to professional tryout agreements.
TRANSACTIONS
By James J. Hoorman,
Assistant professor
OSU-Extension,
Putnam County
The Putnam OSU
Extension office will host
the 2013 Agronomy program
from 6:30-9:30 p.m. on Jan.
24 at the Kalida Knights of
Columbus Hall. A sandwich
and drinks provided.
The Agronomy Day pro-
gram will provide a wide
variety of topics presented
by Extension specialists
and local agencies. The
program will begin with
introductions and continue
with Putnam Soil and Water
District updates from Albert
Maag,
After the updates, the
program will focus on agri-
cultural topics of interest
based on the 2012 growing
season. The program will
start with a presentation
on “Producing Corn After
a Drought” by Emerson
Nafsiger, University of
Illinois Extension Specialist
Crop Production. Emerson
grew up in the Pettisville
area and has served as
Extension grain specialist in
Illinois since 1982.
Anne Dorrance, Ohio
State Extension Specialist
Soybean Pathology, will
present on “Soybean
Disease Update.” She will
look at northwest Ohio soy-
bean diseases and pathogens
and other factors affect-
ing the health of a soybean
plant. After a light meal,
Harold Watters, Ohio
State University Extension
Agronomy Field Specialist,
will provide a presentation
on “Dealing with Tough
Weeds.” Harold will review
some new, reformulated,
and renamed products, as
well as, some changes in the
status of certain labels for
dealing with tough weeds,
especially marestail and rag-
weed. Jim Hoorman, Putnam
County AGNR Extension
Educator will finish with a
short session on “Lake Erie
and Soluble Phosphorus – 4
Rs”.
In addition, area agricul-
tural businesses sponsoring
the program will be setting
up displays to share informa-
tion about their products and
programs. If you have any
additional questions about
the Free Agronomy Night
Program contact the Putnam
County Extension Office.
Pesticide re-certification
credits are available and a
fee of $15 will be charged
for those credits.
The Putnam County
Extension office is host-
ing a winter meeting series
on “Using Cover Crops to
Improve Soil Health” with
Jim Hoorman as the major
speaker. The program will be
on Feb. 11, 20, 23 from 7-9
p.m. at the OSU Extension
office located at 1206 East
Second Street by the fair-
grounds.
On Feb. 11, topics
will include information
on “Ecological Farming
Practices” and how cover
crops may reduce nutrient
loses and increase nutrient
efficiency. A session on
“Soil Ecology and Nutrient
Recycling” will focus on
the role of soil microbes in
supplying nutrients to crops.
“Using Cover Crops to
Adapt to Extreme Weather”
will look at the role of cover
crops, soil organic matter and
crop residue in improving
crop yields during adverse
weather events.
On Feb. 20, topics will
include “Biology of Soil
Compaction” and the
role cover crop roots and
microbes perform in improv-
ing soil structure. “Cover
Crop Economics” will look
at the yield advantages/ dis-
advantages of cover crops
and its impact on farm profit.
The Midwest Cover Crops
Council website will be high-
lighted along with the new
“Ohio Cover Crop Selector
Tool”.
On Feb. 25, the manage-
ment and selection of cover
crops will be discussed.
The first session will focus
on “Raising Homegrown
Nitrogen” by growing
legumes cover crops like
winter peas, crimson clover,
cowpeas, and sun hemp. A
session on “Using Grasses
and Brassicas in your Crop
Rotation” will discuss the
benefits of using cover crops
like cereal rye, oats, Sorghum
Sudan grass, buckwheat,
and oilseed radish on crop
production. An open discus-
sion will follow on “How
to Incorporate Cover Crops
into your Crop Rotation”.
Contact the Putnam
county Extension office
at 419-523-6294 or email
hoorman.1@osu.edu to pre-
register for the Soil Health
Series. The registration fee
for the Soil Health Series is
$10 per night or $20 for three
meetings. Soil Health regis-
tration includes a copy of the
Cover Crops Field Guide,
handouts, and refreshments.
21
www.delphosherald.com
Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Herald — 7
Agri-Business
Putnam OSU-Extension offers agronomy program
Oilseed radish, winter peas, cereal rye and other cover crops will be discussed in a win-
ter meeting series on “Using Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health” at the Putnam County
Extension Office on February 11, 20, 25. (Submitted photo)
*Price refects minimum6 month commitment, billed monthly, only at participating locations.
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SilverSneakers Club!
The Putnam County
annual Beef, Pork and Dairy
banquets have been set for
2013. Tickets for all three
banquets are available at the
Putnam County Extension
office in Ottawa or from any
member of the beef, pork or
dairy committees. All three
banquets will be held at the
Kalida Knights of Columbus
hall.
The Beef Banquet is set
for 6:30 p.m. Jan. 23. The
entertainment will be Country
Singer Matt Bowers.
The Pork Banquet is sched-
uled for Feb. 18. Dinner will
start the evening off at 6:30
p.m. Entertainment for the
banquet will be The Barber
Shop Quartet.
The Dairy Banquet is
set for 7:15 p.m. March
20. Entertainment for the
night will be a Will Rogers
show presented by Randall
Reeder.
Ticket are $10 each.
Putnam County Extension sets annual banquets
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 23 11 .676 —
Brooklyn 20 15 .571 3 1/2
Boston 18 17 .514 5 1/2
Philadelphia 15 22 .405 9 1/2
Toronto 13 22 .371 10 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 23 10 .697 —
Atlanta 20 14 .588 3 1/2
Orlando 12 23 .343 12
Charlotte 9 25 .265 14 1/2
Washington 5 28 .152 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 21 14 .600 —
Chicago 19 14 .576 1
Milwaukee 18 16 .529 2 1/2
Detroit 13 23 .361 8 1/2
Cleveland 9 28 .243 13
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 28 10 .737 —
Memphis 23 10 .697 2 1/2
Houston 21 15 .583 6
Dallas 13 23 .361 14
New Orleans 10 25 .286 16 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 8 .771 —
Denver 21 16 .568 7
Portland 19 15 .559 7 1/2
Utah 19 18 .514 9
Minnesota 16 16 .500 9 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 28 8 .778 —
Golden State 22 12 .647 5
L.A. Lakers 15 20 .429 12 1/2
Sacramento 13 22 .371 14 1/2
Phoenix 12 25 .324 16 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Results
Cleveland 99, Atlanta 83
Utah 112, Charlotte 102
Toronto 90, Philadelphia 72
Boston 87, Phoenix 79
Milwaukee 104, Chicago 96
New Orleans 88, Houston 79
Oklahoma City 106, Minnesota
84
San Antonio 108, L.A. Lakers
105
Denver 108, Orlando 105
Memphis 94, Golden State 87
L.A. Clippers 99, Dallas 93
Today’s Games
New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Miami at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8
p.m.
Chicago at New York, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10:30
p.m.
Oklahoma City at L A. Lakers, 10:30
p.m.
NBA GLANCE
The Associated Press
Includes games of Wednesday,
January 9, 2013
Offense
G Pts Avg
Houston 36 3816 106.0
Oklahoma City 35 3689 105.4
San Antonio 38 3988 104.9
L.A. Lakers 35 3612 103.2
New York 34 3478 102.3
Miami 33 3372 102.2
Denver 37 3779 102.1
L.A. Clippers 36 3666 101.8
Golden State 34 3432 100.9
Utah 37 3648 98.6
Dallas 36 3543 98.4
Portland 34 3308 97.3
Atlanta 34 3287 96.7
Toronto 35 3378 96.5
Milwaukee 34 3281 96.5
Sacramento 35 3377 96.5
Charlotte 34 3272 96.2
Brooklyn 35 3366 96.2
Phoenix 37 3550 95.9
Minnesota 32 3056 95.5
Boston 35 3331 95.2
Detroit 36 3421 95.0
Orlando 35 3317 94.8
Memphis 33 3127 94.8
Cleveland 37 3499 94.6
Chicago 33 3083 93.4
Philadelphia 37 3412 92.2
New Orleans 35 3208 91.7
Indiana 35 3193 91.2
Washington 33 2945 89.2
———
Defense
G Pts Avg
Memphis 33 2939 89.1
Indiana 35 3131 89.5
Chicago 33 3033 91.9
L.A. Clippers 36 3351 93.1
Brooklyn 35 3315 94.7
Atlanta 34 3249 95.6
Minnesota 32 3067 95.8
Boston 35 3367 96.2
Oklahoma City 35 3372 96.3
Detroit 36 3478 96.6
Philadelphia 37 3579 96.7
New Orleans 35 3388 96.8
San Antonio 38 3680 96.8
New York 34 3305 97.2
Milwaukee 34 3306 97.2
Washington 33 3209 97.2
Miami 33 3212 97.3
Orlando 35 3426 97.9
Toronto 35 3455 98.7
Utah 37 3658 98.9
Golden State 34 3364 98.9
Portland 34 3374 99.2
Denver 37 3681 99.5
Cleveland 37 3694 99.8
Phoenix 37 3709 100.2
L.A. Lakers 35 3560 101.7
Sacramento 35 3572 102.1
Dallas 36 3708 103.0
Houston 36 3716 103.2
Charlotte 34 3536 104.0
NBA TEAM STATS
The Ohio State Buckeyes shocked many in 2002, as they
went 14-0 and won the national championship for the first time
since 1968.
By RONALD BLUM
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — No one
was elected to the Hall of
Fame this year. When vot-
ers closed the doors to Barry
Bonds, Roger Clemens and
Sammy Sosa, they also shut
out everybody else.
For only the second time in
four decades, baseball writers
failed to give any player the
75 percent required for induc-
tion to Cooperstown, sending
a powerful signal that stars of
the Steroids Era will be held to
a different standard.
All the awards and accom-
plishments collected over long
careers by Bonds, Clemens
and Sosa could not offset sus-
picions those feats were boost-
ed by performance-enhancing
drugs.
Voters also denied entry
Wednesday to fellow newcom-
ers Craig Biggio, Mike Piazza
and Curt Schilling, along with
holdovers Jack Morris, Jeff
Bagwell and Lee Smith.
Among the most honored
players of their generation,
these standouts won’t find
their images among the 300
bronze plaques on the oak
walls in Cooperstown, where
— at least for now — the
doors appear to be bolted shut
on anyone tainted by PEDs.
“After what has been writ-
ten and said over the last few
years I’m not overly surprised,”
Clemens wrote in a statement
he posted on Twitter.
Bonds, Clemens and Sosa
retired after the 2007 season.
They were eligible for the Hall
for the first time and have up
to 14 more years on the writ-
ers’ ballot.
“Curt Schilling made a good
point; everyone was guilty.
Either you used PEDs, or you did
nothing to stop their use,” Hall-
of-Famer Mike Schmidt wrote
in an e-mail to The Associated
Press after this year’s vote was
announced. “This generation
got rich. Seems there was a
price to pay.”
Biggio, 20th on the career
list with 3,060 hits, appeared
on 68.2 percent of the 569
ballots, the highest total but 39
votes shy. The three newcom-
ers with the highest profiles
failed to come close to even
majority support, with Clemens
at 37.6 percent, Bonds at 36.2
and Sosa at 12.5.
Other top vote-getters were
Morris (67.7), Jeff Bagwell
(59.6), Piazza (57.8), Tim
Raines (52.2), Lee Smith
(47.8) and Schilling (38.8).
“I’m kind
of glad that
nobody got in
this year,” Hall-
of-Famer Al
Kaline said. “I
feel honored to
be in the Hall
of Fame. And
I would’ve felt
a little uneasy
sitting up there
on the stage,
listening to
some of these new guys talk
about how great they were. ...
I don’t know how great some
of these players up for election
would’ve been without drugs.
But to me, it’s cheating.”
At ceremonies in
Cooperstown on July 28, the
only inductees will be three
men who died more than 70
years ago: Yankees’ owner
Jacob Ruppert, umpire Hank
O’Day and barehanded catch-
er Deacon White. They were
chosen last month by the
16-member panel considering
individuals from the era before
integration in 1947.
“It is a dark day,” said Jose
Canseco, the former AL MVP
who was among the first play-
ers to admit using steroids.
“I think the players should
organize some type of lawsuit
against major league baseball
or the writers. It’s ridiculous.
Most of these players really
have no evidence against them.
They’ve never tested positive
or they’ve cleared themselves
like Roger Clemens.”
It was the eighth time the
BBWAA failed to elect any
players. There were four fewer
votes than last year and five
members submitted blank bal-
lots.
There have been calls for
the voting to be taken away
from the writers and be given
to a more diverse electorate
that would include players and
broadcasters. The Hall says
it is content with the process,
which began in 1936.
“It takes time for history
to sort itself out and I’m not
surprised we had a shutout
today,” Hall President Jeff
Idelson said. “I wish we had an
electee. I will say that but I’m
not surprised given how vola-
tile this era has
been in terms
of assessing the
qualities and the
quantities of the
statistics and
the impact on
the game these
players have
had.”
B o n d s ,
baseball’s only
7-time Most
Valuable Player,
hit 762 home runs, including a
record 73 in 2001. He was
indicted on charges he lied
to a grand jury in 2003 when
he denied using PEDs but a
jury two years ago failed to
reach a verdict on three counts
he made false statements and
convicted him on one obstruc-
tion of justice count, finding he
gave an evasive answer.
Clemens, the only 7-time
Cy Young Award winner,
is third in career strikeouts
(4,672) and ninth in wins
(354). He was acquitted last
year on one count of obstruc-
tion of Congress, three counts
of making false statements to
Congress and two counts of
perjury, all stemming from his
denials of drug use.
Sosa, eighth with 609 home
runs, was among those who
tested positive in MLB’s 2003
anonymous survey, The New
York Times reported in 2009.
He told a congressional com-
mittee in 2005 that he never
took illegal performance-
enhancing drugs.
Since 1961, the only years
the writers didn’t elect a can-
didate had been when Yogi
Berra topped the 1971 vote
by appearing on 67 percent of
the ballots cast and when Phil
Niekro headed the 1996 ballot
at 68 percent — both got in
the following years. The other
BBWAA elections without a
winner were in 1945, 1946,
1950, 1958 and 1960.
Morris will make his final
ballot appearance next year,
when fellow pitchers Greg
Maddux and Tom Glavine are
eligible for the first time along
with slugger Frank Thomas.
The BBWAA election rules
say “voting shall be based upon
the player’s record, playing
ability, integrity, sportsman-
ship, character, and contribu-
tions to the team(s) on which
the player played.”
An Associated Press sur-
vey of 112 eligible voters
conducted in late November
after the ballot was announced
indicated Bonds, Clemens and
Sosa would fall well short of
50 percent. The big three drew
even less support than that as
the debate raged over who was
Hall worthy.
Voters are writers who have
been members of the BBWAA
for 10 consecutive years at any
point.
BBWAA president Susan
Slusser of the San Francisco
Chronicle said she didn’t vote
for Bonds, Clemens or Sosa.
Mark McGwire, 10th on
the career home run list with
583, received 16.9 percent on
his seventh try, down from
19.5 last year. He got 23.7 per-
cent in 2010 — a vote before
he admitted using steroids and
human growth hormone.
Rafael Palmeiro, among
just four players with 500
homers and 3,000 hits along
with Hank Aaron, Willie Mays
and Eddie Murray, received
8.8 percent in his third try,
down from 12.6 percent last
year. Palmeiro received a
10-day suspension in 2005 for
a positive test for performance-
enhancing drugs, claiming it
was due to a vitamin vial given
to him by teammate Miguel
Tejada.
NOTES: There were four write-in
votes for career hits leader Pete Rose,
who never appeared on the ballot
because of his lifetime ban that fol-
lowed an investigation of his gambling
while manager of the Cincinnati Reds.
... Two-time NL MVP Dale Murphy
received 18.6 percent in his 15th and
final appearance. ... At the July 28 cer-
emonies, the Hall also will honor Lou
Gehrig and Rogers Hornsby among a
dozen players who never received for-
mal inductions because of restrictions
during World War II. ... Piazza has a
book due out next month that could
change the view of voters before the
next election.
Steroids fallout: No BB
Hall for Bonds, Clemens
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HERALD DELPHOS
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AMISH
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419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
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PUBLIC AUCtIon
Thursday, January 17th – 3:00 p.m.
Van Wert Co. Fairgrounds – US Rt. 127 South
– Van Wert, Ohio
Visit our Website at www.BeeGeeRealty.com to view the
Auction Calendar and see more information/
photos of this auction and all upcoming auctions.
1999 CADILLAC - COLLECTIBLES - 2000 DODGE VAN
www.BeeGeeRealty.com • 419-238-5555
BEE GEE REALTY & AUCTION CO., LTD
122 N Washington St., Van Wert, OH 45891
Auctioneers: Bob Gamble, CAI, Broker, Dale Butler, Broker,
Ron Medaugh, Broker, Andrew Schwieterman & Max Prichard
Apprentice Auctioneer: Robert Priest
Member of Ohio & National Auctioneers Associations.
Seller: Winifred Ruhlin and
Robert Ruhlin Estate;
Charmel Farmer, POA;
Todd Farmer, Executor;
Charles Koch, Attorney
AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: DON’T MISS THIS AUCTION! Lots
of Quality items from a prominent Van Wert Family
COLLECTIBLES & ANTIQUES: Many pieces of
costume jewelry including Van Dell Sterling necklace and items by
Monet, Alt, Joan’s, Kramer of N.Y., Trifari, Hollycraft and others; 1962
Barbie doll case, doll and accessories; set of Sterling Silver Silverware
(processional pattern); ladies’ watches including Hamilton, Croton,
Citizens and Seiko; Stratton compact from England; 7 pc. silver on
copper tea set with tea and coffee pots, creamer & sugar, hot water
kettle and stand and large tray; 3 light candelabras that are silver on
copper (consigned); men’s jewelry including Masonic pins, Hamilton
& Seneca watches and a 1917 Masonic coin; Ronson cigarette
case/lighter combo; pocket knives; Mikado Occ. Japan hand warmer
(original box); locomotive cigarette lighter; Everett spinet piano; many
sets of bookends including alabaster Dice and Eskimos; pewter set by
Metawa/Holland; small contemporary desk; Art Deco electric clock;
Herschede mantel clock; pottery; baskets; hat boxes; ladies scarves,
hankies and gloves; mink coat; foor and table lamps; many older
books; large Raggedy Ann doll; child’s rocker; oak dining table; linens
& bedding; sets of china; depression glass; glassware and decorator
items; artwork including New York paintings by John Haymson; and
much more….
HOUSEHOLD & RELATED: Upholstered sofa & loveseat;
5 pc. king size bedroom suite (very nice); 11 pc. full size bedroom
suite (unusual & very nice); curio cabinet; end tables & coffee tables;
lots of kitchen cookware, bake ware and small appliances; oak desk
with bookcase topper; other nice book cases; jewelry boxes; jewelry
cabinet; Swiss music box; bedding & linens; lots and lots of items not
mentioned.
1999 CADILLAC DEVILLE: Very sharp Deville – gray paint
and gray leather interior – power everything – looks great and only has
75,000 miles on odometer.
2000 DODGE MINIVAN: Family transportation at its best. A
good minivan with about 147,000 miles on the odometer.
GARAGE/LAWN & GARDEN: Small amount of yard tools
and hand tools and tool related items.
Terms: Cash or check with proper ID.
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
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tive. Call 419-695-0015
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125 Lost and Found
LOST: 2 CATS, MISSING
FOR MONTHS. White fe-
male (lost May 2012) &
Male tiger (lost Oct. 2012)
from E. Suthoff St. They
got out and never came
back. Neither are used to
being outside. We have
been earnestly looking for
them and would appreci-
ate any i nformati on.
Please call 419-692-1512
305
Apartment For
Rent
2BR APT. 128 N. Jeffer-
son. $375/mo plus deposit
No p e t s . Ca l l
419-642-6535
305
Apartment For
Rent
ONE BEDROOM APT.,
537 W. Third, Delphos.
$325 plus deposit. No
Pets. Call 419-204-5924,
419-692-2184
320 House For Rent
DELPHOS 2-3 Bedroom
house for rent with ga -
rage. $450/month. Ph.
4 1 9 - 6 9 2 - 6 7 4 1 o r
419-692-1890.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951
2 BR, 2 BA in the country,
2 wi th car garage.
$620/mo. first, last + de-
posit. 4505 Redd Rd.
419-230-0906
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951
577 Miscellaneous
FREE PHONE, No Activa-
ti on fee, No Credi t
Checks, No Hassles, No
Contract Phone, $45 Best
Value Unlimited Talk, Text
and Mobile Web.
Van Wert Wireless the
Alltel Store, 1198 West-
wood Drive, Suite B, Van
Wert, Ohio 419-238-3101
583
Pets and
Supplies
FREE KITTEN, long black
haired. 419-605-8023
FREE: POTBELLIED Pig
Call 419-741-2178
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist in
the investigation of these
businesses. (This notice
provided as a customer
service by The Delphos
Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
805 Auto
1995 JEEP Wrangler, soft
t op, 4x4, 4-cyl i nder
5-speed. Runs & looks
good. $2950. Cal l
419-439-5557
810
Auto Parts and
Accessories
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
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DANCER LOGISTICS, Inc
in Delphos is in need of a
full-time Diesel Mechanic.
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son 10am-3pm Monday
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I/T PROGRAMMER is
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Delphos, OH 45833
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Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Tall tale
5 Didn’t spoil
9 UPS vehicle
12 Fencing sword
13 Scintilla
14 Lilly of pharmaceuticals
15 PC screens
16 Fascinating
18 Bays and chestnuts
20 Overjoy
21 Black, in Monte Carlo
22 Dogma
23 -- on (incited)
26 Movie lioness
30 Like crudites
33 Fishtail
34 Get dizzy
35 “The X-Files” topic
37 OPEC rep, maybe
39 Numskull
40 La -- Tar Pits
41 Bit parts
43 Make the most of
45 Harness part
48 Cyclist -- Armstrong
51 Binaural
53 Minimize (2 wds.)
56 Basted together
57 Garnet or ruby
58 Jai --
59 Not for
60 Bunyan’s tool
61 Right after
62 “Wild” place
DOWN
1 Ugh!
2 Barbecuer’s garb
3 Nostalgic look
4 Tabloids “monster”
5 Novak and Basinger
6 Job-ad letters
7 Qt. parts
8 Makes gentle
9 Actress -- Miles
10 Perched
11 Delightful
17 Fudd of cartoons
19 Joule fractions
22 Best possible
24 Stare balefully
25 Lira replacer
27 August kid, maybe
28 Continent divider
29 Sitcom alien
30 Polish
31 Kenya’s loc.
32 Heartache
36 Pert
38 Ernie’s buddy
42 Teeter-totter
44 Family car
46 Castle who danced
47 Some salamanders
48 Links org.
49 Mr. Trebek
50 Moniker
51 Grumpy mood
52 I’m working -- --!
54 Bullring cheer
55 Honeycomb material
Answer to
Puzzle
Ask Mr. Know-it-all
Double murder still haunts Chicagoland
By Gary Clothier
Q: While growing up in
Chicago in the 1950s, I recall
a murder of two sisters who
had attended a movie together.
I think their last name was
Grimes. Whatever happened to
the case? -- B.B., Peoria, Ill.
A: Some historians say there
is no greater unsolved mystery
in the history of the Chicago area
than that of the Grimes sisters.
On Dec. 28, 1956, Patricia, 13,
and Barbara Grimes, 15, were
going to the Brighton Theater,
only a mile away. The girls
were recognized at the theater,
and there were even reports of
them being seen by classmates
and others a few days later. They
were found dead on Jan. 22,
1957. This crime is the subject
of Tamara Shaffer’s 2006 book,
“ M u r d e r
Gone Cold.”
Did you
know? ...
As a child,
A n g e l i n a
Jolie wanted
to grow up to
be a funeral
director.
Q: My
wife and I
recently saw
a film titled “The Rise and Fall
of Legs Diamond,” starring
Lana Turner and Ray Danton.
My wife thought Danton was a
super stud. Who is he? -- D.S.,
Torrance, Calif.
A: Ray Danton (1931-1992)
was a radio, film, stage and
television actor, as well as a
director and producer. Critics
say his most famous role
occurred in the 1960 film you
mentioned in which he played
the title role. He is described as
a handsome and smooth-natured
leading man. Born in New York
City and trained as an actor at
Carnegie Tech, Danton appeared
in more than 100 TV shows and
films. He died in Los Angeles,
Calif., of kidney disease.
Q: One of my claims to fame
is that I share the same birth
date as singer-songwriter Stevie
Wonder -- May 13, 1950. Several
years ago, I was reading a blurb
about this
i n c r e d i b l y
t a l e n t e d
p e r s o n ,
and the
bi ogr apher
called him a
“polymathe-
me t i c i a n. ”
When did he
learn math?
-- C.M.,
C h a r l o t t e
County, Va.
A: I have been scratching
my head for a bit over this
question. I think maybe you got
something confused. He may
have very well been called a
“polymath,” meaning learned or
knowing. A polymath is a person
whose expertise encompasses a
large number of different subject
areas. A more common term is
Renaissance man. Look up the
word “polyhistor” while you’re
at it as well.
Q: If you cross the street at
any place other than a designated
intersection or crosswalk, you
are said to be “jaywalking.”
Why is it called that? -- P.B., San
Francisco, Calif.
A: According to the
dictionary, “jay” is slang for a
person lacking experience (as
in city ways); that person also
might be called unsophisticated,
countrified or gullible. In the
early 1900s, when people
from the country visited the
big city, they may have paid
more attention to the towering
buildings than to street traffic.
Not realizing the dangers of
crossing in the middle of the
street and the hazard they
created, locals dubbed them
“jaywalkers.”
Q: Was actor Robert Blake
ever in the “Our Gang” series?
He is said to have played the role
of Spanky McFarland. -- V.C.,
San Dimas, Calif.
A: Child actor Robert Blake,
then known by his real name
Mickey Gubitosi, appeared as
the character Mickey in about
40 of the “Our Gang” shorts
between 1939 and 1944. In
1942, he acquired the stage
name Bobby Blake, and his
character in the series was
renamed Mickey Blake.
The role of Spanky was
played by George Robert
Phillips McFarland. McFarland
was born in 1928 and died in
1993 of cardiac arrest. Blake
was born in 1933.
Q: What is the history of
French crepes? I am especially
interested in crepes suzette.
-- P.A., Rancho Palos Verdes,
Calif.
A: A crepe is a type of very
thin pancake. The word crepe
comes from Latin “crispa,”
meaning “curled.” Crepes
originated in Brittany, in the
northwest corner of France.
They are made by pouring a thin
batter made with flour, eggs,
milk and butter onto a hot frying
pan or flat, circular hot plate.
Fillings might include cheese,
ham, eggs, asparagus, spinach
and other meats and vegetables.
Crepes suzette is a dessert
made with an orange- butter
sauce and liqueur (usually Grand
Marnier), which is lit before
serving. According to some, the
dish was made in 1895 for the
Prince of Wales (the future King
Edward VII) and named after his
lady friend.
Q: Why is the guardian of
the United States called Uncle
Sam? -- J.G., Naples, Fla.
A: The reference dates to the
War of 1812 and a government
meat inspector in Troy, N.Y.,
named Samuel Wilson (1766-
1854), commonly known as
Uncle Sam. After inspection,
provisions usually were marked
“U.S.” for United States, but
workers for Wilson joked that
the “U.S.” stood for “Uncle
Sam.” The joke caught on,
and before long the United
States and Uncle Sam became
synonymous.

(Send your questions to Mr.
Know-It-All at AskMrKIA@
gmail.com or c/o Universal
Uclick, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City, MO 64106.)
Stevie Wonder
Angelina Jolie
Place A Help
Wanted Ad
In the Classifieds
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Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Hubby doesn’t
see emotional
affair as cheating
Dear Annie: Two years
ago, I caught my husband
having an emotional affair
with a friend of ours. Even
though we went through
counseling and he told me
he was no longer in contact
with her, he lied. He contin-
ued to lie for almost a year,
even during our counseling
sessions. In one session, he
tried to blame me for his ac-
tions, and after six months,
he still refused to take any
responsibility for
the affair.
This whole
thing has made
me not trust him.
I recently saw an
email to an ex-
girlfriend from
high school. He
said he wished he
had been a better
person, and that
he would be look-
ing for a woman
like her.
He says they were just
reminiscing about the past.
I believe he is up to his old
ways. I know he wouldn’t
like it if the tables were
turned. Am I wrong to be
upset and ready to divorce
him? — Disappointed and
Heartbroken
Dear Disappointed: You
aren’t wrong to be upset,
but whether or not to di-
vorce him is a more diffcult
choice. Men often don’t real-
ize how hurtful an emotional
affair can be. They don’t
understand that it is still a
betrayal, and consequently,
they don’t always do the nec-
essary work to heal the mar-
riage from what they justify
as a harmless firtation.
Right now, your hus-
band cannot be trusted to be
faithful or honest. He won’t
change unless he recognizes
and admits that his behavior
is wrong. Please go back to
your counselor on your own
and discuss what you can
live with, whether you be-
lieve your husband will grow
up anytime soon, and what
the best course of action is
for you.
Dear Annie: I am part of
a family business, and I work
from an offce in my home.
I get dressed for work every
day, the same as those who
work outside the home. I am
as important to our company
as everyone else. If I’m not in
my offce, I miss phone calls
from customers, vendors and
employees who have to wait
for me to get back to take
care of their needs.
I have siblings and an
elderly mother who all live
nearby. Because they think
I “don’t work,” I am the one
called upon to take Mom to
doctor appointments and run
errands for her. In addition,
I am asked by family and
friends to care for children
who are home sick or cannot
get to their regular child care
provider.
Taking time from my job
puts me behind, and I often
have to work evenings and
weekends to catch up. These
days, more and more people
are working from home.
Please tell others to be re-
spectful. — Work-at-Home
USA
Dear Work: Working
from home often gives oth-
ers the impression that you
don’t actually work or that
your time isn’t that
important. And
while it may give
you more fexibil-
ity with your hours,
it is still the same
number of hours,
which would re-
quire working eve-
nings and week-
ends to make up
time spent doing
other things during
the day.
It would help
for you to set boundaries. If
you can manage to do these
favors without resentment, go
right ahead. But if you don’t
want to babysit little John-
ny, say, “So sorry, but I’m
working and can’t take care
of him. You’ll have to make
other arrangements.” If you
say it enough times, they will
get it.
Dear Annie: This is in re-
sponse to “Never the Better
Offer,” whose mother skips
family gatherings because
she would rather stay home
by the phone waiting for a
better offer from a potential
date.
If Mom does not have a
cellphone, they should give
her one as a gift and pay for
a year’s service. Then Mom
will no longer have an excuse
for missing out with family
and friends, because she will
still get her calls and can eas-
ily arrange for a short-notice
date. — Mollie
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 2013
From time to time in the year
ahead, you are likely to be privy to
some valuable information that won’t
be available to just anybody. If you’re
smart, you’ll figure out how to use it
to your advantage.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- A situation in which you’re
involved has been inhibiting your
performance, though it was initially
intended otherwise. Changes ahead
will give you greater authority to
remedy this.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- A secret ambition you’ve been
harboring for some time can be
openly, if carefully, acted upon. It’ll
still pay to be very selective regarding
persons to whom you make your
revelations.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
You are entering a cycle that bodes
well for the establishment of new
friendships. One particularly strong
one might be with a person who was
born in a distant land.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Both circumstances and chance could
serve to awaken some fresh ambitions
in you, as long as you can adapt
quickly to unexpected circumstances.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Your mind is open to fresh thinking
and ideas, making this a better than
average day to deal with unusual
situations or unfamiliar ideas. Check
out new people, places or things.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Be alert to the possibility of acquiring
new income channels. It may require
some innovative thinking as well as
some optimism, but you can make it
happen.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Improved conditions are indicated
in a valued relationship that has been
experiencing some ups and downs
lately. Your counterpart is likely to be
the one bearing the olive branch.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A
project you inaugurate will have good
chances of acceptance by the powers
that be. However, once introduced,
progress could be slow, so a lot of
patience may be called for.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- A
more intense bonding could begin
to develop with a currently platonic
friend. Where it leads will be up to
you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Much to your relief, you’ll be able to
walk away from an arrangement that
has been causing a lot of frustration
lately. Fortunately, the dissolution
will be amicable.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Important plans you formulate
will have high chances of success,
provided you don’t wait too long to
implement them. Time is not on your
side.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Make a concerted effort to put
your financial affairs in better order. If
you take the time to systemize things
properly, you could make or save
yourself a lot of the green stuff.

COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
22
10 – The Herald Thursday, January 10, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The first wildlife featured on a U.S. postage
stamp was a buffalo, on a 1923 sepia-colored
30-cent stamp.
The oldest corporation in the Western
Hemisphere is Harvard University, which was
incorporated as Harvard College, aka the Harvard
Corporation in 1650.
Today’s questions:
To focus world attention on the threat of global
warming, in what unusual setting did the president
of the Republic of Maldives hold a cabinet meet-
ing?
Before hitting the big time, what entertainer
played the piano in a pretzel commercial featuring
Chubby Checker singing a jingle based on “The
Twist?”
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
German lesson:
I like it - Es gefälit mir - ess ge-felt meer
I don’t like it - Es gefälit mir nicht - ess ge-
felt meer nixht
That’s fine - Sdas ist gut - dass ist goot
Common verbs
I want - Ich will - ixh vill
I am - Ich bin - ixh bin
I have - Ich habe - ixh har-ber
Flu season has Boston declaring health emergency
BY BOB SALSBERG
The Associated Press
BOSTON — Boston declared a public health
emergency Wednesday as flu season struck in
earnest and the state reported 18 flu-related
deaths so far.
The city is working with health care centers
to offer free flu vaccines and hopes to set up
places where people can get vaccinated. The city
said there have been four flu-related deaths, all
elderly residents, since the unofficial start of the
flu season Oct. 1.
“The best thing you can do to protect your-
self and your family is to get the flu shot,” said
Boston Mayor Thomas Menino.
The city was experiencing its worst flu season
since at least 2009, Menino said, with about 700
confirmed cases of the flu, compared with 70 all
of last season.
Massachusetts was one of 29 states reporting
high levels of “influenza-like illness,” according
to the most recent weekly flu advisory issued by
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The CDC said the proportion of people visit-
ing health care providers with flu-like symptoms
climbed from 2.8 percent to 5.6 percent in four
weeks. By contrast, the rate peaked at only 2.2 per-
cent during the relatively mild 2011-12 flu season.
The estimated rate of flu-related hospitaliza-
tions in the U.S. was 8.1 per 100,000 people,
which is high for this time of year, according to
Dr. Joe Bresee, chief of the epidemiology and
prevention branch of the CDC’s influenza divi-
sion.
Barbara Ferrer, director of the Boston public
health commission, said the emergency was
declared in part to get residents’ attention. She
said that the 700 confirmed cases represent only
those reported to the city and that thousands of
other people may be ill.
Boston hospitals had counted about 1,500
emergency room visits since December by peo-
ple with flu-like symptoms. Menino said people
with symptoms shouldn’t go to work or school.
LaKeisha Davis, 23, was at the Whittier Street
Health Center on Wednesday for treatment of
unrelated pain when she heard about the flu
emergency being declared in Boston.
She took a flu vaccine on the spot, fearing that
if she got the flu her 4-year-old daughter might
catch it as well.
“I love her more than anything in the world
and I don’t want anything to happen to her,”
Davis said.
Frederica Williams, president of the com-
munity health center in the inner-city Roxbury
neighborhood, said her facility had opened a
special flu clinic and was using social media and
sending letters to residents urging them to come
in and get flu shots. Williams estimated that the
number of patients coming to the clinic with flu-
like symptoms was triple that of a year ago.
Hospitals around the state were also taking
precautions to protect patients and staff members
from exposure to the flu.
Baystate Health, which operates Baystate
Medical Center in Springfield and two other
hospitals in western Massachusetts, announced
it was changing its visitor policy. The hospitals
will no longer allow visitors younger than 14 and
are recommending no more than two people visit
a patient at once.
“This is the worst in several years,” said Dr.
Sarah Haessler, an infectious disease specialist at
Baystate. She said the flu outbreak has strained
the hospital’s resources and helped to fill its beds
to capacity.
City, state and federal officials have all identi-
fied a Type A influenza known as H3N2 as the
predominant strain reported so far this season.
The strain, historically associated with more
serious illnesses, is among those covered by the
current vaccine.
“No vaccine is 100 percent effective,” cautioned
Kevin Cranston, head of the state bureau of infec-
tious diseases. Some people, for example, might
be vaccinated but get the flu in the 10 days to two
weeks it takes for the immunity to take hold.
“There are any number of reasons why people
could have done all the right things and still get
the flu,” he said.
High flu rates were being reported all over
Massachusetts, Cranston said, and while he
didn’t have specifics on the 18 statewide deaths,
he noted that the flu is most dangerous for the
young, the elderly and people with other chronic
health conditions.
“I hate needles, and I got (a shot),” Gov.
Deval Patrick said Wednesday, adding that he
wasn’t aware of any shortages of vaccine in the
state. He also reminded residents to use common
sense, such as washing their hands and sneezing
into their sleeves.
The CDC said 18 children have died from
the flu so far this season. While the CDC doesn’t
keep a tab of deaths overall from the flu, it esti-
mates that 24,000 Americans die each year.
Facing backlash, AIG won’t join lawsuit against US
BY STEVE ROTHWELL
and CHRISTINA
REXRODE
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Afraid
of looking like a world-class
ingrate, AIG on Wednesday
decided against suing the fed-
eral government over the $182
billion bailout that saved the
giant insurance company from
collapse.
American International
Group Inc. was put in the awk-
ward position of having to con-
sider joining a lawsuit brought
against Uncle Sam by its for-
mer CEO, Maurice “Hank”
Greenberg.
The suit claims that the
terms of the taxpayer-funded
bailout were too onerous. The
government received a huge
stake in AIG when it bailed the
company out at the height of the
2008 financial crisis. AIG has
since paid all the money back
and notes that the government
made a profit of $22.7 billion.
The timing could hardly
have been worse for AIG.
The company is in the midst
of a “Thank You, America”
ad campaign to show its grati-
tude for being rescued from the
brink of collapse.
The prospect of the insurer
joining the lawsuit had already
triggered outrage. A congress-
man from Vermont issued a
statement telling AIG: “Don’t
even think about it.” Comedian
Andy Borowitz likened the
insurer to somebody suing a
fireman for ripping a designer
jacket after rescuing them from
a burning building.
AIG, which was legally
obligated to consider joining
the lawsuit, demurred. The
company said it would not join
Greenberg’s lawsuit and would
also not permit Greenberg to
pursue his claims in AIG’s
name.
“The majority of directors
decided that the reputational
damage was greater than the
possibility on a long-shot law-
suit,” said John Coffee, a pro-
fessor at Columbia Law School
who specializes in corporate
and securities law.
AIG’s CEO Bob Benmosche
told CNBC in a televised inter-
view that the company would
be better off in the long run
without the “headwinds” of the
lawsuit and should look for-
ward, rather than focusing on
the past.
“It’s not acceptable socially
for AIG to take the money and
go back and sue the govern-
ment,” Benmosche said in the
CNBC interview. “A deal is a
deal.”
The insurer nearly imploded
after making huge bets on mort-
gage investments that later went
wrong. Regulators were con-
cerned that if it were allowed to
fail it would send shock waves
through the financial system,
which was already reeling as
Lehman Brothers collapsed.
David Boies, an attorney
who represents Greenberg’s
company, Starr International,
said in a statement that AIG’s
attempt to prevent Starr from
pursuing its claim was against
the interest of the company’s
shareholders.
The company became a
symbol for excessive risk on
Wall Street and a touchstone of
public anger. It was criticized
by some members of Congress
for spending $440,000 on spa
treatments for executives only
days after it was bailed out and
for the millions of dollars in
bonuses it paid to executives.
Since the financial melt-
down, AIG has undergone a
restructuring that has halved
the size of the company, with
the twin aims of focusing on
its core insurance operations
and repaying the government’s
bailout cash.
The insurer spun off Asian
life insurer AIA Group in Hong
Kong’s biggest initial public
offering in 2010, raising $20
billion, which was used to pay
bailout debt. AIG also said last
month that it would sell 90 per-
cent of its airplane leasing unit,
International Lease Finance
Corp., to a Chinese investor
group for $5.3 billion.
Eli Lilly settles Mass.
pregnancy drug-cancer case
NYC crane collapses at
construction site; 7 hurt
BY ABDUL SATTAR and SEBASTIAN ABBOT
The Associated Press
QUETTA, Pakistan — A bomb targeting paramilitary sol-
diers killed 11 people in southwest Pakistan on today, while
five suspected militants died in a U.S. drone strike in the coun-
try’s northwest, officials said.
The drone strike was the seventh in two weeks, one of the
most intense series of attacks in the last two years, a period in
which political tensions between the U.S. and Pakistan led to a
reduced number of strikes compared to 2010, when they were
at their highest.
It’s unclear whether the current uptick has been caused
by particularly valuable intelligence obtained by the CIA, or
whether the warming of relations between the two countries
has made strikes less sensitive. Protests by the government and
Islamic hardliners have been noticeably muted.
The U.S. views drone attacks as a key weapon against
Taliban and al-Qaida militants out of its forces’ reach in
Pakistan’s tribal region. But the attacks are extremely unpopu-
lar in Pakistan, posing a problem for the Pakistani government,
which has played a double game in the past of denouncing the
strikes in public while supporting some of them in private.
Mom who shot intruder inspires gun control foes
Investigators looking into
high-speed ferry crash
BY DENISE LAVOIE
The Associated Press
BOSTON — Eli Lilly and Co. has settled a lawsuit brought by
four sisters who contended their breast cancer was caused by a drug
their mother took during pregnancy in the 1950s, a move some
believe could trigger financial settlements in scores of other claims
brought by women around the country.
A total of 51 women, including the Melnick sisters, filed law-
suits in Boston against more than a dozen companies that made or
marketed a synthetic estrogen known as DES.
The Melnick sisters’ case was the first to go to trial. The settle-
ment was announced Wednesday on the second day of testimony.
DES, or diethylstilbestrol, was prescribed to millions of pregnant
women over three decades to prevent miscarriages, premature births
and other problems. It was taken off the market in the early 1970s
after it was linked to a rare vaginal cancer in women whose mothers
used it. Studies later showed the drug didn’t prevent miscarriages.
Attorney Aaron Levine, representing the Melnick sisters, told
the jury during opening statements that Eli Lilly failed to test the
drug’s effect on fetuses before promoting it as a way to prevent
miscarriages.
Lawyer James Dillon, for Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly, told the
jury that there was no evidence the drug causes breast cancer in the
daughters of women who took it.
Dillon also said that no medical records show that the mother of
the Melnick sisters took DES or that, if she did take it, it was made
by Eli Lilly. Leading researchers at the time recommended that
DES be used for pregnant women who had consecutive miscar-
riages, he said.
DES was not patented and was made by many companies.
Boston attorney Andrew Meyer, who’s handled numerous
medical malpractice cases, said the settlement in this case could
signal settlements in other cases.
BY DEEPTI HAJELA
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — With the popping of cables and the snapping of
metal, a 200-foot crane collapsed onto a building under construction
near the East River waterfront Wednesday, injuring seven people,
three of whom needed to be extricated from underneath the fallen
machinery.
The red crane toppled around 2:30 p.m., sprawling across the
metal scaffolding and wood planking that made up the first floor
skeleton of a residential building in the New York City borough
of Queens behind a big neon “Pepsi Cola” sign, a local landmark.
Workers putting up the second floor framework scrambled to get out
of the way.
“Once that snap came, that was it,” said Russell Roberson, 32, of
Brooklyn. “I just heard guys yelling, ‘Run, run!”
The people who had to be extricated from underneath the crane
suffered a range of injuries, broken bones being the most severe,
Deputy Fire Chief Mark Ferran said. He said emergency services
personnel didn’t need heavy machinery to get them out. None of the
injuries was life-threatening.
Preston White, 48, a carpenter from the Bronx, was working his
first day at the site in the Long Island City neighborhood. He had
turned to speak to a friend when he heard a popping sound and turned
back around.
At that moment, “I saw the cable whipping toward the deck. ...
You could just hear it buckling,” White said.
The impact shook the scaffolding he was on.
The crane cut down the framework of the building “like a hot
knife in butter,” White said, because there was no concrete on it yet.
Roberson said the crane had been up since the weekend — and
went down really fast.
Bomb, drone attack kill 16 people in Pakistan
BY KATE BRUMBACK
The Associated Press
LOGANVILLE, Ga. —
A Georgia mother who shot
an intruder at her home has
become a small part of the
roaring gun control debate,
with some firearms enthusi-
asts touting her as a textbook
example of responsible gun
ownership.
Melinda Herman grabbed
a handgun and hid in a crawl
space with her two children
when a man broke in last
week and approached the
family at their home north-
east of Atlanta, police said.
Herman called her husband
on the phone, and with him
reminding her of the les-
sons she recently learned at
a shooting range, Herman
opened fire, seriously wound-
ing the burglary suspect.
The National Rifle
Association tweeted a link
to a news story about the
shooting, and support poured
in from others online, hailing
Herman as a hero. The local
sheriff said he was proud of
the way she handled the situ-
ation.
“This lady decided that
she wasn’t going to be a vic-
tim, and I think everyone else
looks at this and hopes they
have the courage to do what
she done,” Walton County
Sheriff Joe Chapman said
Wednesday.
Herman was working from
home Friday when she saw a
man walk up to the front
door. She told police he rang
the doorbell twice and then
over and over again. He went
back to his SUV, got some-
thing out and walked back
toward the house, a police
report said.
Herman took her 9-year-
old son and daughter into
an upstairs bedroom and
locked the door. They went
into the bathroom and she
locked that door, too. She got
her handgun from a safe, the
report said, and hid with her
children. At some point, she
called her husband, who kept
her on the line and called 911
on another line.
In a 10-minute 911 record-
ing released by the Walton
County Sheriff’s Office,
Donnie Herman calmly
explained what was happen-
ing to a dispatcher. His part
of the conversation with his
wife was also recorded.
“Is he in the house,
Melinda? Are you sure? How
do you know? You can hear
him in the house?” Donnie
Herman said.
His wife told him the
intruder was coming closer.
“He’s in the bedroom?
Shh, shh, relax. Just remember
everything that I showed you,
everything that I taught you,
all right?” Donnie Herman
told his wife, explaining later
to the dispatcher that he had
recently taken her to a gun
range.
It wasn’t clear from the
recording exactly when they
went to the range and Donnie
Herman told The Associated
Press on Wednesday the fam-
ily didn’t want to talk about
the shooting.
After Donnie Herman
told his wife police were on
the way, he started shouting:
“She shot him. She’s shoo-
tin’ him. She’s shootin’ him.
She’s shootin’ him. She’s
shootin’ him.”
“OK,” the dispatcher
responded.
“Shoot him again! Shoot
him!” Donnie Herman yelled.
He told the dispatcher he
heard a lot of screaming, but
he seems to get increasingly
worried when he doesn’t hear
anything from his wife.
Melinda Herman told
police she started shooting
the man when he opened the
door to the crawl space. The
man pleaded with her to stop,
but she kept firing until she
had emptied her rounds, she
told police. She then fled to
a neighbor’s house with her
children.
The man drove away in
his SUV. Police found the
SUV on another subdivision
street and discovered a man
bleeding from his face and
body in a nearby wooded
area. Police identified the
suspect as 32-year-old Paul
Slater of Atlanta.
Chapman said the hospital
asked him not to comment on
Slater’s condition, but he said
he is not certain Slater will
survive. Authorities have a
warrant but haven’t formally
arrested Slater yet. They plan
to charge him with burglary,
possession of tools for the
commission of a crime and
aggravated assault, Walton
County sheriff’s Capt. Greg
Hall said.
A phone number for Slater
was not listed and it was
not clear whether he has an
attorney.
Authorities believe Slater
targeted a home in anoth-
er local subdivision but left
when confronted by the hom-
eowner, Chapman said.
BY COLLEEN LONG and DAVID B. CARUSO
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — A high-speed commuter ferry that crashed
into a lower Manhattan dock, injuring dozens of people, had
recently undergone a major overhaul that gave it new engines and
a new propulsion system, and officials were looking into whether
they played any role in the morning rush hour accident.
The catamaran Seastreak Wall Street had slowed following a
routine trip across New York Bay and past the Statue of Liberty
Wednesday morning when the impact took place, hurling scores
of people to the deck or into the walls. Around 70 were hurt, 11
seriously.
The naval architecture firm that designed the reconfiguration,
Incat Crowther, said in an August news release that the ferry’s
water-jet propulsion system had been replaced with a new system
of propellers and rudders to save fuel costs and cut carbon dioxide
pollution in half. James Barker, the chairman of the ferry’s owner,
Seastreak LLC, said the overhaul made it “the greenest ferry in
America.”
The hull was reworked, and the boat was made 15 metric tons
lighter. At top speed, the ferry, built in 2003, travels at around 35
knots, or 40 mph.
Seastreak spokesman Bob Dorn, asked whether the work had
hurt the ferry’s maneuverability or caused pilots any problems,
said it would be up to the National Transportation Safety Board to
determine if the new equipment played any role.
Dee Wertz, who was on shore waiting for the ferry, saw the
impact. She said that just moments before the ferry hit, she had
been having a conversation with a ferry employee about how the
boat’s captains had been complaining lately about its maneuver-
ability.
“He was telling me that none of these guys like this boat,” she
said. “It was coming in a little wobbly. It hit the right side of the
boat on the dock hard, like a bomb.”
Supporters rally in show of support for Chavez
BY IAN JAMES and CHRISTOPHER TOOTHAKER
The Associated Press
CARACAS, Venezuela — Thousands of cheerful supporters of
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez rallied outside his presidential
palace today in an alternative inauguration for a leader too ill to
return home for the real thing.
Backers wearing T-shirts with the slogan “I am Chavez” waved
flags while upbeat music from Chavez’s last presidential campaign
blared from speakers, proclaiming: “Chavez, heart of the people!”
The government organized the unusual show of support for
the cancer-stricken leader on the streets outside Miraflores Palace
on what was supposed to be his inauguration day. A swearing-in
ceremony has been indefinitely postponed, despite opposition
complaints.
“We came to show support, so he knows his nation is with him,”
said Anny Marquez, a secretary and voluntary member of a civilian
militia that Chavez has built in recent years. “We’re with him in the
good times as well as the bad.”

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