INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013

University of Massachusetts Boston University College Instructional Design Graduate Program Instructor Information
Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA, CTS Email: insert email (Preferred) Phone (W): insert phone Phone (M): insert phone Office Hours: By Appointment Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email account. Please review the following website for a job aid that will assist you in forwarding your UMB email account to your personal account if you prefer: http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Account The best method of contact is via email. I am to respond to all emails within 48 hours of receipt. Please note that I do not check my email on the weekends, so if you send me something on Friday by email and don’t respond, I will most likely respond on Monday.

Course Information
Course Title: Introduction to Mobile Learning

Prerequisites: INSDSG 601 & 640 - or - permission of the instructor Prerequisite Skills: Course Description:

A basic understanding of course design and learner environments.

Mobile Learning (mLearning), learning assisted by mobile technology that allows learners to untether from physical locations and temporal boundaries, has been around since the introduction of personal portable devices. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of mLearning as they apply to adult learner learners.

Technical Requirements: Students ought to have access to a mobile device such as a cell phone, or a smartphone (iPhone, Android, Windows Phone, etc.), or a PDA, or a portable media player (iPod, Zune), or a tablet, or other mobile device would be helpful in order to understand the contexts of learning with such devices.

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Required Text(s):     Quinn, C. N. (2010). Designing mLearning: Tapping into the Mobile Revolution for Organizational Performance. Pfeiffer. ISBN: 0470604484 Guy, R. (2010) Mobile Learning: Pilot Project and Initiatives. Informing Science Press. ISBN: 1932886311. [Get it for Free on Google Books] Ally, M. (2009) Mobile Learning: Transforming the Delivery of Education and Training. Athabasca University Press. [Get it for Free on AU Press website] Journal Articles as Assigned.

Other Reading:

Journal Articles as Assigned http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Recommended Texts Publication Manual of APA. Sixth Edition. Course Objectives:

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to: 1. Identify instances where learning can be enhanced by various types of mobile devices. 2. Identify and utilize appropriate mobile devices and activities for learning. 3. Demonstrate an understanding the pedagogical nuances and opportunities of mobile devices. 4. Design learning activities for mLearning.

Core Competencies: The objectives for this course focus on the following (IBSTPI) core competencies: 1. Professional Foundations a) Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form (Essential). b) Apply current research and theory to the practice of Instructional Design (Advanced). c) Update and Improve One’s Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes Pertaining to Instructional Design and Related Fields. (Essential). d) Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects. e) Identify and Resolve Ethical and Legal Implications of Design in the Work place. 2. Planning & Analysis a) Conducts a needs assessment. b) Design a Curriculum or Program. c) Select and Use a Variety of Techniques for Determining Instructional Content. d) Identify and Describe Target Population Characteristics. e) Analyze the Characteristics of the Environment. f) Analyze the Characteristics of Existing and Emerging Technologies and their Use in an Instructional Environment. Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 2

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
g) Reflect Upon the Elements of a Situation before Finalizing Design Solutions and Strategies. 3. Design & Development a) Select, modify or create a design and development model appropriate for a given project. b) Select and Use a Variety of Techniques to Define and Sequence the Instructional Content and Strategies. c) Select or Modify Existing Instructional Materials. d) Design Instruction that Reflects an Understanding of the Diversity of Learners and Groups of Learners. Required Assignments: Participation This is a seminar course, implying active engagement in discussions and other class activities. Participation includes completing pre-class readings, online exercises, and participating substantively in both in-person activities and in online discussions. You should expect to participate in one or more online discussions focused on applying concepts derived from the weekly topic. The agenda for each class session will clearly identify required activities for a given week. An example of participation in the face-to-face component of the course are listening to your fellow classmates present and ask questions and engage in dialogue with the goal of furthering everyone’s understanding of the concepts discussed. Participating in weekly discussion on the class discussion board includes both responding to the posed discussion questions in a substantive way and commenting on the responses of other participants. Again, this participation is not graded, but is required to receive credit for being “in class” that week. Each week you will need to make one original post, and respond to at least two of your classmates’ postings. Peer Development & Networking No one person is an island. One of the great resources we have available to us is our program’s online social network (http://www.umassid.com). This is a great resource to post interesting things you discover on topics of instructional design, and in particular mLearning. It’s also a place to help out your fellow instructional designer by answering questions from a field that you are a subject matter expert, in in Vygotskian terms a More Knowledgeable Other. Just like participation, this assignment is not graded but is required to receive credit for being “in class” that week. Every two weeks you will need to make one original post on an original topic you’ve found on mLearning, and respond to at least two postings on umassid.com. An original posting is one that has not been posted before on umassid.com. In professional communities and other communities of practice, asking questions, or posting information, that has been posted before invites the discontentment of the community and lights you in a bad light. White Papers on mLearning Technology (Individual) During this Fall coures you will undertake three (3) mLearning technology white papers. The white papers will be based on your own personal explorations of mLearning technology that you will undertake this semester. White papers will be 4-5 pages, typed, doubleUpdated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 3

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font and will aim to educate your readers and help them make decisions about how to best use the technology that you are exploring in your White Paper. The grading rubric for this assignment, as well as the due dates, are available on our Blackboard site.

mLearning Site Surveys (Individual) mLearning allows learning to take place regardless of the location and the time context. During the semester you will be required to attend three different sites, observe the environment, the learners, and the interactions, and write three (3) site surveys; one for each site. The site surveys will be brief descriptions of the mLearning opportunity (i.e a needs analysis), who is this mLearning geared toward (i.e. a learner analysis) and in what environment does the learning take place and what are the affordances and hindrances of this environment (i.e. a learning context analysis). These site surveys will be 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font and will aim to educate your readers and help them make decisions about how to best use the technology that you are exploring in your White Paper. The grading rubric for this assignment, as well as the due dates, are available on our Blackboard site. Final Paper & Presentation (Group Project) This final presentation will take place on the final day of class. This final week is all about putting it all together. This is a group project that you will be working on with your team throughout the semester. In this plan you will expand on the information and the analysis from the site surveys, that each of your team-members completed, based on the feedback you have received from your peers and me (this will most likely require you to go back and revisit the site to obtain more information). You will identify all relevant information from the ISD process: Needs analysis, learner analysis, learning context, environmental analysis, learning materials (i.e. what type of mLearning solutions), your instructional strategy, and so on. Your final deliverable will be a document that contains an instructional proposal, which details all of the information you’ve found, your proposed learning intervention, what technologies you will use, and why, and the proposed cost (if you can estimate a cost). This deliverable is due to the instructor via as a hard copy on the day of your presentation. In addition to this deliverable you will have 30 minutes to present highlights of this deliverable to your classmates. If you wish to also submit an electronic copy of your presentation and your paper, I can annotate them with comments and distribute it back to each member of your team at the end of the semester.

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Course Rubric: Assignment/Deliverable 1. Participation and Attendance (on-campus) 2. Discussions Online 3. Peer Development & Networking 4. mLearning Technology White Papers 5. mLearning Site Surveys 6. Final Presentation & Paper (group) Relevant Course Objective 1a, 1b, 1c 1d, 1e 1a, 1b, 1c 1d, 1e 1a, 1b, 1c 1d, 1e 1d, 1e, 2c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 3d 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d Grade % 10% 10% 05% 25% 25% 25%

Course Policies:  Attendance (online) – You are required to attend every course session for this class. During our “online weeks,” you are expected to post your initial post by Wednesday at 23:59 EST, and your responses to classmates by Sunday at 17:00 EST. During our “oncampus weeks,” if you participate at any point during the week online, you will be counted as having attended class online that week.  Attendance (campus) – You are expected to attend all on-campus meetings in order to have a full participation grade.  Participation – Participation presupposes attendance. If you don’t attend you can’t participate in class. Participation includes completing all required reading and writing assignments prior to attending class (on-campus) and prior to participating in discussions (on-campus and online) and thus thoughtfully participating in discussions, and taking responsibility for helping create a positive learning situation by arriving promptly, listening respectfully, and participating constructively.  Group Work – Most projects for this course are meant to be individual projects. The only group project is your semester long project. In order to lay the groundwork for you working in a group: o let me know in advance who will be in your team [first week of the semester] o you create a team contract to show me that you have defined the parameters of your partnership, who does what, in what time frame, and what remedies you will have in place if conflicts arise. I can provide you with a template for a team contract. o you agree to evaluate (anonymously) the work of your group peers, and agree to receive anonymous evaluation from your group peers, upon completion of work. Your team grade will only be a team grade if everyone agrees that work was distributed equally. I will provide you with a rubric to grade your peers.  Late Work – Late work for full credit will be accepted only if it’s late due to demonstrable unforeseen circumstances such as a medical or family emergency. Late work is due within two weeks of due date, no later. Work turned in late, without extenuating circumstances will drop half a grade for every day it’s late.  Collegiality – It is expected that work will be turned in on time. Feedback is available from the instructor, provided that you give adequate time (at least a week’s notice) to the instructor for this feedback request. At times debate in class could get heated. If Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 5

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
you disagree with someone, please do it in a respectful manner and if in the end you can’t agree, then you agree to disagree. Disrespectful language is not an option. For additional information see Core Netiquette Rules: http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html  Course Social – Traditionally online courses have contained a course café discussion forum where non-course social conversations could take place. Our program has an online community for current students and alumni at http://www.umassid.com. I encourage you to use this space for socializing with classmates, as well as other students and alumni. This is also a good space to ask for advice, ask fellow instructional designers to take surveys that you create, and a place to find and post news (and jobs) pertaining to instructional design, educational technology, teaching and learning.  Where in the world is AK? – As stated at the beginning I don’t check email on the weekend. I do log-in to blackboard for a little while on the Saturday afternoon to check up on student progress. If you have non-sensitive course questions, they should be posted to the Q&A forum, and I can see course inquiries there. I try to not intervene too much into student discussion forums so as to not stifle your creativity. Even if you don’t see me, I am reading everything you write. I have been known to play devil’s advocate in my courses. What I say, I may not personally believe, so please do not take offence, my comments are sometimes meant to provoke thought when I play devil’s advocate.

Grading
Grading: This course is designed to help everyone succeed and get the most out of research methodologies and research analysis. Weekly discussions (online and in-class) are ungraded -- simply participate meaningfully in them all and 20% of your grade is an "A." The following scale is used for final grading: Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see table below) Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a “C”. Grades lower than a “C” that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as an “F”. Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the University’s grading policy.

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy
Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C F INC INC/F W AU NA

Percentage
93-100% 90-92% 87-89% 83-86% 80-82% 77-79% 73-76% 0-72%
Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in majority of coursework. Contract of completion terms is required. Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms. Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline. Audit (only permitted on space-available basis) Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student is still responsible for tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on cumulative GPA.)

Quality Points
4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

72 and below is a failing grade (UMass Boston policy for graduate courses)
Grades of "Incomplete" may be granted at the discretion of the instructor. An "Incomplete" will only be available to students who have completed at least 75% of the course work and have a substantiated problem at the end of the semester that prevents completion of the course work. Due dates for assignments will be posted on Blackboard. Students are expected to submit
all assignments on time. Lateness is permitted without penalty only with written medical documentation or under grave extenuating circumstances that can be substantiated.

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Methods of Instruction
This course mobile learning is a designed as a blended course. One can't really experience mobile learning in its totality in a physical classroom. Some aspects can be explored, but you also need to be able to go out in the field and observe people in natural settings, experiment and get a sense of how mLearning applies to everyday life. We could meet every week face to face, and require you to go out in the field for x-many hours every week, but this can lead to fatigue. So instead of meeting in person, in class, we will be using our time in-class judiciously, and working online for other projects. This way you will have time to go out in the field without feeling like you have no time to spare. Taking a blended course is a different type of experience from meeting face-to-face each week, and the activities of the class will reflect these differences. This course is divided into sessions, each of which will run for one week. Each new session begins on Monday at 6:00 AM EST. Any work due during a previous session must be submitted BEFORE that time. Sessions will be available one or two weeks in advance, so that you can be prepared for upcoming modules and get a head start if you’d like. Keeping up with the work is one of the keys and challenges to being a successful graduate student; and this course does require more readings that the typical instructional design course. Even on weeks where we meet in-person there will be a module online for you so that you have access to any additional materials before meeting in person, and to provide you with a collaborative learning space to meet with peers before class. Typically, students should plan to spend on average approximately 9-12 hours each week completing the activities outside of class for each session (3 hours per credit). This means that you’d spend 3 hours in Blackboard “in-class” per week, so you can expect to spend 12-15 hours per week doing readings, preparing work and presentations, and participating online in the discussion fora. Weekly work may include the following activities: ● Listening to a brief module introductory lecture. ● Readings from the course textbooks. ● Additional research article readings ● Visiting sites where mLearning can take place ● Experimenting with mobile development technologies ● Completing small mLearning white papers 
 These tasks may include Internet research, working with a case study, peer-reviewing another student's work and providing feedback, or working on a piece of your semester project. These assignments will not be graded, but you must complete them to receive credit for being “in class” that week. In addition to these weekly activities, each student will use complete a semester project consisting of an mLearning project proposal. Every student is different, of course, and there are different circumstances in every student's life that impacts academics and organization. The one thing that remains constant, in my own observations, that helps in most instances, is regularity. Make time to login to Blackboard and take care of work at specific intervals, regardless of whether we are meeting in-person, or not, that given week. Put it in your calendar and make sure you set an alarm for it. Being a regular visitor (and scheduling your learning activities in your own personal calendar) seems like a tactic that has

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
worked for many students. I know that it worked for me when I was a student, and I still use it when I take part in professional development workshops.

Accommodations
Section 504, 508 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for curriculum modifications and adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may obtain adaptation recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross Center (508-287-7430. You need to present and discuss these recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period. You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when applying for future degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Code of Student Conduct
Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including requirements for the Academic Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and relevant program student handbook(s). http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf You are encouraged to visit and review the UMass website on Correct Citation and Avoiding Plagiarism: http://umb.libguides.com/GradStudiesCitations

Other Pertinent and Important Information
Writing Style: Everything in this course (except discussion posts) should be written following the Style Guide of the American Psychological Association (APA). This format is the academic standard among social scientists in the United States. As such, you should be able to write in this format as a graduate student in Education, and especially if you plan to pursue additional post-graduate studies. Your professional writing in the instructional design profession may not follow APA style,
but part of your graduate education in the Instructional Design program is to learn how to communicate to a variety of audiences – both formal and informal. Learning how to write following these guidelines will help you demonstrate excellent written communication skills to your own future stakeholders. Page 9

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
In addition to the APA Style Manual (required readings) you can find many excellent resources to help you learn APA Style; A good bootcamp overview for APA is provided by Purdue’s Online Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/ Assignment Submissions:

All assignment submissions will be through using Google Docs. During the first class session I will demonstrate how to create a new Google Doc and share it with me, and any teammates or peer-reviewers. Google Docs doesn’t have as many features as Microsoft Word, but it was what you need to complete your assignments. The reason we are using Google Docs is because as a program it provides a better platform for collaboration and for providing comments and feedback. There is a dummy assignment available on Blackboard that will get you acclimated to creating a new Google Doc and sharing a link with the instructor. This syllabus is subject to change throughout the semester due to emergent student needs, important new learning opportunities, guest speakers, inclement weather, or other unforeseen situations. In the event a change must be made, I will notify you as soon as practically possible, and provide an updated syllabus on our course website. Students input will be sought throughout the semester and the instructor is willing to modify the course (while it’s in session) as needed to improve the course, clarify issues, or fix inadequacies.

Changes to Syllabus:

Student Input:

Course Schedule Week 0: One week before the official course start
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Blackboard  Getting acclimated with Blackboard

Please go through the self-paced blackboard instructional videos on Atomic Learning if you haven’t taken a course in Blackboard yet.  Discussion Board: Who are ya? Introduce yourself the class   Blackboard Walkthrough Check-sheet Blackboard Scavenger Hunt

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Week 1: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Introduction to mLearning Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of what constitutes mLearning.  Quinn Chapter 1: Overview (p. 1-6)  Quinn Chapter 2: Details (p. 7-12)  Retta Chapter 1: Mobile Learning Defined (p. 1-8)  In-Class: Personal Experiences with mLearning (Show and tell)  In-Class: Team creation and beginning to work on team contract  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Bring any mobile learning tools, technologies and artifacts that you wish to share with classmates

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 2: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Currents in mLearning Blackboard  Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the current state of mLearning.  Ally chapter 1: Current state of mobile learning (p. 9-24)  Retta Chapter 2: Benefits & Barriers to mLearning (p. 9-26)  Quinn Chapter 4: The Technology is not about (p. 29-50)  Retta Chapter 5: mLearning Reviewed (p. 59-74)  Discussion Board: Prejudices & Preconceptions to mLearning  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Final Team Contract due on Blackboard by Saturday 13:00 EST

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Week 3: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment A theoretical perspective on mLearning Blackboard  Students should be able to demonstrate basic knowledge mLearning theory.
   

Class Activities

     

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Retta Chapter 4: Understanding mLearning in terms of Informing Science (p. 45 58) Ally Chapter 2: A model for Framing mobile Learning (p 25-50) Quinn Chapter 5: Getting Contextual (p. 51-59) Rogers et al (2010) Enhancing Learning: a study of how mobile devices can facilitate sensemaking. (25 pages) In-Class: Share your Site Surveys and Comment on others In-Class: Teams should take a moment and see if any of the 5 sites that their team members presented might be a site candidate for their final project. Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments Site Survey #1 is due in class. Be prepared to present a brief overview of your site with photos you’ve taken of the site. Optional: students can also bring in brief videos of their first site to share with the class. Maximum Presentation time is 5 minutes. There will be an opportunity to answer peer questions during class and receive feedback.

Week 4: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities mLearning Learning Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the history and background of mLearning, and mLearning and Learning models pertaining to mLearning.  Quinn Chapter 3: Brief History of Learning & Cognition (p. 15-28)  Quinn Chapter 6: Getting Concrete (p. 63-93)  Quinn Chapter 7: Mobile Models (p. 97-128)  In-Class: Share your White Paper and Comment on others’  In-Class: Your experiences with Learning Theory & mLearning  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Technology White Paper #1 is due. Please post your paper into the course dropbox by Saturday 13:00 EST (before our class meeting) so that you classmates have an opportunity to review your submissions and we can discuss in class. Please come prepared to share examples of use-cases for your technology of choice. Page 12

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013

Week 5: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment mLearning Design Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of appropriate mLearning design principles.  Quinn Chapter 8: A platform to stand on (p. 129-132)  Quinn Chapter 9: Mobile Design (p. 133-152)  Retta Chapter 3: Content Creation and Delivery (p. 27-44)  Herrington et al design principles for mobile learning (11 pages)  Ally chapter 5: Informal learning evidence in online communities of mobile device enthusiasts (p. 99-112)  In-Class: Share your Site Surveys and Comment on others’  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moment  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Site Survey #2 is due in class. Be prepared to present a brief overview of your site with photos you’ve taken of the site. Optional: students can also bring in brief videos of their first site to share with the class. Maximum Presentation time is 5 minutes. There will be an opportunity to answer peer questions during class and receive feedback.

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 6: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment mLearning Impact Blackboard  Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of the potential impact of mLearning and mLearning implementations.  Quinn Chapter 10: The development is not about (p. 153-160)  Quinn Chapter 11: Implementation and evaluation (p. 161-174)  Retta Chapter 6: Using smartphones to the extend educational experience (p. 7582)  Wang, M., Shen, R., Novak, D., Pan, X. (2009) The impact of mobile learning on students’ learning behaviours and performance: Report from a large blended classroom. British Journal of Educational Technology. 40(4) DOI: 10.1111/j.14678535.2008.00846.x (23 pages) Page 13

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Class Activities  Blackboard Groups: Getting together with your semester project team. By this point you should have 4-10 mLearning site candites. As a team, you should get together this week to pick your top three site candidates for your final project. You should do a preliminary analysis on all three of them as a team and why you are picking them as your candidates. Be prepared to present next week!  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments None

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 7: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: mLearning in the various contexts Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Should be able to demonstrate understanding of the affordances of mLearning in a variety of contexts.  By the end of the in-class session, teams should be well on their way to preparing their final project.  Retta Chapter 9: mLearning in Academia (p. 123-142)  Retta Chapter 14: Corporate mLearning (p. 215-242)  Kumar et al (2010) an exploratory study of unsupervised mobile learning in rural India (10 pages)  Brown (2005) Toward a model for m-learning in Africa (10 pages)  In-Class: Share your 3 site candidates and Comment on others (team Assignment; 20 minutes per group including Q&A)  In-Class: mLearning – Thinking outside the box activity (help your peers with their sites)  In-Class: Group work, using the remainder of class as a lab space to pick the pros and cons of the different candidate sites, weigh ideas from classmates, and come up with a plan of action.  Discussion Board: Articles issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Team Presentation with site candidates due  Site Survey #3 is due in class. This is submitted only to the instructor as a paper only. No need to prepare a presentation.

Reading Assignment

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Week 8: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment mLearning Acceptance Blackboard  Students should be able to identify potential barriers to mLearning acceptance and mLearning implemtnation.  Ally chapter 3: Mobile Distance Learning with PDAs: development and testing of pedagogical and system solutions supporting mobile distance learners (p. 51-74)  Retta Chapter 10: Resistance to mLearning (p. 143-166)  Wang, S-Y, Wu, M-C., Wang, H-Y. (2009) Investigating the determinants and age and gender difference in acceptance of mobile learning. British Journal of educational technology. 40(1). DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2007.00809.x (27 pages)  Retta Chapter 8: Assessing mLearning (p. 105-122)  Group Work: Teams should be working on their projects  Discussion Board: Read through at least 2 technology white papers from your fellow classmates and comment on how you might be using these technologies, and ask any questions you may have.  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Article issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Technology Paper #2

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 9: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment mLearning Research Blackboard  Students should be able to constructively critique mLearning research
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Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Retta Chapter 11: Individual Learner Styles (p. 167-184) Retta Chapter 12: Mobile Writing (p. 185-200) Retta Chapter 13: Mobile Creativity (p. 201-214) Ally Chapter 9: From e-learning to m-learning: new opportunities (p. 183-192)  Group Work: Teams should be working on their projects  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments None

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Week 10: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Applied mLearning, Part I Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Students should be able to constructively critique research into mLearning Applications.  Ally chapter 6: mlearning: Positioning Educators for a Mobile Connected Future (p. 113-134)  Ally Chapter 7: Practitioners as Innovators: emergent practice in personal mobile teaching, learning work and leisure. (p. 135-156)  Ally Chapter 13: Use of Mobile Technology for Teacher Training (p. 265-278)  Group Work: Teams should be working on their projects  In-Class: Teams will be asked to present some of their work to their peers, discuss their challenges, and have an opportunity to solicit feedback.  Discussion Board: Read through at least 2 technology white papers from your fellow classmates and comment on how you might be using these technologies, and ask any questions you may have.  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Technology White Paper #3 (online)  Team Presentations

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 11: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Applied mLearning, Part II Blackboard  Students should be able to constructively critique research into mLearning Applications.  Ally Chapter 12: Using mobile technologies for multimedia tours in a traditional museum setting (p. 247-264)  Ally Chapter 10: MobilED: mobile tools and service platform for formal and informal learning (p. 195-214)  Group Work: Teams should be working on their projects  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments

Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date:

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Week 12: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Applied mLearning, Part III Blackboard  Students should be able to constructively critique research into mLearning Applications.  Lam, P., Lam, J., McNaught, C. (2010). How usable are eBooks in an mLearning environment? International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and LifeLong Learning. 20(1). (15 pages)  Ally Chapter 8: Design and Development of Multimedia Learning Objects for mobile Phones (p. 157-182)  Group Work: Teams should be working on their projects  Discussion Board: mLearning useful (and cool) tools redux  Discussion Board: Ally Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Article issues, questions & “aha” moments None

Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 13: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Futurism, Wrap up & Presentations Healey Library, Lower Level, Presentation Room 2  Students should be able to demonstrate a holistic understanding of mLearning.
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Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date:

Quinn Chapter 12: Being Strategic (p. 175-182) Quinn Chapter 13: Trends and Directions (p. 183-192) Retta Chapter 15: What's next? (p. 243-252) Retta Chapter 16: Futurist Perspectives (p. 253-272)  Discussion Board: Quinn Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Discussion Board: Retta Chapter issues, questions & “aha” moments  Final Presentations

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Bibliography
Ally, M. (2009). Mobile Learning: Transforming the Delivery of Education and Training. Au Press. Caballe, S., Xhafa, F., Daradoumis, T., Juan, A.A. (2009). Architectures for Distributed and Complex Mlearning Systems: Applying Intelligent Technologies. IGI Global. Castledine, E., & Sharkie, C. (2010). jQuery: Novice to Ninja. SitePoint Danaher, P. A., Moriarty, B., Danaher, G. (2009). Mobile Learning Communities: Creating New Educational Futures. Routledge. Druin, A. (2010). Mobile Technology for Children: Designing for Interaction and Learning. Morgan-Kaufman. Facerm B. R., & Abdous, M. (2010). Academic Podcasting and Mobile Assisted Language Learning: Applications and Outcomes. IGI Global. Firtman, M. (2010). Programming the Mobile Web. O’Reiley. Fling, B. (2009). Mobile Design and Development: Practical concepts and techniques for creating mobile sites and web apps. O’Reilly. Frederick, G. (2010). Beginning Smartphone Web Development. Apress. Gayeski, D. (2002). Learning Unplugged: Using Mobile Technologies for Organizational Training and Performance Improvement. AMACOM. Harwani, B.M. (2010) Beginning Web Development for Smartphones: Developing Web Applications with PHP, MSQL, and jQTouch. CreateSpace. Kitchenham, A. (2011). Models for Interdisciplinary Mobile Learning: Delivering Information to Students. IGI Global. Klopfer, E. (2011). Augmented Learning: Research and Design of Mobile Educational Games. MIT Press. Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2005). Mobile Learning: A Handbook for Educators and Trainers. Routledge. Metcalf, D. S. (2006). M-Learning: Mobile Learning. HRD Press. Nielsen, L., & Webb, W. (2011). Teaching Generation Text: Using Cell Phones to Enhance Learning. JosseyBass. Ng, W. (2010). Mobile Technologies and Handheld Devices for Ubiquitous Learning: Research and Pedagogy. IGI Global Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., Cook, J., Kress, G. (2009). Mobile Learning: Structures, Agency, Practices. Springer. Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 18

INSDSG-697 - Mobile Learning Fall Syllabus 2013
Parsons, D. (2011). Combining E-Learning and M-Learning: New Applications of Blended Educational Resources. IGI Global. Reid, J. (2011). jQuery Mobile. O’Reily Retta, G. (2009). The Evolution of Mobile Teaching and Learning. Informing Science. Retta, G. (2010) MLearning Pilots and Initiatives. Informing Science. Rogers, R. A. (2011). Learning Android Game Programming: A Hands-On Guide to Building Your First Android Game. Addison-Wesley. Ryu, H. (2008). Innovative Mobile Learning: Techniques and Technologies. Informing Science Press. Quinn, C. N. (2011). Designing mLearning: Tapping into the Mobile Revolution for Organizational Performance. Pfeiffer. Quinn, C. N. (2011). The Mobile Academy: Mobile Learning for Higher Education. Jossey-Bass. Stark, J. (2010). Building iPhone Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript: Making App Store Apps Without Objective-C or Cocoa. O’Reilly Turner, K. & Harrington, T. (2011). Learning iPad Programming: A Hands-on Guide to Building iPad Apps with iOS 5. Addison-Wesley. Unger, K., & Novak, J. (2011). Game Development Essentials: Mobile Game Development. Delmar Cengage Learning. Vavoula, G., Pachler, N., Kukulska-Hulme, A. (2009). Researching Mobile Learning. Peter Lang. Woodill, G. (2010). The Mobile Learning Edge. McGraw-Hill

Updated: November 16, 2012 This mLearning Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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