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Peterson  Design  Report  Draft     1                                                          

        Renee  A.  Peterson   Principles  of  Instructional  Design   16  February  2011  

             

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Introduction  
 

Background       All  of  the  numbers  are  going  up:    high  school  graduates,  high   school  dropouts,  college  freshmen,  college  graduates,  college  costs.     Even  though  dropout  rates  for  high  schools,  especially  in  the  inner  cities   are  going  up,  so  are  the  numbers  of  graduates.    How  can  that  be?    The   United  States  has  more  students  than  ever  crowding  its  high  schools   and  applying  to  its  colleges.    More  college  students  available  results  in   more  colleges.    According  to  the  National  Center  for  Education  Statistics,   there  are  over  4,000  colleges  in  the  United  States  today.         In  order  to  get  into  college  in  the  21st  century,  each  student  must   accomplish  a  complicated  series  of  tasks  within  a  strict  series  of   deadlines  while  competing  against  thousands  of  other  students   graduating  from  high  school  vying  for  the  same  colleges.    This  process   can  be  overwhelming  for  students  and  parents  alike.    Each  high  school   needs  to  take  ownership  of  preparing  its  students  for  college,  not  just   academically  but  also  practically.         Needs  Analysis       The  senior  class  of  Williamsport  High  School  in  Williamsport,   Maryland  has  157  students  getting  ready  to  graduate  in  May.    One   guidance  counselor  must  care  for  those  157  students  and  all  of  their   college-­‐prep  needs.    Since  one  counselor  would  have  an  impossible  task   of  working  with  each  student  in  depth,  ambitious  seniors  seek  out   favorite  teachers  to  become  impromptu  college  counselors.    In  order  to   attempt  to  reach  a  few  more  of  the  seniors,  a  college-­‐prep  class  was   created  to  meet  the  needs  of  specifically  the  first-­‐in-­‐family  college   bound  seniors.    Eighteen  students  take  this  class  leaving  the  others  to   fend  for  themselves.       In  order  to  evaluate  the  needs  for  the  students,  each  student  will   complete  a  survey  at  the  end  of  the  sophomore  year  with  the  following   questions:     1. Have  you  taken  the  PSAT?  

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2. Have  you  taken  the  SAT?     3. What  are  your  current  plans  for  higher  education?   a. 4-­‐year  college   b. 2-­‐year  and  transfer  to  a  4-­‐year   c. 2-­‐year  only   d. Military  service   e. Work     4. Have  you  ever  been  on  a  college  campus?   5. Name  colleges  with  which  you  are  familiar.   6. Do  you  have  a  written  college  entrance  essay?   7. Are  you  prepared  to  interview  at  a  college?   8. Do  you  know  what  you  want  your  major  course  of  studies  to   be?     As  the  students  return  to  school  in  the  fall  as  juniors,  the  Path  to  College   program  will  begin.        Each  high  school  student  needs  to  have  access  to  a  program  with   step-­‐by-­‐step  instructions  on  the  path  to  college  taking  them  from  the   PSAT  to  graduation  from  high  school  with  college  acceptance,  grants,   loans,  and  scholarships  in  hand.     Learner  and  Context  Analysis       The  target  audience  is  the  Williamsport  High  School  junior  class.       Total  students:  #     Current  plans:     4-­‐year   2-­‐year  and   2-­‐year   Military   Work   college   transfer  to   college  only   service   4-­‐year   #   #   #   #   #      

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 The  Path  to  College  program  would  take  place  during  the  30-­‐minute   Personalized  Education  Plan  (PEP)  time  in  the  beginning  of  the  day  with   specialized  workshops  as  needed.     Facilitators  would  be  the  teachers  of  the  PEP  mods  for  juniors  and   seniors.    Path  to  College  master  teacher  will  provide  all  lessons  and   materials  needed  for  each  facilitator.     Primary  Persona  
 

Jessica  
Jessica  is  going  to  college.    The  only  question   is…where?    She  has  two  professional  parents  who   both  have  Masters  degrees,  and  they  expect  her  to   earn  one  as  well.     Having  a  GPA  of  4.13  and  taking  AP  courses  will   ensure  Jessica  college  admittance,  but  she’s  just   not  sure  what  she  wants  to  do.    She  has  always   been  expected  to  do  well  in  school,  so  she  has   done  that…now  what?     After  school,  Jessica  is  a  runner.    She  is  on  the   varsity  cross  country  team,  indoor  track  team,  and  outdoor  track  team.     Having  a  sport  for  every  season  and  keeping  up  a  high  gpa  doesn’t  give   her  much  time  to  explore  colleges,  possible  majors,  and  prepare  for  the   SATs.         Since  she  is  a  high  school  junior,  the  colleges  have  started  bombarding   her  mailbox  with  colorful  brochures  with  photos  of  smiling  co-­‐eds   sitting  on  benches  on  beautiful  campuses,  but  the  flyers  end  up  in  a  pile   in  the  corner  of  her  bedroom  floor.     Jessica  works  well  with  others  and  is  very  capable  on  the  computer.    Her   632  Facebook  friends  enjoy  her  pithy  quotes  on  her  status  every   morning.    This  active,  well-­‐liked  student  just  needs  some  direction.  

 

 

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Secondary  Persona  

Kevin  
  Kevin  does  not  plan  to  go  to  college.    His  dad  left  the   family  when  Kevin  was  only  8.    His  mom  works  two   jobs  to  try  to  make  ends  meet,  so  Kevin  has  to  take   care  of  his  younger  brother  and  sister  after  school   until  his  mom  gets  home.    Since  his  mom  has  only  a   high  school  education,  Kevin  figures  he  will  be   finished  then  as  well.     Mostly  a  shy,  quiet  young  man,  Kevin  is  ignored  by   most  of  the  other  kids  at  school.    His  teachers  like   him  once  they  take  the  time  to  get  to  know  him.    He   does  his  work,  maintains  a  3.0  gpa,  and  doesn’t  cause  problems.    Kevin   enjoys  using  the  computer  when  he  has  the  opportunity  at  school,  but   does  not  have  one  at  home.    Surfing  the  “net”  does  not  come  easily  to   him,  but  he  can  follow  directions.     Since  he  has  to  ride  the  bus  home  to  be  there  for  his  siblings,  getting   involved  in  after-­‐school  activities  is  just  not  possible.    He  does  his  best   to  make  sure  he  is  in  school  every  day  and  uses  every  possible  moment   to  get  his  work  done,  including  lunchtime,  because  he  just  doesn’t  have   time  in  the  evenings.         Kevin  is  a  loner.    He  needs  someone  to  open  the  possibility  of  a  college   education  to  him  and  give  him  the  encouragement  and  the  tools  to  go   for  it!         Instructional  Goal       High  school  juniors  participating  in  the  Path  to  College  program   will  be  able  to  navigate  through  all  processes  and  procedures  relating  to   college  preparation  and  successfully  begin  a  college  career  in  two  years.          

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Design  and  Development    
Content  Analysis     Students  entering  the  Path  to  College  program  will  have  already  taken   the  PSAT  and  completed  the  sophomore  year  of  high  school   successfully.    The  junior  student  eligible  for  the  Path  to  College  program   at  WHS  will  also  have  passed  all  four  of  Maryland’s  High  School   Assessments.  

The  Path  to  College  

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•  Analysis  of  sophomore  PSAT  scores  and  preparation  for  official  PSAT  

•  Analysis  of  new  PSAT  scores  and  preparation  and  registration  for  SAT  

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•  Completion  of  several  interest  inventory  tools  to  focus  career  path  

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•  Survey  colleges  to  create  a  target  list  of  schools  in  career  path  

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•  Review  and  retake  SAT  as  necessary  to  improve  scores  

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•  Take  two  college  trips  to  see  a  large  and  a  small  campus  

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•  Evaulate  high  school  education:  plan  senior  year  to  complete  all   necessary  classes  and  add  benefical  electives  or  community  college   courses  as  available  

 

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•  Complete  high  school  junior  year   •  Summer  workshop:    "Get  in  the  WRITE  way!"  writing  the  college   entrance  essay   •  Summer  workshop:    "Put  your  best  FACE  forward!"  the  college  interview   •  Summer  workshop:    "YOU  in  one  page"    resume  writing   •  Senior  year:    evaluate  work  of  the  junior  year  and  repeat  any  necessary   steps   •  Narrow  college  choice  list  to  five    

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•  Using  tools  created  in  summer  workshops,  complete  college  applications  

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•  Apply  for  scholarships  (high  school  based,  college  based,  and  other)   •  January-­‐March  of  senior  year:    FAFSA  WORKSHOP  for  students  and   parents   •  Take  tours  and  complete  overnight  visits  of  top  three  colleges  

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•  Complete  all  graduation  requirements  for  high  school   •  Evaluate  college  acceptance  letters  and  either  make  a  choice  or  apply  to   others  on  final  list.   •  Apply  for  grants  and  loans  as  needed....  then  get  ready  to  graduate!  

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Instructional  Module  
  “Get  in  the  WRITE  way!”  a  workshop  for  students  between  their  junior   and  senior  years  of  high  school  on  the  college  entrance  essay     Objective     By  the  end  of  the  one-­‐day  workshop,  the  upcoming  high  school  senior   will  write,  type,  and  polish  the  presentation  of  a  general  college   entrance  essay.     Plans     The  workshop  will  begin  with  icebreaker  activities  so  that  the   participants  will  get  to  know  each  other.    The  activities  will  jog  the   memories  of  participants  so  to  gather  interesting  life  experiences  for  the   essays.     The  life  experiences  will  be  categorized  and  then  altered  to  fit  other   topics.    For  example:    having  difficulty  learning  to  ride  a  bike  can   demonstrate  perseverance  or  overcoming  a  weakness  or  even  joy  in   accomplishment.     One  anecdote  will  be  chosen  as  part  of  the  introduction.    Each  student   will  write  a  draft  of  the  introduction,  and  then  in  pairs,  they  will   introduce  themselves  with  their  introduction  paragraphs  revising  them   as  needed.     The  central  part  of  the  workshop  will  be  evaluating  accomplishments   and  envisioning  the  future.    These  topics  will  comprise  the  body  of  the   essay.     In  role-­‐playing  format  as  speeches,  the  participants  will  “speak”  the   conclusions  of  their  essays.    Verbalizing  conclusions  create  stronger   conclusions.    The  conclusions  will  also  refer  to  the  anecdote  in  the   introduction.     Finally,  each  participant  will  type  the  essay.    Partners  will  edit,  and   facilitators  will  assist  in  order  to  ensure  that  each  essay  is  error-­‐free.  

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The  participants  will  leave  with  an  electronic  copy  and  a  hard  copy  of   the  completed  essay  ready  to  present  to  colleges!     Materials     Laptop  computers  (one  for  each  participant)  linked  to  a  wireless  printer   Flash  drives  or  CDs   Materials  needed  for  icebreaker  activities   Refreshments  for  participants