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Volume 46 - Issue 13 January 16, 2013 theeyeopener.

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HOW YOU COULD HAVE AN ADDICTION AND NOT KNOW IT

VICE:

ILLUSTRATION : DASHA ZOLOTA

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The MAC: It’s not just for hockey
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PHOTO: STINE DANIELLE

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PHOTO: EMMA PRESTWICH

Ryerson as a film set

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SPECIAL SECTION

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

While you were sipping Piña Coladas and hearing stories from relatives you don’t care about, Ryerson athletes were putting in work

What you’ve missed in sports

PHOTO: BRIAN BATISTA BETTENCOURT

Ryerson hosted the Chinese Junior National Team in the Rams’ annual invitational tournament. Despite being without 7’1” star Zhou Qi, China put up a good fight, but lost 79-65. Ryerson went on to win the tournament for the second straight year.
PHOTO: BRIAN BATISTA BETTENCOURT

PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

In the midst of the (most recent) NHL lockout, the Players’ Association held a charity game at the Mattamy Athletic Centre on Dec. 19. Stars included the Toronto Maple Leafs’ Phil Kessel (above) and the Montreal Canadiens’ P.K. Subban (below). The event raised $100,000 towards youth hockey initiatives.

PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

Aaron Best and the men’s basketball team had their 10-game winning streak snapped — losing 66-91 to the top-ranked Carleton Ravens.

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

NEWS

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The Globe and Mail confirmed Alaa Hejazi was a Ryerson student with a phone call to the registrar, The Eyeopener has learned

Registrar gave student info to national paper
legislation forbids that and I support that one hundred per cent.” According to privacy officials at Ryerson and the provincial privacy commissioner’s office, a stuThe registrar’s office at Ryerson dent’s name and enrolment status University could have violated On- at a post-secondary institution tario’s privacy legislation when it should be categorized as personal released the name and program of information, which the Freedom of student Alaa Hejazi last November. Information and Protection of PriHejazi, whose lawyer had not vacy Act is bound to protect. Ryerson became subject to the yet confirmed his enrolment status, had turned himself in to Toronto Act on June 10, 2006. Under section 21. (3), FIPPA Police on Nov. 14 in connection with two sexual assaults in the city. outlines a presumed invasion of In an email to The Eyeopener, privacy where the disclosed perthe Globe and Mail confirmed that a reporter called the Ryerson regisThat does not happen, trar’s office later that day to investigate Hejazi’s student status. The should not happen Globe also learned that Hejazi was and I don’t believe it enrolled as a second-year in the happened university’s business technology management program. But according to Tony Conte, sonal information “relates to emdirector of the office of the vice ployment or educational history.” Brian Beamish, assistant comprovost, students, the registrar’s release of such information would missioner of access at Ontario’s violate the university’s privacy office of information and privacy, said universities have a responsibilpolicy. “That’s a problem. That actu- ity to determine whether releasing ally does not happen, should not personal information without the happen and I don’t believe it hap- individual’s consent is in accorpened,” Conte said in a Nov. 15 dance with exceptions outlined in conversation with The Eyeopener. FIPPA. “In a case like this where it’s a “We cannot disclose any information about whether or not a person general member of the public callattends Ryerson at all […] Privacy ing up and saying, ‘is so-and-so a

By Diana Hall

The registrar’s office at Ryerson University is responsible for student financial records,, recruiting and enrolment. student there?’ the school would then have to ask itself — if it were going to disclose that information — is that justified or not?” Beamish said. According to section 11 of the Act, circumstances that obligate institutions to release these records can include police investigations and other “reasonable and probable grounds to believe that it is in the public interest to do so, and that the record reveals a grave environmental, health or safety hazard to the public.” “I would say generally speaking as a general rule, an inquiry from a member of the public would not be sufficient grounds [to release a student’s information],” Beamish said. The policy at Ryerson “is to err on the side of privacy,” said Heather Driscoll, the school’s information and privacy officer. Driscoll admitted that confirming whether a student attends Ryerson is a “grey area” of policy. “Though to be quite frank, [the

PHOTO: naTalia balceRzak

release of a student’s name] is pretty low-risk in almost every case,” she said. Although Beamish warned such disclosures can also be high risk, Driscoll said Ryerson is more concerned with breaches involving student email addresses, phone numbers and social insurance numbers. The university has not confirmed whether the release of Hejazi’s name was deemed to be a privacy breach, or if an investigation will be taking place.

Radio Ryerson finds foothold in SCC
By Colleen Marasigan
After being denied an FM license, Radio Ryerson is now looking to find a new home on the AM airwaves. In October 2011, 85 per cent of students who voted said yes to a redistribution of $10.35 from their tuition to help fund and support a new radio station. Despite an attempt to reclaim the 88.1 FM frequency, which included what Ryerson President Sheldon Levy called “a huge amount of work,” Radio Ryerson lost the bid. Meanwhile, on the second floor of the Student Campus Centre (SCC), the office of the former CKLN, which was stripped of its license in Aug. 2011 by the CRTC, is now undergoing a complete renovation. The space is now also being repurposed for student campus groups. Much of the space is being converted into a common area, and a smaller, separate chunk will be used as office space for Radio Ryerson. This space will help with the group’s next application and host media workshops, according to Jacky Tuinstra Harrison, who managed Radio Ryerson’s application. “Right now there’s no working space,” Harrison said. “We usually just meet in a common area that we can find at [the SCC] or elsewhere on campus.” Harrison added that though the group has access to approximately $240,000 obtained through the referendum (of which almost 25 per cent was spent on the FM application), the cost of the renovations would be paid for by the Palin Foundation. Rodney Diverlus, president of the Ryeron Students’ Union (RSU), said that although the Palin Foundation would cover the costs of the common space, Radio Ryerson was expected to cover the costs associated with its office. “Radio Ryerson is covering the cost of their [space] and the student centre is covering the cost of the bookable room,” Diverlus said.

Jacky Tuinstra Harrison, manager of Radio Ryerson’s cRTc application, at work during a 2011 referendum. “They have access to funds.” Harrison said adding an office space with equipment to produce content is important to the CRTC application process, which requires a preemptive inspection of site location by Industry Canada. Currently the group’s volunteers are at work producing content — such as documentaries, artist interviews and event listings — but Harrison said it will not be made available until the launch of an online portal. The group will feature the content on its website. Though the group was unsuccessful in its first attempt to nab a frequency, Levy says the students have his full support. “I think the university deserves it

File PHOTO

but more importantly the students deserve it,” Levy said. “And if they needed help, needed some money, needed support, I would be 100 per cent behind them.” Though there is not a hard and fast deadline, Radio Ryerson hopes to apply to Industry Canada for approval sometime this winter. With files from the news team

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editorial

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

Editor-in-Chief Lee “Stale pizza” Richardson News Diana “Don’t get sued” Hall Sean “Frank Sinatra” Wetselaar Associate News Mohamed “Loves strippers” Omar Features Sarah “Toilet paper” Del Giallo Biz & Tech Jeff “Olde English” Lagerquist
FILE PHOTO

Former Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities Glen Murray worked on a proposal that could have drastically reformed Ontario’s post-secondary system. But now that proposal, after Murray’s resignation, is in limbo while universities like Ryerson are setting their own reforms for new ways of teaching.

Arts and Life Susana “Rant” Gómez Báez Sports Charles “Eddy Merckx” Vanegas Communities Shannon “Business card” Baldwin Photo Dasha “Sideboob” Zolota Stine “Desk pasta” Danielle Associate Photo Natalia “Salad King virgin” Balcerzak Fun Kai “No law” Benson Media Lindsay “Stripper in face” Boeckl Online Emma “Crusts” Prestwich John “Owns talentless dog” Shmuel General Manager Liane “Poe boy” McLarty Advertising Manager Chris “Death to Campus Plus” Roberts Design Director J.D. “Cuba has a file on you” Mowat Circulation Manager Megan “Damn circ” Higgins Contributors Colleen “Party” Marasigan Alfea “In” Donato Vivian “The” Fairbank Ashley ‘CPA” Cochrane Latifa “Baller” Aladin Josh “Sort of hockey” Beneteau Alan “Liberal” Hudes Brian “Thunderwolf” Batista Bettencourt Nicole “Doc” Schmidt Vanessa “Leather” Francone Rebecka “Community” Calderwood Prajakta “Outreach” Dhopade The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s largest and only independent student newspaper. It is owned and operated by Rye Eye Publishing Inc., a non-profit corporation owned by the students of Ryerson. Reach us at 416-9795262, at SCC207, at theeyeopener. com or on Twitter at @theeyeopener.

RSU

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By lee richardson
Our university wants to expand — that is clear. Proof enough is easy to find; head over to the patch of grass in front of Pitman to find a chunk of glass. Eventually, that same standard of glass will be used in the Student Learning Centre, which at the minute is Ryerson’s biggest construction project. Construction is becoming perpetual around campus, with building plans mapped out for years to come — all with the goal to house newly introduced programs and (hopefully) fit the growing number of incoming students. Though physical growth is not the only forecast for the university. The administration is taking matters into its own hands in terms of bringing its teaching methods beyond the standard model of ‘professors talk, students listen.’ As The Eyeopener reported last semester (in ‘Going Beyond the Classroom’), the administration is aiming to boost online course options, to the point that entire degrees could potentially be completed from the comfort/squalor of your bedroom. Plans for digital learning stemmed from a government proposal that came to attention last year. Earning much hype and discussion, it was released under the watch of Glen Murray, Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities at the time. The future of the proposal, though, is not clear. After resigning from his post in the education

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Former minister’s plan for education is needed to boost and support universities’ plans for reforms

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The Ryerson Students’ Union represents over 28,000 full time undergraduate students and alll graduate students. Each year a Board of Directors is elected by the membership to represent and advocate for all RSU members. You must be a full time undergraduate or full/part-time graduate student to run.

ELECTION DAYS ARE FEB 11, 12, 13

department and running for Liberal leader, Murray has further stepped out of the public sphere for the time being, having recently removed himself from the Liberal race. This means his education reform proposal — dubbed ‘3 Cubed: vwwvv institutions as centres of creativity, competency and citizenship equipped for the 21st century’ that set goals of introducing threeyear degrees, online courses and year-round semesters, is in limbo. That’s a shame. It deserves a future. The education system is reaching a straining point. Classes are full, spaces are limited and tuition fees are growing beyond reach. Ryerson is responding to this, and rightly so, by considering online courses, though eventually a more drastic change, either provincially or nationwide, has to be looked at seriously. Murray’s proposal was criticized — both by pundits and those working in the academic field — though he mentioned in talks with the press last year that it was being considered more seriously than most would expect. Let’s hope so. Universities like Ryerson, that are putting steps forward by realizing that teaching can be more than lectures and tutorials, can’t do it by themselves. Whichever party comes into power next needs to consider the ‘3 Cubed’ plan for what it is — a radical, though valuable, guide to bringing Canada’s education in line with others globally. Ryerson’s administration may be taking matters into its own hands, but an extra (governmental) finger pointing the way to go wouldn’t go amiss.

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

NEWS

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Diverlus says students have access to many resources by joining Canada’s largest peace organization.

FILE PHOTO

Rodney Diverlus supports rejoining lobbying group, but said the students’ union has no definite stance on some of its mandates

RSU rejoins national anti-war coalition
time — the umbrella group passed a few resolutions that would reBy quire a general consultation with Mohamed students, according to RSU PresiOmar dent Rodney Diverlus. One resolution calls for the CPA and its members to “urge the GovThe Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) voted to rejoin a national ernment of Canada to make it a lobbying group Thursday, despite priority to eliminate the military not having a clear-cut stance on and to divert the funding of military recruitment, facilities, [and] some of its objectives. The RSU’s Board of Directors passed a motion to renew mem- To say we do [broad] bership — at a $600 cost — to the Canadian Peace Alliance (CPA), a consultations on every coalition of social groups founded single [motion] would in 1985 currently boasting more be a lie than 150 members. The CPA has lobbied the government continuously with major equipment to human needs and socampaigns to oppose Canada’s in- cial programs,” 2011 CPA convenvolvement in Afghanistan and to tion minutes state. “The RSU does not have a stance call for smaller military budgets. Its groups have passed vari- on the military,” Diverlus said. ous anti-war and anti-military “That kind of mandate, it would resolutions at its biannual meet- require a policy, an issue-based ings, including a 2002 motion to policy or a motion from the general “implement a ban on space-based meeting, to agree and say that we now have a stance.” weapons.” Other CPA resolutions include But in 2011, when the RSU hosted the CPA’s convention — al- a campaign to delist Hamas, the though it was not a member at the organization governing the Gaza Strip, from Canada’s list of terrorist organizations. A similar motion calls for the removal of Lebanese group Hezbollah from the list as well. The RSU has no official stance on these resolutions. Although Diverlus said the RSU did not consult its student members before joining the CPA, he said that board members from different faculties ensure campus-wide representation. But the CPA’s resolutions on eliminating the military and delisting Hamas and Hezbollah from Canada’s list of terrorist organizations were not presented at the board meeting. “We pass six to eight motions every board meeting, to say that we do broad-based consultations on every single one would be a lie,” he said. “Students have made it clear that they want us to do anti-war and peace work, and the CPA is the body to do that.” Melissa Palermo, the RSU’s vicepresident education, supports the motion and said she wants Ryerson students to be informed about the CPA. “That’s a conversation that I would love to have,” Palermo said at the meeting. “[To] let students know that this alliance exists, that we’re part of it and that they can get involved in our work on campus, and provincially and nationally.” Palermo added that the relationship between the RSU and the CPA would be mutual. “All of our causes are linked to each other, and so when we help and support anti-war movements, they support the work we do for education because we all have the same goals in mind,” she said. The motion to formally renew membership in the CPA was brought forward by Marwa Hamad, the RSU’s vice-president equity. Palermo supported the motion, saying that with it “we’re able to join a lot of groups across Canada.” The RSU cancelled its membership with the CPA in 2008 due to budget cuts to the equity committee.

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Should the RSU join a group it does not always agree with?

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Mark Alverne, 2nd year business management They need to plan what’s in the best interest of the students as a goal. You need to find some sort of consensus. Jenny Le, 2nd year business management They should make sure they spend $600 on something that benefits the students, not just something political. Brian Capital, 2nd year arts and contemporary studies It’s important to have a conversation. The RSU is elected so... they represent us best.

business.humber.ca/postgrad

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NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

Despite former school board director’s claim to enrol in a Ryerson University ethics course, the journalism school says it can’t take him

Spence doesn’t make sense, prof says
By Ashley Cochrane
The former director of the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) vowed to enrol in an ethics course at Ryerson University after details of his plagiarism scandal came to light. But his plan to compensate for his academic dishonesty is not possible. Chris Spence submitted a plagiarized opinion piece to the Toronto Star on Jan. 5 that led to his resignation and a follow-up investigation of his past work. The National Post uncovered numerous pieces written by Spence that failed to properly cite sources and credited parts of other’s work as his own. In an official statement, Spence wrote, “I intend to enrol myself in the ethics and law in journalism course offered by Ryerson University. A component of that course is identification, and avoidance, of plagiarism. I will enrol in that course at the earliest opportunity.” Chair of the journalism program, Ivor Shapiro, questions the details of Spence’s plan to join the course. “In order for Spence to enrol in the ethics and law in journalism course he must be registered as a Ryerson journalism student,” says Shapiro. Shapiro says Spence would have to enrol through the Chang School, instead, which doesn’t offer an ethics course to the public. Lisa Taylor, instructor of ethics and law in journalism at Ryerson, says even if the course was available to Spence, it would not be fitting for him to enrol. “I’m completely blown away that this is being presented as a journalism issue,” says Taylor. “Chris Spence is not a journalist and this is not an ethical dilemma.” Taylor differentiated between ethical issues and Spence’s predicament. “An ethical issue is when you have two competing rights. Do you help save a kid’s life? Or do you continue to film to tell the world about this problem? Plagiarism is not a question of being right, it is just wrong.” According to Shapiro, if Spence were to be enrolled in the course it would not help his plagiarism dilemma. “The course does not focus too much on plagiarism because it is not a complicated issue,” says Shapiro. “I think journalism students know that when they come out of high school. I think my high school-attending son knows that.” The University of Toronto is now reviewing Spence’s doctoral dissertation for academic dishonesty, the Toronto Star reported. It could lead to the suspension of his doctorate.

PHOTO: daSHa zOLOTa

Lisa Taylor, professor of law and ethics in Ryerson University’s journalism program, says Spence’s acts of plagiarism aren’t ethical dilemmas.

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The Ted Rogers School of Management will play host to a new ethical leadership program at Ryerson next fall.

FILE PHOTO

Explorations in ethical leadership
By Vivian Fairbank
Ryerson University is adding a new Jim Pattison ethical leadership education and research program to its roster for next fall, an experimental branch which will attempt to develop and teach the role of ethics in business leadership. Funds for the program come from a $250,000 donation from the Jim Pattison Group — one of Canada’s largest privately held companies. The program’s first tier will offer leadership workshops to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as seminars to current business managers. The second tier will involve funding research initiatives into this new area of business management. Chris MacDonald, director of the ethical leadership program at the Ted Rogers Leadership Centre, explains that the program is envisioned as “a sort of umbrella project that is going to encompass some educational activities not courses, but weekend, evening, or half-day events for undergraduate and fuller MBA students.” Matt Fullbrook, manager of the Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics and Board Effectiveness at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, agrees that there is a new trend when it comes to management education. “What gets taught in management schools gets boiled down into discreet categories — finance, accounting, consulting… the nuts and bolts. But leadership is a little less tangible. With the fact that management education is now much more focused on leadership, ethics is an even newer piece of that new piece,” he explained. But MacDonald pointed out everyone has an individual definition of what ethical leadership means. “One of the things we can say is that ethical leadership is not just about having someone at the top who is ethical, but also about how that ethical vision or commitment is translated… what it is you do to put your money where your mouth is,” MacDonald said. Fullbrook said there is a growing job market for expertise in ethical business leadership. “There’s a desire for leaders who are not just conscious about social ethics of business but are able to integrate those values in the way they’re leading their teams or organizations. I think that there’s certainly an emerging need for that type of skill.” The program will have its official inauguration on Jan. 30.

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Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

NEWS

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A Board of Directors meeting on Nov. 15 saw the first iteration of a motion to oppose partnerships with the private sector, which returned to the table Thursday.

FILE PHOTO

Anti-private sector motion sparks internal RSU debate
By Sean Wetselaar
tion with Aramark, Ryerson’s food services provider since 1993. However, while Aramark is a relationship with the private sector, it is a contract, not a partnership. “I don’t think you can find a group of students who are saying they are satisfied with the work that Aramark does,” said Rodney Diverlus, president of the RSU. “I don’t think you can find a group of staff that has been satisfied with the work Aramark does.” Gerald Mak, a director for the faculty of business and a fourthyear business technology management student agreed that Aramark is not perfect, but he stressed that a replacement of the food provider is not a quick process. “It takes time,” Mak said. “You can’t simply just take out all the jobs of all the union workers that are currently employed by Aramark because they’re going to be jobless.” But the RSU said it is acting in the best interests of Ryerson students by exploring different models and providing alternatives to companies like Aramark. “I ultimately think one of the founding principles of the student union is to seek for high quality, affordable and completely publiclyfunded post-secondary,” Diverlus said. “As tuition fees aren’t enough to make up for the lack of public funding, institutions like ourselves are now relying [on] and constantly spending a majority of our time seeking private sponsorships or private partnerships for funding.” Mak believes P3s present advantages to the school, and spoke out against the motion. “Public-private partnerships are what has helped the university grow and develop to what it is today, in the last five or six years, and will continue [to do so],” Mak said. “I mean if it weren’t for these partnerships that we have, the university wouldn’t be as known as [it is].” The motion was originally proposed on Nov. 15, but was delayed until the most recent board meeting. It includes a plan to “create information materials… that can be used to educate our members,” and “file Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) requests regarding details of Ryerson University’s public-private partnerships.” Though the intention to oppose P3s was hotly debated, the motion also sparked debate over the vagueness of its propositions, which Mak said “allows them to spend as much as they want.” “I’ve always seen public/private partnerships as a good thing if they’re truly a win-win,” said Ryerson President Sheldon Levy. “Just because you go into a partnership with the private sector, it doesn’t mean it’s good, it doesn’t mean it’s bad. [But] do you get a good deal out of it?” The RSU feels differently. The motion cites a case at the Université de Québec (University of Quebec), in Montreal where, it says, a P3 cost the public $200 million in unnecessary costs. This issue is not a new one for the RSU. It has long campaigned for free, publicly-funded education, and Diverlus said an opposition of privatization of the school went hand-inhand with this stance. “The argument we’re trying to make is that the government can provide it,” Diverlus said. “It’s just all about priorities.” Mak disagreed, pointing out that the government has priorities besides student tuition, such as health care and research and development. “It’s a strong economy and we have to be fiscally responsible to make sure the economy is in good hands,” he said. “If we focus on providing free everything to everyone in this province, we would take a huge hit on our economy.” The motion was postponed to a future meeting after Mak left, causing the board to lose quorum.

A motion by the RSU to take an official stance against public-private partnerships remains in limbo after a meeting Thursday

Plans by the Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) to formally oppose partnerships with the private sector sparked fierce debate at the most recent Board of Directors meeting. Held Thursday, the meeting saw an attempt to pass a motion proclaiming the RSU’s opposition to public-private partnerships (P3s), which RSU executives say are a financial risk and less cost-efficient. “One of the major problems when you have outsourced an entire department or entire organization like food services is that you lose the ability for students to have representation,” said Andrew McAllister, vice-president operations, at the meeting. McAllister headed a task force on campus food established last fall, which looked into student satisfac-

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NEWS

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

What you missed while you were out
Student thwarts school violence
A Ryerson student’s YouTube channel led to the arrest of a 16-year-old high school student in Arizona. Alex Haney, a photography student who operates a YouTube channel chronicling his experiences as a trans youth, was first alerted to the issue when he noticed a disturbing post on his channel. The post, made by the 16-yearold in Mesa, Arizona, detailed her plan of “seriously hurting” students at her school, the CBC reported. Haney alerted the Toronto Police Department, who tracked the message to Mesa. Local police have detained the girl who, they say, was afraid she may actually carry out her threat.

Ford lawsuit kickstarted by Rye student
Ryerson’s very own Adam ChaleffFreudenthaler kickstarted Rob Ford’s conflict of interest lawsuit, the Toronto Star reported in November. Although it was Toronto local Paul Madger who brought up the issue to lawyer Clayton Ruby, it was Chaleff-Freudenthaler who caught Ford’s breach of the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act and notified Madger. Chaleff-Freudenthaler, 28, is a labour relations officer at the Association of Management, Administrative and Professional Crown Employees of Ontario. He studies part-time at Ryerson, working his way towards a bachelor of public administration.

RSU releases food survey results
After almost a month of surveys, the RSU has released its findings on campus food services. Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with Ryerson’s current food provider Aramark, a Ryerson partner since 1993. Over 2,200 students were surveyed. Twenty-seven per cent said they never ate on campus, while 17 per cent said they did one to two times a week. In terms of affordability, 59 per cent of students surveyed said the price of food items on campus, compared to their quality, was unfair. The survey’s findings can be accessed on the RSU’s website, rsuonline.ca

PHOTO: MOHAMED OMAR

A scale-model of the glass skin that will cover the Student Learning Centre, currently under construction, has been built just outside Pitman Hall and the Architecture building. The project is designed to test the glass’ resilience to the elements.

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Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

NEWS

9

The parking lot near Church and Dundas streets which will be developed into Ryerson’s latest building.

PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK

Ryerson’s new health sciences building was revealed to have more features for students under one roof than any capital project to date

Rye unveils home for health sciences
By Alfea Donato
Ryerson is set to replace a parking lot on Church Street with a new, multipurpose building addressing the dearth of study spaces, classroom space and food options on campus. The Church Street Development’s lower level will host a combination of study and retail spaces with a focus on food facilities, according to a December press release. The upper levels will accommodate the School of Nutrition, the School of Occupational and Public Health (SOPHe), the Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing and the Midwifery Education program. Plans for the 250 student residence spaces will be determined by the architect in charge. Julia Hanigsberg, a member of the project’s steering committee, said in an email that the large development site — 6,230 square metres —` will help Ryerson cater to students’ needs. “We will be able to design a building that has effective and efficient floor plate for all our uses,” said Hanigsberg, vice-president administration and finance. “We are excited to be able to include stateof-the-art simulation suites for the sophisticated hands-on learning that future healthcare professionals need.” The new building also presents an opportunity for the to expand student residence space, which Ryerson President Sheldon Levy said is “far short” of meeting student demand. “The Master Plan talks about intensification of land use and what that really means is that land is so expensive; you’re downtown, you can’t afford to do what you see out the window anymore, which is three-storey buildings,” said Levy. “You’ve got to go high, and you’ve got to use your land.” Additional storeys will feature a combination of academic spaces like lecture halls, classrooms, shared teaching labs and research labs. It is designed to optimize Ryerson’s limited space — which Levy says directly affects program development and the number of students the university can physically support. Although the Ontario government is providing $56.4 million in project funding, the predicted cost of construction for the health sciences spaces is $84 million. The total budget, an estimated date of completion as well as a project architect have yet to be determined. According to the Ryerson Builds website, students and faculty will be able to provide feedback on the building’s design when an advisory committee is established in the spring of 2013. The timeline is frustrating for third-year occupational health student Mark Tadena, who is eager to take advantage of the extra amenities. “We [SOPHe students] just have one study area, and it’s a room,” Tadena said. Fellow third-year occupational health student Mohiuddim Ahmed said he hopes the new space will bring more awareness to the health sciences at Ryerson. “It matters… mainstreaming it gets [people] to know more about our program and makes a difference,” says Ahmed.

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You’re downtown, you can’t afford to do ... three-storey buildings. You’ve got to go high, and you’ve got to use your land
Ryerson President Sheldon Levy.
FILE PHOTO

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FEATURES

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P

aul Lukas* remembers his first cigarette. Many smokers do. In 2011, Lukas was walking home from a friend’s when he came across a serious car accident. The aspiring photographer had his camera equipment with him and started shooting, thinking the photos could be sold to a news source. Lukas recalls viewing dismembered bodies through his lens, when another photojournalist approached him. “He offered me a cigarette, just to reduce my stress because it was very obvious that I hadn’t seen a dead person before,” says Lukas, a Ryerson student. “From there, something just happened where I was just associating my stress with cigarettes to kind of relieve it.” and want to de-stress from a long week at work or school.” By definition, a vice is an immoral or evil practice, however the term is more comUniversity life is hectic, so any chance to de-stress is a welcome one. But some medimonly used to simply describe a bad habit that is accepted due to the joy or benefit cal experts say that a vodka shot, bong hit or cigarette may not be as simple as routine drawn from it, while acknowledging its harm. But experts say vices aren’t as innocent unwinding. as they’re often played off, especially for university students, who can use the habits According to Dr. Clairélaine Ouellet-Plamondon, a psychiatrist at the Centre for Addiction to mask underlying substance abuse and mental health issues. and Mental Health (CAMH) who specializes in the neurological connections behind substance While Lukas says he doesn’t like the fact that he smokes because he knows it’s unabuse and mental health disorders, university students may have a greater chance to develop healthy, it’s something that he continues because it helps with his anxiety. substance abuse-related mental health issues due to their age. “It’s anxiety, but it’s [also] because I smoke pot and I like to get a head rush when “This is an at-risk period, and we know that alcohol and drugs can trigger mental illness I’m stoned,” says Lukas. “I’d say 85 per cent of my cigarette consumption is when I’m in some cases, so we need to be careful,” says Ouellet-Plamondon. “Around 75 per cent of high or drunk. I’ll rarely smoke just to smoke.” mental health illnesses develop between the ages of 15 and 25, so really When he was 17, Lukas was diagnosed with Bipolar II, He offered me a cigarette there are a lot of people who have their first episode while they are at a disorder that causes him to have sudden mood changes university.” to reduce my stress because and anxiety issues. This is due to synaptic pruning, a process in which the brain elimi“I didn’t really know bipolar was really a thing at the it was obvious that I hadn’t nates unnecessary connections (called synapses) between neurons, altime, and I just thought ‘I’m just a teenager going through seen a dead person before lowing the remaining synapses to develop and become capable of more what teenagers go through.’” complex functioning. As a toddler, the brain has its maximum number Lukas says that living with his parents wasn’t that bad, of neuro-connectors, but synaptic pruning is largely completed throughbut leaving to come to Ryerson made it easier to deal with his mental health. out the aforementioned ages of 15 to 25, which makes young adults more likely to develop While he has medication to help with his issues, Lukas says he isn’t free from sympmental health issues. This risk is enhanced if the person is a frequent user of alcohol or toms, and has to make a conscious effort to ensure his disorder doesn’t affect his drugs, since the brain itself is still developing. relationships with others. The Cannabis-Psychosis Link, a journal published in the Psychiatric Times in June 2012, “You just want to live in that moment and get away from what’s going on. I analyzed the findings of numerous studies conducted since 1987 that connected marijuana guess that’s why people party,” says Lukas. “They just want to have a good time use with the development of psychosis, a mental disorder in which contact with reality is lost.

p utti ng You r mind at risk

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

FEATURES

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Photo and illustrations: dasha Zolota

years and years every week. So we’ll refer them to people in the community who can see them for longer,” says Teo. Betzalel Wolff, a psychotherapist at Toronto Addiction Counselling, says that students rarely seek treatment for addictions or addictive behaviour, because it’s difficult to differentiate what is a problem, and what is normal and healthy for young adults. It is especially difficult for students to know if they have any issues related to sexual addiction because they either don’t know the consequences of their behaviour, or simply “think they’re having fun.” “We do have the compulsive masturbator or the guy who spends ten hours a day online, but [usually it’s more difficult to recognize],”says Wolff. “The guy who is doing things that may appear to be sexual addiction but he’s The compiled evidence suggests there is an “increased risk of psychosis in cannabis users comhaving no consequences – nothing’s going wrong. He’s watching porn for two hours pared with non users,” sometimes up to 40 per cent. But while cannabis use in adolescents a day but it’s not affecting his family or his job – then it’s going to be hard to call it may result in a mental disorder for those with a family history, there is non-conclusive data an addiction. He may be an addict or he may become an addict, but it’ll be hard at that suggests cannabis will trigger a disorder that wouldn’t have occurred without it. this point to call it an addiction.” Dietary habits, which are notoriously unbalanced for students, may The simplest way to know whether someone needs treatment, also have a direct correlation to mental health. The U.S. National Institutes of Health found that the freshman 15 could weigh on your mood It depends on the frequency, according to Wolff, is to determine whether the behaviour is causing significant consequences in the person’s life and they are as well. Their study found that those who drank more than four cans the quantity, when you use still unable to quit their habit. of soda per day had a 30 per cent greater risk of developing depression it, and what you’re using While the information is inconclusive on whether vices are than those who drank none. contributing to or simply triggering mental health issues, OuelAccording to Dr. Su-Ting Teo, Director of Student Health and let-Plamondon says students need to monitor whether their use of vices is reaching the Wellness, 11 per cent of visits to the Ryerson Medical Centre are related to mental health level of addiction. Those who “wake-and-bake,” for instance – where a user smokes issues. Teo says a number of these visitors report using vices, predominantly marijuana and marijuana in the morning, similar to having a coffee first-thing – should be concerned if alcohol, to cope with stress-related issues. they actually need the drug to start their day, according to Ouellet-Plamondon. “If they’re using them that much (daily or excessively), there’s often a mental health issue,” “There are people who will say ‘I [smoke] a joint three times a week and there are says Teo. “I would have the conversation and say, ‘this is helping you feel better, it makes no [negative] consequences – that’s where we’re less concerned,” she says. “There’s a total sense, but in the long run, it’s worsening the anxiety and depression. Do you want to do big difference between [occasional use], and when your body and mind are used to it.” something about it?’” Ouellet-Plamondon said there are always people who will try to keep their occasional he centre employs three full-time physicians and a weekly psychiatrist. While the unibad habits from transforming into an addiction, but there’s no guarantee their will can versity is reviewing its next steps in improving its services for students with mental overpower their possible dependence to a given vice. health issues – adding two additional counselors (making 14 in total) to the Centre for “There’s always a risk, but it depends on the frequency, the quantity, when you use Student Development and Counselling – it still lacks the resources needed if students it, and what you’re using,” she says. are having extensive issues, and often students are referred to nearby facilities, such as CAMH. *Name has been changed. “Because we have to support so many students at Ryerson, we can’t see one individual for

Experts have found a connection between your favourite bad habits and your worst feelings — from depression to reality disconnect. That vice may be nice, but it turns out university students are at the perfect age to snap.

By Charles Vanegas

T

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ARTS & LIFE

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

A film still from Andrew Moir’s documentary Just As I Remember, showing Moir’s fondest childhood memories.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDREW MOIR

A Ryerson film student won an award for his documentary about a father living with ALS, inspired by the story of his own father

Rye grad wins award & $5,000 with film
By Nicole Schmidt
Andrew Moir used to spend his childhood days at his father’s farm near Lucan, a short drive from London, Ont. “I have these memories of me spending time with [my father] in his fields,” he said. Moir’s father was diagnosed with ALS — an incurable, fatal illness that affects mobility, speech, and in later stages, the ability to swallow and breathe — when Moir was three years old. His dad is now paralyzed and cannot breathe without the help of a ventilator. So when the Ryerson film graduate first began creating his documentary, Just As I Remember, he did not know exactly how it would unfold. The film closely follows the lives of two men living with ALS. Brad, a father of three, still in the early stages of the disease, and Moir’s own dad. The final product has received a lot of positive attention, earning Moir the 2012 Manulife Financial Best Student Film Award and a $5,000 cash prize. As the narrator of the film, Moir relates Brad’s story back to his childhood, reflecting on what it was like growing up with a father who has ALS. “I made this film because I wanted to re-experience my childhood and learn more about my dad,” said Moir. “As much as the film is about Brad, the spine of it is about me reexperiencing my childhood through him.” Since his father was paralyzed, there were things that his family couldn’t do, but regardless, he still lead a normal life, saying he didn’t feel like the illness affected him in a negative way. But the documentary doesn’t only focus on the topic of the disease and the patients. It deals with how it changes and shapes a family. “It’s a very human story. I think that it appeals to a lot of people because it’s about basic things like being a child, having parents, being a parent, and family,” said Rachel McParland, the editor of the film. at first, Brad and his family were unsure about whether or not they wanted to participate. The film was shot over a ninemonth period. During that time, Moir interviewed Brad and his family with his cinematographer, shooting footage of their every day lives. At the end of the nine months, Moir worked with the collected material, editing and shaping a story from what he had gathered, and creating what became an awardwinning documentary. “I can’t say that it was a shock because I knew it was great,” said McParland. For Moir, the film is about helping viewers extract a better understanding of the resilience a parent can face, as well as what they are willing to do to protect their children. “It’s a chance for people to see personal bravery in the face of different realities,” said Moir. Because his dad is now bed-ridden, Moir says what he misses the most are those childhood days he spent with his father on the fields.

The spine of [this film] is about re-experiencing my childhood

IN THE NAME OF

INNOVATION
I am a person who challenges ideas and turns them into reality. I create and collaborate with an intellectual community. My passion is my research and this is where I will impact the future. I am a graduate student.

Moir started developing his idea for the documentary during the summer of 2011. He began the process by meeting with different families living with ALS. Brad’s family was the first one that Moir met with, and right away he knew that he wanted them to be a part of his documentary. Although he had a general idea about the direction he wanted to take in his work, he didn’t know what was going to happen because

UNIONTARIO
www.uoit.ca/graduatestudies

Lettuce wraps are for breakfast, lunch, or dinner: It depends what you put in it

Recipe: Chicken fajita lettuce wrap
Ingredients: -6 tbsp Italian dressing -1/4 tsp ground cumin -1 cup sliced onions -1 lb chicken breasts in strips Instructions: 1) Mix 1/4 cup of the dressing, cumin, and chicken in medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate 30 minutes to marinate. 2) Add leftover dressing, peppers and onions to large nonstick skillet. Cook on medium heat 6 to 8 minutes. Remove vegetable mixture from skillet; place in separate bowl. 3) Add chicken with marinade to same skillet. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, stirring frequently. 4) Return vegetable mixture to skillet; cook for 2 or 3 minutes,. 5) Spoon chicken mixture evenly onto lettuce leaves; sprinkle with cheese. 6) Slice an avocado and toss in. Roll up. Serve warm.
Vegetarians can substitute the chicken breast with tofu.
*Healthier option: substitute dressing with feta cheese. PHOTO COURESTY OF WWW.CAIRNSMANOR.COM RECIPE COURTESY OF KRAFT FOODS

-2 cups sliced red/green peppers -1 cup Cheddar cheese -8 large iceberg lettuce leaves

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

ARTS & LIFE

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This year’s paricipants of the Danier Design Challenge gave judges a hard time choosing winners

High-pressure leather front
The Danier Design Challenge is a partnership between Toronto-based Danier stores and Ryerson’s School of Fashion. It has become very popular amongst third-year fashion students enrolled in the advanced fashion design I class. Every year, they submit design illustrations of a leather jacket and after a rigorous judging process, 11 are selected to actually produce their designs. The student with the best final product gets to sell their jacket at a Danier store. “Danier is trying to market towards a younger audience,” says Som Kong, this year’s second-place winner. “We’re the younger audience who know what we like and what other people want to dress like.” The company provides contestants with all the materials, meaning there are no out-of-pocket expenses for designers, and the top three jackets get cash prizes of $5,000, $3,000, and $2,000 respectively. But Olga Koel, Danier’s chief merchandising officer, says the contest is about more than just the money. “[Students] have to feel that they’re getting something out of [the competition],” Koel says. She reminds students that even if they do not win, there’s always Mass Exodus, the fourth-year fashion show where participants unveil five outfits of their own creation. According to Koel, last year, Sisi Jiang, Alyssa Alikpala and Yvonne Lin caught Koel’s eye so she approached them about Danier manufacturing some of their garments for its stores. The students were paid for the designs and their own label was put on the pieces. Because of this experience, Koel likes to remind students that participation is all that counts. “Just because you didn’t make the top 10 or the top three doesn’t mean you don’t have a chance for next year.” Kong said he thinks what Danier is doing for the contestants is amazing. He will soon be on his way to Hong Kong for an exchange trip, where he will meet up with this year’s first place winner Ostwald Au-Yeung, who was already there at the time of the announcement and was unavailable for comment. “You can get all the education, but if the drive is not there then it’s [worthless],” Kong says. Robert Ott, Chair of the School of Fashion, agrees. He says he wants students to question the practices of the industry and to change it for the better. “We are in a position to not only train students but to actually educate them through leadership.”

RIC named top gallery in the city
By Susana Gómez Báez
The Ryerson Image Centre (RIC) was deemed the number one gallery in Toronto by BlogTO last week, calling it “Canada’s photography mecca.” What began as a simple remodelling of the Image Arts building soon turned into a world-class gallery, worthy of housing the single largest gift of cultural property ever gifted to a Canadian University—the Black Star Collection. With about 292,000 images capturing many of the most historical and political events of the late 20th century, the collection is valued by some at more than $100 million. Four new exhibitions will open at the end of this month. One of them, Unamerican Unfamous by Clive Holden, draws from some of the Black Star Collection photographs.

A model wearing Ostwald Au-Yeung’s winning design.

PHOTO: STINE DANIELLE

By Vanessa Francone
Although only the first-place of the annual Danier Design Challenge gets to sell their garment in a Danier store, the judges had so much difficulty choosing just one third-place winner this year that they settled for a three-way tie.

“Even if I didn’t win, I think it was great just to be here and to be recognized as one of the top 11,” says Diana Li, one of the third-place winners. “And just going through the process and having the judges input was great because they’re all industry professionals. That’s really valuable.”

Celebrity sighting at the MAC

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PHOTO: EMMA PRESTWICH

Early Tuesday morning, the fourth floor of the Mattamy Athletic Centre (MAC) was bustling with camera crews for the filming of an episode of the CW Television Network action show, Nikita. One of the stars was spotted wearing all black and holding a gun with a silencer, apparently picking out targets in the crowd of hockey fans below. Lead actress Maggie Q was also on set.

business.humber.ca/postgrad

14

SPORTS

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

Ryerson to host 2013 OUA Final Four
By Charles Vanegas
After months of speculation, Ryerson Athletics and the Ontario University Athletics (OUA) conference announced last week that the 2013 Wilson Cup will be held at the Mattamy Athletic Centre on March 1-2. The event, which will be televised on the Score network, will feature the semifinal, bronze-medal and championship games of the OUA men’s basketball playoffs. It’s the first time Ryerson has hosted an OUA basketball championship. “It’s great that we have the facilities to hold an event like this,” said Rams guard Aaron Best. “It’s great for our program.” Similar to when Ryerson hosted the Wake Forest Demon Deacons during the first Hoops Festival, the athletic department plans to hold the contests on Mattamy Home Ice. While the Hoops Festival attracted more supporters than the 1,000-seat Coca-Cola Court would’ve been able to accommodate, it only filled twothirds of the upstairs bowl. Ryerson Director of Athletics Ivan Joseph said that, after Ryerson qualifying, the easiest way to ensure attendance numbers for the Final Four is to reach out to students at other universities. “We have a pretty good community following of basketball [but] I think what we need to do is to get the students out of the institutions,” said Joseph. “To me, what makes a great basketball championship game is the energy and the enthusiasm and how loud it is, and the key to that is how we get out to the students.” Last season’s Final Four was originally planned to have been held at the MAC, but the building’s delayed construction forced the OUA to award the event to the University of Waterloo. With the completion of the state-of-the-art facility, it was assumed by many that Ryerson would be selected as the host, and was even listed as host on a tentative schedule by Lakehead — the team Ryerson upset in last season’s Final Four. Joseph says that while the athletic department knew its bid was selected as early as November, it wasn’t until December before an agreement was signed, due to uncertainty regarding the Score, the OUA’s TV partner, being acquired by Rogers Media.

PHOTO: BRIAN BATISTA BETTENCOURT

Ryerson will host the OUA Final Four in men’s basketball, one year after the Rams upset the #2-ranked Lakehead Thunderwolves in last year’s Wilson Cup semifinals. Similar to the Ryerson Hoops Festival, the games will be played on Mattamy Home Ice.

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8/7/12 9:45 AM

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

SPORTS

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Lacrosse returns to former Maple Leaf Gardens
By Josh Beneteau
Last weekend, the Toronto Shooting Stars made their Canadian Lacrosse League (CLax) debut in front of 500 cheering fans at the MAC — the first time lacrosse had been played in the building formerly known as Maple Leaf Gardens in 13 years. “Last time I was here, I was eight years old,” said Shooting Star Aaron Grayson. “It’s pretty exciting to play here.” CLax, entering its second season of league play, is a semi-professional indoor lacrosse league designed for players that don’t quite make the top league in North America, the National Lacrosse League (NLL). CLax is comprised of seven teams — with clubs located in Toronto, Barrie, Brampton, Oshawa, St. Catharines and Hagersville (two teams, the Iroquois Ironmen and the Ohsweken Demons, play here) — playing a 14game season. Indoor lacrosse (also known as box lacrosse) uses a similar format as hockey, with a goalie and five players (called “runners,” as opposed to skaters). “But the strategy is closer to basketball, with pick-and-rolls and a more offensive mindset,” said CLax Deputy Commissioner Jim Veltman, who was the captain for Toronto’s NLL team, the Rock, for 10 seasons, and is regarded by many to be the Wayne Gretzky of lacrosse. Despite being Canada’s national game, lacrosse isn’t as well-known, played or watched as other sports. But the Toronto Shooting Stars are hoping to change that for Ryerson students. “What you see [the crowd turnout] is by word of mouth,” said Veltman. “Once we have a chance to get our feet off the ground, we hope to get into the Ryerson community to [show them] a product we hope they will love.” CLax Commissioner Paul St. John said he was in contact with the RSU and is hoping a partnership will draw in more students to games. The Shooting Stars next home game is Feb. 3 vs. the Barrie Blizzard.

PHOTO: STINE DANIELLE

The Shooting Stars lost a close match to their main rivals, the Durham Turfdogs, 11-10. Last season, both teams shared an arena in Oshawa, when the Shooting Stars were known as the Oshawa Machine.

Immerse yourself in a world of infinite possibility
PHOTO: CHARLES VANEGAS

The women’s basketball team is one of many being forced out of the MAC for the Ontario Liberal Leadership convention.

Liberals force Rams out of MAC
By Alan Hudes
Nearly a year after celebrating the final game on their former home court, the Ryerson Rams are returning to Kerr Hall Gymnasium. With the Ontario Liberal Leadership convention being held at the Mattamy Athletic Centre (MAC) from Jan. 25–27, Ryerson Athletics will be forced to move several home games out of Coca-Cola Court. “The Liberal Leadership convention is going to bring national attention to the venue just with the nature of what (it’s) all about,” said Kelly Austin, director of sales and marketing for the MAC, of the decision to relocate the Rams in favour of the event that will select the next Premier of Ontario. The former Maple Leaf Gardens was also the site where outgoing Premier Dalton McGuinty, who announced his resignation on Oct. 15, was first elected as the leader of the Ontario Liberals in 1996. “The building has historically been the site of a number of different political events [and] it is a pretty significant [one] to have here,” said Austin. This year’s convention has affected six Rams home games. The men’s and women’s basketball teams are scheduled to host the Queen’s Gaels on Friday, Jan. 25, while both volleyball squads are slated to play the Guelph Gryphons the following day. The men’s volleyball team will play the Waterloo Warrriors on Jan. 27. “I’m kind of frustrated that Ryerson would plan something in the gym that they just built for [us],”said Kelcey Wright, a fourth-year guard on the women’s basketball team. “It’s obviously a distraction in our season, and we definitely lose our home court advantage.” The games mark the first varsity action in Kerr Hall since a historic win on Feb. 25 of last year, when the men’s basketball team defeated the Ottawa Gee-Gees in the second round of the playoffs, advancing them to the Ontario University Athletic (OUA) Final Four. The men’s hockey team also moved the date of its home game against the University of Toronto to accommodate the convention. The downtown rivals, who were scheduled to face off at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 24, will now play a day earlier to allow for the conversion of Mattamy Home Ice. This isn’t the first time the Rams have been displaced by a high-profile event this season. On Oct. 20, the men’s hockey team was forced to move a game to GM Centre in Oshawa, in order to accommodate the Ryerson Hoops Festival and men’s basketball game that featured Wake Forest of the NCAA.

JUNE 3 – 15, 2013

Puppetry Intensive

Humber School of Creative & Performing Arts Toronto, Ontario, Canada For 12 full days of in-depth training you will: • learn from some of the best professional puppet artists in North America • take courses in Construction, Manipulation and Ensemble Creation • work in the state-of-the-art facilities of Humber College's Arts and Media Studios • rediscover your own endless artistic potential

www.humber.ca/puppetry

16

biz & tech

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

Komodo OpenLab’s Tecla Shield lets the mobility impaired use smartphones

Accessing the technological age
by Jeff Lagerquist
Nodding her head, Carolyn Pioro sends a text message on her Samsung Galaxy Note, a much needed upgrade from her outdated cell phone and earpiece. Using the same controls that pilot her wheelchair, she selects the next letter as the cursor automatically scrolls each character on the keyboard. An accomplished trampolinist and circus performer, Pioro suffered a severe spinal cord injury while rehearsing for a performance in 2005. She landed on her head and neck when her trapeze mate couldn’t catch her. The fall left her without feeling or mobility below her shoulders. While the world embraced the wave of smartphone and tablet technology, Pioro was left behind. “A lot of times you’re cut off from aspects of society because you can’t get into a particular building, but there was a whole smartphone culture that everyone is in sync with that. I was an outsider to that until now,” said the 33-year-old graduate of the Chang School’s magazine and web publishing program. Komodo OpenLab, born from Ryerson’s Digital Media Zone (DMZ), has developed a product that allows those who lack conventional dexterity to take control of the latest smartphones and tablets using input from wheelchair driving controls and other sensors they already own and use. “Think about how many things we do on our smartphones. We have an endless amount of information and entertainment at out fingertips. For people with no access to printed material or a universal remote, it’s a big deal,” said Mauricio Meza, one of the company’s co-founders. The Tecla Shield’s hardware, contained in a small case, attaches to a user’s mobility device and uses a Bluetooth interface to connect to any iOS or Android device. Four hundred have been sold in the year since the Tecal Shield hit the market. Silicon Valley insiders touring the DMZ noticed the start-up in the early stages and helped foster partnerships with both Apple and Google. Komodo is also looking to partner with Canadian wireless carriers to increase the company’s exposure. Komodo’s “not-just-for-profit” model means that while they anticipate significant profits, the company will keep costs to consumers as low as possible. Price tags on assistive products are usually double or triple their consumer equivalent at Future Shop or Best Buy. “Anything labeled medical or for use by someone with a disability means the prices are going to be crazy jacked up,” said Pioro. “I was using a speaker phone that cost around $400, and the device that I use for controlling the lights in my apartment, that seems like it was made in the 1970s, cost over $700.” By comparison, Apple’s $399 iPad looks like a bargain. The problem is that in order to qualify for government assistance, a product has to be designed for rehab purposes from the ground up. “Companies have to go out of their way to redesign something that already exists in the market place to make it more rehab oriented to be able to fulfill the requirements of various government assistance programs,” said Meza. Komodo’s partnerships with notorious rivals Google and Apple help ensure the user experience remains as seamless as possible and keeps up with the rapid release of apps. The next generation iOS Tecla Shield will likely wear the coveted “made for Apple” badge.

Screen ShoT froM video (Theeyeopener.coM)

Mauricio Meza explains how his Tecla Shield reads input from mobility device sensors and operates a smartphone or tablet.

For more on this story, and to watch a video demonstration, visit theeyeopener.com

From trade shows to weddings to cultural festivals, this program offers the unique skills you need to launch your career as an event coordinator, account representative, corporate meeting planner or many other exciting career opportunities.

EVENT MANAGEMENT
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE

business.humber.ca/postgrad

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013

COMMUNITIES

17

This year’s collaborative assignments on display in the lobby of the architecture building.

PHOTO: STINE DANIELLE

Designing civility in downtown Toronto
By Shannon Baldwin
Imagine being able to walk out of a subway station and rather than passing some unused green space, you can walk up to a cellphone charging station, use an interactive digital wall or find out where you’re going on a map that’s also made in brail. Ryerson’s architecture students designed places just like that for this year’s annual collaborative assignment: An Architecture of Civility. The goal for this year was to take an existing, unused space in Toronto and redesign it into something the community can use and interact with, while keeping in mind Toronto’s diverse demographic. And they have to do all of this in four days. Architecture student Radomir Smiljanic said that the biggest struggle with the time constraint is that “it’s one of those projects where you can keep battling yourself back to the beginning.” The theme of civility also put an additional emphasis on inclusion by having a group of volunteer graduate students assess designs from the viewpoint of concerned community voices. They represent dog walkers, the homeless, the disabled and other minority groups that need to be voiced. Third-year student Aubrey Delvca and her group worked on the Harbour Square Park Station. To create inclusivity, they designed agricultural gardens for community use, level walkways for those in wheelchairs and clean lake water for drinking and irrigation. For the blind, they created pathways that change textures, from concrete to limestone pavers to woodchips, to help differentiate paths. But Delvca said it took a lot of focus and long hours to create that design with her group. “You’re given four days to do a project that you’d usually have months to design” she said. The project divides 400 architecture students into 16 groups to fully design and digitally create a working space in Toronto that all types of people can use. Architectural science professor, George Kapelos, said the theme of civility became actualized through this exercise because students had to quickly learn how to work with each other and different skill levels, since each group was made up of students from first through fourth year. “I’ve been impressed by the number of people that have thrown themselves into the assignment,” Kapelos said. “Everybody finds that they have a voice.” First-year Shirathmikha Suresh Kumar said she found it difficult to find her voice in the beginning, since she’d never done anything like this in her classes before. “There were definitely times where I was lost, but we learned so much from the upper years that I ended up really enjoying this whole experience,” she said. Kapelos said that the collaborative is an initiation for first years, but he doesn’t think that puts them at a disadvantage since, “first and second year students are sometimes more technologically advanced than the upper years.” While it’s important to come up with a good design, Kapelos said the process of working with others and learning together is just as important. The designs will remain on display in the lobby of the architecture building until Jan. 31 and the whole process can be viewed at http://dasryersonu.tumblr.com/

Schulich

Global Reach. Innovative Programs. Diverse Perspectives.

“All Master of Accounting programs are not created equal. The new Schulich degree offers a

unique opportunity for non-business graduates to access a rewarding

career as an accounting professional.”
MARCIA ANNISETTE, PhD

Associate Professor of Accounting Director, Master of Accounting Program Schulich School of Business

Three fast tracks to a rewarding career in business
Choose a 12-month full-time Schulich Masters program.

Learn more
INFORMATION SESSION

MAcc

Master of Accounting

Open doors to a career in accounting. Choose the CA Accredited Stream or the Management Accounting Information Stream. A unique program designed for both non-business and business graduates alike.

MF

Master of Finance

Become an expert in all areas of finance. Specialize in Capital Markets or Financial Risk Management. Gain exposure to governance, regulatory and global frameworks that impact decision-making.

MSc

MSc in Business Analytics

Master the skills to uncover business insights and drive decisions. This degree leads to careers as a Business Analytics professional in the fields of strategy, research, marketing, consulting and sales.

Ryerson University Tuesday, January 22 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Career Development & Employment Centre Room POD 60 Lower level of the Podium Building

Schulich Programs: MBA, Accelerated MBA, IMBA, MBA/JD, MPA, MF, MSc (Business Analytics), MAcc Study Options: Full-Time, Part-Time Evenings, Days and Alternate Weekends

Registration optional, visit: schulich.yorku.ca/infosessions

Schulich Leads in Rankings Schulich is ranked in the world’s top tier of business schools by The Economist (#16 in the world); Forbes (10th best non-US school); Bloomberg Businessweek (14th best non-US school); The Aspen Institute, a US think tank (#2 in the world in Social and Environmental Leadership); and Expansión (#20 in the world) in their most recent global MBA surveys. The Schulich MBA is also ranked #1 in Canada by The Economist, Forbes, The Aspen Institute and Expansión.

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Hey everyone, Fun Editor Kai Benson here with another exciting offer! Today’s offer is for whoever lays out this page to go eat a dick! Seriously, what am I supposed to do with this tiny space up here? Does anyone out there specialize in incredibly tiny comics? Please send your submissions to fun@theeyeopener.com. Comics must be no more than one half-inch tall, because whoever laid out this page is AN ASSHOLE. You hear that, Jerry? I’m going to tell the government that you’re making bombs in your garage. I’ll tell your wife that you tried to seduce my teenage sister. I swear to god, Jerry, I will. What did I ever do to you? And for all my not-doing-badshit-to-you, you repay me with a page that won’t fit anything properly! I’ll spit in every coffee you ever drink, Jerry, I’ll firebomb your house and make obscene phone calls to your mother. I fucking hate you, Jerry.

FUN
Horoscopes!
Aries
You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to never drink again by dying of alcohol poisoning.

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 By Kai Benson!
Libra
You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to relax more by getting addicted to Xanax.

Taurus

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to lose weight when a drifter cuts off your legs. You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to run every day, because now a pack of wolves will chase you to school every day.

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to get straight A’s, because it turns out all your teachers love blowjobs! You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to enjoy life more because that’s an easy resolution, you fucking coward.

Scorpio

Gemini

Sagittarius

From retail management to wholesale to logistics, this program offers the unique skills you need to launch your career as a fashion buyer, logistics coordinator, product development manager, visual merchandiser and many other exciting career options.

Cancer

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to quit smoking when your mom finds out and threatens to stab you in the lungs.

Aquarius

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to stop smoking weed, because meth is taking up most of your time these days. You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to volunteer more now that you owe the court 300 hours of community service.

FASHION MANAGEMENT & PROMOTIONS
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE

Leo

Pisces

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to spend your money more wisely now that you can only afford cat food. You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to eat healthier now that those vegans are keeping you in a pit in their basement.

Virgo

Capricorn

You will accomplish your New Year’s resolution to kill your family. So, uh... Good job, buddy. You really nailed that one.

business.humber.ca/postgrad

Wednesday Jan. 16 2013

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MMPA

Master of Management & Professional Accounting

• Designed primarily for non-business undergraduates • For careers in Management, Finance and Accounting • Extremely high co-op and permanent placement To learn more about the MMPA Program, attend our information sessions: Wednesday, January 16, 2013 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Room POD 60A, Podium Building, Ryerson University Tuesday, January 29, 2013 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Room POD 60A, Podium Building, Ryerson University

www.utoronto.ca/mmpa

Design Exchange
is pleased to announce the second annual

Connect: EnAbling Change Competition,

a provincial, post-secondary design competition.

Open to both undergraduate and graduate students, this multi-disciplinary competition seeks to explore design that is accessible to the greatest number of people, to the largest extent possible, regardless of age or ability.

For more info, go to dx.org/connect Submit by May 1, 2013

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10Dundas EYE OPEN JAN Ad_10Dundas EYE OPEN JAN Ad 12-12-06 2:30 PM Page 1

Wednesday Jan. 16 2013

EAT, EAT,
Over $10,000 in prizes to be won! Exclusively for Ryerson Students.
Pick up a new monthly DUNDEAL Card at participating eateries for your chance to win the latest monthly prize. Check out 10dundaseast.com at the beginning of each month for the latest prize giveaway and more details.

THIS IS AN

IT’S A

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January’s DUNDEAL giveaway
WIN 1OF 10
TTC STUDENT

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FREE
METRO PASSES

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*Each meal purchase must be a minimum of $4.99 (plus tax) to earn 1 stamp. Check out 10dundaseast.com for more details.

Visit 10dundaseast.com for complete Contest Rules & Regulations.

DUNDAS EAST

25 EATERIES & 15 GREAT SHOPS NE CORNER OF YONGE & DUNDAS ACROSS FROM DUNDAS SQUARE

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