T h e T r e a s u r y o f t h e H u n g a r i a n

F r u i t s a n d V e g e t a b l e s
2
Яблоку
Mal us domest i ca
1
Pr ol ogue
The picturesque lands of Hungary are characterised by a cli-
mate which is especially good for fruits of the temperate zone.
The length of the growing season, the number of days with
sunshine, the distribution of precipitation, the humidity of the
air and the quality of the soil give fruits a special flavour. They
also result in a special balance of acids and sugar, making any
variety created in the various countries of the world and grown
in Hungary bear fruits with an unequalled flavour. In addition
to mellowing fruits, the rich soils and the long, sunny growing
season produce first quality vegetables as well.
In addition to excellent taste, Hungarian fruit and vegetable
varieties also have an unsurpassed dietary value. For example,
a survey of the Michigan State University and Amway
Corporation on the composition and health effects of
Hungarian sour cherry has produced interesting results. The
composition tests showed that puree made from Hungarian
sour cherry contained more antioxidants and four to five times
more anthocyan than, the Montmorency variety for example,
which is widely produced in America and Europe. Data from
the medical institutions participating in the survey indicated
that the active substances of sour cherry have been shown to
reduce the risk of cancer by 50% and the risk of heart attack by
30% in clinical and other tests.
It is good to know that in addition to climate and soil quality,
the geographical location of Hungary has other benefits as
well. Situated in the centre of Europe, Hungary is both a bridge
between East and West and a node for business. To achieve
this, we would like to become attractive to all players in
European horticulture, and turn Hungary into the centre of the
horticultural business in Central and Eastern Europe.
This publication is intended to bring to the mind of the readers
the benefits of our most important fruits and vegetables, so
that they can enrich and improve their diet through the varied
and informed consumption of these important sources of
nutrients.
The Tr easur y of t he Hungar i an Fr ui t s
and Veget abl es
2
The apple is a symbol of love, beauty and fertility. Greek
mythology considered it a panacea. As the saying goes , ’An
apple a day keeps the doctor away’.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Apple is a fruit with very high dietary value. Its high phospho-
rus content makes it recommended for persons under stress,
for persons doing intellectual work, students, people with
anaemia, children and the elderly. It reduces atony and exces-
sive blood level in the liver, and reinvigorates muscles and the
nervous system. It has a diuretic and anti-rheumatic effect. It
restores the body’s pH balance to normal, and attenuates
strong acids. It is rich in pectin and vitamin C, and it is very
important in any general detoxification or skin healing pro-
gramme. It is also useful for regulating cholesterol level.
Tartaric acid and malic acid in apple have a beneficial effect on
digestion. Grated apple, left to stand uncovered for fifteen
minutes, can be used to treat both queasiness and diarrhoea.
People with diabetes should eat tartish apple (in smaller
amounts several times a day). Tartish apple is recommended
also for people susceptible to rheumatism, to those who are
overweight or suffer from constipation. Sweet apple alleviates
diarrhoea, and helps those who suffer from an excessive level
of gastric acids. It has been proven that people who regularly
eat apple in the winter are less likely to catch a flu or develop
illnesses of the upper respiratory system.
Possi bl e uses:
Apple is an extremely versatile fruit. Here, we highlight some
possible uses which are less commonly known. Apple peel tea
is an excellent remedy for the irritation of the bowels and the
stomach. Apple peel tea is also a diuretic and can therefore be
recommended to assist with weight loss. Dried apple is a won-
derful snack, both when mixed with muesli or to replace
candy. Apple juice is a good medicine to treat renal calculus
and bile-stone. Apple juice may be pressed from any type of
apple, but crisp, succulent types are the best. Wax-coated
apple needs to be peeled before pressing. Waxing, however, is
not typically applied in Hungary, only to a portion of imported
apple. Do not forget, however, that apple juice made from
pared apple contains only half as much vitamin as juice made
from unpeeled apple. It is especially vitamin A which is con-
centrated in the skin. Vitamin C can be found in juice made
from both peeled and unpeeled apple. 1 kg apples make 0.4-
0.5 l juice. Apple juice also has an anti-virus effect and thus
helps fight off influenza, cold or intestinal infections. The high
level of fruit pectin found in apple often makes apple juice
unclear and thick. The same pectin, however, helps stop both
diarrhoea and constipation.
Maj or consti tuents:
Nutrition figures (100 g provides): 54 kcal, 12 g carbohydrate,
0.3 g protein, 0.4 g fat, 2.3 g fibre, 7 mg calcium, 0.5 mg iron,
145 mg potassium, 3 mg sodium, 12 mg phosphorus, 12 mg
vitamin C, 0.3 mg niacin, 0.03 mg vitamin B1 and B2.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Apple can be grown under most types of climate, and it stores
well. Apple production is significant in Hungary, amounting to
more than half of the country’s total fruit production. Main
growing areas: Trans-Danubia, Western Hungary – Zala, Vas,
Veszprém and Somogy counties, the region between the rivers
Danube and Tisza - Bács, Csongrád and Pest counties, Szabolcs-
Szatmár-Bereg, Hajdú-Bihar and Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén coun-
ties.
Of all fruits, apple has the largest number of varieties. Nearly
1200 apple varieties are produced around the world. The first
domestic apple varieties appear in the markets in mid-July.
These are summer varieties, for example Julyred. The apples
harvested in August, such as Mollies Delicious, Éva and Nyári
fontos, can only be stored for a limited period.
Autumn apple varieties include Gala and its variants. The origi-
nal variety is from New Zeeland. In Hungary, it ripens at the
end of August and in the beginning of September, and it can
be stored and consumed for 3 to 4 months thereafter. The fruit
is of medium size, round, crisp, sweet and aromatic. It is basi-
cally yellowish, with some orange-red colouration. Other
important varieties include Ozark Gold, Elstar, Arany Parmen,
Egri piros and Jonathán.
Winter varieties intended for storage include Golden Delicious
and its variants, Red Delicious and its shape versions, Jonagold,
Cox's orange, Ranet, Batul, Húsvéti rozmaring, Idared, Braeburn
and Fuji.
Mal us domest i ca
Appl e
3
Appl e
Chicken Breast with Apple on Rosemary Skewer
Ingredients:
2 chicken breast fillets
salt, ground pepper
2 apples
6-8 fresh rosemary stems
oil for roasting
Wash and dry the chicken breasts, and cut them to 1.5 cm cubes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, mix thoroughly, cover and put in the
refrigerator for half an hour. Then wash the apples. Do not peel. Cut the apples in half, remove the core, and cut into approx. ½ cm slices.
Remove the rosemary leaves from the stem, only leaving a small leaf at the top to prevent the meat and apple pieces from slipping down.
Then spit the chicken breast cubes and apple slices alternately on the rosemary stems. Heat the oil in a grilling plate or a pan and roast
both sides of the skewers for 8 to 10 minutes. While roasting, sprinkle with the minced rosemary leaves. Offer grilled vegetables as garnish.
Time to prepare: 1 hr | One serving provides 753 kcal
4
Pyr us communi s
Pear was widely known in the antique world, and it was often
mentioned by both Roman and Greek authors. Pear was first
grown by the most ancient Greek tribe, the Achaeans. Le
Lectier’s catalogue, published in 1958, described as many as
254 varieties.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
In traditional medicine, pear is noted for its ability to regulate
blood circulation, its diuretic effect, and for preventing caries
and cancer of the food-pipe. Pear contains much fibre, half of
it in the skin. These fibres absorb water and thus improve
bowel functions, and can therefore prevent deficiency of peri-
stalsis and constipation symptoms. They also dilute potential
carcinogens and cause them to leave the alimentary tract
faster, which can prevent cancer in the colon. Pear contains
nearly as much pectin as apple. Pectin inhibits the absorption
of fats and cholesterol, and has an effect on cholesterol
metabolism. Persons with a sensitive digestive system should
not consume a large amount of pear, as its detoxification
action may cause queasiness and headache. Succulent, soft
and sweet varieties are the most recommended. Pear is excel-
lent for canning and drying, but it may also be stored fresh in
ULO cold stores.
Possi bl e uses:
Due to its salt dissolution and alkalizing effect, pear is most
suitable for a fruit diet, which will greatly benefit people with
rheumatism, gout or arteriosclerosis. Pear is also recommend-
ed for nephritic persons, as it is very effective in dissolving uric
acid crystals. Pear is beneficial for the entire body, and is espe-
cially recommended against chronic constipation and neu-
ropathy, as it is a good laxative and stimulates the central
nervous system. As a diet, it is recommended to be consumed
for one or two weeks for breakfast and supper, with brown rye
bread. The recommended daily amount is 1-1.5 kg. It is also
suitable for people with diabetes. Pear juice is very thick and
sweet, but it contains an extremely large amount of valuable
nutrients.
Maj or consti tuents:
Pear contains a significant amount of vitamins A, B1, B2 and C,
folic acid, as well as nicotinamide. It is rich in phosphorus and
potassium, and also contains Na, Ca, Fe, S and chloride. One kg
pear makes 0.25-0.4 l juice. One kg pear contains 4 g protein,
120 g carbohydrate, 4 g mineral salts, and 26 g fibre. Its energy
content is 209 kJ/50 kcal per 100 g.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Major growing areas are Western Hungary - Zala, Vas, Győr-
Moson-Sopron counties, Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén county –
Bodrogköz, Pest county and the micro-region of Szatmár,
where the annual precipitation exceeds 800 mm.
In Hungary, winter pear varieties are produced mainly in
South-western Trans-Danubia and in the northern counties,
while summer and autumn varieties are produced in the
region between rivers Danube and Tisza. The most important
varieties are Bosc kobak (41 %), William’s pear (12 %), and Clapp
kedveltje. Additional important varieties include Packham's
Triumph, Hardenpont winter pear, Téli esperes, Esperen berga-
mott, Guyot Gyula and Diel. Pear trees have special require-
ments for their location, such as lots of precipitation which is
distributed in an appropriate way. Pear trees also need a high
level of air humidity, and will not tolerate dry air. At the right
location, with irrigation, high-quality fruit of excellent taste can
be produced.
William’s Pear
This variety comes from England, and dates back to as far as
1770. It is fit for consumption from the 2nd or 3rd decades
of August. It can be stored until the end of October in a cold
store. It is delicious, sweet, juicy, soft, and has a distinctive
aroma. It’s a large soft pear variety, with smooth soft skin.
When ripe, the skin is yellowish, with scattered small brown
spots. This high-quality variety is excellent for canning.
Bosc kobak, also known as Alexander pear
It may be harvested from mid-September and stored for six
months in a cold store. It’s juicy, with fine grains, sweet, and has
a delicious aroma. It has an elongated shape, similar to a bottle.
The part below the stem is often a little curved. It’s dry skin is
rough to the touch. It is basically green, but it’s usually covered
in a network of fine brown lines. It was found in a forest near
Aprémont, France, and named by the director of the nursery-
garden in Versailles at that time, whose name was Bosc.
Pear
5
Pear
Turkey Breast on a Spit with Stewed Pear
Ingredients:
4 slices of turkey breast fillet, each approx. 150 g
1 teaspoon ground anise
salt
4 medium-sized pears
200 g red grape
30 g butter or margarine
0.1 l white wine
1 small lemon
2-3 teaspoons of oil
Beat out the meat slices lightly, salt and dust with the ground anise. Cut the pears in half lengthwise, remove the core, and cut the fruit
to pieces. Pick each grape from the cluster. Melt the butter, put in the pears, turn the pear pieces over a few times, and add the wine and
the lemon juice. Cook for 3-4 minutes, then add the grapes and cook for another 3-4 minutes. Oil the turkey meat and roast it in a grilling
oven or in a non-stick pan. Let the juice drip down, put the meat on a plate and add the fruits.
Time to prepare: 40 minutes | One serving provides 1882 kJ/450 kcal
6
Pr unus cer asus
Sour cherry originates from the Caucasus region and Asia Minor.
It is hard to track its appearances in the past, as old drawings do
not always indicate clearly whether it’s cherry or sour cherry. For
a long time, it was overshadowed by cherry. Sour cherry produc-
tion was given a boost in the 16th century. Sour cherry was one
of the first fruits cultivated by the Hungarian people. The micro-
climate of the Carpathian Basin is optimal for sour cherry; as a
result, the region has become one of the major gene centres for
this fruit.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Together with cherry, sour cherry is very valuable as compo-
nent of spring diets. It is excellent against paleness. In tradi-
tional medicine, it is generally recommended to treat problems
in the urinary tract. When eaten regularly, it stimulates bowel
functions. Its fibre content may reduce constipation and defi-
ciency of peristalsis. Sour cherry stem can be used as an anti-
catarrh, antispasmodic, sedative and diuretic substance, as well
as in a weight loss diet, and in the case of heart illness. Sour
cherry stem extract is also sold in herb shops. Consuming 20
uncooked sour cherries a day will prevent the formation of
plaques on the walls of arteries, while antioxidants in sour
cherry juice help retain the flexibility of vein walls, and thus
prevent vein problems. The consumption of fruit juice made
from sour cherry purée has been proven to alleviate pains
caused by illnesses of the joints in only three months. Sour
cherry juice is also ten times more effective in alleviating head-
ache than aspirin, while having no ill effects on the stomach.
Possi bl e uses:
Sour cherry is globally primarily regarded as industrial raw mate-
rial. Therefore, consumption of raw sour cherry, which is wide-
spread in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, including
Hungary, is somewhat an exception. Although a large portion of
the Hungarian consumers are familiar with and like sour cherry, its
level of consumption still does not match its significance.
Promoting the consumption of fresh sour cherry would be impor-
tant for Hungary also because then the more favourable compo-
sition of Hungarian varieties – which is better than that of the
varieties of other countries – could exert a greater influence.
Maj or consti tuents:
100 g sour cherry provides 213 kJ/51 Kcal. Its main constituent is
water (85%), but 100 g flesh contains 10 g carbohydrate, 1 g
protein and 1 g ballast substances, 2 g organic acid, as well as
macro and micro elements and lipids. Sour cherry contains
mainly the carbohydrates glucose and fructose. 100 g sour
cherry contains 12 mg vitamin C, together with potassium, phos-
phorus, magnesium and calcium. Its iron content is not negligi-
ble either. Sour cherry is a source of all essential amino acids.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Sour cherry is a fruit species which can adapt to and bear fruit
under a wide range of climatic circumstances. It is native to all
parts of the country. The three major growing regions in
Hungary are the region between rivers Danube and Tisza, the
middle part of Trans-Danubia, and Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg
county. High season for sour cherry lasts from the beginning of
June to the end of the first decade of July. As a result of the
creation of self-pollinating varieties, production in Hungary
started to increase in the 1970-ies. Sour cherry is a true success
story among Hungarian export fruits thanks to its size, colour,
and the ease of stoning. Hungarian sour cherries have an
unmatched quality.
A few years before, the American Amway Corporation and the
Michigan State University commissioned a survey on the com-
position and health effects of the colour substances and anti-
oxidants found in some Hungarian sour cherry varieties
(Újfehértói fürtös, Érdi bőtermő). Studies of the composition
showed that purée made from Hungarian sour cherry con-
tained more antioxidants and four to five times more anthocy-
an than purée made from the Montmorency variant, which is
widely produced in America and Western Europe. This makes
the Hungarian variety significantly more valuable than other
European and American varieties in terms of nutrition and as a
commodity.
Sour cherry varieties are grouped in three distinct categories in
industrial usage, each with very different properties:
1. Juicy varieties with lots of colour substance, fit for juice
production, e.g. ’Gypsy sour cherry’.
2. Large varieties with firm flesh and a balanced sugar and
acid content, used in the canning industry, e.g. ’Pándy’.
3. Varieties used by the confectionary profession, e.g. ’Pipacs’.
Sour cher r y
7
Sour cher r y
Sour Cherry Pudding
Ingredients (for 6 large slices):
4 eggs
6 teaspoons (approx. 120 g) honey
0.5 l milk
6 rolls or croissants (or braid of the same weight, 350-400 g)
0.70 kg sour cherry
1 teaspoon cinnamon
4 tablespoons (approx. 50 g) wheat germ
4 tablespoons apricot jam (preserved with honey if available)
2 tablespoons (approx. 40 g) grape-sugar
to grease the oven-pan: 1 tablespoon margarine
Separate egg yolk from egg-white. Add half of the honey to they yolk and beat until foamy. Add the milk. Cut the rolls in half lengthwise.
Put them in the milk and let them soak for approx. 10 minutes, turning them once or twice. Meanwhile, stone the sour cherries and mix
with the other half of the honey. Add cinnamon for flavour, then the wheat germ. Grease a small high-walled oven-pan with margarine,
and put half of the roll slices in the pan. Add an even layer of sour cherries and cover with the other half of the roll slices. Heat the oven
to 180 ºC and bake for approx. 15-18 minutes. Spread apricot jam on the top. Beat the egg-white until you get a mousse, adding two
tablespoons of grape-sugar towards the end. Spread the mousse on the cake, put back in the oven and bake for approx. 10 minutes more.
Cut into cubes and serve while still warm.
Note: You can add raisins to the buns if you like.
Time to prepare: 60 minutes | One serving provides 1814 kJ/435 kcal
“Meteor korai”
This variety was created in 1965 by Maliga Pál. Ripe in the first
week of June, with soft juicy flesh and characteristic sour cherry
flavour.
“Érdi bőtermő”
Another Hungarian variety, excellent as preserved fruit. The fruit
is of medium size, light carmine colour, with moderately soft
flesh, giving off juice which stains.
There are numerous further promising candidates, of which
Maliga emléke deserves special mention. This 22-23 mm,
medium-sized and moderately soft sour cherry variety can be
harvested in the third decade of June.
8
Cer asus avi um
Cherry is a symbol of freshness, spring and youth. In Japan, the
entire country celebrates when the cherry trees are in blos-
som. Cherry is a descendant of a small-fruited wild cherry,
which has existed in the Near East for a very long time. Nearly
400 years B.C., the disciple of Socrates, Xenophon wrote that
when returning from the lost battle of Cunaxa, the Greek sol-
diers quenched their thirst with delicious juicy cherry. Wild
cherry was native to Hungary before the Hungarian people
first arrived.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
In ancient times, Greek doctors prescribed cherry for epilepsy.
Every part of the cherry is – flesh, stone and stem – has healing
properties. Cherry has a cleansing effect on the blood, the
digestive system and the excretory system. The acid it contains
can dissolve stones in the human body. Cherry-stone and
cherry juice strengthen the muscles of the heart. When eaten
in itself, it can restore the acid and base balance of the body.
Cherry has an alkalinizing effect, and it can neutralize blood
acidity. Cherry can be considered a fruit with full nutritional
value. When eaten regularly, it alleviates pain in the joints and
pain from gout, and reduces the risk of caries. It strengthens
the muscles and nerves, and also soothes nerves. It regulates
liver and stomach functions. Due to its laxative effect, it is rec-
ommended in cases of constipation. It improves the natural
resistance of the body, and stimulates the immune system.
Being rich in potassium, it can help the body excrete excess
sodium and water, which makes it an excellent cure for gout.
Possi bl e uses:
Cherry stalk tea is recommended for illnesses of the stomach
and the lungs. It also has a very strong diuretic effect. A mask
made of cherry mash reinvigorates tired skin when spread on
the face and neck. Placed on the forehead, it helps fight
migraine. Oil pressed from the stone is used for the prevention
of stroke. Cherry makes a good and wholesome breakfast. It
may be eaten by people with diabetes as well, as it is low in
carbohydrate, and a large part of its sugar content comes from
cellulose. Eating only cherry for one or two days in cherry
season cleanses the body by helping the excretion of waste
materials and poisons.
Maj or consti tuents:
Cherry juice contains 0.4 mg vitamin A /100 g, approximately
the same amount of vitamins B and C, and it also provides folic
acid and nicotinamide (vitamin PP). It contains the following
minerals and trace elements: iron, calcium, phosphorus, mag-
nesium, sodium, potassium, sulphur, zinc, copper, manganese
and cobalt. 1 kg cherry makes 0.4-0.5 l juice.
Composition: 100 g cherry fruit provides 266 kJ (63 kcal) ener-
gy, 82% water and 13% carbohydrate, 1% organic acid and 1%
proteins, which include all 10 essential amino acids.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Some regions of Hungary are outstanding in terms of soil and
climate for the production of cherry, and numerous high-
quality Hungarian variants have been created. These are char-
acterised by firm flesh and an excellent harmony of flavours,
offering significant competitive advantage. Regions of produc-
tion: the region between rivers Danube and Tisza, the Southern
Great Plain, near River Tisza in and around Nagykörű, Szolnok
county, near Gyöngyös in the Northern Mountain Range, in
Northern Hungary, around Lake Balaton and in Trans-Danubia.
Varieties produced in Hungary can be harvested for 8-9 weeks
from 15-20 May. The most important varieties include Bigarreau
Burlat, Germersdorfi óriás, Van, Margit and Katalin.
The orchard arrangement where trees are kept lower and are
spaced closer is gradually gaining more and more popularity,
as it ensures a more even coloration of the fruits. Hungarian
variety development and clone selection efforts have pro-
duced significant results, offering fruits of special size and col-
our, on sale in Hungary from the 2nd to the 8th or 9th week of
the cherry season.
Bigarreau Burlat
Large, somewhat flattened spherical fruit, with the colour
ranging from bright red to dark red, very juicy, sweet and
pleasant-tasting.
“Germersdorfi óriás”
Originally from Germany, this variety is ripe for picking in the
third decade of June. The large fruits have crisp, firm flesh
with a delicious, sweet-and-tart taste.
Katalin
Ripe in the first week of July. The fruits are large, dark red,
with firm, crisp and delicious flesh.
Cher r y
9
Duck with Cherry
Ingredients (for 4 persons)
1 smaller, cleaned duck (2.5-3 kg)
salt
50 g smoked bacon
1 smaller onion
1 larger carrot
1 medium-sized parsley root
6 tablespoons oil
1 full tablespoon tomato puree
approx. 0.5 l sweet red wine
1 tablespoon fine flour
2 tablespoons sugar
a pinch of ground cinnamon and clove
grated peel of half a lemon
0.5 kg cherry
1. Cut the duck into 12 pieces – first cleave in half lengthwise, then cut the breast, legs and wings. Rub the meat with salt and set aside.
2. Dice the bacon. Clean the vegetables, cut the onion into fine small pieces and the carrot and parsley root into round slices. Fry the
bacon, then add first the onion then the vegetables and fry for some more time.
3. Add the meat and fry, together with the tomato puree. Pour in half of the wine and some water, cover and cook on a low flame for
approx. 1 hr until tender, while replacing the evaporated juice. Put the meat in another dish. Let the juice settle for 10 minutes while
the fat comes to the surface. Remove the fat (or it will form a precipitate in the sauce), then press it through a sieve.
4. Fry the flour on the remaining 3 tablespoons of oil until golden brown, add the sugar and the juice from the duck. Bring to boil while
stirring continuously. If too thick, dilute with some wine. Add cinnamon, clove and grated lemon peel for seasoning.
5. Stone the cherries and throw them in the sauce, also adding the cherry juice left after pitting. Pour the juice on the meat and boil for
2-3 minutes. Serve with potato chips.
Time to prepare: 1 hr 40 minutes | One serving provides 812 kcal | Not easy
Cher r y
10
Pr unus ar meni aca
Similarly to peach, apricot originates from China. It was taken
through Armenia to Italy near 0 A.D. Ancient Romans called
apricot "malus praecox", which means “early ripener”. It is true
that it blooms very early in the year, and is therefore suscepti-
ble to frost. With the movement of tribes in Europe, it con-
quered Spain first, then the Moorish spread it to all corners of
the Iberian Peninsula. It then spread to France and through
France, to Central Europe.
Apricot was probably brought to the Carpathian Basin in the
Roman era. The first apricot stone fossils in Hungary are from
the 3rd or 4th century. Apricot is a Hungaricum of similar value
to sour cherry. Both fresh and processed apricot has earned
recognition in the international market. Old foreign writings
mention that apricots from Hungary are “large” and “the best”,
and this judgement has remained throughout the centuries.
Despite the favourable composition of fruits grown in Hungary,
we used to have difficulties competing with apricot producers
at more favourable locations. With the planting of new
orchards, however, production has been moved to locations
where fruits can be grown more securely. Thus, apricot has
been reinstated as a competitive product of Hungary.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
This 'golden fruit' seems to have been created especially for
persons doing intellectual work, as it is rich in phosphorus,
magnesium and iron. It enhances brain functions, growth and
eyesight, and improves the natural resistance of the body. It is
important in re-building bones and tissues. Apricot consump-
tion increases cell longevity, as well as cell activity. When eaten
raw, it can be part of the cure for various illnesses (e.g. cold,
bronchitis, constipation). It should not be eaten while unripe,
as the high cellulose content and skin of unripe apricot may
easily cause problems for the stomach and the intestines.
Possi bl e uses:
Apricot is a fruit with especially varied uses, including con-
sumption as preserved fruit, jam, dried fruit, palinka and the
production of frozen goods. If processed in a juice-centrifuge,
it provides a delicious apricot juice which is rich in nutrients.
Dried apricot (without sulphur treatment) also makes a won-
derful snack.
Maj or consti tuents:
The energy content of apricot (100 g) is 180 kJ 43-45 kcal. It
contains approx. 85% water and nearly 10% carbohydrate. Its
fibre content is more significant than its acid content (citric
acid). Most of the sugar it contains is sucrose. It is rich in potas-
sium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron, and it is extremely
rich in beta carotene, a precursor of vitamin A.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
In addition to sour cherry and cherry, apricot is a Hungaricum
where Hungarian variety development work has produced
important results. Unfortunately, spring frosts make its produc-
tion unsafe. Even so, there is a great demand for Hungarian
apricot, as Hungarian varieties ripen after apricot varieties in
Southern Europe do, they taste delicious, and have a pleasant
colour. Main regions of production are Fejér, Komárom, Tolna,
Baranya, Somogy, Heves and Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén counties
(Gönc region), the best regions of Bács-Kiskun county and the
northern part of Pest county. Most frequent varieties are
“Magyar kajszi” (45%), “Rózsakajszi” (22%) and the giant apricot
varieties (15%). Further important varieties include “Harmat”,
“Ceglédi Piroska”, “Mandulakajszi” and “Pannónia”. It is mostly
grafted on wild apricot or plum stock.
“Ceglédi óriás”
This variety can be harvested at the beginning of July. The
fruit is large and a little flattened. The flesh is sweet, orange
coloured, juicy, delicious, and its kernel can also be eaten as
a snack.
“Magyar kajszi C 235”
Ripens in mid-July and suitable for all forms of consumption
and processing. The fruit is of medium size, orange colour,
with reddish coloration on the sunny side. The flesh is juicy
and very delicious.
“Pannónia”
Can be picked in the third decade of July. The fruit is of
medium size, with tasty orange-coloured flesh, which is
somewhat more tart than ‘magyar kajszi’
Apr i cot
11
Pie with Apricot and Almond
Ingredients:
10 pieces apricots
20 pieces almonds
250 g margarine
250 g sugar
1 pack vanillin sugar
6 eggs
0.05 l rum
250 g fine flour
to grease the pan: butter, fine flour
as icing: castor sugar or castor sugar with cinnamon
Dip the apricots in boiling water for a few moments, remove with a draining spoon, then pare the fruits. Cut in half and pit. Replace the
stone with 2 almonds. Stir the margarine first in itself then with 2/3rd of the sugar until foamy. Add the egg yolks one by one, then the
rum spoon by spoon to the margarine. Beat the egg-white into a firm mousse and combine with the rest of the sugar. Add one third of
the flour to the margarine cream through a sieve, add one third of the egg-white mousse, and combine carefully. Combine the rest of
the flour and mousse in the same way, in another two parts. Put the batter in a buttered oven pan of 35x 25 cm which is dusted with
flour. Put the apricots containing the almonds on the batter so that the almonds are under the apricots, and press them a little into the
batter. Bake in a pre-heated oven at medium heat for 40 minutes.
Time to prepare: 1 hr 10 minutes
One slice provides 271 kcal
Apr i cot
12
Pr unus domest i ca
Plum has been cultivated for 5000 years. The place of origin, as
well as the genetic origin of varieties varies greatly. The
Hungarian variety range includes varieties of unknown origin,
which date back to several hundred years (Besztercei, green-
gage etc.) Based on their origin, plum varieties are classified as
European, Asian or Northern American. Even varieties belonging
to the same species can have very different properties. The most
frequent varieties belong to the ‘domestic plum’ (European
plum) species. These do not grow wild, and were probably the
result of interbreeding of blackthorn and cherry plum. The latter
is native to South-eastern Europe and South-western Asia.
Mirabella and Japanese plum varieties are also widespread.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
The good taste of plum results from the wholesome ratio of
sugars and acids. Plum is very valuable for preserving health and
increasing the ability to work. It is beneficial to the functioning
of the nervous system and the brain. It is great as a regulator of
excretion, acting as a mild laxative. In illnesses caused by a cold
on the chest, it helps by eliminating catarrh and by cleansing
the intestines. Because of its high acid content, it should only be
eaten when ripe, when its sugar content makes it refreshing.
There are several plum species, each with numerous varieties,
which all have rather different effects and composition.
Freestone plum (Besztercei type) is very rich in nutrients, and no
amount will have an ill effect. It is a valuable food for the brain
and the nervous system, as it has a stimulating and refreshing
effect. It is also invaluable in detoxification. Red and yellow
plums typically have a thinner layer of flesh and are clingstone.
These are less valuable types. Greengage is tasty, juicy and
refreshing, without recorded health effects.
Possi bl e uses:
Dried plum is the best laxative. It is excellent against catarrh,
6-12 prunes should be taken in the morning as a cure. It dries
very well, but it should never be fried in an oven or a furnace, as
heat destroys its valuable components. Heat-dried plum is
prone to aflatoxin, which appears as a white fungal pellicle on
the surface of the fruit. Plum stone contains toxins and should
not be eaten. Cooked plum is refreshing, and increases stamina
for long walks, for example. It will break a stubborn cold if during
the day, the ill person eats nothing else which induces catarrh.
A large amount of plum is used in the distilling industry. Plum
juice is usually made from dried plum, which is left to soak in
water for the night and then poured in the shredder machine
together with the water. The juice of dried plum is rich in vitamin
A, as well as copper and iron. Its benzoic acid and quinic acid
content makes it an effective laxative. 15 dried plums soaked in
1 l of water make one half to three quarters litre of juice, depend-
ing on the degree of dilution. It is recommended for overweight
persons, and also for constipation and anaemia.
Maj or consti tuents:
Plum offers a wide variety of valuable substances such as vita-
mins, minerals, enzymes, pectin, cellulose, anthocyan etc. Its
energy content is half the energy content of bread. One kg of
fresh plums provides 7 g protein, 5 g fat, 131 g carbohydrate, 5
g organic salts and 5 g fibre. Dried plum provides 8 g protein, 8
g fat, 135 g sugar, 5 g organic salts and 6 g plant fibre.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
The different plum varieties bear fruit one after the other, nice and
orderly. Plum and greengage is sold in the markets for two
months. Plum production is a long-standing tradition. The most
frequent varieties are Besztercei, Stanley and Bluefre, and over the
last ten years, ‘csacsaki’ hybrids have gained significant popularity.
Major regions of production are Northern Hungary - Borsod,
Heves, Nógrád counties, Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg and Hajdú-Bihar
counties, the region between the rivers Danube and Tisza -
Szolnok, Pest, Bács counties, Fejér and Győr-Sopron counties.
Cacanska lepotica
This Serbian variety has been cultivated in Hungary for
approximately 15 years. It mellows at the end of July. This
freestone plum is large, with strongly glaucous dark blue skin
and yellowish green flesh.
Besztercei
This most important plum variety in Central Europe can be
harvested from the beginning of September. Fruits are typi-
cally small, with glaucous dark blue skin and delicious yellow
flesh rich in important nutrients and fibre.
Pl um
13
Pl um
Plum Balls with Sesame Seed
Ingredients (18-20 pieces):
0.4 kg soft pitted dried prune
100 g ground walnut
a pinch of ground cinnamon
4 tablespoons of honey
60-70 g sesame seed
1. Grind the prunes, then combine with the walnut and cinnamon. If too dry (this depends on the quality of the plum), flavour with honey
or a few spoonfuls of rum.
2. Form balls with moist hands. Balls should be about the size of a walnut. Roll in honey then in sesame seed.
Useful tips:
- For a better taste, roast the sesame seed in a pan (without oil) until golden. Let it cool, then roll the plum balls first in honey then in this
sesame seed.
- Instead of sesame seed, you may use sunflower seed as well.
Time to prepare: 15 minutes | One piece provides 452 kJ/108 kcal
Very easy to prepare | Keeps for 5 days in a refrigerator if covered with foil.
May be prepared at any time of the year.
14
Rubus i deaus
Raspberry is a popular fruit, known since ancient times. Greek
and Roman authors described raspberry collection in the for-
est. It has only been cultivated since the 15th century. There is
a traditional belief among our distant relatives, the Finnish, that
this noble fruit makes the husband gentle and prepares the
wife for motherhood, and preserves the health of the couple.
Therefore Finnish brides bear a small basket in which their
friends put three dried raspberries. The belief concerning the
wife and husband has not been verified by science, but the
health effect of raspberry have been. In Hungary, raspberry is
not only consumed but also produced. Owing to the favoura-
ble Hungarian climate, raspberry develops an ideal ratio of
acids and sugars, inducing a high demand for Hungarian
raspberry, which has a special taste and flavour.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
As raspberry is rich in vitamins, calcium, iron and phosphorus,
it all but rejuvenates the body. It is especially beneficial in the
case of fatigue from great intellectual work. It nourishes, invig-
orates and refreshes the body, and restores mineral balance. It
reduces blood pressure and contributes to the cleansing of
the body. It also stimulates the body’s natural resistance and
liver functions, and regulates nerves and hormones. Insoluble
fibres in raspberry regulate bowel functions and may prevent
cancer in the colon. Its many small seeds stimulate digestion.
Due to its high level of vitamin C and E, it is a significant anti-
oxidant. It is excellent for cleansing the blood, but it should be
used carefully, as it can increase blood flow in the female
genitalia. As a bactericide, it has a positive influence on the
working of the ovary and the endocrine glands. Raspberry is
also an excellent cure for anaemia. It binds acids. It helps in
convalescence, heart illnesses, exhaustion, depression, and is a
cure for inflammation of the gum. In traditional medicine,
raspberry is recommended to prevent inflammation of the
bladder, and for renal calculi.
Possi bl e uses:
The uses of raspberry – fresh and frozen, and as raw material
for the food industry – are varied, which makes it an important
good for export. It may be incorporated into many foods
including pastries, jam, juice, squash, dairy products etc. In the
raspberry season, 1/4-1/2 kg could be eaten daily on an empty
stomach as a diet. It is not recommended to consume rasp-
berry together with sugar or milk proteins, as these cause fer-
mentation. Raspberry juice has a cooling effect and reduces
fever. Dried raspberry reduces sweating. Raspberry leaf tea is
excellent for alleviating menstrual pains, as it contains a spas-
molytic called fragalin.
Maj or consti tuents:
100 g provides 117 kJ/28 kcal. One kilogram contains 12 g
protein, 8 g plant fat, 54 g carbohydrate, 6 g organic salts and
56 g plant fibre.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Raspberry is the queen of berries, which achieves its maximum
potential in Hungary both in terms of volume and in the size
of individual fruits. Hungarian raspberry is a sought-after fruit
in the international market. The most frequently cultivated
variety in Hungary is ‘Fertődi zamatos’. In addition to the usual
varieties which bear fruit once in a year, there are some varie-
ties with two fruit-bearing periods as well. Regions of produc-
tion are Győr-Sopron county – Kisalföld, Somogy county,
Northern Hungary - Dunakanyar, Nógrád county, Heves coun-
ty, Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén County, Szabolcs-Szatmár county.
Malling Exploit
This British variety can be harvested early, and the fruit sof-
tens fast. The fruit is large or extra large, medium red, with a
nice sweet flavour.
“Fertődi zamatos”
This variety was developed by the Research Centre in
Fertőd, in 1982. The fruit, harvested in the second half of the
season, is round, medium-sized, bright red and nice-look-
ing. It tastes delicious, with a harmonious balance of tart-
ness and sweetness.
Raspber r y
15
Raspber r y
Cottage Cheese with Raspberry
Ingredients:
0.5 kg raspberry
0.3 kg cottage cheese
4 tablespoons honey
1 egg
Clean the raspberry. Set aside a few berries for decoration, and squeeze the rest through a hair-sieve. Combine yolk with the honey and
raspberry. Colander the cottage cheese through the hair-sieve and add to the mix. Beat the egg-white into a mousse and add to the mix
to get a better texture. Before serving, decorate with the raspberries set aside.
Time to prepare: 30 minutes | One serving provides 239 kcal
16
Common walnut is native to the lands extending from the
Carpathian mountain range through Turkey and Iraq all the way
to India. It has been eaten from times immemorial, and is there-
fore widespread in the Mediterranean and temperate zones.
Regions with different climate have caused different variety
ranges to evolve. Walnut was probably imported to Hungary via
the ancient Greek from Persia. The Greek brought it to Rome,
where it was named “Jupiter’s acorn”, which probably gave it its
Latin name.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
When eaten raw, its high fat content allows the body to build up
reserves of energy. Heat treatment and baking reduce its value.
In addition to being very nutritive, it has other valuable proper-
ties as well. It regulates the lymphatic system, acts as a laxative
and a vermifuge. It’s a useful for arteriosclerosis and diseases of
the nervous system. Walnut has a beneficial effect on persons
with anaemia and paleness. Russian doctors recommend it for
patients with a heart disease. It is not recommended for persons
who are often queasy or dizzy. It is prone to cause inflammation
of the skin and rash. Walnuts should be examined carefully after
breaking open. People with anaemia and liver problems may
also consume walnut, but people with stomach problems
should not eat more than 5 or 6 a day.
Possi bl e uses:
Walnut can be used in a myriad of ways. In addition to being
eaten raw and in pastries, walnut can be used to stuff prunes, as
walnut coated with honey, green walnut, jam, walnut palinka,
drug, and a raw material for dyes. A special use is plantations of
walnut trees used in forestry. Until walnut is fully ripened, it is
covered by a thick green husk. Fresh walnut should be used in a
short time. At this time, the thin membrane covering the actual
walnut seed is yet bitter, and should be removed. Walnut
intended for longer storage has to be dried with care. Walnut
meat is a wonderful snack. It’s characteristic compounds are
juglon and hydrojuglon glycoside.
Nearly all parts of the walnut tree have their use. Especially the
leaves, the thick husk, the membrane and partition found in the
walnut, and the valuable cold-pressed oil provided by walnut
meat are used for medical purposes. Walnut leaves have a pleas-
ant smell, and in addition to essential oils, they contain naftochi-
non derivatives. The leaves are a roborant and reduce blood
sugar level, and have a cleansing and vermifugal effect. Tea
made of walnut leaves is taken for stomach complaints, catarrh
of the intestines, against endoparasites, and as roborant by
children with rickets.
Walnut leaf tea is used externally for inflammation of the gum
and the mycoderm in the mouth. A more concentrated solution
is used for gargling one's throat in the case of a throat ache. It is
also used as bolstering in the case of rash, eczema, festering
wounds or frostbite. Infusion of walnut leaves is recommended
for inflammation of the eye and for cataract. In Transylvania,
freshly gathered walnut leaves are placed under the sheets and
pillows for the night to drive away fleas. The infusion of walnut
leaves contains naftochinon derivatives and is therefore added
to bath water to sooth pains.
The shell is rich in tannic acid and naftochinon derivatives. It is
used as a tea or infusion, where the astringency of tannic acid
can stop diarrhoea or cure swollen mycoderm in the case of an
angina. It is also a good antiseptic. Infusion made from the thick
husk of walnut can help complaints about sweating, stomach
and intestines, or anorexia. It can be part of tea mixtures to treat
psoriasis. It is recommended as a bath, bolstering or wash for
cancer, rash or inflammation of the eye. The peel of green wal-
nut is used for the production of dyes, not only for fabric but also
for hair. Oil pressed from walnut is rich in unsaturated fatty acids
and can therefore be used for the prevention or treatment of
arteriosclerosis and high blood-pressure. Cold-pressed oil from
walnut contains 73-84% unsaturated fatty acids, including lin-
oleic acid and oleic acid, and is therefore even more valuable
than sunflower seed oil or soybean oil. It is especially effective
against arteriosclerosis. Walnut oil is considered to act as vermi-
fuge. It is used externally as a rub for children with rickets or
anaemia, as well as for skin problems.
Maj or consti tuents:
Walnut is rich in iron and zinc, and also contains potassium,
magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, as well as vitamins A, B, C, D,
F and P. One kilogram provides 186 g protein, 570 g fat, 117 g
carbohydrate, 17 g organic salts and 28 g fibre.
Jugl ans r egi a
Wal nut
17
Chicken Breast with Mushroom and Walnut-Roquefort Sauce
Ingredients:
200 g mushroom 1 onion
salt, ground pepper 5 tablespoons oil
1 tablespoons flour 2 chicken breast fillet
200 g Roquefort 150 g whole walnut
1 clove garlic, crushed 0.2 l cooking cream
Wash and grind the mushrooms. Cut the onion into small pieces and fry it on 2 tablespoons of oil. Add the ground mushroom, salt and
pepper. Braise and stir occasionally. Fry until the juice has evaporated, dust with flour and fry a little, then remove from the heat and let
it cool.
Meanwhile, was and dry the chicken breast. Cut a small opening in the thicker part. Enlarge the cavity with hand to make it easier to stuff
with the mushroom paste. Stuff the chicken with the cooled mushroom paste, secure the opening with toothpicks, rub with salt and
pepper, and roast both sides for approx. 15 minutes in the remaining oil. To make the sauce, grate the cheese and cut two thirds of the
walnut to rough pieces. Mix both with the cream, season with garlic, salt and pepper, then warm on a low heat. To serve, remove the
toothpicks and cut the chicken breast into 2 cm slices, pour the sauce under the meat, and garnish with seasoned penne pasta. Finally,
roast the rest of the walnut without oil and sprinkle on the chicken breast and the sauce.
Time to prepare: 1 hr10 minutes | One serving provides 987 kcal
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Contrary to popular belief, walnut has special demands for its
environment. High yield figures are an indication of optimal
precipitation and hydrology factors. Walnut is sensitive to frost in
the late spring, and therefore development efforts in Hungary
have focused on creating late-blooming varieties, with signifi-
cant results. One way of increasing yield has been to develop
varieties where lateral buds also bear fruit, as well as new hybrids
whose quality matches that of traditional varieties.State-of-the-
art processing coupled with this genetic background makes
Hungarian walnut high-quality and very attractive, increasing its
competitive value. Regions of production are Zala county,
Somogy county, Szatmár, but there are smaller regions all over
the country where walnut production is successful.

Walnut varieties: Milotai 10, Alsószentiváni 117, Tiszacsécsi 83.
Novelties: varieties where lateral buds also bear fruit: Milotai
10-14 and Alsószentiványi 117-15.
Wal nut
18
Capsi cum annuum
Thanks to its appetizing, refreshing taste, paprika is one of the
vegetables of which the largest amount is consumed in
Hungary. Just like potato, this yearling plant belongs to the
family of solanaceous plants, and comes from Brazil. It has
been cultivated by the native people of Central and South
America since ancient times, but it was only introduced to
Europe after the discovery of the New World. It was brought
to Hungary by the Turks. The oldest mention of paprika in
Hungary is from 1570, when it was described as a rarity in the
garden of Széchy Mária (the foster-mother of Zrínyi Miklós).
Regular paprika production started after the end of the
Turkish occupation of the country, but up to the middle of
the 19th century, it was only used for seasoning. Since then,
also sweet paprika (‘green paprika’) has been grown, primar-
ily by the Bulgarian horticulturists
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
In paprika season, we eat lots of paprika even if we are not
aware of its healthy and beneficial properties. A good indica-
tion of its nutritional value is the fact that one sweet paprika
a day can provide 100% of the recommended daily allow-
ance of vitamin C. Paprikas where the flesh is also coloured
usually contain more vitamin. Pickled paprika retains a major
part of its vitamin C content. “Spring fatigue” is the result of
lower vitamin intake in the winter and spring months. An
extreme lack of vitamin C causes scurvy, with symptoms such
as fatigue, aching joints and muscles, bleeding, and suscepti-
bility to infection. Vitamin C has an antioxidant effect, helps
in the building of cartilage and bone tissue, improves iron
metabolism, and has an important part to play in protecting
the vascular system and in protecting the body from infec-
tions. Paprika consumption stimulates the production of
gastric juices, improves appetite and stimulates the move-
ments of the stomach wall. When used excessively as a sea-
soning, however, it may lead to pyrosis.
Possi bl e uses:
In Hungary, one can consume paprika all year round, thanks
to its varied uses. One fourth of the paprika produced in
Hungary is processed by the canning industry. Approx. 50%
of all processed paprika is ‘tomato paprika’, the rest is white
sweet paprika. The share of hot varieties only amounts to a
few percent. There are a wide variety of processing methods
ranging from pickling, pureeing, combining with tomato,
stuffing and others. Paprika is used as seasoning in soups,
vegetable dishes, sauces, various meat and fish foodstuffs, as
well as processed meat products. It is used as seasoning and
colorant in cheeses, butters, cottage cheese spreads and
salads. Seasoning mixes and dried paprika powders are also
popular. In addition to the taste, aroma and colour substanc-
es (carotenoids, chlorophyll) of sweet paprika, its is of high
dietary value due to its high vitamin C content, for which it is
well known.
Maj or consti tuents:
100 g paprika provides 84 KJ energy; 1.2 g protein; 0.3 g fat;
3 g carbohydrate; 93.5 g water; 1.1 g ash; 0.9 g raw fibre; 0.1
mg carotene (provitamin A); 30 mg vitamin B2; 170 mg vita-
min C; 12.3 mg calcium; 9.8 mg iron; 55 mg phosphorus; 165
mg potassium; 16 mg magnesium.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Hungarian paprika variety development has earned a global
recognition. In accordance with domestic preferences, table
paprika varieties are yellowish white and keep their colour
after processing. After their colour, these paprika varieties –
which are considered Hungaricum – are referred to as white
paprika. When fully mature, paprika varieties intended as
seasoning are red. In the 1930-ies, Szent-Györgyi Albert pro-
duced vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid) from paprika
grown near the town of Szeged. For this discovery, he was
honoured with the Nobel prize by the academic community.
The most important current varieties grown in Hungary are
the white tapering varieties. These already dominate our
export, and can be expected to increase in importance
because:
• They are different in terms of both colour and shape
from the blocky type dominating international markets,
and thus the right marketing efforts – also capitalising
on Hungary’s favourable image – can create better-than-
average market environment for their introduction and
the ensuing supply.
• Intermsoftasteandthicknessofflesh,theyareundoubt-
edly better than their intensively coloured (red, green
etc.) competitors.
• They are produced at uniform quality for 9 months
(greenhouse, heated and not heated foil, open air),
which makes them ideal for supermarkets as well.
Papr i ka
19
Roasted Paprika with Ewe Cheese and Eggs Recipe from Kárpátalja
Ingredients:
1 kg green paprika
3-4 tablespoons oil
salt
0-0.15 kg ewe cheese (or cottage cheese)
5-6 eggs
1 teaspoon red paprika powder
1 bunch parsley
Arrange the paprika in a roasting pan, put in a pre-heated oven and roast for approx. 30-35 minutes. At half-time turn on other side so
that it roasts evenly. Pare, remove the core and dice the flesh. Heat the oil in a pan and add the paprika. Salt lightly, then add the ewe
cheese. Beat the egg, add, and cook until the egg jellifies. Stir if necessary. Sprinkle with red paprika and finely minced parsley.
Note: May also be made with one half sweet to one half hot paprika.
Time to prepare: 70 minutes | One serving provides 1428 kJ/324 kcal
Papr i ka
Varieties:
White, sweet, tapering varieties:
D. Cecei SH, HRF F1, Fehérözön
Red sweet, tapering varieties:
Karmen
White, sweet, blunt varieties:
Alba Regia, Táltos SH, Albatrosz
Yellow, hot round varieties
Yellow, sweet, round varieties:
Almapaprika, Édesalma, Evita
White, sweet, blocky varieties:
Blondy F1, Brill F1
Green-Red, hot, round varieties(Cherry paprika)
Kalocsai A, Kalocsai M, Szentesi
Green, tapering - hot varieties:
Rapires F1, Novares F1, Titán F1
Tomato-shaped varieties:
Pallagi PAZ, Szentesi PAZ, Greygo, Pritavit F1, Piknik
20
Lycoper si con aescul ent um
Tomato originates from South America, its production in
Europe started in the 18th century. A curiosity: some nations
call it the “apple of love”, as in popular belief, it induces gentle
feelings. It belong to the family of solanaceous plants.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Uncooked tomato is primarily a source of vitamins, but it also
has a significant content of minerals essential to human
metabolism. This fruit has wonderful healing properties. Next
to lemon, tomato is the second in terms of richness in vitamins
and mineral salts, as well as citric acid, which discourages
many from eating it. When consumed properly, it is one of the
best natural medicines. It should be eaten raw whenever pos-
sible. In terms of cultivation technology, tomato is a vegetable,
and botanically, it also belongs to the Solanaceae family. Still,
from a nutritional aspect, it is considered a fruit, as evidenced
by its high acidity, while vegetables are basically alkaline. When
consumed as an acid fruit component of the diet, it has excel-
lent effects. In traditional medicine, it is used primarily for
drawing abscesses and to treat inflammation.
The atropine-like alkaloid it contains, as well as other active
substances make it suitable as raw material for anti-rheumatic
rubs. It is also used to make creams for fungal infections and
inflammations abroad. Persons with a weak stomach should
pare tomatoes before eating. Tomato is especially recom-
mended for rheumatism, nephritis, arthritis, gout, inflamma-
tory diseases, for the dissolution of stones in the body, and for
catarrh in the small intestine. Due to its blood cleansing effect
and its ability to dissolve uric acid crystals, it is an excellent
detoxifier. In the USA, there is a new treatment for arterioscle-
rosis: laser is used to clean the inner surface of the blood ves-
sels, and a diet rich in carotenoids is prescribed. The patients
follow a diet of tomato and carrot, as carotenoids get absorbed
in the deposits of cholesterol, protecting the walls of the blood
vessels and making it easier to remove plaques.
Possi bl e uses:
Tomato juice: freshly pressed tomato juice tastes very different
from the generally known cooked, salted and bottled or
canned tomato juice. The effect of cooked tomato juice is
exactly the opposite of that of raw tomato juice. Cooked juice
acidifies the blood and abstracts minerals from the tissues,
teeth and bones. Ripe uncooked tomato or the juice pressed
from such tomato, however, has a slight alkalizing effect. It
boosts the mineral reserves of the body, adding especially
calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin C, effective for cleansing
the liver, and improves blood circulation and heart functions.
Tomato sold in the winter months, which is grown in green-
houses and ripened artificially, should never be pressed for
juice. Juice should always be made from fresh tomato.
Maj or consti tuents:
Composition: 100 g edible part provides 82 KJ (19 Kcal), and
contains 94% water, 3% carbohydrate, 2% ballast substances,
1% protein, 0.5% organic acid and mineral salts. Tomato has a
significant potassium, magnesium, phosphorus and calcium
content, and its iron and zinc micro element content deserves
mentioning as well. Its proteins contain all essential amino
acids. In terms of vitamins, it is especially rich in vitamin C (25
mg) and nicotinamide. The carbohydrate of which it contains
the largest amount is fructose. 100 g edible part contains 440
mg citric acid and 35 mg malic acid.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Its significance is much higher than its current share of export.
One reason for this is that the entry price under the EU import-
ing system was unfavourable for tomato export. Still, the varie-
ties available (especially the LSL varieties), the supply period
(available continuously for 9 months), the cultivation methods
(dominated by heating with thermal water) and, last but not
least, the flavour of Hungarian tomato justify hopes for a better
future. The cocktail or cherry tomato varieties, as well as clus-
tering varieties are gaining increased popularity. These are
better in terms of ripeness and can also be stored for a longer
period.
Varieties:
Indeterminate varieties:
Monika F1, Credito F1, Cristal F1, Delfine F1, Tissot F1, Suso F1
Semi-determinate varieties:
Prisca F1, Savor F1, Transit F1
Determinate varieties:
K3 F1, Zephyr F1, Prima, Mobil, Korall
Tomat o
21
Carp Balls in Tomato Sauce
Ingredients:
0.7 kg carp fillet
7 tablespoons cooked rice
approx. 1 teaspoon salt
1 coffee spoon ground black pepper
1 smaller onion
1 clove garlic
a pinch of marjoram
1 egg
1. Skin the carp fillets, remove the larger bones, then grind. Add the cooked rice, salt and pepper, season with the grated onion, crushed
garlic and the marjoram. Combine with the egg. With a moist hand, form 16-20 balls.
2. Cut out the stems of the tomatoes, the process the tomatoes in a blender. Strain the juice into a pot. Add sugar and salt to taste, and
season with the celery leaves. Add 0.1-0.2 l water, put the fish balls in the sauce and boil while gently shaking the pot. (Be careful about
seasoning ready-made tomato juice!)
3. Cover and cook over a low heat for approx. 25 minutes. Remove the fish balls with a sieve spoon. Mix the starch thoroughly with approx.
0.1 l water, add to the sauce, boil for 2-3 minutes to thin down, then put back the balls and heat together.
Useful tips:
- The same dish may be made using catfish, fogash or sea fish instead of carp.
- It’s a good idea to cook one ball in salt water separately. If it’s too soft, some breadcrumbs may be added to the paste.
For 4 persons | Time to prepare: 1 hr 25 minutes | One serving provides 1388 kJ/332 kcal | Not complicated.
Keeps for 3 days in the refrigerator if covered with foil. |
In the summer and autumn, use fresh tomato, and in the winter and spring when
tomato is too expensive and not juicy enough, use 100% unstrained tomato juice.
Tomat o
a mártáshoz:
1.2 kg ripe tomato or 1 l unstrained tomato
juice
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon salt
1 celery stem
2 tablespoons table starch
22
Asparagus has been considered a delicacy for a long time. It is
also referred to as the “king of vegetables and the vegetable of
kings”. It is a native plant of the East, whose cultivation slowly
spread to Central and Eastern Europe, North Africa, Asia and
West Siberia. The plant was probably known to ancient
Egyptians as well. There are drawings of bundles of asparagus
from 2700 B.C. in the Egyptian pyramid. Asparagus – with
stronger leaves then our current varieties – was also eaten in
ancient Greece. The first known description of asparagus culti-
vation was bequeathed to us by the Romans. It was also them
who spread asparagus throughout Europe, and the plant’s
name in most European languages is also derived from their
word “asparagus”.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Its good dietary value follows from its high vitamin and min-
eral content, as well as the asparagin, nitrogen and sulphur it
contains. Asparagus has a positive effect on kidney functions.
As it stimulates the elimination of water by the body, it is rec-
ommended as a diet for people with kidney problems. Due to
its low carbohydrate content, it is a valuable component of the
diet of people with diabetes. It contains lots of cellulose and
thus stimulates peristalsis. Its distinct taste is the result of the
essential oils which also contain sulphur, as well as its vanillin
and methyl merkaptan content. Green asparagus is richer in
chlorophyll and thus in magnesium, which further enhances
its dietary value.
Possi bl e uses:
Fresh asparagus is a luxurious delicacy. It keeps for a maximum
of three days in a refrigerator. Covering it in a wet cloth can
help preserve the freshness of shoots. When cooking aspara-
gus, it should always be placed in already boiling water, lest its
aromas and scent substances be transferred to the cooking
water. It softens in approx. 15-20 minutes. Care should be
taken to ensure that the tips of the shoots are not submerged.
Asparagus shoots should be cooked in a vertical position in
order to prevent them from breaking. As the season for fresh
asparagus is very short, it is often preserved.
Maj or consti tuents:
In addition to being delicious, the king of vegetables is also
ideal for a weigh-loss diet. 100 g cooked asparagus provides 13
kcal. It contains potassium, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium,
iron, and vitamins A-, B1-, B2, niacin, B6 and C. 100 g contains
0.31 g nitrogen, 1.91 g protein, 1.31 g fibre and 0.57 g minerals.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
More than 100 asparagus varieties are grown worldwide. It is
also popular as a pot-plant, and certain varieties are used by
florists in making bouquets. Table asparagus also has numer-
ous varieties, of which nearly ten are grown in Hungary. Fresh
shoots, which are typically harvested between April and June,
may be white, purple or green. White-coloured varieties with a
gentle taste are the most popular. They need to be skinned
carefully, though, to avoid bitterness. Cleaning should start 2
cm below the tip, and the base end of the shoots must be cut
off. Green asparagus has a more robust taste and needs no
paring. Purple asparagus is very rare, with a taste in between
white and green.
In Hungary, it is a perennial plant cultivated in sandy soils. It
yields produce for 15 years after planting, and the asparagus
shoots, which are 15-20 cm long, are harvested from the 3rd or
4th year. At the end of the 1990-ies, the share of white aspara-
gus in production was nearly 75 %, but – in line with the mar-
ket trends – green asparagus has been preferred for newer
plantations. The benefits of Hungarian asparagus are its fresh-
ness, uniform quality and lower price, which follows from the
lower labour costs and shorter carrying distances. Only a single
day elapses between harvest and delivery, which ensures
maximum shelf life. Longer storage period is also made possi-
ble by the "hydrocooling" treatment applied after harvesting
at dawn.
Varieties:
• MaryWashington
• UC157F1
• AndreasF1
• UC172F1
• GejnlimF1
• FranklimF1
• Schwezinger
• JacquesMarrionnet
Aspar agus of f i ci nal i s
Asparagus
23
Chine with Creamy Asparagus
Ingredients:
0.6 kg pork chine
salt
0.6 kg asparagus (approx. 0.35 kg after cleaning)
60 g low-fat butter
1 large bunch of dill
1 tablespoon table starch or fine flour
0.2 l milk
0.1 l cream
½ coffee spoon ground white pepper
juice from ½ lemon
Cut the chine into 12 slices, beat out lightly, salt and set aside.
Clean the asparagus and cut each to a length of 10 cm (including the tip). (The cut-off parts may be used for a thick soup or salad on the
next day.)
Melt half of the butter in a large frying pan and lay the asparagus shoots in the pan. Salt lightly, then cook on a low heat until soft. Mix
the starch, the milk and the cream thoroughly, and add to the asparagus. Add pepper and dill to taste, and flavour with lemon juice.
Meanwhile, shake the pan occasionally to prevent the sauce from sticking to the pan. Boil for not more than 1-2 minutes, which is enough
to thinning down sufficiently. Fry the meat slices on the rest of the butter and serve on top of the creamy asparagus. May also be
garnished with cooked brown rice.
Useful tip: Asparagus may be cooked in 4-5 segments instead of cooking whole.
Time to prepare: 40 minutes | One serving provides 1714 kJ/411 kcal
Aspar agus
24
Zea mays convar sacchar at a
There are contradictory theories about the origin of this veg-
etable, which came to us from the tropical zone. Its origin is
certainly in South and Central America, though. It was staple
food for the Mayan and Inca people. After the discovery of
America, its cultivation started everywhere where there was
ploughland and where the climate allowed. It was first brought
to Spain, then to Venice and Crete. Large plantations were
developed, and the sweet corn harvested there was trans-
ported to the Far East, to China, Japan and North India. It was
also brought to Central Africa. It was called “kukuruc” by the
Turks, who brought it to Eastern and Central Europe, including
Hungary, as late as in the 16th century.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
In traditional medicine, sweet corn used to be recommended
for diabetes, dysentery, as a diuretic and also as a stimulant.
The beliefs about its healing properties have not been verified,
but as it is an excellent ingredient of numerous dishes, its sig-
nificance has not diminished. Its most important component
is edible fibre (8.80 g/ 100 g), which makes sweet corn suitable
as the basis of balanced, healthy eating, together with other
cereals and vegetables. It can be used as a component of vari-
ous diets, for example a diet rich in fibre, which is recom-
mended for curing constipation and for preventing cancer in
the colon. It is also an important part of diets for high blood
pressure, as well as of a diet for coeliac disease, where cereals
containing gluten are replaced by rice flour, potato starch and
sweet corn flour. As it is not likely to cause allergy, sweet corn
is an important foodstuff in diets designed to combat various
food allergies. Contrary to these dietary advices, its energy
content (550 kJ/100 g (131 kcal) makes it unsuited for weight-
loss diets, and it should be left out from diets low in fibre or in
non-soluble fibre as well.
Possi bl e uses:
Its production was only boosted in the 19th century. It is a
versatile crop which can be used as animal feed, raw material
for the textile and paper industry, for packing in the cigarette
industry, as well as for human consumption, either raw, dried
or cooked. The flour made by grinding sweet corn kernel is
cooked to prepare a thick mush, which is called “polenta” and
is a national food of Southern European peoples. The high
sugar content of the kernel also allows alcoholic beverages to
be distilled from sweet corn. In its country of origin, Mexico,
sweet corn was called “tortilla”, and it was a staple food, and
considered sacred. Sweet corn is rich in carbohydrate, protein
and fat, which makes it the vegetable providing the most
energy. No wonder, then, that its high nutritive value has made
sweet corn an essential basic foodstuff in the four continents.
Sweet corn may be purchased as entire fresh cobs which may
be cooked, roasted or grilled. Frozen or preserved shelled corn
is also available, and sweet corn flour may also be used to
prepare foods.
Maj or consti tuents:
The most important constituent of sweet corn are carbohy-
drates (24 g/100 g), primarily polysaccharides, but it also con-
tains 2.7 g saccharose (it contains half as much starch as fodder
maize), as well as 4.7 g/100 g protein and 1.6 g/ 100 g fat. It is
not typically rich in any vitamin or mineral, but its carotene,
vitamin E, niacin and riboflavin content deserves mentioning.
It contains 12 mg vitamin C and some K, Mg and P.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
While sweet corn is fundamentally one of the cereal crops,
supersweet table varieties are evidently vegetables. Sweet
corn is the vegetable grown in the largest quantity in Hungary,
the production volume has by now exceeded that of the for-
mer leading country of Europe, France. As it needs much heat,
its harvest usually starts before it is fully mature and still soft. It
ripens from the end of July to September, but preserved and
frozen sweet corn is available throughout the year. Table sweet
corn is sold only to the Hungarian freezing and canning indus-
try.
Varieties:
• ShebaF1,
• Dessert80F1
• ChallengerF1
Sweet Cor n
25
Venison Stew with Red Wine and Vegetables
Ingredients:
0.25 l ( + a little at the end of cooking) red wine
0.75 l water
2-3 juniper berries
salt, possibly herb mix
1 parsley root
1 larger carrot
1 smaller piece of celery and kohlrabi each
0.2 kg shelled sweet corn
0.8 kg roe-deer haunch
60-80 g smoked bacon
2-3 tablespoons oil
1 larger onion
pinch of ground pepper
1 tablespoon red paprika
1 paprika and tomato each
Mix the water, wine, juniper berries and salt. Add the cleaned and sliced vegetables and the pre-cooked sweet corn, bring to boil, then
add the meat. Bring to boil again, then set aside to cool. Strain, but keep the juice. Cut the meat into 2x2 cm cubes. Grind or mix in a
blender all vegetables and seasoning used for soaking.
Dice the bacon, put in a pot or marmite, and fry until transparent at high heat. Add the cleaned and finely minced onion and fry it some
more. Add the vegetable puree and heat together, then season with salt, ground pepper and red paprika. Remove the core of paprika
and the stem of the tomato, cut both into small pieces, add to the former mixture, and combine with a little soak. After a few minutes of
boiling, add the meat and cook for approx. 1 ½ hr until tender. While cooking, baste with the soak. In the end, season with some red wine.
Time to prepare: kb. 2 hr | One serving provides 630 kcal
Sweet Cor n
26
Al l i um cepa
This plant, which belongs to the Liliaceae family, can be grown
on both the northern and the southern hemisphere. It was an
essential ingredient in the kitchens in ancient Egypt, as well as
in the Greek and Roman Empires. It is still indispensable to
tasty dishes. Onion is also considered an aphrodisiac, and it is
found either fragrant or ill-smelling, depending on one’s atti-
tude. It probably originates from Asia, from where it has spread
south-west. It was highly regarded in ancient Egypt, as evi-
denced by its depiction in various drawings. In neighbouring
Palestine, the onion now referred to as Welsh onion was
extremely popular. Onion and its relatives contain essential oils
which contain sulphur, which smells the strongest when con-
sumed raw. These essential oils (diallyl-disulphide, other disul-
phides, polysulphide, mustard oil etc.) evaporate fast when the
onion is heated.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Onion has been used as a medicinal plant for thousands of
years. It’s healing properties have been verified by modern
medical sciences as well. It stimulates glands, improves liver
functions, appetite, peristalsis and digestion. Onions and its
relatives (especially garlic), however, can do even more. They
are suitable for preventing, assuaging and curing various ill-
nesses of the intestines which are due to infection. Onion
improves a wide range of digestive disorders, as well as related
symptoms such as headache, queasiness or insomnia. It
increases blood pressure. Essential oils with a sulphur content
are effective at dissolving mucilaginous plaques and can there-
fore fight off various diseases of the respiratory system.
Essential oils primarily stimulate excretion by the bronchioles.
Onion and its relatives stimulate and expand blood vessels,
increasing the work done by heart muscles, effectively contrib-
uting to healing diseases of the arteries. Onion has a significant
indirect effect on the nervous system, and it is an effective
vermifuge. The relatively large quantity of iodine bound in
organic compounds (found especially in garlic) stimulates
metabolism in general. Rather than being concerned with its
smell, it should be incorporated into everyone’s diet at a level
corresponding to its many wonderful healing effects and the
needs of the individual.
Possi bl e uses:
As it stores well, it is available all year round. This might be one
of the reasons why onion is the most frequently used vegeta-
ble in Hungarian cuisine. It is a basic ingredient in most recipes.
It is also available in dried form, which extends the range of its
already versatile uses.
Maj or consti tuents:
100 g edible part provides 116 kJ (27 kcal) energy. Nearly
85-90% of onion is water, its protein content is 4-5%, and it
contains various minerals, such as a significant amount of
potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper and boron.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Onion is one of the most important traditional plants cultivat-
ed in Hungary. "Mako onion" is well-known and appreciated by
all professionals in Europe. Why is this? A production history of
several hundred years, as well as favourable soil and climate
make the small region of Makó, in the southern part of
Hungary, a unique growing place for onion in Europe.
Production is a double-cycled procedure: this red-brown
onion with a shiny armour and a nice shape, which can hardly
be mistaken for any other variety, is grown from seed onion
(2-year cycle) or from seed. Onion grown from seed onion can
be harvested, packaged and sold from the end of July, before
European competitors are available. These onions also outclass
others in terms of dry matter and aroma content. When their
supply dwindles in September, they are replaced by onion
grown from seed, which has the same quality. The range of
onions on offer is widened by intensive new varieties grown
from hybrid seed.
Varieties:
• Winteringonions:Radar,Alix,Tisza1,Globusz
• Seedonionvarieties:Makói,MakóiCR
• Varietiesgrownfromseed:Makóibronz,Pannónia,Piroska,
Aroma, Banko, Daytona F1
Oni on
27
Leg of Turkey with Onion, Prune and Cabbage
Ingredients:
2 smaller legs of turkey, cooked in soup
for the onion ragout:
4-5 onions
approx. ½ teaspoon salt
1 coffee spoon ground black pepper
½ teaspoon red paprika specialty
1 teaspoon marjoram
1-2 tablespoons oil
1. Bone the turkey leg, slice and lay in a baking pan. To make the ragout, clean the onion, slice thinly, take apart, mix with the seasoning
and the oil, and pour on the meat.
2. Roast in an oven at medium heat (180 °C; air circulation oven: 165 °C) for approx. 30 minutes, until the onion is soft and the meat
develops some reddish crust.
3. Make braised cabbage in the traditional way (recipe on page ), but add the pitted prunes at the beginning and braise together with
the cabbage until tender. Pour the onion ragout on the meat and garnish with the cabbage and prunes to serve. Offer potato with
parsley as garnish.
For 4 persons | Time to prepare: 1 hr 10 minutes + cooking the soup |
One serving provides 2906 kJ/695 kcal | Easy to prepare.
Keeps for 3-4 days in the refrigerator if covered with foil.
May be frozen. | Can be prepared at any time of the year.
Oni on
for the cabbage:
1 kg white cabbage
4 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons sugar
½ onion
1 teaspoon salt
1 coffee spoon ground cumin seed and ground
pepper each
150 g pitted dried plum
1 tablespoon 6% white wine vinegar
28
Ar mor aci a r ust i cana
Horseradish is a native plant of South-western Europe and
South-eastern Asia. We know more about its uses in traditional
medicine than about its past. Next to onion, its is the second
vegetable which has existed in Hungary at least since the
arrival of the Hungarian people. It is a perennial plant of the
Brassicaceae family.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Regular consumption of small amounts of horseradish syrup
was thought to help tuberculosis, asthma, diseases of the
endocrine glands, and to act as a depressor, diuretic, antiseptic
and a blood cleanser. There were also external applications of
horseradish. In the Mezőség, horseradish leaves were used to
cover the chest or the entire body of feverish patients to
reduce fever. Horseradish tincture was recommended for
strong headache as bolstering applied to the nape, as it
caused congestion. The same bolstering was recommended
for sphacelate wounds. Although it is painful when put on
fresh wound, it is also effective and brings instant relief, and
speeds up the healing process. Pressed horseradish syrup
mixed with honey is excellent against coughing. It is also very
effective for stubborn coughing, hoarseness, trachitis and
chronic bronchitis. Regular consumption of horseradish
increases the body’s natural resistance to contagious diseases
and helps fight the flu.
Possi bl e uses:
When eaten raw, it is very effective against the accumulation
of water in the body, digestive disorders and metabolic disor-
ders. Raw horseradish is extremely rich in vitamin C. French
researchers have shown that horseradish juice strongly stimu-
lates the gall-bladder, causing it to contract, which alleviates
complaints caused by the inactivity of the gall-bladder.
Horseradish has an important role in cancer prevention. It is a
relative of broccoli, Brussels sprouts and Savoy cabbage, and,
when eaten regularly, can reduce the risk of cancer in the
stomach, the colon, the prostate and the bladder. The benefits
of members of the Brassicaceae family are enhanced by the
antioxidant they contain - vitamin A. Pregnant women and
people with kidney problems should only consume limited
amounts, though.
Maj or consti tuents:
Horseradish contains lots of essential oils. The strong pungent
taste is caused by the sinigrin content of the root, which is
supplemented by mustard oil glycoside and glycoarmorasin.
100 g provides 328 kJ (78 kcal). Main components are 76%
water, 12% carbohydrate, 3% protein (17 different amino
acids), 2.2% mineral substances. It contains 628 mg potassium,
and its selenium, magnesium and calcium content also
deserves mentioning.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
All over Europe, local varieties of horseradish are produced. In
Hungary, 85-90% of the total production come from a distinct,
nearly continuous region in Hajdú-Bihar county, the region of
Hajdúság, located southeast of Debrecen. The variety range
grown in this region is dominated by the Bagaméri varieties
(Bagaméri magyar, Bagaméri 93/1, Bagaméri delikát), devel-
oped through selection from the population referred to as
“Debreceni édesnemes”. The horseradish grown in this region
is easily distinguishable from other types by its thick, lush dark
green leaves, which twist in the upper one third section, and
also by its straight, cylindrical, off-white rhizome. Its allyl iso-
thiocyanate content is low, causing it to be only a little pun-
gent. The Danvit variety, which has been imported from
Denmark, is also cultivated in a larger area.
Hungarian horseradish is an excellent export article. The high
level of demand is generated by its high dry matter and aroma
content, which make it especially suitable for industrial pro-
cessing. In Hungary, it is increasingly sold in single “extra size”
pieces (packaged in shrinkfoil), which perfectly satisfies the
needs of supermarkets. It can be stored in cold house, ensur-
ing a continuous supply for 10 months.
Varieties
• Bagaméri93/1
• BagamériDelikát
• Danvit
• Pózna
• Nürnberg
• Erlagen
• Bayersdorf
Hor seradi sh
29
Hor ser adi sh
Chicken with Horseradish
Ingredients:
one cleaned chicken (1.2 kg)
vegetables and herbs for a bouillon
for the sauce:
100 g freshly grated horseradish or 4 teaspoons horseradish in vinegar
half a lemon
50 g butter
2 tablespoons flour
0.1 l dry white wine
salt
to sprinkle: half a bunch of parsley
Cut the chicken in four, put in a pot, add the vegetables and seasoning to cook a consommé. Strain and set the soup aside. For the sauce,
clean and grate the horseradish, then add lemon-juice to prevent it from browning. Fry the flour in the molten butter, and stir while
adding 0.5 l of the strained consommé. Add wine and salt to taste, then add two thirds of the horseradish. Finally, boil for 2-3 minutes
until it thickens into a sauce. You may add a few drops of lemon juice and some sugar for a better taste. Pour the sauce on the meat, and
decorate by sprinkling with the rest of the horseradish and the minced parsley. A fitting garnish is cooked rice with vegetables. Offer the
rest of the consommé and the vegetables separately.
Time to prepare: 30 minutes + 1 hr | 30 minutes for cooking the consommé
One serving provides 1551 kJ/371 kcal
30
Br assi ca peki nensi s
In Chinese, this plant is called ‘Pe-tsai’. As indicated by its name,
it comes from China, where many varieties are grown, and
where this is one of the most popular vegetables. The largest
amounts are produced on the Shantung Peninsula. Chinese
cabbage is one of the few vegetables which have their season
in the winter. The softness and gentle taste of its leaves make
it more akin to lettuce than to cabbage. The strong thick main
vein of its elongated green leaves is hardly ever bitter, and may
be used separately in a similar manner as asparagus. This veg-
etable matures in the autumns and may be picked from mid-
October to the beginning of November.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Its nutritive and physiological value is enhanced by the fact
that it is available in the winter period. It is rich in proteins and
a wide range of substances, which makes it a good source of
nutrients. It has a low energy content, and is rather fulfilling,
which makes Chinese cabbage a very appropriate component
of low-salt, vegetarian and weight-loss diets.
Possi bl e uses:
Chinese cabbage is sold in Hungary in 7-8 months of the year.
From April, Chinese cabbage produced under slightly heated
foil is sold, and from May and June large amounts produced
under foil without heating and in open-air beds appear in the
marketplaces. It is best as uncooked salad, either in itself or
when mixed with other raw foodstuffs, to preserve its vitamin
C content. The lower and outer leaves of Chinese cabbage –
which are not edible – are removed when harvesting. Thus,
only the lower end of the leaves (where the veins are more
fibrous) needs to be cut before consumption. Cutting this part
also causes the outer leaves to fall apart, allowing them to be
washed more thoroughly and to carefully remove any dirt.
Chinese cabbage is among the first vegetables suitable for
infants, as it is easy to digest. For infants, should be primarily
given the green part of the leaves, thickened with finely cut
potato. Its shelf life is short and cannot be frozen, nor are there
any typical methods of preservation.
Maj or consti tuents:
Chinese cabbage is characterized first of all by its significant
content of vitamin C (30 mg/100 g), carotene, potassium and
plant fibre.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Chinese cabbage became more widespread in Hungary at the
end of the 1970-ies. In the beginning, it was only grown in the
spring season, then the production of winter Chinese cab-
bage, intended for storage, started in the 1990-ies. This plant is
very sensitive to wind, therefore it is primarily grown indoors. It
needs much water, but it can produce a high yield in a short
time. Chinese cabbage produced in the spring is sold from
April, which is the time when Spanish and Portuguese supply
usually stops. This makes market conditions favourable. Most
of the production is done under foil without heating, and if the
weather in early spring is favourable, the plants develop a large
thick bulk. Favourable weather also helps prevent browning of
the core. Cultivation methodologies and experience guaran-
tee that leaves and stalks are clean. In the autumn, Chinese
cabbage is grown in open-air beds. It is cheapest in October
and November, but Chinese cabbage is primarily intended for
storage throughout the winter, optimally ensuring a continu-
ous supply until February or March. The winter types, which
can currently be stored until mid-February, increase the range
of vegetables on offer at a relatively low price. The main varie-
ties are the barrel-shaped ones, which are the most poplar
throughout Europe.
Variety
• Nagaoka50F1
• SpringAF1
• OpticoF1
Chi nese Cabbage
31
Chinese Cabbage with Roquefort Dressing
Ingredients:
1 Chinese cabbage
2 hard-boiled eggs
1 tomato
200 g Roquefort
0.2 l sour cream or yogurt
2 cloves of garlic, crushed
pinch of salt and ground pepper
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Wash the Chinese cabbage and slice the leaves thinly, as for slew. Arrange on a large plate and set aside. Pass the egg yolks through a
hair-sieve, cut the egg-white and the tomato into small cubes. Grate the cheese and combine with the sour cream. Add the egg yolks
and the tomato. Salt and pepper, add lemon juice to taste, add the garlic and mix thoroughly. Pour the dressing on the Chinese cabbage
arranged on the plate. Serve with fresh toast.
Time to prepare: 25 minutes | One serving provides 173 kcal
Kí nai kel
32
Ci t r ul l us l anat us
Watermelon is one of the plants which have been known by
humanity for a very long time. Its original home is India, where
it has been consumed since 3000 B.C. The Greek and the
Roman grew similar quantities of watermelon and muskmel-
on. Physical evidence recently uncovered makes it safe to
assume that watermelon was known to and popular with the
wandering Hungarian people.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
It used to be said that from a nutritional aspect, eating water-
melon was a complete waste of time, as it is made up of 90%
water. Now we know that each type of melons is nourishing
and has a cleansing effect. They are rich in vitamin C and potas-
sium, and also contain folic acid, vitamin A and iron. Their
energy content is low, but it does not mean that they are
without nutritive and healing effect. Judgement on the basis
of energy content is an obsolete approach. It’s not the amount
of nutrients, but their variety which matters. From this aspect,
watermelon is among our best fruits. However, as usually a
large quantity is consumed, the amount of nutritive substanc-
es is also significant. It is low in fibre, still, eating much water-
melon can act as a laxative, as the water absorbed in its cells
influences the walls of the intestines, stimulating peristalsis.
Consumption of watermelon prevents the proliferation of
certain harmful bacteria in the alimentary tract, and also
reduces putrefaction. Watermelon diet is a time-tested cure for
persons with bladder and kidney problems, as well as for renal
calculi. In cases when the body accumulates waste materials
and toxins (e.g. rheumatism, metabolic diseases), it detoxifies
and flushes the body. Persons with heart illnesses or with
blood circulation disorder should refrain from consuming too
much liquid, and should therefore eat only limited amounts of
watermelon.
Possi bl e uses:
It is best to eat watermelon in itself, as the first course of any
meal, with a 15 minute pause before the next course.
Watermelon juice is nourishing, and is rich in vitamin A and
potassium. In the summer, the entire watermelon – including
rind and seeds – is used for pressing juice. Such juice is much
less sweet and contains much less sugar than juice pressed
only from the red flesh. Rind provides a significant amount of
minerals and chlorophyll to the juice. Watermelon juice is a
first-class cleanser of the kidneys and bladder, and as a diuretic,
it helps the body eliminate excess liquid. It is rich in enzymes
and acts as an appetizer. One kg watermelon makes 0.35-0.5 l
juice. It is recommended for people with skin diseases, accu-
mulation of liquids in the body, bladder and kidney com-
plaints, arthritis, prostate complaints, obesity, constipation,
pregnancy and blood disorders. A special processing method
for unripe (mostly small) melons is pickling in whole or in slic-
es, in itself or mixed with other vegetables.
Maj or consti tuents:
Watermelon contains 90% water, but it is rich in vitamin C and
potassium, and also contains folic acid, vitamin A and iron. It is
a low-calorie fruit, with the lowest fibre content of all fruits.
Growi ng i nformati on and frequent vari eti es:
Watermelon is one of the vegetables (consumed as fruit) of
which the largest quantity is produced, and the one of which
undoubtedly the largest amount is exported. Its significance as
an export article is based on the production history of over a
hundred years, the favourable weather under the country’s
continental climate, and the excellent taste, which is due to
the quality of the soil. Watermelon season starts in mid-July
and continues to the end of September. Its peak time is
August, which coincidences with the end of production in
Southern Europe and is significant as an extension of the
watermelon season. Varieties correspond to the consumption
habits in Europe, therefore mostly striped watermelons of a
size which fits the boxes (approx. 3 kg) are produced. However,
large dark-coloured varieties, which taste the best, also exist.
Over the recent years, along with traditional varieties with
seed, the seedless and “low-seed” triploid varieties have been
gaining popularity in Western Europe. Experience shows that
seedless watermelons taste better, have a higher sugar con-
tent, and crispier flesh. Being denser than traditional varieties,
they also pack and transport better.

Varieties:
• Watermelon,striped(withseeds)
Crimson Tide F1, Crisby F1, Crimstar F1, Madera F1, Pelion F1
• Watermelon,darkskin(withseeds)
Pata Negra F1, Szigetcsépi 51 F1, Sungold F1, Coral F1
• Watermelon(“low-seed”)
Scarlet Trio F1, Vanity F1, Tripeto F1
Wat er mel on
33
Wat er mel on
Watermelon salad with Ham
Ingredients:
1 lettuce
700g watermelon
150 g very thin strips of smoked ham
For the dressing
salt
black pepper powder
4 tablespoon mild apple vinegar
4 tablespoon Soproni Kékfrankos red wine
4 tablespoon oil
Wash the lettuce, remove leaves and let them dry. Remove the seeds from the watermelon, and form small balls with a melon baller. For
the dressing, add the salt and pepper to the apple vinegar and stir; add the wine, then whisk together with the oil, drop by drop. Combine
the lettuce and the fruit. Pour the dressing over and put the ham on top.
Time to prepare: 25 minutes | One serving provides 1400 kJ/335 kcal
34
Agar i cus bi spor us
Mushrooms are nature’s gift and the foodstuff of gods – such
praise was sung for the "meat from the forest" by the ancient
poets. Mushrooms were considered embellishment at the
banquets in the classical age, to the extent that the host him-
self prepared mushroom delicacies for his guests, never allow-
ing his slave to do it for him.
Physi ol ogi cal effects:
Cultivates mushrooms are very useful and valuable sources of
nutrients. It would be possible and desirable to increase their
consumption. Being low in carbohydrate but rich in proteins
and fibre, they meet modern dietary requirements. The same
qualities make mushrooms suitable for healthy eating and a
perfect component of the diet of people with diabetes, high
blood pressure and high cholesterol level, as they are entirely
free from cholesterol and low in energy, fat and carbohydrate.
Possi bl e uses:
Mushroom is a foodstuff which is available in stores all year
round. Still, many are reluctant to purchase and eat mush-
rooms because of the news of poisoning and deaths. It should
be apparent, however, that cultivated mushroom does not
present such risks, and can be used in an unlimited number of
ways. Mushroom is among the most versatile of foodstuffs, it
can be eaten raw, roasted, stewed, fried etc. Mushrooms can
be combined with nearly any vegetable, and are suitable to
complement almost any meat type. Mushrooms can be used
to replace meat, as they contain all amino acids essential to
the functioning of the human body.
Maj or consti tuents:
Its mineral composition is ideal for the human body. It con-
tains large amounts of potassium, iron, phosphorus, selenium
and vitamin D – which is essential to the health of bones and
teeth. Furthermore, it is rich in vitamins B and C. 100g
Agaricus provides (% of recommended daily allowance): 40
kcal (14%), 5.9 g protein (11%), 0.2 g fat (0.2%), 0.002 mg vita-
min D (36%), 0.13 mg vitamin B2 (8%), 4.6 mg niacin (28%), 1.8
mg panthotenic acid (23%), 0.025 mg folic acid (13%), 0.37 mg
copper (26%), 47 mg phosphorus (47%), and 26 mg magne-
sium (8%).
Growi ng i nformati on and types:
Humans have been trying to cultivate mushrooms similar to
garden plants for millennia. The attempts were fully successful
first in the case of Agaricus. This is the mushroom of which the
largest amount is produced and consumed globally. There are
two types of Agaricus, one with white and the other with
brown cap. The main difference between the two is the col-
our of their cap and their shelf life. Brown-capped Agaricus
can be stored for 2-3 days more without any ill effects on
quality. Depending on the time and ingredients available,
Agaricus can be used to prepare anything from a simple meal
to exquisite symphonies of dishes.
Mushrooms i n the ki tchen
Mushrooms are very easy to prepare and cook, which makes
them popular with housewives, single persons and the
retired. When buying mushrooms, only fresh and good-look-
ing ones should be purchased, as mushrooms are perishable
goods. They should always be stored in the refrigerator at 0-4
°C. It is important not to wash them before storing, only
immediately before they are used. Mushrooms should be
stored in a paper bag or in a dish. Before use, they should be
cleaned with a clean brush or by scraping with a knife. Dirt at
the base of the stem should be removed with a sharp knife.
After that, the mushrooms should be washed under running
water. They should not be soaked, partly because valuable
nutrients are leeched and partly because they soak up water,
which is hard to evaporate while cooking. Mushrooms should
not be pared, as a significant portion of their valuable nutri-
ents and flavours is concentrated below the skin of the cap.
From then on, possibilities are limited only by imagination.
Mushrooms may make a starter, a main dish, used raw for
salads, be stewed, cooked, roasted, stuffed, made into a
ragout, soup or sauce, be grilled or added to scrambled eggs.
Before freezing, they should be steamed and wiped dry.
Agar i cus
35
Csi per kegomba
Ragout of Turkey with Mushroom and Sweet Corn
Ingredients:
0.5 kg turkey breast fillet
0.2 kg Agaricus, Pleurotus or forest mushroom
40 g butter
approx. 1 teaspoon salt
1 full tablespoon fine flour
0.1 l cooking cream
0.2 l sour cream
100 g frozen sweet corn
1 coffee spoon ground white pepper
½ teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon dill
1. Cut the turkey breast lengthwise into slices as thick as your little finger, then cut it across the fibres into strips of the same width. Clean
and slice the mushrooms.
2. Melt butter in a frying pan and sauté the meat for approx. 4 minutes, stirring, until it turns white. Add salt and the mushrooms. Roast
for a few minutes. When the juice of the mushrooms is gone, dust with flour. Roast for another half minute, stirring, but be careful, it
shouldn’t get seared even a little.
3. Add the sour cream and the cream, add the sweet corn, then season with the white pepper, curry and minced dill. Boil for 1-2 minutes,
stirring continuously, until the creamy gravy thins down. Best with cooked rice as garnish.
For 4 persons| Time to prepare: 25 minutes | One serving provides 1865 kJ/446 kcal
Keeps for 3-4 days in a refrigerator if covered with foil.
May be frozen. | Can be prepared at any time of the year.
36

APPLE 526.000 t
PEAR 32.700 t
CHERRY 12.100 t
SOUR CHERRY 56.200 t
PLUM 69.900 t
APRICOT 30.500 t
PEACH 52.600 t
RASPBERRIES 10.500 t
BLACKBERRIES 6.100 t
STRAWBERRIES 7.200 t
CURRANTS 10.400 t
GOOSEBERRY 2.200 t
WALNUT 5.400 t
WATERMELON 180.600 t
MUSKMELON 12.000 t
PAPRIKA 218.200 t
TOMATO 231.600 t
WHITE CABBAGE 28.500 t
SAVOY CABBAGE 19.200 t
BROCCOLI 16.800 t
CAULIFLOWER 16.800 t
CHINESE CABBAGE 7.000 t
GHERKIN 26.800 t
SWEET CORN 466.900 t
SNAP BEANS 20.800 t
GREEN PEAS 85.400 t
LETTUCE 32.700 t
ONION 91.300 t
GARLIC 4.200 t
ASPARAGUS 3.300 t
HORSERADISH 10.300 t
CARROT 708.200 t
PARSLEY 46.700 t
PARSNIP 8.800 t
AGARICUS 26.300 t
PLEUROTUS 1.800 t
.
.
Season- Cal endar and domest i c
pr oduct i on of Hungar i an f r ui t s and
veget abl es
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
500.000t
45.000t
20.000t
50.000t
90.000t
30.000t
65.000t
17.000t
7.000t
8.000t
10.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
RBROKH
FPYLA
HEPELHR
BHLHR
CRHBA
ABPHKOC
HEPCHK
MARHHA
EXEBHKA
KRYBHHKA
CMOPOþHHA
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
4.000t
4.000t
160.000t
10.000t
250.000t
260.000t
80.000t
18.000t
10.000t
25.000t
5.000t
40.000t
80.000t
400.000t
17.000t
80.000t
5.000t
2.000t
140.000t
10.000t
3.000t
10.000t
100.000t
50.000t
15.000t
38.000t
3.000t
I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII.
KPLXOBHHK
OPEX
APBY3
þLHR
HAHPHKA
TOMAT
KAHYCTA BEROKOHAHHAR
KAHYCTA CABOHCKAR
BPOKKORH
KAHYCTA UBETHAR
KAHYCTA KHTAHCKAR
OFYPEU KOHCEPBHPOBAHHLH
OFYPEU CARATHLH
KYKYPY3A CRAþKAR
OACORL CTPYHKOBAR
FOPOLEK 3ERËHLH
CARAT KOHAHHLH
CARAT «AHCBEPF»
RYK
HECHOK
CHAPXA
XPEH
MOPKOBL
HETPYLKA
HACTEPHAK
LAMHHHLOHL
BELEHKH
Recipes, photos:
Csaba Hunyaddobrai food-stylist
Technical text:
Hungarian Fruit and Vegetable Product Council
1118 Budapest, Villányi út 35-43. K. ép.
Tel: +36-1-381-1020 | Fax: +36-1-209-1697
info@fruitveb.hu | www.fruitveb.hu
Agricultural Marketing Centre (AMC)
H-1042 Budapest, Árpád út 51-53.
Tel: 36-1-450-8800 | Fax: 36-1-450-8801
info@amc.hu | www.amc.hu

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