The First 24 Elements

Hydrogen

H He Li Be B
Helium Lithium Beryllium Silicon

Boron

Carbon

C

Nitrogen

N

Oxygen

O

Fluorine

F Ne Na Mg
Neon Sodium
Magnesium

Aluminium

Al Si

P
Phosphorus

Sulfur

S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti V Cr
Chlorine Argon Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium

Chromium

1

H

2

Hydrogen 1.008

He

3

Helium 4.002

Li

4

Lithium 6.941

Be

5

Beryllium 9.012

B

6

Boron 10.811

C

Carbon 12.011

7

N Nitrogen
14.007

8

O Oxygen
15.999

9

F Fluorine
18.998

10

Ne Neon

11

20.180

Na Sodium
22.990

12

Mg
24.305

Magnesium

13

Al Aluminium
26.982

14

Si Silicon

15

P

16

28.0855

Phosphorus

30.974

S Sulfur

17

32.065

Cl Chlorine
35.453

18

Ar Argon

39.948

19

K Potassium
39.0983

20

Ca Calcium
40.078

21

Sc Scandium
44.956

22

Ti Titanium
47.867

23

V Vanadium
50.942

24

Cr

Chromium 51.996

Developed by Natalie Gillis, 2013

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The First 24 Elements
Potassium

K Ne Sc P Cl Ti N Ar S
Neon Scandium
Phosphorus

Chlorine

Titanium

Nitrogen

Argon

Sulfur

Vanadium

V Cr O
Chromium
Magnesium

Oxygen

H Si
Hydrogen Silicon

F Ca Li
Fluorine Calcium Lithium

C Be B He Al Mg Na
Carbon Beryllium Boron Helium Aluminium Sodium

1

H

2

Hydrogen 1.008

He

3

Helium 4.002

Li Lithium
6.941

4

Be

5

Beryllium 9.012

B

6

Boron 10.811

C

Carbon 12.011

7

N Nitrogen
14.007

8

O Oxygen
15.999

9

F

10

Fluorine 18.998

Ne Neon

11

20.180

Na Sodium
22.990

12

Mg
24.305

Magnesium

13

Al

14

Aluminium 26.982

Si

15

Silicon 28.0855

P

16

Phosphorus

S

17

30.974

Sulfur 32.065

Cl

18

Chlorine 35.453

Ar

Argon 39.948

19

K Potassium
39.0983

20

Ca Calcium
40.078

21

Sc Scandium
44.956

22

Ti Titanium
47.867

23

V Vanadium
50.942

24

Cr

Chromium 51.996

Developed by Natalie Gillis, 2013

FOLD HERE

The Elements and STSE Na H
Sodium Selenium Hydrogen Fluorine

F

Oxygen

O
Gold

Carbon

C Cl Mg Ca Ti V Cu Ga
Chlorine
Magnesium

Calcium

Titanium

Vanadium

Copper

Gallium

Se Ta Re Au Hg Pb Po Sg Bh Cn Fr Ra
Tantalum Rhenium Mercury Lead
Polonium

Seaborgium

Bohrium

Copernicum

Francium

Radium

88 - Ra Radium

1-H Hydrogen

73 - Ta Tantalum

106 - Sg Seaborgium

29 - Cu Copper

23 - V Vanadium

107 - Bh Bohrium

6- C Carbon

22 - Ti Titanium

87 - Fr Francium

20 - Ca Calcium

17 - Cl Chlorine

84 - Po Polonium

8-O Oxygen

80 - Hg Mercury

112 - Cn Copernicum

9-F Fluorine

82 - Pb Lead

11 - Na Sodium

79 - Au Gold

12 - Mg Magnesium

34 - Se Selenium

75 - Re Rhenium

31 - Ga Gallium
Developed by Natalie Gillis, 2013

FOLD HERE

The Elements and STSE
Tantalum

Ta Bh Ti V Cn Ga Pb Po Se O Au Cl
Bohrium Titanium Vanadium
Copernicum

Gallium

Lead

Polonium

Selenium

Oxygen

Gold

Chlorine

Na F Sg H
Sodium Fluorine
Seaborgium

C Ca Fr Mg Cu Ra Hg Re
Carbon Calcium Francium
Magnesium

Hydrogen

Copper

Radium

Mercury

Rhenium

88 - Ra Radium

1-H Hydrogen

73 - Ta Tantalum

106 - Sg Seaborgium

29 - Cu Copper

23 - V Vanadium

107 - Bh Bohrium

6- C Carbon

22 - Ti Titanium

87 - Fr Francium

20 - Ca Calcium

17 - Cl Chlorine

84 - Po Polonium

8-O Oxygen

80 - Hg Mercury

112 - Cn Copernicum

9-F Fluorine

82 - Pb Lead

11 - Na Sodium

79 - Au Gold

12 - Mg Magnesium

34 - Se Selenium

75 - Re Rhenium

31 - Ga Gallium
Developed by Natalie Gillis, 2013

FOLD HERE

AGES 13+ 2 Players

For example: You ask, “Is your mystery element a gas?” or “Was your mystery element named after a scientist?” Your opponent answers, “No.” Close all the doors to elements that are gases or were named after scientists. You are now closer to figuring out the mystery element. Now it’s your opponent’s turn to ask a yes or no question.

The Periodic Table! Get to know the game: Set-up
Choose a game card (The First 24 Elements or The Elements and STSE) and slide it into the game tray. Choose a mystery element from one of the top two rows and slide the selector over that element. The other selector should be completely to the left of the window. Open all of the doors on your game tray so you can see the elements.  

Winning

Once you think you know your opponent’s mystery element, wait until your next turn and make your guess instead of asking a question. If you guess correctly, you win. If you guess wrong, your opponent wins!

Championship Play

For tournament-style play, slide the scorekeeper up one for every game you win. The first player to win five games is the champion!

Challenge Game
For an extra challenge, both players choose two elements ⎯ one from the first row and one from the second row. Your object is to guess both of your opponent’s mystery elements. You’ll have to say “both” or “either” when asking questions about two mystery elements. For example, you could ask, “Are both of your elements mined in Canada?” or, “Does either of your elements react exothermically with water?” Be very careful when eliminating elements! For example: You ask, “Is either of your elements radioactive?” and your opponent answer “yes.” You cannot close any doors, because even though one mystery element is definitely radioactive, the other one may not be! To win the Challenge Game, you must guess both of the mystery elements correctly on the same turn.

Object
Be the first to guess your opponent’s mystery element!

Playing the Game
The younger player goes first. Players alternate turns by asking a YES or NO question. Depending on the answer, you will close the door(s) to any elements you know are NOT your opponent’s mystery element. Note: You may ask any questions about an element’s properties (lustrous, flammable, metal, gas, etc.) but you may not ask questions about an element’s location on the periodic table (group or period). This would make the game too easy!

Developed by Natalie Gillis, 2013

Glossary and Legend
Alchemy: Alchemists were the first chemists, working with many elements and developing scientific processes. Alchemists tried to turn cheap, common metals into precious metals like silver and gold, and to create the fabled philosopher's stone. Allotrope: An element that exists in two or more different structural forms within a single phase (solid, liquid or gas) is allotropic. Graphite, diamonds, grapheme and fullerenes are all allotropes of carbon. Antiquity: These elements have been known to humans since before the middle ages (1500 CE). Copper was probably the first to be mined and crafted, as early as 9000 BCE. Canada: Many elements are mined in Canada. While the mining industry is economically important across Canada, Northern Ontario has the greatest concentration of mines in the country. Gas: These elements naturally exist as gasses at standard temperature and pressure. Essential: Elements that are necessary for animal or plant life are called macronutrients or micronutrients, depending on the quantity needed. These nutrients cannot be synthesized in the body and must be consumed. Mythology: Many elements were named for Greek, Roman or Norse gods. Many elements that are named for astronomical bodies have mythological names, too. For example, selenium was named for Selene, which is both “moon” in Greek, and the Greek moon goddess. Non-metal: There are only 18 non-metallic elements to more than 80 metals, but non-metals make up most of Earth’s crust, atmosphere and oceans. They are generally poor conductors of heat and electricity, are dull and brittle, and have lower densities than metals. Place name: Many elements were named for cities, states, countries or continents. For example, copper was derived from the Latin for Cypress. Radioactive: The nuclei of these atoms are unstable and lose energy through radiation, transforming into an atom with a lower atomic weight, or into a lighter element. Elements heavier than bismuth are radioactive. Scientist: Many elements were named for scientists who made important contributions to our understanding of the elements. For example, seaborgium was named for Glenn Seaborg, who discovered 10 elements. Synthetic/transient: These elements are so radioactive that they are not stable in nature. Transient elements are produced by heavier elements as they decay. Synthetic elements do not exist on Earth and are created in the lab. Toxic: Some elements are poisonous, causing acute illness, cancer or birth defects. Some essential elements are toxic if ingested in the wrong state. Many toxic elements bioaccumulate in the body or food chain. Women: Only four elements were discovered by women. Marie Curie was the first. She was also the first woman to win the Nobel prize, and the first person ever to receive it twice.

Periodic Table of the Elements

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