PUBLISHING ARTS CURRICULUM: KEANSBURG HIGH SCHOOL ART DEPARTMENT

Arts Education in the 21st Century
Creativity is a driving force in the 21st-century global economy, with the fastest growing jobs and emerging industries relying on the ability of workers to think unconventionally and use their imaginations. The best employers the world over will be looking for the most competent, most creative, and most innovative people on the face of the earth ... This will be true not just for the top professionals and managers, but up and down the length and breadth of the workforce. ... Those countries that produce the most important new products and services can capture a premium in world markets … (2007, National Center on Education and the Economy) Experience with and knowledge of the arts is an essential component of the P-12 curriculum in the 21st century. As the state of New Jersey works to transform public education to meet the needs of a changing world and the 21st century workforce, capitalizing on the unique ability of the arts to unleash creativity and innovation in our students is critical for success, as reflected in the mission and vision that follow:

Essential or Driving Question(s):
Mission: The arts enable personal, intellectual, social, economic, and human growth by fostering creativity and providing opportunities for expression beyond the limits of language. Vision: An education in the arts fosters a population that: • • Creates, reshapes, and fully participates in the enhancement of the quality of life, globally. Participates in social, cultural, and intellectual interplay among people of different ethnic, racial, and cultural backgrounds through a focus on the humanities. • • Possesses essential technical skills and abilities significant to many aspects of life and work in the 21st century. Understands and impacts the increasingly complex technological environment.

Intent and Spirit of the Visual and Performing Arts Standards
The intent and spirit of the New Jersey Visual and Performing Arts Standards builds upon the philosophy and goals of the National Standards for Arts Education. Equitable access to arts instruction is achieved when the four arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) are offered throughout the P-12 spectrum. Thus, the goal of the standards is that all students have regular, sequential arts instruction throughout their P-12 education. The expectation of the New Jersey arts standards is that all students communicate at a basic level in each of the four arts disciplines by the end of fifth grade, using the vocabularies, materials, tools, techniques, and intellectual methods of each arts discipline in a developmentally appropriate manner. Beginning in grade 6,

student instruction in the arts is driven by specialization, with students choosing one of the four arts disciplines based on their interests, aptitudes, and career aspirations. By the end of grade 12, students are expected to communicate proficiently in one or more arts disciplines of their choice. By graduation from secondary school, all students should, in at least one area of specialization, be able to: • • • Define and solve artistic problems with insight, reason, and technical proficiency. Develop and present basic analyses of works of art from structural, historical, cultural, and aesthetic perspectives. Call upon their informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods.

Relate various types of arts knowledge and skills within and across the arts disciplines by mixing and matching competencies and understandings in art-making, history, culture, and analysis in any arts-related project.

Interdisciplinary Curriculum Connections:
Art combines may aspects and facets of various curriculums. Mathematical relationships are explored in Art via perspective, proportion, ratios, measurements, patterns, and the rhythmic qualities of design (NJCCCS { MA.9-12.4.5.C.4} {MA.9-12.4.2.D.2.1} {MA.9-12.4.2.A.2}). Color theory, optical illusions, the composition of art materials, chemical changes produced in various firing techniques provide practical exposure to various aspects of science (NJCCCS {SCI.9-12.5.1.A.1}{SCI.9-12.5.1.A.2}{SCI.912.5.1.A.4}). Art terms in various foreign languages are used to convey effects produced in artwork. Some of the languages include but are not limited to Spanish, Italian, German and French (NJCCCS {FL.3-4.7.1.A.2} {FL.3-4.7.2.A.4}). Art criticism and critiquing are used as written component in the classes which reinforces our Literacy program. In addition, the interpretations of lyrics and poetry are used to inspire students’ creativity. (NJCCCS LA.9-12.3.1.G.7}{LA.9-12.3.2.B.4}). Art requires fantastic coordination of fingers, hands, arms, eyes, and other muscle groups to execute various techniques (NJCCCS {HE.912.2.5.A.1}). Art is history as it reflects cultural heritage and historical events ( NJCCCS VP K-12 1.5). Lastly, students learn techniques and strategies for marketing and selling Art work. (NJCCCS ART.912.1.2.D.4}).

Work Place Readiness Standards - ( State of New Jersey)
Within the context of all Art Department courses will be the opportunity for students to pursue career guidance, which follows the ideals set forth by the NJ. State Work place Readiness Standards:

1) All Students will Develop Career Planning and Workplace Readiness Skills 2) All Students Will Use Information, Technology, And Other Tools 3) All Students Will Use Critical Thinking, Decision Making And Problem-Solving Skills 4) All Students Will Demonstrate Self-Management Skills. 5) All Students Will Apply Safety Principles.
(Percentage Breakdown -Student Assessment) Work Place Readiness Skills - 20% Studio Projects - 40% Cultural and Historical Research – 20% Homework - 10% Midterm / Final Exams - 10%

Teachers will provide feedback to parents regarding completion and performance of homework assignments. Homework is one means of demonstrating and building a partnership between home and school that may lead to more consistent academic success. Homework assignments will be directly linked to instruction and involve problem solving and creative thinking skills. Effective homework will be clearly defined. purposeful. support student achievement. It is recommended that if a student is going to be . • If a student is absent from school the student will have 48 hours from the time he or she returns to school to produce the homework assignment. evaluated. developed. and assigned in order to: • Increase academic success • Enhance the curriculum • Move learning outside the classroom • Develop independent life skills • Promote thinking skills • Help students to identify the linkage of future educational and career planning Purpose of Homework An extension of the course curriculum in visual arts by • • • • • • practicing and reinforcing skills exploring art history increasing awareness of contemporary arts in the news and arts issues developing career explorations in the arts work place readiness skills self-evaluation and analysis through journaling Grading Homework is a part of the recommended assessment of student progress. • If homework is late teachers will deduct 20 points per day the assignment is not provided. and recorded into the grading system. • Homework will account for 10 % of the marking period grade. The Key Principles of Homework Quality homework tasks can play a vital role in our school through the: • Development of independent learning • Development and refining of intellectual skills • Reinforcement and extension of curriculum outside the school setting Objectives Homework is to be appropriately planned. Assignments will be reviewed. and will be modified to meet the needs of the individual student.Assessments/Evidence of Learning: • Group projects/presentations / Power Points / Videos / Digital Photography • Student maintained digital portolios • Writing activities / Journals / Reports / Analysis • Homework assignments – (see policy below) • Quizzes • Tests / Exams: Midterm and Finals • Presentations / Multimedia • Interim and Benchmark Assessments Keansburg High School Art Department Homework Policy Homework is an intricate part of the instructional program and is used as an extension of the classroom.

clarifying. * Additional time as needed for assignments. * Masking portions of reading or test questions to eliminate visual distracters. In addition. * Providing frequent breaks. Photoshop. assessments. Accommodations: • Use of audio/visual. In the area of special education instructional accommodations and modifications must be made as a result of the student’s IEP. For extenuating student medical issues or family bereavement an extension may be provided with administrative approval. software programs such as Illustrator. * Breaking assignment into parts. Meeting the Needs of Special Learners: Art has always involved the special learner. Many Internet websites are used for research and resources for materials. etc.• • absent for an extended period of time that the parent request schoolwork and homework through the Keansburg High School Guidance Office. * Providing alternate versions of materials that are appropriate for the individual reading level of the student. which support the adjustment of digital imagery have been integrated into the Art Curriculum. The following accommodations (as recommended by the NJ Department of Education) are considered as special needs students are always mainstreamed for art classes. near student role model. which would otherwise be unavailable or have limited availability for our students. * Allowing students to type written responses. graphic organizers. Special learners who may need accommodations can have their work adjusted to meet their individual needs and they can work at their own rate. * Providing visual cues. Digital photography is used as a base for several assignments throughout the program. scripted notes. modify assessments as dictated by student IEP. * Reading directions aloud. The smart board and digital projector are also used as visual aids for our art programs. etc. Many aspects of the art program require the student to work as an individual so art making can be taught according to each student’s ability level and style of learning. * Repeating. and activities. * Providing written directions to support verbal instruction. * Terminating a section of test or portion of assignment when student has completed all items they are able and teacher has ascertained that the student has demonstrated understanding of the topic. or rewording directions and/or questions. Testing modifications as stated in student IEP • Visual reinforcement Accommodations and Modifications * Preferential seating – including seating near the front of the room. low-distractibility work area. . Technology Integration: Technology has become an important aspect of the KHS Visual Arts curriculum.

* Summarizing and Note taking – Students are given assignments that require this skill to complete the task. * Tiered Assignments – students are given projects that are appropriate for the individual readiness level. and are provided with feedback regarding proper technique and procedures. * Allowing student the opportunity to re-take or re-do assignments for the benefit of learning. The state and national standards are deliberately broad to encourage local curricular objectives and flexibility in classroom instruction. * Assessment – Students assess Art work based on a predefined set of standards/rubrics. history. * Journal Writing – Students set goals and evaluate completion of projects. community centers. they learn through and within the arts. * Cooperative Learning – grouping of students to research materials. In addition. libraries.).use of pretests to identify student’s prior knowledge and progressing from that point in the instruction. * Homework – students prepare assignments as instructed by the teacher. Student work is displayed in the art room. and responding. techniques and objectives. Art assignments can be adapted to individual learning styles. and principles of design. * Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback – Students are given assignments and objectives. * Flexible grouping – students work in various areas depending on the task at hand.g. * Differentiated Instruction – lessons are given based upon the student’s individual skill level. Instructional strategies that are used in the teaching of Art include but are not limited to: * Computer Assisted Instruction – both software and websites: teaching of Art theory. elements. When actively engaged in these processes. * Lecture – Instruction may require both lecture and demonstration as a tool for conveyance of ideas. * Frequently checking for understanding. * Reinforcing Effort and Providing Recognition – Students receive grades based on effort and progress. * Pre-assessments . students not only learn about the arts. * Centers – Various sections of the rooms provide students with resource material. * Scaffolding – teacher models use of proper techniques used in art and then students repeats it with less and less input from instructor until students have mastered technique.* Allowing student to orally respond to questions. they correlate structurally to the three arts processes defined in the 2008 NAEP Arts Education Assessment Framework: creating. and as a resource for ideas and expanding awareness * Comparing and Contrasting: to identifying similarities and differences – discussion groups on how Art works are both similar and different in composition and style. etc. Instructional Strategies: A variety of best practices are used daily in the teaching of Art. New Jersey’s revised 2009 visual and performing arts standards provide the foundation for creating local curricula and meaningful assessments in the four arts disciplines for all . performing. * Ensure that the student understands directions and assignment expectations before working independently. * Computer as a Tool – using the computer to help teach digital imaging. various areas of the building and at other locations beyond the school (e. Standards or Established Goals: The revised 2009 visual and performing arts standards align with the National Standards for Arts Education. and working in small groups to create original Art work.

1 and 1. music. Like Standard 1. music. including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of methodologies for critique. theatre.children.3 Performing: All students will synthesize skills.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies: All students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies. Dance. Standard 1. as follows. Together. theatre. and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures. This standard pertains to all four arts disciplines. . and D. and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A.1.1 includes four strands. all students demonstrate proficiency in at least one chosen arts discipline by meeting or exceeding the content knowledge and skills delineated in the arts standards. Standard1.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role. media. student instruction continues to focus on one of the four arts disciplines. There are four visual and performing arts standards. methods. Visual Art. Standard 1. theatre. Theatre. and visual art. Visual Art. Standard 1. Music.4 provides a corollary to the NAEP Arts process of responding.3 is rooted in arts performance and thus stands as a corollary to the NAEP Arts process of performing/interpreting. articulate required knowledge and skills concerning the elements and principles of the arts. respectively. B. and visual art. as chosen by the student. and/or presenting works of art in dance. Standard 1. By the end of grade 12. Organization of the 2009 Standards This organization of the 2009 visual and performing arts standards reflects the critical importance of locating the separate arts disciplines (dance. performing. Music. Aesthetic Responses and B. while still pointing to the unique requirements of individual disciplines. music. The expectations for student achievement increase across the grade band clusters as follows: • Grades 9-12: Throughout secondary school.2. which may have implications for instructional delivery according to licensure. Standard 1. Proficiency Levels and Grade Band Clusters The grade-band clusters for the 2009 visual and performing arts standards correspond to new federal definitions of elementary and secondary education. standard 1. and D. the two standards forge a corollary to the NAEP Arts process of creating. Critique Methodologies. standard 1. and visual art. judgment. one for each of the arts disciplines: A. theatre. music. Standard 1.1 The Creative Process: All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance. development. theatre. B.4 addresses two ways students may respond to the arts. and analysis to works of art in dance. music. and visual art) as one common body of knowledge and skills. C. and technologies that are appropriate to creating. Dance. History of the Arts and Culture.3 is made up of four arts-specific strands: A. and the visual arts at the appropriate level of study.2 includes a single strand: A. Theatre. C. Standard 1. Standards 1. They are designed to assist educators in assessing required knowledge and skills in each discipline by laying out the expectations for levels of proficiency in dance. as well as arts history and culture.

rulers. computer lab. computers Product label design teacher made visuals. internet access. resources. lesson plans. tracing paper. glue software. all visual and performing arts teachers must meet the “Highly Qualified Teachers” standards within their certificated arts discipline(s). resources. lesson plans. drawing materials. computers. papers. publishing company’s tutorials. State licensure is the initial gatekeeper for highly qualified status. drawing materials. resources. glue. software. text book Camera Use and Care 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 blocks . computer lab and DTP software Layout design teacher made visuals. rulers Desk top Publishing Layout teacher made visuals. lesson plans. card stock. software. lesson plans. triangles. computer lab History of photography teacher made visuals. resources. glue. pencils. lesson plans. rulers. resources. cameras. periodicals. cardstock. lesson plans. software. software. paper. rulers . instructional materials. computer lab DTP for School Publications teacher made visuals. resources. software Graphic enhancement teacher made visuals. press type letters. computers. paint. graph paper. colored papers. computers 3-D product package design teacher made visuals. resources. lesson plans. paints. lesson plans. Visual and Performing Arts Pacing Chart Course: Publishing Arts 1 TEXT TITLE: Focus on Photography PUBLISHER: Davis Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Jostens SOFTWARE: Current versions of Adobe Desktop Publishing and Photo Editing Software Current version of publisher’s software for school publications Framework PROJECTS MATERIALS TIME 90 Blocks Total 5 Blocks Typography teacher made visuals.Teaching the Standards: Certification and Highly Qualified Arts Educators The visual and performing arts are considered a “core” subject under the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB-2001). resources. Therefore. lesson plans. photo equipment Color theory applications teacher made visuals. resources. software.

4 ) Demonstrate a knowledge of the legal and ethnic responsibilities for artists involved in printed media.4 ) Demonstrate the ability to effectively use tools and materials to produce typography . needles.2 1.3 1.1 1. decorative papers Printmaking teacher made visuals. software.2 1. Recognize the elements of art and principles of design in artworks as they apply to visual arts inherent to photography and publishing ( NJ CCCS 1.1 1. Papers.5 blocks 5 blocks 5 blocks 5 blocks Understandings: All Students enrolled within Publishing Arts 1 will.1 1.3 1. computer lab Publishing Arts and the law “Taking Issue” text. thread. ( NJ CCCS 1. lesson Plans. photographic equipment. guest speaker. lesson plans. lesson plans. religious and ethnic traditions. resources. ( NJ CCCS 1.teacher made visuals. visuals. and graphics ( NJ CCCS 1. resources.1 1. stencil knives. resources.5 blocks 2. cameras.2 1. political. digital cameras. periodicals.3 1.2 1. lesson plans. bookbinding teacher made visuals. resources. resources. brayers. cameras. photography. resources. ink. resources.3 1.1 1. resources. photography equipment. cameras. resources. fabric. resources. lesson plans.1 1. computer lab.2 1. calligraphy rule paper.3 1. text book Careers in Graphic Design teacher made visuals. computer lab internet access. lesson plans.4 ) . lesson plans. teacher made visuals. lesson plans. wheat paste. software Photo composition teacher made visuals. computer lab. software.5 Blocks 5 Blocks 5 blocks 5 blocks 2.3 1. pens. board. internet access Calligraphy/ Text as Art teacher made visuals.5 blocks 5 blocks 2.4 ) Demonstrate a knowledge the relevance of Graphic Art and the place it holds in various social.2 1.1 1. student photographs. text book Digital Photo Editing teacher made visuals. periodicals.2 1. adobe current adobe photo editing software Photographic Careers teacher made visuals. internet access. computer lab.4 ) Demonstrate adherence to employable standards in daily application of workplace readiness skills ( NJ CCCS 1.1 1.3 1. online tutorials. text book Digital Photography Teacher made visuals. lesson plans. resources. text book Editing Digital Photos Teacher made tutorials.4 ) Survey the historic development of photography and make photographs typical of each chronological period ( NJ CCCS 1. photography equipment. peripherals. printing plates 2. markers. lesson plans. decorative papers Book making.3 1. ink . lesson plans.4 ) Survey the use of calligraphy throughout history and practice calligraphy strokes with traditional tools and media ( NJ CCCS 1.4 ) Pursue personal growth through self discovery and aesthetic awareness ( NJ CCCS 1.

5 Blocks . Make handcrafted books to illustrate the processes learned.Correlate and apply appropriate math. teacher made visuals.2 1. Developing Content with Visual Elements/ Typography and Graphics 5 Blocks 7. computers.3 1.4 ) Explore career options that involve photography making. digital photography. ( NJ CCCS 1.4 ) (NJ Work Place Readiness) Visual and Performing Arts Pacing Chart Course: Publishing Arts 2 TEXT TITLE: Focus on Photography Yearbook Journalism Curriculum PUBLISHER: Davis Jostens SOFTWARE: Current versions of Adobe Desktop Publishing and Photo Editing Software Current version of publisher’s software for school publications Framework PROJECTS MATERIALS TIME 90 Blocks Total Function of a theme.4 Recognize and use select Art vocabulary and design terminologies in both written and oral platforms. ( NJ CCCS 1.4 ) Illustrate mastery of design principles. Writings will include Journals. a three dimensional package design and construction (NJ CCCS 1.3 1. presentation software and hardware Developing Content with Verbal Elements/ teacher made visuals. and composition through the production of a comprehensive project.1 1.3 1. resources. software Ethical and legal considerations for Publishing/ Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide “Taking Issue”.3 1.1 1. Jostens St u d en t Pr ess Law Cen t er p ub licat io n s an d lin ks 5 Blocks 2. Narratives.2 1.4 ) Assess personal development and aesthetic growth by building a portfolio of work and journaled self assessments ( NJ CCCS 1. computers. Define Role of Publishing in the School Environment / Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide Yearbooks. editing. (NJ Work Place Readiness) Identify physical elements and processes involved in production of books. Descriptive and Persuasive writing tasks which reflect a mastery of related Art vocabulary and terminology. software. periodicals. ( NJ CCCS 1.5 Blocks 5 Blocks Internet access. resources. internet. lesson plans.2 1.3 1. and writing skills within the context of Art related objectives mirroring the proficiency levels necessary to meet HSPA standards. thematic development/ Periodicals. and marketing.4) All Students will use assistance of technology to produce and edit digital photographs and desktop publishing ( NJ CCCS 1.3 1. reading. Analytical Evaluations. lesson plans. software.1 1.

software .3 1. rulers.2 1. papers. rulers. paint. resources. font posters. Participate in seminars on censorship in graphic arts.2 1. cameras. bookbinding/ Teacher made visuals. Student Yearbook Guide Digital Cameras.3 1.3 1. Writings will include Journals. resources. .1 1.2 1. ( NJ CCCS 1. ( NJ CCCS 1. bookmaking. computers.4 ) Demonstrate advanced development of technical skill by designing and producing desktop published page layouts .submission ready for school produced publications. card .1 1. periodicals stock. lesson plans.4 ) (NJ Work Place Readiness) Identify conceptualization and physical processes involved in production of children’s literature.1 1.4 ) Demonstrate advanced ability to effectively use tools and materials to produce typography.1 1. drawing materials Art Careers in Publishing/ Guest speakers.1 1. and writing skills within the context of Art related objectives mirroring the proficiency levels necessary to meet HSPA standards.3 1.4 ) Chronicle events using a photojournalistic format. Art materials for production and binding Understandings: All Students enrolled within Publishing Art 2 will 10 Blocks 15 Blocks 10 Blocks 15 Blocks 5 Blocks 10 Blocks Recognize the elements of art and principles of design in artworks as they apply to visual arts inherent to photography and publishing ( NJ CCCS 1. computers. editing software. photography. Narratives.2 1. ( NJ CCCS 1. Periodicals. papers. periodicals stock. resources. ( NJ CCCS 1. lesson plans.2 1. drawing materials Photography: Planning.2 1. resources. software. art materials. paint. Analytical Evaluations.3 1. lesson plans.4 ) Demonstrate adherence to employable standards in daily application of workplace readiness skills ( NJ CCCS 1. presentation software. political.2 1.4 ) Pursue personal growth through self discovery and aesthetic awareness ( NJ CCCS 1.1 1.2 1. storytelling and technical quality/ Photography textbook teacher made visuals.3 1.4 ) Demonstrate a knowledge of the legal and ethnic responsibilities for artists involved in printed media And Describe the implications of the law on school publications ( NJ CCCS 1. religious and ethnic traditions. shooting and editing / Photography Textbook teacher made visuals. reading. internet access software.4 ) Demonstrate a knowledge of the relevance of graphic art and the place it holds in various social.4 ) Assess personal development and aesthetic growth by maintaining an annotated online portfolio of work and journaled self assessments ( NJ CCCS 1. current editing software computers. glue. Texts. lesson plans.3 1. measuring tools Layout and Copy Design / teacher made visuals. card .3 1. and graphics ( NJ CCCS 1. font posters. glue. Books.1 1.4 Recognize and use select Art vocabulary and design terminologies in both written and oral platforms.teacher made visuals. internet.3 1.3 1.2 1. Photo composition.1 1. rulers. Photojournalism. hardware. resources. lesson plans Advertising and Package Design/ teacher made visuals. rulers.3 1.4 ) Correlate and apply appropriate math.1 1. ( NJ CCCS 1.1 1. and periodicals Art in Children’s Literature. software. Internet. lesson plans. Descriptive and Persuasive writing tasks which reflect a mastery of related Art vocabulary and terminology.

g. and visual art. Standard 1.12. NOTE: By the end of grade 12.4 ) Illustrate mastery of design principles. Cultural and historical events impact art-making as well 1. those students choosing VISUAL ART as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.D.A. Understandings: (Performance objectives) Students will be able to….1 1. Stimuli for the creation of artworks can come from 1.12.1 The Creative Process: All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance. including other arts disciplines.4 ) (NJ Work Place Readiness) KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS: NEW JERSEY STATE CCCS FRAMEWORK – VISUAL ARTS Standard1. musical. compositions by using them as stimulus/inspiration for corresponding visual artworks.Publish a handcrafted book to illustrate the processes learned. 1 influenced world cultures throughout history.3 1. or VISUAL ART.2 Translate literary.2. development. and visual art have as how audiences respond to works of art. and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures.4) All Students will use assistance of technology to produce and edit digital photographs and desktop publishing ( NJ CCCS 1. personal 2 availability of music online) on societal norms and habits expression. symbolism. and allegory.1.2 1. theatre. theatrical. MUSIC.3 1. Common themes exist in artwork from a variety of 1. cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes. music. ( NJ CCCS 1. citizenship. the of an individual’s lifelong learning.12.A. music. THEATRE.1 Distinguish innovative applications of the elements of art cultures across time and are communicated through and principles of design in visual artworks from diverse metaphor. Access to the arts has a positive influence on the quality 1. Understandings: (Performance objectives) Students will be able to…. and dance many places. Justify the impact of innovations in the arts (e. NOTE: By the end of grade 12. theatre.3 1.D.1. and composition through the production of a three dimensional package design and construction (NJ CCCS 1.2.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role. Determine how dance.. and contributions to community and global of mind in various historical eras. . digital photography. all students demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE.12.

Music.and three-dimensional artworks. This standard pertains to all four arts disciplines.12. theatre. techniques.3 is rooted in arts performance and thus stands as a corollary to the NAEP Arts process of performing/interpreting. Standard 1. Recognition of fundamental elements within various arts 1. theatre. music. and technologies that are appropriate to creating. techniques. Critique Methodologies. or VISUAL ART.1 Use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common disciplines (dance. Identify the styles and artistic processes used in the creation of culturally and historically diverse two. all students demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE.D.3. NOTE: By the end of grade 12. NOTE: By the end of grade 12.3 1.and three-dimensional artworks can be rendered culturally specific by using the tools.12.D. How individuals manipulate the elements of art and principles of design results in original portfolios that reflect choice and personal stylistic nuance. methodology. impressionism.3.4. C. and techniques used.D. and cultural understanding. and visual statement allows the artist to use expressionism.3 is made up of four arts-specific strands: A. performing. abstractionism (nonobjective art).A. and visual art. music. media. Understandings: (Performance objectives) Students will be able to…. theatre. 1. standard 1. Visual Art.3. Theatre. music.12. and visual art) is properties and to discern the cultural implications of works of dependent on the ability to decipher cultural implications dance. materials. . Standard 1. THEATRE. embedded in artworks.12. those students choosing VISUAL ART as their required area of specialization demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills.3. Organize an exhibit of personal works of visual art that convey a high level of understanding of how the expression of ideas relates to the art media. and visual art.3. methods. and/or presenting works of art in dance. realism/naturalism.D. and other genre styles to convey ideas to an audience.12. Two. MUSIC. Understandings: (Performance objectives) Students will be able to…. and styles impact originality and interpretation of the artistic statement. techniques. The artist’s understanding of the relationships among art media. styles.3 Performing: All students will synthesize skills.4 Analyze the syntax and compositional and stylistic principles of two. 1. and methodologies that are germane to a particular cultural style. Like Standard 1. and D. art mediums. Artists interpret/render themes using traditional art media and methodologies as well as new art media and methodologies. including (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of methodologies for critique.Standard 1. Aesthetic Responses and B. Dance.4 provides a corollary to the NAEP Arts process of responding. art mediums. 1.D.2 1.5 Standard 1. Culturally and historically diverse art media.1 Synthesize the elements of art and principles of design in an original portfolio of two.12.and three-dimensional artworks in multiple art media (including computer-assisted artwork). and is comprised of two strands related to the mode of response: A.and three-dimensional artworks that reflects personal style and a high degree of technical proficiency and expressivity.4 addresses two ways students may respond to the arts. and emulate those styles by creating an original body of work. B. methods. and interpret themes and symbols suggested by the artworks.1. Produce an original body of artwork in one or more art mediums that demonstrates mastery of visual literacy.

2 Evaluate how an artist’s technical proficiency may affect the communicate a theme or narrative can be directly affected creation or presentation of a work of art. theatre. using discipline-specific arts terminology and citing embedded clues to substantiate the hypothesis. Photography: Planning .1 The Creative Process: All students will demonstrate an understanding of the elements and principles that govern the creation of works of art in dance. music. principles of design. and visual art). Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual.3 Criteria for assessing the historical significance.3 Determine the role of art and art-making in a global society by in a global society. movements. as well as how the context by the artist’s technical proficiency as well as by the in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of manner and physical context in which it is performed or its significance/meaning. and visual art. or VISUAL ART. 1. performing.A. Artistic styles. and originality of art are often expressed in qualitative. visual.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies: All students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies. discipline-specific arts terminology. cultural context. and performers around the world.12.4. and multimedia arts for consumers.B. Art and art-making reflect and affect the role of technology 1.12.12. SUGGESTED LEARNING ACTIVITIES: NJCCCS Materials/Application Assessments/Evidence of Learning: Standard 1.2 1.4. music.4. shown.A.4. The cohesiveness of a work of art and its ability to 1. trends.1 Formulate criteria for arts evaluation using the principles of positive critique and observation of the elements of art and embodied in the formal and informal aspects of art. and visual art. MUSIC. using historical significance. and analysis to works of art in dance.B. craftsmanship. Understandings: (Performance objectives) Students will be able to…. and kinesthetic responses to artwork. Standard 1. emotional. NOTE: By the end of grade 12. THEATRE. and use the criteria to evaluate works of dance. Develop informed personal responses to an assortment of artworks across the four arts disciplines (dance. music. theatre. shooting and editing • • • • • – Chapter 5 “Focus on Photography” -Chapter 11 “Focus on Photography” Work of Scott Mutter. theatre. enabling the viewer to hypothesize the artist’s concept.Contextual clues within artworks often reveal artistic intent.B. and multimedia artwork from diverse cultural contexts and historical eras. Distinguish innovative applications of Journal entries Displays Still Life Photography Design Principles Close-ups Pages submitted for . music. intellectual.A. Photo composition.4 Speculate on the artist’s intent.4. and originality as criteria for assigning value to the works.12. and historical responses to various genres of art evolve over time. symbolism.12. judgment. all students demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE.4.12. creators. and allegory. cultural context. Maggie Taylor and Jerry Ulesman Teacher prepared visuals Textbook Digital portfolio Photographs included in School Publications Portraiture Shape and Form Candid Portraits Environmental Portraits Retouching Portraits The Self Portrait Common themes exist in artwork from a variety of cultures across time and are communicated through metaphor. theatre. craftsmanship. 1. analyzing the influence of technology on the visual. Archetypal subject matter exists in all cultures and is 1.

contemporary and technological methods. Faith Ringold Movie.the elements of art and principles of design in visual artworks from diverse cultural perspectives and identify specific cross-cultural themes. Eric Carle – Picture writer Readings in content areas . Evaluation based upon exemplars Appropriate proficiency of art principals.Artists Measuring tools Templates Stencils Layout materials Drawing media Papers Drawing media various papers. and produce A child’s book based on a folktale or song using collage as a medium Illustrations of Lyrics with student made photos And prints Experience and create original art works of varied media through the application of traditional. musical. Inks Papers Printmaking tools Internet site research. methodologies and technologies as instructed Review students concerns and viewpoints in relation to career/educational pursuits (work -place readiness) Review learners use of time to all related work as instructed -Time on Task Evaluate work ethics and the learners ability to meet predetermined due dates Teacher evaluates learners use of all related materials and techniques as applied to art project guidelines . Stimuli for the creation of artworks can come from many places. Library Museum/Exhibits observations. Internet search engines. Leo Lionni. tests exams Teacher guided/ Student self evaluative critiques Project evaluative rubrics. Product Photography for ads Students will create “surrational” photo collages using software based on traditional negative made prints Art in Children’s Literature Cooperative groups conceptualize. techniques. Effectively transpose two dimensional work Into three dimensional work for package design And display Camera Use and Care Digital Photo editing as means of artistic expression Collections of children’s books written and illustrated by authors such as: Eric Carle. Translate literary. theatrical. Classroom presentations . Maurice Sendak. Correctly employ art media. publications Deadlines met Quizzes. and dance compositions by using them as stimulus/inspiration for corresponding visual artworks. including other arts disciplines. plan. Film/Video. tools and technology Demonstrate a proficient knowledge of photographic composition Correctly employ Design Theories and Principles within works of art.

Museum and virtual Field Trips Observe evident usage of correct self-evaluative criteria in terms of vocabulary. theatre. political. Learner exhibits the ability to defend and evaluate their artistic philosophies employing correct terminologies and vocabulary The learner correctly rates art employing aesthetic evaluation criteria The learner provides evident comprehensive writings about art and artist Teacher designed evaluative test. Book making supplies “Cover to Cover” “Altered Art” Visiting Artists. one that reflects nostalgia and is made without computer enhancement.Student narratives based on picture prompts Street Photography – Guerilla Journalism Advertising Design. Recognize and appreciate divergent artistic techniques through reading. the availability of music online) on societal norms and habits of mind in various historical eras. and visual art have influenced world cultures throughout history. music. and worksheets Teacher supervised evaluative critiques Student self evaluative critiques . and influence of the arts throughout history and across cultures. Photo Essay .. terminologies and aesthetic philosophy.g. and contributions to community and global citizenship. Access to the arts has a positive influence on the quality of an individual’s lifelong learning. Determine how dance.Standard 1.Survey the development of Logos for specific companies through the last 75 years – Create a fictitious logo in 2 forms. religious and ethnic traditions. History of Photography The Camera Obscura Early developments Civil War Photography National Parks and Landmarks Photography Today Digital Photography Students make self portraits in the style of early sepia vignettes Chapter 1 “Focus on Photography” Teacher prepared visuals Visuals from “Picturing America” series from the National Endowment Internet research Teacher prepared visuals and examples Art Materials. development. Traditional and Contemporary Bookmaking project using recycled materials Gain an ability to see the relevance of Published Art and the place it holds in various social.Students chronicle – life as a teen today Photo Journalism . personal expression. Justify the impact of innovations in the arts (e.2 History of the Arts and Culture: All students will understand the role. Trace the historic and social development of . quiz.portfolio development Cultural and historical events impact art-making as well as how audiences respond to works of art. the other more contemporary made with software Calligraphy and Book Arts. viewing and emulating the work of various historic and cultural art forms.

Internet search engines. and technology used in the arts. Teacher guided/ Student self evaluative critiques Related art media. Produce an original body of artwork in one or more art mediums that demonstrates mastery of visual literacy. Film/Video. and styles impact originality and interpretation of the artistic statement. supplies. Culturally and historically diverse art media. Library Museum/Exhibits observations. techniques. Review students concerns and viewpoints in relation to career/educational pursuits (work -place readiness) Review learners use of time to all related work as instructed -Time on Task Evaluate work ethics and the learners ability to meet predetermined due dates Teacher evaluates learners use of all related materials and techniques as applied to art project guidelines Software for desktop publishing. methodologies and technologies as instructed Readings in content areas . graphic arts and photography applications . Synthesize the elements of art and principles of design in an original portfolio of two. materials. and cultural understanding.and threedimensional artworks that reflects personal style and a high degree of technical proficiency and expressivity. methods. tools and technologies Teacher supervised evaluative critiques Student self evaluative critiques . techniques. Study Historic photographs. cartoons and prints Student Portfolio Standard 1. Computers cameras audio visual equipment Evaluation based upon exemplars Appropriate proficiency of art principles. art mediums.3 Performance: Performing and Interpreting : Visual Art How individuals manipulate the elements of art and principles of design results in original portfolios that reflect choice and personal stylistic nuance. printing.portfolio development Project evaluative rubrics. Inks Papers Printmaking tools Internet site research.Artists Measuring tools Templates Stencils Layout materials Drawing media Papers Drawing media various papers. Create original art emulating various cultural art forms employing varied media and techniques.photography. techniques. illustrations. Classroom presentations .

16 and 20 Activities 16-20 Digital Cameras. equipment.16 and 20 Activities 16-20 Typography and Graphics Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide mod. photo software Focus on Photography text Teacher lesson plans . media. art mediums. Teacher prepared visuals Teacher’s lesson plans Digital cameras Software and computer lab Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Selected Readings Collected periodicals ad books Teacher Lesson plans Teacher prepared visuals Student Press Law Center Typography and Graphics Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide mod. and visual art. impressionism. and visual statement allows the artist to use expressionism. materials. and other genre styles to convey ideas to an audience Artists interpret/render themes using traditional art media and methodologies as well as new art media and methodologies Two. technologies and processes as required by course project proficiencies Teacher prepared visuals Teacher’s lesson plans Digital cameras Software and computer lab “Focus on Photography” Experience and create original art works of varied media through the application of traditional. methodology. performing. and techniques used.Standard 1. techniques.and three-dimensional artworks can be rendered culturally specific by using the tools. an understanding of the elements and principles of artistic design in original art works Effectively employ a variety of tools.and threedimensional artworks in multiple art media (including computer-assisted artwork). Correctly employ art media. Organize an exhibit of personal works of visual art that convey a high level of understanding of how the expression of ideas relates to the art media. tools and technology Demonstrate a proficient knowledge of photographic composition Correctly employ Design Theories and Principles within works of art. abstractionism (nonobjective art). music. methods. and/or presenting works of art in dance. styles. and interpret themes and symbols suggested by the artworks. and methodologies that are germane to a particular cultural style.3 Performing: All students will synthesize skills. theatre. Demonstrate through the creative process. Analyze the syntax and compositional and stylistic principles of two. realism/naturalism. media. and technologies that are appropriate to creating. The artist’s understanding of the relationships among art media. Effectively transpose two dimensional work Into three dimensional work for package design And display Camera Use and Care Digital Photo editing as means of artistic expression Periodicals. contemporary and technological methods.

mod. 1. theatre. movements. 3. cultural. Develop informed personal responses to an assortment of artworks across the four arts disciplines (dance.1. using discipline-specific arts terminology and iting embedded clues to substantiate the hypothesis. 3. music. music.and three-dimensional artworks. music. trends. Speculate on the artist’s intent.4 Teacher prepared graphic organizers. Use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common properties and to discern the cultural implications of works of dance. and contemporary art forms employing teacher guided instructional criteria and appropriate art media Execute a written review of an art exhibition Annotate Journal entries to record self progress in portfolio collections Participate in self evaluative critiques Recognize and identify strength and weaknesses in their art work through a designed rubric Readings in content areas Prints and visuals Research studies in Art/Cultural History Film and video resources Internet search engines/sites Museum exhibition observations/field trips Virtual field trips Candid photography that represent action.4 3.1. enabling he viewer to hypothesize the artist’s concept.2. craftsmanship. Printmaking supplies Teacher prepared visuals Standard 1. and visual art). and rubrics outlining criteria to be evaluated for studio assignments Rubrics in Focus on Photography Text Teacher prepared visuals . and visual art) is dependent on the ability to decipher cultural implications embedded in artworks.2. 1. and visual art. Emulate specific historic. Artistic styles. discipline-specific arts terminology. Evaluate how an artist’s technical proficiency may affect the creation or presentation of a work of art.3. theatre. reaction or relationship . and originality of art are often expressed in qualitative.4 (1) the study of aesthetics and (2) the application of methodologies for critique.Using different points of view Chapter 6 – Photography text Still life photography as portraits – “objects that tell stories” Teacher prepared visuals Text Books Periodicals Collections o Product packages and labels Students will use photographs to replace the cartoon in a comic strip – telling a story with imagery Interpretive self portraits in pop art Photography and print making Define Role of Publishing in the School Environment Ethical and legal considerations for Publishing Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide mod 1. theatre. craftsmanship.3. using historical significance. Recognition of fundamental elements within various arts disciplines (dance.3 Activities 1.1. 3. checklists.Identify the styles and artistic processes used in the creation of culturally and historically diverse two. Contextual clues within artworks often reveal artistic intent. and emulate those styles by creating an original body of work. and historical responses to various genres of art evolve over time Criteria for assessing the historical significance. cultural context. as well as how the context in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of its significance/meaning.

Create a package for a specific product Critiques (self /teacher assisted) Guest artists and speakers Peer-to-Peer critiques . art mediums. and multimedia artwork from diverse cultural contexts and historical eras Evaluate how an artist’s technical proficiency may affect the creation or presentation of a work of art. Quiz. and use the criteria to evaluate works of dance. Research Papers Web – Quests Midterm and Final examinations Portfolio assessment. emotional. and techniques used. music. and kinesthetic responses to artwork. “Taking Issue”. and originality as criteria for assigning value to the works.cultural context. and analysis to works of art in dance. criteria (rubrics) and aesthetic judgment Apply informed judgments as well as personal opinion when responding to and evaluating a work of art developing an appreciation of artistic freedom Correlate current controversies over censorship in the arts with First Amendment Rights Collaborative work On obscenity standards And student rights Student Portfolio Related art media. theatre. Comparison of boxes and wrappers from Asian food products to comparable US products Art reviews and select readings within the content area. . and visual art. Art and art-making reflect and affect the role of technology in a global society.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methods Students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies. music. intellectual. Assessment based upon vocabulary comprehension. visual. Jostens Identify specific criteria inherent to graphic artists through emulation of period or style illustrating technique and artistic impact View selected photographs. Organize an exhibit of personal works of visual art that convey a high level of understanding of how the expression of ideas relates to the art media. checklists. Archetypal subject matter exists in all cultures and is embodied in the formal and informal aspects of art. The cohesiveness of a work of art and its ability to communicate a theme or narrative can be directly affected by the artist’s technical proficiency as well as by the manner and physical context in which it is performed or shown. theatre. and provide written evaluative responses regarding photo composition. and rubrics outlining criteria to be evaluated for studio assignments Rubrics in Focus on Photography Text Classroom teacher lead critiques based upon established criteria and content. Student Presentations Unit Test. tools and technologies Teacher supervised classroom debate. judgment.posting comments online For specific work in digital portfolios Oral Class critiques Journal Entries Open Ended narratives Related art project objectives Internet access and computer lab Teacher evaluation of content and criteria applied in self evaluation (critique) Web Quest with Role play as collectors. Formulate criteria for arts evaluation using the principles of positive critique and observation of the elements of art and principles of design. evaluation of criteria employed in judgmental critiques. using appropriate terms and vocabulary Typography and Calligraphy Create a Poster for a Rock Event circa 1970 Text Books Periodicals Collections o Product packages and labels Teacher prepared graphic organizers. materials. Standard 1. critics and museum curators Weigh conflicting ideas about art to achieve a personal viewpoint. as well as how the context in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of its significance/meaning. supplies. Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual. utilization and content structure of written work.

realism. Art media: Artistic methods. (2) Perceive artworks from structural. and aesthetic perspectives. or transverse axes.7 Activities 7. 7.Determine the role of art and artmaking in a global society by analyzing the influence of technology on the visual. .4 GLOSSARY Archetypal work of art: An artwork that epitomizes a genre of art. Exemplary works: Works representing genres of art that may be examined from structural. expressionism. 7. Types of materials include clay. (3) Perform in all four arts disciplines at an age-appropriate level. Kinesthetic principles: Principles having to do with the physics of movement. color. Artistic processes: For example. or visual art) in which it was created. and multimedia arts for consumers. naturalism. force. Competency: A level of achievement that indicates a student meets or exceeds the K-8 arts standards. “medium” refers to the physical substance used to create artwork. and others. cultural. form. in dance. and torque. such as work. processes. horizontal. Basic Literacy: A level of achievement that indicates a student meets or exceeds the K-5 arts standards. complementary positions that are on or off the vertical. Art medium(s): Any material or technique used for expression in art. and performers around the world. style. and design. 7. and its medium. Discipline-specific arts terminology: Language used to talk about art that is specific to the arts discipline (dance. Each of the four arts disciplines is associated with different genres. (4) Draw similarities within and across the arts disciplines. form. presentation mechanisms such as screen. Formalism predominated Western art from the late 1800s to the 1960s. pencil. velocity. (4) Understand how various types of arts knowledge and skills are related within and across the arts disciplines. Kinesthetic awareness: Spatial sense. (2) Understand that artwork reflects historical. or tactile modes) used to produce a work of art. or means of expression (e. and aesthetic perspectives. print. creators. conceptualizing thematic development Yearbook Journalism Curriculum Student Yearbook Guide mod. Historical eras in the arts: Artworks that share distinct characteristics and common themes associated with a period of history. shape. theatre. historical. and cultural perspectives. including line.1.g. In art. Function of a theme. auditory.2. impressionism. (3) Perform in a chosen area of the arts with developing technical ability. abstractionism/nonobjectivism. music. calling upon acquaintance with works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods.3. and others. Balance: For example. The context for the work is of secondary importance. cultural. and space. paint. performing. as well as the ability to recognize and conceive solutions to artistic problems. X Consummate works of art: Expertly articulated concepts or renderings of artwork. texture. historical. Art genres: Artworks that share characteristic approaches to content. Elements of art: The compositional building blocks of visual art. its purely visual aspects.. Competency is attained when a student can: (1) Respond to artworks with developing understanding. Basic Literacy is attained when a student can: (1) Respond to artworks with empathy. Formalism: The concept that a work’s artistic value is entirely determined by its form—the way it is made.

by mixing and matching competencies and understandings in art-making. Within Our Power: The Progress.S. The Partnership also provides information on government funding at the federal and state levels. (2008). Sensory recall: A technique actors commonly employ to heighten the believability of a character. film. New York: DANA Press.giarts. the most comprehensive survey ever compiled on the status of arts education in New Jersey’s public schools. Movement affinities: The execution of dance phrases with relation to music. utilitarian) or decorative (i. the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership was established in 2007 as a clearinghouse for information and best practices in arts education. and others. computer graphics.e. including the grant programs of two federal agencies: the U. and electronic media. and technical ability. computer animation. Both are technically correct. rhythm. Dancers tend toward either lyricism (using the expressive quality of music through the full extension of the body following the accented beat). proportion.pdf Asbury.org/usr_doc/Learning. and Promise of Arts Education for Every Child. • At the state level. but are used in different circumstances. The success of visual communication is often determined by measuring the audience’s comprehension of the artist’s intent. and is not based aesthetic or artistic preference. arts.. is the NJAEP’s response to the New Jersey Arts Census Project. Visual communication: The sharing of ideas primarily through visual means—a concept that is commonly associated with two-dimensional images. reason. the importance of visual communication is heightened because visual displays help users understand the communication taking place. Proficiency: A level of achievement that indicates a student meets or exceeds the K-12 arts standards. emphasis. educate or persuade. defining and solving artistic problems with insight.. state. Learning and the arts: Crossing boundaries (proceedings of an invitational meeting for education. culture. history. Utilitarian and non-utilitarian art: Art may be functional (i. and calls attention to the contribution arts education makes to student achievement. the ability to communicate in a wide array of art media and express oneself in at least one visual discipline. (3) Perform in a chosen area of the arts with consistency. nonutilitarian). and youth funders held January 12-14. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Arts. and analysis in any arts-related project. Suggested Print Materials/Resources/Internet Links: Education in the Arts: National and State Advocacy The Arts Education Partnership provides research information and other guidance to assist in advocating for arts education at the national. and unity. television. art. • . virtual art. B. and the brain: The DANA foundation consortium report on arts and cognition. which involves using sense memory to inform their choices. Principles of design: Balance. WA: Grantmakers in the Arts. & Associates (Ed. (2000). historical.). video. The report. Plight. artistic nuance. • A Glossary of arts terms used in the 2009 visual and performing arts standards was designed to support implementation of the arts standards.e. C. Seattle.. and local levels.). S. pointing to their impact on contemporary modes of expression. Resources Amdur. cultural. (4) Relate various types of arts knowledge and skills within and across the arts disciplines. Learning. such as digital art. Los Angeles). (2) Develop and present basic analyses of artworks from structural. or bravura dancing (in which the dancer tends to accent the musical beat). & Rich. Visual communication explores the notion that visual messages have power to inform. radio. calling upon informed acquaintance with exemplary works of art from a variety of cultures and historical periods.Media Arts: For example.. Visual literacy: The ability to understand subject matter and the meaning of visual artworks within a given cultural context. and aesthetic perspectives. computer robotics. New art media and methodologies: Artistic works that have a technological component. Online: http://www. Proficiency is attained when a student can: (1) Respond to artworks with insight and depth of understanding. and technical proficiency. In the era of electronic communication. (Eds.

National Center on Education and the Economy. Kendall. National standards for arts education: What every young American should know and be able to do in the arts. Trenton. Content knowledge: A compendium of standards and benchmarks for K-12 education (3rd ed. (2002). G. (2005). (2000).org/content.Consortium of National Arts Education Associations. NJ: Author. (Ed. Understanding by design (2nd ed. Tough choices or tough times: The report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce. New Jersey State Department of Education. MD: Author. B. DC: Arts Education Partnership.org/pdf/exec_sum/ToughChoices_EXECSUM. Online: http://ndeo.skillscommission..aspx?page_id=22&club_id=893257&module_id=55412 New Jersey State Department of Education. Trenton. (1994). J. Washington. DC: Arts Education Partnership.org/teach/standards/ Deasy. Online [executive summary]: http://www.. Online: http://www. New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards. Trenton.). Standards clarification project. Literacy in the Arts Task Force. Online: http://artsedge. & Marzano. Washington. Third space: When learning matters. New Jersey State Department of Education. (1996). Alexandria.) (1999). Reston. J. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons. J. R. (1999). Washington. Critical links: Learning in the arts and student academic and social development. Standards for learning and teaching dance in the arts: Ages 5-18. VA. NJ: Author. Literacy in the arts: An imperative for New Jersey schools. S. New Jersey State Department of Education. & McTighe. R. (2004). (2005). R. Deasy. NJ: Author. (Ed. (Ed. E.). Trenton. J. Gaining the arts advantage: Lessons learned from school districts that value arts education. (1989). VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum and Development . (2008). Trenton. Wiggins. Alexandria. (2007).gov/education/aps/njscp/ President’s Committee on the Arts & Humanities & Arts Education Partnership.kennedy-center. J. New Jersey visual & performing arts curriculum framework. New Jersey visual & performing arts curriculum framework. Fisk. Silver Spring.pdf National Dance Education Organization. DC: Authors. & Washington. VA: Music Educators National Conference.). NJ: Author. Champions of change: The impact of the arts on learning. NJ: Alliance for Arts Education. DC: The President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities & Arts Education Partnership. (2005).nj.). Alexandria. VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (1999).

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