EXHIBIT “A”

H.O.P.W.A. PROGRAM MANUAL (See Attachments)

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TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS (HOPWA) PROGRAM MANUAL

Revised: February 2008

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Table of Contents
SECTION 1. PURPOSE AND USE OF MANUAL ..................................................................... 2 SECTION 2. PROGRAM RULES ................................................................................................ 2 SECTION 3. PROGRAM DEFINITIONS & ACRONYMS ....................................................... 2 SECTION 4. PROGRAM PURPOSE, ADMINISTRATION AND OVERVIEW ....................... 6 SECTION 5. ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCY AND PROJECT SPONSOR ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................................................. 7 SECTION 6. ENSURING ACCESS TO THE HOPWA PROGRAM .......................................... 9 SECTION 7. LINKAGE WITH HUD HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) HOUSING AND OTHER AFFORDABLE HOUSING RESOURCES .............. 10 SECTION 8. CONFIDENTIALITY ............................................................................................ 11 SECTION 9. DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY OF APPLICANTS ............................................ 11 SECTION 10. SHORT-TERM RENT, MORTGAGE, AND UTILITIES (STRMU) PROGRAM ........................................................................................................... 15 SECTION 11. TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE (TBRA) PROGRAM .................. 25 SECTION 12. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES AND PERMANENT HOUSING PLACEMENT .. 34 SECTION 13. PROVISION OF ASSISTANCE TO SURVIVORS ........................................... 36 SECTION 14. TERMINATION OF ASSISTANCE .................................................................. 37 SECTION 15. HOPWA PROGRAM FORMS........................................................................... 38 SECTION 16. PROGRAM REPORTING REQUIREMENTS................................................... 40 SECTION 17. HUD TABLES ..................................................................................................... 40 SECTION 18. PROGRAM TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ......................................................... 40 APPENDICES .............................................................................................................................. 42

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SECTION 1. PURPOSE AND USE OF MANUAL
1-1 PURPOSE AND USE OF MANUAL This program manual is intended to provide guidance to:  Texas DSHS Administrative Agencies (AA) and Project Sponsors for the administration of the HOPWA Program; and  Texas DSHS Regional HIV/STD and Field Operations staff for program reviews and technical assistance.

SECTION 2. PROGRAM RULES
2-1 PROGRAM RULES The HOPWA program rules in 24 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 574 provide general standards for eligible housing activities such as client eligibility, housing quality standards, and standards regarding resident rent payments as provided under the United States Housing Act of 1937. Standards for shared housing are referenced in 24 CFR Part 882, Subpart C. Other applicable CFRs are:  Lead-based paint poisoning notification requirements, 24 CFR Part 35, LeadBased Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846) and 24 CFR Part 574 Subpart G Section 574.635;   Smoke alarm requirements, Section 31 of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974; and Record keeping requirements, 24 CFR 574 Subpart F Section 574.530.

SECTION 3. PROGRAM DEFINITIONS & ACRONYMS
3-1 PROGRAM DEFINITIONS:  Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS): a medical diagnosis requiring a positive HIV test (Western Blot confirmed), and a CD4+ cell count below 200 cells per microliter OR CD4+ cells account for fewer than 14 percent of all lymphocytes OR a diagnosis of one or more of the AIDS-defining illnesses.

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Administrative Agency: An agency that contracts with DSHS to administer the HOPWA program and contracts with the HOPWA project sponsors for service delivery. Administrative Costs: Nonservice-related operating costs of administering the HOPWA program (may include salary, fringe, benefits, etc.) Project sponsor administrative costs are limited to 7% of the total project sponsor grant award. Beneficiary: The HOPWA Client and family members (see definition for Family) receiving HOPWA assistance. Any individual(s) residing with the HOPWA Client whose income is not considered in the HOPWA Client’s income eligibility criteria is not considered a beneficiary, i.e. roommates, paid caregivers, and live-in aides. Chronically Homeless Person: “An unaccompanied homeless individual with a disabling condition who has either been continuously homeless for a year or more OR has had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years.” For this purpose, the term “homeless” means “a person sleeping in a place not meant for human habitation (e.g., living on the streets) or in an emergency homeless shelter.” This does not include persons temporarily staying or living in someone else’s residence. Disabling Condition: “A diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability, or chronic physical illness or disability, including the cooccurrence of two or more of these conditions.” In addition, a disabling condition may limit an individual’s ability to work or perform one or more activities of daily living. An HIV/AIDS diagnosis is considered a disabling condition. Domestic Violence Survivor: A self-reported current or past victim of domestic violence. Duplicated Count: A household/client that received more than one HOPWA service in the same project year, e.g. a client received both STRMU and TBRA or a client received both STRMU and Supportive Services. Eligible Individual: A person with HIV or AIDS who meets the income eligibility criteria as defined by the Income-eligible definition. Emergency: A situation that is short-term in nature and one that the case manager has reason to believe will put the client at risk of becoming homeless. Family: A family may be composed of two or more related persons. A person who is not a relative by blood or marriage can also be considered a family member if they are important to the care or well-being of a person with HIV. This is not the same as a live-in aide who is compensated for providing care to the person with HIV. The status of a roommate or a live-in aide cannot change to that of being a family member after the death of a HOPWA client in order to receive survivor benefits.

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Family Unit: A household composed of a HOPWA Client and 1 or more other beneficiaries. Grassroots Organization: An organization that is headquartered in the local community to which it provides services; and, (i) has a social services budget of $300,000 or less, or (ii) has six or fewer full-time equivalent employees. Local affiliates of national organizations are not considered “grassroots.” HOPWA Client: A person with HIV/AIDS who qualifies for and receives HOPWA assistance. HOPWA Project Sponsor: An agency that contracts with an AA to directly provide HOPWA services. Household: Refers to a client and all other beneficiaries residing with that client. In situations where no other beneficiaries reside with the client, the client constitutes a household unto him/herself. Non-beneficiaries who reside in the shared unit are not part of the household. Housing Stability: See Appendix A of the HOPWA Quarterly Report for definitions of stable and unstable housing situations. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: an infection caused by a virus that infects the body and destroys portions of the immune system and is documented by a positive serologic test (Western Blot confirmed). Income-eligible: Any individual or family whose income does not exceed 80 percent of the median income for the area, as determined by HUD, with adjustments for smaller and larger families. Project Sponsors MUST use the current HUD Income Limits Table (see Section 17 HUD Tables) to determine HOPWA program eligibility. The Project Sponsor in consultation with the AA may establish more restrictive income criteria for client eligibility. Non-HOPWA leveraged sources: Refers to cash resources separate from the DSHS HOPWA grant award, and may include: CDBG, HOME, ESG, SHP, S+C, SRO Mod Rehab, Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8), PHA units, Supportive Housing for Persons with Disabilities/Elderly (Section 811/202), Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), Historic Tax Credits, USDA Rural Housing Service, Ryan White programs, other federal programs at HHS, VA, DOL, etc., state funds, local government funds, and private philanthropy. While other HOPWA funds may be used in conjunction with this grant, the amounts are not counted as leveraged sources and performance is reported under the applicable HOPWA grant. Non-HOPWA supportive services: All other supportive services the HOPWA client receives related to HIV/AIDS and the client’s well-being, including medical care, transportation, food, drug treatment, social services, etc.

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Outcome Assessed: The HOPWA assisted households who have been enabled to establish or better maintain a stable living environment in housing that is safe, decent, and sanitary (per the regulations at 24 CFR 574.310(b)), to reduce the risks of homelessness, and improve access to HIV treatment and other health care and support. Permanent Housing Placement (PHP): Assistance for reasonable security deposits, not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent, and related application fees and credit checks. Project year: The DSHS HOPWA project year runs February 1- January 31. Roommate: a roommate relationship is established for the purposes of sharing rent and utility bills in return for receiving a share of the space available. The applicant must identify those living in his or her home as either family or roommates at the time of application and at any subsequent renewals. Short-term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance (STRMU): A housing subsidy for short-term rent, mortgage, and utility payments to prevent homelessness of the tenant or mortgagor of a dwelling. This program provides assistance for a period not to exceed 21 weeks (147 days) worth of assistance in any 52-week period. These payments are for eligible individuals and their household beneficiaries who are already in housing and who are at risk of becoming homeless. STRMU was previously known as Emergency Assistance in Texas. Supportive Services: Assistance for case management, basic telephone service, and provision of smoke detectors. Supportive Services may be provided in conjunction with HOPWA housing assistance or as a stand alone service (Supportive Services Only). Tenant-based Rental Assistance (TBRA): A housing subsidy for tenant-based rental assistance, including assistance for shared housing arrangements. It assists Incomeeligible clients and their beneficiaries with rent and utilities until they are able to secure affordable, stable housing. TBRA was previously known as Rental Assistance in Texas. Veteran: Anyone who served or is currently serving in the military forces. Year-to-date (YTD): Cumulative information starting from the beginning of the project year up to the current reporting quarter. ACRONYMS IN THE HOPWA MANUAL AA AIDS CFR COS Administrative Agency Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Code of Federal Regulation Contract Oversight and Support Unit

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DSHS EID FMR HIV HOME HOPWA HQS HSDA HUD PHA PHP SHP SSI STRMU TANF TBRA WTW

Texas Department of State Health Services Earned Income Disregard Fair Market Rent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Housing Opportunities Made Equal Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Housing Quality Standards HIV Service Delivery Area Housing and Urban Development (U.S. Department of) Public Housing Authority Permanent Housing Placement Supportive Housing Program Supplementary Security Income Short Term Rent, Mortgage, and Utilities, formally known as Emergency Assistance Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Tenant-Based Rental Assistance, formally known as Rental Assistance Welfare-to-Work program

SECTION 4. PROGRAM PURPOSE, ADMINISTRATION AND OVERVIEW
4-1 PROGRAM PURPOSE The goal of the program is to provide housing assistance and supportive services for income-eligible individuals living with HIV/AIDS and their families to establish or better maintain a stable living environment in housing that is decent, safe, and sanitary, to reduce the risk of homelessness, and to improve access to health care and supportive services. 4-2 PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION The HOPWA program is administered by DSHS, which receives annual formula grants from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). DSHS contracts with Ryan White Part B Administrative Agencies serving the State's 26 HIV Service Delivery Areas (HSDA). Administrative agencies contract with Project Sponsor(s) for delivery of services. 4-3 OVERVIEW – DSHS HOPWA PROGRAMS Texas provides HUD-approved activities through the following programs: (a) STRMU (formerly known as Emergency Assistance): Provides short-term rent, mortgage, and utility payments to prevent homelessness of the tenant or mortgagor of a dwelling. This program enables income-eligible individuals living with HIV/AIDS at risk of becoming homeless to receive short-term assistance for
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a period not to exceed 21 weeks worth of assistance in any 52-week period. These payments are for eligible individuals and their household beneficiaries who are already in housing and who are at risk of becoming homeless. (b) TBRA (formerly known as Rental Assistance): Provides tenant-based rental assistance, including assistance for shared housing arrangements, for incomeeligible clients living with HIV/AIDS and their beneficiaries until they are able to secure affordable stable housing. Supportive Services: Provides financial assistance for HOPWA case management, basic telephone service, and provision of smoke detectors. Supportive Services may be provided in conjunction with HOPWA housing assistance or as a stand-alone service (Supportive Services Only). Permanent Housing Placement: Provides assistance for permanent housing placement costs that include reasonable security deposits not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent, and costs related to application fees and credit checks.

(c)

(d)

Refer to Appendix A for a Table Comparison of the HOPWA Programs.

SECTION 5. ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCY AND PROJECT SPONSOR ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
5-1 ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCY (AA) ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES REGARDING PROJECT SPONSORS.  The AA must comply with all applicable state and federal policies, standards, and guidelines as specified in the contract and is responsible for ensuring efficient, effective, and proper implementation of the HOPWA program in its geographic area of responsibility. The AA will ensure that Project Sponsors properly manage HOPWA funds in compliance with DSHS and HUD regulations. The AA must assure that Project Sponsors develop local HOPWA policies as needed. These local policies:  should not conflict with guidance provided by the DSHS or the HOPWA regulations (24 CFR Part 574) as developed and amended by HUD.  may address, but are not limited to, issues surrounding moving clients into the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) or other affordable housing programs, setting financial caps for STRMU, and setting stricter eligibility requirements beyond standard guidelines. Local housing experts may be consulted as needed. However, consulting fees are not allowed. The AA will assure that the Project Sponsors’ administrative costs shall not exceed seven (7) percent of the amount of funds received by the Project Sponsor. Administrative costs include all non-service costs and indirect costs.

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HOPWA PROJECT SPONSOR ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES The Project Sponsor must manage HOPWA funds for delivery of HOPWA program services by establishing policies and procedures as required by federal regulations including:  Management of grant funds: Attention must be given to assuring that HOPWA funds are available throughout the project year and are not expended prematurely. Having knowledge of current caseloads and expenditures by client, waiting lists, and past program experience can be used to effectively plan services. No more than 7 percent of the Project Sponsor grant may be expended for administrative costs. Budgeting grant funds: It is recommended that Project Sponsors budget 1/12 of their annual HOPWA budget per month after the TBRA commitment is determined. In this way, if a Project Sponsor under-spends or over-spends in any particular month, program staff will be able to determine the balance of funds available for the coming months. Charging to appropriate contracts: Costs incurred in one contract year cannot be paid with funds from a different contract year.

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REQUIREMENTS TO FILE IRS FORM 1099 FOR TBRA PAYMENTS TO INDIVIDUALS AND PARTNERSHIPS Project Sponsors are required under IRS regulations to report TBRA payments made to owners of housing projects (Revenue Rule 88-53). Payments in excess of $600 to a person in any calendar year must be reported to the IRS on form 1099-MISC, Box 1, “Rents.” In order to comply with this requirement, Project Sponsors must obtain the taxpayer identification number, social security number (SSN), or employer identification number (EIN) from all entities to which it will make housing assistance payments. In order to accomplish this, Project Sponsors should issue a W-9 form to all property owners as part of the process of preparing to issue TBRA payments. At the completion of the calendar year, Form 1099-Misc must be issued to each “person” who has been paid at least $600 in rents. Persons include individuals and partnerships. The form is not required to be issued to corporations. The form must be issued to the recipient of the TBRA payments by January 31st and submitted to IRS no later than February 28th. Copies of IRS form W-9 and 1099Misc as well as detailed instructions on their completion can be obtained from the IRS website, www.IRS.gov.

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ESTABLISHING ANNUAL STRMU CAPS AAs and Project Sponsors may choose to implement Annual STRMU Caps per client as needed based on availability of HOPWA funds, clients’ needs, and waitlists. AAs are required to establish a written policy to ensure that Project Sponsors apply the Annual STRMU Cap in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner. If caps are established, they must be in concurrence or approval with the AA and comply with the established DSHS Annual STRMU Cap formula (no less than 1 month of the FMR for the appropriate unit size and no more than the Project Sponsor’s budgeted STRMU funds per client per year).

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SECTION 6. ENSURING ACCESS TO THE HOPWA PROGRAM
6-1 LOCATION OF APPLICATION OFFICE Project Sponsors should have an easily accessible location(s) where individuals/families can apply for assistance. 6-2 PROVIDING INFORMATION ABOUT HOUSING ASSISTANCE Ryan White/State Services applicants should be informed of the housing assistance available during intake and existing clients should be informed during routine medical/psychosocial appointments. Applications can be completed during intake and/or routine appointments. Appointments made specifically for a HOPWA application can also be scheduled. All HIV-infected clients should be assessed for housing needs. 6-3 METHODS OF TAKING APPLICATIONS To accommodate the needs of various individuals/families and assure proper use of staff resources, the Project Sponsor should offer the following options of taking applications:  REGULAR OFFICE INTERVIEWS. The majority of interested individuals/families should be able to apply for the program at the Project Sponsor’s office(s) during regular business hours.  SPECIAL OFFICE INTERVIEWS. The Project Sponsor should arrange for interviews to be conducted during off-hours for those unable to apply during regular business hours. HOME VISIT INTERVIEWS. Some applicants may need to have the interview in their homes for health or other reasons.

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INFORMATION SHARING HOPWA program information and eligibility criteria must be shared routinely with other HIV/STD prevention and service agencies and local housing authorities within the HSDA. The Project Sponsors can accomplish this by the distribution of informative pamphlets and fliers, and also by networking with local agencies. All program information sharing must be documented.

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SECTION 7. LINKAGE WITH HUD HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) HOUSING AND OTHER AFFORDABLE HOUSING RESOURCES
7-1 COLLABORATION WITH HUD HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) HOUSING PROGRAM The Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) program can also be a vital resource for the housing needs of HOPWA clients. Project Sponsors must establish linkages and collaborative relationships with local Housing Choice Voucher program staff. Project Sponsors must have written documentation on file indicating how the linkages and collaborative relationships are being accomplished (e.g., written cooperative agreements, protocols, etc.). 7-2 POLICY TO APPLY AND TRACK APPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) HOUSING HOPWA Project Sponsors must develop a local policy that requires TBRA clients to apply for the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) program and other affordable housing programs and to renew this application every 90 days or as required by the other housing programs. Project Sponsors must develop a system to track compliance with this requirement. 7-3 FAILURE TO ACCEPT HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER (SECTION 8) HOUSING Local policy must clearly state that failure to accept the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) or other affordable housing programs when offered may result in termination of HOPWA assistance. This will reduce the HOPWA wait list and provide timely housing assistance to other eligible individuals. The case manager must work closely with the client and the local housing authority to assure that the client’s needs/requests are met. In special circumstances where accepting Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) or other housing would place an undue burden on the client, Project Sponsors may request a waiver to the policy using Form O Failure to Accept the Housing Choice Voucer (Section 8)/Other Housing Waiver, which must be approved by the AA on a case-by-case basis. Special circumstances may include but are not limited to: (1) client would have to move away from family who are necessary for the client’s care and well-being, (2) client would have to move but is too sick at the time to do so, (3) client can not find a suitable residence that will accept Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8). AAs must establish a written policy for the waiver request to ensure the waiver is implemented in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner. Termination of assistance to clients must follow the procedures as set forth in Section 14 Termination of Assistance.

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SECTION 8. CONFIDENTIALITY
8-1 ENSURE CONFIDENTIALITY Confidentiality of all records is required. Project Sponsors are required to have a written confidentiality policy and assure confidentiality of client name, information, and records. All information obtained in connection with the examination, care, or services provided to any client shall not be disclosed without the client’s signed consent. There may be exceptions to client disclosure as required by law. Particular care must be taken to assure confidentiality by having the Project Sponsor’s correspondence, envelopes, and checks to landlords, utilities, etc., not reveal that the client is receiving assistance due to HIV/AIDS. This can be accomplished by establishing a checking account for the provision of HOPWA assistance using a neutral account name such as “Housing Fund” or “Assistance Fund.” Confidentiality requirements are set forth under the HUD regulations, 24 CFR 574.440. 8-2 CONSENT TO RELEASE AND OBTAIN CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION Prior to exchanging information with any other agency or entity, HOPWA Project Sponsors must first secure a release of information from the client. Form E Consent to Release and/or Obtain Confidential Information (also in Spanish) must be completed and signed by the client identifying specific individuals or organizations to which confidential information may be disclosed and must be resigned annually. In the absence of specific written authorization, no information identifying an individual’s HIV status may be disclosed by the HOPWA Project Sponsor to ANY individual or organization.

SECTION 9. DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY OF APPLICANTS
9-1 DETERMINING ELIGIBILITY OF APPLICANTS The Project Sponsor is responsible for determining the eligibility of applicants who seek HOPWA assistance. The minimum eligibility requirements are: (a) STRMU PROGRAM: The client is:  HIV positive  income-eligible  already in housing and has a short-term emergency situation which may put the client at risk of becoming homeless (See Section 9-2 (f) for documentation of emergency need)  a tenant or named occupant on a valid lease/rental agreement, or the owner of a dwelling (see Section 10-2 STRMU Eligibility)

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(b)

TBRA PROGRAM: The client is:  HIV positive  income-eligible SUPPORTIVE SERVICES: The client is:  HIV positive  income-eligible PERMANENT HOUSING PLACEMENT The client is:  HIV positive  income-eligible

(c)

(d)

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ELIGIBILITY VERIFICATION AND DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS The Project Sponsor must obtain complete information from applicants, thoroughly document the methods by which the information was verified, and maintain all pertinent information in the client’s file. Project Sponsor staff must ensure that client confidentiality is maintained when verifying client information (see Section 8. Confidentiality). The following must be verified and documented: (a) HIV/AIDS STATUS Verification may be accomplished by one of the following ways:  laboratory report indicating a positive serologic test (Western Blot confirmed)  signed statement from a physician, physician’s assistant, or advanced nurse practitioner attesting to the HIV positive status  hospital discharge summary that documents the HIV positive status  laboratory test result with a detectable viral load (b) INCOME Income must be verified upon application to the program and re-verified annually, or as needed if income status changes. Adequate verification of income is very important since it not only affects eligibility but also the amount of assistance that will be provided on behalf of the client. All income that is anticipated to be received by the client/family over the 12-month period must be verified and included in determining income eligibility, unless the income is specifically excluded. The DSHS HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet must be used to determine the applicant’s income eligibility. The DSHS HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet includes:  Annual Gross and Adjusted Income Worksheet (Form A)

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Suggested Forms of Income Verification and Documentation of Expenses (Attachment 1) Income Exclusions (Attachment 2) Earned Income Disregard (EID) Worksheet (Form B) Earned Income Disregard (EID) Instructions (Attachment 3) Verification of No Income (Form C)

Verification of income may require the use of one or more of the following documents:  employer verification  check stubs or earning statements showing employer, gross pay amount, rate, time covered  W-2 form  letters or statements from Social Security, Supplementary Security Income (SSI), Disability Income, Veterans Benefits, Retirement and/or Pension  records from unemployment office stating dates and amount of unemployment compensation  copy of divorce decree describing amount and type of support  written confirmation from an educational agency providing the amounts of assistance expected and the estimated cost of tuition, fees, books, and equipment that the beneficiary will incur during the subsequent 12-month period  financial institution documents such as current bank statements, bank passbooks, and certificates of deposit  income tax returns and 1099 forms from financial institution Suggested Forms of Income Verification and Documentation of Expenses (Attachment 1) will assist in determining client’s income and allowable deductions from gross income. (c) ALLOWABLE DEDUCTIONS The HOPWA Program allows certain allowances and deductions to the applicant’s gross income. If a deduction is given, then verification and documentation must be on file. (d) NO INCOME In the event that a client claims to have no source of income, the Verification of No Income Form (Form C) must be completed by the client verifying the statement of no income. (e) OTHER FACTORS Project Sponsor staff must document in the applicant’s case file appropriate case management and supportive services that are provided or offered. The Project Sponsor must obtain and keep on file copies of utility bills, mortgage payment

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coupons or invoices, and/or rental leases for which HOPWA assistance is provided. (f) STRMU EMERGENCY NEED For each time an eligible applicant requests STRMU assistance, the Project Sponsor is required to gather documentation verifying the emergency need. As STRMU assistance is not intended for perpetual need and is meant to address emergency need, case managers must document the emergency in the Comprehensive Housing Plan and continuously assess the housing needs of the client. A variety of documentation may be deemed acceptable by the case manager to determine emergency housing need, depending on the nature of the emergency situation. Examples of documentation may include:  Current checking/savings account balance statement  Default/late payment notice  Current medical bills  Current utility bills  Current income documentation  Current documentation for unexpected expenses that would constitute a household emergency  Signed Affidavit by client verifying the emergency need may be acceptable if no other documentation is available; the affidavit must explain the reasons why no other documentation is provided. (g) SHARED HOUSING HUD permits HOPWA to assist individuals who share housing with unrelated individuals (roommates). HUD regulation (24 CFR Part 574.320(b) requires that any HOPWA assistance provided in shared housing arrangements must be prorated to assure that HOPWA is only supporting the rent for that portion of the living unit that is occupied by the HOPWA eligible individual and associated beneficiaries. A Shared Housing Rent Calculation Worksheet (Form J) can be used to calculate the appropriate level of HOPWA support in shared housing situations. (h) REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION HUD regulation 24 CFR 82.306 (d) does not allow housing assistance to a unit if the owner is the client’s parent, grandparent, grandchild, sister, brother or any member of the family unless it is determined that approving the unit would provide ‘reasonable accommodation’ for a family member who is a person with disabilities. A reasonable accommodation would permit a ‘person with disabilities’ including persons with HIV/AIDS to receive benefits when housed with a family member who owns or rents the housing unit if it is determined by a physician that living with the family member is important to the client’s overall health and well-being. In such situations, the family’s income is not to be counted in determining the eligibility of the low-income person with disabilities for a

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STRMU or TBRA payment. Such payments are based on the number of bedrooms that the person with disabilities occupies in the home and must be reasonable for the type and nature of the housing arrangement, and similar to the reasonable rental fees available in comparable unassisted units.

SECTION 10. SHORT-TERM RENT, MORTGAGE, AND UTILITIES (STRMU) PROGRAM
10-1 STRMU PROGRAM The goal of the STRMU program is to provide short-term interventions that help maintain stable living environments for households who are temporarily unable to meet their monthly housing and utility expenses as a result of emergency situations arising from their HIV/AIDS condition. It is intended to prevent homelessness, reduce the risks of homelessness, and improve access to health care and other supportive services. The STRMU program enables income-eligible individuals or families living with HIV/AIDS and who are at risk of becoming homeless to receive short-term rent, mortgage, and/or utility assistance for a period not to exceed 21 weeks (147 days) worth of assistance in any 52-week period. STRMU funds can be used to pay rent, mortgage, and utilities (up to the monthly allowable amount as established by the local housing authority). Late and/or reconnect fees are allowable. Utility and rent security deposits and telephone service costs are not allowable under STRMU. However, assistance for security deposits are allowable under Permanent Housing Placement and assistance for basic telephone service may be allowable as a Supportive Service (see Section 12. Supportive Services and Permanent Housing Placement Services for eligible activities). The Project Sponsor must make payments directly to the landlord, mortgage holder, or utility provider and maintain client confidentiality. No payments may be made to the client. STRMU payments cannot be made on behalf of a client and his/her beneficiaries for a particular period of time or housing cost if assistance is also being provided for that same period of time/cost through another HOPWA or federal, state, or local housing subsidy program. All STRMU applicants must be recertified for each emergency situation. The DSHS HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet and Client Enrollment Packet must be completed for each time an individual applies for STRMU assistance. Where the applicant’s information has not changed, forms may be photocopied but must be resigned and dated by the client and case manager. All required documentation must be updated and verified. Recertification of emergency need is still required in cases where the emergency situation remains the same, and the case manager must focus on goals/action steps to address the recurrence of the emergency situation and establish housing stability. 10-2 CLIENT ELIGIBILITY To qualify for the STRMU program, the applicant must: be HIV positive, be incomeeligible, already be in housing, and have a short-term emergency situation which may put the client at risk of becoming homeless (See Section 9-2 (f) for documentation of
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emergency need), and be a tenant or named occupant on a valid lease/rental agreement for property in which they have been residing before seeking HOPWA assistance, or be the owner of a dwelling in which they reside. In order to receive STRMU assistance, the applicant must provide evidence of client tenancy or ownership and residency. To receive rental payments, the eligible person or a member of the resident household must present evidence that he/she is a named tenant under a valid lease or that he/she is a legal resident of the premises. To receive a mortgage payment, the eligible person must demonstrate that he is the resident owner of mortgaged real property. For utility assistance, the eligible person must have an account in his name with a utility company or proof of responsibility to make utility payments, such as cancelled checks or receipts in their name from a utility company. Satisfactory evidence of tenancy includes the lease naming them as leaseholder or eligible household occupant, or a default/late payment notice that identifies the eligible person or a resident member of the family as a named tenant under the lease. If an STRMU applicant is listed as an occupant on a lease agreement and can prove through paid receipts in their name, money orders, or cancelled checks that they pay rent or utility bills, even if the accounts are in the name of another household member, it is permissible to assist the applicant. 10-3 RESTRICTIVE STRMU ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA The Project Sponsor may establish more restrictive criteria for STRMU client eligibility. By statute, a HOPWA client must be HIV-positive, income-eligible, have a verifiable emergency situation which places him/her at risk of homelessness, and be a named occupant/tenant on a valid lease/rental agreement or owner of a dwelling. The Project Sponsor must establish a written policy describing the more restrictive eligibility criteria and priorities for serving clients to ensure eligibility criteria are applied in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner. For example, a Project Sponsor may establish priorities for:    types of emergencies to be considered establishing an Annual STRMU Cap per client serving priority clients (e.g., individuals who are unemployed, who are being discharged from the hospital, who are disabled by their HIV illness, Special Needs clients, waitlist, family situation, etc.)

10-4

VERIFICATION AND DOCUMENTATION OF EMERGENCY NEED After verification of the client’s HIV status, income, and tenancy, the case manager must verify the applicant’s emergency need. To qualify for STRMU assistance, the client must have an emergency need that puts the client at risk of becoming homeless due to the inability to pay rent, mortgage, and/or utilities. An emergency situation is short-term in nature, one that the case manager has reason to believe will put the applicant at risk of becoming homeless and that has a good probability of being resolved within the 21- week period of assistance. Clients whose needs are unlikely to be resolved within the 21-week period of assistance would, in most instances, be more appropriately served through the TBRA program, if eligible. Clients can demonstrate need by submitting evidence of inability to make a monthly payment. For example, this could be a medical bill or employment termination letter. This could also include delinquent payment notices from

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the mortgagor, landlord, and/or the utility company/companies. Case Managers are responsible for verifying and documenting the client’s emergency need in the Comprehensive Housing Plan (Form K) (See Section 9-2 (f) for documentation of STRMU emergency need). 10-5 HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT The household’s on-going housing needs must also be assessed and documented in the Comprehensive Housing Plan. The Project Sponsor must ensure that the client’s Comprehensive Housing Plan addresses long-term financial and housing stability after STRMU expires. The case manager must assess that (i) the household’s needs are for actual costs, (ii) that other resources, such as household income, are not reasonably available to address the unmet housing need, (iii) that the STRMU payment will alleviate the payment delinquency so as to avoid eviction and result in at least temporary stability for that household, and (iv) that the household’s on-going housing needs were assessed or will be assessed in connection with the development of a Comprehensive Housing Plan for the household. Although STRMU assistance does not require the client to pay a portion of the rent or utility bill, STRMU payments must not be used to relieve the household of its responsibility for rent, mortgage, or utility payments in the absence of inability to pay. If a client is capable of paying some of his/her required payments, program staff may negotiate an appropriate amount for the household’s contribution to ensure that partial payments are made by the client, thereby limiting STRMU payments to the difference between the amounts due and the amount the client is able to pay. If clients know that they could save some weeks of assistance for future emergencies by paying at least a portion of the debt, it fosters more incentive and accountability for the client. Case Managers must complete Form L STRMU Worksheet to determine the amount of STRMU assistance the client is eligible for and the portion the client has the ability to pay, if any. 10-6 CONNECTION TO PERMANENT HOUSING As a short-term intervention tool, STRMU assistance is not intended to provide continuous or perpetual assistance. STRMU assistance is “needs-based” and intended to benefit clients who are temporarily unable to meet their monthly housing and utility expenses due to unexpected situations. STRMU assistance should be consistent with an assessment of the family’s housing or utility needs and connected to the establishment of a related Comprehensive Housing Plan to address those on-going needs. Other types of HOPWA assistance, such as TBRA (see 574.300(b)(5)), residency in community residences or other housing facilities (see 574.300(b)(3), (4) and (8)), or assistance with access to other housing programs should be employed when client assessments indicate that little or no improvement of the "conditions" that caused this financial burden are likely during or after the 21-week benefit period.

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10-7

COMPREHENSIVE HOUSING PLAN All HOPWA clients must have a Comprehensive Housing Plan, including STRMU clients. STRMU assistance must be provided in a manner that has a sufficient or clear beneficial effect on addressing the client’s assessed emergency or short-term housing needs and only be provided in connection with the client’s demonstrated compliance with the plan. Plans should establish the on-going housing stability goals for clients in connection with their need to access medical treatment and supportive services associated with HIV/AIDS issues. The Case Manager should work with the client to develop a Comprehensive Housing Plan to set short-term and long-term goals for alleviating risks of homelessness, establishing affordable permanent housing stability, and improving access to health care and supportive services. The Comprehensive Housing Plan should identify the household’s on-going housing stability needs, along with the reasons or causes of the housing need, short-term and long-term action steps to address housing needs, and identify available housing resources and supportive services for the client. Case Managers must follow up with clients to monitor their progress and needs and also monitor and track utilization of referral services as established in the Comprehensive Housing Plan. The plan should address budget and money management issues if the cause for housing debt is related to the household’s poor money management practices, such as the use of credit cards or cash for non-essential items or entertainment activities. The Plan should help determine how to best use STRMU in connecting the client to permanent housing and supportive services. If a client refuses to comply with the Comprehensive Housing Plan or if the case manager has reason to believe the client is committing fraud or inappropriately using STRMU assistance, the Project Sponsor may terminate the client’s STRMU assistance, given the HOPWA and Project Sponsor termination policies and procedures are followed (Section 14. Termination of Assistance).

10-8

HOUSING QUALITY STANDARDS A HUD Housing Quality Standard inspection is not required for the use of STRMU payments if the payments are needed to prevent the homelessness of the household, but client verification of safe, decent, and sanitary housing (Form D) is required. All HOPWA-assisted housing must be in compliance with all applicable State and local housing codes. It is the responsibility of the Project Sponsors to discuss with their clients whether the housing is safe, decent, and sanitary as part of their required on-going assessment of the client’s housing needs. In the event that the unit is substandard, the Case Manager must document deficiencies in the Comprehensive Housing Plan and assist the client to address unit deficiencies or to obtain safe, decent, and sanitary housing that is, at a minimum, consistent with all applicable State and local housing codes.

10-9

RENT REASONABLENESS Though rent reasonableness is not directly required for STRMU households, an assessment of the client’s current housing situation is required. If it is clearly shown that

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the individual or family needing assistance is dwelling in a unit beyond their means and will be perpetually dependent upon STRMU assistance for 21 weeks out of every year, then the client must have a Comprehensive Housing Plan that leads to increased income, more appropriate housing, or apply for HOPWA TBRA or other appropriate housing assistance. 10-10 STEPS IN ESTABLISHING AND DOCUMENTING APPLICANT ELIGIBILTIY Refer to the following table for a description of the steps in establishing and documenting client eligibility for the STRMU Program. Note that the sequence of steps in the process may vary and steps may occur simultaneously. The Project Sponsor must ensure that the appropriate procedures are utilized to establish applicant eligibility and documentation.

STEPS TO DETERMINE CLIENT ELIGIBILITY AND ENROLL CLIENTS FOR THE STRMU PROGRAM
1. Initial contact with applicant When an individual requests housing assistance, the case manager must inform the individual verbally and in writing about the HOPWA Program. This should include information about:  HOPWA housing assistance available  the application process  documentation that will be needed from the applicant to determine eligibility (income, HIV Status, tenancy) for the first meeting/interview.  the emergency situation to determine if the emergency qualifies for HOPWA assistance and determine documentation required for first meeting.  existing program waiting lists and priority populations, if applicable  interview dates/times  The case manager must explore other housing assistance and resources that may be available to the applicant before utilizing HOPWA assistance. Document efforts to access other resources and list referrals.  Verify all documentation required for determining income eligibility, HIV status, residency, STRMU emergency, etc.  Explain Form D the Client Rights and Responsibilities Statement (also in Spanish) to the client.  Explain to the client the confidentiality policy and Form E, the Consent to Release and/or Obtain Confidential Information (also in Spanish)  Form D and E must be signed and dated by the client and case manager.  The case manager should complete the DSHS HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet with the client present.

2.

Initial meeting/interview with applicant

3.

Explain client rights and release of confidential information

4.

Verify and document applicant’s HIV status

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 The case manager must document in the case file what was used to determine eligibility and include backup documentation.  The Income Eligibility Packet must be signed and dated by both the case manager and client. Verify applicant’s 5.  The case manager must document the evidence of tenancy applicant’s tenancy and maintain in client file.  Applicant must be a tenant/named occupant on a valid lease/rental agreement and/or provide evidence of paying rent/utilities if not a named occupant on lease/rental agreement. Verify and document 6.  The applicant must provide evidence of the emergency the applicant’s situation (Section 9-2 (f)). emergency situation  If the case manager determines that the situation is not an emergency, the applicant is not eligible for STRMU. The case manager’s supervisor must confirm this decision. Notify client about 7.  The client must be notified in writing about his/her his/her eligibility eligibility using the STRMU Worksheet. A copy must be given to the client. If the applicant is eligible, continue to STEPS 8-13 and complete the DSHS HOPWA CLIENT ENROLLMENT PACKET. Collect client 8.  Complete Form F Demographic/Statistical Demographic/ Information to collect all required information on client Statistical information and beneficiaries. Provide Lead-Based 9.  Provide and explain the HUD Fair Housing pamphlet Paint and Fair and Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home Housing Pamphlets pamphlet (also in Spanish). See Section 10-13 Leadand Complete Based Paint.  STRMU clients must self-certify and sign the HQS HQS Certification Certification (Form G). 10. Develop a  The case manager and client must develop a Comprehensive Comprehensive Housing Plan (Form K) to assess Housing Plan housing needs, set short and long-term goals of developing housing stability, and monitor and track use of referrals.  Document the emergency situation in the Comprehensive Housing Plan.  The case manager and client must sign and date the Comprehensive Housing Plan.  Housing needs assessment must be on-going and the Comprehensive Housing Plan must be reviewed and updated to reflect client’s current needs. 11. Provide case  The case manager must assist the client in accessing management and medical care and supportive services as needed. referrals to medical  The case manager must document which services were care and supportive offered and used by the client in the Comprehensive and income

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 Use the STRMU Worksheet (Form L) to assess client’s income resources, expenses (rent, utilities, etc.) and emergency situation to determine amount of assistance needed. Also determine the portion client is able to contribute, if any.  Clients can only be certified for a maximum of 1 month of STRMU assistance for each verified emergency situation.  All payments must be made to appropriate third parties. No payments can be made directly to the client. 13. Calculate and track  Use the STRMU 21-week tracking worksheet (Form the number of days of M) to track client’s period of STRMU assistance in STRMU assistance actual number of days (maximum 147 days).  Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/hopwa/default.shtm  Apply Annual STRMU Cap, if established by Project Sponsor (Section 10-12). 14. Follow-up with  Follow-up with the client on the progress made on client’s emergency goals/action steps established in the Comprehensive situation, housing Housing Plan. needs, and referrals  Assess status of client’s emergency situation and current housing needs and discuss further goals/action steps as needed.  Update housing needs and goals/action steps in the Comprehensive Housing Plan.  Follow-up with the client and/or provider on use of referral services offered and document in the Comprehensive Housing Plan. 15. Complete  Complete the HOPWA Termination Form (Form N) at the end of the period of assistance or at termination of Termination Form the client (Section 10-17 and 14).  A termination form is not required monthly for STRMU clients.  Document client’s current (or most recently available) housing situation at the end of the last month of assistance. If an applicant has received STRMU assistance in the past 52-weeks, and is returning to be recertified for another month of STRMU assistance: 16. Verify client  Repeat Steps 1-15 to determine client’s eligibility for eligibility and STRMU. Recertify  The client must be recertified to receive STRMU for each verified emergency situation (maximum 1 month of assistance at certification).  Where the client’s information did not change, forms may be photocopied for client’s file, but must be 12.

services Determine amount of STRMU assistance

Housing Plan (Form K).

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resigned and dated by the client and case manager. All documentation for income, tenancy, and emergency situation must be updated and verified.

10-11 TRACKING 21 WEEKS OF STRMU ASSISTANCE The statute (42USC12907) and regulations (24CFR574.330) place limitations on the length of time clients may receive STRMU assistance. Assistance may not be provided for costs accruing over a period of more than 21-weeks worth of assistance in any 52week period. The 21-weeks of assistance do not have to be consecutive. Program staff is required to use the calendar day method to ensure that STRMU payments are not made in excess of amounts incurring over 21-weeks worth of assistance. The calendar day method utilizes the actual number of days for which housing and/or utility payments are made on behalf of the client/household. Hence, 21 weeks is equated to 147 days of assistance in the year. Form M STRMU 21-week Tracking Worksheet must be used to calculate and monitor the number of actual days of assistance. The Excel spreadsheet of Form M may be downloaded at http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/hopwa/default.shtm. .   Example 1: If a total utility bill was paid and the service period was April 17-May 16, 14 days would be attributed to April and 16 days to May. Example 2: If a portion of the utility bill was paid, the days would be counted based on the amount that was paid by STRMU. Total bill for April 17-May 16 (30 days) is $148.00. Agency agrees to pay $100. Divide $148 by 30 days, which equals $4.93 per day. The $100 payment divided by $4.93 per day equals 20.3 days (rounded to 20 days) assisted by STRMU.

10-12 ANNUAL STRMU CAPS PER CLIENT Project Sponsors may place a restriction on the amount of STRMU assistance a client can receive by establishing an Annual STRMU Cap. The goal would be to restrict the 21weeks of assistance that clients are eligible for but still provide sufficient support to avoid any continuing housing crisis. In setting an Annual STRMU Cap, the Project Sponsor must use the DSHS formula and seek concurrence or approval from the AA. AAs must ensure Project Sponsors comply with the established written policy to apply the STRMU cap in a consistent, uniform, and non-discriminatory manner. The established formula is: the Annual STRMU Cap per client must be no less than 1 month of the FMR for the appropriate unit size and no more than the Project Sponsor’s budgeted STRMU funds per client per year. STRMU Caps include rent and utility assistance. Example: 1 month FMR for appropriate unit size < Annual STRMU Cap < STRMU funds per client per year 1 month FMR for 1 bedroom Project Sponsor’s STRMU budget for project year The STRMU goal (number of households) for project year STRMU funds per client per year $550 $40,000 20 households $2,000/client/year

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The Annual STRMU Cap can be between $550 and $2,000 per client per year, as determined necessary and reasonable by the Project Sponsor and may be based on historical data. If the Project Sponsor establishes that $1500 is the Annual STRMU Cap, clients can receive no more than $1500 in STRMU assistance over the 52-week period, starting from the first day an STRMU payment is made. The Annual STRMU Cap can be tracked in Form M the STRMU 21-week Tracking Worksheet. A monthly STRMU Cap can be calculated for budgeting and planning purposes by taking the established Annual STRMU Cap divided by 147 days times 30 days. Example: Monthly STRMU Cap Annual STRMU Cap per client per year $2000 / 147 days X 30 days = $408 per client per month In the case that a client receives the maximum Annual STRMU cap, the assistance is considered to have been attributable to the entire 21-weeks (147 days) worth of assistance allowed. A client cannot, in any case, receive more than the allowed 21-weeks (147 days) worth of assistance, even if the accrued assistance has not exceeded the established STRMU cap. STRMU assistance is “needs-based” and is NOT intended to provide continuous or perpetual assistance. See Form M the STRMU 21-week Tracking Worksheet. If an Annual STRMU Cap is not utilized, the maximum amount of STRMU assistance (including rent and utilities) cannot exceed 21-weeks (147 days) worth of assistance. Although STRMU assistance does not require the client to pay a portion of the rent or utility bill, STRMU payments must not be used to relieve the household of its responsibility for rent, mortgage, or utility payments in the absence of the inability to pay. If a client is capable of paying some of their required payments, case managers may negotiate an appropriate amount for the household’s contribution to ensure these partial payments are made by the client, thereby limiting STRMU payments to the difference between the amounts due and the amount the client is able to pay. If clients know that they could save some weeks of assistance for future emergencies by paying at least a portion of the debt and having the assisted portion count as only a portion of the month, it fosters more incentive and accountability with that client. For example, case managers might determine through the assessment process that the client is able to pay $100 of their $400 rent (equal to ¼ of the total). For the purposes of tracking, the amount of days of assistance used would be only for the part of the monthly housing costs paid by STRMU, which in this case is ¾ of the month or three weeks of assistance. In providing STRMU assistance, case managers must document that the client has no other means to cover the payment(s) during the 21-week period and that the Project Sponsor is making efforts to develop a permanent solution in the client’s Comprehensive Housing Plan. 10-13 LEAD-BASED PAINT $2000

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Many houses and apartments built before 1978 have paint that contains lead (called leadbased paint). The relevant regulations are found under 24 CFR 574.635. Lead from paint, chips and dust can pose serious health hazards. HUD requires Project Sponsors to give all HOPWA clients the lead-based paint pamphlet entitled Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home. The client's case file must include documentation that a copy of the pamphlet was given to the client (Form G). The pamphlet was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency in response to concern about lead-based paint hazards in the home. Copies of the pamphlet are available at the following website address: English version: http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadpdfe.pdf Spanish version: http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/pyfcameraspan.pdf 10-14 FAIR HOUSING ACT

The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, and national origin. Its coverage includes private housing, housing that receives Federal financial assistance, and State and local government housing. It is unlawful to discriminate in any aspect of selling or renting housing or to deny a dwelling to a buyer or renter because of the disability of that individual, an individual associated with the buyer or renter, or an individual who intends to live in the residence. Other covered activities include, for example, financing, zoning practices, new construction design, and advertising. The Fair Housing Act requires owners of housing facilities to make reasonable exceptions in their policies and operations to afford people with disabilities equal housing opportunities. For example, a landlord with a "no pets" policy may be required to grant an exception to this rule and allow an individual who is blind to keep a guide dog in the residence. The Fair Housing Act also requires landlords to allow tenants with disabilities to make reasonable access-related modifications to their private living space, as well as to common use spaces. The Act further requires that new multifamily housing with four or more units be designed and built to allow access for persons with disabilities. This includes accessible common use areas, doors that are wide enough for wheelchairs, kitchens and bathrooms that allow a person using a wheelchair to maneuver, and other adaptable features within the units. For more information and resources about the Fair Housing Act: http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/index.cfm. The Fair Housing Equal Opportunity for All Pamphlet can be downloaded at: English version: http://www.hudclips.org/sub_nonhud/html/pdfforms/1686.pdf Spanish version: http://www.hudclips.org/sub_nonhud/html/pdfforms/1686-1-FHEO-Spa.pdf

10-15 SMOKE DETECTORS

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Project Sponsors are required to ensure that an operable hard-wired or battery-operated smoke detector is installed in all HOPWA-assisted units. This applies to STRMU with one exception: if the utilities are the only service being subsidized, the requirement for smoke detectors does not apply. STRMU clients must self-certify that there is a working smoke detector in the residence (Form G). This form must be signed and included in the client’s case file. HOPWA funds may be used to purchase smoke detectors for clients receiving STRMU only if the clients cannot afford to purchase their own and have no other funds to pay for them. Provision of smoke detectors must be funded as a HOPWA Supportive Services activity. Units receiving TBRA must pass HUD’s Housing Quality Standards which require the presence of smoke detectors. Standards for installation of smoke detectors may be obtained from your local fire safety officials. 10-16 GRACE PERIOD A grace period must be established to continue STRMU assistance for surviving family members who were living in a household with the HIV/AIDS client at the time of his or her death. A grace period must also be established for clients and beneficiaries entering incarceration facilities, hospice/long term health care or drug treatment programs. Within the limits allowed by HUD, the Project Sponsor must determine the length of the grace period by developing a written policy and/or procedure. (Refer to Section 13 for Provision of Assistance to Survivors). The grace period cannot exceed 21-weeks (147 days) in a 52-week period for STRMU. 10-17 TERMINATION OF STRMU CLIENTS A client’s STRMU assistance may be terminated if the client violates program requirements or conditions of occupancy. Project Sponsors must ensure that supportive services are provided to the client, so that a client’s assistance is terminated only in the most severe cases. Section 14 for procedures for Termination of Assistance due to client violation of program requirements and termination policies and procedures established by the Project Sponsor must be followed. A HOPWA Termination form (Form N) must be completed at termination (at the end of the 21-weeks or when the client leaves the program).

SECTION 11. TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE (TBRA) PROGRAM
11-1 TBRA PROGRAM The purpose of TBRA is to assist income-eligible individuals or families living with HIV/AIDS with their rent and utilities, including shared housing arrangements, until they are able to secure Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) housing or other affordable stable housing. Failure to accept an offer of the Housing Choice Voucher program (Section 8) or other affordable stable housing may result in termination of HOPWA assistance. A Project Sponsor may apply for a waiver of this requirement if they are able to
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demonstrate appropriate justification as to why acceptance of the housing would be detrimental to the client's health and well-being (Section 7-3 Failure to Accept Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Housing/Other Affordable Housing). Eligible individuals can receive TBRA for up to 12 months, and must be recertified annually or as client’s income changes. Utility and rent security deposits are not allowable as a TBRA payment. Reasonable security deposits can be provided as a Permanent Housing Placement service (Section 12. Supportive Services and Permanent Housing Placement). Late and reconnect fees are not allowable under TBRA. 11-2 RESTRICTIVE TBRA ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA The Project Sponsor may apply more restrictive eligibility criteria for TBRA assistance. If the Project Sponsor establishes more restrictive eligibility criteria for TBRA, a written policy must be developed. Eligibility criteria must be approved by the AA. By statute, a HOPWA client must be HIV positive and income-eligible. A Project Sponsor may also establish priorities for serving clients who are unemployed, being discharged from the hospital, Special Needs clients, clients on the waitlist, or family situation. A written policy must also be established by the Project Sponsor to apply wait list priorities in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner for all eligible individuals. 11-3 HOUSING QUALITY STANDARDS All HOPWA-assisted housing must meet both state and local housing standards and HUD’s habitability standards as outlined in 24 CFR Part 574.310(b). Case Managers must certify that all TBRA-assisted households are safe, decent, and sanitary by completing Form G Housing Quality Standards (HQS) Certification. The inspection can be performed by the case manager without a requirement for specialized training. The case manager or other designee must make a home visit to determine the overall suitability of the rental property and certify that it meets the standards listed on the HQS form. The TBRA household must be re-inspected and re-certified annually when the client is re-certified for TBRA assistance or when the client moves to a new residence. The quality standards listed should be interpreted in the best judgment of the case manager. 11-4 RENT REASONABLENESS

 HUD regulation 24 CFR 574.320(a)(3) requires that “rent charged for a unit must be reasonable in relation to rents currently being charged for comparable units in the private unassisted market and must not be in excess of rent currently being charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units.” In order to meet HUD’s Rent Reasonableness requirement, Project Sponsors must document that staff has made efforts to determine that the rent requested by the landlord is reasonable. Rent reasonableness tests must be conducted on every unit receiving TBRA assistance before assistance is provided and must be documented on the TBRA Worksheet (Form I). Reasonableness of the rent is determined by comparing the proposed unit with other similar, but unassisted units in the private market, taking into account the location, size, type, age of the units and the amenities and utilities provided by the owners.

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Size Type Amenities Location

Units will be compared based on similar number of bedrooms, bathrooms and square footage. Units will be compared to similar units. (ex. House to house, duplex to duplex, etc…) The amenities must be similar. (ex. Garage, appliances, decks, patios, yard, etc…) The location of the comparable units used is determined by looking at units within the same general area (ex. within the same complex, street, subdivision or zip code). This is done in order to find the most comparable unit closest to the subject unit.

There are two ways in which Project Sponsors can determine rent reasonableness. 1. Complete the Rent Reasonableness Checklist and Certification (Form H) for each TBRA assisted unit. This form needs to be completed and signed by a staff member and filed in the client’s folder. 2. Create a local housing spreadsheet comparing a variety of units across the service area. Proposed units will be compared with similar units on the chart that are located within the same area (by neighborhood or zip code). This spreadsheet would contain information regarding the unit size, number of bedrooms, type of construction, amenities, approximate age of building and utilities provided. This information can be obtained from units listed in the MLS, newspapers, apartment locating agencies, the local housing authority, as well as lease information submitted by landlords. This database must be updated at least annually to ensure the most current information is utilized to compare rent reasonableness. To qualify as reasonable, the proposed unit’s gross rent (including rent and utilities) cannot be more than 10% above the average gross rent of a minimum of 2 comparable units (or the average of the units by area if using the local housing spreadsheet). With approval of the AA, Project Sponsors must establish a written policy of the rent reasonableness requirement. Documentation of rent reasonableness must be included in the client files to ensure that efforts have been made to comply with this requirement. Compliance will be evidenced by completed Rent Reasonableness Checklist and Certification forms in client files or review of the housing spreadsheet (including verification of rent reasonableness on client’s TBRA Worksheets). 11-5 RENT PAYMENT Each person receiving TBRA must pay a portion of the rent, including utilities. Each HOPWA client must pay the higher of:   30 percent of the family's monthly-adjusted income (adjustment factors include the age of the individual, medical expenses, size of family and child care expenses etc.) 10 percent of the family's monthly gross income

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The HOPWA Project Sponsor must pay the balance of the rent up to the lesser of the contract rent or the most current Fair Market Rent (FMR) value or reasonable rent for comparable units in the area. Any documentation used to determine TBRA assistance must be documented in the client’s file. HOPWA funds must not be given directly to a client. Link to current Fair Market Rent table http://www.huduser.org/datasets/fmr.html (also on DSHS website). Form I TBRA Worksheet.

11-6

UTILITIES UNDER TBRA When utilities are not included in the rent and the client is billed directly for utilities, an allowance for reasonable utility consumption must be subtracted from the client's rent portion (30% of the monthly adjusted income or 10% of the monthly gross income). This allowance is established locally by the Public Housing Authority (PHA). The Project Sponsor must contact the PHA in their areas to obtain the current local utility allowance schedule for use in the computation of the client's rent payment. The regulations at 24 CFR 982.514(b) state that, if paid directly to the utility, the Project Sponsor must notify the family in writing of the amount paid to the utility on their behalf. The client, however, is responsible for paying any utility costs in excess of the established local utility allowance. Use the TBRA Worksheet to calculate the rental subsidy and the client rent portion. The Project Sponsor must keep on file utility receipts or invoices.

11-7

DETERMINATION OF APPLICANT'S UNIT SIZE The amount of TBRA the Project Sponsor pays the landlord on behalf of the applicant is based on the number of sleeping/bedrooms for which the individual/family is eligible and the actual number of bedrooms (not sleeping rooms) in the unit. An individual/family may rent a larger than authorized unit if the rent is at or below the FMR for the authorized unit size. To be counted as a bedroom, the room must meet HOPWA Housing Quality Standards, and the room must provide a private area where family members may sleep. If the only method to enter one area is to pass through another room, that space may be counted as a living/sleeping area but will not be counted as a bedroom. The kitchen and bathroom may not be counted as sleeping rooms. The living room may be counted as a sleeping room. Units must have the minimum number of bedrooms/sleeping rooms required for that family’s size and composition. The Project Sponsor must determine the appropriate unit size using the following standards: A. PROGRAM OCCUPANCY STANDARDS The unit size designated should be determined in accordance with the following criteria: (1) the bedroom size assigned should not require more than two persons to occupy the same bedroom, except that a very small child (less than 2 years of age) may share a one-bedroom unit with a single parent

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(2)

the bedroom size assigned should not require persons of opposite sex other than husband and wife to occupy the same bedroom with the exception of infants and very young children a two-bedroom unit may be used by a two member family which consists of a single parent and child or by a couple who, due to medical reasons, must have separate bedrooms, as approved by the Project Sponsor

(3)

These principles result in the following standards: NUMBER OF BEDROOMS Number of Bedrooms 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 B. Minimum Number of Persons in Household 1 1 2 3 6 8 10 Maximum Number of Persons in Household 1 2 4 6 8 10 12

OCCUPANCY STANDARDS FLEXIBILITY The criteria and standards prescribed for the determination of an applicant's unit should apply to the vast majority of individuals/families. In some cases, however, the relationship, age, sex, health, or handicap of the individual/family members warrant the assignment of a larger unit size than that which would result from strict application of the criteria. Any determinations that do not strictly apply to the criteria must be fully documented in the applicant's case file.

11-8

STEPS IN ESTABLISHING AND DOCUMENTING APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY Refer to the following table for a description of the steps in establishing and documenting client eligibility for the TBRA Program. Note that the sequence of steps in the process may vary and steps may occur simultaneously. The Project Sponsor must ensure that the appropriate procedures in establishing applicant eligibility and documentation are completed.

STEPS TO DETERMINE CLIENT ELIGIBILITY AND ENROLL CLIENTS FOR THE TBRA PROGRAM
1. Initial contact with applicant When an individual requests housing assistance, the case manager must inform the individual verbally and in writing about the HOPWA Program. This should include 29

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2. 3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

information about:  HOPWA housing assistance available  the application process  Documentation that will be needed from the applicant to determine eligibility (income and HIV Status) for the first meeting/interview.  existing program waiting lists and priority populations, if applicable  interview dates/times Initial meeting/interview  Verify all documentation required for determining with applicant income eligibility and HIV status Explain client rights and  Explain to the client, Form D the Client Rights release of confidential and Responsibilities Statement (also in Spanish). information  Explain to the client the confidentiality policy and Form E the Consent to Release and/or obtain Confidential Information (also in Spanish)  Form D and E must be signed and dated by the client and case manager. Verify and document  The case manager should complete the DSHS applicant’s HIV status HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet with the and income client present.  The case manager must document in the case file what was used to determine eligibility and include backup documentation.  The Income Eligibility Packet must be signed and dated by both the case manager and client. Notify client about his/her  The client must be notified in writing about his/her eligibility eligibility using the TBRA Worksheet. A copy must be given to the client. If the applicant is eligible, continue to STEPS 6-14 and complete the DSHS HOPWA CLIENT ENROLLMENT PACKET. Collect client  Complete Form F Demographic/Statistical Demographic/ Statistical Information to collect all required information on information client and beneficiaries. Provide Lead Based Paint  Provide and explain the HUD Fair Housing and Fair Housing pamphlet and Protect Your Family from Lead in Pamphlet Your Home pamphlet (also in Spanish) Section 1012 Lead-Based Paint. Inspect property and  An inspection of the property must be performed to Complete ensure the unit meets both state and local housing quality standards and the HUD housing quality HQS Certification standards.  The Housing Quality Standards (HQS) Certification (Form G) must be completed and signed by the client and case manager.  If the unit is substandard, the case manager must

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9.

Verify Rent Reasonableness

10.

Develop a Comprehensive Housing Plan

11.

Determine amount of TBRA

12.

Provide case management and referrals to medical care and supportive services, as needed

13.

Follow up with the client’s housing needs and referrals

assist in correcting the deficiencies or in locating housing that meets the standards.  An inspection must also be done at recertification (at least annually).  Complete Form H Rent Reasonable Checklist and Certification to compare rent reasonableness with other comparable units  The case manager may also certify rent reasonableness with an established local housing spreadsheet and include in client’s file the relevant section for the proposed unit.  The case manager and applicant must develop a Comprehensive Housing Plan (Form K) to assess housing needs, set short and long-term goals of developing housing stability, and monitor and track use of referrals.  The case manager and client must sign and date the Comprehensive Housing Plan.  Housing needs assessment must be on-going and the Comprehensive Housing Plan must be updated.  Complete the TBRA Worksheet (Form I) to determine the amount of TBRA based on the applicant’s actual needs and certify the applicant for an appropriate period of assistance (maximum 12 months at a time)  All payments and communication must maintain client confidentiality.  The case manager must ensure that the client is offered case management and supportive services as needed.  The case manager is responsible for ensuring that the client applies for Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) housing and renews his/her application (Section 7 Linkage to Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Housing).  The case manager must document which services were offered and used by the client in the Comprehensive Housing Plan (Form K).  Make minimum quarterly contact with the client to follow up with client's progress on goals/action steps as established in the client's Comprehensive Housing Plan, re-assess the client’s current housing needs, and track the client’s use of referrals offered.  Document status/changes of client's situation in the Comprehensive Housing Plan.

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14.

Complete the HOPWA Termination Form (Form N) at termination of the client (Section 14).  Document client’s current (or most recently available) housing situation at the end of the period of assistance. If an applicant has received TBRA assistance in the past 52-weeks, and is returning to be recertified for TBRA assistance: 15. Determine client  The case manager must begin the recertification eligibility and recertify process at least a month before the anniversary date client of the initial certification date to ensure that by the completion date it has not been longer than 12 months between certifications.  The client must also be recertified if significant changes occur, e.g. change in income or housing composition. This recertification can take place as often as significant changes occur.  In either of the above situations, repeat Steps 1-14 to determine client eligibility for TBRA.  Where the client’s information did not change, forms may be photocopied for client’s file, but must be resigned and dated by the client and case manager.  All documentation for income, tenancy, and emergency situation must be updated and verified. 11-9 COMPREHENSIVE HOUSING PLAN All HOPWA clients must have a Comprehensive Housing Plan. Plans should establish the on-going housing stability goals for clients in connection with their need to access medical treatment and supportive services associated with HIV/AIDS issues. The purpose of the Comprehensive Housing Plan is to provide a tool for the case manager and client to achieve housing stability without long-term dependency for HOPWA housing assistance. Efforts must be made to locate other housing assistance as this would make TBRA funds available for clients on the waitlist. The Case Manager should work with the client to develop a Comprehensive Housing Plan to set short-term and long-term goals for alleviating risks of homelessness, establishing affordable permanent housing stability, and to improve access to health care and supportive services. The Comprehensive Housing Plan should identify the household’s on-going housing stability needs, along with the reasons or causes of the housing need, short-term and long-term action steps to address housing needs, and identify available housing resources and supportive services for the client. Case Managers must follow up with clients to monitor the progress and needs of the clients and also monitor and track utilization of referral services as established in the Comprehensive Housing Plan. The plan should address budget and money management issues, if the cause for housing debt is related to the household’s poor money management practices, such as the use of credit cards or cash for non-essential items, or

Complete Termination Form

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entertainment activities. The Plan should help determine how to best use STRMU in connecting the client to permanent housing and supportive services. If a client refuses to comply with the Comprehensive Housing Plan action steps or if the case manager has reason to believe the client is committing fraud or inappropriately using TBRA assistance, the Project Sponsor may terminate the client’s TBRA assistance, given the HOPWA and Project Sponsor termination policies and procedures are followed (Section 14. Termination of Assistance). 11-10 LEAD-BASED PAINT Many houses and apartments built before 1978 have paint that contains lead (called leadbased paint). The relevant regulations are found under 24 CFR 574.635. Lead from paint, chips and dust can pose serious health hazards. HUD requires Project Sponsors to give all HOPWA clients the lead-based paint pamphlet entitled Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home. The client's case file must include documentation that a copy of the pamphlet was given to the client (Form G). The pamphlet was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency in response to concern about lead-based paint hazards in the home. Copies of the pamphlet are available at the following website address: English version: http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadpdfe.pdf Spanish version: http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/pyfcameraspan.pdf 11-11 FAIR HOUSING ACT

The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, and national origin. Its coverage includes private housing, housing that receives Federal financial assistance, and State and local government housing. It is unlawful to discriminate in any aspect of selling or renting housing or to deny a dwelling to a buyer or renter because of the disability of that individual, an individual associated with the buyer or renter, or an individual who intends to live in the residence. Other covered activities include, for example, financing, zoning practices, new construction design, and advertising. The Fair Housing Act requires owners of housing facilities to make reasonable exceptions in their policies and operations to afford people with disabilities equal housing opportunities. For example, a landlord with a "no pets" policy may be required to grant an exception to this rule and allow an individual who is blind to keep a guide dog in the residence. The Fair Housing Act also requires landlords to allow tenants with disabilities to make reasonable access-related modifications to their private living space, as well as to common use spaces. The Act further requires that new multifamily housing with four or more units be designed and built to allow access for persons with disabilities. This includes accessible common use areas, doors that are wide enough for wheelchairs, kitchens and bathrooms that allow a person using a wheelchair to maneuver, and other adaptable features within the units. For more information and resources about the Fair Housing Act: http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/index.cfm.

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The Fair Housing Equal Opportunity for All Pamphlet can be downloaded at: English: http://www.hudclips.org/sub_nonhud/html/pdfforms/1686.pdf Spanish: http://www.hudclips.org/sub_nonhud/html/pdfforms/1686-1-FHEO-Spa.pdf

11-12 SMOKE DETECTORS All TBRA-assisted households must meet both state and local housing standards and HUD’s habitability standards as outlined in 24 CFR Part 574.310(b)(2), which also requires a functioning smoke detector. Smoke detectors for TBRA households must be provided by the landlord, local fire department, or some other source other than HOPWA. Form G HQS Certification must be completed before TBRA assistance is authorized and re-certified annually, which includes verification of a functioning smoke detector(s). 11-13 GRACE PERIOD A grace period must be established to continue TBRA assistance for surviving family members who were living in a household with the HIV/AIDS client at the time of his or her death. Within the limits allowed by HUD, the Project Sponsor must determine the length of the grace period by developing a written policy and/or procedure. (Refer to Section 13 Provision of Assistance to Survivors). The grace period cannot exceed 12 months for TBRA. A grace period must also be established for clients entering incarceration facilities, hospice/long term health care or drug treatment programs. A local written policy must state an acceptable absence from the housing unit must not exceed 90 days.

SECTION 12. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES AND PERMANENT HOUSING PLACEMENT
12-1 SUPPORTIVE SERVICES The Administrative Agency must assure that Project Sponsors make available appropriate supportive services to eligible individuals, either directly or through referral. The following are DSHS-approved HOPWA supportive services: case management, provision of smoke detectors, and basic telephone service. Supportive Services may be provided either in conjunction with HOPWA housing assistance or as a stand alone service (Supportive Services Only). All income-eligible, HIV positive individuals are eligible to receive case management and basic telephone service. Smoke detectors may only be provided to clients with a mortgage. All rental units are required to have a functioning smoke detector that must be provided by the landlord, local fire department, or leveraged source. To the extent possible, case management for HOPWA clients should be funded by some other source (e.g. Ryan White Part A or B, State Services, or local funds). Services and referrals must be documented and tracked in the client’s Comprehensive Housing Plan. 12-2 CASE MANAGEMENT

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HOPWA Supportive Services funds can be used to pay for appropriate portions of time for a HOPWA case manager or case worker. All income-eligible, HIV positive individuals are eligible to receive case management. To the extent possible, case management for HOPWA clients should be funded through some source other than HOPWA (e.g. Ryan White Part A or Part B, State Services, or local funds). HOPWA funds must not pay for a general psychosocial or medical case manager. If a HOPWA client is not in medical care, the case manager must include medical care as part of the Comprehensive Housing Plan, locate a care provider and make a referral to obtain appropriate medical care. Project Sponsors must document and track in the client’s Comprehensive Housing Plan which services are utilized and the amount of services received. Case management services must be provided in accordance with the DSHS HIV/STD Comprehensive Services “HIV Clinical and Case Management Services Standards” from the HIV and STD Program Operating Procedures and Standards manual, section 19) http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/pops/pdf/pdf_case_mgt_stands_of_care.pdf

Key case management activities include:       12-3 initial comprehensive assessment of the client's needs and personal support systems development of a Comprehensive Housing Plan for TBRA and STRMU clients, including affordable stable housing, supportive services, and medical care coordination of the services required to implement the Comprehensive Housing plan client monitoring to assess the progress and efficacy of the Comprehensive Housing Plan periodic re-evaluation and revision of the Comprehensive Housing Plan as necessary client-specific advocacy

SMOKE DETECTORS HOPWA Supportive Services funds may be used to provide smoke detectors for eligible individuals IF there are no other means available to cover the costs, including the leveraged or donated funds AND the client cannot afford the smoke detector on their own in the event they are the homeowner. Smoke detectors may only be provided to clients with a mortgage. All rental units are required to have a functioning smoke detector that must be provided by the landlord, local fire department, or other leveraged source.

12-4

TELEPHONE SERVICE Assistance for basic telephone service is allowable if it is determined to be needed to assist the client in accessing services, such as medical care or other essential supportive services. Assistance may also be extended for reasonable costs of long-distance services, if needed, for connecting clients in rural or small population areas.

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12-5

PERMANENT HOUSING PLACEMENT (PHP) Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) enables Project Sponsors to assist eligible individuals to secure new and permanent housing through the assistance of reasonable security deposits (not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent) and related application fees and credit checks. Security deposits must be returned to the Project Sponsor (see Appendix C for PHP Application Process and Accounting Guidelines). With approval of the AA, Project Sponsors must establish a written policy to ensure deposits are returned to the program and client confidentiality is maintained. Agencies that wish to offer PHP to eligible clients should make this decision based upon:  Funds available for the HOPWA program  Clients’ needs  Fiscal capacity to maintain accounting records In order to qualify for PHP, Project Sponsors must:  Complete the application for PHP (Appendix D PHP Application Form) and submit to the Administrative Agency (and AA submits application to Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us on behalf of Project Sponsors for approval).  Obtain accounting technical assistance from the DSHS Contract Oversight and Support (COS) Unit.  Follow the DSHS Accounting Guidelines for documenting and maintaining PHP activities.  Submit revised Project Sponsor Data Sheets to DSHS Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us.

SECTION 13. PROVISION OF ASSISTANCE TO SURVIVORS
A local written policy must be developed and approved by the AA to address the following issues. 13-1 SURVIVING AND REMAINING FAMILY MEMBERS With respect to the surviving member or members of a family who were living in a unit assisted under the HOPWA program with the person with HIV/AIDS at the time of his/her death, housing assistance under the HOPWA program shall continue for a grace period following the death of the person with HIV/AIDS. See HOPWA regulations 24 CFR Part 574.310(e). The Project Sponsor must establish a reasonable grace period for continued participation by a surviving family member. 13-2 TBRA The grace period for the TBRA Program must be a minimum of one month from the end of the month in which the family member with HIV/AIDS died. The maximum grace period must not exceed 12 months from the time of death of the client. It is advisable to limit this benefit to 2-4 months assistance. The Project Sponsor must notify the family in

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writing of the duration of their grace period and should assist the family with information about other available housing programs and supportive services. 13-3 STRMU The grace period for the STRMU Program must be a minimum of one month from the end of the month in which the family member with HIV/AIDS died. The maximum grace period cannot exceed 21-weeks (147 days) in a 52-week period for STRMU from the time of death of the client. It is advisable to limit this benefit to 2-4 months assistance. The Project Sponsor must notify the family in writing of the duration of their grace period and should assist the family with information about other available housing programs and supportive services. 13-4 ROOMMATES If a participant resides in a roommate situation, where the roommate is not a beneficiary, then survivor benefits would not apply. 13-5 CASE MANAGEMENT REQUIRED FOR SURVIVORS Case Management must be offered to assist the survivor(s) to resolve their housing related needs or to secure alternate housing solutions to the extent possible. Families who are continued on assistance for any period must receive case management monthly to assess the status of the need for continued assistance and this must be documented. 13-6 AMOUNT OF ASSISTANCE When a client dies or other circumstances change (see Section 13-7 Other Circumstances), the case manager must reassess and recertify to determine the amount of assistance the family will receive. 13-7 OTHER CIRCUMSTANCES The grace period also applies to remaining household members of clients entering incarceration, drug treatment and hospice/long term health care. A local written policy must be developed that states an acceptable absence from the housing unit must not exceed 90 days.

SECTION 14. TERMINATION OF ASSISTANCE
14-1 VIOLATION OF REQUIREMENTS Assistance to participants who reside in HOPWA assisted housing programs may be terminated if the client violates DSHS HOPWA program requirements or conditions of occupancy. See HOPWA regulations, 24 CFR Part 574.310(2). Project Sponsors must establish a written policy of termination policies and procedures. Project Sponsors must

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ensure that supportive services are provided, so that a participant's assistance is terminated only in the most severe cases. The Project Sponsor must document in the client’s case file the supportive services that were offered and provided to the client. Project Sponsors must also ensure that the Client’s Right and Responsibilities Statement (Form D) is adhered to and the HOPWA Termination Form (Form N) is completed and a copy is given to the client. In terminating assistance to any client for violation of HOPWA program requirements, which include but not limited to:  Non-compliance with conditions of occupancy  Income-eligibility  Fraud Project Sponsors must establish a formal written policy and procedure that recognizes the rights of individuals receiving assistance to due process of law. This policy at a minimum, must consist of:  Providing the client with a written notice containing a clear statement of the reasons for termination;  Permitting the client to have a review of the decision, in which the client is given the opportunity to confront opposing witnesses, present written objections, and be represented by their own counsel, before a person other than the person (or a subordinate of that person) who made or approved the termination decision; and  Providing prompt written notification of the final decision to the client.

SECTION 15. HOPWA PROGRAM FORMS
15-1 HOPWA PROGRAM FORMS DSHS has provided forms and instructions to assist Project Sponsors to determine client eligibility for HOPWA assistance and if eligible, to enroll eligible individuals for HOPWA assistance. Project Sponsors are required to use the DSHS forms in administering the HOPWA program. The DSHS forms are coded on the bottom with the latest revision date. All old forms must be discarded, as they are no longer valid. All client forms must be maintained in the client's case file. The HOPWA program staff must ensure that all required forms are completed accurately. To determine client income eligibility, use the DSHS HOPWA Income Eligibility Packet:  Annual Gross and Adjusted Income Worksheet (Form A): is used to assess the client's income. If income exceeds low-income for the area, the client is not eligible for HOPWA assistance.  Suggested Forms of Income Verification and Documentation of Expenses (Attachment 1): lists the types of information and methods of documentation needed to verify the HOPWA applicant’s income and expenses.

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   

Income Exclusions (Attachment 2): lists the income that does not have to be included as gross income. Earned Income Disregard (EID) Worksheet (Form B): is used to determine eligibility and amount of deduction for a disabled individual/family receiving HOPWA assistance. Earned Income Disregard (EID) Instructions (Attachment 3): provides information regarding who qualifies for EID; how the initial and phase-in exclusion periods are determined; and how required documentation is maintained. Verification of No Income (Form C): is used by the HOPWA applicant to certify that he/she has no income.

If eligible for HOPWA, use the DSHS Client Enrollment Packet:    Client File Contents Checklist: is used to verify that required documentation is included in the client file by the HOPWA case manager. Client Rights and Responsibilities Statement (Form D, also in Spanish) : is used to verify that the client acknowledges his/her rights and responsibilities in the HOPWA program. Consent to Release and/or Obtain Confidential Information (Form E, also in Spanish): is used to ensure that all information obtained or released in connection with the services provided to any HOPWA client is disclosed only with the client’s signed consent. Demographic/Statistical Information (Form F): is used to gather the client and beneficiary demographic and statistical information for federal reporting purposes. Housing Quality Standards (HQS) Certification (Form G, also in Spanish): is used to document housing quality standard inspections for TBRA households, selfcertification for STRMU households, and certify receipt of the Lead-Based Paint and Fair Housing Pamphlets. Rent Reasonableness Checklist and Certification (Form H): is used to verify rent reasonableness of TBRA households. TBRA Worksheet (Form I): is used to compute the client's TBRA amount of assistance and client rent portion. Sharing Housing Rent Calculation Worksheet (Form J): is used to determine if the HOPWA applicant can be assisted under shared housing. Comprehensive Housing Plan (Form K, also in Spanish): is used to assist identify client’s housing needs, short-term and long-term goals and action steps to establish housing stability, and monitor and track referrals offered and used. STRMU Worksheet (Form L): is used to compute the client's STRMU assistance. STRMU 21-week Tracking Worksheet (Form M): is used to track the amount of STRMU assistance to ensure it does not exceed 21 weeks (147 days) or the established Annual STRMU Cap. HOPWA Termination Form (Form N, also in Spanish): is completed for all clients either at the end of the period of assistance or at termination.

 

      

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Failure to Accept the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8)/Other Housing Waiver (Form O): is used to apply for a waiver to require the client to accept Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8)/other affordable housing on behalf of the client.

SECTION 16. PROGRAM REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
16-1 QUARTERLY REPORTS The AA and Project Sponsors (through the AA) must submit quarterly cumulative progress reports to DSHS. The HOPWA Quarterly Report and DSHS Exhibit A can be found at http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/fieldops/page9.shtm. Quarterly Reports are used to produce the required annual progress report to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The project-reporting period each year begins on February 1 and ends January 31 of the next calendar year. The Project Report is due within 20 days after the end of each quarter. The schedule of due dates is available on the coversheet of the Quarterly Report. 16-2 PROJECT SPONSOR DATA SHEETS Project Sponsor data sheets (Appendix E) are used to establish and monitor DSHS HOPWA program activities in HUD’s Integrated Disbursement and Information System (IDIS) database. Project Sponsor Data Sheets are due no later than February 1 of each HOPWA project year and must be submitted at anytime during the year when there is a change in Project Sponsor or in the funding levels or program budget for Project Sponsors. Reports and Project Sponsor Data Sheets must be submitted to DSHS Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us.

SECTION 17. HUD TABLES
17-1 All Project Sponsors must use the current HUD table when assessing income and TBRA/STRMU: a. Fair Market Rent (FMR) Table: sets maximum amounts to be used in computing TBRA/STRMU http://www.huduser.org/datasets/fmr.html or see the DSHS website: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/hopwa/default.shtm) Income Limits Table: shows income limits according to family size and is used to assess income eligibility for HOPWA assistance. http://www.huduser.org/datasets/il.html (or see the DSHS website link above).

b.

SECTION 18. PROGRAM TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
18-1 PROGRAM TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.

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Project Sponsors who have program questions or need program technical assistance may contact their Administrative Agency. Administrative Agencies may contact DSHS.

HIV/STD Comprehensive Services Branch P.O. Box 149347 Austin, TX 78714-9347 Main: 512-533-3000 Fax: 512-371-4672 DSHS HIV/STD Program website http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/default.shtm DSHS HOPWA website http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/hivstd/hopwa/default.shtm

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APPENDICES

A. Comparison of DSHS HOPWA Programs B. Using HOPWA funds for mobile homes C. Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) Application Process and Accounting Guidelines D. Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) Application Form E. HOPWA Project Sponsor Data Sheet F. Frequently Asked Questions

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APPENDIX A COMPARISON OF DSHS HOPWA PROGRAMS STRMU Program Short-term rent, mortgage, and utility payments to prevent homelessness of the tenant or mortgagor of a dwelling. This program enables income-eligible individuals at risk of becoming homeless to receive short-term assistance for a period not to exceed 21 weeks (147 days) in any 52 week period. Minimum Eligibility- low income, HIVpositive, already be housed and have an emergency situation. Limited to 21 weeks worth of assistance in any 52-week period. May place a restrictive Annual STRMU Cap per client. Must have a Comprehensive Housing Plan Can pay rent, mortgage and/or utility payments. Utilities assessed separately, if applicable. Client contributes a portion, if applicable. TBRA Program Tenant-based rental assistance, including assistance for shared housing arrangements. It assists income-eligible clients living with HIV/AIDS and have on-going housing needs with their rent and utilities until they are able to secure Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) housing or other affordable stable housing. Minimum Eligibility- low income, HIVpositive. Maximum 12 months of assistance at certification, with income recertification every year. Must have a Comprehensive Housing Plan Rental assistance only. Cannot pay more than the FMR, including utilities. Utilities included. Client contributes the highest of 10% of gross or 30% of adjusted income, or the amount of welfare or other assistance designated for rent. An individual/family may rent a larger than authorized unit if: (1) the rent is at or below the Fair Market Rent (FMR) for the authorized unit size; or (2) the individual/family decides to pay the rental amount above the FMR. Property must be inspected and meet HUD Housing Quality Standards. Project Sponsor must pay difference between actual rent or Fair Market Rent or reasonable rent (whichever is lower) and tenant rent. Document evidence of rent reasonableness. Cannot pay more than the FMR, including utilities. Client pays his/her portion of rent directly to landlord and Project Sponsor pays balance directly to landlord. No payments can be made directly to the client. If more than one unrelated client in a household, each client may receive assistance based on their share of the rent. Families receive benefits as a unit.

Project Sponsor pays rent, mortgage and/or utilities up to maximum of 21-weeks (147 days) or Annual STRMU Cap per client per year, if applicable.

Project Sponsor can set maximum Annual STRMU Cap on amount of assistance per client per year (no less than 1 month of FMR and no more than STRMU budget per client per year. Client pays his/her portion of rent directly to landlord and Project Sponsor pays balance directly to landlord. No payments can be made directly to the client. If more than one unrelated client in a household, each client may receive assistance based on their share of the rent.

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Does not include telephone. Utility or rent deposits are not allowable. HUD Housing Quality Standards inspection is not required but clients must self-certify on Form D that the unit is safe, decent, and sanitary. STRMU households cannot continue to receive HOPWA assistance in substandard housing. Client must be offered appropriate supportive services through case management. Late and/or reconnect fees allowed. Supportive Services (may be provided either in conjunction or not in conjunction with HOPWA housing assistance) May be used to provide case management, smoke detectors, and basic telephone services, as needed to access supportive services and medical care. Assistance may also be extended for reasonable costs of longdistance services, if needed, for connecting clients in rural or small population areas. Case Management and basic telephone service may be used to assist all incomeeligible, HIV positive individuals. Smoke detectors may only be provided to clients with a mortgage.

Does not include telephone. Utility or rent deposits are not allowable. Inspection and certification of property must be conducted in compliance with state and local housing standards and HUD Housing Quality Standards. Client must be offered appropriate supportive services through case management. No late and/or reconnect fees allowed. Permanent Housing Placement

May be used to provide reasonable security deposits (not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent), costs for related application fees and credit checks. Includes all types of security deposits for rent, utilities, etc.

May be used to assist all income-eligible and HIV positive individuals.

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APPENDIX B Using HOPWA funds for Mobile Homes Purpose: The intent of the information presented below is to support the use of Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funds for tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA) or short-term rent, mortgage, and/or utility assistance (STRMU) payments for eligible persons living in manufactured housing. Because the HOPWA program allows flexibility in its application, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Office of HIV/AIDS Housing has determined that HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) guidelines may be referenced to support the use of HOPWA funds for manufactured home rental and mortgage payments. The following are excerpts from the HUD Notice CPD 03-05 and for your reference, can be downloaded from http://www.hudclips.org/sub_nonhud/cgi/pdfforms/03-5c.doc/ From Notice: CPD 03-05 Issued: March 11, 2003 Expires: March 11, 2004 Cross References: Supersedes CPD 94-17 Subject: Guidance on Manufactured Housing under the HOME Program Section III. Background and Eligible Activities

Manufactured homes and manufactured housing lots (also called “homesites” in this Notice) qualify as housing under the HOME Program. A manufactured home is defined as “a structure, transportable in one or more sections which, in the traveling mode, is eight body feet or more in width or forty body feet or more in length, or, when erected on site, is three hundred twenty or more square feet, and which is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities, and includes the plumbing, heating, air-conditioning, and electrical systems contained therein.” A mobile home is a manufactured home. “Mobile home” and “trailer” were commonly used terms before 1976 when Congress adopted legislation using the term “manufactured home” to take their place. This Notice uses the term manufactured home to refer to all types of nonmotorized manufactured housing units (thus excluding recreational vehicles) that meet the definition in 24 CFR 3280.2. HOPWA funds can be used to: Provide tenant-based rental assistance to tenants who rent manufactured housing or rent the home site on which the household’s manufactured home is located.  Provide short-term rent, mortgage, and utility emergency assistance to qualified tenants who rent or own manufactured housing.

The following HOME regulations apply to the use of HOPWA TBRA and STRMU funds:

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Section IV.

Utility Hook-up and the Homesite

The HOME regulation at §92.205(a)(4) requires manufactured homes assisted with HOME funds (except for existing, owner-occupied manufactured homes that are rehabilitated with HOME funds) to be connected to permanent utility hookups. The HOME regulations also require the manufactured home to be located on land that is owned by the manufactured home owner or on land for which the manufactured home owner has a lease such as, a mobile home park. Section V. Permanent Foundations

The manufactured home regulations (24 CFR 3282.12) define a site-built permanent foundation as “a system of supports, including piers, either partially or entirely below grade,” and that meets the criteria as further defined in §3282.12. HUD Handbook 4930.3G, Permanent Foundations Guide for Manufactured Housing, further defines a permanent foundation as one that “must be constructed of durable materials at the site, with attachment points to receive a manufactured home.” …once the manufactured home is set on a permanent foundation, it is treated as real property and ownership then is evidenced through title to the real property, therefore eligible for HOPWA STRMU assistance. The HOME final rule published on September 16, 1996, eliminated the requirement that HOMEassisted manufactured housing units rest upon a permanent foundation.

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APPENDIX C PERMANENT HOUSING PLACEMENT (PHP) APPLICATION PROCESS AND ACCOUNTING GUIDELINES Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) enables Project Sponsors to assist eligible clients secure new and permanent housing through the assistance of reasonable security deposits (not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent) and costs for related application fees and credit checks. Agencies that wish to offer PHP to eligible clients should make this decision based upon:  Funds available for the HOPWA program  Clients’ needs  Fiscal capacity to maintain accounting records In order to qualify for PHP, Project Sponsors must:  Complete the application for PHP and submit to the Administrative Agency (and AA submits application to DSHS on behalf of Project Sponsors for approval at Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us)  Obtain accounting technical assistance from DSHS through the DSHS Contract Oversight and Support (COS) unit  Follow the DSHS Accounting Guidelines for documenting and maintaining PHP activities  Submit revised Project Sponsor Data Sheets to DSHS Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us. Security deposits are an allowable cost to the extent the cost conforms with the general policies and principles stated in Uniform Grants Management Standards, Attachment A and Attachment B, Section 40. Adequate records and supporting documentation must be maintained for all deposits. A record of individual deposits should be maintained in a subsidiary ledger that is posted to the general ledger. The subsidiary ledger should be reconciled on a monthly basis to the general ledger control account. Outlays for security deposits will be reflected as assets until returned to the grantee. Any funds returned to the grantee will be treated as applicable credits towards program expenses in the year recovered. The cash outlay for a deposit will require the following entries: DR: Deposits (expense) CR: Cash (asset) DR: Deposits (asset) CR: Deposits Contra-account (asset) The refund of a deposit will require the following entries: DR: Cash (asset) CR: Deposits (revenue) DR: Deposits Contra-account (asset) CR: Deposits (assets) Deposits held/used to pay for rent, utilities, etc. should be accounted for by the following entries: DR: Deposits Contra-account (asset) CR: Deposits (asset) Deposit refunds (credits) should be reported on the Program Income line on Form 269a, Financial Status Report. Questions about accounting for security deposits should be addressed to the DSHS Contract Oversight and Support, Financial Technical Assistance Group at 512-4587484 or by e-mail to COSta@dshs.state.tx.us

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APPENDIX D PHP Application Form Instructions: If a Project Sponsor wishes to provide Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) for reasonable security deposits (not to exceed the amount equal to 2 months of rent) and costs for related application fees and credit checks, the Project Sponsor must complete the information below and provide a justification for requesting PHP and submit to the AA. The Administrative Agency must electronically submit the Application for PHP on behalf of the Project Sponsor to the Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us. The Project Sponsor and AA must receive technical assistance from DSHS COS, receive final DSHS approval for PHP, comply with DSHS accounting guidelines, and submit a revised Project Sponsor Data Sheet to Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us.

DSHS HOPWA Application for Permanent Housing Placement (PHP) AA Name, Contact, Phone Project Sponsor Name Contact, and Phone Project Year $ Amount for PHP Number of clients to be served by PHP

Justification for request:

For DSHS Use Only Received by Field Ops Date Recipient’s Name and Signature COS to enter Names and title of TA participants at the AA and Project Sponsor level: The program shall ensure AA submits the following documents to the program and CMU after final approval: Revised Project Sponsor Data Sheet

Received by COS

Approved by COS

DSHS Comments:

Final DSHS Approval

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APPENDIX E HOPWA PROJECT SPONSOR DATA SHEET INSTRUCTIONS: The AA completes the Project Sponsor Data sheet on each HOPWA Project Sponsor and submits to DSHS no later than February 1 of each HOPWA project year and as changes in Project Sponsors and contract or budget amounts occur, via the reporting mailbox at Hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us.
Administrative Agency Project Sponsor Street address Mailing address Phone Contact Person Employer Identification Number (EIN) or Tax Identification Number (TIN) Congressional District of Business Location of Project Sponsor Zip Code(s) of Primary Service Area(s) Is the sponsor a nonprofit organization? Select all that apply to the project sponsor Selection process for project sponsor Date City, State, Zip City, State, Zip Fax Email DUN & Bradstreet Number (DUNS) if applicable Congressional District(s) of Primary Service Area(s) City(ies) and County(ies) of Primary Service Area(s) Yes No If yes, is sponsor faith-based organization? Yes If yes, is sponsor grassroots organization? Yes Minority Organization1 Minority Provider2 Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Certified Competitive RFP Sole source Single Source Amount Budgeted for Project Period No No

Program Activity STRMU TBRA Supportive Services3 Permanent Housing Placement Administration Total
1

Goals for Project Period # of Households to be Served

Minority Organization is one whose Board of Directors is made up of 50% racial or ethnic minority members. Minority provider is defined as:  has documented history of providing service to the targeted racial/ethnic minority community(ies) to be served; and  located in or near the targeted racial/ethnic minority community they are intended to serve; and  has documented linkages to the targeted racial/ethnic minority populations, so that they can help close the gap in access to services for highly impacted communities of color; and provides services in a manner that is culturally and linguistically appropriate. 3 Includes Supportive Services provided in conjunction and not in conjunction with HOPWA housing assistance.
2

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APPENDIX F FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

I. QUESTIONS RELATED TO ELIGIBILITY

1.

What is income eligibility? Anyone whose income is below 80% of the median income for the area is eligible for the program. A Project Sponsor may set a percentage below the 80% for income eligibility if a written policy is established, approved by the AA, and applied in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner. Does HOPWA allow for conditional eligibility? No. A client is either eligible or not eligible. There is no flexibility in applying program eligibility requirements. Can an individual who is HIV-positive receive assistance under this program or must the disease be more advanced? HUD has determined that persons who are HIV+, without having a diagnosis of AIDS, are eligible for assistance as long as they meet the income criteria. The Project Sponsor may establish more restrictive eligibility criteria as needed. How can eligibility for STRMU be defined if the client’s name is not on the lease agreement? With regard to eligibility for STRMU, the 06-07 STRMU Notice states: “In order to receive STRMU assistance, there must be evidence of client tenancy or ownership and residency. To receive rental payments, the eligible person or a member of the resident household must present evidence that he is a named tenant under a valid lease or that he is a legal resident of the premises.” Possible sources of evidence of this include:  Documentation that the individual has been responsible for rental payments. Rental receipts, a cancelled check or a copy of a money order from the tenant to the landlord would satisfy this condition.  A late payment notice or any other written communication from the landlord to the tenant that provides evidence of tenancy would also be satisfactory.  If not named on the lease, any written documentation from the landlord that the individual is a legal resident of the property.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Can a person simultaneously receive TBRA and STRMU assistance? No. However, an eligible individual may receive multiple HOPWA services in the 52-week client eligibility period. Can a person be on the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) and also receive HOPWA housing assistance? No. If a client is receiving the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) housing assistance payments, he/she is not eligible to receive HOPWA housing assistance including TBRA

6.

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and STRMU. However, clients may also receive Supportive Services and Permanent Housing Placement as these are eligible expenditures (CFR 574.300(b)(7). 7. Can a person receive HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance and HOPWA housing assistance at the same time? No. As with the Housing Choice Voucher program (Section 8), a client is not eligible to receive HOPWA housing assistance at the same time with other federal housing assistance programs. This would be “double dipping.” However, clients may also receive Supportive Services and Permanent Housing Placement as these are eligible expenditures (CFR 574.300(b)(7). How is zero income verified? There are three acceptable methods of verifying any type of income. In order of preference, they are: (a) third party written or oral verification (e.g., pay stubs, letters); (b) review of documents (e.g., income tax returns, award letters): and (c) selfcertification. The last method is the least preferred method of verifying. If the client cannot verify income with the first two methods, he or she may sign a statement certifying income status. A sample form has been included in Appendix G. Can a client have zero income and receive TBRA? Yes. Clients with zero income must have their situation documented and routinely reassessed.

8.

9.

10. Are property taxes an eligible HOPWA cost? No. The contract between HUD and DSHS allows funds to be used for TBRA and STRMU assistance only. Unless taxes are part of a mortgage payment, payment of taxes is ineligible. 11. Can HOPWA assistance be denied to clients who are active substance abusers? HOPWA assistance should not be denied simply because a client uses or is alleged to use or abuse illegal drugs in their place of residence, or because he or she refuses to enter drug treatment services. Client eligibility must be based on the criteria specified in the eligibility sections of this manual. The Case Manager should make referrals to assist the client in receiving the appropriate treatment and supportive services. The owner of the rental property certainly has the right to prohibit illegal acts on his or her property, and has the right to notify law enforcement officials when needed or to initiate eviction proceedings when a client has violated lease provisions.

II. QUESTIONS RELATED TO A FAMILY OR ROOMMATE 12. What is the difference between roommates and family? An applicant must identify those living in his/her home as either family or roommates when applying for assistance, or at renewal. A roommate relationship is established for the purposes of sharing rent and utility bills in return for receiving a share of the space

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available. A family relationship is based on responsibility for the care and well-being of others and may be a dependent relationship. A person who is not a relative by blood or marriage can be considered a "family" member if they are important to the "care or wellbeing" of a person with HIV. (This is not the same as a live-in aide who is a person compensated for providing care to the person with HIV.) NOTE: A roommate or live-in aide cannot change status to a "family" member after the death of a HOPWA client in order to receive survivor benefits. 13. Are an elderly parent and adult child a family? Yes. Income of both persons must be included to establish eligibility. There is an income deduction for persons age 62 or over. See Form A. 14. Can a client rent a room from his own family? No. The shared housing regulations at 24 CFR 882.315 state that "an assisted person may not be related to a resident owner." This means that a client may not rent a room from a relative and then request rental assistance. The family, however, may be eligible to receive HOPWA assistance if they are low income. HUD regulation 24 CFR 82.306 (d) does not allow housing assistance to a unit if the owner is the parent, grandparent, grandchild, sister, brother or any member of the family unless it is determined that approving the unit would provide ‘reasonable accommodation’ for a family member who is a person with disabilities. A reasonable accommodation would permit a ‘person with disabilities’ including persons with HIV/AIDS to receive benefits when housed with a family member who owns or rents the housing unit if it is determined by a physician that living with the family member is important to the client’s overall health and well-being. In such situations because of this reasonable accommodation determination, the family’s income is not to be counted in determining the eligibility of the low-income person with disabilities for a STRMU or TBRA payment. Such payments are based on the number of bedrooms that the person with disabilities occupies in the home and must be reasonable for the type and nature of the housing arrangement, and similar to the reasonable rental fees available in comparable unassisted units. 15. Can a client rent property from a family member? Yes, but the client cannot rent from the family member if the family member also lives on the property. The purpose of the program is to provide housing assistance to persons with HIV/AIDS and their families who are in need of housing assistance. Reasonable accommodations are required to be made to assist families including persons with disabilities. It is not intended to reimburse families for expenses incurred while taking care of their HIV-infected family member. 16. If someone is married and both people receive Social Security or other income, with one spouse being the sole care giver for the other, do we have to include the caregiver's income in the computation? Yes. A married partner cannot be considered as a live-in aide. Regulations at 24 CFR 813.102 define a live-in aide as a person who resides with an elderly, disabled, or handicapped person or persons and who (a) is determined to be essential to the care and well-being of the person(s); (b) is not obligated to support the person(s); and (c) would not be living in the unit except to provide necessary supportive services.

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17. Can a HOPWA applicant with a child who does not live with him/her, include the child as part of the household? No, the dependent child must live in the household at least 51% of the time. 18. Can a HOPWA applicant reduce his gross income if he pays $300 per month for child support? Can he deduct the amount from his gross income? No, the applicant’s child support is not included in the Gross Income Exclusions Form (Attachment 2). 19. Does income earned by a child count as household income? Earned income for family members under the age of 18 is not counted as income to the Household. 20. A male/male or male/female live together as a family unit, one is HIV+, the other is not. The HIV+ individual receives HOPWA emergency assistance as a family unit. If the other person then becomes positive and applies for services, is that person eligible for up to 21 weeks of emergency assistance even though he/she receives assistance directly as a family member? No, the 21 weeks of assistance are based on the family and cannot be doubled or otherwise increased. 21. If two clients live together and receive HOPWA rental assistance and claim their relationship to be that of “roommates” but then decide to get married, what type of documentation is needed to change their status on the HOPWA application? Reapplication is required with client signatures certifying the information is accurate. 22. What happens to the family of a client who was receiving TBRA at the time of his/her death? The Project Sponsor needs to have a policy that establishes a reasonable grace period for surviving beneficiaries of TBRA clients. The grace period must be a minimum of one month at the time of death and must not exceed 12 months from the time of death. It is advisable to limit this benefit to 2- 4 months of assistance.

III. QUESTIONS RELATED TO STRMU 23. Under the STRMU Program, can we pay rent, mortgage and/or utility bills for clients that predate their enrollment in HOPWA? For example, if a client began HOPWA in January, can we pay December bills? Yes, previous, verifiable balances can be paid for months that predate a client’s certification and enrollment into the STRMU Program. This also applies if the bills predate the start date of the contract period. For example, if the client is certified for assistance in February and has incurred verifiable, outstanding bills from January of the prior contract year, this client may be assisted with the prior bills in order to prevent homelessness. Thus, from the point of view of the eligible client’s period of need, there is meant to be a “seamless” housing assistance service even though a contract timeframe is crossed. From an accounting perspective, the predating bills would be charged on the

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current project year’s budget. As required, Form M the 21-week tracking worksheet must be used to ensure that the 21 weeks of assistance is not exceeded and the 52- week client eligibility period is defined as the date the first payment was made. In this example, the 52- week client eligibility period would start from the first day the payment was made in February until February of the following year, even the payments were made for January bills. 24. When a client begins receiving STRMU, an agency can pay utilities for the previous month(s). What if a client starts the program in June and receives utility reimbursement for that month plus the previous months of April and May that were past due? Does this count as one month of assistance or three months? The 21-week time limitation under the STRMU program is based on the date the first payment was made. Therefore, if the unpaid utility bills cover a period of 12 weeks of assistance then that will constitute 12 out of the 21 weeks for which assistance can be provided. 25. In regard to the 21-week rule for STRMU, what happens when the 21st week is in the middle of a month? You cannot exceed the 21-weeks worth of assistance for STRMU. The client will need to pay the balance of what is due. 26. What constitutes an emergency? An emergency is a situation that is short-term in nature and one that the case manager has reason to believe will put the client at risk of becoming homeless. To receive STRMU assistance a client must provide verifiable evidence of the outstanding obligation and evidence of his/her inability to make the monthly payments. See Section 9-2(f). 27. To document STRMU need, is a default notice or eviction action required, as these can add late fees to our costs? Documentation in the form of a default/late payment notice is not required to demonstrate emergency housing need for STRMU. A late payment notice is only one of the methods that can be used to verify the debt; there may be a variety of other ways to verify amounts owed, including calling the utility company, landlord, or mortgage company directly prior to a late payment notice being issued, and thereby avoiding adding late fees as additional costs. This could involve a record of actual monthly bills for reoccurring cost, and evidence of the limited nature of household income along with limited available financial resources (i.e. balance on bank accounts). This could involve a case manager's assessment of "need" which includes a variety of elements such as current, previous and future month's financial situation/forecast, employment/benefits circumstances, and HIV/AIDS health-related conditions. A household budget review of these costs, and assessment of inability to meet such costs, could be done by a housing case manager as part of this documentation of this record. 28. What are examples of circumstances an applicant may experience that may result in the need for emergency assistance in spite of having ongoing income sources? The applicant may be unable to pay rent, mortgage, utilities because (a) the applicant is unable to work due to recent hospitalization and, therefore, received significantly less pay and unable to cover expenses; (b) the applicant had to recently purchase unexpected

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costly HIV medications or pay for unexpected medical expenses out of pocket; (c) the applicant was not hospitalized but too ill to work in the recent past according to a physician’s statement, and the client did not have a position where sick and annual leave was accrued; (d) the applicant left employment, has been declared presumptively eligible for disability benefits in writing, and is pending commencement of benefits; (e) the applicant has attempted, but been unsuccessful in collecting child support legally owed the applicant. 29. If an agency provides one month of STRMU assistance in March, then another month in September, then another month in December, do they need to fill out a termination form each time? No. A Termination form (Form N) only has to be completed at the end of the period of assistance or at termination. The Termination form is a tool to assist Project Sponsors in tracking information that must be reported to HUD. 30. Can the Project Sponsor develop their own system to track the number of weeks a client is in the STRMU program within a 52-week period? No. The Project Sponsor must use the DSHS calendar day method using the client’s first payment date to determine the 52-week period. The calendar day method is used because it is the most accurate method with minimal rounding and HUD requires all Project Sponsors to use the same method of tracking and must be applied uniformly and consistently for all Project Sponsors. 31. Does HUD permit a waiver of the 21-week time limitation for STRMU? HUD regulations permit a waiver to be granted through the HUD Headquarters office on a case-by-case basis and approval can only be granted by the HUD Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development. HUD approval is rare and extraordinary and should not be expected by anyone assisted under this program. 32. Is a Project Sponsor required to set an Annual STRMU Cap? No. The Project Sponsor may choose to set an Annual STRMU Cap based on available funds and clients’ needs. If an Annual STRMU Cap is established, it must be in approval with the AA, applied in a uniform, consistent, and non-discriminatory manner, and follow DSHS’ Annual STRMU Cap formula. The Annual STRMU Cap can be used to calculate a monthly cap amount for clients and is also useful if the Project Sponsor wants to restrict eligibility for STRMU assistance to less than the 21-week period. See Section 10-12. 33. If a STRMU payment is made for previous months, how is that tracked? A client’s 52-week eligibility period starts the first day a STRMU payment is made. If a STRMU payment is made on November 1 for the previous 2 months, the client’s eligibility period remains the same and runs 52 weeks from the first day the payment was made. In terms of tracking the amount of assistance, the amounts paid for September and October should be tracked as assistance for September and October in the STRMU 21week tracking worksheet. The client period should start the first day of the STRMU payment and the client cannot receive more than 21-weeks worth of assistance. 34. Is it the responsibility of the Project Sponsor to inspect a client’s housing for STRMU?

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No. An inspection is not required for STRMU but the client must assure the Project Sponsor that the property is safe and decent and sign Form D to self-certify. The case manager needs to ask some questions to confirm this statement as the Project Sponsor is ultimately responsible to ensure that this is true. 35. Why do STRMU clients need a Comprehensive Housing Plan? All HOPWA clients are required to have a Comprehensive Housing Plan. Goals must be established for on-going housing stability for clients with referrals for access to medical treatment and supportive services. The purpose of the Comprehensive Housing Plan is to provide a tool for the client and case manager to achieve housing stability without longterm dependency on the HOPWA program. 36. What happens to the client’s family members if the client passes away after having received 20 weeks worth of STRMU assistance? The Project Sponsor needs to have a policy that establishes a reasonable grace period for surviving beneficiaries of STRMU clients. STRMU assistance must still be certified month to month and should not be understood as an automatic 21-weeks of assistance. The grace period must be a minimum of one month at the time of death and must not exceed 21 weeks from the time of death. It is advisable to limit this benefit to 2-4 months of assistance.

V. OTHER QUESTIONS

37. Can we prorate bills or rent when someone moves into a place or is approved for HOPWA after the first of the month, or do we wait until the next full month to start? Yes. You can pay for a partial month. 38. When someone is renting a room/bathroom with kitchen privileges, do we treat it the same as sharing an apartment with someone? Yes. However, in the event the client is renting a room in a Single Room Occupancy (SRO) facility, the rent standard is based on 75% of the rent standard for a 0-BR (studio) unit. 39. Is the rent for land to place a mobile trailer allowable for assistance? Yes, the cost of land is always included in rent or mortgage payments and therefore is allowable. See Appendix B. 40. Can HOPWA funds pay for a boat slip for a client living in a houseboat? Yes, if the boat slip provides water and utility connections. 41. Due to limited funds and with the approval of the AA, can a program elect to fund only STRMU and not TBRA? Project Sponsors must justify to the AA the reason for providing only STRMU. For example, an acceptable justification may be that another community organization is
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meeting the need for TBRA. Project Sponsors should not decide to provide only one service based on administrative purposes. The decision should be based on the needs of the community. 42. Is a Termination form required at the end of the year for TBRA clients continuing to the following year? No. Only TBRA clients that have been terminated require a Termination form. However, TBRA clients continuing to the following year must be re-certified annually for eligibility. 43. Does HOPWA allow the use of funds for late and reconnect fees? Yes. Late and reconnect fees are allowable under STRMU only and not under TBRA. 44. Can a Project Sponsor choose not to pay late and/or reconnect fees? Yes, if the Project Sponsor has a policy stating that it will not pay late and/or reconnect fees in the HOPWA program and the policy must be approved by the AA. 45. Is it necessary to obtain rental receipts? No. It is not necessary that Project Sponsors obtain rental receipts from the landlords. However, rental receipts are necessary as evidence of tenancy if the client’s name is not on the lease or a lease is not available. Leases must be maintained in each client file. Also, accounting records must be maintained which document monthly payments made to landlords on behalf of the client. If TBRA payments are made to individuals/partnership who are landlords (as opposed to corporations), the HOPWA Project Sponsor is required to file 1099 statements at the end of the tax year. 46. When a formal lease agreement is not available, what type of documentation is needed for HOPWA assistance? A letter signed and dated by the landlord and the client is acceptable if it contains the following information: address of unit, amount of rent, due date of rent, period covered by the lease, whether utilities are included in the rent and the address and phone number of the landlord or other individual to whom payment is to be made. 47. Does the FAIR Market Rents table (FMRs) used to compute HOPWA assistance include utilities? Yes, FMRs includes rent and all utilities except phone. 48. What are the penalties for clients receiving HOPWA who violate their lease? The client may be terminated if the client violates the terms of their lease/rental agreement. All termination policies and procedures must be followed. If the client is evicted, the client may apply for Permanent Housing Placement assistance. 49. What is the liability of the Project Sponsor under the housing quality standards? None. The inspection is not a declaration to the client that his home is a safe environment and should not be represented that way. The HQS is a qualifying criteria for receiving the service, just as is low income. In addition, the HQS form states that the person doing the inspection has inspected the property to the best of his/her ability only.

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This does not imply any professional liability. Only STRMU clients must self-certify on the form that the housing is safe, decent, and sanitary. 50. How does the contractor ensure compliance with the smoke detector without inspections? TBRA requires a smoke detector inspection prior to the client residing on the premises. A signed statement from the client or a third party verification from the landlord that there is an operational smoke detector is acceptable. 51. Is the HOPWA Program able to pay long distance phone charges? Yes, but only at the program’s discretion and if needed. Under Supportive Services, reasonable costs for long-distance services, if needed, may be extended for clients in rural or small population areas to connect clients to supportive services and/or medical care. Basic telephone services must be paid as a Supportive Services expense. 52. Is a Project Sponsor required to allow assistance for security deposits? No. The Project Sponsor may choose to allow Permanent Housing Placement Services based on available funds, clients’ needs, and fiscal capacity to maintain accounting records. See Section 12-5. 53. Can a Project Sponsor pay utility deposits as a Permanent Housing Placement service? Yes. All types of security deposits are eligible as a PHP service, including rent, utilities, etc. 54. What if accepting the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) would place an undue burden on the client? For example: a) Client would have to move away from family members who are necessary for client’s care and support. b) Client would have to move but is too sick at the time to move. c) Client cannot find a suitable residence that will accept the Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8). Yes. A waiver (Form N) is required if the client cannot accept the Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) at the time offered. A justification must detail the reasons for declining the housing and must be approved by the AA. 55. Does a client who has been terminated have the right to reapply for HOPWA for the following month? Yes. The Project Sponsor must have a policy that determines the length of time that a client will have to wait to reapply for HOPWA after termination. 56. Can you pay for the first month’s rent out of TBRA if a client pays for the security deposit? Yes. The first month’s rent is not a security deposit, so TBRA can be used to pay for the first month of rent. Permanent Housing Placement can also be used to assist clients to pay for the security deposit and, if eligible, TBRA can then be used to assist the client with the first month’s rent.

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IV. QUESTIONS RELATED TO PROJECT REPORTING 57. What is a unit of service for HOPWA? A unit of service would be one TBRA payment or one STRMU payment (any combination of rent/utilities or mortgage/utilities). 58. Do the reports submitted to DSHS by HOPWA Project Sponsors provide cumulative numbers of unduplicated clients (individuals and family units) served during the reporting period? How do we determine an unduplicated client? Yes, the Project Sponsor reports to DSHS cumulative numbers of unduplicated numbers served during the reporting period. An unduplicated client is a client counted only once during the reporting period, even if the client received more than one service or entered the program more than once during the reporting period.

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EXHIBIT “B” LINE ITEM BUDGET SUMMARY OF HOPWA EXPENDITURES WORK PLAN

19

EXHIBIT “B-1” COST ALLOCATION PLAN (CAP)

20

EXHIBIT “C” HIV SERVICES INVOICE

21

Bexar County Ryan White Program Invoice / Billing Packet
INVOICE #
Amendment # Revision Date Place an "X" for Grant being billed

PROGRAM:

Part A - Formula Part A-(Supplemental) Part A-MAI Part B-Service Delivery Part B-SD (Supplemental) Part B-State Services H.O.P.W.A.

Name of Service Provider: Address:

Period covered: Service category you are billing for:
Health Insurance Prem & Cost Sharing Mental Health Services Substance Abuse Services (Outpatient) Case Management (Non-Med.) Medical Case Management Medical Transportation Services AIDS Pharm. Asst. (Local) Ambul./Outpatient Med. Care Early Intervention Services (E.I.S) $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

to

-

Emergency Financial Assistance Food Bank/Home Delv'd Meals Hospice Services Medical Nutrition Therapy Oral Health Care Housing Services Substance Abuse-Residential *Program Income*

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

Total Amount of Invoice

$

-

This represents current expenses for which Bexar County is being Invoiced. All supporting data is on file and available for inspection by Bexar County and other appropriate personnel. All appropriate entries have been made in the ARIES system as required. Prepared by: Signature of Preparer Preparer Phone # DATE Certified by: Signature of Authorized Personnel Printed Name & Title Printed Name & Title

Phone #

DATE

*************************************************************************************
Based upon review of this invoice and documentation submitted with this invoice I ( ) recommend ( ) do not recommend this invoice for processing

Bexar County Community Resources (Fiscal) Staff

DATE

Bexar County Community Resources Manager

DATE

EXHIBIT “C-1” H.O.P.W.A. PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT

22

HOPWA Program Progress Report Coversheet
HIV/STD Prevention and Care Services Branch Contractor and Report Information Agency Name: HSDA: Prepared By: Email: Phone #: Initial or Revised Report: Instructions Reports must be e-mailed in MS Word or PDF format to: hivstdreport.tech@dshs.state.tx.us Reporting Period Covered: ☐ Initial ☐ Revised Click here to enter a date.
to

Contract #: Project Sponsor: Title:

CC your: Services Consultant Nurse Consultant HOPWA Grant Coordinator/Program Specialist

February – April (3 months) May – July (3 months) August - October (3 months) November - January (3 months)

HOPWA Reporting Periods and Due Dates May 30 August 30 November 30 February 28 (this report is also the 12-month cumulative final program year-end report)

Page 1

DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Housing Opportunities for Persons With AIDS (HOPWA) Program Progress Report
Table of Contents
HOPWA Program Progress Report Coversheet ................................................................................................................................... 1 Overview, General Instructions, and Definitions .................................................................................................................................. 3 Instructions and Administrative Agency Summary Information ........................................................................................................ 6 Project Sponsor Information .................................................................................................................................................... 7 Part 1: Performance Measures Assessment and Narratives ............................................................................................................... 7 A. STATUS OF HOPWA WAITING LIST ............................................................................................................................ 7 B. PERFORMANCE MEASURES EVALUATION ............................................................................................................. 8 1. Reporting by Program Period .............................................................................................................................................. 8 NARRATIVE SECTION INSTRUCTIONS:.......................................................................................................................... 8 C. OUTPUTS REPORTED ...................................................................................................................................................... 8 D. OUTCOMES ASSESSED .................................................................................................................................................... 8 E. COORDINATION ................................................................................................................................................................ 9 F. BARRIERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ....................................................................................................................... 9 G. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ............................................................................................................................................ 10 Part 2: Information on HOPWA Clients, Beneficiaries, and Households ....................................................................................... 11 H. HOPWA ELIGIBLE CLIENTS ........................................................................................................................................ 11 I. SPECIAL NEEDS CLIENTS.............................................................................................................................................. 11 J. PRIOR LIVING SITUATION ........................................................................................................................................... 11 K. HOPWA BENEFICIARIES .............................................................................................................................................. 12 L. AGE AND GENDER OF BENEFICIARIES ................................................................................................................... 13 M. RACE AND ETHNICITY OF BENEFICIARIES .......................................................................................................... 14 N. HOUSEHOLD AREA MEDIAN INCOME ..................................................................................................................... 14 Part 3: Leveraged Information (To be completed in the Final Program Progress Report only) .................................................... 15 O. LEVERAGED HOUSEHOLDS ........................................................................................................................................ 15 P. LEVERAGED SOURCES BY PROGRAM ACTIVITY ................................................................................................ 15 1. Leveraged Sources ............................................................................................................................................................... 15 2. Program Income and Resident Rent Payments ............................................................................................................. 17 Part 4: STRMU Expense Summary (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only) ............................................. 18 Q. STRMU EXPENSE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................................... 18 Part 5: Listing of Supportive Services (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only) .......................................... 19 R. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES ................................................................................................................................................ 19 Part 6: HOPWA Performance Outcomes (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only) .................................... 20 S. TBRA HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES - Housing Stability: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Maintaining Housing Stability. Please note that at this time, HUD is not requiring PHP to be added to STRMU and TBRA Stability Outcomes. ................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 T. STRMU HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES - Prevention of Homelessness: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Reduced Risks of Homelessness (Short-Term Housing Assistance) .................................................................................... 20 U. ACCESS TO CARE AND SUPPORT OUTCOMES ...................................................................................................... 22 V. HOPWA HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES ............................................................................................................ 23 Appendix A: HOPWA Program Progress Report FAQs ................................................................................................................... 24

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Overview, General Instructions, and Definitions
OVERVIEW
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is emphasizing grantee performance and the use of client outcome measures in demonstrating program effectiveness. Towards this end, the HOPWA Program Report has been revised to incorporate new performance measure and other new reporting requirements. The report format is designed to help grantees and project sponsors aggregate results from the use of HOPWA resources: (1) to provide housing assistance as the annual output measure; and (2) to collect client information demonstrating the outcome for improved housing stability for this special needs population. HUD collaborated with grantees and technical assistance providers to implement the reporting information to measure this new performance outcome. This outcome measure will identify HOPWAassisted households that have been enabled to establish and/or better maintain a stable living environment in housing that is safe, decent, and sanitary (per the regulations at 24 CFR 574.310(b).) to reduce the risks of homelessness and improve access to health care and other support. Recipients need to assess accomplishments in achieving this outcome and report on program progress. These assessments will help inform the community as well as HUD in assessing past performance and helping to direct future efforts. Additionally, programs can use the information to consider alternatives or program enhancements if activities are not meeting the stated outcome. HUD collects the necessary information under the authority of the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (AHOA), as amended, 42 U.S.C. 12901-12912. This Act authorizes HUD to provide states and localities with the resources and incentives to devise long-term comprehensive strategies for meeting the housing needs of persons living with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and their families. The reports assist HUD in monitoring the use of federal funds and ensuring statutory and regulatory compliance. 1. 2a.

HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance
Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Permanent Housing Facilities: Received Operating Subsidies/Leased units Transitional/Short-term Facilities: Received Operating Subsidies Permanent Housing Facilities: Capital Development Projects placed in service during the operating year

[1] Outputs: Number of Households
1

2b.

3a.

3b.

Transitional/Short-term Facilities: Capital Development Projects placed in service during the operating year (N/A for Texas DSHS) Short-term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance Adjustment for duplication (subtract) TOTAL Housing Subsidy Assistance (Sum of Rows 1-4 minus Row 5) 1 1 1

4. 5. 6.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS
Purpose. The HOPWA Program Report fulfills statutory reporting requirements and provides DSHS with the necessary information to report program outcomes to HUD and to assess the overall performance and accomplishments of the Administrative Agency and Project Sponsors’ program activities under the approved goals and objectives. Assembly of Report. Project Sponsors must complete the report for each predesignated reporting period in which HOPWA grant funds were expended with quality assurance provided by the Administrative Agency. Information on each Project Sponsor is to be reported in a separate report and submitted by the Administrative Agency. The program progress reports should reflect year-todate performance for each project sponsor for the project year. The final program progress report will serve as the annual progress report. Record Keeping. Names and other individual information must be kept confidential, as required by 24 CFR 574.440. However, HUD reserves the right to review the information used to complete this report for grants management oversight purposes, except for recording any names and other identifying information. Information is reported in aggregate to HUD without personal identifications. Do not submit client or personal information in data systems to HUD.

Administrative Costs: Costs for general management, oversight, coordination, evaluation, and reporting. By statute, grantee administrative costs are limited to 3% of total grant award, to be expended over the life of the grant. Project sponsor administrative costs are limited to 7% of the portion of the grant amount they receive. Beneficiary(ies): All members of a household who received HOPWA assistance during the operating year including the one individual who qualified the household for HOPWA assistance as well as any other members of the household (with or without HIV) who benefitted from the assistance. Any individual(s) residing with the HOPWA Client whose income is not considered in the HOPWA Client’s income eligibility criteria is not considered a beneficiary, i.e. roommates, paid caregivers, live-in aides. Chronically Homeless Person: An individual or family who: (i) is homeless and lives or resides individual or family who: (i) Is homeless and lives or resides in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter; (ii) has been homeless and living or residing in a place not meant for human habitation, a safe haven, or in an emergency shelter continuously for at least 1 year or on at least 4 separate occasions in the last 3 years; and (iii) has an adult head of household (or a minor head of household if no adult is present in the household) with a diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability (as defined in section 102 of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 15002)), post-traumatic stress disorder, cognitive impairments resulting from a brain injury, or chronic physical illness or disability, including the cooccurrence of 2 or more of those conditions. Additionally, the statutory definition includes as chronically homeless a person who currently lives or resides in an institutional care facility, including a jail, substance abuse or mental health treatment facility, hospital or other similar facility, and has resided there for fewer than 90 days if such person met the other criteria for homeless prior to entering that facility. (See 42 U.S.C. 11360. Disabling Condition: Evidencing a diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability, chronic physical illness, or disability, including the co-occurrence of two or more of these conditions. In addition, a disabling condition may limit an individual’s ability to work or perform one or more activities of daily living. An HIV/AIDS diagnosis is considered a disabling condition. DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

DEFINITIONS
The HOPWA regulations provide definitions at 24 CFR 574.3. The following terms supplement these definitions for the use of preparing this Program Progress Report. Adjustment for Duplication: Enables the calculation of unduplicated output totals by accounting for the total number of households or units that received more than one type of HOPWA assistance in a given service category such as HOPWA Subsidy Assistance or Supportive Services. For example, if a client household received both TBRA and STRMU during the operating year, report that household in the category of HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance in Part 3, Chart 1, Column [1b] in the following manner:

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Domestic Violence Survivor: A self-reported current or past victim of domestic violence. Duplicated count: A household/client that received more than one HOPWA service in the same project year, i.e. a client received both STRMU and TBRA or a client received both HOPWA-funded Case Management and Smoke detectors. Entered the program: The point when the client’s eligibility and housing needs are assessed, housing plan is established, or the client or family starts to receive rental assistance. Faith-based organization: A nonprofit organization affiliated with a particular place of worship or faith, but established as a separate entity. Family: A household composed of two or more related persons. The term "family" also includes one or more eligible persons living with another person or persons who are determined to be important to their care or well being, and the surviving member or members of any family described in this definition who were living in a unit assisted under the HOPWA program with the person with AIDS at the time of his/her death. [24 CFR 574.3] Grassroots Organization: A “grassroots organization” means an organization that is headquartered in the local community to which it provides services; and, (i) has a social services budget of $300,000 or less, or (ii) has six or fewer fulltime equivalent employees. Local affiliates of national organizations are not considered “grassroots.” HOPWA Client: A person with HIV/AIDS who qualifies for and receives HOPWA assistance. HOPWA Eligible Individual: The one (1) low-income person with HIV/AIDS who qualifies a household for HOPWA assistance. This person may be considered “Head of Household.” When the CAPER asks for information on eligible individuals, report on this individual person only. Where there is more than one person with HIV/AIDS in the household, the additional PWH/A(s), would be considered a beneficiary(s). Household: A single individual or a family composed of two or more persons for which household incomes are used to determine eligibility and for calculation of the resident rent payment. The term is used for collecting data on changes in income, changes in access to services, receipt of housing information services, and outcomes on achieving housing stability. Live-In Aides (see definition for Live-In Aide) and non-beneficiaries (e.g. a shared housing arrangement with a roommate) who resided in the unit are not reported on in the CAPER. Housing Assistance Total: The non-duplicated number of households receiving housing subsidies and residing in units of facilities that were dedicated to persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families that were supported with HOPWA or leveraged funds during this operating year. (added 02/2011, taken from CAPER definitions) Housing Stability: The degree to which the HOPWA project assisted beneficiaries to remain in stable housing during the operating year. See Part 5: Determining Housing Stability Outcomes for definitions of stable and unstable housing situations. In-Kind Leveraged Resources: These involve additional types of support provided to assist HOPWA beneficiaries such as volunteer services, materials, use of equipment and building space. The actual value of the support can be the contribution of professional services, based on customary rates for this specialized support, or actual costs contributed from other leveraged resources. In determining a rate for the contribution of volunteer time and services, use the rate established in HUD notices, such as the rate of ten dollars per hour. The value of any donated material, equipment, building, or lease should be based on the fair market value at time of donation. Related documentation can be from recent bills of sales, advertised prices, appraisals, or other information for comparable property similarly situated. Leveraged Funds: The amount of funds expended during the operating year from non-HOPWA federal, state, local, and private sources by grantees or Page 4

sponsors in dedicating assistance to this client population. Leveraged funds or other assistance used directly in HOPWA program delivery. While other HOPWA funds may be used in conjunction with this grant, the amounts are not counted as leveraging and performance is reported under the applicable HOPWA grant. Live-In Aide: A person who resides with the HOPWA Eligible Individual and who meets the following criteria: (1) is essential to the care and well-being of the person; (2) is not obligated for the support of the person; and (3) would not be living in the unit except to provide the necessary supportive services. See the Code of Federal Regulations Title 24, Part 5.403 and the HOPWA Grantee Oversight Resource Guide for additional reference. Multiple Diagnosed Issues: A disease or condition, such as serious mental illness or substance abuse, co-existing with risk of homelessness for persons living with HIV/AIDS. Non-HOPWA supportive services: All other supportive services the HOPWA client receives related to HIV/AIDS and the client’s well-being, including medical care, transportation, food, drug treatment, social services, etc. Outcome Assessed: The HOPWA assisted households who have been enabled to establish or better maintain a stable living environment in housing that is safe, decent, and sanitary, (per the regulations at 24 CFR 574.310(b)); and to reduce the risks of homelessness, and improve access to HIV treatment and other health care and support. HUD’s national annual HOPWA goals are that 85% of TBRA clients will achieve housing stability and 60% of STRMUassisted clients will result in stable housing or reduced risks of homelessness. http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/ai dshousing Output Assessed: Output refers to the number of households assisted during the year, as measured by the annual use of HOPWA funds. Permanent Housing Placement Services: A supportive housing service that helps establish the household in the housing unit, including but not limited to reasonable costs for security deposits not to exceed two months of rent costs. Program (Project) Year: The DSHS HOPWA program year is always February 1- January 31. Program Income: Gross income directly generated from the use of HOPWA funds, including repayments. See grant administration requirements on program income for state and local governments at 24 CFR 85.25, or for non-profits at 24 CFR 84.24. Short-term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance (STRMU): A housing subsidy for short-term rent, mortgage, and utility payments to prevent homelessness of the tenant or mortgagor of a dwelling. This program enables assistance for a period not to exceed 21 weeks in any 52-week period. These payments are for eligible individuals and their household family members who are already in housing and who are at risk of becoming homeless. STRMU was previously known as Emergency Assistance in Texas. Supportive Services: DSHS-approved supportive services include case management for all HOPWA clients, and purchase of smoke detectors and telephone service. To the extent possible, case management for HOPWA clients should be funded through some source other than HOPWA (e.g., Ryan White Part A or Part B, State Services, or local funds). Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA): A housing subsidy for tenant based rental assistance, including assistance for shared housing arrangements. It assists income eligible clients with their rent and utilities until there is no longer a need, or until they are able to secure other affordable housing. TBRA was previously known as Rental Assistance in Texas. Transgender: Transgender is defined as a person who identifies with, or presents as, a gender that is different from his/her gender at birth. Veteran: A veteran is someone who has served on active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States. This does not include inactive military reserves or the National Guard unless the person was called up to active duty.

DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Year-to-Date (YTD): Cumulative information starting from the beginning of the project year up to the current reporting period.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Instructions and Administrative Agency Summary Information
Instructions:  AA: Complete a Reporting Coversheet for the AA, an AA Summary Information, and Exhibit A. Please review each Program Report to assure accuracy and completeness before submission. Do not cut and paste from previous reports (except for the final report). This must be reviewed and updated each time. The final Program Progress Report (only) should be a cumulative report for the entire project year/all 12 months of the program year (FebJan). Project Sponsor: Complete a Reporting Coversheet and a Program Report for each Project Sponsor. Do not aggregate Project Sponsor information. The final Program Progress Report (only) by Project Sponsor should be a cumulative report for the entire program year unless specifically noted to report by reporting period.

1.

Discuss any concerns related to staffing at the administrative agency level.

2.

Discuss any concerns and/or significant changes related to staffing at the Project Sponsor level (e.g. staff positions vacant longer than 90 days).

3.

Describe any needs assessments or other activities to solicit community input that occurred during the reporting period. Include public meetings/forums, advisory group meetings, ad hoc group meetings, web-based activities, and any major material distribution activities. (If appropriate, please attach copies of minutes and agendas to this report.)

4.

List and describe all monitoring, technical assistance, meeting facilitation, (such as QI meetings), etc. provided to Project Sponsors by the Administrative Agency during this reporting period.

5.

Describe coordination activity that occurred during the reporting period between the Administrative Agency and other service providers, including but not limited to: other housing programs, TB elimination programs, immunization programs, STD clinics, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), health care delivery systems, and Ryan White Parts A, C, and D.

6.

List and describe training provided by the Administrative Agency to Project Sponsors during this reporting period.

7.

Describe training/technical assistance (TA) needs expressed by Administrative Agency or Project Sponsor staff. Describe the steps taken to secure training/TA. If further assistance is required in securing training/TA, please provide details.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Project Sponsor Information
Instructions: Please complete Reporting Coversheet and a separate program report for each project sponsor. Report year-todate information for each reporting period; the final program report serves as the annual report. Please review responses to assure accuracy and completeness before submission. The colored cells indicate numbers that should match. The final Program Progress Report is a cumulative 12-month program report for February 1 – January 31, unless the item specifically indicates it is by program reporting period. Legend for Color-Coded Cells/Boxes Total # Unduplicated Clients Served with Housing Subsidy Assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP) – does not include SS Total # Unduplicated Clients Served with only with SS (did not receive TBRA, STRMU, or PHP in this project year) Total # All Unduplicated Beneficiaries (all members of a household who received HOPWA assistanceincluding client) Total # Unduplicated Beneficiaries NOT including HOPWA clients Total # Unduplicated Clients that received Supportive Services with or without having received TBRA, STRMU, and or PHP assistance Goal for Total # of Unduplicated Client to Serve with Housing Subsidy Assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP)

Part 1: Performance Measures Assessment and Narratives
A. STATUS OF HOPWA WAITING LIST Provide the current number of HOPWA-eligible individuals on the waiting list for STRMU and TBRA. 1. Assessment of Unmet Need for HOPWA-eligible Households (On Waitlist) 1. Total number of households that have unmet housing needs From Item 1, identify the number of households with unmet housing needs by type of housing assistance a. Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) b. Short-Term Rent, Mortgage and Utility payments (STRMU) Total: • Assistance with rental costs • Assistance with mortgage payments • Assistance with utility costs.

Does Project Sponsor maintain a waiting list? If yes, explain how this list is administered:

Yes

No

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

B. PERFORMANCE MEASURES EVALUATION 1. Reporting by Program Period Provide an overview of your program’s performance measure accomplishments for the project year as established in the program plan. Provide the number of clients entering into each program activity during each reporting period. Adjust for duplication so that each client is only listed once per program activity per project year in the “YTD Unduplicated” column, regardless of the number of times they received assistance. For example, if an STRMU client received assistance in the 1 st reporting period, and then reapplied and received STRMU assistance in the 3rd reporting, he/she would initially be counted in both periods, then subtracted one time as to only be counted as “1” in the “YTD Unduplicated” column. Or if a client received STRMU and then TBRA, he/she would initially be counted in each category, but subtracted as a duplicate in the second category (TBRA) of service received. All clients served within the 1st reporting period should be counted regardless if they are continuing from the previous project year. Year to Date (YTD) Unduplicated clients should be the sum of reporting periods 1 through 4 and should be unduplicated per program activity. Performance Measure Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Adjust ment for Duplic ation YTD Total Undupl icated Yearly Goal % of Yearly Goal

a. b. c. d.

e.

f.

# of TBRA households # of STRMU households # of SS households # of PHP households Total TBRA, STRMU, & PHP YTD Unduplicated (YTD a+b+d) (does not include [c] SS) Total # Unduplicated Clients Served with only/solely with SS alone (did not receive TBRA, STRMU, or PHP in project year)

NARRATIVE SECTION INSTRUCTIONS: Each narrative section’s data must correspond with the reporting period listed on the coversheet with the exception of the final cumulative program progress report. The final cumulative report must include data for all 12 months of the program year in the final report. While not every single success story or piece of information must be carried over, at a minimum, you should at least include the highlights from prior reports. C. OUTPUTS REPORTED Describe significant accomplishments or challenges in achieving the number of housing units supported and the number of households assisted with HOPWA funds during this operating year compared to plans for this assistance, as approved in the annual HOPWA Budget Application. Describe how HOPWA funds were distributed during your program year among different categories of housing and geographic areas to address needs throughout the grant service area, consistent with approved plans.

D. OUTCOMES ASSESSED Assess your program's success in enabling HOPWA beneficiaries to establish and/or better maintain a stable living environment in housing that is safe, decent, and sanitary, and improve access to care. Compare current year results to baseline results for clients. Describe how program activities/projects contributed to meeting stated goals. If program did not achieve expected targets, please describe how your program plans to address challenges in program implementation and the steps currently being taken to achieve goals in next operating year. If your program exceeded program targets, please describe strategies the program utilized and how those contributed to program successes. (Consider the Housing Performance Outcomes and Access to Care and Support Sections of this report when providing comparisons.) Provide success stories or examples illustrating how the HOPWA program prevented the clients’ risk of homelessness and/or helped them access medical care and supportive services. “None”, “N/A”, “No Progress” and/or cut and paste responses from previous reports are not acceptable.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

E. COORDINATION Report on program coordination with other mainstream housing and supportive services resources, including the use of committed leveraging from other public and private sources that helped to address needs for eligible persons identified in the annual HOPWA Budget Application.

F. BARRIERS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Provide a narrative addressing items 1 through 3 below. Explain how barriers and trends affected your program’s ability to achieve the objectives and outcomes discussed in the previous section. 1. Select one or more barriers encountered during this reporting period from the following list. Describe any barriers (including regulatory and non-regulatory) encountered, actions taken in response to barriers, and recommendations for program improvement. Provide an explanation for each barrier selected.
HOPWA/HUD Regulations Planning Issues Housing Affordability Housing Availability Rent Determination and Fair Market Rents Geography/Rural Access Eligibility Issues Credit History Rental History Criminal Justice History Discrimination/Confidentiality Multiple Diagnosed Issues Supportive Services Technical Assistance or Training Issues Other- please specify

2. Describe any trends in the community that may affect the way in which the needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS are being addressed, and provide any other information important to the future provision of services to this population.

3. Identify any evaluations, studies, or other assessments of the HOPWA program that are available to the public.

For the final cumulative program progress report, please summarize Barriers and Recommendations for the entire project year. This must be reviewed and updated for each program report but must include data for all 12 months of the program year in the final report. Emphasize issues that have workable solutions, rather than systemic issues such as lack of housing, etc.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Barriers/challenges 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Probable Causes

Attempted Solutions

TA Needs

G. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Based on the program’s experience during this reporting period, are there any areas in which technical advice or assistance is needed? If so, please describe. This must be reviewed and updated each reporting period. Do not cut and paste from previous reports.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Part 2: Information on HOPWA Clients, Beneficiaries, and Households
H. HOPWA ELIGIBLE CLIENTS Please indicate below the year-to-date unduplicated number of HOPWA clients who received HOPWA assistance during this project year. If a client received STRMU, PHP and/or TBRA during the reporting period, then the client should only be counted once. Please note that this count now includes PHP.
Clients Served with HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance this program year Number of unduplicated HOPWA Clients served (TBRA, STRMU, PHP) Total Number

Please check: Because these are unduplicated clients, this total should match the corresponding color-coded boxes in Parts 1 and 2.

I. SPECIAL NEEDS CLIENTS Please indicate the total year-to-date number of HOPWA Clients who have the following special needs, if known. Clients may count in more than one category.
Veteran(s) Category Total number of HOPWA clients Chronically Homeless

Category Total number of HOPWA clients

J. PRIOR LIVING SITUATION Row (a) Column 1: Enter the number of HOPWA clients that are continuing if they received HOPWA assistance in the prior project year and are also receiving HOPWA assistance in the current project year. Do not include beneficiaries. Under New HOPWA Clients - Please indicate the prior living situation year-to-date only for (unduplicated) new HOPWA Clients who began receiving HOPWA housing assistance during this project year. DO NOT report the prior living situation of the HOPWA clients continuing from the prior project year in row (a). Only indicate the (one) category that best describes the clients’ most recent living situation. Remember that HOPWA (Housing Subsidy) Assistance includes PHP.
[1] Total # of HOPWA clients (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP)

Category1

a.

Continuing in the HOPWA program from the prior project year

New HOPWA Clients (began receiving HOPWA assistance this project year) b. Place not meant for human habitation (such as a vehicle, abandoned building, bus/train/subway station/airport, or outside) c. Emergency shelter (including hotel, motel, or campground paid for with emergency shelter voucher) Per HUD: Note: Include in Row C those individuals who would have lost their primary nighttime residence within 14 days of entry into HOPWA housing subsidy assistance and had not identified subsequent residence outside of the HOPWA program (imminently homeless). d. Transitional housing for homeless persons e. Total number of new Eligible individuals who received HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance with a Prior Living Situation that meets HUD’s definition of homelessness (Sum of Rows b – d) f. Permanent housing for formerly homeless persons (such as Shelter Plus Care, SHP, or SRO Mod Rehab) g. Psychiatric hospital or other psychiatric facility
1

If the client database does not match these categories, report the clients in the best matching category based on available information. Page 11 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

h. i. j. k. l. m. n. o. p. q. r.

Substance abuse treatment facility or detox center Hospital (non-psychiatric facility) Foster care home or foster care group home Jail, prison or juvenile detention facility Rented room, apartment, or house Client-owned house Staying or living in someone else’s (family’s or friend’s) room, apartment, or house

Hotel or motel paid for without emergency shelter voucher Other
Don’t Know or Refused TOTAL (add items a-q)

Please check: Row (r) [1] should equal the total number of HOPWA corresponding color-coded total clients under Parts 1 and 2. K. HOPWA BENEFICIARIES Please report the total number year-to-date of unduplicated HOPWA beneficiaries receiving HOPWA assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP). Beneficiaries are all HOPWA Clients and ALL associated members residing with the HOPWA client whose income was counted as part of the HOPWA client’s assistance eligibility criteria (roommates, paid caregivers, live-in aides are not beneficiaries).2 Individuals and Families Served with Housing Assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP) 1 Number of (unduplicated) individuals with HIV/AIDS who qualified the household to receive HOPWA housing subsidy assistance (should equal the number of HOPWA Eligible Individuals reported in the table under J above. 2 Number of ALL other persons diagnosed as HIV positive who reside with the HOPWA eligible individuals identified in Row 1 and who benefitted from the HOPWA housing subsidy assistance. 3 Total Number

Number of ALL other persons NOT diagnosed as HIV-positive (or unknown HIV status) who reside with the HOPWA eligible individual identified in Row 1 and who benefited from the HOPWA housing subsidy 4 TOTAL number of ALL beneficiaries served with Housing Subsidy Assistance (Sum of Rows Total Beneficiaries 1, 2, & 3) Please check: Because these are unduplicated clients, this total should match the corresponding color-coded boxes in Parts 1 and 2.

2

In cases of ‘reasonable accommodation’ where a HOPWA Client is renting from a family member (the family member’s income is not considered for housing assistance eligibility), the family member(s) are hence not considered to be receiving housing assistance although residing with the HOPWA client and are also NOT considered beneficiaries. Roommates, paid caregivers and live-in nurse-aides are not beneficiaries. See Appendix B. Program Progress Report FAQs for further clarification. Page 12 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

L. AGE AND GENDER OF BENEFICIARIES Report the age and gender of the HOPWA clients [1] who received housing subsidy assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and PHP) and their beneficiaries [2]. Please Note: Although the definition of beneficiary includes HOPWA clients, in the table below, data is broken out by HOPWA clients only and then the remaining members of the HOPWA households (which exclude HOPWA clients). 1 Age & Gender of All HOPWA Clients – from Row 1 in the Section K table Age Male Female Transgender MTransgender F-M Total F 1 Under 18 2 18 to 30 years 3 31 to 50 years 4 51 years and older 5 Total Age & Gender of All Beneficiaries (minus HOPWA clients) – from Rows 2 and 3 in the Section K table Age 6 7 8 9 10 Under 18 18 to 30 years 31 to 50 years 51 years and older Total (should equal the total of Rows 2 and 3 in Section K) Total Age & Gender (Rows 5 + 10) Male Female Transgender MF Transgender F-M Total

2

11

Total ALL Beneficiaries

This table has been amended to include the following new data elements: There is now space provided to identify the age and gender for Transgender Clients. This is captured for both Transgender women (M to F) and Transgender men (F to M). The age/gender of the identified client who received HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance should be provided in Rows 1-5. The age/gender of all other Beneficiaries should be provided in Rows 6-10. Please check: Row 5 total should equal color-coded boxes in Parts 1 and 2. Row 11 should equal the total in green in Sections K above, and Section M below

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

M. RACE AND ETHNICITY OF BENEFICIARIES In Chart M., indicate the Race and Ethnicity of all beneficiaries receiving HOPWA Housing Subsidy Assistance as reported in Section 2, Part 2, Section K. Report the race of all HOPWA eligible individuals in Column [A]. Report the ethnicity of all HOPWA eligible individuals in column [B]. Report the race of all other individuals who benefitted from the HOPWA housing subsidy assistance in column [C]. Report the ethnicity of all other individuals who benefitted from the HOPWA housing subsidy assistance in column [D]. The summed total of columns [A] and [C] equals the total number of beneficiaries reported above in Part 2, Section K, Row 4. HOPWA Clients (Eligible Individuals) Category [A] Race [all individuals reported in Section K, Row 1] [B] Ethnicity [Also identified as Hispanic or Latino] All Other Beneficiaries (does not include clients) [C] Race [D] Ethnicity [total of [Also individuals identified as reported in Hispanic or Section K, Latino] Rows 2 & 3]

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

American Indian/Alaskan Native Asian Black/African American Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander White American Indian/Alaskan Native & White Asian & White Black/African American & White American Indian/Alaskan Native & Black/African American Other Multi-Racial Column Totals (Sum of Rows 1-10)

Please check: Sum of Row 11 Column A, and Row 11 Column C, together equal the total number HOPWA Beneficiaries reported in Part 2, Section K, (green), Row 4.

N. HOUSEHOLD AREA MEDIAN INCOME Please indicate the area median income for all unduplicated households served with HOPWA housing subsidy assistance (STRMU, TBRA, and PHP). Refer to http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/il/il2010/select_Geography_mfi.odn for information on area median income in your community.
Percentage of area median income a. b. c. d. 0-30% of area median income (extremely low) 31-50% of area median income (very low) 51-80% of area median income (low) Total number of households # of HOPWA Households

Please check: Row (d) should equal the total number of unduplicated HOPWA clients reported in corresponding color-coded boxes in Parts 1 and 2.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Part 3: Leveraged Information (To be completed in the Final Program Progress Report only)
O. LEVERAGED HOUSEHOLDS Enter the total HOPWA-eligible households assisted with non-HOPWA funds. DO NOT include the HOPWA households receiving DSHS HOPWA funds, which have already been reported or other households receiving non-DSHS HOPWA funds. Leveraged households are clients of your agency and are eligible for HOPWA but are assisted by other funds or another housing assistance program.     Leveraged Households are those served by your agency that would be eligible to receive HOPWA TBRA, STRMU, and/or PHP but are receiving direct housing assistance (similar to HOPWA TBRA, STRMU, and/or PHP) from a nonHOPWA source. These households must be receiving HOPWA Supportive Services but are receiving direct housing assistance from a program other than HOPWA. Example: A client receiving HOME rental assistance but is receiving HOPWA Supportive Services. Must be connected to HOPWA to be leveraged. These are households served by your agency that also receive HOPWA Supportive Services with their non-HOPWA housing assistance. This means leveraged households are receiving direct housing assistance (i.e. rental assistance or emergency assistance similar to HOPWA TBRA, STRMU, and/or PHP) from a non-HOPWA source (i.e. State Services/Delivery, Ryan White, Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8), HOME, Shelter Plus Care, or any other direct housing funding source).

New: HUD is requesting leveraging goals by type of assistance. If establishing a goal for # of households to be assisted is not done or is not feasible, please put “N/A” in that box.

Housing Assistance
1. 2. Tenant-based Rental Assistance (i.e. rental assistance) Short-term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance (i.e. Emergency housing assistance) Permanent Housing Placement

Total # of Additional Households

Goal of # Households to be Assisted with Leveraged Funds

3.

P. LEVERAGED SOURCES BY PROGRAM ACTIVITY 1. Leveraged Sources Report the source(s) of cash or in-kind leveraged federal, state, local or private resources identified in the Consolidated or Annual Plan and used in the delivery of the HOPWA program and the amount of leveraged dollars. In Column [1], identify the type of leveraging. Some common sources of leveraged funds have been provided as a reference point. You may add Rows as necessary to report all sources of leveraged funds. Include Resident Rent payments paid by clients directly to private landlords. Do NOT include rents paid directly to a HOPWA program as this will be reported in the next section. In Column [2] report the amount of leveraged funds expended during the operating year. Use Column [3] to provide some detail about the type of leveraged contribution (e.g., case management services or clothing donations). In Column [4], check the appropriate box to indicate whether the leveraged contribution was housing subsidy assistance or another form of support. Note: Be sure to report on number of households supported with these leveraged funds in the chart above in Part 3, Section O. Identify the amount and source(s) of cash or in-kind resources leveraged from other sources year-to-date, and used in delivery or operation of HOPWA activities. These funds include other funds used for on-site or other specific activities directly connected to serving HOPWA client households, at the activity or program level. Make a good faith estimate of the sources of leveraged funds that you are aware of used to provide housing assistance, supportive services, and administration in the delivery of the HOPWA program. This is any money used to support HOPWA households that are non-HOPWA dollars. Supportive Services may include:  adult day care and personal assistance  alcohol and drug abuse services  client management/advocacy/access to benefits and services  childcare and other child services
Page 15 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

        

education employment assistance and training health/medical/intensive care services (if approved, client records must conform with 24CFR 574.310) legal services life skills management (outside of case management) meals/nutritional services mental health services outreach transportation

Source of Leveraging Chart [2] Amount of Leveraged Funds [3] Type of Contribution [4] Housing Subsidy Assistance (TBRA, STRMU, and/or PHP) or Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support Housing Subsidy Assistance Other Support

[1] Source of Leveraging Public Funding Ryan White-Housing Assistance Ryan White-Other Housing Choice Voucher Program Low Income Housing Tax Credit HOME Shelter Plus Care Emergency Solutions Grant Other Public: Other Public: Other Public: Other Public: Other Public: Private Funding Grants In-kind Resources Other Private: Other Private: Other Funding Grantee/Project Sponsor/SubRecipient (Agency) Cash Resident Rent Payments by Client to Private Landlord TOTAL (Sum of all Rows)

Example:
Page 16 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

The table has been re-designed for clarity and to determine the type of leveraged services that benefit the HOPWA program. See below for an example of how to complete the table:

[1] Source of Leveraging

2] Amount of Leveraged Funds

[3] Type of Contribution

[4] Housing Subsidy Assistance or Other Support
Housing Subsidy Assistance

Public Funding Ryan White-Other

$356,252.34

Ryan White Medical Case Management Services for HOPWA clients.

2. Program Income and Resident Rent Payments In this section, Chart A., report the total amount of program income and resident rent payments directly generated from the use of HOPWA funds, including repayments. Include resident rent payments collected or paid directly to the HOPWA program. Do NOT include payments made directly from a client household to a private landlord. Note: Please see report directions section for definition of program income. (Additional information on program income is available in the HOPWA Grantee Oversight Resource Guide). A. Total Amount Program Income and Resident Rent Payment Collected During the Operating Year Total Amount of Program Income (for this operating year)

Program Income and Resident Rent Payments Collected 1. Program income (e.g. repayments) 2. Resident Rent Payments made directly to HOPWA Program 3. Total Program Income and Resident Rent Payments (Sum of Rows 1 and 2)

B. Program Income and Resident Rent Payments Expended To Assist HOPWA Households In this section, Chart B, report on the total program income and resident rent payments (as reported above in Chart A) expended during the operating year. Use Row 1 to report Program Income and Resident Rent Payments expended on Housing Subsidy Assistance Programs (i.e., TBRA, STRMU, and PHP). Use Row 2 to report on the Program Income and Resident Rent Payment expended on Supportive Services and other non-direct Housing Costs. Total Amount of Program Income Expended (for this operating year)

Program Income and Resident Rent Payment Expended on HOPWA programs

1. 2. 3.

Program Income and Resident Rent Payment Expended on Housing Subsidy Assistance costs Program Income and Resident Rent Payment Expended on Supportive Services and other non-direct housing costs Total Program Income Expended (Sum of Rows 1 and 2)

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Part 4: STRMU Expense Summary (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only)
Q. STRMU EXPENSE SUMMARY (Note: Unduplicated STRMU totals should equal other STRMU totals in this report. Total STRMU expenditures in (a) [2] should match what is reported on the Exhibit A)

Housing Subsidy Assistance Categories (STRMU)

[1] Output: Number of Households

[2] Output: Total HOPWA Funds Expended on STRMU during Operating Year $ $ $ $ $ $ -

a) Total Short-term mortgage, rent and/or utility (STRMU) assistance b) Of the total STRMU reported on Row a, total who received assistance with mortgage costs ONLY. c) Of the total STRMU reported on Row a, total who received assistance with mortgage and utility costs. d) Of the total STRMU reported on Row a, total who received assistance with rental costs ONLY e) Of the total STRMU reported on Row a, total who received assistance with rental and utility costs. f) Of the total STRMU reported on Row a, total who received assistance with utility costs ONLY. g) Estimate of total STRMU Activity Delivery Costs (STRMU funds expended to support direct program costs such as program operations staff) (Estimated costs could come from either or both Supportive Services and Administrative Expenses. This is an estimate only) N/A

$

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Part 5: Listing of Supportive Services (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only)
R. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES Report on the use of HOPWA funds for supportive services. In the table below, rows 1 through 17, provide the total of all households for each type of supportive services activities provide by the Project Sponsor. Do NOT report on supportive services leveraged with non-HOPWA funds. Adjust for duplication on Row 16. Supportive Services [1] Output: Actual Number of Households that Received HOPWA Assistance [2] Output: Amount of HOPWA Funds Expended

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Adult day care and personal assistance Alcohol and drug abuse services Case management/client advocacy/ access to benefits & services Child care and other child services Education Employment assistance and training Health/medical/intensive care services, if approved Note: Client records must conform with 24 CFR §574.310 Legal services Life skills management (outside of case management) Meals/nutritional services Mental health services Outreach Transportation Other Activity (e.g. basic phone service) Specify: Sub-Total Households receiving Supportive Services (Sum of rows 1-14) Adjustment for Duplication TOTAL Households receiving Supportive Services (Row 15 minus Row 16) Please check: The total for Row 17 should equal the total in the corresponding color-coded box in Section 1, B, 2. N/A N/A

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Part 6: HOPWA Performance Outcomes (To be completed in the final Program Progress Report only)
S. TBRA HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES - Housing Stability: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Maintaining Housing Stability. Please note that at this time, HUD is not requiring PHP to be added to STRMU and TBRA Stability Outcomes. In Column 1, report the total number of eligible households that received HOPWA TBRA housing assistance, by type. In Column 2, enter the number of households continuing to access TBRA housing assistance, the following year. In Column 3, report the housing status of all households that exited the program. Columns 2 (Number of Households Continuing) and 3 (Exited Households) summed will equal the total households reported in Column 1. Complete only the blue highlighted cells. [1] Total Number of Households Receiving Housing Assistance [2] Assessment: Number of Households Continuing with this Housing (per plan or expectation for next year) [3] Number of Exited Households and Housing Status

1 Emergency Shelter/Streets 2 Temporary Housing 3 Private Housing

TenantBased Rental Assistance

4 Other HOPWA 5 Other Subsidy 6 Institution 7 Jail/Prison 8 Disconnected/Unknown 9 Death

Please check: The totals of Column 2 (households continuing) and Column 3 (households exiting) should equal the total number of unduplicated TBRA households reported in Column 1 (households served during the project year). Column 1 should also equal each total reported for unduplicated client served with TBRA in Part 1 and Part 2.

T. STRMU HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES - Prevention of Homelessness: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Reduced Risks of Homelessness (Short-Term Housing Assistance) Report the total number of households that received STRMU assistance in Column 1. In Column 2, identify the result of the housing assessment made at time of assistance, or updated in the operating year. (Column 3 provides a description of housing outcomes; therefore, data is not required.) Note: The sum of Column 2 should equal the number of households reported in Column 1. Complete only the blue highlighted cells. Note: If client remains in the STRMU program at the end of the project year, they should be listed under “Private Housing.”

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

[1] STRMU Housing Assistance Type total number of unduplicated STRMU clients in the box below

[2] Assessment of Housing Status

[3] HOPWA Client Outcomes

Maintain Private Housing without subsidy (e.g. Assistance provided/completed and client is stable, not likely to seek additional support)

Other Private Housing without subsidy Other HOPWA support (PH) Other housing subsidy (PH) Institution (e.g. residential and long-term care)

Stable/Permanent Housing (PH)

Likely to maintain current housing arrangements, with additional STRMU assistance

Temporarily Stable, with Reduced Risk of Homelessness

Transitional Facilities/Short-term (e.g. temporary or transitional arrangement) Temporary/non-permanent Housing arrangement (e.g. gave up lease, and moved in with family or friends but expects to live there less than 90 days) Reduced Risk of Homelessness

Emergency Shelter/street Jail/Prison Disconnected Death Total of All Rows Above (should equal total number in [1])

Unstable Arrangements

Life Event

Please check: ALL STRMU households should be reported here and only reported once. Also, total STRMU households should equal the STRMU totals reported in Part 1 and Part 2. Note: in the table above, there is an additional outcome (now there is both Temporarily Stable, with Reduced Risk of Homelessness AND Reduced Risk of Homelessness).
[1] [2] Number of STRMU households currently served that ALSO Of Column 1, number of households that ALSO received STRMU in the prior project year: received STRMU in the two (2) prior consecutive project years:

(This number cannot exceed the above number of STRMU households receiving assistance in the prior year)

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

U. ACCESS TO CARE AND SUPPORT OUTCOMES Please report on the access to care and support for ALL HOPWA households served during the project year. Categories of Services Accessed Households Receiving HOPWA Outcome Assistance within the Operating Indicator Year 1. Has a housing plan for maintaining or establishing stable onSupport for going housing. Stable Housing 2. Has contact with case manager/benefits counselor with the Access to schedule specified in client’s individual service plan. Support 3. Had contact with a primary health care provider consistent with Access to the schedule specified in clients individual service plan. Health Care 4. Has accessed and can maintain medical insurance/assistance. (This is the number of HOPWA clients that accessed medical insurance or received medical assistance (e.g. copay or deductible assistance, including RW medical and/or ADAP assistance) and can maintain medical insurance coverage and/or source of assistance. HOPWA services do not qualify as medical assistance.) 5. Successfully accessed or maintained qualifications for sources of income. 6. Total number of households that obtained an income-producing job Access to Health Care

Sources of Income Sources of Income

Sources of income include, but are not limited to the following (Reference only)
Earned Income Unemployment Insurance Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) Veteran’s Disability Payment General Assistance, or use local program name Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) income, or use local program name Veteran’s Pension Pension from Former Job Child Support Alimony or Other Spousal Support Retirement Income from Social Security Private Disability Insurance Worker’s Compensation Other Income Sources

Sources of medical insurance and assistance include, but are not limited to the following (Reference only)
MEDICAID Health Insurance Program, or local program name Veterans Affairs Medical Services State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), or local program name MEDICARE Health Insurance Program, or local program name AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) Ryan White-funded Medical or Dental Assistance

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

V. HOPWA HOUSING STABILITY OUTCOMES Worksheet - Determining Housing Stability Outcomes. This chart is designed to assess program results based on the information reported in Housing Stability Outcomes. Use data from the charts under S (TBRA) and T (STRMU). Permanent Housing Assistance Stable Housing (# of households remaining in program plus 3+4+5+6=#) 0 Temporary Housing (2) Unstable Arrangements (1+7+8=#) Life Event (9)

Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Total Permanent HOPWA Housing Assistance Reduced Risk of Homelessness: ShortTerm Assistance

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stable/Permanent Housing

Temporarily Stable, with Reduced Risk of Homelessness 0

Reduced Risk of Homelessness

Unstable Arrangements

Life Events

Short-Term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance (STRMU) Total HOPWA Housing Assistance

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Background on HOPWA Housing Stability Codes Stable Permanent Housing/Ongoing Participation 3 = Private Housing in the private rental or home ownership market (without known subsidy, including permanent placement with families or other self sufficient arrangements) with reasonable expectation that additional support is not needed. 4 = Other HOPWA-funded housing assistance (not STRMU), e.g. TBRA or Facility-Based Assistance. 5 = Other subsidized house or apartment (non-HOPWA sources, e.g., Section 8, HOME, public housing). 6 = Institutional setting with greater support and continued residence expected (e.g., residential or long-term care facility). Temporary Housing 2 = Temporary housing - moved in with family/friends or other short-term arrangement, such as Ryan White subsidy, transitional housing for homeless, or temporary placement in institution (e.g., hospital, psychiatric hospital or other psychiatric facility, substance abuse treatment facility or detox center). Unstable Arrangements 1 = Emergency shelter or no housing destination such as places not meant for habitation (e.g., a vehicle, an abandoned building, bus/train/subway station, or anywhere outside). 7 = Jail /prison. 8 = Disconnected or disappeared from project support, unknown destination or no assessments of housing needs were undertaken. Life Event 9 = Death, i.e., remained in housing until death. This characteristic is not factored into the housing stability equation.
Page 23 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

Tenant-based Rental Assistance: Stable Housing is the sum of the number of households that (i) remain in the housing and (ii) those that left the assistance as reported under: 3, 4, 5, and 6. Temporary Housing is the number of households that accessed assistance, and left their current housing for a non-permanent housing arrangement, as reported under item: 2. Unstable Situations is the sum of numbers reported under items: 1, 7, and 8. Permanent Facility-Based Housing Assistance: Stable Housing is the sum of the number of households that (i) remain in the housing and (ii) those that left the assistance as shown as items: 3, 4, 5, and 6. Temporary Housing is the number of households that accessed assistance, and left their current housing for a non-permanent housing arrangement, as reported under item 2. Unstable Situations is the sum of numbers reported under items: 1, 7, and 8. Transitional/Short-Term Facility-Based Housing Assistance: Stable Housing is the sum of the number of households that (i) continue in the residences (ii) those that left the assistance as shown as items: 3, 4, 5, and 6. Other Temporary Housing is the number of households that accessed assistance, and left their current housing for a non-permanent housing arrangement, as reported under item 2. Unstable Situations is the sum of numbers reported under items: 1, 7, and 8. Tenure Assessment: A baseline of households in transitional/short-term facilities for assessment purposes, indicate the number of households whose tenure exceeded 24 months. STRMU Assistance: Stable Housing is the sum of the number of households that accessed assistance for some portion of the permitted 21-week period and there is reasonable expectation that additional support is not needed in order to maintain permanent housing living situation (as this is a time-limited form of housing support) as reported under housing status: Maintain Private Housing with subsidy; Other Private with Subsidy; Other HOPWA support; Other Housing Subsidy; and Institution. Temporarily Stable, with Reduced Risk of Homelessness is the sum of the number of households that accessed assistance for some portion of the permitted 21week period or left their current housing arrangement for a transitional facility or other temporary/non-permanent housing arrangement and there is reasonable expectation additional support will be needed to maintain housing arrangements in the next year, as reported under housing status: Likely to maintain current housing arrangements, with additional STRMU assistance; Transitional Facilities/Short-term; and Temporary/Non-Permanent Housing arrangements Unstable Situation is the sum of number of households reported under housing status: Emergency Shelter; Jail/Prison; and Disconnected.

Appendix A: HOPWA Program Progress Report FAQs
1. Are STRMU clients considered ‘continuing’ if their housing assistance overlaps from the prior project year? Yes. STRMU clients are ‘continuing’ if they have not exhausted their 21 weeks of assistance by the end of the prior project year and they are receiving assistance in the current project year. 2. If a HOPWA client is renting from a family member, is the family member considered part of the household and as a beneficiary? No. A HOPWA client that is renting from a family member is considered in a ‘reasonable accommodation’ situation. [revised HUD regulation 24 CFR 82.306 (d)] A ‘reasonable accommodation’ would permit a “person with disabilities” including persons with HIV/AIDS, to receive benefits when housed with a family member who owns or rents the housing unit if it is determined by a physician that living with the family member is important to the client’s overall health and well being. In such situations of reasonable accommodation, the family’s income is not to be counted in determining the eligibility of the low-income person with disabilities for a STRMU (or TBRA) payment. In this case, since the family’s income is not considered, the family member is not counted as part of the household nor as a beneficiary although the family member and HOPWA eligible individual are residing in the same household. 3. We also receive HOPWA funding directly from HUD. Does the program progress report require us to include the non-DSHS HOPWA funds?

No. The Program Progress Report is specifically for DSHS HOPWA funds expended for HOPWA housing assistance and supportive services. Project sponsors receiving multiple HOPWA funds from non-DSHS sources should be reporting that separately to the funder. 4. What are the differences between an eligible individual, a HOPWA Client, a beneficiary, and a household?

An eligible individual is qualified for HOPWA but is not yet accepted to the program and may be on a wait list. A HOPWA Client is the individual that qualifies for HOPWA and is accepted to the program. A beneficiary is someone who benefits from HOPWA assistance, including the HOPWA Client and the household members living with the client that are included in the client’s HOPWA application. A household is every HOPWA client receiving HOPWA assistance,
Page 24 DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

whether or not the client lives with his/her beneficiaries. Roommates, paid caregivers, live-in aides, or live-in landlords are not included. 5. If a beneficiary of the HOPWA Client also has HIV/AIDS, how do we report him/her?

Effective 2012, HUD now requires these individuals to be reported separately as beneficiaries in the beneficiary section. 6. Why do we need to report the sources of leveraged dollars and the additional households leveraged?

HUD is required by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to report all leveraged dollars by the source type and the additional households assisted in order to show Congress that HOPWA funds are also being matched with leveraged funds to achieve HOPWA program goals.

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DSHS HOPWA Program Report Revised 11/2012

EXHIBIT “D” STAFF CHANGE REPORTING FORM

23

Staff Change Reporting Form
Discuss any concerns related to staffing. For example, illness, extended leave, leave without pay, issues with filling a position, and/or positions that have been open for longer than 60 days. When you have completed this form, please send them via email to the following Bexar County Ryan White Staff. This will be in addition to submitting these forms in your invoices. Program Manager, Charlene Doria-Ortiz (cdoria-ortiz@bexar.org) April Marek, Fiscal Monitor (april.marek@bexar.org) Crystal Rodriguez, Fiscal Monitor (crystal.rodriguez2@bexar.org) Allison Elmer, HIV Planner (aelmer@bexar.org) Peggy Villareal, Contract Analyst (peggyv@bexar.org) Andrea Ramirez, Data Analyst (andrea.ramirez2@bexar.org)

AGENCY NAME:

.

Name and Position Title

Date of vacancy

Action taken to fill vacancy

Date vacancy will be filled

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