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Homage to

Prof. K.A. Jaleel

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Volume 1 l Issue 2 l August - October 2012

WISDOM SHARING

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AN EVENTFUL YEAR

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45 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

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GURUS HONORED

Volume 1 Issue 2 August - October 2012

Editorial Board Chairman Dr. M. Abdul Salam
Vice Chancellor

Vice Chairman Prof. K. Raveendranath
Pro Vice Chancellor

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An Action-packed and Thrilling Year

Chief Editor Dr. P.P. Mohamed
Registrar

Editor Dr. Muhammadali N.
Reader, Dept. of Journalism

Members Dr. Janaki Sreedharan
Associate Professor, Dept. of English

Dr. K.V. Lazar
Associate Professor, Dept. of Zoology

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Dr. P. Raveendran
Associate Professor, Dept. of Chemistry

Dr. P. Somanathan
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Malayalam

C.H. Mohammed Koya
the Architect of

Dr. Burton Cleetus
Assistant Professor, Dept. of History

University of Calicut

Dr. Umer O Thasneem
Assistant Professor, Dept. of English

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Sri. V. Omprakash
Publication Officer

Sri. T.P. Varghese
Superintendent, Calicut University Press

Design Sri. V. Asuthosh Photos Dept. of Art & Photography

P.O. Calicut University, Pin - 673 635 Kerala, India Tel: 0494 2407104 e-mail: editorcunews@gmail.com www.universityofcalicut.info

Gurus Honored
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Netherlands honours
Dr. K.S. Manilal
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Botanical Garden a Marvelous Isle

V.R.Krishna Iyer
Visits University

Keeping Abreast of the Times

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Homage to
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Prof. K.A. Jaleel

US opens
ITS DOORS
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People expect progressive steps only from Universities, not from any other fields like industries. -Justice Iyer

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CU ties up with INO
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PROGRAMME

TO EMPOWER SC/ST STUDENTS
WORKSHOP ON

PARENTING
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THE ART OF
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Facts on 3 Projects

MASCAA

conducts Communion 2012

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Vice Chancellor
COLONEL RANK
CONFERRED WITH

Campus getting

green
Out-gendered

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The endangered Male
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Magnificent

Climber
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Deccani Souls
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Screened

The Last Poem

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An

Action-packed and Thrilling Year
n August 12, 2012, Vice-Chancellor Colonel (Prof.) M. Abdul Salam completed one year in office with an array of students-friendly and researchoriented, administrative and academic reforms to his credit. The most crucial task at hand during the last year was to get rid of the backlog of all the sort. The University took special initiatives to clear the pending files, applications for degree certificates and revaluations, and settled 1,500 litigations related to delayed results. It also conducted special sports convocation to distribute five years overdue scholarships. Total e-governance introduced with a dedicated network of 800 plus computers in the administrative and examination wings and teaching departments under the direct control of Calicut University Computer

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Centre (CUCC) was the most revolutionary initiative last year. Global online certificate verification system and launching of placement portal and School of Distance Education website are some other innovative steps on the technological front. The organizational structure of Examination Wing (Pareekshabhavan) was monolithic and not conducive for systematic conduct of examinations. Therefore, its administration was decentralized, and put under the control of seven Joint Controllers of Examinations fixing specific responsibilities based on permanent academic and examination calendar. To make the University an excellent centre for research, an exclusive Directorate of Research, for the first time in its history, was set up and entrusted with overseeing

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the research projects and admissions. The University also instituted Directorate of Self-Financing Courses (DSFC) to maintain quality of self-financing courses under its direct control. Quality management of the Institute of Engineering & Technology (IET), self-finacing engineering colleges run directly by the University, was ensured by appointing excellent academics with a handsome pay package. Focusing on the tribal development, Institute of Tribal Studies was set up at Chethalayam in Wayanad. The project costs ` 4.5 crores. The integrated post-graduate programmes for the tribals at the centre will be commenced soon. Brigadier Subramaniam, Deputy Director General in charge of Kerala and Lakshadweep NCC conferring honorary rank of Colonel on Vice Chancellor Dr.M. Abdul Salam.

Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam receiving award from Amity University for academic excellence Yet another progressive move was to keep discipline and punctuality on the campus declaring it strike-free in line with the court order and introducing bio-metric punching systems for employees' attendance verification. CCTV cameras were installed in strategic points to heighten campus security. An Estate Development Office (EDO) was instituted under Estate Development Officer to oversee campus development. The Office took initiatives to keep the campus green and clean and to facilitate proper solid waste management. A mango orchard spread over four hectares with 800 plants of rare mango verities is a commendable step taken by the EDO. Apart from this, University expects a grant of Rs 14 crore under Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana scheme over five-year period.The State Horticulture Mission has agreed to provide Rs 25 lakh to establish a model nursery on the campus. Rain Water Harvesting Project of the EDO is expected to replenish the ground water sources benefiting the campus and the surrounding villages. For this purpose, around 5,000 moisture conservation pits along with two large size (20X20X6 m) water conservation pits were also arranged on the campus. Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam and higher officials of the University along with Olympians Irfan Kolothum Thodi, Diju V. and Tintu Luka at the function organised to honour them for their great achievements the London Olympics 2012

Rain Water Harvesting project of the EDO is expected to replenish the ground water sources benefitting the campus and the surrounding villages.

Dr T.K. Raveendran inaugurating the 45th foundation day of Calicut University

Calicut University, the second to be set up in Kerala came into being in 1968 with the objective of developing human resources in the northern districts of the State by extending higher education and promoting research with particular emphasis on technology, art and culture.
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CU45
TURNS
niversity of Calicut celebrated its 45th foundation day on July 23 with the launching of a couple of new projects – placement portal and e verification system. Former vice-chancellors whose effort had significant role in the development of the University were honoured at the function. Calicut University, the second to be set up in Kerala came into being in 1968 with the objective of developing human resources in the northern districts of the State by extending higher education and promoting research with particular emphasis on technology ,art and culture.

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Former Vice Chancellor and well known historian Dr. T. K. Raveendran inaugurated the function. 'Universities can achieve a lot by the joined efforts of the vice chancellor, syndicate, and campus fraternity. The syndicate should take the lead to make the university a centre of excellence, he said. Vice chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam presided over the function. ''Many projects are on the cards to keep up the University with the needs of the modern world. Eco friendly, litter free green campus, smart class rooms, better hostel facilities, cafeteria, digital library and rest houses are the upcoming projects. They would be of immense help to the students, Dr. Abdul Salam said. Former Vice Chancellor ANP Ummer Kutty launched the placement portal developed by the university placement cell to streamline campus placements. The global online verification system was inaugurated by Dr.KKN Kurup, former vice chancellor. The system helps verify University certificates and mark sheets online. Dr Salam honoured his predecessors draping them with shawls and presenting mementos. Syndicate member

R.S Panicker ,TV Ibrahim, Adv PM Niyas ,TP Asharafali and University union vice chairman Ansan C Joy felicitated the function. Pro- vice Chancellor Prof K Raveedranath welcomed the gathering and Registrar PP Mohamed proposed a vote of thanks. A musical treat by the University Music Club followed. Santhosh Mithra, artist at Art and Photography department, did a painting in tune with the music. - Mujeeb Cheriyampuram (III Sem. MCJ)

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Archive

by
C H MOHAMMED KOYA
at the first meeting of Calicut University

Syndicate
am very happy to be present here today when for the first time, the executive body of the new university's meeting. It would be premature on my part to venture to address you on an occasion like this. You are all mostly veteran educationists who have had almost a life time of experience in looking at the problems of higher education and university administration. As you know, I am only a novice in the line. There is therefore considerable diffidence in me. However, there is one saving element; I am very sensitive to your pressing problems and deeply anxious to solve them or at least help to solve them. Whatever help the government machinery can give to render the working of the university more efficient and more relevant to the current state of affairs, I shall try my best to make available to you. It is more to reassure you in this simple and vital matter that I have decided to come here today. I have not hesitated to give public expression to my desire and resolve that Calicut University shall not be just one more or another university for the state, but it shall be a new university for the state, Kerala has pioneered in many fields of education and I do feel that we will be able to evolve the pattern of a dynamic, creative even adventurous system of education, that would draw forth all the natural and material resources of the region and would evidence the infinite capacity of our human potential to rise equal to the contemporary challenges. Institutions of higher education should be viewed as servants of society, created and maintained to meet the needs of the people comprising the society. Since needs change, colleges and universities are expected to change. If institutions through decisions of their faculties, board members of administrators refuse to
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modify practices to confirm to new conditions, their existence or multiplication is hardly justifiable. Only such institutions are alive and open to such timely changes are viable, the others becoming moribund as time goes by. Now let's look closely at conditions prevailing here and ask a few questions. 1. What is the role of the junior colleges? Should they all, in due course be up-graded as first grade colleges? Is it necessary, is it even desirable? Should they increase in larger and larger numbers, at such terrific cost to the exchequer? Should they continue to be attached to, or controlled by university, or shall it be controlled by an independent board forged out of the secondary educationist and university men? What shall be the qualifications for the teachers there? What about fee levels? I would like you to examine this question in all seriousness and suggest an optimum number and their location during the next plan period. 2. You are aware of the anxiety of all the colleges to start fresh courses at graduate and post graduate levels. Of course the managements are willing to put up physical facilities with or without the quantum of grants. But the recurring expenditure with deficits more or less subsidised by government, is mounting tremendously. Here again a natural policy of discretionary limitation or selection appears to be called for. There should be a planned approach to such expansion of a routine nature. It is not easy for any single executive head to tackle this problem. The syndicate, I hope would give its anxious consideration to this question. It is here that I hope

the university will not be a replica of the older models but will boldly cry a halt repetitive expansion for parochial or other reasons and should conserve its resources for expansion of a more worth- while type. It is proposed to constitute a development council with experts from different parts of India to help us with suggestions in this regard. But, remember their suggestions are to be made relevant and live for our situation by the responsible executive body of this university. I congratulate you for the confidence the chancellor has placed in you for starting this work of great importance for the future of education in the land. 3. How can the university effectively make a salutary impact on the milieu which ultimately pays for the services thus set up in their midst. What specific steps the members of the staff and the senior students can take to make their knowledge the property of the common man? The universities are to be the criticism of the life around them. What practical sustainable form can this criticism take? How far can the medium of the press and publicity concerns like the radio and the cinema and the journals be engaged to cooperate with the work of the university? 4. During the discussion which Mr. Chacko and I had with the University Grants Commission, we have gathered the impression that the University Grants Commission is certainly willing to consider any dynamic process of evolution of the education system. Mr. Chacko has suggested to me that he would like to send some of our youth into the major industrial concerns in this region, provide them with facilities for theoretical instruction there and qualify them to be graduates emerging from actual life environments- graduates in technology not coming out of colleges of technology but out of centres of technological excellence. May be, it is such men who will be better equipped to exploit the local resources than the usual college type of technologist. I do not want to repeat again and again my hopes on the new faculties we have proposed for the university. I wish that you take the challenge that nature places before you here and evolve ways and means by which the youth of the land whose prosperity is our aim is enabled to enjoy a higher standard of living. 5. I shall not take more of your time. I shall conclude observing that while I attach great importance to science, technology and research in these lines, I do

not minimise the great values of a cultural evolution. The faculties of philosophy and oriental studies and fine arts and extension services must all grow from any possible role of passivity and speculation to one of tangible action. Greater understanding of our sociological and cultural problems, more enlightened and harmonious acceptance of a fusion of values, an enviable measure of tolerance and spirit of coexistence – these must also be the visible contribution of the new university. We are thinking of building up a big unit of intellectuals living together as a homestead or community supra-sectarian in outlook and behaviour. What shape you will give to it is in your hands. That task is not simple. The problems are numerous. Temptations will be too strong. Challenges from a society in ferment may prove too trying for us of the older generation. But the satisfaction from achievement will be high if out of such conditions we can produce and bequeath to posterity a centre of excellence which trading upon the best of values in man will shine forth as a beacon and tell them that out of sincere work prosperity for the brethren will emerge. What will be intrinsic worth of any project if it cannot ultimately transform the life of all our brethren to one of peace and prosperity? Thank you for the opportunity you have given me to meet you all on this momentous occasion. I wish you all success. I promise once again the most sympathetic consideration of your problems at the level of government. Source: Minutes of the Calicut University Syndicate meeting 2 November 1968 Appendix II

C.H. Mohammed Koya at a function at the University
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University History

C.H. Mohammed Koya
the Architect of

University of Calicut
“I haven't shown any impropriety in giving the name of a world famous city to a university which, I hope, would become world famous one day-indeed, there is a great possibility, that this university would become world famous in future.”
C.H. Mohammed Koya (Vol.XXiX-17-8-71 Kerala Assembly proceeding)

am quoting the above from the proceedings of the Kerala Legislative Assembly, the words uttered by the then education minister Mr. C.H.Mohammed Koya in a tone that reverberated inside the assembly hall for a number of years. Yes, that was his wish, his dream-a university that would become world famous. I was elated on hearing that statement on that occasion. When the assembly was discussing the University Bill, I was present in the visitor's gallery. It was my lot then to be the organiser of the University and its temporary administrator in the initial stages. 'A university that is likely to be world famous'-there was hope, self confidence and determination in the words of its far sighted founder. I am recording my memories here with the sad thought that he could witness its growth only for a short period of a decade and half. He enjoyed a great sense of satisfaction, a feeling of a great victory when he was piloting the bill in the

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Legislative Assembly. There was no model before him for a new university having been established in Kerala. However he had no misgiving about the need for such a university. He told the Assembly. “Everyone knows that the northern districts of Kerala are educationally backward. I believe that the establishment of a new university would certainly be a remedy for that situation” I wish that somebody would write a complete history of the university of Calicut. My aim is just to indulge in reminiscences, pointing out, at the same time, a few relevant facts. It was in accordance with the recommendation of a public committee with the Vice Chacellor of the University of Kerala or its chairman, that the Government of Kerala decided to establish an affiliating University in Calicut and a federal University in Cochin. The making of university legislation was a complex problem in Kerala. It was a matter of common

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knowledge that private managements were considered to have vested interests and teachers were taken as an organized group perfectly demanding their rights. The relationship between the management and the teachers was taken to be one like the relationship between capitalists and the proletariates. This state of affairs led to all sorts of conflicts. Many provisions in the Kerala University Bill were questioned in courts. In these circumstances it was not an easy job to make a university bill which would satisfy the administration, teachers, students and the management. Moreover, framework of the existing university bill, in toto had to be followed as a model. Taking these limiting factors in to consideration, an act was drafted and to avoid delay the university was established after having got the act passed as an ordinance. Sri.Koya wished that the new university should have a new approach that would facilitate its growth in consonance with his dreams. An expert committee was thus appointed with Sri.Koya himself as its chairman. Its members were experienced men like Dr. Nag Choudhary, planning commission member, Dr, Tayabji who had been vice-chancellor in several universities, Dr.K.G Saiyiddeen, who was secretary for education to the Government of India, I was the member secretary of the chief executive officer of the university. We met several times at Calicut and prepared many long term projects. The U.G.C appointed an expert committee to examine them. The committee, in turn approved the projects. In the light of the development of the new campus at Thenjipalam the U.G.C recorded that the University of Calicut would be a model for new universities. The practice of granting exemptions for teachers in qualifications and age limit was stopped forthwith. It was suggested that university departments should not be satisfied with traditional M.A/MSc courses and that they should engage themselves in original research. It was

also envisaged that teachers in the university departments should go and teach, occasionally, in affiliated colleges. However, these programmes could not be implemented as there was opposition to these moves from some quarters. New projects were planned, in which the educational and industrial sectors could cooperate. These too were short lived. However, later experience proved that these projects could be revivied. The development of the Thenhipalam campus received high priority. In all these the minister himself showed a personal interest and provided all help and cooperation. Two years later, when the University of Cochin was established, Mohammed Koya was anxious about the growth and shortcomings of the University of Calicut. Whatever may be his dreams and expectations, it is true that the delay in the implementation of projects, unavoidable obstructions and the negative response from many who were expected to help disheartened him. This could be seen in the speeches that he made in the Assembly on the occasion of the passing of Cochin University Bill. Nobody should expect that this would change the face of the country and that as if with the help of Aladdin's magic lamp, all unemployed young men and women would get jobs. This is just a small beginning to solve a big problem that our country faces. As the poet says, In this small boat do I cross the waters To reach the other shore of the ocean. This is just an earnest attempt to find solutions to our problems. Education should be linked with industry. The University of Calicut had, right from its inception, made some attempts to generate employment opportunities by linking education with industry. I hope this university would also follow suit. No doubt it would have some effect.

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When a new university is established and it passes through teething troubles, the society would not take into consideration all the factors when it passes its judgement. Even two years after its establishment, the University of Calicut and its activities were not well known to the public. The people were ignorant of its achievement. As such there was a lot of adverse criticism in the mass media. Keeping all these things in mind, Mohammed Koya was outlining the future programme of the University. Mr.Triguna Sen, the then Union minister for education said a few things to the thousands of people assembled at Mananchira maidan on the occasion of the unveiling of a plaque to commemorate the founding of the university. One of the things that he suggested was when a new university was being established it should be through proper legislation and not through an ordinance. He also expressed genuine doubts about the promulgation of another ordinance aimed at the improvement of the new university. He also queried whether the same dull routine processes to establish outdated departments, curricula, and the meaningless ritual of research could be unimaginatively repeated here too just to boast of the size and stature of the university perhaps even about the number of universities in the state. The Education minister C.H Muhamammed Koya, the architect of Calicut University obviously must have been pained by these stringent observations. In his characteristic way he remarked that to do something new was really difficult though it was customary to be criticized for the lapses. In Kerala,

education ministers had been changing at short intervals and hence the educational policy too. A general complaint is that experimental and innovative educational policies are harmful. So there has ever been a cry for pursuing the tested and trusted path in matters of education. However, C.H. made it very clear in a statement that after the formation of the Calicut University, within a short period it could do something original at least in the form of new attempts. What were those new experiments? Calicut Unviersity was not formed just with the intention to reduce the size and problems of Kerala University. Northern Kerala, as hinted earlier, has ever been backward in education. But it is blessed with boundless natural resources, tradition, history and culture and highly imaginative people gifted with creative talents. The prime aim behind the formation of Calicut University was to transform the people of this region into educated people of action with an abounding sense of dedication. A meaningful rapport between the university and the industrial sector and a pioneering effort to transform the whole mass were woven into the very concept of Calicut University. The introduction of an adult education department, not very common in other universities, was a step in this direction. The hope was to make use of the service of college and university professors and teachers to spread education and information among the older people, men and women through evening and night classes. CH himself took part in many such classes and inspired others to futher this project.

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Another effort was to lint the educational experiments and the industrial sector. He thought, a degree in technology or engineering was important but it was more important for such personnel to gain actual work experience. He firmly believed that industries could provide the base for this and in turn receive the benefits of newfound, sound technological knowledge. The appointment of Sri Kaderkutty, a proven industrialist of north Malabar, as the first dean of technology faculty, was a bold step in this line. A mere degree was not reckoned as a must for this appointment. On the contrary, the organizational ability, vision and planning evinced by that industrialist were the sole criteria. We tried to solicit the co-operation of the industrial sector as a whole to educate and evolve a set of high calibre technologists and scientists. The very same point he highlighted in his later speech at the Assembly. Bachelor of technology courses in four subjects-forestry resources and development, fisheries, harnessing and utilization of chemicals, use of iron and steel. These courses of four years duration(8semester) were expected to be practical and actual work experience oriented under the prevailing conditions in factories. Western India Plywoods, Western India Steel Rolling Mills, Gwalior Rayons, Kerala Soaps Factory, etc. gave the facilities for practical training and actual work experience. The students also worked in distant and different processing, preserving, developing, and sales depots pertaining to fisheries,forestry, chemicals and iron and steel. At a time when big factories were unwilling to take even qualified engineers and scientists as apprentices on a

meager stipend basis, the education minister used his own personal influence to train more than fifity students in the above mentioned prestigious and fully developed factories. Perhaps this vital factor was not known to many. Some central institutions with the backing of Indian government objected to the courses on forestry and fisheries and even threatened that the degrees conferred by Calicut University would not be recognized. C.H. stuck to his guns at least during his tenure and masterminded the running and completion of these innovative courses; even granting its experimental nature and the inherent inevitable drawbacks. But all obstacles were overcome and all the four degree courses were started. Subject experts of neighbouring institutions, factories and governmental departments were appointed as teachers on a temporary basis. Classes were held in places like the Y.M.C.A on every working day students received lectures for two to three hours, besides vocational training. Koya himself inaugurated the courses at an informal gathering. It was a new experiment at the university level of education, innovative and exciting. Endeavors of this kind were not easy. In the meantime, we had to find a new location for the university and also provide essential facilities for its smooth functioning. In tackling these problems too, we had Koya's unstinted moral support and encouragement so that we could be bold and innovative. Professor Samuel Mathai happended to visit Thenhipalam where Kerala university had planned to

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develop a centre of learning. He was the chairman of the committee constituted for this purpose and among other members who visited the spot were Prof. Mundasseri and myself. That day I secretly shared one of my doubts with Mundasseri. 'Why should this great centre of learning be established in a locale so isolated and cut off from the haunts of social activities?' Indeed the place was desolate. Mohammed Koya himself described it as a God-forsaken barren land'. That is another story to which I shall return later. The administrative offices of the university were shifted from the Government Polytechnic, Calicut to Thenhipalam on October 2, 1969 _the day of Gandhiji's birth anniversary. Arrangements had been made for housing all the employees of that time on the campus itself. The supply of water and electricity was ensured right from the beginning. Facilities for travel, communication and shopping were also been made available prior to the shifting of the office. In due course the head office and the teaching departments were moved in to the campus. These were accomplished at an incredibly short space of time thanks to Koya's foresight and timely guidelines as well as the confidence that he reposed in me. It may not be out of place to cite here a brief note that he wrote about the role that I had in effecting these changes: 'The Calicut University he built up from scratch. It was Alladin's wonderful lamp. He planned it and managed the

The prime aim behind the formation of Calicut University was to transform the people of this regions into educated people of action with an abounding sense of dedication. A meaningful rapport between the university and the industrial sector and a pioneering effort to transform the whole mass were woven into the very concept of Calicut University. execution of the plans. In no time, the God-forsaken barren land at Thenhipalam became a model university'. As a matter of fact he himself was the Alladin who gave me the magic lamp. With a dignified humility he was only concealing his role while complimenting me. All the experiences of the new campus were not sweet. Some were bitter. But Mr.Koya shared our problems by visiting the campus almost every week. He was very fond of the university guest house. During his journeys to north Malabar he often halted enroute at the guest house. He would discuss our problems with us for hours together.
K.C. Chacko (First Pro Vice Chancellor, University of Calicut)

Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam receiving Justice V.R. Krishna Iyer

V.R.Krishna Iyer Visits University
People expect progressive steps only from Universities, not from any other fields like industries. niversities are meant for social uplift and they are the only source of guidance for social progress, said former Supreme Court Judge and veteran social activist Justice V. R. Krishna Iyer. The doyen of Indian judiciary, who visited the University on October 10, 2012, was interacting with the higher officials and academicians at the University Guest House. Every university has a mission to accomplish. Calicut is also no difference. People expect progressive steps only from Universities, not from any other fields like industries. If you aim at social development, your

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University can set out on a real odyssey, he inspired the teachers encircled him with reverence. The University community led by Vice Chancellor Prof. M. Abdul Salam, Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K Raveendranath and Registrar Dr. P.P.Mohamed and other statutory officers and Syndicate members received Krishna Iyer with a guard of honour. Syndicate member T.V Ebrahim handed over to him a copy of the draft project proposal for setting up the Department of Legal Studies on the campus and requested his patronage for the project.

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Honour

Vice Chancellor
COLONEL RANK
CONFERRED WITH
Brigadier Subramaniam, Deputy Director General in charge of Kerala and Lakshadweep NCC conferring honorary rank of Colonel on Vice Chancellor Dr.M. Abdul Salam. ice Chancellor Prof. M Abdul Salam was conferred with the honorary rank of Colonel by the Ministry of Defense for his outstanding contributions to the National Cadet Corps. Brigadier Subramaniam, Deputy Director General in charge of Kerala and Lakshadweep NCC, along with NCC Malabar Wing Commander Colonel M Purushothaman awarded the rank to the Prof. Salam by fixing the insignia on his shoulders at a function held at the Seminar complex on 7 August. “Today is a memorable and historic day in my life. Indeed with great honor and humility, I receive this prestigious title – the honorary rank of Colonel Commandant of the armed forces,” said Prof. Salam receiving the much coveted title. “I am deeply moved by the sense of patriotism and commitment to the mother nation and am fully aware of the responsibility. With this title, I have a responsibility to support all causes of NCC and Armed Forces with added spirit and enthusiasm. This title also confers more

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responsibility on me to promote NCC in all the affiliated colleges,” he said. NCC helps the youth develop good character, patriotism, comradeship, discipline, leadership, secular view and selflessness. Without the uniform, we may have caste, religion, politics, regional or linguistic spirits, and several diverse feelings, but in uniform, we shed all these feelings away to become one, just an Indian, he said. Brigadier Subramaniam read the citation at the function. “The NCC aims to add two lakh more cadets to the present number of 13 lakh in the country. It is our pleasure to honor great personalities in the country. That is why we recommended Prof. Salam to the Defence Ministry for the honorary rank, he said. University Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K. Raveendranath, NCC Group Commander Colonel M Purushothaman, Syndicate members Navas Jan, T V Ibrahim and PM Niyas felicitated. Colonel Manjeet welcomed the gathering and Battalion Commanding Officer Colonel KN Vijayan proposed a vote of thanks. - Vindhya P (III Sem. MCJ)

Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam Honoring Prof. M G S Narayanan. Also seen are Dr. Mohamedunni Alias Musthafa M.N. (Director, SDE), Prof. K. Raveendranath (PVC), T.V. Ibrahim (Member, Syndicate) and E J Jacob

Gurus Honored
t a special function titled 'Guruvandanam', Calicut University honored two luminaries who immensely contributed to the establishment of the Department of History and Department of Physical Education, which fetched many accolades to the institution from national and international circuits of intelligentsia. Prominent historian, social critic and former Head of the Department of History Prof. M G S Narayanan and Sri. E J Jacob, former Director of Physical Education and mastermind behind many victories of the University in sporting arena were the

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stalwarts honoured for their outstanding contributions to the University. Vice Chancellor Prof. M. Abdul Salam inaugurated Guruvandanam on October 5, 2012 at the Seminar Complex. “We are happy to imbibe lessons from the rich experiences of former leaders like Prof. M G S Narayanan and Sri. Jacob. It is nothing but their commitment to the University and perseverance to the knowledge that motivate these octogenarians to still serve us with valuable guidance. The new generation has many lessons to learn from their zeal and vigour”, Vice Chancellor said draping them with golden shawls in their honour. Prof. Narayanan and Sri. Jacob recollected good old days they spent on the campus. Integrity of Mohamed Arshad, an eight year old student, who gave back the lost money to its owner, was also acknowledged at the function. Vice Chancellor presented him with a memento.. Prof. M G S Narayanan launched the website and Sri. Jacob released the brochure of the School of Distance Education, University of Calicut at the session chaired by Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K. Raveendranath. Syndicate member T V Ebrahim, Head of the Department of History Prof. Asokan Mundon, Deputy Director of Department of Physical Education Dr. V P Zakeer Husain facilitated. Dr. Muhammadunni alias Mustafa, Director, SDE welcomed the gathering and Sri. M V Zacharia, PRO in charge proposed a vote of thanks. Muhammadali N.
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Vice Chancellor presenting certificate to Mohamed Arshad

Honour

Netherlands honours
Dr. K.S. Manilal
Interpretation and translation of Hortus Malabaricus brings award

hree and half decades of investigations of the flora and in depth study of the translations 12 volumes translation of Horthus Malabaricus has fetched the renowned taxonomist Dr.K.S. Manilal, the highest Civilian Award given by the Netherlands Government. Representing Her Majesty Queen Beatrix, Ms. Marijke A. Van Drunen Littel, Consel General in Mumbai, kingdom of the Netherlands honoured him with “Officer in the Order of Oranje-Nassau Award'' at an august gathering held at Taj Gateway Hotel, Kozhikode. Prof. K.S.Manilal, Emiratus Professor, Department of Botany, University of Calicutwas chosen for this rare honour in recognition of his signal achievement in interpreting and translating Hortus Malabaricus, which is the most extensive study of the medico-botanical resources of Asia published in 17thcentury Europe. The treatise is considered to be an important testimony of the historical contact between Netherlands and India. Hortus Indicus Malabaricus was the result of a project launched by Hendrik Adriaan van Rheede, the then Dutch Governor of Malabar. The 12 Volumes of the Latin book were published during 1678-1693 from Amsterdam. The compilation and publication of Hortus Malabaricus is intimately connected with the history of India, politics of the 17th century Netherlands and the social conditions of Malabar, now part of Kerala.
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An important development in the study of Hortus Malabaricus was its translation from Latin into English and Malayalam, with annotation and modern botanical and historical interpretation, a 35-year work by Prof. Manilal. These 12 volumes in English were published in 2003 by the Univesity of Kerala. The information on the medicinal uses of plants described in this book is of immense significance in the context of attempts being made in several countries to recover the traditional knowledge and native wisdom related to various scientific disciplines. Scattered throughout the Hortus Malabaricus are details of aspects of life and culture in South India. The importance given to Itty Achuthen the local physician whose knowledge forms the key pillar in the Hortus Malabaricus in spite of his lower caste origin tells us a great deal about the complex social structure of south Indian society 300 years ago. Achuthen's selection by the Dutch Governor van Rheede highlights the respect and high regard placed on merit of the individual in the ancient south Indian society. Despite the uniqueness and importance of the book, Hortus Malabaricus is seldom mentioned in scholarly discussions onthe scientific heritage of Asia, because the book was written in old Latin and soinaccessible to most Asians. The significance of Prof. Manilal's translation to English and Malayalam lies in this context. Yet, the

significance ofHortus as a scientific treatise with immensecontemporary value remains to be properly appreciated and its translator remainslargely unknown outside theacademic community. The award and its publication during the Netherlands-India heritage day celebration were actually a belated tribute to a welldeserved academic.

Eminent Botanists, from across the country attended the function which wasinaugurated by Hon. Minister Dr.M.K. Muneer. Dr.C.K. Ramachandran presided over. Prof. M.G.S. Narayanan, and Dr.P.A. Indira Balachandran offered felicitations. Dr.M.Sabu, Professor and Head Department of Botany welcomed the gathering and Dr.P. Sunoj Kumar proposed a vote of thanks.

Profile
Pro. (Dr.). K. S. Manilal

Pro. (Dr.). Kattungal Subramaniam Manilal started his career as one of the earliest taxonomic researchers in South India in 1960 at the University of Calicut. He played a pivotal role in establishing theSchool of Floristic and Plant Taxonomy at the University, now recognized as one of the foremost institutions of its kind in Asia. As a teacher he was involved in the training of several young taxonomists at a time when taxonomy received little attention and institutional support. His explorations at Silent Valley helped reveal the status of the rare flora there and provedcrucialin prompting the Central Govt. declaration of the site as a national park. Dr. Manilal verified the botanical identity of several traditional Indian ayurvedic medicinal plants, and established the identity of over 650 plants described in Hortus Malabaricus. During the years 1972-2002, he and his students discovered and described over 240 new species and prepared records of newly identified flowering plants. Dr. Manilal has published 11 books and as many as 200 papers on various aspects of plant taxonomy. Through his timely initiative, he helped establish the Indian Association for Angiosperm (IAAT), with over 700 dedicated Life Members on its rolls. Dr. Manilal is also the founder of the international research journal Rheedea,specializing in taxonomy. He has conducted extensive studies on the social, cultural, political, historical and linguistic aspects of botanical researches, proving the relevance of taxonomy to both laymen and the nation. His work has also won him international reputation. He has been a visiting scientist at various universities such as London University, Smithsonian Institution and Leiden University. In the present scenario, when our natural plant resources assume great economic and political importance, in thecontext of issues related to patent and Intellectual Property Rights, the significant contributions made by Dr. Manilal in nurturing, maintaining and developing expertise in taxonomy needs to be further acknowledged and appreciated.

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Botanical Garden a Marvelous Isle
floating leaf that does not sink even if a 10 kg stone is placed on it…a carnivorous plant that eats insects… a tree that mimics the sound of a cannon firing…a tree looking as if it has been planted upside down….These are not scenes from a Harry Potter movie but feasts that entertain the beholders' eyes as they wind their way down the leafy fringes of the Botanical Garden at Calicut University Campus. Amozon Lily is an aquatic plant that should make it to the Olympics in weight lifting. Its leaf can coolly carry a weight of upto 10 kg . The carnivorous plant that eats insects is known by the innocuous name Pitcher plant. Cannon Ball tree's fruits when collide with each other, make the sound of a cannon: Boom! Boom!! Boom!!! The Botanical Garden is a magical feast to eyes that can inspire even the dullest of you to a poetic ecstasy. “With around 2500 species of plants and trees from all over the world, it is regarded as the best botanical garden among universities in India,” says Dr. M. Sabu, Head of Botany Department which maintains the garden. Medicinal plants, ginger plants, aroides, aquatic plants, ferns, aromatic grasses, wild bananas, spices and

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various exotic trees grow here. “Due to the existence of diverse geographical features, we could cultivate almost all types of plants ,” Dr. Sabu adds. There are low lands, uphill slopes and wet patches in the Botanical Garden that gives it the appearance of a sylvan collage complete with exotic flora. Rudraksha, Andaman Padok, Autograph, Ficus Krishnae, African Tulip, Camphor, Iron Wood, Octopus, Aeroplane Wood, Sausage and Baobab are among the rare trees growing here. The 40 acre greenery project was launched in 1972 under the stewardship of Dr. B.K. Nayar, the then Head of the department. It was inaugurated by Prof. R.E. Holttum, Director of Singapore Botanical Garden. Students from various educational institutions visit the garden with prior permission. The entrance fee is nominal and the money is used solely for the maintenance of the garden. The miniature jungle path in the garden serves to provide visitors the delights of a virtual trekking experience. For the adventure seekers there is also an erumadam to pump up their adrenaline.

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The garden is a member of Botanic Gardens Conservation International which is the largest plant conservation network in the world. It was adjudged the best stall at Calicut Flower Show during 2006 and 2007. go, the project still remains incomplete. The Garden is also in urgent need of footpaths and street lights. Green brigade Green brigade is the eco club of the Botany department. It is an Environmental Science division initiative to conserve nature and spread awareness of eco-friendly projects. They undertake various initiatives like planting trees, training students on planting and conserving trees etc. Recently they planted 50 Sapota saplings along University roadsides and in department premises. “All the 52 club members actively took part in the venture. Their job is not simply planting trees. Instead they are taking turns to do watering, manuring and other nurturing activities to ensure their proper growth,” said C.C. Harilal,

faculty of botanical department who is in charge of the club. “We wanted the departmental club to be upgraded to a university level club. The process is expected to complete soon. Then all students of the university can take part in it,” he added. Ginger house and Ginger villa Ginger House and Ginger Villa are projects for multiplication, popularization and domestication of endangered and wild ornamental plants. It is done by Dr. M Sabu, Head of Botany Department. Under the projects, department grows 200 species of ginger and its 2000 accessions. Ginger House is funded by Botanic Gardens Conservation International and Ginger Villa by Department of Bio Technology and Department of Science and Technology. Through these novel schemes and projects, Calicut University is reasserting its commitment to nature, ecology and sustainable development. - Sanish. M.S.(III Sem. MCJ)

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College Profile

GOVT. ARTS & SCIENCE COLLEGE

Keeping Abreast of the Times
ovt. Arts & Science college was established in 1964 following popular pressure to cater to the higher educational needs of the students of the Kozhikode district and its adjacent districts. In the beginning, it started functioning on the Training College Campus, Mananchira , Kozhikode. In 1970, the college moved to the present location in Meenchanda with 20.15 acres of land. One of the pertinent facts about this college is that a predominant section of the students belong to economically and socially underprivileged families. Besides students from Lakshadeep Islands and the tribal belts of Waynad, students from Cannanore to Trissur districts are studying here. The college has 84 teachers, 42 non teaching staff and around 1600 students. It is to be noted that 80% of the students are girls nowadays. The College offers 12 under graduate courses and 6 post graduate courses .Apart from these, the college has an excellent Research Centre at the Hindi Department. The degree courses include Physics, Chemistry, Zoology, Botany, Mathematics, Malayalam, English, Hindi, Economics, Commerce, History and Arabic & History. PG courses comprise Physics, Hindi, Economics, History, Commerce and Malayalam. The college has a Computerized Library with more than 75,000 books. Besides an automated office, the college has internet facilities which give access to the students free of cost. INFLIB NET facility in the college gives students as well as teachers access to ebooks and journals. College offers coaching classes and training sessions to various competitive examinations conducted at the National and State levels. These include UPSC – Civil Service Exam, UGC – NET Exam and exams of the Kerala Public Service Commission. Last year alone nearly 20 students got admission to various Central Universities after completing their degree courses and 15 students cleared the NET exam in different disciplines. The college has a vibrant Placement Cell as well.

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The college excels in cultural and extra - curricular realms through the activities of an array of clubs such as Film Club, Media Club, Literary Club and so on. Recently the college has started a Publication Division too. Annually the students published their new letters 'Arts Post' and 'Arts Focus'. The students have already produced half a dozen short films which were aired on prominent Malayalam Television Channels. Eminent public figures such as late Sukumar Azeekode, O.N.V.Kurup, M.G.S.Narayan etc. visited the college last year and conversed with the students. Seminars were conducted focusing on socially sensitive issues such as Mullapperiyar and Koodamkulam. NSS and NCC units have been doing exemplary work in Kozhikode and neighboring districts. Special mentioned deserves to NSS units which are instrumental in changing the faces of many remote villages in Kozhikode and Wayanad districts. The work done by the NSS units in the Marad area got immense appreciation from the general public. The Blood Donation Forum in the college has 117 members. With the completion of the Ladies' Hostel, a long cherished dream of the students of this college has come true. As there was no Ladies' Hostel, students and teachers from distant places had to depend on private hostels in Kozhikode town. For the construction of the same, UGC has granted Rs. 1 crore and the State Government Rs. 97.7 lakhs. Apart from this amount, the State Government has agreed to give Rs. 25 lakhs for the construction of a compound wall for the hostel and Rs. 2 lakhs for setting of a kitchen. The state Plan Fund has also allotted Rs. 10 lakhs for various miscellaneous works such as auditorium echo proofing, repair of Ladies' Haven and Canteen, extension of Library building and for providing projectors and Laptops to each department. There is not an iota of exaggeration in telling that Govt. Arts & Science College, despite its various limitations, can cop up with the changing times.

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Tribute

Homage to

Prof. K.A. Jaleel
He was a scholar and a ripe and good one; Exceeding wise, fair spoken and persuading; Lofty and sour to them that loved him not; But to those men that sought him, sweet as summer. (Shakespeare, Henry VIII)

he best available verses to portray the magnanimity and erudition of Prof. K A Jaleel (90), former Vice Chancellor of the University of Calicut, who passed away on September 12, 2012, after leaving indelible marks in the history of higher learning in Malabar. Passionate scholar and committed warrior of social cause, Prof. Jaleel served the society in many capacities. Born to the late B. Kunhali and Naseema in North Paravur on September 22, 1922, Prof Jaleel graduated from University College, Trivandrum in 1945 and received Post-graduate degree from Travancore University in 1946. After obtaining his Masters in English and a short stint with Islamiah College, Vaniampadi, Prof. Jaleel shifted his domain of activities to Malabar in 1948 joining Farook College as Professor of English. In 1957, he assumed the charge of Principle of the college; a small step in his personal life, but a giant leap in the advancement of Malabar since the college, under his wise leadership, fast became the most professionalized higher education hub in the region. Considering his visionary leadership, Government of Kerala nominated him as Vice Chancellor of the University in 1979 and he continued in the post till 1983. Apart from these crucial roles, Prof. Jaleel served in many positions like Chairman, Task Force for Establishing University in Kannur University, Member, Special Committee appointed by Govt. of Kerala for advising the Govt. on starting of more universities in the state (1967), Member, Special Committee appointed by Govt. of Kerala for advising the Govt. on starting of more universities in

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the state (1967), Member, Kerala Public Examination Board, Govt. of Kerala(1979-83),Member, Task Force for Planning for Higher Education (VI plan) appointed by govt. of Kerla, Member, Special Committee, Central Wakf Council for co-ordination of Modern Education and Deeni Taleem (1973-75), Member, UGC Committee for Academic Centres (1975), Member, Syndicate, University of Calicut (1968-76), Dean, Faculty of Languages, University of Calicut (1976-78). Prof. Jaleel has many publications in English and Malayalam to his credit. 'Humour in Ancient Greek Literature' (1958), '“Education in the Ancient World' ( 1 9 7 0 ) , ' V i d ya b h a s a n i r i k s h a n a n g a l ' , ' N e w Horizons','Thirinchi Nokkumbol' are some of them. For his achievement and contributions, Prof Jaleel clinched many awards like IC Chakko Award by Kerala Sahithya Academi (1991), Sha Saheb Award (1992), Senior Citizen Excellence Award (1994) Ramashramam Award (1997), Rotary Award for Excellence in Education (1997) and Gem Serve Award. Prof. M. Abdul Salam, Vice Chancellor of the University along with Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K. Raveendranath paid homage to Prof. Jaleel at his residence at Feroke. The University community also expressed its deep condolence on the demise of the former Vice Chancellor at a meeting held at the Seminar complex on 13 September 2012. Registrar Dr. P.P. Mohamed read the condolence message and Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K. Raveendranath presided over the function. Representatives of various service organizations spoke on the occasion. Dr. Muhammadali N.
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US opens

Collaboration

ITS DOORS
TO CALICUT UNIVERSITY

American Consul General Jennifer McCain (middle), Vice Chancellor Dr. M Abdul Salam and PVC Prof. K Raveendranath in the session.

“A lot of opportunities await Calicut University in education and research if it joins hands with the universities in America”, Mrs. McCain said.

epresentatives of the American Government under the leadership of American Consel General Jennifer McCain visited the University on July 16 and had discussions with University higher officials to explore the possibilities of academic tie-up with US higher learning centres. The visit was part of a pact between the USA and India in the field of information and communication. “A lot of opportunities await Calicut University in education and research if it joins hands with the universities in America”, Mrs. McCain said. The team met Vice Chancellor Prof M Abdul Salam, Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K Raveendranath and various department heads. They explained different ways to utilize the services like short and long term exchange programs, library services, joined seminars, scholarships, fellowships, opportunities for higher education etc. Departments like Distance Education, Journalism and Mass Communication, Nano Technology, Women's Studies and Botany can benefit more, the team said. They also elaborated the services rendered by the US-India Education Foundation and Public Affairs department in Chennai office of the Consul General. Koreena Ebra Arnold, Maya Sivakumar and Ratna Mukharjee were in the US team. Prof M.V.Joseph, Dr C D Sebastian, Finance Officer K P Rajesh, Dr. Molly Kuruvila, Dr. Sucheta Nair, Dr P Raveendran, Dr M Sabu, and Dr Ashokan Mundon represented the University. - Thara (III Sem. MCJ)

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Collaboration

CU ties up
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with INO

he India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) Project is a multi-institutional collaboration to build a world-class underground laboratory for non-accelerator based high energy and nuclear physics research in India. One of the biggest experimental particle physics projects undertaken in India to focus on neutrino experiment, INO is called as CERN of India. This 1350-crore project is expected to be completed in 2015. When completed, the INO will house the world's most massive magnet, four times larger than the 12,500-tonne magnet in the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Along with premier research institutes like Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (IITB), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Indian Institute of Technology (IITI), University of Calicut is also collaborating with the project through the active participation of two of its faculty members - Dr A.M Vinod Kumar and Dr. C.D. Ravi Kumar of Department of Physics. They talk to ASCENT, about the modus operandi and expected outcome of the tie-up. Excerpts:

What is the project about? The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is an effort aimed at building a world-class underground laboratory to study the fundamental issues in science. It is one of the biggest experimental particle physics projects undertaken in India. The primary goal of the laboratory is to study the neutrinos from various natural and laboratory sources using an iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector. It is envisaged that such an underground facility will develop into a centre for other studies as well - physics, biology, geology, etc., which can make use of the special conditions that exist deep underground. What is its cost and who supervise it? It is a 1350 crore project jointly funded by Department of Atomic Energy and Department of Science and Technology. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research which supervises the project has, Dr. Naba K Mondal as its project leader. At present, there are nearly 26 institutions and about 100 scientists involving in the project. Tamilnadu Electricity Board(TNEB) has been entrusted with the task of being the consultant and nodal agency for the project formulation. The study is expected to have great impact on nuclear physics, particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics. This large collaboration is first of its kind in the country and is expected to grow further. It will also facilitate in tying up the requisite infrastructure for the underground labs and over-ground residential quarters, office, guest house, etc.

Dr. C D Ravikumar and Dr. A M Vinodkumar

Where is it located? The INO is proposed to be constructed in Bodi West Hills (BWH) region near Pottipuram village in Theni district of Tamilnadu. Since the laboratory cavern needs to be more than 1000 m underground, the choice of site is determined by the rock quality. The rock found in Bodi West Hills is mainly Charnockite, which is the hardest variety of rock known. The site was decided, taking into consideration environmental and geological aspects as well. Its tunnel and other apparatus do not cross Kerala territory. If such a tunnel is to be constructed in Kerala territory, it should get sanction from the State government.
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Will the construction work of the INO project give chance for any disturbance to the residents ? Blasting executed for the excavation of the cavern underground will cause low and short vibrations . INO will undertake ground vibration monitoring study during actual execution of the project along with other rock mechanics and instrumentation studies. Controlled blasting will be adopted in the initial reaches to dampen noise and vibrations till first few hundred meters of tunnel is constructed. However, it is likely to be much lower because of the overburden of hard rock and soils, except in the case of the initial sections of the tunnels. Appropriate blasting pattern and modern blasting techniques, may be adopted such that vibration due to the blasting is the minimum. The technology required for building tunnels is very well known and is used routinely around the country to build road tunnels and metro rail projects in cities. What is your role in this project? The construction of iron calorimeter (ICAL) for studding neutrinos is crucial in this project. The detector will consist of around 50000 tons of magnetized iron plates arranged in stacks with active detectors like Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in between the iron plates. Charged particles such as muons produced in the rare interactions of neutrinos with the iron will be detected by the RPCs. This detector if constructed successfully will make India the owner of the largest magnet in the world. At present my work is pertained to the Simulation process. In this process we analyses the workings of the detector under development using computers . Our group (AM Vinod Kumar and CD Ravikumar) will focus initially on simulation of detector properties using libraries developed by INO group. Once the project is sanctioned (which is submitted) we will hire two JRF's and we plan them to be part of assembling, testing, measurements etc. of RPC's. As neutrinos are chargeless particles ,this iron detector will help in detecting the massless particles effectively. ICAL being a static device without moving parts will enable the neutrino reaction with the cosmic rays in the earth's atmosphere. How will the student community benefit from this project? This project will give the chance for the research students to explore the wide scope of particle physics. Several groups belonging to different Universities, IITs and research Institutes in India are part of the
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The Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider

collaboration working on the research & development of all components of INO under the name National Neutrino Collaboration Group (NNCG). All members of the collaboration, executing agencies and their workers will be trained to cooperate in ensuring compliance with environmental guidelines. Faculties and students from participating universities/institutes will be trained in different labs where RPC's were setup. INO being the biggest experiment on particle physics in India, it indeed enhances one's knowledge on the nuclear physics and other related areas of study. How do majority of the residents in Pottipuram village in Theni district where the project will be located, respond to the project? Pottipuram village is now acquainted with many opportunities because of this project. INO has already accepted the proposal, from the State government through the district collector, to set aside some amount for local area development. An amount of three crore rupees has already been sanctioned for this purpose. This will be used to provide street lighting, water and other amenities to communities living in villages near by. INO will be a catalyst for improvement in academic and living standards in the neighbourhood. Furthermore, gainful employment will be there for a small number of people by way of sourcing of services and daily needs for the INO facility and for the upkeep of buildings and landscapes. A major benefit will be for schools and colleges in the region as the students interested in science can benefit from the outreach activities as well as doing projects at the lab. Efforts will be made to improve the infrastructure and academic standards of the surrounding schools as permitted by governing rules. Exhibitions and other similar facilities will be arranged to enhance the scientific spirit of the local youngsters, etc Water will be piped in from outside. The Tamil Nadu Water and Drainage Board (TWAD) is responsible for providing a suitable water source which will not affect the present usage in local villages. Shamna Mohammed Ali & Sanish M.S (MCJ III Semester)

Events

TWO-DAY PROGRAMME

TO EMPOWER SC/ST STUDENTS
A.P Anil Kumar, Minister for Welfare of Scheduled Castes and Backward Classes and Tourism, inaugurating the workshop

he Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribes Cell of the University in association with UGC Career & Guidance Wing conducted a two-day workshop for the empowerment of SC/ST students on September 27 and 28. A.P Anil Kumar, Minister for Welfare of Scheduled Castes and Backward Classes and Tourism, inaugurated the function which was attended by more than 200 students and 50 teachers from different affiliated colleges. Vice Chancellor Prof. M.Abdul Salam chaired the inaugural session. The workshop was to nurture self confidence and competitive mindset in students and to sensitize them to their rights and opportunities in public sector. This is for the first time a University in Kerala conducts an exclusive empowerment programme for SC/ST students. This never-before effort of the University was initiated by the Vice Chancellor following a proposal submitted by K.Sivaraman, the only SC/ST representative in the Syndicate. Minister has said that the Government plans to extend the financial support to the SC/ST students in the selfThis is for the first time a University in Kerala conducts an exclusive empowerment programme for SC/ST students. This never-before effort of the University was initiated by the Vice Chancellor following a proposal submitted by K.Sivaraman, the only SC/ST representative in the Syndicate.

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financing colleges also. “We also plan to give Rs 20,000 to each SC/ST student who joins the professional course after good performance at Plus-Two level. The concession given to the professional course students will be further extended to the students of Arts and Science College”, he said. Registrar Dr. P P Mohamed launched the portal of SC/ST Empowerment Initiative and Pro Vice Chancellor Prof. K.Raveendranath presented memento to the winner of logo design competition C.K.Suhail from student of School of Distance Education. Syndicate member K.Sivaraman welcomed the gathering and Syndicate members R.S Panickar, T.V Ibrahim and P.M Niyas, CRUST director Prof. D. D Namboothiri facilittate. Employment Information & Guidance Bureau Chief K. Janardhan proposed a vote of thanks. Counseling experts P.N. Sambasivan, K.Rajendran and PRO of the University M.V. Zacharia offered classes on SC/St rights, career opportunities and other related areas. Vinod Krishna T.Y. Nirmal, Joy Sujaritha Hoatha and Vinod A.R also spoke on subjects like self improvement, body language and nurturing the unique talent. Folk art forms presented by various troops were the highlight of the function. Advocate K.N.A Khader inaugurated the valedictory session where and K.Sivaraman distributed certificates to the participants and Dr. Pushpalatha proposed a vote of thanks.

- Vibish (MCJ III Semester)
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Events

WORKSHOP ON

PARENTING
he fast changing world influences our life styles, ways of thinking, and feelings just as it takes a heavy toll on our interpersonal relationships. The sheer magnitude of changes in science and technology, especially in communication technology, is complex and unimaginable. The hectic life style and occupational stress of the parents take away the chances of warm and affectionate relationship between parents and kids. Communication gap between parents and children and between parents themselves is paradoxically, the most hazardous reality in the present socio-familial scenario. Most of the parents complain about the behavior of their children, particularly the adolescents. For them, it is positively annoying and embarrassing. Even educated parents are unaware of the problems of development in various stages of life. Parents are increasingly resigned to the fate of being passive spectators in the growth of their own kids. In fact, parenting is an art that needs skill and training. It is against this backdrop that the Department of Lifelong Learning and Extension conducted a three-day workshop on 'The Art of Parenting'. Objective of the Course: The objective of the workshop was to enlighten the parents on their role in the growth and development of their children and to foster parenting skills, by adopting healthy ways of dealing with kids in order to bring the best out of them and thus pave way for the emergence of a new and healthy generation, geared up to face the realities and challenges of life. Course contents: The course contents focused on 'Developmental needs of children' Psycho-Socio-Cultural and Educational problems, Parental overindulgence and consequences, Causes of maladaptive behaviour, Role of parents in paving the way for happy and successful future of the children.
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THE ART OF
The experts: A team of experts in including Trained Counselors, Clinical Police Personals specializing in juvenile Teacher educators and Pediatricians workshop. diverse fields Psychologists, delinquencies, attended the

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The workshop was inaugurated by Dr.M.Abdul Salam, Hon'ble Vice Chancellor, University of Calicut. Stressing the need for deep and abiding friendship and understanding between parents and children, the VC explained how a healthy equation between them will prompt children to share their problems and concerns with parents. An atmosphere of mutual concern thus fostered will go a long way in helping children negotiate the challenges of modern existence. The first session on 'The Art of parenting' was a presentation by Dr.K.Sivarajan, Head, Dept. of Lifelong Learning and Extension University of Calicut. Mr. Yahya Khan, Mentor, ORC City Police, Calicut, dealt with diverse issues related to parenting. Causes of Maladaptive Behavior, Problem Identification and Solving were dealt by Dr. L.R.Madhujan, Consultant Psychologist, Praptham Adolescent Counseling Centre, Karuna Sai, Vellanad, Trivandrum. Dr. Madhujan's interactive sessions were captivating and formed the highlight of the workshop. Dr.C.N.Balakrishnan Nambiar ,Principal, Devaki Amma Memorial College of Teacher Education presented on the topic 'Inter-parental relationship – a masterpiece module of child rearing and caring'. Sr. Catherine Chacko 'MEA SPANDAN' Counseling Centre St.Vincent's Home, Calicut spoke on 'Role of parents in the successful future of children.' She explained how the best gift the parents could give their children could be nothing but a high level of 'Self Esteem' that forms the key to happiness and success in life. Sr. Chacko also threw light on the various styles of parenting and their consequences on children.

Elaborating on the four commonly identified types of parenting, she delineated their relative merits and demerits. Her talk was liberally peppered with practical parenting tips that could foster greater self-esteem and mutual understanding between parents and children. Valedictory function: The Valedictory function that included the evaluation session and the certification ceremony was held on the afternoon of 31-05-2012. Sri.Abdul Ahad Pathiyil, Section Officer welcomed the gathering. The function was attended by Prof:K.Raveendranath, Pro Vice Chancellor, University of Calicut. Promising the university's support and continued encouragement to such novel programmes, he expressed his immense appreciation for the efforts of Dr.K.Sivarajan, Head, Dept. of Lifelong Learning and Extension. Dr.K.Sivarajan, in his presidential address announced the New Mega Enterprise on MOTHER EMPOWERMENT throughout the jurisdiction of Calicut University. Sr. Catherine Chacko, Counselor, MEA Spandan Counseling Centre, felicitated the participants of the programme as well as the Department for its novel programmes and activities which hoped will pave way for the emergence of a healthy generation. She greatly appreciated the team spirit of the department.

Parents are increasingly resigned to the fate of being passive spectators in the growth of their own kids. In fact, parenting is an art that needs skill and training.
Feedback from participants: The participants expressed their appreciation for conducting the

- Dr. K. Sivarajan

Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam inaugurating the workshop

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Facts on 3 University Projects
in Public Private Participation (PPP)

Sl. No. 1.

Proposed Projects Green Sports Complex Institute of Education and Research for Developing Societies Badminton Courts and allied facilities

Sponsoring Agencies Indian Olympic Association along with Calicut University Grace Educational Association along with Calicut University
Badminton Development

Estimated Outlay
(Approximate)

Land Space Required

Land use Policy Total ownership and possl

`. 92.55 crore

50 acres

2.

ession right of the land along with the created structure will be with the University only. Administrative and acadl emic control will be with a governing body with ViceChancellor as Chairman. This approval is subject to l the concurrence of the Government of Kerala.

`. 30.00 crore

10 acres

3.

Trust along with Calicut University `. 30.00 crore Total `. 152.55 crore

3 acres

1.Minutes Details of Syndicate resolution - Green Sports Complex, University of Calicut. Item No. Subject 2012. 244 dated 09-03-2012 To consider the minutes of the meeting of the Vice-Chancellor with the office bearers of the Kerala Olympic Association. (DPE A2) Decision The proposal of establishing Green Sports Complex in Calicut University under the Kerala Olympic Association and National Olympic Association along with Kerala Government be proceeded further for a detailed study and for developing a strategy for its execution, implementation, utilization and management of the same in a manner that will ensure, total ownership and possession of the land (along with the created structure) with the University. There will be a triparty management involving Calicut University, Olympic Association and Government of Kerala for this project. This project should primarily aim the sports aspirations of South India with particular reference to the students of Calicut University and people of Northern Kerala. This decision is subject to the approval of Government of Kerala. The Vice-Chancellor is authorized to proceed with Kerala Olympic Association and Government of Kerala. The details of the proposal shall be presented in the next Syndicate meeting for further decision.

2.Minutes Details of Syndicate resolution C.H. Mohammed Koya Chair for Studies on Developing Societies. Item No. Subject 2012. 315 dated 27-03-2012 To consider the master plan of CH Mohammed Koya Chair for studies on developing societies. (Pl.D. B) Decision Accepted. The Chairman, Grace Educational Association vide his letter dated 20-03-2012, requested to establish C.H. Mohammed Koya Institute of Education and Research for Developing Societies. C.H. Mohammed Koya is the founding father of this University. Therefore, this proposal is considered as a very special case. As requested by the Chairman, Grace Educational Association, instead of C.H. Mohamed Koya Chair, they are allowed to establish C.H. Mohammed Koya Institute of Education and Research for Developing Societies as per the plan (approximate 10 acres) and estimate (approximate Rs.30 Crores). This permission is allowed subject to the land use policy of the University. Accordingly, the execution, implementation, utilization and management of the project will be in a manner that will ensure total ownership and possession of the land along with created structure with the University. This decision will be subject to the approval of the Government of Kerala. There will be a biparty Governing Body involving Calicut University and Grace Educational Association for this purpose with the Vice-Chancellor as Chairman. The programmes undertaken by the C.H. Mohammed Koya Institute of Education and Research for Developing Societies will be as per the rules and regulations and mandate of the University. The Syndicate felt that the present plan needs an elegant modification to fit the stature of the founding father. A MoU will be signed between the Chairman of the trust and the Registrar of Calicut University.

3. Minutes details of Syndicate resolution Establishing Badminton Courts and allied facilities of International Standards. Item No. Subject 2012. 343 dated 31.03.2012 To consider the report of the Syndicate Sub Committee to examine the proposal submitted by Badminton Development Trust, Kozhikode seeking permission to associate with university in establishing Badminton courts and allied facilities of international standards. (DPE) Decision Accepted. This permission is allowed subject to the land use policy of the University. Accordingly, the execution, implementation, utilization and management of the project will be in a manner that will ensure total ownership and possession of the land along with created structure with the University. This decision will be subject to the approval of the Government of Kerala. There will be a biparty agreement between Calicut University and Badminton Development Trust detailing the terms and conditions of the associations, use of the facility, etc. There will be a governing body consisting of members from both sides with the Vice-Chancellor as Chairman. The Badminton facility will be established at a place closely adjacent to the proposed Green Sports Complex of the University. Shri. R.S. Panicker and Shri. Adv. G.C. Prasanth Kumar dissented.

Note Unfortunately, due to false propaganda and media hype accusing gift of land to private parties and consequent chaos, marches, dharnas, agitations and violence, the University was forced to cancel the decisions.

Events

MASCAA
ice Chancellor Dr. M Abdul Salam urged the budding journalists to uphold the ethics of journalism in their future media endeavors. He was inaugurating the 8th edition of Mass Communication Alumni Association (MASSCAA) gathering 'Communion 2012” on August 10 at the Education department seminar hall. 'Today, media content is far removed from truth and reality. But, truth cannot be suppressed forever. Human values such as truth, fairness and integrity should be the top priority of journalists as they are the watchdogs of any democratic society, said Dr. M Abdul Salam. A seminar on 'T.P Chandrasekharan's Murder and the Media' held as part of the gathering highlighted various aspects of media coverage of the issue. P.M Manoj, associate editor, Deshabhimani ,K.Shahjahan, senior news editor, Asianet News and N.Padmanabhan ,Ex-Gen Secretary of Kerala Union of Working Journalists (KUWJ) made presentations in the seminar moderated by M P

conducts Communion 2012

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Prasanth, Malabar Bureau Chief of the Times of India. An interactive session held after the seminar witnessed interesting feedbacks from the audience. M.P Prasanth, president of MASCAA chaired the inaugural session. Sajeed Naduthodi, secretary welcomed the gathering and Abdul Latheef Naha, treasurer proposed a vote of thanks. Dr. Sucheta Nair, head, department of Journalism and Mass Communication and Sanish M, student representative felicitated. In the general body meeting of MASCAA held at the department of Journalism and Mass Comm-unication, alumni reminisced their good old days. Abdul Latheef Naha, senior reporter of the Hindu and Rajeev P R, reporter of the Times of India were elected president and secretary respe-ctively. Dr. Shaju P P, assistant professor at Mary Matha College is the treasurer. The Iftar party held at the end added colour to the whole event.
- Supriya .M (MCJ III Semester)

Vice Chancellor inaugurating Mass Communication Alumni Day Communion 2012

Events

green
Vice Chancellor Dr. M. Abdul Salam inaugurating the plantation project . ice Chancellor Dr.M.Abdul Salam inaugurated the plantation project titled 'Greening the Campus for Food Security and Environmental Sustainability' on June 26 by planting mango saplings in the newly set up orchard on the western side of the campus. The primary objective of the project is to ensure sustainable biodiversity and food security with the support of local people. It meant for research purpose also. The total area proposed for the plantation is five hectors. “At the outset, our plan is to develop a mango orchard that will showcase rare varieties of mango trees” said M Bhaskaran, Estate Officer. For the project the campus is divided into sub blocks based on soil type and cropping pattern. The mango orchard is behind the Humanities block”, he said. This project is included in the University's 12th plan proposal. On the inaugural day, higher officers and trade union representatives on the campus planted saplings bearing

Campus getting

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their names. Secured with bio-fencing, the orchard is designed to maximize the utilization of rain water. “Apart from environmental sustainability the project will beautify the campus as the orchards include stunning landscapes and well designed ponds”, Bhaskaran said. “The project offers jobs to the local people. Moreover, the fruits of the trees will fetch some income too' he added. The inauguration held at the seminar hall of the humanities building. Registrar Dr M V Joseph welcomed the gathering. Pro-vice-chancellor Prof.K Raveendranath chaired the function. Estate officer, M Bhaskaran presented the report. Dr. A K Pradeep proposed a vote of thanks.
- Supriya .M (MCJ III Semester)

33 l ASCENT AUGUST - OCTOBER 2012

Trends

Out-gendered
ould you call Anver Khalid lucky or unlucky? To be sure, he is not an all too rare a specimen.Anvar is a student doing Teachers' Training at an institute in Mokkam, a moderate town some thirty kilometres away from Kozhikode. In Anvar's class there are a total of forty students. But Anvaris the only male representative! A lone male amid a melee of females. Anvar, a young boy not yet out of his teens, finds the experience positively enjoyable, though at times he finds himself in an awkward position since there is nobody in the class on whose shoulders he can lay his hands and have a friendly chat. Though Anver'scase mightbe extreme, the depleting numberof male students on our campuses is indeed a topic worthy of a sociological dissertation. It is especially interesting since it's happening in a country like India, where the general demographic trend is in the contrary direction. Why are boys becoming a minority in our educational institutions when they are a majority in the society? Figures speak for themselves. In Delhi, for example, it is not only the traditional girls' only colleges that have become girls' colleges, but even coeducational institutions are becoming female bastions because of the predominantly female student population. In the reputed Sri Ram College, Girls account for more than seventy seven per cent ofthe student population, while boys constitute a measly 23 per cent. In courses like psychology, the gender ratio is even more skewed.

The endangered Male
In most metro cities, Arts & Science colleges are becoming female strongholds with little male presence. Kerala is no exception. Farook College, one of the largest colleges in the state was once a boys' only college. VP Muhammad, the celebrated humourist has written nostalgically about his college days spent there thinking of an imaginary Cleopatra; but the only female presence on the campus, rues the writer, was a sixty year old female cook with abundant silvery locks! In the same college, men are now becoming a rarity with females accounting for more than seventy per cent of the total students.In some courses, like English literature girls outnumber boys to the tune of 1: 10. It is like Vaikam Muhammad Basheer's hell, observesAsif, who graduated from the college. Quizzed about Basheer's hell, Asif's face lights up with a mischievous smile. When Basheer went on a visit to hell (those who have read Basheer know he was entitled to such journeys!), all that he could see in one particular corner was a clutch of women with alone man in the middle. The man, according to Basheer, was PunathilKunchabdulla, the famous author of kanyavanangal. For Asif, such a hell is not an altogether an unpleasant experience. But the changing campus demography is not any sign of female empowerment, according to Dr.Sajitha Assistant Professor at Farook College. The common belief is that girls perform better in the exams and hence get access to higher avenues. But the case is not so black and white. The depleting number of males in arts and science colleges also owes to the fact that most parents prefer sending their boys to professional colleges and girls to ordinary schools. Most girls who study in Arts and Science colleges have brothers studying in engineering colleges. While families take pains to send their boys to professional schools, they are not so eager about girls. This owes to society's unchanging perception regarding gender roles. While boys are expected to be bread winners supporting parents in old age, girls are expected to fulfil domestic roles. Hence they are trained in soft courses. Courses like literature and psychology are here seen as favourite options.

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This is part of the reason why courses like physics and mathematics still attract a sizable number of boys. While boys are trained to become professionals, for many girls, University is still seen as a convenient waiting shed for a bride. In today's marriage market a woman without a degree is not an easy business proposition, says Dr.Sajitha. This is the reason why Engineering colleges continue to be male bastions. While boys constitute the bulk of the student population in most engineering colleges, the picture at IITs illustrates an extreme case. At IITs, the gender ratio is staggeringly pro-male. It ranges from 5-1 to 20-1. Bombay IIT, for instance, has only 3 girls' hostels against 13 boys' hostels. Not surprisingly, boys outperform girls in both medical and engineering entrance exams. Indeed, entrance exams have been the pegs on which the traditional male pride has been clinging on for many years. However, the gap in the professional colleges is also being steadily bridged by girls, saysArun, a physics teacher associated with a coaching centre in Calicut. According to Arun, just as the society's perceptions regarding gender roles are changing, so are the performance indices of boys vis-àvis girls in competitive exams. 'Even now there are social inhibitions that prevent girls from being allowed to choose a course or vocation of their own preference. Once such inhibitions are done away with we will have more female engineers and doctors. There is still a widespread perception that engineering, especially branches like mechanical,is not an easy choice for girls. Once this changes more and more girls will be finding their way to engineering colleges. After all, even army and police are no longer male preserves.' Not everyone agrees. According to ReenuGeorge, Assistant Professor of English at Calicut University, academic field is still a heavily gendered arena. Reenu has had a chequered career as teacher having taught both at the higher secondary level and a poly-technique before joining the University. While she had only four male class-mates while doing MA English at Brennen College Telichery, she had only one female student in the electronics batch at the poly-technique. This shows how gendered our choices and options are. Many girls who acquired Engineering degrees couldn't take up gainful jobs as engineers because juggling together the twin responsibilities of housekeepers and technocrats wasn't easy, says Reenu. Some of them are even working as teachers and being paid less than trained teachers. This makes engineering a not so happy prospect for girls. Reenu however attributes the greater presence of girls on our college campuses to the higher dedication and more focussed approach being displayed by them. Having taught at the Higher Secondary level, she

Figures speak for themselves. In Delhi, for example, it is not only the traditional girls' only colleges that have become girls' colleges, but even coeducational institutions are becoming female bastions because of the predominantly female student population.

vouches for the greater industry and dedication shown by girls in their studies. This is why more girls get admitted to those prestigious Higher Secondary schools than boys. Boys are less disciplined and have several distractions than girls, says Abdulrehiman, a Calicut-based clinical –psychologist. The impact that the media, especially the TV, has had on boys and girls is also different. While boys spend a lot of time watching cricket and horror movies, girls spend more time with books. This is reflected in their better academic performance. Diseases like ADD (Attention Deficiency Disorder) are seen more in boys, he notes. So, are girls going to finally elbow out boys from our conventional academia? There are ample indications that boys are finding it increasingly difficult to compete against girls for admissions. St. Joseph's college Devagiri was until recently a Boys' college. But gradually, the college opened its gates to girls, first at the postgraduate level and then at the undergraduate. Now boys are finding it difficult to get admitted there. Najeem, an undergraduate studying at another college says how he was discouraged from applying at St. Joseph's by his friends who warned him about girls coming with donkey loads of A plus. Actually this is part of an emerging global pattern. Colleges in the West now exhibit a similar demography. In America, sociologists are busy discussing the impacts of the skewed gender ratio on campuses, especially since campuses there had traditionally doubled up as sites of social interaction paving way for marriages and partnerships. Poor Virginia Woolf! Even in 1940s, the celebrated writer was denied admission to the famous Baliol library for the 'unforgivable sin' of having been born a female. In a 'Room of One's Own,' she gives vent to the many disappointments she had to suffer on account of finding herself on the wrong side of the gender equation. Given the new trend on our campuses, will it be time for the rougher species to think along similar lines? U.O.Thasneem (English Dept.)
35 l ASCENT AUGUST - OCTOBER 2012

Campus Flower

Magnificent

Climber

ne cannot resist stopping for a while to have a closer look at this handsome evergreen climber. A native of Colombia, this extensive climber was introduced into the University Botanical Garden in early 1980's. Botanically called Saritaea magnifica, it belongs to the family Bignoniaceae, which has contributed many well-known ornamental trees and climbers. The plant produces its large bell-shaped mauve flowers in bunches of three or four in leaf axils or at the tips of branches. The flower has a funnel-shaped tube and a 5-lobed corolla. The throat of the tube is pale yellow with longitudinal purple veins. The leaves are bifoliolate and glossy green usually with a tendril by which they climb upon trees. The plant puts forth its magnificent blossoms soon after the monsoon, and the flowering often extend up to summer in Kerala. Being very hardy and free flowering, Saritaea is much appreciated in tropical gardens to cover and beautify old leafless trees and pergolas. The plant grows vigorously in humus rich soil with good drainage. The plant does not make much demand and does well if planted in pits filled with a mixture river sand, bone meal and compost. Being a spreading plant, it requires pruning at regular intervals, especially after flowering to keep the plant in good shape. Saritaea seldom sets fruits and seeds under Indian conditions, and is generally propagated from cuttings from one-year old stem of about 25-30 cm long, with the thickness of a pencil. To initiate rooting, the cut surface can be treated with root hormones such as Indole acetic acid (IAA) or Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). The treated cuttings can also be raised in polythene bags containing equal parts of rotten farmyard manure, one part of river sand and one part of red soil. Once the plant is firmly rooted, the poly bags can be transplanted in a well-lit location in the garden, provided with a strong support to climb. The plant requires plenty of space, light and water. Within two years of planting, it will produce hundreds of bell-shaped mauve flowers adding beauty to homestead gardens. A.K. Pradeep
36 l ASCENT AUGUST - OCTOBER 2012

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Film Screening

Deccani Souls

Screened

anadian Director Kaz Rahman stunned the film buffs on the campus with his movie 'Deccani Souls' screened at the Malayalam department seminar hall under the auspicious of Calicut University Film Society (CUFS) on August 6. The film screened in two parts namely 'Collector of Dreams' and 'Landscape of Souls' ably captured the wounded memories of Hyderabad during its amalgamation to Indian territory in 1948. The film highlighted the characters of a census collector called Babu and an Urdu poet Siddique to depict the shards of the unforgettable Indian past. An open forum was also held after the screening. Kaz Rahman responded to the queries of the viewers. He said that the history of every nation moved different people differently and he had a special place for India in his heart as his roots were in Hyderabad. Grown up in Canada and studied visual arts at New York University in Toronto, Rahman has screened his works at prominent venues such as Anthology Film archives, National Film Board of Canada, Salar Jung Museum(Hyderabad), Andy Warhol Museum (Pittsburgh) and the San Jose Museum of art (USA). His recent film 'Salat'(2010) received many reviews in the English, Urdu and Telugu media and was shown as a multi-channel installation at the international Festival of video art in Camaguey, Cuba in late 2011. Dr. Umar Tharammel, Reader, Malayalam Ddepartment delivered the presidential address. Prof. Anil Vallathol , Head of the Hepartment presented the memento to Mr. Kaz Rahman . -Sinosh K.P (III Sem. MCJ)

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Poem

The Last Poem
Dhoomil
All you have to see is How words become poetry, Read the men and women Who lie prostrate between the lines, Listen to the clang of iron on iron, Look at the earth Turning crimson with the dripping blood. The blacksmith never knows How iron can hurt; The horse knows – When the reins tighten.

Dhoomil (Sudama Panday, 1936-'75) was known as the 'angry young man' of Hindi poetry. Dhoomil was one of the best representatives of political poetry in Hindi. He overhauled Hindi poetry with his startling images and refreshingly modernist idiom. Dhoomil's poems have been translated into English, Malayalam and other Indian languages.