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Pressing Matter Fall 2012 The Publication of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Guild of

Pressing Matter

Pressing Matter Fall 2012 The Publication of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Guild of Book

Fall 2012

The Publication of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers

Message froM oUr president

News from Near and Far

I hope you enjoy this rather lengthy newsletter. There is so much going on! I am very excited about the collaborative book project and am really pleased that so many of our members are participating. On November 3 rd , we hosted a gath-

ering to exchange our editions and collate them so that the next phase can begin:

binding them into a book. The editions were wonderful! You can see them all on our website: www.dvc-gbw.org.

As members finish bind- ing their books, we will post them on the website. In January, we will col- lect all the books and send them to Massachusetts for an exhibition at the Cabot Science Library at Harvard University. The dates for the exhibition are January 24 to May 19, 2013. We also plan to show them locally in the Library at the Philadelphia

Museum of Art. In October, I went to Salt Lake City for the Standards of Excellence Seminar. It was an excellent conference, as always. I always look forward to the presentations, and believe it or not, I also enjoy attending the board meetings as your chapter rep- resentative! Recently, we held a potluck dinner at Alice Austin’s house. What a great turnout! The food was really good. I have always noticed that bookbinders love to eat well. Which made me think: we should do that more often. So, we are planning to have another potluck in May or June.

So, we are planning to have another potluck in May or June. sharing a book at

sharing a book at the potluck Photo by Stephanie Wood

Jennifer Rosner

Chapter Chair

in this issue

Traditional paper making in Korea Pages 2-5

6 questions

Page 6

Workshop review Page 7

DVC-GBW Exhibits Page 8

deLaWare VaLLey CHapter offiCers Jennifer rosner Chapter Chair

alice austin Secretary, Treasurer, Exhibitions

Hedi Kyle Programs Co-chair

denise Carbone Programs Co-chair

Jon snyder

Newsletter

Valeria Kremser

Webmaster

neW MeMBers:

Mindy trost Washington Crossing, PA sherry Barber Frisco, TX amey Hutchins Philadelphia, PA Linda Lee rossi Media, PA James e. Welker Janesville, WI Maria fredericks New York, NY

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Delaware Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters

Fall 2012

Korean Paper-making Traditions

Hanji paper-making studio in South Korea visited by University of the Arts group

in South Korea visited by University of the Arts group By Denise Carbone photos by erin

By Denise Carbone

photos by erin paulson

A summer a trip to Seoul, South Korea was organized by Susan Viguers, director of the MFA Book Arts Program from the University of the Arts. This amazing whirlwind of a trip took us to the Codex International

Book Arts Fair in Seoul, gallery shows at Hongik University and 175 Gallery, part of the Korean University of Arts, and a trip way south to the village of Ga- pyeong. For me, the highlight of this amazing trip was a visit with Jang Yong Hoon of Jang Ji Bang, a 3rd- and 4th-generation family-run paper mill in Gapyeong, Korea. Hoon and his family showed us how they make Hanji Paper, Korea’s intan-

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after the bark is left to sit outside and ret, to help loosen the fibers from the bark, it is then cooked to loosen the outer layer of bark, then brought inside to be washed, picked and scraped cleaned by Hoon family members.

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Delaware Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters

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Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters Page 3 gible cultural property no. 117. Korean paper,

gible cultural property no. 117. Korean paper, or hanji, is the name of traditional handmade paper made from the inner bark of the paper mulberry, known in Korean as dak, a native tree that grows well on rocky mountainsides. The formation aid necessary to making hanji is using the mucilage that oozes from the roots of the plant hibiscus mani-

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from the roots of the plant hibiscus mani- Continued » Jang yang Hoon holding wood ash,

Jang yang Hoon holding wood ash, which is soaked in water. the bast fiber, or inner bark of the mulberry tree is cooked in this solution .

a beautiful vat.

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Delaware Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters

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Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters Fall 2012 a huge stamper beats the fiber into

a huge stamper beats the fiber into pulp.

Matters Fall 2012 a huge stamper beats the fiber into pulp. this formation agent was made

this formation agent was made from the roots of the hibiscus manihot plant, which the Hoons also grow.

» Continued

hot. This substance helps suspend the fibers in the vat. The methods for making hanji are similar to those used in Japanese papermaking to make washi paper, but differ in sheet formation technique. Hanji is made by laminat- ing sheets using the we bal method, which allows for multi-directional grain and calendaring, and Dochim, the method of pounding finished sheets to compact fibers in order to lessen ink bleed.

Below are some photos by Erin Paulson of the Hoon family’s paper studio.

photos by Erin Paulson of the Hoon family’s paper studio. another vat of paper pulp. the

another vat of paper pulp. the mould is cantelivered to assist the papermaker.

vat of paper pulp. the mould is cantelivered to assist the papermaker. Couching paper onto the

Couching paper onto the post. the surface is a rug.

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Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters Page 5 a wet pressed sheet of paper ready

a wet pressed sheet of paper ready to be brushed onto a warm freestanding hotplate.

paper ready to be brushed onto a warm freestanding hotplate. a demonstration of the art of

a demonstration of the art of paper spinning.

hotplate. a demonstration of the art of paper spinning. this hut is where the fiber is

this hut is where the fiber is stored after harvested, dried and stripped.

the fiber is stored after harvested, dried and stripped. a woven basket made from spun paper

a woven basket made from spun paper and coated with persimmon tannin.

For more information about the tradition of Korean paper and paper art, go to Aimee Lee’s website, http://aimeelee.net/paper/hanjib/. Aimee studied with masters at Jang Ji Bang paper mill. Everyone there was so extremely kind and enthusiastic in sharing his or her knowledge with us — it was a truly humbling experience. n

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Delaware Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters

Fall 2012

6 Questions

Jon Sweitzer-Lamme will be spending the fall semester in Denmark, so his workspace is packed up in boxes. He is one our newest and youngest members

1 How long have you been a member of the GBW? I joined this January after an internship at the

Library Company of Philadelphia; I joined pretty much as soon as I learned that it existed.

2 Where are you from originally? Durham, North Carolina.

3 When did you realize you wanted to learn bookbind- ing?

I made an artist’s book in high school (deconstructing a science book from the 1920s), and I couldn’t figure out how to put together the pages. I’ve been trying to learn ever since

4 What is your favorite book structure these days? I’ve been working with Bruce Bumbarger at the

Haverford College Bindery, and I’ve been really enjoying getting into the details of hand hollow-back binding--I taught myself half-leather binding for a couple journals, and that was a lot of fun.

5 What are you working on right now? I’m sort of between projects at the moment, be-

cause I’m heading to Denmark for a semester, but my notebook is filling with ideas for when I return (when my supplies come out of storage).

6 Tell us something about yourself that might surprise us. For a Chemistry of Art class in the spring, I taught

myself to make parchment from a hunk of pigskin and pig fat. After 3 weeks of soaking, and quite a bit of scrap- ing, it turned out well enough to use as a soft book cover.

thomas parker Williams’ studio.
thomas parker Williams’ studio.

Thomas Parker Williams is not exactly a longtime member, but he is an active one. Below are his answers to the Six Questions:

1 How long have you been a member of the GBW? Since 2009, I found out about the Guild when I had a

table at Hybrid Book.

2

Where are you from originally?

I grew up in South Jersey but have lived in Philadelphia

since 1990

3

When did you realize you wanted to learn bookbinding?

I had been painting for a number of years and had been

aware of artist books. I tried to make a few simple books around 1994 but did not really start until 1998 when I was working on a painting series about fire. I made some unique books and my first real printed edition. I continued to make books, some related to the painting I was doing, until 2009 when I stopped painting to focus on books exclusively.

4

What is your favorite book structure these days?

I don’t have a favorite. Inventing structures and trying to

make them work is part of the fun.

5

What are you working on right now?

I am working on two collaborations with my wife Mary

Agnes who does pinhole photography, One is a book about the Manayunk Bridge that will be a pop-up.

6

Tell us something about yourself that might surprise us.

I had been trained in instrumental music in my younger

days and had been away from it for a long time. When I was working on abstract paintings that were processed based I read an article about the musical composition method known as 12 tone row. I thought of using this process to make visual art and when showing a book to a dealer in New York she said to me “people will want to hear what this work sounds like”. That led me back to making music again and including music CD’s

with some of my books. Some of this work can be seen and heard on my website www.thomasparkerwilliams.com. n

CD’s with some of my books. Some of this work can be seen and heard on

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WorKsHop reVieW

Box Making with Barbara Muriello

October 20-21, 2012

B arbara Mauriello loves boxes, and shared her enthusiasm with members of the Delaware Valley

shared her enthusiasm with members of the Delaware Valley one of Barbara Muriello’s beautiful boxes. Chapter

one of Barbara Muriello’s beautiful boxes.

Chapter for a weekend of box making. We made two boxes, A Box as Stage Set and a Box with Flip-Top Lid and Compartments. Any box is a combination of tray and case. First measure for the case, build it, and then measure for the tray. We

worked on both boxes at the same time during the weekend, going back and forth, so that we could wait for one part to dry. Barbara had all the board cut to size so that we could focus on construction techniques. She showed us how she cuts

a board for accuracy and how she makes

cuts in the covering material. Barbara is very organized, handed out

good notes, and added valuable tips and tricks to the learning process. In fact, perhaps that is what I liked best about the class. She started by discussing glue and paste. She uses three kinds; methyl cellulose, rice paste and PVA. The type of paste is selected based on the paper used to cover the box. For a fine thin paper you would use paste. For good quality heavier papers, you would use PVA mixed with methyl cellulose. The percent of your mix depends on how wet you want the glue. For paste, she likes rice starch because of its silkiness. She cooks as much as she needs for the day and does not store it in the fridge because it gets watery. Her approach to making paste is one of the experienced cook - when it looks good its done cooking. For those who need a recipe, use one cup water to 2 -3 tablespoons of starch. Dissolve the starch in cold water and then cook. It is done when translucent and thick. Transfer to a cool container and pour cold water on top. Do not cover with

a tight lid. At the end of the workshop, we all left happy with our two almost-finished boxes and our gems of new understanding of techniques and materials. n

gems of new understanding of techniques and materials. n denise Carbone shows off her work from

denise Carbone shows off her work from Barbara’s workshop.

— Alice Austin

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Delaware Valley Guild of Bookworkers • pressing Matters

Fall 2012

Multifarious Members Mile High

Books by Members of the GBW-DVC exhibited in Denver, Sept., 2012

It was a pleasure to have our Delaware Val- ley Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers exhibit at Abecedarian Gallery in Denver in September. When Alicia invited our Chapter I was immediately interested. She does a great job promoting book art- ists and I knew this would be an opportunity for our members to not only exhibit but also to sell books. Add a beautiful catalog to that list and it gets even better! The books exhibited display the wide inter- ests and talents of our membership. We are happy to share with the Denver community and the Abece- darian Gallery web followers. Thank you Alicia! More info at www.abecedariangallery.com.

Member news

DVC members Alice Austin and Jon Snyder were invited to be artists-in-residence in Gmunden, Aus- tria for the month of September, 2012. Alice taught book arts and paste paper workshops at Arthaus4, a collective gallery in Gmunden, and collaborated with the Arthaus4 members in a paper-making workshop at the Hobl & Sohn hand papermaking workshop in nearby Laarkirchen. The hand-made paper was used for several projects that were exhib- ited at the Arthaus4 gallery in late September. Jon made videos of the workshops and paper making process, which will be available online shortly at Alice’s web site, www.amaustin.com. The couple are the first international artists spon- sored by the town Gmunden and by Arthaus4. More info at www.arthaus4.com.

Book review

1,000 Artists’ Books, Exploring the Book as Art By Sandra Salamony and Peter and Donna Thomas Quarry Books, 2012 This lovely book was released in May and many of our members have books included. The images look good and a huge variety of book works are repre- sented. A great buy! n

Alice Austin

Exhibits Chair

repre- sented. A great buy! n Alice Austin Exhibits Chair the dVC-gBW show at abecederian gallery

the dVC-gBW show at abecederian gallery in denver.

Chair the dVC-gBW show at abecederian gallery in denver. alice austin taught several workshops while at

alice austin taught several workshops while at arthaus4, in gmunden, austria in september.