KADOKA PRESS

The official newspaper of Jackson County, South Dakota
$1.00
includes tax
Volume 106
Number 28
January 24, 2013
~ by Ronda Dennis ~
News Briefs …
Funding available: Jackson
Kadoka Economic Develop-
ment Corporation has loan
funds available for businesses.
For more information on the
program please visit the web
page www.growkadoka.com,
call (605)488-0206, or see Jo
Beth Uhlir.
~~~~~
The annual meeting of the
Kadoka Nursing Home Associ-
ation will be held on Wednes-
day, January 23, 2013 at 7:00
p.m. in the nursing home din-
ing room. Everyone is invited
to attend.
~~~~~
The annual meeting of Jack-
son-Kadoka Economic Develop-
ment Corporation will be held
on Wednesday, February 6,
7:00 p.m. at the Gateway
Apartments Community Room.
The organization invites every-
one to attend the meeting.
During the 71st South Dakota
Rural Electric Association annual
meeting Jan. 10 and 11, numerous
South Dakotans were recognized
for their dedication to the electric
cooperative program in the state.
SDREA’s 28 electric cooperative
distribution systems and three gen-
eration and transmission electric
cooperatives serve nearly 300,000
people across 90 percent of South
Dakota’s land mass. These systems
are member-owned utilities estab-
lished to provide at-cost electric
service to more than 114,000
farms, homes, schools, churches,
businesses and other establish-
ments across the state.
SDREA is the service associa-
tion of the state’s electric coopera-
tives and is devoted to unifying,
promoting and protecting the inter-
ests of member electric coopera-
tives in South Dakota by providing
leadership, training, communica-
tion, legislative representation and
other member services. Each of the
31 SDREA member cooperatives
selects a director from their local
board, which is elected by the coop-
erative’s membership, to represent
the cooperative on the SDREA
board of directors.
Fifty-eight cooperative directors
and employees were recognized for
25 or more years of service to the
state’s electric cooperatives. Those
recognized, along with their years
of service and the cooperative they
are affiliated with, include:
30 Years of Service: Marvin
Moor, West Central Electric Coop-
erative, Murdo; 35 Years of Service:
Steve Reed, West Central Electric;
50 Years of Service, Ray Osburn,
Cherry Todd Electric.
South Dakota Co-ops
honored at meeting
by Del Bartels
Philip, a one-third partner of the
continuing Stronger Economies To-
gether project, hosted the Wednes-
day, January 9, multi-community
session.
The first meeting, in December,
was held in Kadoka. The third
meeting, in February, will be held
in Wall. Attendees are still con-
tributing toward a growing kitty of
possible names for this specific
SET region. Made up of Haakon
County, Jackson County and the
eastern portion of Pennington
County, the economic partnership
could vote to be called the Bad-
lands/ Bad River Region, Western
Plains Region, Central Plains Con-
nection, Old West Region or some
other name that was in the sugges-
tion jar.
This two-year federal program is
currently in its third round. The
two-year program’s first year is the
creation of an economic plan for a
given region. The second year is for
the “fun work” of putting that plan
into action.
After a supper social provided by
the Philip Chamber of Commerce,
the attendees of this session fo-
cused on three main topics. The
first point discussed was the cur-
rent demographics of this region,
not only what they look like today
but what they are projected to look
like in the future. It was stressed
by speaker Dr. David Olson, com-
munity development program di-
rector, and video-taped Dr. Michael
McCurry, state demographer, that
projections, even from the Census
Bureau and other fact-based
sources, can change. Haakon
County has been losing population
for years. Currently, over 20 per-
cent of its population is over 65
years of age. Communicable dis-
eases, such as whooping cough and
others, have been diminishing,
while degenerative diseases, such
as cancer and those associated with
old age, have been increasing. In
Haakon County, the average in-
come has increased, yet the num-
ber of people considered under the
poverty line has also increased.
Things can change.
The second main topic was an at-
tempt to determine what makes a
strong region, particularly this re-
gion. Differences between the
Philip, Kadoka and Wall communi-
ties are numerous. The similarities
can be used to strengthen their
partnership.
The third main topic was an ex-
amination of existing economic de-
velopment plans in the region. One
of these was a new idea promoted
by residents from the Kadoka area.
Several plans were revisited plans
from Horizons meetings held in the
individual communities from previ-
ous years.
Kari O’Neil, community develop-
ment field specialist, stated that
the kickoff session produced some
great thoughts on how this region
can gain a competitive advantage
by working together, pooling re-
sources and building relationships.
As the sessions move forward, at-
tendees are to invite those diverse
and committed people they know
who would be assets to this group.
The only real requirement is an
openness to this process and a pas-
sion for this region.
The Philip session discussed the
Creation, Attraction, Retention,
Expansion model. Communities
can grow from the creation of new
businesses, from the attraction of
new industry or businesses, from
the retention and strengthening of
existing businesses, and from the
expansion of existing firms in the
region.
Stronger Economies Together project
From left, Dr. David Olson – community development program director,
Christine Sorensen – rural development coordinator, Kari O’Neil – com-
munity development field specialist, and Mary Burnett – Philip coordi-
nator in the Stronger Economies Together program.
--photo by Del Bartels
The United States Department
of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Devel-
opment honored BankWest, Inc.
today for their partnership in uti-
lizing the USDA Business & Indus-
try (B&I) Loan Guarantee Program
to increase access to capital and
support jobs for businesses in rural
areas of South Dakota. BankWest
has also utilized a USDA Rural De-
velopment Community Facilities
Loan Guarantee to develop essen-
tial community facilities in the
area.
“President Obama is committed
to strengthening rural communi-
ties,” said Elsie Meeks, South
Dakota USDA Rural Development
State Director. “By working with
private lenders throughout the
state, USDA Rural Development is
able to increase investment capital
and assist communities and local
organizations build a strong busi-
ness infrastructure to nurture eco-
nomic growth.”
USDA Rural Development pro-
vided a $296,200 Business and In-
dustry Loan Guarantee for Bank
West, Inc. that, through leveraging,
assisted a local business. This proj-
ect is expected to retain 16 jobs in
the local community.
“Working with programs like the
B&I Guaranteed Loan Program to
help improve local economies and
create opportunities for local citi-
zens is a natural partnership for
BankWest,” said BankWest Vice
President/Sr. Ag Officer Gary
Ambur. “Helping area customers
and communities achieve financial
success is the most important and
rewarding aspect of community
banking.”
In Fiscal Year 2012, USDA
Rural Development Business & In-
dustry (B&I) Guaranteed Loan pro-
gram made available $33.2 million
that, through leveraging $128 mil-
lion, assisted nine businesses.
The purpose of the B&I Guaran-
teed Loan Program is to improve,
develop, or finance business, indus-
try, and employment and improve
the economic and environmental
climate in rural communities. This
purpose is achieved by bolstering
the existing private credit struc-
ture through the guarantee of qual-
ity loans which will provide lasting
community benefits. Visit
http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/sd/ for
additional program information or
to locate an USDA Rural Develop-
ment Office nearest you.
For additional information on
Rural Development projects, please
visit Rural Development’s new in-
teractive web map featuring pro-
gram funding and success stories
for fiscal years 2009-2011. The data
can be found at: http://www.rur-
dev.usda.gov/RDSuccessStories.ht
ml.
President Obama’s plan for
rural America has brought about
historic investment and resulted in
stronger rural communities. Under
the President’s leadership, these
investments in housing, commu-
nity facilities, businesses and infra-
structure have empowered rural
America to continue leading the
way – strengthening America’s
economy, small towns and rural
communities. USDA’s investments
in rural communities support the
rural way of life that stands as the
backbone of our American values.
President Obama and Agriculture
Secretary Tom Vilsack are commit-
ted to a smarter use of Federal re-
sources to foster sustainable
economic prosperity and ensure the
government is a strong partner for
businesses, entrepreneurs and
working families in rural commu-
nities.
USDA, through its Rural Devel-
opment mission area, has an active
portfolio of more than $176 billion
in loans and loan guarantees.
These programs are designed to
improve the economic stability of
rural communities, businesses, res-
idents, farmers and ranchers and
improve the quality of life in rural
America.
BankWest, Inc. receives honor
from Department of Agriculture
South Dakota Rural Water Associ-
ation and Jake Fitzgerald of West
River/Lyman-Jones to discuss
water options.
There was no action take on
having a meeting.
However, a motion carried to ap-
prove the contract contingent on
receipt of written compliance
guidelines.
Other than plowing snow,
Patrick Solon said he is working on
compiling information for potential
street projects for the year 2013.
He will present more information
at the next meeting.
Dick Stolley said he’d received a
phone call regarding the city plow-
ing alleys.
The city alley ordinance reads
that unless it’s a commercial alley,
it is up to the residents to take care
of alley work. Commercial alleys
include those next to Main Street
and along the Kadoka Nursing
Home. Any other snow plowing
would be done to allow access to
fuel or propane delivery.
Stolley also noted that the year-
end inventory was done at the city
bar on January 3.
The council reviewed a 2013
commercial service contract from
TruGreen for lawn and tree care for
the softball fields and city park.
The contract amount was for
$3,831.25.
A motion carried approve the
contract and lock the prices in for a
three-year period, if payments can
be made yearly.
The next regular meeting will be
held on Monday, February 11 at
7:00 p.m.
Brad Jorgensen called the regu-
lar meeting of the Kadoka City
Council to order on Monday, Janu-
ary 14. Absent was Mayor Harry
Weller and Kieth Prang.
The bills and finance statement
were approved. It was noted that
all departments, including the
water department, were in the
black at the end of the year.
A motion carried to combine the
city election on April 9, 2013 with
the school election.
Bob Fugate addressed the coun-
cil regarding the sound system at
the auditorium.
For a $700 fee, Mid States Audio
& Video will readjust the current
sound system and look for dead
spots.
Fugate said KCBA, Horizons
and the Kadoka Music Parents
have agreed to help by paying $100
each. He asked that the city pay
$200 and with the school paying an
additional $200, there would be
enough money to get Mid States
here to look at the system.
He said the school had asked
that board member Dale Chris-
tensen be there when Mid States
looks at the system. In addition,
Fugate asked that Colby Shuck at-
tend as well.
A motion carried to give $200 to-
ward checking the sound system.
Under the water/sewer report
Nathan Riggins said they had
moved a water line west of Dis-
count Fuel.
Riggins also presented a con-
tract from Maguire Iron, Inc. for
water tower work which would in-
clude sandblasting and applying
two coats of epoxy to the interior of
the downtown tower. The lump
sum of work would total $24,890.
Riggins said Maguire Iron asked
that the city sign the contract so
Maguire Iron can put the city work
on their schedule.
Jackie Stilwell noted that she
could set up a meeting with the
Kadoka City Council discusses
water tower, sound system issues
ply, according to stock contractors.
“It’s been the case for a while,
and overall, there are more good
bucking horses now than there
were in the ’70s and ’80s, due to
breeding, but we definitely need
more,” said Ike Sankey, a Joliet,
Mont., cowboy and the PRCA’s
Stock Contractor of the Year in
1999.
Sutton’s concept is simple. He
rallied five competing stock con-
tractors, including Sankey, to agree
to share bloodlines of their cham-
pion bucking horses. Each brought
10 mares and one high-caliber stud
to Sutton’s ranch. All of the studs
had been selected for the Wrangler
National Finals Rodeo at some
point.
From May 1 to July 1, Sutton
babysat as the horses went to pas-
ture. Sutton’s property is large
enough that each band of mares –
ranging from seven to 13 in num-
ber – had a separate pasture bor-
dered by two fences, so the stallions
couldn’t fight. Stock contractors
paired at least one of their mares –
some bred before, others maiden –
with each stud. The cross-breeding
arrangement was all horse trade –
no fees changed hands, with the ex-
ception of a feed payment to Sutton
of $3 per day, per horse.
Some 15 stock contractors
showed interest, Sutton said. But
some snubbed the program from
the get-go; others folded at the last
minute.
Kirsten Vold, who runs Harry
Vold Rodeo Co., which her father
started in 1954, thought about join-
ing but decided not to – not because
she thinks it’s a bad idea but be-
cause the setup wasn’t right for
her.
Sutton asked Vold to pony up
Painted Valley, the PRCA’s 2010
Saddle Bronc of the Year and the
top saddle bronc at the 2009 NFR.
Vold declined.
“I’m glad more rodeo companies
are working together to try to im-
prove the genetics of our sport, and
I appreciate the opportunity,” she
said. “But I currently get $2,500
per mare for a breeding with
(Painted Valley’s) semen, and I
want to keep the value of the prod-
uct. My lack of involvement is not
due to me not supporting the proj-
ect but of protecting my commod-
ity.”
While stock contractors some-
times arrange individual stud
trades with a fellow contractor to
diversify bloodlines, they are gen-
erally protective of their stock.
That, Vold said, has been a mis-
take.
“What everyone’s figuring out is
we all succeed if we all share and
cross bloodlines,” she said. “What
Steve is doing is groundbreaking,
the start of something new. It’s an
easy way to breed a lot of different
studs at one time.”
Breeding the same stud year
after year results in good mixes
with some mares but not others,
Vold said, which can reduce the
chances of ending up with a stellar
bucking horse.
Sankey agrees it’s a challenge
for breeders to introduce new ge-
netics to their stock and said he
was excited to give Sutton’s pro-
gram a try, bringing two world-
champion mares and others who
have been good producers.
“The ideal situation would be to
end up with 10 colts that were all
world champions. That’s not a real-
istic goal, but who knows?” he said.
A proven bucking horse that’s good
enough to be selected for the NFR
can fetch around $40,000, Sutton
said, adding that the rare top buck-
ing broncs have sold for $100,000
to $200,000.
Sutton did not test the mares in
this year’s program to see if they’re
pregnant. Foaling should occur in
mid-April. The offspring won’t be
bucked until they’re about five
years old, which is when they’ll
demonstrate their prowess.
No one seems worried about cre-
ating bucking horses that are just
too rank for cowboys to ride.
“One thing time has proven: the
better the horses are, the better the
contestants are,” Sankey said. “I
think raising bucking horses is
going to spread out to more than
just a select group of stock contrac-
tors. I think you’ll find investors
starting to get into breeding be-
cause a horse can perform at his
peak from five years old until 14 or
15. A bull has maybe two to three
years, and he’s peaked.”
Sutton wants to make the cross-
breeding program an annual event
and has dreams of expanding to a
larger-scale operation. He also has
visions of being able to announce
success in five years.
“I hope we’ll celebrate at the
NFR the great thing that was
started here,” he said.
--by Debbie Kelley
ProRodeo Sports News
Steve Sutton is a gambling man.
But he’s playing no ordinary game
of chance. Sutton’s using mares as
chips and superstar studs as his
ace in the hole.
There isn’t much to lose, the
South Dakota stock contractor fig-
ures. A little time, effort and money
could be up in smoke if his experi-
ment fails. On the other hand, a
windfall could be in the cards.
Patience is in order first. He and
five other stock contractors won’t
know if their wager will pay off for
about five years.
“Nope, there are no guarantees,”
Sutton said. “It’s a risk, and I’ve
had people tell me I was crazy. But
the bucking horse world needs a
boost, and I’m hoping this deal can
help.”
Earlier this year, Sutton, who
co-owns Onida, S.D.-based Sutton
Rodeos Inc., with his father, Jim,
launched the Breeding to Buck
Program of 2012.
“I watched the bull world change
from 20 years ago by trading
semen. I couldn’t talk anybody in
the horse world into doing that,”
Sutton said. “Now, we’re in the
same situation with bucking horses
– there’s a shortage of good ones.”
The population of bucking
horses has been in a crisis mode be-
fore. After World War II ended and
rodeo resurged in popularity, stock
contractors scrambled to meet de-
mand, as more wide-open spaces
became fenced, and fewer wild
horses roamed the land.
Stock contractors like Sutton’s
grandfather James, a ProRodeo
Hall of Famer, figured out how to
breed horses to buck, and the
process became an industry stan-
dard.
Today, demand for rank bucking
horses is once again outpacing sup-
Chance worth taking: Sutton, contractors
come together in crossbreeding effort
See the answers on the classified page
Suduko
Kadoka Press
USPS 289340
Telephone 605-837-2259 • PO Box 309, Kadoka, South Dakota 57543-0309
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com Fax: 605-837-2312
Ravellette Publications, Inc.
PO Box 309 • Kadoka, SD 57543-0309
Publisher: Don Ravellette
News Writing/Photography: Ronda Dennis, Editor
Graphic Design/Typesetting/Photography: Robyn Jones
Published each Thursday and Periodicals postage paid at
Kadoka, Jackson County, South Dakota 57543-0309
Official Newspaper for the City of Kadoka, the Town of Interior, the Town of Belvidere,
the Town of Cottonwood, the County of Jackson and the Kadoka School District #35-2.
• ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES •
All of Jackson, Haakon, Jones, Mellette and Bennett Counties
and Quinn and Wall Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .$35.00 Plus Tax
All other areas in South Dakota . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 Plus Tax
Out of state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42.00 No Tax
South Dakota Newspaper Association
POSTMASTER:
Send change of address to the Kadoka Press. PO Box 309, Kadoka, SD 57543
Church Page …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 2
HOGEN’S
HARDWARE
837-2274
or shop by phone toll-free
at 1-888-411-1657
Serving the community
for more than 65 years.
BELVIDERE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Gary McCubbin • 344-2233
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m.
Coffee & Donuts: 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:45 a.m. Sept. - May
OUR LADY OF VICTORY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Father Bryan Sorensen • Kadoka • 837-2219
Mass: Sunday - 11:00 a.m.
Confession After Mass
INTERIOR COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m. • Church: 10:30 a.m.
EAGLE NEST LIFE CENTER
Gus Craven • Wanblee • 462-6002
Sunday Church: 11:00 a.m.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH-LCMS
MIDLAND, SD
(6 mi. north and 3 mi. east of 1880 Town)
Rev. Glenn Denke, pastor 605-462-6169
Sunday Worship--10:00MT/11:00CT
PEOPLE’S
MARKET
WIC, Food
Stamps & EBT
Phone: 837-2232
Monday thru Saturday
8 AM - 6 PM
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN • Kadoka • 837-2390
Sunday Services: 10:00 a.m.
LUTHERAN PARISH - ELCA
OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN • Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Sunday Services: 5:00 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Kadoka • Pastor Gary McCubbin • 837-2233
Worship Services: 11:00 a.m.
Sunday School: Sr. Adults - 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School: All Ages - 9:45 a.m., • Sept. - May
Release Time: 2:15 p.m. Wednesdays. • Sept. - May
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Interior • 859-2310
Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Church Calendar
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka . . . . .837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
Letter to
the Editor
Kadoka Police
Department
Forrest L. Davis,
Chief of Police
Monthly Report
12/10/12 ~ 1/4/13
Accidents: 0
Parking Violations: 0
Warnings:
Verbal: 2
Written: 0
Investigations: 3
Court: 3
Calls for Service: 44
Complaints: 3
Arrests: 3
Citations: 1
John 17:1-26
Sin is a divider. That’s what separated mankind
from the Lord in the garden, and it has been fracturing
relationships ever since. It’s also the reason that God
considers reconciliation so important. He wants to re-
establish an intimate relationship with fallen humanity. But His desires for His children don’t end with
their salvation experience. He also wants His church to be a shining example of unity for all to see.
The last time Christ prayed for His followers before going to the cross, He asked “that they may all be
one” as the Father and Son are one (v. 21). Despite the fact that we cannot attain perfect unity with God
until we reach heaven, we do have the capacity to walk in harmony with Him by living in obedience to
His Holy Spirit within us.
The other aspect of oneness that God desires for us is unity with one another within His church. We
will always have differences in what we prefer and how we interpret certain Bible passages, but our com-
mon identity as Christians is based on the essential truths of the faith as revealed in God’s Word. The
unity Christ advocates is possible only when each member of His body walks in submission to the Spirit
so that together they can achieve the purposes of God and reflect Christ’s character in their behavior.
Ask the Lord to produce a desire for unity within your heart. When you’re tempted to demand your
own way, remember what’s at stake. Accord in a local church allows God to do His work effectively through
that congregation, but it’s also an attractive witness that draws the lost world to Christ.
Christ's Priority for His Church
Inspiration Point
University of South Dakota stu-
dents have been honored for their
academic success during the 2012
Fall Semester.
Students earn Dean’s List dis-
tinction by achieving a GPA of at
least 3.5 while maintaining a
course load of 12 or more credit
hours with no incomplete or failing
grades.
Jessica Graupmann, Kadoka
~~~~~
Northwestern College in Or-
ange City, Iowa, has announced
those who have earned the distinc-
tion of Academic Dean’s List for
the fall 2012 semester.
The Dean’s List is comprised of
students who have achieved a se-
mester grade point average of 3.50
or above while carrying a mini-
mum of 12 graded hours.
Brett Amiotte, Kadoka
College News
Monday, January 28
Sloppy joe on a bun, oven
browned potatoes, baked beans,
and pears.
Tuesday, January 29
Roast beef, mashed potatoes and
gravy, corn o’brian, bread, and
tropical fruit.
Wednesday, January 30
Meatloaf, baked potato, mixed
vegetables, bread, and strawberry
gelatin dessert.
Thursday, January 31
Baked chicken breast in gravy,
rice pilaf, seasoned green beans,
tossed salad, dinner roll, and
mixed fruit.
Friday, February 1
Potato soup, meat sandwich, pea
salad, juice, and apricots.
Meals for
the Elderly
TRAFFIC/COURT REPORT
Jackson County, SD
Refusal to Surrender License &
Fail to Maintain Financial Responsibility:
8-09-12: Thomas Thunder Hawk, Kadoka: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 10-
17-12; Refusal to surrender: Fine and costs $134; 30 days jail with 10
days suspended. Financial responsibility: Fine and costs $116; 5 days
jail suspended. Jail time is suspended based on the following conditions:
unsupervised probation 6 months; no violations of law; work permit is au-
thorized if allowed by DL.
Driving Under the Influence - 2nd Offense:
05-17-12: Dustan Pick, Davis: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 10-24-12; Fine
and costs $1,154; 60 days jail with 37 days suspended based on the fol-
lowing conditions: attend in patient treatment; pay court appointed attor-
ney and blood tests costs; allow jail time to be served in Clay County no
later than 11-02-12 by 5 p.m. to serve 5 days; credit 18 days of off jail
time if successfully complete in patient treatment program; no law viola-
tions for one year; surrender DL by 11-09-12; if for any reason not com-
pleting program, the balance of the jail would be 55 days; pay significant
amount of account by June or can ask for extensions; can apply for permit
for attending counseling or work after completion of program.
Posses Two Ounces of Marijuana or Less:
05-25-12: Daniel Murillo, Brookings: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 10-24-12;
Fine and costs $584; 30 days jail suspended based on the following con-
ditions: no law violations for one year; pay restitution by 12-31-12; credit
days served towards fine and costs with one more day suspended.
Driving Under the Influence - 1st Offense, No Drivers License &
Open Alcoholic Beverage Container Accessible in Vehicle:
07-21-12: Elwood Brokenrope, Rapid City: Plea: Guilty; Plea date: 07-
01-10; DUI: Fine and costs $584; 30 days jail suspended. No License:
Fine and costs $120. Open Container: Fine and costs $120. Jail time is
suspended based on the following conditions: no law violations; pay fine,
costs and restitution by 5-30-12.
To the editor:
A special thank you to the Jack-
son County Sheriff and Kadoka
Chief of Police for their assistance
in our time of emergency while
traveling I-90 on December 30,
2012.
Your sheriff went over and above
to assist us. Our emergency neces-
sitated an overnight stay in
Kadoka.
There is definitely something to
be said for small-town living! We
found everyone so kind and helpful.
Thank you everyone!
/s/ Lionel & Fran Torgrude
116 Lincoln Ln
Volga, SD 57071
Ruby Kosters ___________________
Ruby Helm Kosters, 74, of
Pierre, SD, was called home to
heaven on Thursday January 17,
2013, at Avera St. Mary’s Hospital
in Pierre and has now joined the
legions who walk with God.
Ruby Gene Helm was born
March 30, 1938, to Frieda Belle
(Seiler) and Arthur Henry Helm at
their farm northwest of Java, SD.
She attended country school
through eighth grade and Java
High School, graduating in 1956.
Ruby attended business college for
one year in Aberdeen and worked
at the county courthouse serving
in the treasurer’s office.
On July 17, 1957, Ruby married
the love of her life, Henry Garret
(Hank) Kosters at Selby, SD. They
moved to Madison, SD, where she
worked for a time at the local bank
while Hank attended General Bea-
dle State teacher’s college. During
this time two daughters were born,
Debra (1958) and Daria (1959).
After Hank graduated from col-
lege, they spent two years at Fe-
dora, SD, five years at Roscoe, SD,
where three daughters, Donna
(1962), Dianne (1964) and Dawn
(1966) were born. Ruby lovingly
supported Hank through a year of
required residency at USD in Ver-
million, SD, where he earned his
Doctoral degree. She moved with
the family to Pierre, SD, for 13
years, where daughter Denise
(1976) was born and in 1981,
moved to New Underwood, SD, for
three years, Rapid City for another
three years and returned to Pierre
where she resided until the time of
her death.
Ruby was a constant source of
comfort and lovingly supported the
activities of her family. She served
as a substitute teacher, was in-
volved with her church’s religious
education programs, and through-
out her lifetime, she took college
coursework from several South
Dakota universities within her in-
terest areas of art and special edu-
cation. She was a member of the
American Legion Auxiliary. Ruby’s
hobbies included; sewing (self-
taught seamstress) clothing for her
family, quilting, drawing and
sketching, hand-crafts like knit-
ting, crocheting, and embroider-
ing, decorating for holidays,
traveling with Hank and the fam-
ily, softball, bowling and golf and
she was an avid Green Bay Pack-
ers fan.
Ruby was preceded in death by
her parents. She is survived by her
loving husband of 55½ years,
Hank; six daughters, Debra (Mar-
vin) Moor of Kadoka, SD, Daria
Hatlestad of Pierre, SD, Donna
(Dave) Needham of Rapid City,
SD, Dianne (Jim) Sorem of Dallas,
TX, Dawn VanSickle of Pierre, SD,
and Denise Kosters of Sioux Falls,
SD; grandchildren, Matthew,
Mitchell and Marcus Moor,
Michael Hatlestad, Amanda and
Bridget Doyle, Michael, Garrett
(Christina) and Julie Sorem, and
Shawn (Bridget) VanSickle; great-
grandson, Jackson Garrett Sorem,
future great-granddaughter,
Ariyah; siblings, Janice (Morris)
Kosters, Dwight (Yvonne) Helm,
and Les (Audrey) Helm; and spe-
cial step-grandchildren, LyRanda
(Mike) Fuoss, Ty, Dylan and Ryan
Fuoss; LuAnn Hatlestad, Anthony
and Whitney Hatlestad, and Tom
and Jeremy Needham; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Visitation was held from 5-7
p.m. CT, Monday, January 21 at Is-
burg Funeral Chapel followed by a
prayer service at 7 p.m. Mass of
Christian Burial will be held Tues-
day, January 22 at 10:00 at St
Peter & Paul Catholic Church,
Pierre, SD. Burial will be at 3:00
p.m., MST at Black Hills National
Cemetery.
Arrangements have been placed
in care of Isburg Funeral Chapel.
Online condolences may be
made at www.isburgfuner-
alchapels.com
Alma Weller ___________________
Alma Weller, 96, passed away on
Friday, January 11, 2013, at the
Avera Eureka Health Care Center.
Alma Wolff, the last surviving
child of Jacob and Christina (Gohl)
Wolff, was born March 27, 1916, in
McPherson County. She married
Emil Weller on August 25, 1940. In
1955 she and Emil opened the Eu-
reka Bakery which they operated
until their retirement in 1974. She
was a lifetime member of Zion
American Lutheran Church.
Alma enjoyed cooking, baking,
knitting, crocheting, traveling and
gardening. Her greatest pleasure
was to spend time with her chil-
dren and especially the grand chil-
dren and great grandchildren.
Survivors include three sons:
Richard (Audrey) Weller, of Tuc-
son, Arizona, James (Candy)
Weller of Hastings, Minnesota,
Harry (Nancy) Weller of Kadoka;
one daughter, Barbara (Darold)
Owens of Brainerd, Minnesota;
eight grandchildren: Mara (John)
Determan, Carla (Brent) Johnson,
Christa (Chris) Strenge, Michael
(Jennifer) Owens, David (Kari)
Weller, Debra (Ryan) Hafey,
Brandee (Heath) Hauptman, and
Kendra (Neal) Mastel; and fifteen
great grandchildren: Maia,
Matthew and Hallee Determan,
Von and Levi Strenge, Brady and
Carolyn Johnson, Hailey and Kate
Owens, Kenzie and Maycie Jo
Weller, Chauncey and Blaine
Hauptman, Hayden and Hudson
Mastel.
Alma was preceded in death by
her husband, Emil; a son, Thomas,
her parents and her thirteen
brothers and sisters.
The funeral service for Alma
Weller was held on Saturday, Jan-
uary 19, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. at Zion
American Lutheran Church in Eu-
reka, with Pastor Ryan Gage lead-
ing the service. Burial followed at
the church cemetery.
Alma’s family prefers memorials
to Zion American Lutheran
Church, PO 546, Eureka, SD
57437 or to the Avera Eureka
Healthcare Center, PO Box 40, Eu-
reka, SD 57437.
To leave an online condolence,
please visit
www.MillerLienFH.com.
Lien-Straub Funeral Chapel,
Eureka, is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Marvin McDaniel________________
Marvin McDaniel, age 54, of
Casper, Wyo., formerly of Philip,
S.D., died Saturday, January 19,
2013, at the Wyoming Medical
Center in Casper.
Marvin Fred McDaniel was born
August 2, 1958, in Philip, the son
of Fred Q. and Beverly I. (Mc-
Clure) McDaniel. He grew up in
Philip, graduating from Philip
High School in 1976.
While in high school, Marvin
worked for Jack Hansen at his fur
plant. After graduation, Marvin
worked for Dorothy Brothers,
where he worked on vehicles. Mar-
vin then attended Mitchell Vo-
Tech, where he earned his
electrician’s license. He moved to
Wyoming where he served as an
apprentice, journeyman, and later
as a master electrician for various
mining companies.
Marvin has made his home in
Casper for a number of years, but
always looked forward to coffee at
Rich Smith’s, when he made it
home to the ranch near Philip.
Marvin was a hard worker, and
able to fix anything that needed re-
pairs. Marvin also became quite a
gardener, and enjoyed canning his
produce he raised. He will be
greatly missed by his family and
friends.
Survivors include his mother,
Beverly McDaniel of Quinn; three
sisters, Kerry Wahlquist and her
husband, Peter, of Las Vegas, Nev.,
Kathy McDaniel of Rapid City, and
Patricia Hauk and her husband,
Phillip, of Piedmont; a nephew,
Sean Wahlquist, and niece, Kersey
Wahlquist, both of Las Vegas, and
a host of other relatives and
friends.
Marvin was preceded in death
by his father, Fred McDaniel, on
April 6, 2005.
Memorial services will be held at
2:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 2,
at the American Legion Hall in
Philip, with Pastor Frezil Wester-
lund officiating.
Interment will be at the Masonic
Cemetery in Philip.
Arrangements are with the
Rush Funeral Home of Philip.
His online guestbook is available
at www.rushfuneralhome.com.
Letter to editor:
I really believe we don’t need
this land zoning law. You need to
realize any thing you do to your
property you need a permit and
they will tell you how to build it,
plus paying for the permits won’t
be cheap. We’ve got enough federal
government taxes and such, so we
don’t need more county.
/s/ Roy Buckmaster
PO Box 173
Kadoka, SD 57543
Bel videre News …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 3
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“Money can’t buy happiness,
but it can buy chickens, and that’s
pretty much the same thing.” I
read this little saying the other
day and thought, “That’s about
right.” For some strange reason,
I’ve always liked having those silly
critters running around the place
making it homey. They’re so dread-
fully optimistic and cheerful. They
can hardly wait to start each new
day since there is bound to be
something wonderful just about to
happen, or so they think. Open the
door or gate in the morning, and
the birds don’t just wander out.
They run and fly out to spread in
all four directions. Pretty soon
they’re chasing grasshoppers,
scratching busily in the dirt, tak-
ing dust baths, and generally hav-
ing a grand old time. Watching all
this lifts my spirits and makes me
smile.
My neighbor, Chuck, apparently
feels somewhat the same way.
They haven’t had any chickens
around their place for a number of
years, but Chuck has been plotting
to get some for quite a while. Last
spring he finally got things to-
gether enough to order some baby
chicks so he now has eggs to sell
from time to time. Since I unfortu-
nately do not have any hens myself
at present, this is good because
farm-raised eggs do taste better
than those shipped in to the gro-
cery stores. They have more color-
ful yolks as well and firmer shells.
Better-tasting eggs, actually,
and more of them, are one of the
main advantages of having chick-
ens around. In my experience and
financially speaking, you aren’t
apt to make much money raising
chickens. You’re probably lucky to
break even. The birds are satisfy-
ing in other terms, some of which
I’ve just mentioned, but as a
money-maker not so much.
Early last year, Chuck asked
what breeds I’d found that might
work out well for him. Heaven
knows I’ve had enough experience
through raising thousands of
chickens over the years and trying
dozens of breeds from tiny little
bantams to huge old things. I said
I’d found Hubbard Golden Comet
hens to be the best layers of
brown-shelled eggs and some form
of Leghorns for white. Cornish-
Rocks are the best meat chickens
by far. Chuck eventually took some
of my advice but also ordered some
just for fun and because their color,
etc. appealed to him. I know he got
some roosters because Ted at our
river place can hear them crowing
from across the river on a quiet
day.
What doesn’t work very well are
those breeds that our touted as
dual-purpose. These are supposed
to be good producers of both meat
and eggs. In practice, those hens
don’t lay nearly as well as the ones
bred strictly for egg production.
The roosters also tend to get tough
before they’re big enough to have
much meat on them. I remember
many years ago when Chuck’s
wife, Merry, was grumbling
around one day that she’d
butchered an old rooster and tried
to boil it up for soup. Her comment
was, “I boiled that sucker for three
days, and it was still tough.” That
may have been a slight overstate-
ment, but it is probably true that
any rooster over six-months old
should just be fed to the cats.
Cooking it is apt to be a waste of
time. Any rooster much over two-
months of age, in fact, is going to
be a little tough unless you fricas-
see it which involves cooking it a
really long time.
Well, as you can probably tell, a
person raises chickens because he
or she enjoys it and reaps some
benefits along the way although
probably not financially. That ap-
plies to lots of other things as well
such as gardening. You can buy
your veggies about as cheaply as
you can raise them, but some
home-raised ones taste ever so
much better. Other pursuits that
grab people’s interest and time
might include hunting, fishing,
woodworking, quilting, knitting,
sewing and genealogy. These
things might not make you rich,
but they might make you happy.
By the way, I saw another say-
ing the other day that probably ap-
plies to neighbor Chuck along with
the one about chickens. That one
goes, “The most important thing in
life is to be yourself, unless you can
be a cowboy. Always be a cowboy.”
Chuck and a whole lot of other peo-
ple around here would definitely
subscribe to that theory. It tends to
get in the blood. Put another way,
we might say, “Money can’t buy
happiness, but it can buy horses
and cattle, and that’s pretty much
the same thing.”
Can’t Buy Happiness
Lookin’ Around
by Syd Iwan
Baxter Badure is once again
making the saddle that R-Calf will
be presenting to someone at the
stock show in Rapid City later this
month. According to Bax’s brother,
Greg, the picture tooled into the
seat of the saddle this year will be
taken from a well-known Wyoming
photo of a man on a black horse in
a snowstorm with a calf being bal-
anced against the saddle horn in
front. Bax and Carol are now
pretty much down to one daughter
at home. Brianna, at present, is
mostly living in Hot Springs and
working at a nursing home, Castle
Manor. She likes the work. Kianna
attends sixth grade in Kadoka and
seems to like that too.
Mary Johnston has been staying
fairly close to home during the cold
weather. She does go to Kadoka
most Wednesdays to help with Re-
lease Time at the church and get
some groceries. Church in
Belvidere is usually on the agenda
for Sundays.
Al Badure and Beverly Mc-
Daniel went to Casper, WY, this
week to see Beverly’s son, Marvin,
who was critically ill with heart
problems. Marvin, unfortunately,
died later in the week, and his fu-
neral service will be held in Philip
this week. Marvin was only 54 but
had been having health problems
for quite a while.
Bud Stickler of Philip is cur-
rently in the Rapid City hospital
after his knee gave way last week.
He’d had the knee replaced some
years ago, but it gave out on him
when he was shoveling some snow.
He will probably be in the hospital
or rehab for quite a while. Bud has
been a long-time friend of the De-
Vries family and has done carpen-
try work at the Belvidere Church
and around the area.
Frank Carlson reports that we
have a new part-time resident
since mid December who lives on
the old Art Johnston place by the
river southeast of town. His name
is Perry Compton, and he is a
jockey by trade. His family owns
the old Johnston place, and Perry
is doing some renovations on the
house there when he has time off
from riding in races. He came here
from Omaha, NE. Frank says his
morning rounds these days include
tending cattle at Mowry’s east of
town, at Bitting’s northwest and at
Mike Blom’s northeast. He said
that James and Colter Carlson
tried some coyote calling on Sun-
day at Lee Addison’s. Four coyote
were called in but only was shot.
Norma Headlee said it was a
nice quite weekend for doing tax
work so that’s what she did. Bill
and she are getting things caught
up in preparation for the calving
season which will start soon and
will keep the vet clinic busy for a
number of months. Norma said her
brother, Tom DeVries, came to her
rescue last week when she got a
tractor stuck in a snow bank. She
said Tom has been rescuing her out
of this and that for going on fifty
years now and hasn’t given up yet.
This weekend, though, she man-
aged to stay out of trouble and did
not need Tom’s help.
Jo and Jory Rodgers went to
Pierre on Sunday so Jory could
compete in a wrestling tournament
there. He came in second in his di-
vision. Also at the meet were Mark,
Nicci and Greyson DeVries since
Greyson took part in the meet too.
His two older brothers were in a
meet at Winner on Friday and Sat-
urday. Jo said they are still work-
ing on the Belvidere Store and
hope they can open it soon. On
Monday, Jo was planning to drive
to Spearfish for a postal meeting.
Monday is a federal holiday so Jo
didn’t have to man a post office
somewhere. In other words, Mon-
day was a holiday from running a
post office but not from postal du-
ties altogether.
Russ and Gay Spinsby are stay-
ing nice and cozy these cold days
thanks to a new heat pump they
had installed last week. Their old
furnace was giving them grief so
the new system was needed. The
heat pump is supposed to be more
efficient that there old system so
Gay is hoping for a lower utility
bill. Both sons have been home to
visit recently. Casey and family
and a hunting friend of Casey’s
came from Huron the last few days
of December and were successful in
getting a deer. Marty and family
came the next weekend from Sioux
Falls with their new daughter, Aria
Elizabeth, who was born on Decem-
ber 14. Both sons now have two
kids each, and each has one son
and one daughter. Both Casey and
Marty say their families are now
complete so Russ and Gay may
have to be content with four grand-
kids unless something unexpected
comes along.
Greg and Dana Badure and kids
were visited by Eric and Pam Os-
born on Sunday. Eric brought along
his saw and helped shore up a
weak spot in the floor that occa-
sionally made one wonder if it
might give way and deposit some-
one in the basement. The family
lately has been putting a new
Christmas gift to good use. It is a
video game called Wii which in-
volves standing up to play it. It is
quite popular with the kids espe-
cially, and Greg says it has some
physical activity involved which
isn’t a bad thing.
In South Dakota, we have an op-
portunity to make our state safer
and save tens of millions of tax-
payer dollars. It is an opportunity
we must seize.
South Dakota’s prison popula-
tion has grown by six times in the
last 35 years. Spending on correc-
tions has tripled in the last 20
years alone. Our state locks up
more people, per capita, than any
of our bordering states. We lock up
75 percent more men than North
Dakota and four times as many
women as Minnesota. We are a
clear outlier.
Unfortunately, these high levels
of imprisonment have not made
our state safer. In the past decade,
17 states have lowered their im-
prisonment rates while also lower-
ing their crime rates at twice the
rate that South Dakota’s went
down.
If we do nothing, our prison pop-
ulation will grow by 900 inmates –
that’s 25 percent – in the next 10
years, costing taxpayers $224 mil-
lion. We will need to build two new
prisons.
This spring, I joined the Chief
Justice and legislative leaders in
engaging over 400 stakeholders be-
fore establishing a bipartisan,
inter-branch work group to look
into this problem. The group in-
cluded law enforcement, judges,
legislators, treatment providers,
defense attorneys and prosecutors.
We asked this work group to see
if we could improve public safety,
hold offenders more accountable,
and get a better return on our pub-
lic safety dollars. I’m pleased that
the work group came back with ro-
bust recommendations.
Following my State of the State
address, the Chief Justice and 70
legislators, including the Republi-
can and Democratic leaders of the
House and the Senate, joined me in
submitting the South Dakota Pub-
lic Safety Improvement Act.
This measure, Senate Bill 70,
will improve supervision on proba-
tion and parole through expanded
treatment and reduced caseloads,
and it will use proven tools like
drug courts and a new 24/7-style
program for drug offenders.
It will focus our prison space on
violent and career criminals by
punishing drug kingpins more
harshly than users while ensuring
swift and certain sanctions for of-
fenders.
Finally, the bill calls for im-
proved victim notification and
restitution collection, and it re-
quires that all of these programs be
measured and evaluated for effec-
tiveness, year after year.
This path will save our state
tens of millions of dollars in prison
costs while keeping South Dakota
safer. This is the right path for-
ward, and I’m not alone in support-
ing the measure. I’m joined by the
Chief Justice, Attorney General,
Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, Victims
Advocates, State’s Attorneys,
County Commissioners, the State
Bar, and Treatment Providers.
South Dakota is showing, once
again, that we can work together to
find common sense, smart solu-
tions to our biggest problems.ing to
get back into a normal routine fol-
lowing the holidays may not have
taken the time to ensure that kids
and parents alike are vaccinated
for the flu this season.

Working Together to Improve
Public Safety
By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
Larvie. These kids never cease to
give us something to boast about-
we are all so proud of them.
Dan Taft is home and feeling
well enough to be bored so please
give him a phone call and visit a bit
if you happen to be in the house.
Being housebound seems like a
punishment to these guys, but is
the best way to heal up. Dan suf-
fered a crushed shoulder from a
four wheeler accident a week or so
ago while moving cattle.
JoAnn Letellier attended a
parish council meeting after church
services at the Our Lady of Victory
Catholic Church on Sunday.
Susan Taft was busy working at
the Wanblee Post Office a few days
this week. Carol Ferguson worked
here at the Norris Post Office in
her absence.
Julie Letellier of Kilgore spent
the Martin Luther King Day holi-
day at the James Letellier home.
A couple of our dear lifetime
Norris residents, Bill and Marjorie
Letellier have moved. Their family
has recently helped Bill and Mar-
jorie get situated in Philip. Bill is
in the nursing home and Marjorie
is a resident at the Silver Leaf As-
sisted Living Center. If you are in
the area, they would sure love to
have you come for a visit; they have
fond memories of Flying Farmers,
baseball games, square dancing,
Norris Extension Club, building
the Township Hall and the activi-
ties at the St. John Lutheran
Church in Norris. They will surely
be missed in this community that
they were so much a part of for so
many years.
Dr. Bill Headlee, DVM of
Kadoka was busy bangs vaccinat-
ing heifers in the area on Thursday.
Tim Merchen helped at the James
Letelliers and was a dinner guest.
Bill had to cover five places that
day so didn't have time to stop.
Good judgment comes from
experience, and a lot of that
comes from bad judgment.”
Will Rogers
Pastor Denke visited in the
Robert Ring home and was a din-
ner guest on Tuesday.
The James Letelliers were
among those enjoying the basket-
ball game Tuesday evening be-
tween White River and Philip. It
was the White River Tigers first
home game of the season. The score
was in the triple digits, but it
should be high if you are playing
the SD State Champions; if they
expect to defend their title. The
Tigers have such an even team that
the subs are getting some real pol-
ish on them, too. I could watch
those guys play all day long. After
I have watched for awhile, my eyes
fill up with tears. I am so proud of
them. I have cheered for some of
those guys all their lives and they
really make basketball a team
sport.
Norris school news: The archery
program has started and soon will
be an after school class. Ms Lodmel
is the instructor this year.
Thursday, James and Marjorie
Anne Letellier enjoyed attending
the Southern Plains girls’ basket-
ball tournament in White River.
White River was playing Kadoka so
we had gals we knew on both sides.
Our neighbor gal, Taylor Merchen,
is a real fireball for Kadoka and she
and White River’s Ashlyn Plooser
were pretty evenly matched so it
made for a real good game.
Little Grace Elise Ring was born
to Daniel and Michelle Ring of
Washington state on Friday, Janu-
ary 18, 2013 at 7:21 a.m. Although
the little lady came a few weeks
early, she weighed in at 5 lbs. and
15 ozs. and was 17¾ inches long.
Grace was welcomed home by her
three big brothers. Proud grand-
parents are June and the late
Lawrence Ring of Norris.
Howard and Nette Heinert vis-
ited Robert and Sharon Ring on
Sunday afternoon.
Norris is once again home to an-
other crowned princess. Geor-
gianne Larvie of Blackpipe was
crowned Miss Rosebud at a cere-
mony at the Tribal Council Cham-
bers on January 9, 2013 by the
outgoing Miss Rosebud Brianne
Herman. Georgianne is a very ac-
tive junior at White River High
School and the daughter of Tasha
Spacious 1 bedroom
units are available for the elderly
(62 years or older)
and/or disabled/handicapped adults
(18 years or older)
OF ALL INCOME
LEVELS.
CALL 1-800-481-6904
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good work we’re doing throughout
the state and because it makes them
proud to know that through their fi-
nancial contributions, they are help-
ing their county sheriff.”
Eggert also stressed that citizen
memberships are solicited by mail
only - never by telephone. Their “No
Telemarketing” policy has been in
effect since the association’s incep-
tion and is one of the policies that
differentiates the SDSA from other
law enforcement organizations in
South Dakota. They will never
make phone call solicitations and
the public should be aware if they
receive a phone call and they iden-
tify themselves as being the SDSA.
This should be reported.
Its newest campaign will be
mailed in January. For further in-
formation on membership in the
SDSA, contact Eggert at
admin@southdakotasheriffs.org or
PO Box 130, Howard, SD 57349.
Since its inception in 1953, the
South Dakota Sheriffs’ Association
(SDSA) has made its main objective
to achieve the law enforcement
goals of all South Dakota sheriffs,
their deputies, state attorney and
other law enforcement authorities
in the state.
In addition to its main focus of
serving as a state-level organization
to support SD sheriffs, the associa-
tion also provides training, legisla-
tive representation and educational
conferences for all of its sheriff
members and their staff. Each year,
SDSA organizes two conferences
with themes ranging from personnel
management in law enforcement to
current public safety trends - all in
an effort to keep officials abreast of
changing technologies, methods and
resources.
While it is primarily funded from
sheriff membership, the SDSA also
solicits citizen and business mem-
bership each spring to help fund
several of its programs. Citizens and
businesses become members by pay-
ing the membership dues by mail or
by visiting their local sheriff ’s office
and filling out a membership appli-
cation. Each member receives a
membership card and a subscription
to the association’s newsletter.
To retain its membership base,
renewal notices are mailed to cur-
rent members along with updated
credentials. According to Executive
Director Staci Eggert, “Many of our
members support us because of the
South Dakota Sheriffs’ Association
membership program wants you
Locals …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 4
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837-2259 or 859-2516
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
ALL types!
Brent Peters
WBackhoe
WTrenching
WDirectional
Boring
WTire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Happy 90th Birthday Mom!
January 17, 2013
Love,
Paul, Diane,
Vern & Dave
Cards may be sent to:
Bertie VanderMay
26800 Fish Creek Rd.
Long Valley, SD 57547
90th Birthday
on Sunday, January 27,
2013.
Open House from
2:00 - 4:00 p.m.
Kadoka Gateway Apt.
Community Room
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 55, Kadoka, SD
57543
The children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren,
and great-great-grandchildren
invite you to help celebrate
Geraldine Allen’s
No gifts, please.
recipients are children and 31% are
adults. Disabled adults and low-in-
come parents qualify for Medicaid.
Many of our nursing home resi-
dents qualify for Medicaid. The Af-
fordable Care Act (ACA) allows the
states to expand coverage to those
adults who qualify if they are at
138% of the poverty level. (Chil-
dren are already covered whether
or not we expand Medicaid).
The population affected by the
expansion would be South Dakota’s
working poor who do not typically
receive health insurance through
their employer. If states choose to
expand Medicaid, the federal gov-
ernment will cover 100 percent of
the costs from 2014 to 2016. The
feds' contribution will begin to de-
crease in 2017, but will never be
less than 90 percent, under the
ACA. This expansion would bring
close to $200 million federal dollars
to SD to care for those in need,
make our citizens healthier, and
keep them out of more expensive
emergency care. Arizona recently
announced that they will provide
the Medicaid Expansion to their
citizens.
I invite you to contact me with
your questions and concerns. I may
be reached at 605-685-4241 or
Sen.Bradford@state.sd.us
We’re now well into committee
work in both Senate Health and
Senate Judiciary as we end the sec-
ond week of the session. As I’ve
known over the 12 years I’ve served
in the Legislature, the 38 days of
the Legislature go by quickly. As I
mentioned in my last article, I’ve
spent many days prior to the start
of this session serving on the Gov-
ernor’s Criminal Justice Task Ini-
tiative Task Force which will be
bringing forth legislation in this
session to improve our justice sys-
tem by providing for increases in
drug and alcohol courts. The focus
here is to help people recover, not
put them in prison. Last week, I
testified in front of the Joint Appro-
priations Committee and let my
voice show support for this attempt
to help reduce the numbers of in-
mates in our prisons and provide
treatment for those who suffer
from addictions. On Friday, Jan. 18
I again testified in front of the Sen-
ate State Affairs Committee where
it passed unanimously.
Earlier this week I attended
briefings on the proposed Medicaid
expansion which I support. Medi-
caid is one of the largest healthcare
insurers in South Dakota. Most of
the people covered in our state
under Medicaid are children. In
fact, 69% of the current Medicaid
From Senator Jim Bradford
With colder temperatures often
come runny noses, sore throats and
unfortunately, the flu. Families
across South Dakota who are try-
ing to get back into a normal rou-
tine following the holidays may not
have taken the time to ensure that
kids and parents alike are vacci-
nated for the flu this season.
This week, South Dakota was
moved into the “widespread” flu
classification by the U.S. Center for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), leading hospitals and busi-
nesses to take extra precautions. In
total, eleven South Dakotans have
died from the flu and the state has
reported almost 600 cases of flu so
far this season.
It’s time to take the flu seriously.
I encourage all South Dakotans to
not only get vaccinated, but to stay
home from work or school if you
have symptoms, such as a cough or
fever. The typical incubation period
for the flu is an average of two days
and adults can be infectious for a
week, starting with the day before
symptoms began. Children can be
contagious even longer.
Flu vaccines protect individuals
from the three flu strains predicted
to be most popular that season.
While the vaccine is still the best
way to prevent the flu, antiviral
drugs can also be a strong line of
defense, as well as common sense
health habits, such as covering a
cough and consistent hand-wash-
ing. South Dakota has the highest
vaccination rate in the country –
with over half of our population re-
ceiving the vaccine during the
2011-2012 flu season! In fact,
South Dakota received the Adult
Immunization Coverage Award
from the CDC in 2012.
I encourage South Dakotans to
look at information provided by the
South Dakota Department of
Health or contact a local health
care provider if you have any addi-
tional questions or concerns re-
garding the flu vaccine.
Rep. Kristi Noem is South
Dakota’s lone U.S. Representative,
elected in November 2010. She
serves on the Agriculture and
Armed Services Committees.
Fighting the Flu
By Rep. Kristi Noem
Since President Obama took of-
fice in 2009, an additional 15 mil-
lion Americans have been added to
the food stamp rolls. This trend has
continued despite economic indica-
tors coming from his administra-
tion that suggest the number of
Americans out of work and en-
rolling in government safety net
programs should be on the decline.
The most recent food stamp par-
ticipation numbers paint a very
troubling picture of the U.S. econ-
omy. According to the latest statis-
tics released on January 4, 2013,
by the Department of Agriculture,
the number of Americans enrolled
in the Supplemental Nutrition As-
sistance Program, commonly re-
ferred to as food stamps, has spiked
to nearly 48 million people, or
nearly 15 percent of the U.S. popu-
lation. Food stamp enrollment has
increased by more than 607,000
just since the last report was pub-
lished in December of 2012.
The enrollment of such a large
number of Americans in the food
stamp program has come at an ex-
tremely high cost to taxpayers.
Last year alone the U.S. govern-
ment spent a record $80.4 billion
on food stamps, and is projected to
spend an estimated $770 billion
over the next 10 years.
With nearly one out of every
seven people using food stamps,
lawmakers should be carefully re-
viewing the rapid increase in en-
rollment and finding answers to
important questions, such as: are
these benefits being provided to
those who need it most; should the
list of eligible food stamp products
be modified; and does this program
encourage independence or does it
instead create an ongoing depend-
ency on government programs?
In December of 2012, I sent a
letter along with Senator Jeff Ses-
sions (R-Ala.) to Wendy Spencer,
Chief Executive Officer for the Cor-
poration for National and Commu-
nity Service (CNCS), a government
entity responsible for matching
government paid volunteers with
local community service organiza-
tions. Our letter outlined our con-
cerns that current CNCS policies
and promotional materials may be
encouraging the exploitation of
food stamps by paid CNCS volun-
teers, resulting in unnecessary food
stamp participation. While this is
just one example of the fraud and
abuse that plagues this system, if a
federal agency such as CNCS is
able to exploit the benefits of an-
other federal program, it is difficult
to predict just how far and wide-
spread fraud and abuse may reach.
It is time for Congress to engage
in a meaningful discussion about
how to best reduce poverty and ex-
pand upward mobility for all Amer-
icans, and take decisive action to
achieve this goal. Congress must
strike a balance to ensure that we
protect our country’s most vulnera-
ble and those who legitimately
need assistance while also cutting
federal spending, reprioritizing fed-
eral programs, and eliminating
waste, fraud, and abuse. As Con-
gress prepares to address our na-
tion’s overall federal spending, I
will continue to advocate for com-
mon-sense reforms to our nation’s
safety net programs that will im-
prove America’s social, fiscal, and
economic health.
Time to Reform the Broken
Food Stamp Program
By Sen. John Thune
The Miss America Pageant is
over, but the memories for Miss
South Dakota’s extended family
will live on. All of Calista Kirby’s
immediate family were in Las
Vegas for the pageant and all are
safely home. Calista’s parents and
brother, September and Cory Kirby
and Nathan of Brookings; her
grandparents, Joe and Kathleen
Leutenegger of Kadoka; and aunts
and uncles and their families –
Shawna and Rich Bendt and chil-
dren, Kadoka; Shanesa and Wade
Rhodes and children of Black
Hawk, and Starette and Brian
Nash and family of Mitchell, were
all able to attend the ceremonies.
The Leuteneggers and Bendts ar-
rived in Las Vegas on Monday, Jan-
uary 7 and the rest of the family
came later in the week. The family
said they sat with about 100 South
Dakotans at the Saturday night
coronation. Calista and all the con-
testants were awarded $3,000
scholarships for participation in
the pageant. Calista will still have
a busy schedule as Miss South
Dakota until the next pageant is
held in Hot Springs later this year.
Alma Weller, 94, of Eureka
passed away on January 11 and
her funeral was held Saturday,
Jan. 19, at the Zion Lutheran
Church in Eureka. Mrs. Weller was
the mother of Harry Weller and the
community extends its sympathy
to Harry, Nancy and their daugh-
ters and families.
Word was received early Thurs-
day morning of the death of Ruby
Kosters of Pierre, the mother of
Debra Moor of Kadoka. Deb went
to Pierre on Thursday to help with
funeral arrangements and on Mon-
day visitation was held in Pierre
with funeral and burial on Tues-
day. Deb and Marv were present
for both days, and their sons,
Matthew, Marc and Mitch, were all
expected to be at their grand-
mother’s services.
Kenny and Cindy Wilmarth
went to Pierre on Monday, Jan. 14,
where they attended meetings at
the Governor’s Tourism Confer-
ence. Kenny also got to attend a
wrestling match in which the
Amiotte grandsons participated.
Cindy returned home on Thursday
and Kenny stayed to spend the
weekend goose hunting. He re-
turned home Monday.
Viola and Russ Olney, Rusty
Olney, Laurel Hildebrand, Bill and
Marsha Sumpter and Sydne Lenox
were among Kadokans who at-
tended the funeral of Cliff Ramsey
in Philip on Wednesday, January
16. Among some of the out-of-town
former Kadoka residents were
Diane (Olney) and Gordon Paulson,
Will Parke and Darral and Marilyn
(Hansen) Brooks of the Rapid City
area.
Hiram Neiffer of Hill City was a
Kadoka visitor on Friday. He vis-
ited with several friends at Jigger’s
and then went down to the Gate-
way Apartments to see Oliver and
Charles Willert.
Karen Denny has been making
many trips to Rapid City to visit
her husband, Larry, who is a pa-
tient in the hospital there. Larry
underwent major surgery recently
and will be going through extensive
rehabilitation later.
Tara Jo Deuter and friend, Nate,
Terry and Kim Deuter and Wanda
Swan enjoyed breakfast on Satur-
day at Jigger’s. TJ has spent a
week or so with her parents and is
in the process of moving to Pierre
where she will be employed at the
women’s prison there. She has been
working at Fresh Start in Edge-
mont since her graduation from
Black Hills State University last
year.
Jeanne Seppala of Gillette, WY,
passed away on January 16 of nat-
ural causes. She and her husband,
Jim, lived in Kadoka in the mid-
fifties as Jim was a teacher and
coach at KHS. Her funeral was
held on Monday. Jim preceded her
in death.
Mike and Marylin Paulson spent
the three-day weekend in Kadoka
from their jobs in North Dakota.
He was the grade school music
teacher in Kadoka and took a job in
North Dakota at the beginning of
this school year. Marylin worked in
the local library and stopped there
for a short visit Saturday after-
noon.
Clayton Struble, 82, of Denver
died on Friday, January 18 after a
long fight with cancer. Les and
Mike Struble, Bonnie and Paul
Briggs, Bruce Madsen and Chris
Madsen of Presho were among
those from this area who left to at-
tend Clayton’s funeral which was
held on Tuesday at 10 a.m. Clayton
was Leslie’s brother. Sympathy is
extended to the family.
Jeff Willert has entered some
upcoming rodeos and will partici-
pate pending the horse draw, ac-
cording to his dad, Jim. The
upcoming ones he may attend are
the National Western Stock Show
and Rodeo in Denver, Jan. 17-27;
Southwestern Expo in Forth
Worth, TX, Jan. 24-Feb. 9, and the
Black Hills Stock Show and Rodeo
in Rapid City, Jan. 26-Feb. 2.
Meatless Meals
With this year’s drought, econo-
mists are predicting a rise in next
year’s meat prices. This has many
individuals thinking about more
meatless meal options. Generally,
when you say “meatless meals”
everyone thinks of grilled cheese
or peanut butter sandwiches.
There are many other types of
healthy, inexpensive meatless
meals that are easy to prepare.
Many of us were raised to think
of meats as the most important
part of any meal, but we often eat
more meat than our bodies actu-
ally need. MyPlate (www.choose-
myplate.gov) recommends that
adults consume 4 to 6 ounces of
meat each day (three ounces is
about the size of a deck of playing
cards.) The institute of Medicine
recommends that we get at least
10% and no more than 35% of calo-
ries from protein. The specific
amount that we needs changes
with age.
Protein is key to the growth and
repair of your muscles, bones, lig-
aments, tissues, and even hair,
skin and nails. Protein food
sources such as meat, poultry, fish,
dry beans and peas, eggs, nuts,
and seeds supply many nutrients.
These include protein, B vitamins,
vitamin E, iron, zinc, and magne-
sium. We also get protein from
grains such as wheat germ and oat
bran. Plant foods such as beans
and nuts are wise choices for pro-
tein, since so many Americans fall
short on fiber.
Canned beans, such as black
beans (1 cup equals 15 grams of
protein), and kidney beans (1 cup
equals 13 grams of protein) can be
easily added to casseroles, soups
and salads. Bags of dry beans are
less expensive than canned. To
prepare dry beans, add 2 cups of
dry beans to 10 cups of cold water.
Bring the water to a boil and con-
tinue boiling for one to three min-
utes. Cover the pot. Let stand for 4
hours, then drain and rinse the
soaked beans. Cover the beans
with fresh water. Serve plain or
use in a favorite recipe; 1-1/2 cups
of cooked beans equals 1 can of
drained beans.
Examples of meatless meals in-
clude: homemade pizza with low-
fat cheese, meatless chili, bean
burritos, soups and stews that in-
clude beans, beans and rice, chick-
peas on salads and vegetable
casserole dishes.
To save money and lower your
fat and cholesterol intake, consider
non-meat proteins and smaller
portions of meat. Consider cutting
out meat one day each week by
having “Meatless Monday”. Check
out SparkPeople’s meatless recipe
ideas at http://bit.ly/WyrrM6.
Ann Schwader, Nutrition Field Specialist
SDSU Extension-Winner Regional Extension Center
Plague Affecting Prairie Dog
Populations?
With much of the snow melting,
and labeling of the chemical prod-
ucts registered for prairie dogs al-
lowing use for some time yet, some
opportunity remains this winter
for control. Before initiating chem-
ical control measures however,
landowners would be advised to
make sure prairie dog towns are
active.
Several recent news stories
have relayed the incidence of syl-
vatic plague, the term assigned to
cover all forms of plague in wild
animals, which is affecting prairie
dogs in various locations across the
U.S. Sylvatic plague is believed to
have been introduced into the
North American prairie ecosystem
around 1899, and was first docu-
mented in a prairie dog colony
near Lubbock, Texas, in 1946. A
1999 article states that plague has
been active in black-tailed prairie
dog populations in the northern
Great Plains only within the last
decade although it has been pres-
ent for much longer.
One source states that few if
any healthy prairie dog complexes
currently exist in the Southern
Plains within the United States.
Another article states that sylvatic
plague was first detected in South
Dakota in 2004, and has since
been confirmed on the Fort Pierre
National Grassland, the Buffalo
Gap National Grasslands, in Bad-
lands National Park and on the
Lower Brule Indian Reservation in
South Dakota. Other reports indi-
cate that the plague may be affect-
ing prairie dogs on private land as
well.
In cases where people have con-
tracted the disease, it is usually re-
ferred to as bubonic plague. When
people contract the disease, it is
usually from coming in contact
with an infected rodent (such as a
rat, a squirrel or a prairie dog) or
their fleas. Before the advent of
modern medicine, bubonic plague
struck the human population in
epidemic proportions every few
centuries. Today, improved sanita-
tion practices and modern insecti-
cides and antibiotics have reduced
the threat of plague epidemics in
developed countries like the
United States. According to an ar-
ticle in late-November, 2012, there
had not been any confirmed cases
of the plague in people in South
Dakota as of that time.
Although it is said to be a rare
occurrence, humans can contract
the plague. Modern antibiotics are
effective against plague, but treat-
ment must begin promptly. Symp-
toms include swollen and tender
lymph glands accompanied by
fever, chills, headache and extreme
exhaustion. Although humans con-
tracting the plague is said to be
rare, it only makes sense to take
precautions. People are advised to
keep themselves and their pets
flea-free and away from plagued
areas. If you are working in or
around a prairie dog town, take
steps to minimize your exposure.
Calendar
1/28/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. CST,
Burke Civic Center, Burke
1/31/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Pennington County Extension
Center, Rapid City
2/12/2013:PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Mueller Civic Center, Hot Springs
2/19/2013:PAT, 1:00 p.m. CST,
Winner Regional Extension Cen-
ter, Winner
2/20/2013: PAT, 1:00 p.m. MST,
Wall Community Center, Wall
Winner Regional Extension Center
Bob Fanning, Plant Pathology Field Specialist • 605-842-1267
Sports …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 5
If you would
like to share
your pictures,
please email
them to the
Kadoka
Press
press@kadoka
telco.com
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Coffee
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Groceries
DISCOUNT
FUEL
Kadoka Oil Co.
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2271
For fuel &
propane delivery:
1-800-742-0041
(Toll-free)
Mark & Tammy Carlson
Jackson County
Title Co., Inc.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
u u u u u
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to Noon
and by appointment.
Over 20 Years of Service
(605) 837-2286
Midwest
Cooperative
Kadoka
South Dakota
•Grain •Feed •Salt
•Fuel •Twine
Phone: 837-2235
Check our prices first!
837-2690
Ditching & Trenching of
ALL types!
Craig cell 605-390-8087
Sauntee cell 605-390-8604
Ask about our solar wells.
B.L. PORCH
Veterinarian
Phone
837-2697
Kadoka
SD
Divisions of Ravellette
Publications, Inc.:
Kadoka Press: 837-2259
Pioneer Review: 859-2516
The Profit: 859-2516
Pennington Co. Courant: 279-2565
New Underwood Post: 754-6466
Faith Independent: 967-2161
Bison Courier: 244-7199
Murdo Coyote: 669-2271
Kadoka Clinic & Lab
601 Chestnut
Kadoka, SD 57543-0640
Fax: 837-2061 Ph: 837-2257
MONDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
TUESDAY
Dave Webb, PA-C
Wednesday - CLOSED
Please call Philip Clinic
800-439-8047
THURSDAY
Dr. David Holman
FRIDAY
Dr. Coen Klopper
Clinic Hours:
8:00 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Lab Hours:
8:15 - 12:00 1:00 - 5:00
Kadoka, SD
605-837-2431
Philip, SD
605-859-2610
Complete line of veterinary
services & products.
MONDAY - FRIDAY
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
8:00 a.m. to noon
by appointment
Check out our website!
http://www.goldenwest.net/~kdahei
The Lab & X-ray departments
accept orders from any provider.
Kadoka Clinic is a Medicare provider &
accepts assignments on Medicare bills.
Sonya Addison
Independent Scentsy Consultant
605-837-2077 home
605-488-0846 cell
sraddison.scentsy.us
Kay Reckling
Independent Norwex Consultant
605-391-3097 cell
kayreckling.norwex.biz
kmreckling@gmail.com
Rapid City Westside:
Mason Stilwell 4th
Marion Tourney:
Jyntre Coller 3rd
Gus Stout 4th
Jadyn Coller 1st
Spearfish (Jan. 19):
Jyntre Coller 1st
Dalton Porch 2nd
Gus Stout 4th
Jadyn Coller 1st
Kaden Stoddard 3rd
Pierre (Jan. 20):
Gus Stout 4th
Jyntre Coller 3rd
Dalton Porch 5th
Greyson DeVries 4th
Jory Rodgers 2nd
Jadyn Coller 2nd
Kadoka AAU
wrestling
It was a good road trip to the
Winner Invitational Wrestling
Tournament for the Philip Area
team as they brought back the first
place team award, eight first and
second individual awards, along
with five other placings, and Rance
Johnson was voted “Most Out-
standing Wrestler.”
Head coach Matt Donnelly noted
that everyone wrestled well and
the team is almost back to full
strength. Some are coming back
from injuries and illness and he
looks forward to them being better
for the next tournament.
Donnelly said that some schools
are noted for certain techniques
which give the wrestlers more ex-
perience. “The only way you’re
going to get better is to find the
best and go after them,” said Don-
nelly.
Twelve teams participated in the
January 19 tournment with Philip
scoring more than 45 points over
their nearest competitor. Final
team placings were Philip (278.5),
Winner (233), Bon Homme (191.5),
Mobridge-Pollock (155), Redfield/
Doland (115), Sunshine Bible Acad-
emy (90.5), Mt. Vernon/Plankin-
ton/Corsica (72), Todd County (69),
St. Thomas More (49), Andes Cen-
tral (29), Cheyenne-Eagle Butte/
Dupree (20) and Pine Ridge (0).
106 lbs: Jed Brown, 2nd, 17-8 record
•Won by forfeit
•Pinned Stone Durham (STM) 1:38
•Tech. fall over Leo Hopkins (ANC) 18-0
•Decisioned by Duncan Stoebner (BH) 4-9
106 lbs: Paul Smiley, 6th, 6-7 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Marcus Urban (MVPC) 1:43
•Won by forfeit (WIN)
•Pinned Riley Binger (RED) :20
•Pinned by Leo Hopkins (ANC) 3:50
•Pinned by Tobias Weddell (TC) :44
113 lbs: Rance Johnson, 1st,
14-9 record
•Pinned Teigan Gray (CEB) 1:48
•Tech. fall over Carter Wegner (RED) 17-1
•Decisioned Patrick Aeschbacher (WIN) 5-4
•Decisioned Isreal Appel (SBA) 13-11
120 lbs: Nick Donnelly, 1st,
21-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Hudson Peaman (TC) 1:53
•Pinned Zach Ayers (WIN) 1:41
•Pinned Jaden Madison (MP) 1:15
126 lbs: Kaylor Pinney, 4th, 3-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Tyrel Haley (WIN) 3:34
•Won by forfeit (ANC)
•Pinned Avery Gilchrist (WIN) 3:24
•Major dec. Caleb McNeill (RED) 18-9
•Major dec. by Taylor Colombe (TC) 5-14
126 lbs: Preston Eisenbraun, 1-2 record
•Won by forfeit (ANC)
•Major dec. by McNeill (RED) 4-12
•Bye
•Pinned by Colombe (TC) :42
132 lbs: Grady Carley, 4th,
17-12 record
•Bye
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Sean Bice (WIN) 2:24
•Decisioned Dominic Paulson (WIN) 6-0
•Decisioned by Tayte Clark (SBA) 0-8
138 lbs: Raedon Anderson, 3rd,
4-10 record
•Bye
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Dustin Cuka (BH) 5:39
•Won by forfeit
•Decisioned Jordan Fiest (MP) 9-4
145 lbs: Reed Johnson, 2nd,
8-4 record
•Pinned Moises Lozano (BH) 3:47
•Major dec. Hayden Medicine Horn (ANC)
18-8
•Pinned Trig Clark (SBA) 2:42
•Decisioned by Adam Farner (WIN) 0-9
152 lbs: Lane Blasius, 1st, 20-2 record
•Bye
•Pinned Grant Brewer (MP) 1:53
•Pinned David Paul (SBA) 1:34
•Tech. fall over Brandyn Middlesworth
(WIN) 18-3
152 lbs: Paul Kary, 1-8 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Jacob Standfield (MVPC) :28
•Pinned Andrew Mitzel (BH) 2:52
•Pinned by Cooper Baloun (RED) 4:07
160 lbs: Chandlier Sudbeck, 2nd,
19-6 record
•Bye
•Pinned Bailey Denoyer (TC) :29
•Major dec. Ryan Yost (RED) 12-1
•Major dec. by Blase Vanecek (BH) 5-14
170 lbs: Clint Stout, 1st, 21-5 record
•Pinned Jeremy Long (TC) 3:49
•Pinned Ryan Sherman (WIN) 1:55
•Pinned Jayson Van Vugt (MP) 2:56
•Decisioned Tate Novotny (WIN) 2-1
182 lbs: Chance Knutson, 1st,
17-7 record
•Pinned Tanner McCloskey (TC) 3:45
•Pinned Kingston LaFronboise (MVPC) 1:20
•Pinned Teddy Lopez (MP) 1:57
•Pinned David Jensen (MP) :49
195 lbs: Gavin DeVries, 8-11 record
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Ezra Bartlett (BH) 1:16
•Won by forfeit (TC)
•Pinned by Cameron Kostal (MVPC) 4:31
220 lbs: Logan Ammons, 2nd,
15-5 record
•Bye
•Pinned Geoffrey DeVries (PHI) 1:00
•Pinned Alan Haataja (BH) 1:03
•Major dec. by Brady Spiry (MP) 0-8
220 lbs: Geoffrey DeVries, 6th
2-11 record
•Bye
•Pinned by Ammons (PHI) 1:00
•Bye
•Pinned Cole Hottel (STM) 1:32
•Pinned by Kyle Blume (RED) :48
•Pinned by Colton Best (WIN) 2:08
Next Saturday, January 26, the
wrestlers will head down to Wag-
ner for their invitational tourna-
ment. Always a tough tournament,
the Scotties will have their work
cut out for them.
The Philip Invitational Wrestling
Tournament has been rescheduled
for Saturday, February 9, and it
will be held in Wall. Start time will
be 9:00 a.m. Donnelly said the
switch from two days to one will
make for one long day, but is glad
it could be rescheduled.
First place at Winner for area wrestlers
Athlete
of the
Week
Kwincy Ferguson
Girls Basketball
Kwincy had 3 good games during
the Southern Plains Tournament.
She played very aggressively, both
on offense and defense. She wasn't
afraid to attack the basket and did
a good job posting up under the
basket although she's not your typ-
ical post player. She is very tena-
cious against her opponents and
can create turnovers and draw
fouls. She scored 37 points during
the tournament and was named to
the Southern Plains All-Tournament
team. Keep up the hard work.
Sponsored by
Jackson County
Title Company
and
Larson Law Office, P.C.
615 Poplar St. • Kadoka, SD 57543
605-837-2286
Kadoka 10 18 26 48
White River 7 16 28 34
The Lady Kougars took part in
the Southern Plains Basketball
Tournament last Thursday, Frid-
day and Saturday.
Kadoka's first game of the tour-
nament had them playing the
White River Tigers on their home
court. Kwincy Ferguson, Marti
Herber and Raven Jorgensen each
had a basket, Tessa Stout hit a
three pointer and Taylor Merchen
made a free throw to give the
Kougars a 10-7 lead after the first
quarter.
Both teams played pretty evenly
the second quarter with Marti,
Taylor, Tessa and Shaley Herber
each scoring a basket. This gave
the Kougars an 18-16 lead at half
time.
The Tigers fought back the third
quarter and outscored the Kougars
12-8, giving White River the lead
28-26.
However, the Kougars had a
strong fourth quarter with Marti,
Kwincy, Tessa, Katie and Shaley
each scoring a bucket. Taylor and
Raven made both their free throws
when they were put on the line and
Tori Letellier got a couple steals
and scored 8 fourth-quarter points.
The Kougars outscored the
Tigers 22-6, which gave the girls
the win with a score of 48-34. Tori
lead scoring with 9 points, Kwincy
- 8, Tessa - 7, Marti and Raven - 6,
Taylor - 5, Shaley - 4 and Katie - 3.
The Kougars were 7/15 from the
free throw line and committed 18
total fouls.
Kadoka 12 25 39 48
Jones Co. 15 29 46 60
Kadoka's second game of the
Southern Plains Tournament had
them facing a strong Jones County
team. Both teams came out fo-
cused, with the intent to win.
Kadoka trailed 15-12 after the
first quarter with Kwincy Ferguson
scoring 3 buckets and 2 free throws
and Katie Lensegrav and Destiny
Dale each with a basket. Kwincy
added another 7 points, Katie - 4
and Tori Letellier - 2, to trail the
lady Coyotes 29-25 going onto half-
time.
The Kougars battled through
the third quarter with Kwincy
adding another 7 points, Marti and
Katie with a bucket and Taylor
with a bucket and free throw. The
Coyotes outscored the Kougars 17-
14, which gave Jones Co. a 46-39
lead going onto the fourth quarter.
The Kougars played hard to the
very end, but didn't attack the bas-
ket like they needed, which led to a
60-48 loss. Kwincy Ferguson led
the team with 22 points and was
4/5 for free throws. Katie Lenseg-
rav added 10 points, Taylor
Merchen - 8, Tori Letellier - 4 and
Marti Herber and Destiny Dale - 2.
The Kougars were 6/10 from the
free throw line and never had a 1-1
opportunity the whole game.
Kadoka 11 24 37 53
Lyman 8 24 34 61
Kadoka played their final game
of the Southern Plains Tournament
in Colome against the Lyman
Raiders. Both teams were evenly
matched which made for an excit-
ing ball game.
Kadoka led at the end of the first
quarter 11-8 with Tori Letellier
scoring a basket and going 3/4 from
the line. Kwincy Ferguson added a
basket and free throw, Tessa Stout
made a basket and Marti Herber
added a free throw.
The second quarter was very in-
tense for both teams. Lyman put
Kadoka in double bonus, but could
only make 10/26. Lyman hit 3,
three pointers the second quarter,
which had the score tied 24-24 at
half time.
Kadoka came out strong the
third quarter with Katie Lensegrav
scoring 10 points, Taylor Merchen
- 2 and Shaley Herber with a free
throw. This gave the Kougars a 3-
point lead going into the final quar-
ter.
Both teams took turns taking
the lead throughout the fourth
quarter, but Kadoka fell into foul
trouble with Kwincy, Marti, Katie,
Taylor and Tori fouling out. The
Lady Raiders converted on free
throws, which ended up giving
them the win 61-53.
The Lady Kougars played a good
game despite the loss. They at-
tacked the basket and rebounded
better than the previous two
games. Katie Lensegrav led the
scoring with 16 points, Taylor
Merchen - 10, Kwincy Ferguson - 7,
Marti Herber and Tori Letellier - 5,
Shaley Herber and Tessa Stout - 4,
and Raven Jorgensen - 2. Kwincy
Ferguson was chosen for the
Southern Plains All- Tournamnet
team. Great job Kwincy!
Kadoka's next games will be
double headers against Jones
County on Thursday, Jan. 24 at
3:00 p.m. MT and Bison on Friday,
Jan 25 at 11:00 a.m. MT.
Lady Kougars 2 of 3 at
Southern Plains Tournament
An extreme showcase of South
Dakota’s finest high school cow-
boys and cowgirls – that is exactly
what you will find if you make
your way to the Black Hills Stock
Show Rodeo at the Rapid City
Rushmore Plaza Civic Center Jan-
uary 27, at 1:00 p.m.
There will be 114 top high school
rodeo athletes will be geared up
and ready to go as they get an op-
portunity to showcase their rodeo
talents during the 11th Annual
20X Extreme Showcase. South
Dakota has four regions of high
school rodeo contestants. The top
three cowboys and cowgirls from
each region in each event, based
on points after state finals, are in-
vited to compete in this exclusive
rodeo event.
Each contestant will receive a
Wrangler 20X shirt and a Wran-
gler jean gift certificate. Event
winners receive a trophy buckle
made by Maynard Buckles. Four
$500 scholarships are available for
senior contestants, one from
Wrangler, two from the Black Hills
Stock Show Foundation and one
from South Dakota Buckaroos.
Bareback
Northwest – Shane O'Connell,
Rapid City, Trig Clark, Meadow, Trevor
Gray, Ridgeview.
Barrel Racing
East – Chesney Nagel, Springfield,
Cassidy Musick, Virgil, Torrie Michels,
Mitchell, alternate Kendra Kannas,
Hayti; Northwest – Taylor Engessor,
Spearfish, Brittany Eymer, Spearfish,
Peedee Doyle, St Onge, alternate
Fehrin Ward, Fruitdale; River – Annie
Fulton, Miller, Laura O'Leary, Timber
Lake, Kailee Webb, Isabel, alternate
Syerra Christensen, Kennebec; South-
west – Keenie Word, Hermosa, Jordan
Tierney, Oral, Baillie Mutchler, White-
wood, alternate Ashley Peterson,
Rapid City.
Breakaway
East – Logan Moody, Letcher, Mad-
die Schaack, Clark, Shanna Swanson,
alternate Brooke Ollerich, Colton;
Northwest – Brooke Howell, Belle
Fourche, Cassy Woodward, Dupree,
Jayci Lamphere, Belle Fourche, alter-
nate Fehrin Ward, Fruitdale; River –
Cedar Jandreau, Kennebec, Tawny
Barry, Carter, Katie Hostutler, Mid-
land, alternate Courtney Dahlgren,
Timber Lake, Southwest – Elsie For-
tune, Interior, Mattee Pauley, Wall,
Cassidy Mutchler, Whitewood, alter-
nate Dale Ellen Cuny, Kyle.
Bull Riding
East – Ryan Knutson, Toronto, Riley
Page, Colton; Northwest – Ian Jacobs,
Belle Fourche, Jade Nixon, Belle
Fourche, Dalton Gerbracht, Faith, al-
ternate Treye Laplante; River – Jake
Frazier, White Horse,Casey Heninger,
Ft. Pierre, Scott Shoemaker, Gregory,
alternate Levi Schonebaum, Herrick;
Southwest – Miles Englebert, Burdock,
Kyle Reddy, Pine Ridge, JD Phelps,
Porcupine, alternate Lane Cermak,
Sturgis.
Goat Tying
East – Jacey Hupp, Huron, Vanzi
Knippling, Chamberlain, Maggie
Heiberger, Hartford, alternate Brandi
Cwach, Geddes; Northwest – Tearnee
Nelson, Faith, Tricia Wilken, Meadow,
Fehrin Ward, Fruitdale, alternate Pey-
ton Smith, Lantry, River – Katie
Lensegrav, Interior, Rylee Jo Rut-
ten, Colome, Bailey Tibbs, Ft. Pierre,
alternate Erin Kenzy, Iona; Southwest
– Karlee Peterson, Sturgis, Kailey Rae
Sawvell, Quinn, Kassi McPherson,
Rapid City.
Pole Bending
East – Hailey Block, Sisseton, Becca
Lythgoe, Colton, Jorry Lammers,
Hartford, alternate Kelsey Kennedy,
Beresford; Northwest – Kellsey Collins,
Newell, Bryce Olson, Prairie City,
Maclyn Hauck, Belle Fourche, alter-
nate Brooke Howell, Belle Fourche;
River – Remi Wientjes, Onida, Jordan
Bickel, Trail City, Kelsey Garber,
Pierre, alternate Moriah Glaus, Cham-
berlain; Southwest – Mazee Pauley,
Wall, Kaitlin Peterson, Sturgis, Carlee
Johnston, Elm Springs, alternate
Tylee Evans, Piedmont.
Saddle Bronc
East – Jade Maier, Bowdle; North-
west – Tayte Clark, Meadow, Teal
Schmidt, Sturgis, Seth Longbrake,
Howes, alternate Kash Deal, Dupree;
River Region – Bill Chauncy, Mission;
Southwest – Reed Johnson, Philip, Jor-
dan Hunt, Faith, Paul Kruse, Interior.
Steer Wrestling
East – Cole Potter, Winfred,
Cameron Fanning, Olivet, Shane Boy-
sen Sioux Falls; Northwest –
Andy Nelson, Spearfish, Caden
Packer, Sturgis, Max Teigen, Camp
Crook, alternate Dalton Hurst, Buf-
falo; River – Jake Fulton, Valentine,
Tyler Gaer, Newell, Logan Chris-
tensen, Kadoka, alternate Wyatt
Schaack, Wall; Southwest – Carson
Johnston, Elm Springs.
Tie Down Roping
East – Braedy Edleman, Huron, Nolan
Richie, Bristol, Kyle Kallhoff, Water-
town, alternate Matt Nelson, Colman;
Northwest – Casey Packer, Sturgis,
Cody Trainor, Faith, Cody Packer,
Sturgis, alternate Lane Foster, Lem-
mon; River – Lee Sivertsen, Ree
Heights, Carson Musick, Pierre,
Samuel Boldon, Oglala, alternate
Wyatt Fulton, St. Lawrence; South-
west – Treg Schaack, Edgemont, Wyatt
Mann, Box Elder, Joshua Hunt, Faith,
alternate Lane Blasius, all.
Team Roping - Headers
East – Wyatte Andersen, Hurley,
Jeremiah Johnson, Huron, Jace Chris-
tiansen, Egan, alternate Joe Hendrick-
son, Chancellor; Northwest – Cody
Bernstein, Faith, Colby Hetzel, Lem-
mon, Dalton Sheridan, Faith alternate
Kash Deal, Dupree; River – Klay O'-
Daniel, Kadoka, Reece Wientjes,
Mound City, Hanna Hostutler, Mid-
land, alternate Courtney Dahlgren,
Timber Lake, Southwest – Caleb
Schroth, Buffalo Gap, Connor Mc-
Nenny, Sturgis, Grady Egly, Oelrichs,
alternate Lane Blasius, Wall.
Team Roping - Heelers
East – Seth Andersen, Hurley,
Kaycee Monnens, Watertown, Dean
Christensen, Beresford; Northwest –
Michael Deichert, Spearfish, Cash
Hetzel, Lemmon, Shay Oliver, Lem-
mon; Northwest – alternate Lane Fos-
ter, Faith; River – Nolan Hall, Timber
Lake, Pearson Wientjes, Mound City,
Brooke Nelson, Philip, alternate Sa-
vanna Glaus, Chamberlain; South-
west – Trey Richter, Quinn, Jade
Schmidt, Box Elder, Cort Baker, Her-
mosa, alternate Lathan Lauing, Oral.
High school rodeo featured at 20X event
Paul Kary
Public Notices …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 6
NOTICE OF
VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY OF
BELVIDERE
The following office will become vacant
due to the expiration of the present term
of office of the elective officer:
Rudy Reimann Trustee – two years
left of a three year term
John L Rodgers Trustee – three year
term
Circulation of nomination petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and petitions
may be filed in the office of the finance
officer located at 402 B Street no later
then 5:00 p.m. mountain time on Febru-
ary 22, 2013.
Jo Manke-Rodgers
Finance Officer
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $20.16]
Public Notices
Continued on
Page 8
NOTICE OF
VACANCY
MUNICIPALITY
OF KADOKA
The following offices will become vacant
due to the expiration of the present term
of office of the elective officer:
Mayor
(2-Year Term)
Harry Weller
Ward I
(2-Year Term)
Richard Stolley
Ward II
(1-Year Term)
Vacant
(2-Year Term)
L. Kieth Prang
Ward III
(2-Year Term)
Ryan Willert
Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and petitions
may be filed in the office of the finance
officer located at the Kadoka City Audito-
rium annex between the hours of 8:00
A.M. and 4:00 P.M., MST, not later than
5:00 P.M. on Friday, February 22, 2013.
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $19.50]
NOTICE OF
VACANCY ON
SCHOOL BOARD
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
35-2
The following school board positions will
become vacant due the expiration of the
present terms of office of the following
school board members:
Ken Lensegrav– three year term
Dawn Rasmussen - three year term
Dan Vander May- three year term
Circulation of nominating petitions may
begin on January 25, 2013 and may be
filed in the office of the business man-
ager located at the Kadoka School be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00
p.m., mountain standard time, not later
than the 22nd day of February, 2013, at
5:00 p.m., or mailed by registered mail
not later than the 22nd day of February,
2013.
Eileen C. Stolley
Business Manager
Kadoka School District
[Published January 17 & 24, 2013, at the
total approximate cost of $24.70]
FINANCIAL REPORT
KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
FOR THE PERIOD
BEGINNING
DECEMBER 1, 2012
ENDING
DECEMBER 31, 2012
GENERAL FUND: Checking account
balance, beginning: 1,875.68; Transfer
into account: (from MMDA account)
188,000.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 45,745.19; Jones
Co.Treasurer, taxes 40.22; Haakon Co.
Treasurer, taxes 23,532.76; County ap-
portionment 3,918.92; BankWest, inter-
est 63.07; First National Midland, int.
168.08; State of SD, state aid
103,410.00; Student Activities 3,142.00;
Student Participation fees 370.00; State
of SD, common core exp 400.00; Sale of
supplies, fax 2.00; Wagner School Dist,
NAFIS conf 500.00; US Dept of Ed, In-
dian Ed 3,652.55; BHSSC, common core
exp 489.46; West Central Elec, cap. Cr
691.52; State of SD, Taylor Grazing
51.00; State of SD, Mineral Lease
18,065.00; State of SD, Title I 54,718.00;
State of SD, medicaid admin 5,776.00;
State of SD,FFV 2,016.00; State of SD,
REAP 9,922.00; Mid Central Coop, Col-
lege Access 1,060.35; Total receipts:
277,734.12; Transfers out: (to MMDA)
198,036.19; Disbursements: 268,205.28;
Ending balance, checking: 1,368.33;
Money Market Deposit Account:(BW)
286,469.05; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count:(MB) 159,001.92; Petty Cash:
130.00; Total Balance of Account:
446,969.30

CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: Checking ac-
count balance, beginning: 635.62; Trans-
fer in: 0.00; Receipts: Jackson Co.
Treasurer, taxes 23,391.33; Jones Co.
Treasurer, taxes 15.22; Haakon Co.
Treasurer 13,050.93; J&S Restore, sur-
plus buses 200.00; First National, Inter-
est 183.35; BankWest, interest 87.58;
Transfers out: 10,770.93; Disburse-
ments: 22,911.79; Ending balance,
checking: 3,881.31; Money Market De-
posit Account: 241,936.55; Money Mar-
ket Deposit Account:(MB) 161,699.99;
Total Balance of Account: 407,517.85

SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: Checking
account balance, beginning: 636.57;
Transfer into account: from savings
4,500.00; Receipts: Jackson Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 21,674.80; Jones Co. Treas-
urer, taxes 14.19; Haakon Co. Treasurer,
taxes 12,168.29; First National, interest
61.12; BankWest, interest 43.79; US
Dept Ed, Impact Aid (FY 2009) 102.74;
State of SD, medicaid admin 599.00;
State of SD, IDEA 17,148.00; State of
SD, state aid 2,492.00; Transfers out:
20,446.65; Disbursements: 38,402.78;
Ending balance, checking: 591.07;
Money Market Deposit Account: (BW)
145,339.07; Money Market Deposit Ac-
count: (MB) 49,596.11; Total Balance of
Account: 195,526.25

IMPACT AID FUND: Beginning balance,
checking Receipts: Interest 1,484.50;
U.S. Dept of Ed, FY 2009 4,305.27;
Transfers out: capitol outlay 0.00; Trans-
fers out: lunch fund 0.00; Money Market
Deposit Account 1,048,029.13; C.M.A.
Account 1,015,108.30; Balance of ac-
count: 2,063,137.43
CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND:

Beginning balance, checking 0.00; Re-
ceipts: Interest BankWest, interest 62.56;
Transfer to MMDA 62.56; Disbursements
0.00; Money Market Deposit Account
169,784.81; Balance of account:
169,784.81

FOOD SERVICE FUND: Beginning Bal-
ance: 2,514.35; Tranfer in (from Impact
Aid) 0.00; Receipts: Sales 2,330.05;
State of SD, reimbursement 10,208.14;
Avera, gains share program 0.00; Dis-
bursements 16,739.83; Total balance
checking account: -1,687.29; Cash
change 0.00; Total balance accounts:
-1,687.29

TRUST & AGENCY FUND: Beginning
balance, checking: 34,658.84; Transfer
in: 0.00; Receipts: 54,057.28; Transfers
out: 40,988.64; Disbursements:
5,507.94; Balance, Checking: 42,219.54;
Cash Change: 500.00; Money Market
Deposit Acct: 33,744.99; Total balance of
account: 76,464.53
ALBIN SCHOLARSHIP FUND: Non ex-
pendable trust fund: Beginning balance:
132.51; Transfer in: Receipts: 264.50;
Disbursements: 0.00;Ending Balance
397.01
/s/ Eileen C. Stolley
Eileen C. Stolley,
Business Manager
February 4, 2012
UNAPPROVED MINUTES
OF THE REGULAR MEETING
OF THE KADOKA AREA
SCHOOL BOARD OF
EDUCATION HELD
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9,
2013 AT THE LONG VALLEY
SCHOOL AT 4:00 P.M.
Members present: Dan VanderMay,
Dawn Rasmussen, Ross Block, Dale
Christensen, Mark Williams, Ken
Lensegrav. Absent: D.J. Addison. Also
present: Supt. Jamie Hermann; Eileen
Stolley, business manager; Jeff Neme-
cek and George Seiler, principals.
All motions are unanimous unless other-
wise stated.
The meeting was called to order by Pres-
ident Dan VanderMay.
The Consent Agenda included the follow-
ing items: to approve the agenda, to ap-
prove the minutes of the December 12,
2012 meeting; to approve the financial
report; to approve the bills as presented.
Ken Lensegrav moved to approve the
consent agenda. Motion was seconded
by Dale Christensen and carried.

CAPITOL PROJECTS FUND: ADTECH
INC, MIDLAND FIRE ALARM MAINT
897.45; AP EXAMS, BOOKS 50.00;
ARMSTRONG EXTINGUISHER SERV-
ICE, INSPECT FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
70.00; BJ'S INSTRUMENT REPAIR,
BAND HORN REPAIRS 80.00; BLACK
HILLS SPECIAL SERVICES, ALTERNA-
TIVE INSTRUCTION 1,361.25; BLOCK,
AIMEE, MIDLAND LUNCHES 55.00;
BOOK FAIR T & A, LIBRARY BOOKS
175.71; BRANT'S ELECTRIC, REPAIRS
584.52; CENTURY BUSINESS PROD-
UCTS INC, COPIER MAINTENANCE
1,159.10; CHILDREN'S CARE, OT & PT
SERVICES & MLG 123.63; CURRICU-
LUM ASSOCIATES INC, READING
SUPPLIES 40.89; DESMET AND BIGGS
CPA, AUDIT 8,000.00; DISCOUNT
FUEL, FUEL ACCTS 2,323.24; DRA-
MATIC PUBLISHING CO, ONE ACT
PLAY 39.75; DSU - FINANCIAL AID
DEPT, REISSUE CANCELLED CHECK
183.23; ERNIES BUILDING CENTER,
MID-SCH CUST SUPPLIES 191.08;
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OMAHA, SUP-
PLIES 7.49; GOLDEN WEST TELECOM
COOP., INC, K/I/LV/M SCH-PHONE
ACCTS 588.83; GROPPER, BRENDA,
ELEC. ALLOWANCE 20.00; HASLER,
POSTAGE METER RESET FEE 50.00;
HAUFF MID-AMERICA SPORTS INC,
ATHLETIC UNIFORMS 5,292.00;
HEARTLAND WASTE MGT INC, MID-
LAND GARBAGE 90.00; HM RECEIV-
ABLES CO LLC, BOOKS 25.75;
HOGEN'S HARDWARE,
SUPPLI ES/ MATERI ALS/ REPAI RS
956.23; J & S RESTORE, REPAIRS
1,345.35; J.W. PEPPER & SON, INC.,
MUSIC 7.99; KADOKA AREA SCHOOL
T&A, REF GIRLS BB 1,053.82; REF
BOYS BB 986.21; ACADEMIC
OLYMPICS 50.00; VB ENTRY FEE
20.00; CC ENTRY FEE 20.00; DENR
EXAM FEE 10.00; KADOKA CITY
TRANSFER STATION, RUBBLE 5.00;
KADOKA GYMNASTICS T&A, GYM-
NASTICS SUPPORT 3,500.00;
KADOKA PRESS, PUBLICATIONS
212.34; KADOKA WRESTLING T&A,
WRESTLING SUPPORT 5,500.00;
KNUTSON, CHANCE, NHS SUPPLIES
25.14; LONG VALLEY BOOSTER
CLUB, CUSTODIAL SERVICES 200.00;
LONG VALLEY STORE, LV MILK/CUST
SUPPLIES 22.39; LURZ PLUMBING,
REPAIRS 248.57; MANLEY, LARRY, I-
BUS ELEC ALLOWANCE 20.00; MID-
WEST CENTER FOR SCHOOL
SAFETY, BULLYING PRESENTATION
1,400.00; MIDWEST COOPERATIVES,
PROPANE/BUS RT FUEL 1,761.29;
MILLER'S GARBAGE, GARBAGE
SERVICE 248.10; MOSES BLDG CEN-
TER, SUPPLIES 23.94; MOUNT
MARTY COLLEGE, REISSUE CAN-
CELLED CHECK 183.23; NEOPOST
USA INC, POSTAGE METER UPDATE
165.00; NETWORK SERVICES COM-
PANY, CUST SUPPLIES 397.94;
OLSON'S PEST TECH, PEST CON-
TROL 82.70; PEOPLE'S MARKET, SUP-
PLIES 1,155.07; PIONEER DRAMA
SERVICE, INC., PLAY SCRIPTS 11.50;
PIONEER PUBLISHING CO., FORMS
401.48; RASMUSSEN MECHANICAL,
MAINT CONTRACT & REPARIS
10,675.16; SCHOOL SPECIALTY, SUP-
WEST COOPERATIVES, HEATING
FUEL 2,155.65; OIEN IMPLEMENT &
SUPPLY INC, BUS GARAGE RENT
600.00; TOWN OF INTERIOR,
WATER/SEWER 520.00; TOWN OF
MIDLAND, MIDLAND SCH-WATER
24.50; WEST CENTRAL ELECTRIC
COOP, ELEC ACCOUNTS 3,202.25;
WEST RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOC., IN-
TERIOR ELEC ACCT 371.66; WR/LJ
WATER SYSTEMS INC, I-SCH WATER
30.00

SPECIAL EDUCATION FUND: BLACK
HILLS SPECIAL SERVICES, OT & PT
SERVICES & MLG 438.80; CHIL-
DREN'S CARE, OT & PT SERVICES &
MLG 935.00; DISCOUNT FUEL, FUEL
ACCTS 112.50; FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OMAHA, SUPPLIES 250.11;
GOLDEN WEST TELECOM COOP.,
INC, K/I/LV/M SCH-PHONE ACCTS
17.56; HOGEN'S HARDWARE, SUP-
PLIES/MATERIALS/REPAIRS 8.98;
PEOPLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES 26.11;
US FOODSERVICE, FOOD & SUP-
PLIES 16.78; WALL SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, SPEECH SERVICES 1,993.86;
REGULAR SALARIES 13,824.30; SUB-
STITUTE SALARIES 497.46

FOOD SERVICE: BLOCK, AIMEE, MID-
LAND LUNCHES 738.30; CASH-WA
DISTRIBUTING, FOOD/SUPPLIES
2,077.83; CHILD & ADULT NUTRITION
SERVICE, COMMODITY PROCESSING
702.90; DEAN FOODS, DAIRY PROD-
UCTS 1,422.86; EARTHGRAINS CO,
K&I-BREAD PRODUCTS 166.15;
FARMER BROTHERS COMPANY, K-
FOODS 155.85; HOGEN'S HARD-
WARE, SUPPLIES/MATERIALS
/REPAIRS 31.05; LONG VALLEY
STORE, LV MILK/CUST SUPPLIES
710.20; MILLER'S GARBAGE,
GARBAGE SERVICE 131.35; PEO-
PLE'S MARKET, SUPPLIES 333.82; US
FOODSERVICE, FOOD & SUPPLIES
2,353.83; REGULAR SALARIES
2,929.96; SUBSTITUTE SALARIES
100.69
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT: Mr.
Hermann reported that the school board
inservice with Rodney Freeman is sched-
uled for January 26, 9:00 a.m. – noon.
The spring NAFIS conference will be
March 3-5, 2013. Eileen Stolley, Ross
Block and Dawn Rasmussen will attend.
Mr. Hermann said that curriculum is
being reviewed and it has been several
years since new curriculum has been
adopted. Math and reading are the prior-
ities. As the review and the adoption
process takes up to a year, he asked if
the committee should pursue an in-depth
curriculum review and adoption recom-
mendation. Discussion followed with
questions and input. The curriculum
committee will continue with a review of
the math curriculum.
Mr. Hermann suggested that a legislative
crackerbarrel session be scheduled and
said that committee meetings for the
sports complex committee, calendar
committee and transportation committee
should be scheduled. Sports complex
committee will be looking at needs for the
complex and for the upcoming track sea-
son; the calendar committee will review
and take input on the 2013-2014 school
calendar and the transportation commit-
tee will be looking at needs for vehicle re-
placements.
PRINCIPALS’ REPORTS: Mr. Nemecek
reported that the elementary achieved
their 94% December attendance goal.
He also reported that the LEAP team will
be meeting in Rapid City with state advi-
sors and is working on the 1003a grant
for Long Valley School.
Mr. Seiler reminded board members that
the School Safety assembly on bullying
and cyber bullying is being held today
and that the parent/public presentation
will be held at 7:00 p.m.
BOARD COMMITTEE REPORTS: POL-
ICY COMMITTEE: Mr. Hermann re-
ported that the policy committee met.
The committee reviewed and discussed
the district’s crisis plan.
CITIZEN INPUT: Mr. Nemecek read a let-
ter received from Linda and Torrey Ring.
They were unable to attend the meeting
but expressed thanks and appreciation
for services provided to the Long Valley
School and its students.
A letter of RESIGNATION from Amanda
Bennett, effective immediately, was read.
Dale Christensen moved to accept the
resignation. Motion was seconded by
Dawn Rasmussen and carried.
The IPP, Impact Aid Policies and Proce-
dures, was reviewed. Ken Lensegrav
moved to adopt the IPP. Motion was sec-
onded by Ross Block and carried.
POLICIES – SECOND READING: Chap-
ter 11 – Support Staff: All support staff
employees are considered to be employ-
ees at will in the Kadoka Area School dis-
trict. Upon receiving an initial contract
from the school district, employees will
be subject to a probationary period up to
90 days. Successful completion of the
probationary period will be deemed by
the administration and salary adjustment
may take place at this time. Ross Block
moved to adopt the policy. Motion was
seconded by Dawn Rasmussen and car-
ried.
Under Board of Education – meeting of
the board, item d.) To expedite the
Board’s proceeding and provide a frame-
work for the orderly conduct of business,
non-action items on the agenda will be
heard but no action will be taken at that
particular meeting. The board will deter-
mine the course of action in regards to
such items for a future meeting.
Board of Education – Section3, page 25:
policy adoption: delete item 1 in this sec-
tion.
Dale Christensen moved to adopt the
policy changes/updates. Motion was sec-
onded by Mark Williams and carried.
SCHOOL BOARD ELECTION: Dawn
Rasmussen moved to set the school
board election date for April 9, 2013, with
the municipal elections. Motion was sec-
onded by Ross Block and carried.
CONTRACTS: Ken Lensegrav moved to
approve a contract to Grady Brunsch, 5-
8th girls basketball, Interior, @ $600.00.
Motion was seconded by Dale Chris-
tensen and carried.
Mark Williams moved to approve a con-
tract to Steve Leithauser, 5-8th boys bas-
ketball, Interior, @ $600.00. Motion was
seconded by Dawn Rasmussen and car-
ried.
At 5:30 Ken Lensegrav moved to go into
executive session, superintendent’s eval-
uation, per SDCL 1-25-2(1). Motion was
seconded by Dale Christensen and car-
ried. The board came out of executive
session at 6:17 p.m.
The February board meeting will be held
on February 13th at Interior School, walk
through buildings and grounds @ 3:00
and business meeting at 4:00.
There being no further business, Ross
Block moved that the meeting be ad-
journed. Motion was seconded by Ken
Lensegrav and carried.
Dan VanderMay, President
Eileen C. Stolley, Business Manager
[Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $172.86]
PLIES 13.33; SD COUNCIL OF TEACH-
ERS OF ENGLISH, MATH CONFER-
ENCE FEES 190.00; SD DEPT OF
HEALTH, HEALTH NURSE SERVICE
460.00; SD DEPT OF REVENUE, LV-
WATER EVAL 26.00; SERVALL TOWEL
& LINEN, K/I/LV/M-DUSTMOP SERV-
ICE 385.90; SHAD'S TOWING, TOWING
SERVICE BUS 629.00; VERIZON
WIRELESS, BUS/PRIN/TECH CELL-
PHONE SERVICE 17.30; WAGE-
WORKS, CAFETERIA PLAN FEES
125.00; WALKER REFUSE, I&LV-DUMP
SERVICE 271.65; WEST RIVER EXCA-
VATION LLC, SNOW REMOVAL 107.14;
WRIGHT EXPRESS FSC, TRAVEL EXP
4.00; TEACHER SALARIES, ELEME-
MENTARY 38,209.00; MILEAGE: KEN-
NETH GRAUPMANN 55.50; RENEE
SCHOFIELD 253.04; ROGER DALE
150.96; SUB TEACHERS, ELEMEN-
TARY 903.74; INDIAN EDUCATION, IN-
STRUCTION 798.93; TEACHER
SALARIES, HIGH SCHOOL 16,113.15;
SUB TEACHERS, HIGH SCHOOL
423.28; PRE SCHOOL SALARIES
958.37; TITLE II A SALARIES 4,489.20;
GUIDANCE SALARY 1,789.50; TITLE I
SALARIES 24,891.80; TITLE I SUB
TEACHERS 796.16; TITLE I TUTORING
425.95; PROFESSIONAL DEVELOP-
MENT ACTIVITIES, SUB TEACHERS
73.88; TITLE I SCHOOL IMPROVE-
MENT ACTIVITIES 180.78; OFFICES
OF THE SUPT., PRINCIPAL AND BUSI-
NESS MANAGER 17,760.01; TECH-
NOLOGY 3,484.91; LIBRARY 120.19;
SUB LIBRARY 29.56; OPERATION OF
PLANT SALARIES 5,212.05; SUB CUS-
TODIAL 23.67; PUPIL TRANSPORTA-
TION 3,038.72; SUB BUS DRIVERS:
ROGER DALE 212.41; KENNETH
GRAUPMANN 156.99; ACTIVITY BUS
DRIVERS: ROGER DALE 198.13; KEN-
NETH GRAUPMANN 162.75; REFER-
EES, SCOREKEEPERS 72.03; RICH
BENDT, GRADE BB COACH 554.10;
GRADY BRUNSCH, GRADE BB
COACH 554.10; ROGER DALE, GRADE
BB COACH 277.05; BUS MONITOR
463.47; CO-CURRICULAR SALARIES
PRORATED 210.83; AMERICAN FAM-
ILY LIFE ASSURANCE CO, CC/IC INS
W/H 2,000.72; BREIT LAW OFFICES,
W/H 100.00; WASHINGTON NATIONAL
INSURANCE CO, W/H 208.70; BENE-
FIT MALL, SD, LIFE INS W/H 703.02;
MG TRUST COMPANY, 403(B) W/H
2,000.00; CREDIT COLLECTION BU-
REAU, W/H 38.96; DELTA DENTAL INS.,
GROUP DENTAL 3,905.56; KADOKA
SCHOOL T&A INSURANCE FUND
112.96; KADOKA SCHOOL T&A CAFE-
TERIA ACCT., PAYFLEX W/H 729.50;
KADOKA SCHOOL T&A FIT/FICA
ACCT., TAX 41,918.74; SD RETIRE-
MENT SYSTEM, TR AND MATCH.
23,127.76; S.D. SCHOOL DISTRICT
BENEFIT FUND, GROUP HEALTH
40,084.74
CAPITOL OUTLAY FUND: BOOK FAIR
T & A, LIBRARY BOOKS 78.95;
KADOKA CITY AUDITORIUM, AUDITO-
RIUM RENT 3,800.00; KADOKA CITY
WATER DEPT., WATER/SEWER
147.71; KADOKA OIL CO, HEATING
FUEL 6,649.95; LACREEK ELECTRIC
ASSN., INC., ELEC-LV SCHOOL
266.28; MID CENTRAL EDUCATIONAL
COOP, LAPTOP CONF., 1,200.00; MID-
Local & Statewide Classified Advertising …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 7
Everyone
reads the
classified
section!
Buy, Sell
or Trade
Kadoka
Press
Call
605-837-2259
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
GROWING BUSINESS OPPORTU-
NITY in Platte SD: Ground floor entry
in firmly established food service
business, tailor made for enterprising
single person or couple. New equip-
ment just added for continued ex-
pansion into the future. Present
owner seeking retirement but not at
new buyer’s expense (priced excep-
tionally reasonable). Seller willing to
stay on to train during transition pe-
riod. Contact Travis Agency for de-
tails 605 337-3764.
NOW IS THE chance to buy a well
established & successful business in
the State Capitol of S.D. The Long-
branch is for SALE (serious inquires
only). Call Russell Spaid 605-280-
1067.
EMPLOYMENT
VACANCY: FAITH SCHOOL DIS-
TRICT, Faith, SD seeking candidates
for the position of superintendent of
schools with Special Education Di-
rectors duties to be determined. Ap-
plication materials available at
www.faith.k12.sd.us or contact Dr.
Julie Ertz at 605.391.4719 or
jertz@asbsd.org.
FAMILY COUNSELOR (RAPID
CITY, SD) Counsel children with se-
vere emotional disturbances. Work
with families towards treatment
goals. Master’s degree Counseling,
Social work. Experience preferred.
Details / Application:
BMSCares.ORG.
CUSTER REGIONAL HOSPITAL-
Custer Clinic and Custer Regional
Senior Care in beautiful Custer, SD,
have full time and PRN (as-needed)
RN, LPN and Licensed Medical As-
sistant positions available. We offer
competitive pay and excellent bene-
fits. New Graduates welcome!
Please contact Human Resources at
(605) 673-2229 ext. 110 for more in-
formation or log onto www.regional-
health.com to apply.
FULL-TIME DEPUTY SHERIFF,
Hyde County, Highmore, SD: Must
be certified in law enforcement or
willing to be trained and certified
within one year of hire date. Applica-
tion available from Hyde County Au-
ditor’s Office, 605-852-2519, or Box
379, Highmore, SD 57345. Closing
date: Feb. 1, 2013. Hyde County is
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Kadoka Press
Classified Advertising
& Thank You Rates:
$5.00 minimum/20 words
plus 10¢ for each word thereafter.
Call 605-837-2259
E-mail: press@kadokatelco.com
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR/MAINTE-
NANCE WORKER: Haakon County
Highway Department. Must have a
commercial driver’s license or be
able to obtain one within three
months of hire date. Benefits pack-
age offered. Open until filled. Apply:
HC Highway Department, 22260
Lake Waggoner Road, Philip, SD
57567. 605/859-2472. Haakon
County is an EOE.
LOG HOMES
DAKOTA LOG HOME Builders rep-
resenting Golden Eagle Log Homes,
building in eastern, central, north-
western South & North Dakota. Scott
Connell, 605-530-2672, Craig Con-
nell, 605-264-5650, www.goldenea-
gleloghomes.com.
MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00.
Make & save money with your own
bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension.
In stock ready to ship. FREE
I n f o / D V D :
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-
578-1363 Ext.300N.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP.
OTR Drivers, TBI, 33¢/34¢, $375
mo., health ins., credit, 03¢ safety
bonus, Call Joe for details,
800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.
STEEL BUILDINGS
STEEL BUILDINGS. Huge winter
discounts for spring delivery. 50x80,
62x100, 68x120, 68x200, 100x200.
Take advantage of tax deductions.
Limited Offer. Call Jim 1-888-782-
7040.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION
PROPERTY, to more than 700,000
South Dakota readers. Your 25-word
classified ad will appear in 130 S.D.
newspapers for only $150. Call
Cherie Jensen at the S.D. Newspa-
per Association, 1-800-658-3697 or
your local newspaper for more infor-
mation.
Stop by the
Kadoka Press
for back issues of the paper
Suduko Answers
See Puzzle on Page 2
Brakes • Fuel Pumps
Alternators • Starters
Timken Seals
& Bearings
We’re Open Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - Noon • 1 - 5 p.m.
Phone 837-2214
Tim home 837-2087
Dave cell 488-0326
Oien
Auto Parts
Hwy 248 • Kadoka, SD
For all your automotive
supplies -- give us call!
HORSE TRAINING/BREAKING: All
horses, prices vary. Call for details
515-3952. K27-3tp
POSITION OPEN: Jackson County
Highway Department Worker. Expe-
rience in road/bridge
construction/maintenance preferred.
CDL Pre-employment drug and al-
cohol screening required. Applica-
tions / resumes accepted.
Information (605) 837-2410 or (605)
837-2422 Fax (605) 837-2447.
K27-5tc
HELP WANTED: Janitor for the
Kadoka Area School District. Appli-
cations available on the website
www.kadoka.k12.sd.us or may be
picked up at the school. Open until
filled. Contact Jamie Hermann at
837-2174, ext. 100. EOE.
KP27-2tc
EARN A FREE TV: Apply now at the
Gateway Apartments and if you
qualify for one of the apartments,
you could be eligible for a free 19”
flat screen TV. Please call 1-800-
481-6904 for details on how you can
earn your free TV. K26-tfn
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL types of concrete work.
Rich, Colleen and Haven Hilde-
brand. Toll-free: 1-877-867-4185;
Office, 837-2621; Rich, cell 431-
2226; Haven, cell 490-2926; Jerry,
cell 488-0291. KP5-tfc
APARTMENTS: Spacious one-bed-
room units, all utilities included.
Young or old. Need rental assis-
tance or not, we can house you. Just
call 1-800-481-6904 or stop in the
lobby and pick up an application.
Gateway Apartments, Kadoka.
36-tfc
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION: will
do all types of trenching, ditching
and directional boring work. See
Craig, Diana, Sauntee or Heidi
Coller, Kadoka, SD, or call 605/837-
2690. Craig cell 390-8087, Sauntee
cell 390-8604, email
wrex@gwtc.net. 27-tfc
SEPTIC TANK PUMPING: Call 837-
2243 or contact Wendell Buxcel,
Kadoka, SD. 10-tfc
POSTER BOARD: White and col-
ored. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
COPIES: 8-1/2x11 - 20¢ each; 8-
1/2x14 - 25¢ each; 11x14 - 35¢
each. At the Kadoka Press. tfc
RUBBER STAMPS: Can be or-
dered at the Kadoka Press. Regular
or self-inking styles. tfc
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED: South
Dakota's best advertising buy! A 25-
word classified ad in each of the
states’ 150 daily and weekly news-
papers. Your message reaches
375,000 households for just
$150.00! This newspaper can give
you the complete details. Call (605)
837-2259. tfc
SCRATCH PADS: 50 cents each at
the Kadoka Press. tfc
Life’s greatest treasures are fam-
ily and friends. Thank you all for the
phone calls and good wishes. God
bless you for remembering our 50th
anniversary. Made our day very spe-
cial.
Thank you,
Barry & Rita Barber
Thank You
Philip League Bowling
Lucky Strike
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Rockers..........................................7-5
Dakota Bar....................................7-5
Handrahan Const .........................7-5
Shad’s Towing ...............................6-6
Badland’s Auto..............................6-6
Petersen’s ......................................3-9
Hightlights:
Ronnie Coyle........3-10 split; 237/560
Matt Reckling...3-9-10 split; 236/580
Karen Byrd...................................133
Trina Brown..........................187/477
Neal Petersen........4-5 split; 203/578
Vickie Petersen ............................187
Jerry Mooney ...............................208
Maralynn Burns...........................170
Jason Petersen......................203/577
Arlene Kujawa......................2-7 split
Wendell Buxcel .....................2-7 split
Tuesday Men’s Early
Peoples Market .............................4-0
Philip Health Service ...................4-0
Philip Motor..................................4-0
Bear Auto ......................................3-1
Kennedy Impl ...............................1-3
George’s Welding ..........................0-4
G&A Trenching.............................0-4
Kadoka Tree Service.....................0-4
Highlights:
Randy Boyd..............................214 &
.............................210 both clean/601
Tony Gould ............................200/546
Earl Park .............2-10 split; 219/533
Dane Hellekson ....................2-7 split
Dan Addison .........................2-7 split
Les Struble .........................3-10 split
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm..................................11-5
Cutting Edge Salon ....................10-6
Bowling Belles ............................10-6
Invisibles.......................................9-7
Jolly Ranchers.............................5-11
Highlights:
Christy Park..........187, 175, 165/523
Debbie Gartner .....................179/447
Deanna Fees..................168, 150/438
Wednesday Night Early
Morrison’s Haying ........................6-2
Dorothy’s Catering........................6-2
Dakota Bar....................................5-3
First National Bank .....................5-3
Just Tammy’s................................5-3
Chiefie’s Chicks.............................2-6
Hildebrand Concrete ....................2-6
Wall Food Center ..........................1-7
Highlights:
Ashley Reckling ....................192/524
Kathy Arthur.........................182/504
Shar Moses...................................177
Brittney Drury.............................172
Stacey Schulz......................5-10 split
Thursday Men
The Steakhouse ............................8-0
Coyle’s SuperValu.........................7-1
O’Connell Const ............................6-2
Dakota Bar....................................3-5
A&M Laundry...............................2-6
McDonnell Farms .........................2-6
WEE BADD...................................2-6
West River Pioneer Tanks............2-6
Highlights:
Mike Moses..........201, 190 clean/589
Cory Boyd..............................207/581
Ronnie Williams...........................218
Jason Petersen......................210/564
Harlan Moos..........................194/575
Brian Pearson ..5-6 & 3-10 split; 552
Rick Coyle...................5-10 split; 201
Matt Reckling.......................5-7 split
Bryan Buxcel ................3-10 split x 2
Jay McDonnell ................3-9-10 split
Conrad Kjerstad.................9-10 split
Alvin Pearson .....................3-10 split
Jordon Kjerstad..................3-10 split
Chad Walker.......................3-10 split
Doug Hauk..........................3-10 split
Dean Schulz........................3-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Randy’s Spray Service ................11-1
Lee & the Ladies.........................11-1
Cristi’s Crew .................................7-5
King Pins.......................................3-9
Roy’s Repair ................................2-10
The Ghost Team............................0-0
Highlights:
Tanner Norman.....................203/559
Robin Bierle .................................417
Aaron Richardson .................216/595
Jeremy Iron Moccasin .................213
Duane Hand.................................202
Angel Nemec .......5-10 & 2-6-10 split
Lee Neville............................2-7 split
Ed Morrison..........................5-6 split
Theresa Miller....................3-10 split
Deb Gartner........................3-10 split
Agricul ture …
January 24, 2013 • Kadoka Press • Page 8
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, JAN. 29: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE. WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. FEEDER CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}. EARLY
CONSIGNMENTS: EXPECTINC 5000 HEAD.
CALVES: FS÷FALL SHOTS, NI÷NO IMPLANTS, AN÷ALL NATUHAL, ASV÷AGE
ö SOUHCE VEHIFIED
SMITH & SONS - 780 CHAF X CLVS; FS ......................................650-775=
SLOVEK & EISENBRAUN - 500 CHAF X CLVS; FS.......................800-900=
HOSTUTLER RANCH - 300 CHAF X HFFS; FS.............................650-750=
NELSON - 290 DWF FIFST CFOSS CLVS; FS,NI, HFFS DV
& ALL IN TOWN.........................................................................600-750=
ARNESON & ELSHERE - 260 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ............................500-650=
K BAR C RANCH - 250 HEFF, DWF, & FWF CLVS;
FS,NI,AN,HFFS DV....................................................................600-700=
ROSETH BROTHERS - 210 FANCY HOME FAISED STFS
(1 LOAD ¸ 850= 2 LOADS ¸800=} .............................................800-850=
WILLIAMS - 190 CHAF X HFFS; FS..............................................700-850=
OFM PART - 160 DLK CLVS; FS,NI ...............................................650-725=
GOTTSLEBEN - 150 DLK & FED CLVS (120 STFS, 30 HFFS} FS .600-700=
KENNEDY'S H & S PART - 150 DLK STFS; FS,AN,ASV- SOUTH DAKOTA
CEFTIFIED ......................................................................................600=
TRASK FAMILY - 150 DLK CLVS; FS............................................600-650=
BROWN - 140 FED CLVS; FS (115 STFS & 25 FWF HFFS ALL IN TOWN}
600-700=
WELLER RANCH - 140 DLK STFS; FS,ASV..........................................700=
LIVERMONT & LIVERMONT - 130 DLK CLVS; FS........................350-450=
KOPP - 120 DLK & DWF CLVS; FS,NI...................................................600=
MILLER - 95 DLK & A FEW CHAF X CLVS; FS,NI .........................550-600=
THORSON - 80 DLK & DWF CLVS;FS ..................................................750=
MARTI - 80 DLK CLVS;FS.............................................................400-550=
RADWAY - 72 DLK MOSTLY STFS; FS..........................................750-850=
NOTEBOOM CATTLE CO - 70 FED & CHAF X STFS; FS..............750-800=
FREELAN - 60 DLK HFFS; FS,NI ..................................................500-650=
NEUGEBAUER - 60 FED ANCUS CLVS; FS,W...............................600-650=
PHILIPSEN - 50 DLK DV HFFS; FS,NI...........................................550-575=
MILLER - 50 FED ANC HFFS; FS.................................................500-550=
LAUING - 50 DLK HFFS; FS,NI,SOME DV .....................................550-650=
COUCH - 24 FED DV HFFS; FS NI ASV................................................600=
NIXON - 20 DLK STFS; FS...................................................................475=
DEERING - 20 DLK STFS; FS,ASV................................................500-600=
FERGUSON - 20 HEFF FEPLC DV HFFS; FS ................................550-600=
BALLARD - 20 DLK CLVS; FS.......................................................500-600=
PFEIFER - 10 DLK HFFS; FS,NI...........................................................600=
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, FEB. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. S: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 12: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE &
FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE & FEC-
ULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 9: SPECIAL CFASSTIME FEEDEF CATTLE, FEPLACE-
MENT HEIFEF, & FEEDLOT CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 16: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE FEATUFINC
DANCS VACCINATED HEIFEFS & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 23: SPECIAL STOCK COW, DFED HEIFEF & PAIF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, APR. 30: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 14: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 21: SPECIAL PAIF, STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, MAY 2S: NO SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 4: SPECIAL PAIF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 11: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE SALE & FECULAF CAT-
TLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 1S: FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, JUNE 2S: DFY COW SPECIAL
TUESDAY, JULY 2: NO SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
"The Next Cenerat|on of L|vestock Product|on"
Event: Thursday, January 24, at ô:30 p.m. at
Ph|||p L|vestock Auct|on
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s our vo1oe 1n
governmen1 1o represen1 U.S. oo111e produoers 1n 1rode
morKe11ng 1ssues. ]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with Superior Livestock
Auction, wiII be offering video saIe as an additionaI service to our
consignors, with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
Upoom1ng Bu11 So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 12: THOFSON HEFEFOFDS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: STOUT CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, FEB. 26: DEEP CFEEK ANCUS & MILLAF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 19: FANNINC ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAR. 26: FOCHAIF ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 2: SLOVEK FANCH ANCUS & ANCUS PLUS CENETIC DULL
SALE, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 9: ANDEFS & DAMFOW LONCHOFNS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 16: CHEYENNE CHAFOLAIS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, APR. 23: FOFTUNE'S FAFTEF U CFOSS ANCUS, 12.00 P.M. MT
TUESDAY, MAY ?: DULL DAY
SOUTH DAKOTA BRAND SELLING
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, AT 12:00 P.M. (MT)
RH CATTLE
Upoom1ng Horse So1es
TUESDAY, FEB. 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
TUESDAY, MARCH 19: OPEN CONSICNMENT HOFSE SALE FOLLOWINC THE
CATTLE SALE.
CATTL£ R£PORT: TU£SDAY, JANUARY 22, 2DJS
We Þod o 111e run o] bred oo111e ]or our so1e. TÞe A1
bred Þe1]ers so1d u11Þ o prem1um. Ne×1 ueeK, Tuesdog,
Jon. 291Þ, b1g Speo1o1 Feeder Co111e So1e e×peo11ng
SDDD Þeod.
BRED CATTLE:
MCPHERSON ANGUS- STURGIS
38.........................DLK & DWF AI'D HFFS 10-MAF 1120= .....$1,725.00
10..........................................DLK HFFS 10-MAF 1187= .....$1,650.00
8 ...........................................DWF HFFS 10-MAF 1038= .....$1,550.00
SHAWN FUGIER - BUFFALO GAP
13 .........................................DWF HFFS 4-MAF 1095= .....$1,540.00
16..........................................DLK HFFS 4-MAF 1057= .....$1,400.00
DOOLITTLE WAGNER RANCH - BELLE FOURCHE
77..........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1061= .....$1,525.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
17..........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1009= .....$1,450.00
180........................................DLK HFFS 1-MAF 1005= .....$1,400.00
BO SHARP - NORRIS
11..........DLK & DWF 3 TO 4 YF OLD COWS 1-APF 1295= .....$1,410.00
KEN COUCH - BUFFALO GAP
28..........FED & FWF 3 TO 6 YF OLD COWS 25-FED 1088= .....$1,410.00
RITTBERGER BEEF - HERMOSA
5............................................DLK HFFS 8-FED 1083= .....$1,400.00
6 .......................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 25-MAF 1258= .....$1,200.00
TERRY GUNN - WASTA
33 ........DLK 6 YFS TO SOLID MOUTH COWS 1-APF 1399= .....$1,350.00
LYNN MILLER - FAITH
44..........................................DLK HFFS 10-MAF 973= .......$1,325.00
14 .........................................DWF HFFS 10-MAF 976= .......$1,320.00
22........DLK & DWF DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 1-APF 1415= .....$1,090.00
CHARLES BELTCH - UPTON, WY
7 .......................DLK 5 & 6 YF OLD COWS 20-MAF 1343= .....$1,310.00
27 .....................DLK SOLID MOUTH COWS 20-MAF 1388= .....$1,210.00
5 ....................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 20-MAF 1244= .....$1,060.00
CHRIS GLINES - CHADRON, NE
22..........................................DLK HFFS 15-FED 910= .......$1,210.00
GARY & JULIE NIXON - PHILIP
6 ....................DLK DFOKEN MOUTH COWS 25-MAF 1334= .....$1,020.00
WEIGHUPS:
RYAN & CHRISSY ELSHERE - ELM SPRINGS
1.........................................................DLK COW 1710= ..........$83.00
JAKE JULSON - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.........................................................DLK COW 1520= ..........$82.50
MIKE LUDEMAN - QUINN
1........................................................DWF COW 1450= ..........$82.50
3.................................................DLK COWETTES 1033= ..........$94.00
RICHARD & LORAYNA PAPOUSEK - QUINN
8 .......................................................DLK COWS 1388= ..........$82.50
19 ....................................................DLK HFFTS 1013= ........$100.50
GARY BIRKELAND - DUPREE
1.........................................................DLK COW 1395= ..........$81.50
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 2235= ........$101.50
MANDY MCGRIFF - QUINN
1.........................................................DLK COW 1260= ..........$86.00
1.........................................................DLK COW 1290= ..........$83.00
9 ......................................................DLK HFFTS 866= ..........$109.50
1 ..................................................DLK COWETTE 1020= ..........$98.00
LYNN MILLER - FAITH
1........................................................DWF COW 1080= ..........$83.50
1........................................................DLK HFFT 970= ..........$100.00
DON HECK - KADOKA
1 ........................................................FED COW 1270= ..........$82.50
ED THOMPSON - STURGIS
6 .......................................................DLK COWS 1303= ..........$82.25
3.................................................DLK COWETTES 1117= ..........$94.00
MIKE NOTEBOOM - PHILIP
4.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1415= ..........$82.00
1........................................................DLK HFFT 1020= ........$108.00
BEAU BENDIGO - HOWES
1.........................................................DLK COW 1330= ..........$82.00
1........................................................FED DULL 1630= ..........$95.00
CHUCK SPRING - UNION CENTER
12...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1485= ..........$81.75
20 ...................................................HEFF COWS 1253= ..........$78.00
20 ....................................DLK & DWF COWETTES 1036= ..........$90.25
CHRIS IVERSEN - MURDO
5.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1361= ..........$81.00
BRIAN WEAVER - HERMOSA
2 .......................................................DLK COWS 1450= ..........$80.50
BILL BRUNSKILL - NEW UNDERWOOD
1.........................................................DLK COW 1265= ..........$80.50
1.........................................................DLK COW 1565= ..........$79.00
CARL & JUDY KNUPPE - NEW UNDERWOOD
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 1870= ..........$97.50
DUANE JOBGEN - SCENIC
5 .......................................................DLK COWS 1344= ..........$80.25
1.........................................................DLK COW 1660= ..........$79.00
DARRIN KLAPPERICH - RAPID CITY
4.............................................DLK & DWF COWS 1335= ..........$80.00
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
14...........................................DLK & DWF COWS 1576= ..........$79.25
1.........................................................DLK COW 1235= ..........$79.00
BRANDON ROCK - LONG VALLEY
1 ........................................................DLK DULL 2220= ..........$96.50
GUY LEONARD ANKER - MURDO
2 .......................................................DLK COWS 1548= ..........$78.00
1........................................................DLK HFFT 980= ..........$111.00
RITTBERGER BEEF INC - HERMOSA
13 .....................................................DLK COWS 1294= ..........$78.00
CAROLYN ANDERS - ELM SPRINGS
1.........................................................DLK COW 1720= ..........$75.50
JERRY STOUT - KADOKA
1 ................................................CHAF COWETTE 1125= ..........$86.00
MARK LANTIS - BOX ELDER
10 ....................................................DLK HFFTS 850= ..........$111.00
RONNIE MAHAFFY - VALE
1........................................................DLK HFFT 915= ..........$106.00
RON TWISS - INTERIOR
1..................................................FED COWETTE 1190= ..........$92.00
MCPHERSON ANGUS- STURGIS
37 .......................................DLACK ANCUS DULLS AVC. .......$4,811.00
HORSE SALE:
UNDEF 1000=..................................................................11.00 - 19.00
1000= - 1099=....................................................................20.00-28.00
1100= & OVEF.................................................................25.00 - 33.00
SADDLE PFOSPECTS...................................................575.00 - 975.00
SADDLE HORSE:
M & N CRONIN - GETTYSBURG
1 ÷ DAY 15 YF OLD CELDINC......................................................$1,500.00
For $150, place your ad in 150
South Dakota daily & weekly
papers through the …
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS!
Call 605•837•2259
To Report A Fire:
Kadoka 911 or 837-2228
Belvidere . . . .344-2500
Interior . . . . . . . . . . .911
Long Valley . . . . . . .911
Green Valley . . . . . .911
WEST RIVER WATER
DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
December 20, 2012
CALL TO ORDER:
The West River Water Development Dis-
trict convened for their regular meeting at
the West River Water Development Dis-
trict Project Office in Murdo, SD. Chair-
man Joseph Hieb called the meeting to
order at 10:25 a.m. (CT).
Roll call was taken and Chairman Hieb
declared a quorum was present. Direc-
tors present were: Joseph Hieb, Casey
Krogman, Marion Matt, Veryl Prokop and
Lorne Smith. Also present: Jake Fitzger-
ald, Manager; Kati Venard, Sec./Book-
keeper.
ADDITIONS TO AGENDA:
None
APPROVE AGENDA:
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Smith to approve the agenda.
Motion carried unanimously.
APPROVE MINUTES:
The minutes of the November 15, 2012,
meeting were previously mailed to the
Board for their review.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Prokop to approve the November
minutes. Motion carried unanimously.
FINANCIAL REPORT:
A. APPROVAL OF BILLS:
Joseph Hieb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Casey Krogman . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Marion Matt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Veryl Prokop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
Lorne Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56.61
West River/Lyman-
Jones RWS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,000.00
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32.81
Lyman County
Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27.11
Murdo Coyote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31.41
Pennington County
Courant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26.64
Pioneer Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26.00
Todd County
Tribune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29.76
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Matt to approve the District bills.
Motion carried unanimously.
B. DISTRICT FINANCIAL STATUS RE-
PORT:
The financial status of the District to date
was previously sent to the Board. A copy
of the November Financial Report is on
file at the District office in Murdo.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the Novem-
ber Financial Report. Motion carried
unanimously.
REPORTS:
A. MANAGER'S REPORT:
Manager Fitzgerald presented his De-
cember report to the Board.
Motion by Director Smith, seconded by
Director Krogman to approve the Man-
ager’s Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
B. OTHER REPORTS:
None
JOYCE WILLIAMSON - USGS:
Joyce Williamson with the United States
Geological Survey was present to give
an overview and answer any questions
on the monitoring, operation and funding
of the streamflow gages. They are seek-
ing funding in the amount of $11,280 for
two gaging stations: White River near
Kadoka and White River near White
River. It was requested that Joyce try to
find a cost share partner for the White
River near Kadoka station, and she
agreed to work on this for the 2014 fund-
ing agreement.
Motion by Director Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Krogman to approve the agree-
ment with USGS for FFY 2013 on the
condition that next year they find some-
one to cost share the project to help
lower costs. Motion carried unanimously.
CASEY PETERSON & ASSOCIATES –
2012 ANNUAL REPORT:
Due to a recent law change that no
longer requires a formal audit, an annual
report will be completed which Casey
Peterson & Associates, LTD. has agreed
to review at an hourly rate that is not ex-
pected to exceed $300.
Motion by Direct Matt, seconded by Di-
rector Smith to authorize Casey Peterson
& Associates, LTD. to review the 2012
Annual Report. Motion carried unani-
mously.
UPPER MISSOURI DUES - $145:
Manager Fitzgerald presented an invoice
from Upper Missouri Water Association
for 2012 membership dues in the amount
of $145.
Motion by Director Krogman, seconded
by Director Prokop to approve payment
of $145 for the 2012 membership dues.
Motion carried unanimously.
ADJOURNMENT:
There being no further business, the
meeting was adjourned at 11:07 A.M.
(CT).
Joseph Hieb, Chairman
ATTEST:
Kati Venard,
Recording Secretary
[Published January 24, 2013 at the total
approximate cost of $50.37]
Town of Cottonwood
REGULAR MEETING
January 16, 2013
The regular meeting of the Town of Cot-
tonwood was held at Town Hall on
Wednesday evening, December 16,
2012 at 7 p.m. Present were JC Heath,
Jeff Heath, and Doug Hovland. The
meeting was called to order by JC
Heath.
Old Business: none.
New Business: Read the Finance report.
The following bills were approved:
Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Trustee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.00
Bookkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38.47
WREA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101.00
Walker Refuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173.79
Kadoka Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25.35
Checking Acct.
Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13,504.15
CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4,832.96
With there being no other business to
discuss, the meeting was adjourned. The
next regular meeting will be held on Feb-
ruary 20, 2013 – 7 p.m. at Town Hall.
JC Heath, President
[Published January 24, 2013, at the total
approximate cost of $12.68]
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