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All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2013 The University Daily Kansan

Classifieds 2B
Crossword 5a
opinion 7a
sports 1B
sudoku 5a
Gameday 3B
Partially cloudy, southeast
winds 10 to 15 mph
SUA is holding a free advance screening of
Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters. The movie
starts at 8 p.m. in the Kansas Union.
Index Dont
forget
Todays
Weather
Bundle up!
HI: 32
LO: 23
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Volume 125 Issue 62 kansan.com Thursday, January 24, 2013
Weekend
a preview
InsIDe ThIs Issue
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Ive taken a certain


class at a specific
time because the
teacher was rated
so well by the other
students on Rate My
Professor.
MonIca Marshall,
senIor
Our attitude is
right, and we are in
a position to accom-
plish our goals in
the spring.
olIVIa KIneT
senIor, all-conference
roWer
Its a great way to expand your social circle and explore
Lawrence, esTher TarshIsh, sophoMore
the number of total
credit hours required
by the new Ku core
opinion
the daily Brew
travis younG/kansan
Gun laws not Bulletproof
pg. 2
Page 2a Thursday, january 24, 2013
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
weather,
Jay?
Overcast with a
chance of rain,
south southeast
winds at 15 to 20
mph
Friday
Why so cirrus?
HI: 55
LO: 37
Clear, northwest
winds at 10 to 15
mph
Saturday
Holy cloud cover Batman!
HI: 48
LO: 21
Partly cloudy,
east winds at 10
to 20 mph
Sunday
Drizzle me this...
HI: 37
LO: 34
wunderground.com
Whats the
calENdar
Sunday, Jan. 27 Friday, Jan. 25 Saturday, Jan. 26 Thursday, Jan. 24
WhaT: Tea at Three
When: 3-4 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, 4th foor
Why: Student Union Activities brings
back its weekly tea and cookies event.
Enjoy free food and good conversa-
tions.
WhaT: Advanced Screen: Hansel &
Gretel: Witch Hunters
When: 8-10 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Woodruff
Auditorium
Why: Students can watch a free
screening of this movie before it hits
theaters, hosted by SUA. Passes are
available at the Union Programs Box
Offce on the 4th foor of the Kansas
Union.
WhaT: Career Education Expo
When: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Where: Pinnacle Career Institute
Why: Companies will be looking to
hire full-time and part-time employ-
ees. Professional attire is preferred.
Students should bring their resumes
and a winning smile.
WhaT: KU Opera presents: Tartuffe
When: 7:30-9 p.m.
Where: Crafton-Preyer Theatre,
Murphy Hall
Why: Watch the KU Opera perform its
frst show of the spring. Tickets are
$15 for general admission and $10
for students and seniors. For more
information, call (785) 864-3436
WhaT: The Oread Open House and
Bridal Fair
Where: Oread Hotel
When: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Why: Enjoy free food samples and
meet with local Lawrence vendors in
preparation for your big day. The event
is free and open to the public.
WhaT: EMU Theatre presents Let My
Mind Flash with Blades
Where: Lawrence Arts Center
When: 7:30 p.m.
Why: This show features University
alumni, including writer/director Dan
Born and producer Feloniz Lovato-
Winston. The play focuses on the
intense relationship between therapist
Sigmund Freud and poet Hilda Doolit-
tle. Tickets are $7 and the admission
is open to those 18 and older.
WhaT: Conversation XIII: Politics as
Symbol/Symbol as Politics
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
When: Noon-4 p.m.
Why: This art exhibit explores the
relationship between image and
politics and features photographs and
abstract art. University political sci-
ence professor Burdett Loomis curated
this exhibition. This event is free and
open to the public.
WhaT: Scary Larry Kansas Bike Polo
Where: Edgewood Park
When: 7 p.m.
Why: Try out this unique sport with
some fellow Lawrencians. Mallets and
balls are provided but bring your own
bike.
neWs ManageMenT
editor-in-chief
Hannah Wise
Managing editors
Sarah McCabe
Nikki Wentling
adVerTIsIng ManageMenT
Business manager
Elise Farrington
sales manager
Jacob Snider
neWs secTIon edITors
news editor
Allison Kohn
associate news editor
Joanna Hlavacek
sports editor
Pat Strathman
associate sports editor
Trevor Graff
entertainment editor
Laken Rapier
copy chiefs
Megan Hinman
Taylor Lewis
Brian Sisk
design chiefs
Ryan Benedick
Katie Kutsko
designers
Trey Conrad
Sarah Jacobs
opinion editor
Dylan Lysen
Photo editor
Ashleigh Lee
special sections editor
Kayla Banzet
Web editor
Natalie Parker
adVIsers
general manager and news adviser
Malcolm Gibson
sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
contact us
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: UDK_News
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
THE UNIVERSITY
DAILY KANSAN
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
first copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50
cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the
Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human
Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue,
Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967)
is published daily during the school year except
Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and
exams and weekly during the summer session
excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by
mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes
to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue.
2000 dole human developement center
1000 sunnyside avenue Lawrence, Kan.,
66045
Kansan MedIa ParTners
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
youve read in todays Kansan and other news.
Also see KUJHs website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice in
radio. Whether its rock n roll
or reggae, sports or special
events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
Editors note: Gun control is
a hot topic in the country right
now, and it impacts college stu-
dents in many ways. Over the
course of the semester, the Kan-
san will examine gun issues from
a variety of angles.
naTIonWIde
In the wake of the Sandy
Hook Elementary School shoot-
ing last month that lef 26
schoolchildren and adults dead,
gun violence has become an is-
sue both national and state of-
fcials are attempting to address.
President Obama and Kansas
Gov. Sam Brownback have pro-
posed measures to reduce gun
violence. Heres a brief look at
what theyre proposing.
1. cLosIng
BacKground
checK LooPhoLes
Te administration wants to
close the gun show loophole
by requiring all frearms deal-
ers, not just federally licensed
arms dealers, to run back-
ground checks on customers.
Currently, private gun sellers
are not required to run back-
ground checks. As a result, buy-
ers in an estimated 40 percent of
gun sales do not undergo back-
ground checks. Te administra-
tion also hopes to remove legal
barriers that prevent states from
providing mental health infor-
mation for use in background
checks. States have voiced con-
cerns that current health privacy
protection laws prevent sharing
such information for back-
ground checks.
2. BannIng MILITary-sTyLe
assauLT WeaPons and
hIgh-caPacITy MagaZInes
In addition to calling on Con-
gress to reinstate and strength-
en the assault weapons ban, the
administration plans to increase
eforts to enforce current gun
laws. Te assault weapons ban
was originally passed in 1994
before it expired in 2004. Te
president has called for banning
semi-automatic rifes, which
were used in the Aurora, Colo.,
theater shooting last August,
limiting ammunition magazines
to 10 rounds and banning the
possession of armor-piercing
rounds. Health care providers
are also encouraged to talk to
their patients about gun safety
and report threats of violence
to law enforcement. Calling the
30,000 gun-related homicides
and suicides a year a public
health crisis, the administration
plans to lif the freeze on gun re-
search, allowing the Centers for
Disease Control to begin inves-
tigating causes of and solutions
to gun violence.
3. MaKIng schooLs saFer
Te administration plans to
spend $150 million to fund 1,000
new school jobs for resource of-
fcers, school psychologists, so-
cial workers and counselors. In
addition to developing school
emergency plans, the admin-
istration proposed a $50 mil-
lion initiative aimed at training
school personnel to create nur-
turing school environments.
Currently, 18,000 schools have
instituted strategies for improv-
ing school climate, and the ini-
tiative hopes to increase this by
8,000 schools.
Our goals are simple: fewer
In yesterdays article University,
city to build rec center, the lead,
Construction is underway on a new
athletics facility... was incorrect.
The plan for the recreation center
has not yet been approved by the city.

children dying from gun violence
and fewer children living in fear,
said Arne Duncan, Obamas edu-
cation secretary. Harder to realize
are the policies, actions and value
changes necessary to reach those
goals.
4. IMProVIng MenTaL heaLTh
serVIces
Te president proposed a state-
based strategy aimed at 16- to
25-year-olds to deal with mental
issues including drug addiction.
Tree quarters of all mental illness-
es manifest in a person by age 24.
Yet less than half of children and
adults with a diagnosable mental
illness receive treatment, according
to the White House. Furthermore,
the administration plans to reach
an additional 750,000 young peo-
ple through its proposed Project
AWARE (Advancing Wellness and
Resilience in Education). Te Af-
fordable Care Act and Medicaid are
guaranteeing mental health cover-
age through insurance.
We are going to need to work
on making access to mental health
care as easy as access to a gun,
Obama said.
sTaTeWIde
In Kansas, Gov. Sam Brownback
has said he wants to address gun
violence by looking into the states
mental health services, as opposed
to changing guns law. Te gover-
nor recently proposed shifing $10
million of state funding to regional
mental health service hubs to ad-
dress mentally at-risk Kansans. Ad-
ditionally, the governor appointed a
task force to examine and overhaul
the Kansas mental health system.
One of the things I want to look
at is whether or not were providing
sufcient mental health services,
Brownback said in a December in-
terview with the Associated Press.
Edited by Sarah McCabe
MarshaLL schMIdT
mschmidt@kansan.com
Lawmakers propose more than gun control
POLITICS
TraVIs young/Kansan
Gun laws have come under scrutiny in the past several months and continue to be
evaluated at the federal and state levels. In Kansas, a background check would be
required to purchase a handgun such as the one above. State legislators are look-
ing into mental health services as opposed to changing gun laws.
CORRECTION
When you think Hibachi,
think
Japanese Steakhouse
& Sushi Bar
2907 W. 6th Street | 785.838.3399
www.kobeatlawrence.com
Wh
WW 66th Street |
khouse
ar ar
2907
www.k
2907 07
PAGE 3A thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, jANUARY 24, 2013
Every Thursday at three oclock, SUA
sponsors Tea @ Three for students,
faculty and staff. Come to the lobby of
the Kansas Union and have some free
tea and cookies with your friends and
classmates.

poliCE rEporTS
KU student arrested on
suspicion of rape
A University student, Alex-
ander Beglinger, was arrested in
Lawrence on Sunday on suspicion
of the rape of an unconscious fe-
male.
According to a statement re-
leased by Sgt. Trent McKinley of
the Lawrence Police Department,
a 19-year-old female University
student reported being sexually
assaulted at a local hotel during
the early morning hours on Sun-
day. Beglinger was contacted by
investigators and arrested later
that day.
Beglinger, a transfer student
from City College of San Francis-
co, made his frst appearance in the
Douglas County District Court on
Tuesday afernoon. Cheryl Wright,
assistant to the District Attorney,
said a preliminary hearing has
been scheduled for Jan. 29 at 9:30
a.m. Bond is set at $35,000.
Additional details regarding the
suspect, victim and the incident
are not being released at this time.
Emma Legault
loCAl
CrimE ChAriTy
Fundraiser returns in
memory of graduate
Just Drew It, the second an-
nual charity sofball tournament
named in honor of Drew Ander-
son, a recent graduate who died in
October of 2011, will be held on
April 27 in Shawnee, Kan.
Te tournament, which also in-
cludes a rafe and silent auction,
was set up last year as a fundraiser
for the Drew Anderson Inspiration
in Journalism Scholarship. Despite
having muscular dystrophy, a con-
dition resulting in muscle weak-
ness confning him to a scooter,
Anderson graduated in 2011 with
a bachelors degree in journal-
ism. Along the way, he inspired
students and professors with his
positive outlook and his refusal to
complain.
Drew faced so many strug-
gles, said Wendee Anderson, his
mother and an organizer for Just
Drew It. He faced what he had to
do and he faced it with a smile on
his face.
Anderson worked for Te Uni-
versity Daily Kansan as a copy
chief during his time at the Uni-
versity. His efect on the newsroom
and the School of Journalism led
to the creation of the scholarship,
which will select its frst recipient
this spring.
Last years tournament brought
in $31,350 through donations and
sales of T-shirts with the slogan.
Just Drew It is from the Nike
slogan, Wendee Anderson said.
It kind of reminds us in our daily
life that things are not so bad for
us.
To donate money, buy T-shirts,
or sign up for the tournament, con-
tact Wendee Anderson at kwan-
derson@sunfower.com or Teresa
Woolley at twoolley@sunfower.
com for more information.
Vikaas Shanker
Running doesnt usually coin-
cide with beer drinking, but the
Larryville Hash House Harriers
know diferently.
Hashing is a combination
of running, socializing and hav-
ing carefree fun. It was created in
modern day Malaysia by British
soldiers who started a hare and
hounds running group. Mod-
eled afer the old childrens game
paper chase, two hares route a
three mile course by using chalk
and four. Te rest of the running
group are called the hounds and
follow the chalked symbols pass-
ing through barriers and wrong
turns.
Esther Tar-
shish, a sopho-
more from Min-
neapolis, was
introduced to
the Larryville
Hash House
Harriers by one
of its founding
members. Last
Tursday, Tarsh-
ish was a hashing virgin, which is
what the group calls newcomers.
She enjoyed herself and recom-
mends students give it a try.
Its a great way to expand your
social circle and explore Lawrence
because the locations change every
week, Tarshish said.
Trevor Gunn recently moved
to Lawrence and heard about the
group through a friend. He said he
likes drinking and wanted to mix
things up.
I told people about it and they
thought I was crazy, Gunn said,
so I thought Id give it a go.
Hashing is a way for people to
get away from their work or school
routine and partake in a unique
combination of exercise and fun.
Socializing with new people and
sharing crude jokes with fellow
hashers makes for an entertaining
evening. Hash-
ing virgins are
dubbed a nick
name of Just
plus their frst
name. Mem-
bers must earn a
hashing name by
doing something
memorable.
Te three-
mile course
begins with chalk talk with one
of the founding members of the
Larryville Hash House Harriers,
Pounding Father, who declined to
provide his real name. Trail sym-
bols are drawn on the ground and
explained to the hounds so they
know how to follow the course the
hares have created.
Multiple obstacles lie along
the trail. Song checks are a point
on the path where the entire group
must sing a song together before
continuing on. A brown bag check
is another team activity in which
an entire bottle of an alcoholic
beverage must be consumed be-
fore fnishing the course.
Te Larryville Hash House
Harriers meet every Tursday at
various locations in Lawrence at
6:30 p.m. Anyone 21 and older
is welcome and hashing virgins
eat and drink for free. For more
fun and weekly location updates,
checkout the Larryville Hash
House Harriers Facebook page.
Edited by Megan Hinman
Harriers make running a more social event
hANNAh bARLING
hbarling@kansan.com
A 21-year-old male was
arrested in the 2400 block
of Crestline Drive on suspi-
cion of the criminal damage
of property. Te damage was
valued at $1,500. Bond was
not set.
A 21-year-old male was
arrested in the 600 block of
Iowa Street on suspicion of
the possession of marijuana.
Bond was set at $200.
A 21-year-old male was
arrested in the 1800 block of
Iowa Street on suspicion of
battery and criminal damage
of property. Te damage was
valued at $250. Bond was set
at $5,000.
A 22-year-old female was
arrested in the 3600 block of
25th Street on suspicion of
driving while intoxicated.
Bond was set at $500.
EmILY WIttLER/KANSAN
members of the larryville hash house harriers, new and old, sign their name in a book before each event last Thursday at the
ranch. members of the group can range from 21-85 years of age.

i told people about it and


they thought i was crazy.
TrEvor gUnn
member of lawrence harriers
please
recycle
This
paper
Students can expect changes to
KUs core curriculum starting next
fall. Te University Core Curricu-
lum Committee is working on f-
nal revisions to the new KU Core,
which will require students to take
12 general education classes along
with classes specifc to their ma-
jors.
Currently, 72 hours of classes
are required for the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences Gen-
eral Education degree. Te KU
Core will require approximately
36 credit hours. While the Core
applies to all students regardless of
their major and is in that sense an
big change, it will likely cut down
on total time spent in general edu-
cation classes.
Professor Chris Haufer, who has
been a leader in implementing the
Core, believes that asking for only
12 units geared toward tangible
learning goals such as strengthen-
ing written communication or ex-
panding global awareness will give
students a better sense of purpose.
Because the KU Core is based
on educational goals and learning
outcomes, students will have a bet-
ter sense of what they are obtain-
ing from the courses that theyre
taking, Haufer said. Te current
general education requirements
tend to just be lists of courses that
dont seem necessarily tied to any
particular learning goals.
Each school recommended
courses to be added as options for
the Core curriculum. Te Univer-
sity Core Curriculum Committee
has already approved nearly 500
courses and has more than 400
possible courses to review this se-
mester. When the reviewing pro-
cess is fnished, students will be
able to choose between more than
800 classes to fulfll the required
12 units. Professor Chuck Marsh,
chair of the University Core Cur-
riculum Committee, believes that
giving students so many class op-
tions in a variety of subjects will
help them fnd courses that ft
their interests.
It makes me
want to be a
student again,
Marsh said. One
of the great things
is to see how
many courses in
how many difer-
ent departments
across campus
can clearly meet
certain of these learning out-
comes.
Faculty members and student
senators have been working to
make sure that these core curricu-
lum changes will positively impact
the students. Tyler Childress, a
junior studying sociology and
political science, is a College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences Student
Senator and a voting member on
the 2012-2013 committee that has
been working to defne the new
KU Core for its frst year.
I wanted to be on the commit-
tee to make sure that while the col-
lege was making this change, that
they were making sure that it was
in the best interest of the students
and that there was some student
input, Childress said.
Te new Core will be put in
practice afer the Provost and the
Chancellor moved to update gen-
eral education requirements last
fall.
Weve had the same curricu-
lum in place pretty much as it cur-
rently stands for about ffy years,
Haufer said. Te fact that for the
frst time, all KU undergraduates
no matter what their major
will have the same grounding in
general education will be a huge
change.
I n c o m i n g
freshmen will
be required to
take the KU
Core starting
Fall 2013. When
degree-specific
requi rement s
from each
school are fnal-
ized afer this
semester, current freshmen may
meet with their advisors to decide
whether to opt into the KU Core
instead of continuing to study un-
der current general education re-
quirements.
It may be advantageous for
students to follow the KU Core
rather than the current college
B.A. requirements, Haufer said.
However, I think, in the profes-
sional schools, its just not going to
have that much of an impact and
its much less likely that students
will switch to the KU Core in en-
gineering or journalism or archi-
tecture.
Current sophomores and up-
perclassmen will not be afected
by the changes. More informa-
tion can be found at http://kucore.
ku.edu.
Many students now turn to the
Internet for guidance before they
enroll in a class.
Monica Marshall, a senior from
Greenville, S.C., used Rate My
Professors while enrolling this
semester to decide what classes
to take and which professors
to avoid.
Ive taken a certain class at a
specific time because the teacher
was rated so well by the other
students on Rate My Professor,
Marshall said. Ive also not taken
certain classes because the teacher
was rated so poorly.
Ratemyprofessors.com is a
website where students can anon-
ymously give feedback about the
professors they have had at colleg-
es across the country. According
to the website, the University of
Kansas has 2,155 professors listed,
with an average professor rating
of 3.69. Comparatively, Kansas
State University also has an aver-
age rating of 3.69, and Washburn
University has an average of 3.78.
Rate My Professors boasts it is
the highest trafficked free site for
quickly researching and rating 1.7
million professors from colleges
and universities across the United
States, Canada, and the United
Kingdom.
Since 2005, Rate my Professors
has been rapidly growing in pop-
ularity, and many students have
used the website to help them
choose the best class with the best
professor.
However, some of the websites
users are cautious before making
a decision on a class or teacher
solely based on the reviews.
Elizabeth Najim, a senior from
Wichita, is one of these users who
is careful before taking the review
of a professor at face value.
Sometimes you have to use
your common sense on some peo-
ples ratings, but usually they are
quite accurate, Najim said.
One of the downsides of the
website is that it can become
insulting and rude, or just infu-
riating because people cant spell,
so how can you trust their judge-
ment? Najim said.
Despite the websites drawbacks,
many loyal users use it frequently
and without hesitation.
I use it every semester before I
enroll, Marshall said.
The last day to officially add a
class is Feb. 18, and the last day to
officially drop or withdraw a class
is April 22.
Edited by Sarah McCabe
Jenna Jakowatz
jjakowatz@kansan.com
college
Fall marks curriculum changes
emily Donovan
edonovan@kansan.com
academics
ashleigh lee/kansan
Rate my Professors is a website that allows students to rate professors after taking their class and allows for others to utl-
ize professor ratings when enrolling for classes. The University has more than 2,000 professors listed on the website.
students grade professors
two men sue subway
over too-short subs
Two New Jersey men sued Sub-
way this week, claiming the worlds
biggest fast-food chain has been
shorting them by selling so-called
footlong sandwiches that measure
a bit less than 12 inches.
Te suit, fled Tuesday in Supe-
rior Court in Mount Holly, may
be the frst legal fling aimed at the
sandwich shops afer an embar-
rassment went viral last week when
someone posted a photo of a foot-
long and a ruler on the companys
Facebook page to show that the
sandwich was not as long as adver-
tised.
At the time, the company issued
a statement saying that the sand-
wich length can vary a bit when
franchises do not bake to the exact
corporate standards.
Stephen DeNittis, the lawyer for
the plaintifs in the New Jersey suit,
said hes seeking class-action status
and is also preparing to fle a simi-
lar suit in Pennsylvania state court
in Philadelphia.
He said hes had sandwiches
from 17 shops measured and
every one came up short.
Te case is about holding
companies to deliver what theyve
promised, he said.
Even though the alleged short of
a half-inch or so of bread is relative-
ly small, it adds up, he said. Subway
has 38,000 stores around the world,
nearly all owned by franchisees and
its $5 footlong specials have been a
mainstay of the companys ads for
fve years.
Subway did not immediately re-
turn a call to Te Associated Press
on Wednesday.
Associated Press
oddiTy

it makes me want to be a
student again.
chUck maRsk
chair of core curriculum committee
thursDay, January 24, 2013 Page 4a the university Daily kansan
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E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
thursday, january 24, 2013
aries (March 21-april 19)
today is a 9
keep your objective in mind
and focus. distractions could
trigger an emotional break-
down. Cooperate with one who
has what you lack. You get a
secret surprise.
taurus (april 20-May 20)
today is a 6
Youre extra brilliant for the
next few days. others may
object to a plan, so devise
a persuasive argument and
dress it glamorously. Get to
work and leave celebrations
for later.
gemini (May 21-june 20)
today is a 6
The next phase could be profit-
able and perfect for traveling,
more fun with a partner. Imag-
ine a future goal realized. Its a
good time to win debates.
cancer (june 21-july 22)
today is a 9
Youre awesome and extremely
creative, even under pressure.
And youre getting stronger.
Look forward to two days in
the spotlight. dream a special
dream.
Leo (july 23-aug. 22)
today is a 5
If youre going to worry, do it
effectively and where you can
make a difference. some of
your best work comes from
confronting the difficulties and
realities of bootstrapping it.
Virgo (aug. 23-sept. 22)
today is a 9
Youre doing a great job with
what you have; search for
allies anyway. You dont have
to go at it alone. Imagine your
space reorganized. Love your
friends.
Libra (sept. 23-oct. 22)
today is a 7
Practice obedience, and get
stronger. Team projects go
well. Accept spiritual encour-
agement, and open the door to
a romantic adventure.
scorpio (oct. 23-nov. 21)
today is an 8
Break out of your shell and
shatter your next ceiling.
Expansion can be sustainable
if done with respect for the
shared environment. Explore
the outdoors.
sagittarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
today is a 7
Nows a good time to pay bills
and complete past homework.
In the face of controversy,
consider another perspective.
use what youve learned to cut
costs. share your ideas.
capricorn (dec. 22-jan. 19)
today is an 8
update your skills and make
inroads quietly. You dont have
to brag about your accomplish-
ments. Just believe in yourself
and continue pedaling forward.
keep the balance.
aquarius (jan. 20-Feb. 18)
today is a 7
somebody very interesting
finds you fascinating; stay
cool. dont go shopping for
treats yet. Focus on making
money for a few days instead.
In the meantime, primp.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
today is an 8
By now you should have done
the homework. If you havent,
dont put it off anymore. Move
up the ladder with increased
confidence. what kind of world
do you want? Build bridges and
alliances.
Landon McdonaLd
lmcdonald@kansan.com
How best to explain the enduring
appeal of Arnold Schwarzenegger?
Over the last four decades, the for-
mer bodybuilder with the impene-
trable accent has come to dominate
nearly every facet of our culture,
from the pop idolatry of Hollywood
to the governorship of California.
His post-politics comeback vehi-
cle, the unapologetically sleazy
action-western The Last Stand,
wisely sticks to the Austrian Oaks
strengths, namely his charisma, his
capacity for self-deprecation and
his Rumpelstiltskin-like talent for
spinning bad one-liners into eter-
nally quotable gold.
The plot plays out like the
demented, Hot Wheels-fueled
fantasy of an especially gifted
first grader. Imagine a pint-sized
Michael Bay pitching The Last
Stand to Lionsgate: Okay, theres
this drug boss, see, and plus also hes
a racecar driver. FBI guys caught
him because drugs are bad and
hes bad, so hes going to jail. But
he escapes, OK, in like this super-
awesome mega-Corvette that never
needs gas and also can outrace a
helicopter. And his henchmen are
building a bridge so he can cross the
border and escape. But to do that,
hes gotta drive through this one
town where the sheriff is Arnold
Schwarzenegger!
Add in a layer of bone-crunching
violence and a cast packed with cult
favorites (Peter Stormare, Harry
Dean Stanton, Luis Guzmn) and
what youre left with is a full-tilt
action smorgasbord worthy of com-
parisons to superior trash-classics
like Commando and Raw Deal.
What sets this apart from the rest
of Arnolds repertoire, though, is
the sharp visual eye of director Kim
Jee-woon, one of the enfantes ter-
ribles of South Korean cinema and
a student of artsy action maestro
John Woo.
Kim, the deviant talent behind
2010s serial killer odyssey I Saw
The Devil and the cheerfully gonzo
western The Good, the Bad, the
Weird, has a gift for staging action
scenes using old tropes in absurd
yet effective new ways, and this
film, his American debut, offers fur-
ther proof of his prowess. Consider
the car chase between Arnold and
the drug lords aforementioned
Corvette (a souped-up version of
the new ZR1) that ends in a sur-
real game of cornfield chicken, the
blur of severed stalks obscuring the
viewers vision while the two bat-
tered vehicles prowl the interior of
the maze like fiberglass minotaurs.
The film also gets a surprising
amount of comic mileage out of
Johnny Knoxvilles Dinkum, the
local eccentric who turns his bare-
ly legal weapons museum into
a makeshift armory for Arnold
and his deputized posse. Watching
him ecstatically feed ammunition
into the ex-Governators mini-gun
is one of the films indelible high-
lights. Could this erstwhile jackass
be angling for a late-career slide into
character acting?
Not everything works. Far too
much dramatic weight is hoisted
on a flimsy love story between a
war vet turned jailbird (Rodrigo
Santoro) and Arnolds token female
deputy (Jaimie Alexander), while
Forest Whitakers wooden FBI agent
seems like an emissary from an
entirely different movie. Whitaker,
an Oscar winner whose range defi-
nitely covers over-the-top, seems
oddly restrained in a part that calls
for spittle-coated bombast.
What about the big guy himself?
Strange as it sounds, Arnold seems
to have grown as an actor during
his time away from the big screen.
Maybe eight years in politics is
the rough equivalent of a semester
at Julliard. His Sherriff Owens, a
weathered lawman who gave up big
city clout for small town serenity, is a
thoughtful, almost Eastwood-esque
presence for much of the movie, at
least until the slam-bang third act
transfigures him back into the gun-
toting, quip-spouting bermensch
we all know and love. He said hed
be back, after all, and The Last
Stand fulfills that promise with
blood and bravado to spare.

Edited by Megan Hinman


associated Press
The Last stand, an action movie starring Arnold schwarzenegger, was released
on Jan. 18. Johnny knoxville and Forest whitaker also star in the movie.
Review
schwarzenegger makes his Last stand worth seeing

Mama is a maddening exercise


in style overtaking suspense, a su-
premely creepy premise undone by
gaping plot holes and saddled with
a derivative, CGI-laden fnale that
shows entirely too much of the titu-
lar ghoul.
Despite the luminous presence
of Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain
(Zero Dark Tirty) and the guid-
ing hand of executive producer
Guillermo del Toro (Pans Laby-
rinth, Te Devils Backbone),
Andrs Muschiettis feature-length
debut seems destined for the PG-
13 sof horror bargain bin, a cine-
matic purgatory where jump scares
reign supreme and quality aberra-
tions like Te Sixth Sense, Te
Mothman Prophecies and Te
Others are few and far between.
Te flm starts of as a particu-
larly grim fairy tale centered on
Victoria (Megan Charpentier) and
her younger sister Lilly (Isabelle
Nlisse), two little girls who sur-
vive in the forest for fve years afer
both their parents are killed. By the
time of their rescue, both children
have been reduced to feral, mono-
syllabic wretches, barely capable of
speech and seemingly beyond the
thrall of civilization. Dr. Dreyfuss
(Daniel Kash) becomes fascinated
with their case, particularly their
relationship with the invisible care-
giver they call Mama, who Victo-
ria claims has followed them back
from the wilderness.
In order to study them further,
Dreyfuss arranges for the girls to
move in with their Uncle Lucas
(Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and his
new wife Annabel (Chastain), a
disafected feminist still clinging
to adolescent dreams of punk rock
stardom. Chastain, almost unrec-
ognizable beneath a black dye-job
and globs of Joan Jett eyeliner, nails
the gradual awakening of Anna-
bels long-repressed maternal in-
stincts in ways both understated
and touching, hardly two words
one would normally associate with
the horror genre. Her character arc
is easily the flms most involving
aspect.
Frankly, the main problem with
the movie is Mama herself, who,
of course, ends up being very real
and wreaks ghostly havoc on the
family afer Victoria starts prefer-
ring the company of the fesh-and-
blood Annabel. Mamas true form
is one of those spindly, waterlogged
wraiths that have become ubiqui-
tous since the heyday of J-Horror
crossover hits like Ringu and
Ju-on: Te Grudge. Even her ex-
cessive back-story, told through a
series of murky fashbacks, takes
its cues from Gore Verbinskis 2002
version of Te Ring.
Te flm also makes the mistake
of having Mama pop up almost
constantly during the fnal act, rob-
bing her of any remaining mystery
or tacit dread. Have we forgotten
what made Alien and Jaws so
efective at shocking audiences
back in the day? When it comes to
inducing terror, less is more. One
of the very best modern examples
is Neil Marshalls 2005 spelunk-
ing shocker Te Descent, where
the monsters arent even seen until
nearly an hour into the movie.
Muschietti, who adapted Mama
from his celebrated 2008 short flm
of the same name, is undoubtedly
a talented flmmaker, one with a
frm command of atmosphere and
the rare ability to elicit natural per-
formances from very young actors
(Charpentier and the nearly mute
Nlisse are both admittedly fan-
tastic). Yet a second viewing of the
original short makes the faws on
display here seem even more egre-
gious by comparison. In the 2008
Mama, we dont know a thing
about this creature or why shes af-
ter these girls. We never even see
her face. Now thats scary.

Edited by Elise Reuter


thursday, january 24, 2013 PaGE 6a thE unIVErsIty daILy Kansan
KU Opera is hoping to bring
a new audience to this form of
entertainment with its upcoming
production of Tartuffe.
I think going to the opera is
a great chance to see something
new, director John Stephens said.
Theres nothing quite like the
experience of hearing someone
who has a really beautiful, strong,
trained voice sing live.
The same can be said for the
upcoming production. With sev-
eral graduate voice students lead-
ing the show, there should be no
shortage of strong voices through-
out the cast.
Tartuffe, Stephens says, tells
the tale of a hypocrite who comes
into the good graces of a man
named Orgon, who is a wealthy
Parisian. Tartuffe, who claims to
be a highly religious man, comes
to live with Orgon and his family,
but tries to steal their money and
Orgons wife. It takes much work
from the family to get him to see
the hypocrite Tartuffe really is.
People still might be scared away
from Tartuffe because of the idea
that the opera may be too foreign
for them. Tartuffe promises to be
different.
Tartuffe is different in a way
that may bring in newer audience
members, Stephens said. Its in
English, and its a play that many
people are aware of, as well. The
subject matter is also one that a
lot of people like to see, what with
a hypocrite getting his comeup-
pance.
After months of rehearsing, the
cast of Tartuffe is ready to per-
form on Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m., and
Jan. 27 at 2:30 p.m. Performances
will be in the Crafton-Preyer
Theater in Murphy Hall. Tickets
cost $10 for students and $15 for
general admission.
Edited by Megan Hinman
Why are you a catch?
Because I genuinely care
about people.
turn-ons: a girl who enjoys
exercising, is independent and wears
cowboy boots.
turn-offs: Burping or a re-
ally obnoxious laugh
If you could take a trIp
anyWhere, Where Would
you go and Why?
I would love to go to Bora
Bora! I prefer warm weather to
the cold Kansas climate. Bora
Boras ocean is clear for miles
and has beautiful beaches. Not
to mention I could wear my
swim trunks all day!
What are the top 3 apps
on your phone?
BBC News, Snapchat and
Twitter
Would you rather go
cluBBIng or have a can-
dlelIght dInner?
I would do whatever my date
wants to do, her choice.
Whats your Ideal Wom-
an lIke?
She would have a nice tan,
big blue eyes and a beautiful
smile. My ideal woman would
also have solid morals, a fun
personality, enjoy sports and
the occasional adventure.
catch of the Week
Barton Blaine
hageman II
hometoWn: mcpherson, ks
year: senior
maJor: political science
Interested In: Woman
to nominate next weeks catch, email the entertainment editor laken
rapier at lrapier@kansan.com
Bigger audience
expected for opera
Mama promises a big scare
but lacks mystery on screen
movIes
theater
assocIatEd PrEss
annabel (Jessica chastain) runs afoul of her nieces jealous supernatural guardian
in andrs muschiettis horror thriller mama.
Landon McdonaLd
lmcdonald@kansan.com
BrEt IVy
bivy@kansan.com
OMEGA PHI ALPHA
Spring 2013 Rush

KUs ONLY Community Service Sorority
Please come join us at one of our info sessions to learn
more about how to be a part of a Sisterhood in Service

Information Sessions
Monday January 28
th
@ 6pm
Tuesday January 29
th
@ 7pm
In the Pine Room of the Kansas Union

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C A S H P O N G
2 2 8 8 I O WA S T . 7 8 5 . 8 5 6 . 7 3 6 4
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thursday, January 24, 2013 PaGE 7a
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
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tHe editOriAL bOArd
Members of The Kansan Editorial Board are Ian Cummings,
Lisa Curran, Jon Samp, Angela Hawkins and Ryan
Schlesener.
SoCIETy
Coming out is becoming easier
Science still impressive,
even over winter break
The claiming of
the NBA throne
TECHNoLogy pop CuLTuRE
@ cocoa_kitt27
@udK_Opinion by stayin home.
#Senioritis
UDK
cHirps
bAcK
c
A
m
p
u
s
how are you staying
warm while walking
from class to class?
Follow us on Twitter @uDK_opinion. Tweet us your
opinions, and we just might publish them.
@ Kaydubbed
@udK_Opinion I avoid everywhere
that the sun doesnt shine like hot
lava. Those extra 3 degrees are
priceless.
@Wooddawg3312
@udK_Opinion I have 3 classes in
the same room...I dont get to go
outside.
T
he past year has, in a
way, kind of been the
year of the casual com-
ing out. From Frank Ocean, to
Anderson Cooper to Jodie Foster
just a week ago, more and more
celebrities have been coming
out as part of the Gay, Lesbian,
Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and
Questioning community. Not
with covers on Time magazine,
but with posts on blogs, as a
vague allusion in speeches, a sin-
gle line of Yep, Im gay, I also just
adopted a puppy in an article. Its
still a big deal, to publicly declare
to the world that your banner
is the rainbow flag. But its not
quite as big of a deal as it used to
be. In fact, theres a lot of pride
held nowadays in being out, and
being able to publicly wave the
rainbow flagtheres also a lot
of pressure to be out, even if you
dont necessarily feel comfortable,
or even safe, in doing so.
Were getting to a point in our
mainstream culture, and in parts
of LGBTQ culture, where theres a
growing expectation to be as out
as possible: to publicly let your
family, friends, peers, third grade
lunch lady, every single person
you come into contact with know
that youre not heteronormative.
Theres a pressure, and an insinu-
ation, that as soon as you know
this about yourself, everybody has
to know this about yourself. And
that if you dont thrust yourself
out of the closet as soon as possi-
ble to every single person, youre
doing a disservice to the LGBTQ
community. There is pressure
that not being super out means
you must be carrying a lot of
self-shame, which you need to get
over. Which is a bunch of bull.
Some members of the LGBTQ
community are simply not ready
to come out, whether if its just to
their mom, or their workplace.
This idea that you have to come
out creates a mentality where not
being super out means youre
letting down the community.
Especially for younger mem-
bers of the LGBTQ community,
theres a certain anxiety. You dont
want to feel like youre hiding
anythingyou may even be out
to some people already, or even
to whole circles of people you
know. But because you dont nec-
essarily want to put on Facebook
that Sally is interested in women,
youre being made to question
your own pride, when in fact,
youre just not ready.
For some people, coming out
even to just yourself can be a
huge and lengthy process, and
you may need time to sort out
what it means for you on a per-
sonal level. For other people, you
may feel comfortable confiding in
certain people, but dont want to
risk losing other friends or family
in case they dont approve. Or
you may not want to come out yet
because of fear for your safety.
In 2011, 30 hate crimes were
committed against members of
the LGBTQ community that
led to death, according to the
National Coalition of Anti-
Violence Programs.
It sucks that despite the year
being 2013, and living in a far
more accepting world than the
one our parents grew up in, that
members of the LGBTQ commu-
nity have to question being out
for fear of being hurt. And every-
body who is very much out as
gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual,
transgender, queer, whatever your
flavor, Im glad youre in a space
in your lives where you can do
that. Go you, because thats awe-
some. But not everyone feels they
can do that. Some people, if they
came out right now, might be
fired, or lose their housing, or be
shunned by their families. They
could literally be putting their
lives at risk.
We need to keep working to
make it safer, and more accept-
able, to be out. We need to edu-
cate people, and create more pro-
tection under the law. And more
people being out does help lend a
stronger visibility, to make more
people realize that whoever a
person is attracted to, or whatever
their gender identity is, it doesnt
make them any more or less of a
valid human being. But there also
needs to be an understanding that
some people dont feel comfort-
able being out yet, and not being
out doesnt make them any less
valid of a human being either.
Gwynn is a sophomore majoring in
English and Women, Gender, and
Sexuality from Olathe. Follow her on
twitter @AllidoisGwynn.
By Katherine Gwynn
kgwynn@kansan.com
I
m not going to lie, when
it got around to the fourth
week of break, being stuck
in my house all day was starting
to drive me crazy. I know some
of us coped by getting jobs or
taking trips to Mexico, but I was
not so lucky; my only luxury was
YouTube.
After 16 hours or so of a coma-
like state of video browsing, I hit
the jackpot and found almost
every episode of Bill Nye the
Science Guy. I powered through
two seasons in one day, and every
episode reminded me of some-
thing I had forgot in my winter
break stupor: science is awesome.
I know its the first week back
from break and the last thing you
want to do is learn about science,
but some seriously cool discover-
ies and research has been going
down the last 30 days, and theres
three main things I think you
should know about.

NO DEAth by AStErOiD
Based on data collected from
orbiting telescopes, NASA
announced that the 300-yard long
behemoth, eerily named Apophis,
will not crash into the Earth in
either 2029 or 2036. Astronomers
were able to get a closer look at
the asteroid as it passed by Earth
early this January. According to
NASA, if it hit the earth, Apophis
would be expected to impact with
a force of 510 megatons of TNT,
or 10 times the force of the larg-
est nuclear weapon.
While Im happy Ill live (non-
asteroid related deaths not with-
standing) at least to the age of 41,
Im still disappointed we wont
get to test out any of our anti-
asteroid technology. While theres
no way wed send astronauts to
the spacerock a la Armageddon,
and we definitely wouldnt nuke
an asteroid that would just cre-
ate a bunch of little radioactive
asteroids that would still hit us
we could still hit it with a rocket
to change its course by 1 or 2
degrees. And if were playing with
giant asteroids, thats exciting
enoughfor me.
SurpriSE: SuGAr iS tErriblE
FOr yOu
After using MRI scanners to
track eating control centers in
the brain, researchers from Yale
believe that our brains dont
realize that fructose, as in high-
fructose corn syrup, is actually
sugar. In contrast, when a high
amount of glucose, normal sugar,
is registered in the bloodstream,
our bodies release chemicals to
make us feel full or stop eating.
With fructose, our body doesnt
recognize the sugar, so we tend to
eat much more.
Fructose became the mainstay
in most sugary foods, such as
soda and most fast foods, starting
in the 1970s, and not surpris-
ingly, the increase in American
obesity started at the same time.
While theres no existing evidence
the two events are linked, I mean,
come on.
tElEpOrtAtiON AlrEADy
ExiStS
Most ideas about the future
always involve crazy ideas of
transportation: from flying cars,
to floating skateboards or tele-
portation. Most of these ideas
will never come to fruition, but
theres a bright side: teleportation
already exists.
Alright, you got me. Its not as
impressive as it sounds. We can
only teleport at most a couple of
photons. Its extremely compli-
cated, and the simplest way to
explain it is say we use quantum
entanglement to send quibits,
or an extremely tiny amount of
information, one at a time. Still,
researchers in Europe were able
to teleport those two photons a
distance of 88 miles.
Luckily for us who want to
teleport, scientists at Cambridge
believe they have a way to
increase the amount of infor-
mation sent via teleportation.
According to an article published
in Physical Review Letters, the
researches have found a way to
send multiple qubits at the same
time.
Think of mailing a bunch of
Legos to a friend. The old way
would ship a single Lego piece
at a time. The new teleporta-
tion technique would mail many
Legos at once, but the more
Legos pieces, the more jumbled
they get.
Except right now, we cant send
Legos, only photons. So we have
a long way to go, but still, weve
teleported things. Isnt that cool
enough?
Simpson is a freshman majoring in
chemical engineering from Fairway.
By Andrew Simpson
asimpson@kansan.com
I
s the NBA the Game of
Rings? Maybe that is a
stretch, but how does this
sound? Competing self-inter-
ested factions making tactical
maneuvers in order to be better
positioned to take the ultimate
prize.
Characters (players) change
allegiances or find themselves
betrayed as their odds at
claiming the throne perpetu-
ally lengthen and dissipate (are
traded and used as leverage to
assemble pieces to a champion-
ship puzzle).
Game of Thrones is a TV
show depicting powerful houses,
lead by royal families, vying for
power through politics and on
the battlefield.
The NBA has seen the devel-
opment of an evolved form of the
player marketplace, as more star
players enter the league and pop-
ularity rises, teams (and some-
times players) are assembling
super teams, with multiple stars.
Key players joining together to
build great teams and challenge
other teams for the title.
Bill Simmons authored Game
of NBA Thrones last year at
Grantland.com where he used
quotes from his newfound favor-
ite show to compare to moments
and events in the NBA. Since
then, thanks to the Los Angeles
Lakers woes and the Oklahoma
City Thunders budget constraint,
the league has developed into a
fully-fledged parody.
Starting with the pioneers
Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen
joining Paul Pierce in Boston, the
NBA underwent an industrial
revolution in how teams com-
pete for titles. The Miami Heat,
or should I say the Lannisters,
popularized the concept when
Lebron James and Chris Bosh
teamed up with Dwayne Wade,
Tyrion Lannister. Tyrion is the
most likeable Lannister, who are
power hungry and also the rich-
est family in the Kingdom (the
Heat have a wealth of superstars),
but Tyrion is unique among
them and aids them because
of his strong family pride and
loyalty.
The Starks, or the Thunder,
are a more traditional, often
honorable family that does not
share the same power lust as
other houses like the Thunder,
who built their dynamic squad
patiently through the draft. Ned
Stark, the leader of the Stark
house (Kevin Durant) was thrust
into the spotlight against his
will and became Hand of the
King without ever desiring such
power, a modest superstar.
The Targaryens are a former
dynasty now in ruin. They have
a reason to be hopeful but find
themselves far from their illustri-
ous goals, much like the Lakers
whose reign has ended and,
although they have assembled
the pieces, have performed
poorly.
Stannis Baratheon, the brother
of the former King, is willing to
do anything to assume power. He
consulted a quasi evil witch lady
and took part in a sort of weird,
dark magic ceremony where she
gave birth to a demon thingy.
The Brooklyn Nets have also
trusted someone with the image
of their organizationJay Z. He
may not be a witch but do you
trust Beyonc? The team moved
to Brooklyn from New Jersey
and changed their team color
to black, the same color as the
demon thingy. They made some
big offseason moves as well,
acquiring pieces that made it
clear that this longtime basement
dweller was eyeing contention.
Clearly, they will do anything to
win.
And James Harden is obvi-
ously Jon Snow, the bastard son
of Ned Stark who chose life on
The Wall instead of as a part of
the Stark house. James Harden
was traded from the Western
Conference champion Oklahoma
City Thunder to the mediocre
Houston Rockets. Instead of
chasing titles with the Thunder
he will be hanging out with
Marcus Morris amd Cole Aldrich
at the Nights Watch, or, I mean,
in Houston.
Cosby is a sophomore majoring in
economics and political science
from Overland park. Follow him on
twitter
@claycosby.
By Clay Cosby
ccosby@kansan.com
Did Ashley pennington ever fgure out
her parking permit dilemma?!
I thought I missed everything about
Ku over break. Then I came back and
remembered how much parking sucks.
Kevin, you are beautiful the way you
are. you can keep your afro if you want
to!
Its oK, K-State. Not everyone can win
in the octagon of Doom.
That awkward moment when you want
to date your stalkers roommate...
EMAW: Ellis, McLemore And Withey.
BAM.
Hahahahaha Kentucky.
We beat K-State. K-State beat Florida.
Florida owned Missouri. Therefore we
could own Missouri.
I dont understand these professors
who require the latest edition of a text-
book worth $200 while the older version
is only $3.
The difference between 8 and 9 a.m.
is something only college students can
truly appreciate.
My sorority sister says I should marry
someone tall so my children wouldnt
be so short. I took that to mean that I
should marry Jeff Withey.
oh my god. This woman is literally
breast feeding her child in the middle of
class right now.
If you gathered up all the crumbs
from Nature Valley granola Bars, you
could end world hunger.
Dont get excited boys, Ill only look
this good the frst week of class. After
that, Ill look like a woolly mammoth.
Finally went to the grocery store. Now
my fridge is only half full of beer.
you spilled coffee down your leg and
it looked like you peed? Too bad Billy
Madison wasnt there to save you.
The frst rule of boat shoes is you do
not talk about boat shoes.
Im wearing boat shoes with socks.
Hate me.
I feel like if the bus driver needs to
tell you to exit at the rear of the bus
second semester, you shouldnt be here.
No I dont want a coupon book. Leave
me alone.
I used to know a person in the CLAS
department with me. Now back to just
knowing Engineers... got to have friends
somewhere I guess.
Arent your ankles cold?
people around campus seem 4 inches
taller than last semester.
Went on a cruise over winter break, I
actually felt justifed wearing boat shoes
for a week straight.
Someone at Mrs. Es deserves to be
banished to culinary hell. My chicken
had so many cloves in it that it tasted
like a mouthful of Christmas potpourri.
JAYHAWK
BOOKSTORE
1420 Crescent Rod
neebo.com/ku
ON YOUR TEXTBOOKS
3
TEXT KU2 TO 22022
SAVE UP TO $20
3
Restrictions apply. See store for details.
Thursday, January 24, 2013 PaGE 8a ThE unIVErsITy daILy Kansan
It had been 18 days since the
last Kansas victory.
What, you didnt think I was
counting? Bonnie Henrickson
said afer her team beat Texas by
a score of 76-38.
It was almost the exact situation
that Kansas found themselves in
last season when they faced Texas
at Allen Fieldhouse, feeling the
desperation of having lost three
games in a row, and once again,
Kansas ended its losing streak.
Henricksons team played with
a sense of urgency afer three
straight Big 12 losses. Afer one
half of play, the Jayhawks went
into the locker room with a 46-
12 lead afer shooting 53 percent
from the feld and 50 percent
from the three-point line.
Te sense of urgency was shared
by the Longhorns, who entered
Allen Fieldhouse on an eight-
game losing streak. Texas was
playing without its two top scor-
ers, Chassidy Fussell and Nneka
Enemkpali, who did not make the
trip to Lawrence because of team
violations.
We had a shot to end it at
[Texas] Tech, Henrickson said.
We wanted to make sure we took
care of that business tonight.
Senior Angel Goodrich showed
of her shooting skills, which she
has been working hard on in prac-
tice, going 5-of-7 from long range
against Texas. She has become a
real three-point threat.
Goodrich led the nation in as-
sists per game last season, but she
has focused recently to become a
more aggressive shooter. Te se-
nior point guard is not just look-
ing to add points to her career
scoring; she is thinking about the
reaction of defenders once they
fgure out that she can shoot.
I want to change my game to
where, if their hands are down, I
can hit an open shot, Goodrich
said. Ten they would have to
put more pressure on me, so then
I can drive and dish.
Te frst three-pointer of the
game gave Goodrich 1,000 career
points, joining Monica Engelman
and Carolyn Davis as the third
current Jayhawk to reach the
mark.
Goodrich and Davis both
struggled against Texas Tech,
combining for 18 points. On
Wednesday, against Texas, Davis
scored 18 points on her own while
Goodrich was the leading scorer
with 20 points.
Bonnie Henrickson can pre-
pare her team for its game against
Oklahoma State without counting
the days in between. Her team
will play Oklahoma State this
weekend, hoping to begin a new
streak.
Edited by Sarah McCabe
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
Volume 125 Issue 62 kansan.com Thursday, January 24, 2013
COMMENTARY
By Ben Ashworth
bashworth@kansan.com
back on track
Border War good
for Kansas fans
Womens team snaps losing streak with victory over Texas
Phog consistent with great moments
ryan mccarthy
mmccarthy@kansan.com
Kansas 76, Texas 38
mens BasKeTBall
PAGE 3B
Gameday
max Goodwin
rmgoodwin@kansan.com
KANSAS VS. OKLAHOMA
JANUARY 26TH, 2013
Designed & Illustrated by @calnewby
T
HE
U
NIVERSITY
D
AILY
K
ANSAN
PAGE 4B
Poster
I
t was probably the biggest game
of Kansas regular season. Te
Jayhawks traveled to Te Octa-
gon of Doom to take on a red hot
Kansas State team who was itching
to beat its bitter rival. Te stakes
were enormous as both teams were
undefeated in conference and bat-
tling for frst place in the Big 12.
Kansas States only losses were to
Michigan and Gonzaga while Kan-
sas only loss was a nail biter to
Michigan State.
Tis game was obviously the
headliner of the night, right? It
must have been the featured game
on ESPN.
Wrong.
Te game was on the Big 12 Net-
work.
Te Big 12 Network. Te biggest
game of the Jayhawks season, and
its viewership was the Midwest.
Tats why Kansas needs to swal-
low its pride and play Missouri
again.
No disrespect to the Wildcats.
Tey are an excellent team that plays
solid defense and if they can knock
down their outside shots, they are
capable of beating any team in the
nation. Yes, even the Jayhawks.
But writing kind words about
the Wildcats did not make me
cringe. It did not leave a sour taste
in my mouth. However, if I had
complimented the Missouri Tigers,
I would be desperately seeking the
nearest shower to wash away my
shame. Te hate for the Wildcats is
just not there. And it is because of
the hate for the Tigers that the Bor-
der War would never be televised
on the Big 12 Network. Television
executives would circle that game
immediately and feel confdent
people all over the country would
switch of Here Comes Honey Boo
Boo and watch the game.
I understand that the Tigers, in
laymans terms, dumped us. Tey
were ofered a nice contract with
a thriving football conference and
pranced out the door without so
much as glancing over their shoul-
ders. It seemed they barely even
considered that they were walking
away from one of the storied rival-
ries in basketball.
If the Jayhawks started play-
ing them again, the Jayhawks are
the jilted man who crawls back to
his former paramour, despite her
leaving him for a man who drives
a Rolls Royce and has a nice, full
mustache. And you know what?
Tats true.
But its about more than just
pride. Its about the fans. Its about
tradition. Its about being the big-
ger man. When Tomas Robinson
blocked current Missouri junior
Phil Pressey, and Allen Fieldhouse
registered a decibel that hadnt been
heard since the Manhattan Project.
It showed how much both sides care
about the rivalry. It showed how ev-
ery Border War has the potential to
become a classic in the making.
Maybe it wont be next year or
even the year afer that. However,
the Border War must continue. Te
Missouri game was always high-
lighted, underlined, and circled on
the schedule of even the most ca-
sual fans around the United States.
Te Kansas State game couldnt
even make it on national television.
Its a mantra thats ofen forgot-
ten in college basketball, but it rings
true.
Its about the fans.
Edited by Tyler Conover
Basketball history is every-
where in Allen Fieldhouse. You
can sense the ghosts of Wilt
Chamberlain and Phog Allen
anytime you curl your feet
around the wooden bleachers or
tilt your head up to the rafters
filled with banners. The halls are
bursting with shining trophies,
gigantic murals and, above all
else, memories. Memories from
games only seen in bits on the
flashy video board or grainy
video clips online. Its the 800th
regular season mens basketball
game in Allen Fieldhouse on
Saturday against Oklahoma.
Heres a few memorable
moments from the past 799.
After three years of con-
struction, the Fieldhouse
opened on March 1, 1955, with
a Kansas victory over Kansas
State. The Jayhawks came out
victorious against the Wildcats
with a 77-67 win.
Before Danny Manning, the
schools all-time leading scorer,
left to have a career in the NBA,
he squeezed out a few indel-
ible performances. One of the
best for Manning came against
Digger Phelps and the Fighting
Irish on Feb. 8, 1987. Manning
dropped 40 points that game as
Kansas beat Notre Dame 70-60.
It was Mannings best perfor-
mance in the Phog behind a
42-point effort against Missouri
State later that year.
150 points is a major accom-
plishment in college basket-
ball. But it means even more
when Kansas played a team
like powerhouse Kentucky. The
Jayhawks dropped 80 points in
the first half and went on to
put another 70 points to set the
school record for most points in
a game. The final score: Kansas
150 Kentucky 95.
In his first varsity game
inside Allen Fieldhouse, Wilt
Chamberlain started off his
career with a bang on Dec. 3,
1956. The Jayhawks crushed the
Northwestern Wildcats behind
Chamberlains 52 points. That
record still stands as the most
points scored in a single game
by any Kansas Basketball player.
In one of the more mem-
orable Final Four runs for
Kansas, no game was bigger
than Nick Collisons 24-point,
23-rebound performance that
led the Jayhawks over Texas by
the score of 90-87 on Jan. 27,
2003. For those who watched
on television, this was the game
ESPN commentator Dick Vitale
gave Collision a standing ova-
tion. Also Kansas great Kirk
Hinrich scored 25 points in his
final game at Allen Fieldhouse.
It was a day full of record-
setting accomplishments on
March 3, 2007 when Kansas cam
back from a 12 point deficit
to win 90-86 over the Texas
Longhorns. On that day Kansas
won its 1,900th all-time game
and clinched its 50th confer-
ence title. However, what is
still remembered most is Texas
Kevin Durants 25 point first
half. He finished the game with
a total of 32 points.
Raef Lafrentz, Billy Thomas,
and Kansas won 83-70 over
Oklahoma on Feb. 23, 1998, com-
pleting their careers as Jayhawks
as undefeated at home. There
was also a man by the name
of Paul Pierce who impressed
Oklahoma coach Kelvin
Sampson with his 31-point per-
formance that night.
With the Border War
appearing to be on hold for
the near future, Kansas 87-86
overtime victory over Missouri
proved to be one of the great-
est games in the rivalries his-
tory while also adding to the
lore of the Fieldhouse. As you
might remember, The Jayhawks
overcame a 19-point second half
deficit to force overtime and the
eventual victory.
Edited by Tyler Conover
kansan File Photo
senior guard Tyshawn Taylor shoots over missouris matt Pressey during the frst half
of the game at allen Fieldhouse on Feb. 25, 2012. Taylor scored a total of 24 points
for Kansas during the border war against missouri.
kansan File Photo
tara bryant/kansan
sophomore forward Bunny Williams pushes her way past two defenders on her
way to the basket in Wednesdays game against Texas.
tara bryant/kansan
a trainer wraps freshman guard lamaria Coles fngers after an injury sustained in Wednesdays game against the Texas
longhorns. Cole appeared to be in pain during the repair. she returned to the game to play the last few minutes of Kansas
76-38 win.
COVINGTON, Ky.
A gossip website operator
defended himself Wednesday
against a defamation lawsuit
by arguing that a former
Cincinnati Bengals cheer-
leader featured in posts on
the site is a public figure.
Hooman Karamian, who
goes by the name Nik Richie,
testified in a northern
Kentucky courtroom that
cheerleader Sarah Jones was
on national television and
participated in community
events because of the high-
profile job. Public figures
trying to prove defamation
have a higher burden than
people who arent in the pub-
lic eye.
Richie, 33, also said his
Scottsdale, Ariz.-based web-
site, thedirty.com, is similar
to Facebook, Twitter and
YouTube in the way it fea-
tures user content. Richie
has said the two posts cited
in Jones lawsuit included
text and photos submitted
by people who knew her.
My position is freedom
of speech, and people are
entitled to their own opin-
ion, Richie testified. This is
America.
Jones, a onetime teacher
who pleaded guilty to hav-
ing sex with her 17-year-
old former student, is suing
Richie and the website over
two posts in 2009 that were
unrelated to her relationship
with the teen.
Her attorney, Eric Deters,
is arguing that the posts tar-
nished her reputation as a
teacher and Bengals cheer-
leader before she ever had
a relationship with the teen,
causing her severe emotional
distress.
In the first post in October
2009, Jones is pictured smil-
ing for the camera with a for-
mer kicker for the Bengals.
The caption says she had sex
with every member of the
team.
The second showed her
in a bikini from one of the
Bengals calendars. It claimed
that her ex-husband con-
tracted chlamydia and gon-
orrhea after cheating on her
with more than 50 women,
and that he likely gave it to
her.
Richie, who lives in
Orange County, Calif., with
his wife and 1-year-old
daughter, said in an inter-
view last week that the com-
ments came from someone
who knew Jones and had
access to photos she posted
on Facebook. He said the
only thing he wrote about
Jones was in the second post,
saying, Why are all high
school teachers freaks in the
sacks?
Richies attorney, Alexis
Mattingly, showed jurors
glossy calendar photos of
Jones wearing bikinis and
reminded them that Jones
lied to police, her family and
her bosses about her rela-
tionship with the teenager.
Jones has said repeatedly
that she has only had sex
with two people, her former
husband and the teenager.
Jones pleaded guilty in
October to having sex with
the teen under an agreement
that let her avoid jail time.
The two are still together.
Testimony in the defama-
tion trial is expected to wrap
up Thursday and will include
footage of Richie from an
appearance on The Dr. Phil
Show. The jury could reach
a verdict as early as the after-
noon.
!
?
Q: Who was Ray Lewis frst recorded
NFL sack?
A: Jim Harbaugh

LA Times
TriviA of The dAy

Proud of my husband and the


Pats. By the way, if anyone is bored,
please go to Ray Lewis Wikipedia
page. 6 kids 4 wives. Acquitted for
murder. Paid a family off. Yay. What
a hall of fame player! A true role
model.
Wes Welkers wife
Facebook post (Anna Welker)
Deadspin.com
San Francisco 49ers quarter-
back Colin Kaepernick is the pet
owner of a 100 pound tortoise.
San Fancisco
Chronicle
fAcT of The dAy
The MorNiNG BreW
QuoTe of The dAy
This week in athletics
Thursday Friday Monday Sunday Tuesday Saturday Wednesday
Robinson struggles in the Association
T
homas Robinson is perhaps the
most beloved player in Kansas
basketball history. While stealing
the hearts of basketball fans near and
far, Robinson led the Jayhawks to the
National Championship all while earning
a spot on the first team All-American
squad.
Everyone loves Robinson. All
Robinsons actions, good and bad, were
justifiable in the eyes of any Kansas fan.
It needs no further explanation; everyone
loved Thomas Robinson.
Robinson was selected fifth overall in
the 2012 NBA draft by the Sacramento
Kings. Not much has been heard of the
man since. In short, its been a rough
start.
To start off, Robinson struggled
through summer league, and was ulti-
mately selected to SBnation.coms All
Disappointing-Team.
Bigger news involving Robinson came
when his mid-game frustration resulted
in a viciously angry elbow to the esopha-
gus of Detroit Pistons forward Jonas
Jerebko (not a bad Youtube watch), earn-
ing T-Rob a two-game suspension.
On Jan. 15, Robinson wrecked his
beautiful (and expesnive) Porsche
Panamera on a concrete median in
Sacramento following a win over the
Cleveland Cavaliers. Robinson was a
little late executing a right turn, and
proceeded to pretty-well deface the
front of the Porsche. The vehicle was
left straddling on the foot-high concrete
divide. Kings fans had plenty of fun with
comments relating to Robinson lane
troubles.
Most recently on Saturday, Robinson
was the victim of an unintentional
Ramon Sessions elbow to the kisser.
Robinson was still able to play Monday
despite an 11-stitch patch-up-job.
As for a performance review, Robinson
hasnt exactly been exceeding the expec-
tations of the Kings organization or
himself. Robinson has averaged only 4.5
points and 15 minutes per game, but
T-Rob is certain hes getting there.
It just took me a little longer than the
rest of them, said Robinson referring to
the progress of other NBA rookies. But
Im back on track.
With Robinson getting limited min-
utes, Kings head coach Keith Smart has
made Robinsons objective clear.
Try to be an efficient player in the
minutes that you have, Smart said. And
I think so far over the [recent] games,
hes played well with what he does well
already.
Robinsons NBA career has been
everything but smooth so far, and in all
honesty, no NBA doings will be able to
taint the legacy left by the Team F.O.E.
co-president. But as for now, lets hold on
to the older memories.
Edited by Laken Rapier
By Chris Hybl
editor@kansan.com
vs. Oklahoma
3 p.m.
Lawrence
vs. West Virgina
8 p.m.
Morgantown, W. Va.
Mens basketball
Mens basketball
vs. Oklahoma State
8 p.m.
Lawrence
vs. Iowa State
7 p.m.
Lawrence
Womens basketball
Womens basketball
Jayhawk Classic
All Day
Lawrence
Track No Events Scheduled No Events Scheduled
No Events Scheduled
CRIMe
Ex-cheerleader sues gossip website
AssociATed Press
Sarah Jones, a former teacher
and Cincinnati Ben-Gal cheer-
leader, was convicted of having
sex with her 17-year-old student.
AssociATed Press
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ThursdAy, JANuAry 24, 2013 PAGe 2B The uNiversiTy dAiLy KANsAN
Romero Osby, Forward
The senior has
led Oklahoma in
scoring its past
fve games, aver-
aging 19.2 points
during that span.
The 6-foot-8
Osby is one of the
best free throw
shooting big men
in the conference at 82 percent and has
been to the charity stripe twice as often
as any other Sooner. Look for him to use
his 232-pound frame to try and bully Jeff
Withey and Kevin Young down low in-
stead of going straight up into Witheys
taller frame.
PAGE 3B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013
OPPONENt
(13-4, 4-1)
StARtERS
Jelon hornbeak, Guard
Hornbeak has scored only 10 points in the Soon-
ers past three games and is averaging only 4.4
points per game during conference play. The fresh-
man doesnt do anything especially poorly, but its
clear he is still adjusting to Division I basketball.
The four-star recruit is second on the team with
19 steals on the season, and his 1.0 assist-to-
turnover ratio is second among Oklahoma start-
ers and fourth on the team overall.

buddy hield, Guard


Denmon has been in the discussion for Nation-
al Player of the Year for most of the season and is
a near shoe-in for frst team All-Big 12. He aver-
ages 17.2 points per game, good enough for fourth
in the Big 12. Hes had three 30-point games this
season. Denmon is the biggest offensive weapon
for Tiger coach Frank Haith, but he isnt immune
to an off-night, fnishing with six points in two
Big 12 games.

Steven PledGer, Guard


The older brother of Phil, Matt Pressey trans-
ferred to Missouri from Navarro Community Col-
lege before last season. Hes started every game
for the Tigers but is sixth on the team in scoring
with just 7.7 pointer per game. Pressey struggles
to shoot the ball with consistency, coming into
the game at 39.1 percent from the feld and 31.5
percent from behind the three-point line.

romero oSby, Forward


English is having a much better year than last
season, when his offensive numbers saw consid-
erable drop-offs across the board. His scoring is
back to 14.1 points per game, like it was his soph-
omore season. He is consistently shooting more
than 50 percent for the frst time in his career. His
three-point shooting is nearly 50 percent as well,
and with more than 100 three-pointers taken,
the number isnt a fuke.

amath mbaye, Forward


Ratliffe is the only forward in Missouris start-
ing fve. He leads the nation in feld goal percent-
age with 75.1 percent. He isnt a volume shooter,
with just three conference games with double-
digit shot attempts.
KANSAS
(17-1, 5-0)
StARtERS
JeFF withey, Center
Withey recorded his seventh double-double of
the season at Kansas State with 11 points and 10
rebounds. Defensively, Witheys dominance of the
paint had a large part in the Jayhawks forcing the
Wildcats to take 30 attempts behind the arc.


eliJah JohnSon, Guard
Kansas State didnt get to see Johnson at his
best, but he certainly bounced back from his 1-11
shooting performance at Texas. The Jayhawks
point guard scored eight points and grabbed four
boards against the Wildcats. Johnson also contin-
ues to be effective at getting the ball to freshman
Ben McLemore.

traviS releFord, Guard


One of the best defenders in college basketball
lived up to his title Tuesday in Manhattan. Releford
forced K-States Rodney McGruder into taking nine
of his 12 shots from three. The senior would also
go on to score 12 points for the fourth time in fve
games.

ben mClemore, Guard


Kansas best pro prospect continues to impress.
McLemore rattled off another 11 points against K-
State and came up with two blocks in transition.
McLemore has now scored in double fgures in 16
of Kansas 18 matches, averaging 16.1 points.
The freshman tossed up just seven feld goals due
to foul trouble. That should be the only reason he
shoots that few again.

kevin younG, PoSition


It was defnitely a game to forget for Kevin
Young on Tuesday. Kansas energy spark was a bit
fried going 1-6 from the feld and having trouble
fnishing at the rim. Yet hes proven to be key in late
game stretches and gets good looks in the paint.

OKLAhOmA
tIPOff
NO. 3 KANSAS VS. OKLAhOmA
3 P.m., ALLEN fIELD hOUSE, LAwRENcE
KANSAS
tIPOff
withey
Phog set to host 800th game
Kansas aims to stay unbeaten in conference play
cOUNtDOwN tO tIPOff
GAME
DAY
blake Schuster and Geoffrey Calvert
At A GLANcE
QUEStION mARK
PLAYER tO wAtch
Osby
After three sub .500 seasons, Okla-
homa is in position to halt its slide from
the Big 12s upper echelon with its 13-4
record. Second-year coach Lon Kruger is
a proven winner, with 507 career victo-
ries, 13 NCAA Tournament appearances
and a Final Four with Florida in 1994.
Kruger coached Kansas State from
1986-1990 and took UNLV to the NCAA
Tournament four times in his fnal fve
seasons in Las Vegas before accepting
the Oklahoma job. The Sooners have won
six of their past seven games, but lost
a head-scratcher to Stephen F. Austin in
Norman, Okla. in mid-December.
Which Steven Spledger will
show up?
The senior is the Sooners most ex-
perienced player, but he is scoring fve
points per game fewer than he did his
junior campaign. He hasnt scored more
than 12 points during conference play.
But he led Oklahoma in scoring in the
fnal three outings before conference
play began, including games of 17 and
18 points. Osby will get his points, and
either MBare or Hield will likely score in
double fgures as well. But if Oklahoma
wants to pull off the almost mystical
Allen Fieldhouse upset, it must get pro-
duction from another player. Pledger is
the best candidate.
At A GLANcE
PLAYER tO wAtch
QUEStION mARK
The Jayhawks defense has been the
difference maker in the last four games
for Kansas as the offense continues to
work through its slump. Kansas has held
opponents to less than 60 points during
that stretch but has struggled to score
60 itself. There were some encouraging
signs against Kansas State (45 percent
shooting), but its not all clicking just
yet.
Perry Ellis, Forward
Ellis has been
riding a large
wave of confdence
through Kansas
last three games,
combing for 18
points and 17 re-
bounds. He has
provided a nice
option for coach
Bill Self off the bench and has seen his
minutes increase recently. Hes due for a
breakout game.
What will it take for the of-
fense to return to its most pro-
ductive level?
Kansas coach Bill Self has used a va-
riety of lineups, but it doesnt seem like
hes found the right formula yet. Keeping
Ben McLemore and Jeff Withey out of foul
trouble will certainly help.
Ellis
Johnson
Releford
mcLemore
Young
hornbeak
hield
Pledger
Osby
mBaye
PREDIctION:
Kansas 72, Oklahoma 58
baby Jay will weeP iF...
Everything goes completely wrong.
The Sooners are frmly entrenched in the
middle of the Big 12 in every statisti-
cal category except free throw percent-
age, where they are second. Along with
a loss to Stephen F. Austin, Oklahoma
beat 10-8 Oral Roberts by one point and
11-6 Northwestern State by four points.
If Kansas can overwhelm Osby inside,
Oklahoma should have no chance to win.
If Osby scores a career high, the game
could stay way more interesting that it
ever needed to be. But even that might
not be enough.
BY thE NUmBERS
507-324
Lon Krugers career head
coaching record, with stops at
Texas Pan-American, Kansas
State, Florida, Illinois, UNLV and
Oklahoma.
4.76
Te number of three-point feld
goals Oklahoma makes per game,
ninth in the Big 12.
3
Consecutive losing seasons for
the Sooners afer 28 straight win-
ning seasons.
biG Jay will Cheer iF...
Kansas opens up with a big run
and gets the bench active early.
Oklahoma has started receiving top
25 votes, and a painful loss at Allen
Fieldhouse could knock out that
idea. Te Sooners handled Texas
and Oklahoma rather handily, but
have not experienced a team this
year like Kansas.

BY thE NUmBERS
21
Jef Withey (78) has 21 blocks
more than Oklahoma Sooners (57)
17
Naadir Tarpe has hit 17 of his
50 three-point attempts
37
Te Jayhawks national rank for
rebounds per game (38.8)
PAGE 6B thE UNIVERSItY DAILY KANSAN thURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013
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save this semesters basketball posters for each home
game starting with #7 and ending with #13 and youll be
entered to win a prize that all hawks fans will love.
look for the posters number at
the bottom right to ensure youve
got em all. Begin with #7.
Thursday, January 24, 2013
Senior guard Angel Goodrich
came into the game against the
Texas Longhorns needing only
four points to reach the 1,000-
point milestone.
After an early bucket, Goodrich
was only a field goal away from
being the 26th player in Kansas
womens basketball history to reach
the milestone.
Then with under 10 minutes
left in the first half, Goodrich fired
a three from the wing.
The ball hit the front of the
rim, took a backspin to the top of
the glass, then came back down
to hit the side of rim to finally fall
through the nylon net inside Allen
Fieldhouse.
The shot was just like, Finally.
Ive been working on my shot
the last few days. The first two I
missed, and they were pretty hard
misses, Goodrich said. So when
that one popped up high, I was
like, Wow, and when it went in, I
was like, Finally it went in.
With a smile running down the
court, Goodrich joined her two
senior teammates Carolyn Davis
and Monica Engelman in the
1,000-point club.
To make the moment even
more special for the three seniors,
all three of them accomplished
the milestone on the hardwood of
James Naismith Court inside Allen
Fieldhouse.
Its really cool doing it with
them two, Goodrich said. And
especially since we all did it here
in Allen Fieldhouse, we can look
back and be grateful and honored
to do it.
The trio of 1,000-point scorers
is only the second time in Kansas
history that a team has had three
scorers hit that plateau.
All three players have had their
difficulties and struggles in the
past, whether it was injuries or
poor play. They have had to fight
through everything in their path
in order to be the number 24th,
25th and 26th players to reach the
milestone.
It says a lot about how much
weve worked since the begin-
ning, Davis said. For us to reach
the milestone, it says a lot about
our determination and Im really
proud of her.
Kansas coach Bonnie
Henrickson said it was appropriate
that Goodrich joined her senior
teammates with the milestone,
because they have each helped the
program in their own way.
Its pretty special that theyre in
with so many great players in the
program, Henrickson said.
Goodrichs quest to 1,000 had
been within reach the last two
games, and none more so than last
Saturday against Texas Tech. In
that game against the Red Raiders,
Goodrich needed just 11 points to
reach the plateau.
With it so close, Goodrich made
just 3 of 15 shots, leaving her four
points shy heading into last nights
game. Goodrich said she didnt
even know she was close to the
1,000-point club in her last game,
but being able to get it at home
was a huge bonus.
It is special to get in Allen
Fieldhouse. Coming here and
being in front of our loyal fans
and get it in front of them, it feels
great, Goodrich said. Its very
special because so much history
has been made here anyway, and
for me to get here, in front of our
own fans, is a great feeling.
Even though Goodrich was
highly recruited out of high school,
Goodrich said she never thought
she would actually reach the pla-
teau that only an elite group of bas-
ketball players can actually reach.
My first two years, my aver-
age wasnt all that high. So I was
shocked to hear I was close to the
1,000th-point club, Goodrich said.
It wasnt something I was going
for. If it happened, then great.
Edited by Sarah McCabe
PaGE 7B ThE unIVErsITy daILy Kansan
WomEns BasKETBaLL rEWInd
Kansas 76, Texas 38
KEy StatS
The Kansas Jayhawks found their shooting touch as they hit
10-of-21 three pointers. The 10 makes is the eighth most in a
game in Kansas history and tied the second most against a
Big 12 opponent.
10
The Jayhawks held the Texas Longhorns to just 12 points in
one half. That was the third fewest opposing points to be
scored in the frst half in Kansas basketball history.
12
JayhawK Stat LEadErS
rebounds
GardnEr
7
angel Goodrich, Senior Point Guard
not only did the senior point guard have a game-high 20
points on 7-of-12 shooting and 5-of-7 from behind the arc.
she also added six assists and fve rebounds. But the reason
this will be remembered for the 54 point guard hit the 1,000
point milestone. When she got her second bucket to fall, she
became the 26th player in Kansas Jayhawk history to reach that
plateau.
GaME to rEMEMbEr
so when it popped up high, I was like wow,
and when it went in, I was like fnally, it went
in.
angel Goodrich on her bucket to 1,000
46| 30 76
Kansas
12 | 26 38
texas
GaME to forGEt
QuotE of thE GaME
Goodrich
Lamaria Cole, freshman Point Guard
The high sprung freshman guard got to see some play time
as the Jayhawks stretched their lead throughout the entire
game. But when Cole was in there, she had a rough time try-
ing to play within the system and at a good speed. In just 11
minutes, she had six turnovers. The future looks bright, but for
this game its more of a learning curve.
Cole
Goodrich
Points
GoodrICh
20
assists
GoodrICh
6
oPPonEnt
KanSaS
Player
GiGi Mazionyte
sara Hattis
I. McGee-stafford
empress Davenport
Celina Rodrigo
Kayla Brewer
Brady sanders
nadia Taylor
Totals
Pts
5
3
8
6
0
5
3
8
38
FG-FGa
2-8
1-8
3-11
3-8
0-4
2-6
1-7
3-3
15-55
rebs
4
2
8
3
3
8
2
3
39
a
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
5
Tos
5
2
4
4
6
2
3
2
28
Player
Chelsea Gardner
Carolyn Davis
angel Goodrich
Monica engelman
natalie Knight
asia Boyd
CeCe Harper
Bunny Williams
Totals
Pts
4
18
20
11
5
6
2
2
76
FG-FGa
2-6
7-8
7-12
5-10
2-7
2-6
2-3
1-3
29-57
rebs
7
6
5
1
4
5
0
2
36
a
1
1
6
1
5
2
1
0
17
Tos
1
2
2
1
0
3
0
3
21
naThan FordyCE
nfordyce@kansan.com
Goodrich becomes 26th player
to reach 1,000-point milestone
Tara BryanT/Kansan
Freshman guard Lamaria Cole moves past a Texas defender on her way to the
basket in Wednesdays game. Cole scored two points in her 11 minutes on the court.
Tara BryanT/Kansan
senior guard angel Goodrich hustles downcourt after a steal during Wednesdays
game against Texas. Goodrich had two points and six assists in addition to scoring
20 points for Kansass 76-38 win.
Tara BryanT/Kansan
sophomore forward Chelsea Gardner tangles herself in the arms of a Texas
player in an attempted steal in Wednesdays game. Gardner had a team-high of
six steals in the 76-38 win.
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SPRINGFIELD, Mo. So
much for assuming this was sup-
posed to be a rebuilding year for
Wichita State.
Cleanthony Early had 17 points
and 11 rebounds, Carl Hall added
15 points and the 20th-ranked
Shockers rallied for a 62-52 victory
over Missouri State on Wednesday
night.
Te Bears, behind freshman
Gavin Turman, used a 19-1 run
to take a 33-25 lead with 16:13 re-
maining in the game.
Te Shockers came away empty
on their frst fve possessions of the
second half then Early and Hall got
more active in the ofense, scoring
all but two of the points in a 16-2
run that gave Wichita State a 41-35
lead with 10:53 to go.
We werent going very strongly
(in the frst half). It didnt remind
me of the guys I had seen on Sat-
urday, said Wichita State coach
Gregg Marshall, referring to the
Shockers win over Creighton. But
in the second half, they changed
that.
Te Shockers won despite their
fourth-lowest scoring output of
the season.
Teres going to be some physi-
cal play and theres going to be
some holds and some grabs and
some body-slamming in the Val-
ley, Marshall added. Teyve got
to know that. Tats what I told
Cleanthony I said, Youre the
new guy. Tis is the way we play,
so youve got to adjust.
Te Shockers (18-2, 7-1 Mis-
souri Valley Conference), who
were playing just days afer up-
setting then-No. 12 Creighton,
remained in frst place in the con-
ference.
Turman had 21 points to lead
Missouri State (5-15, 3-5), which
lost its fourth straight before a
crowd of 6,448.
It was the third straight win for
the Shockers, who were supposed
to be in a rebuilding year afer
winning the conference regular-
season title a year ago.
Te Shockers won again with-
out two injured starters, Ron Bak-
er (foot) and Evan Wessel (hand).
It was Halls third game back since
he missed seven games because of
a broken thumb on his shooting
hand.
Tey just told me to run the
foor, sit in and keep playing, Hall
said.
He later added, I was just try-
ing to make stronger moves.
Missouri State trailed by 12
points with about 5:15 lef before
halfime, but Turman took over
games next 9 minutes to take a 33-
25 lead.
Turman made two free throws
and later hit a jumper afer a tim-
eout, got a steal before knocking
down a 3-pointer and scored on a
tip-in.
Thursday, January 24, 2013 PaGE 8B ThE unIVErsITy daILy Kansan
With four months in between
competitions, the Kansas rowing
team traveled to Tampa, Fla., for
its winter training trip. The team,
which last competed on Nov. 4,
practiced 18 times during its 10
days in Tampa.
The team emphasized keeping
in shape before the trip, so it could
work on the mechanics during the
training.
It was important that everyone
workout at the start of the break
so that when we went on the trip
we could focus on technical parts
of rowing and not fitness, senior
Olivia Kinet said in a Kansas ath-
letics news release. We told the
team that if they were not doing
the work in their free time they
were falling behind the rest of the
teams in the country.
Kinet, an All-Conference USA
selection last year, was among the
52 members of the team who made
the trip. Head coach Rob Catloth
said they spent much of the time
working on being coaches during
competition.
There are no timeouts in row-
ing so part of this is teaching them
how to fix things on their own in
the heat of battle, Catloth said in a
Kansas athletics news release. Im
also seeing improved depth. Many
of our sophomores and juniors
are making big strides in their
improvement.
The team will not be able to
practice again for a few weeks due
to the weather. The first compe-
tition during the spring semes-
ter, the Oklahoma Invite, starts
on March 8 and ends on March
10. Other competitions include the
Big 12 Championships on May
4 in Kansas City, Kan., and the
Conference USA Championships
on May 18 in Oak Ridge, Tenn.
This is the most confident we
have been heading into the sea-
son, Kinet said. This is the best
I have ever seen us perform. Our
attitude is right and we are in a
position to accomplish our goals
in the spring.
Edited by Hayley Jozwiak
rowing Mens basketball
nCaa
Kansas expects to start
spring season off strong
sTELLa LIanG
sliang@kansan.com
Dukes worst loss in years
brings Hurricane fans joy
shockers win after weak frst half
CORAL GABLES, Fla. With a
steady din coming from the sea of
orange behind the visitors basket,
No. 1-ranked Duke had a tough
time making a shot.
Te Blue Devils went more than
8 minutes without a feld goal in
the frst half Wednesday night, and
a sellout became a blowout for No.
25 Miami, which delighted a bois-
terous crowd with a 90-63 victory.
Te defeat was the third-worst
ever for a No. 1 team, and Dukes
worst in nearly fve years.
Durand Scott scored a season-
high 25 points for the Hurricanes,
and Kenny Kadji added a season-
high 22. Shane Larkin had 18
points, 10 rebounds and fve assists,
and Durham, N.C. native Julian
Gamble had 10 rebounds and four
blocked shots.
Miami (14-3, 5-0 Atlantic Coast
Conference) beat a No. 1 team for
the frst time, taking control with a
stunning 25-1 run midway through
the opening half. Te Blue Devils
missed 13 consecutive shots de-
spite numerous good looks, while
four Hurricanes hit 3-pointers dur-
ing the run that transformed a 14-
13 defcit into a 38-15 lead.
Duke (16-2, 3-2) fell to 0-2 when
playing on an opponents court.
Te Blue Devils other loss came at
North Carolina State, a defeat cost
them the No. 1 ranking.
Tey regained the top spot this
week but seemed rattled by the ca-
pacity crowd, only the 10th in 10
years at Miamis on-campus arena.
Students began lining up for seats
outside the arena almost 24 hours
before tipof, a rarity for the atten-
dance-challenged Hurricanes.
But South Florida loves a winner,
and the Hurricanes are alone atop
the league standings. Tey won
their sixth consecutive game and
beat Duke for the second straight
time but only the fourth time in
the 19-game series.
Seth Curry, Tyler Tornton and
Quinn Cook went a combined 1
for 29 for the Blue Devils, who shot
a season-low 30 percent. Rasheed
Sulaimon led them with 16 points.
Duke went 4 for 23 from 3-point
range, while Miami went 9 for 19
and shot 57 percent overall.
A Duke mistake early in the sec-
ond half had coach Mike Krzyze-
wski red-faced and on the court,
screaming at his team. But he
couldnt inspire a turnaround.
Over-rated, the fans chanted
with 3 minutes lef. When the game
ended, they poured onto the court
and mobbed their team.
assocIaTEd PrEss
assocIaTEd PrEss
Duke head coach Mike krzyzewski, center, watches the fnal minutes of an nCaa college basketball game against Miami
wednesday in Coral gables, Fla. Miami won 90-63.
assocIaTEd PrEss

KU

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