MUSINGS

A LO N G

The Mystic W ay

by

F ra.

Thor Kiimalehto, F.R.C.

First Secretary'General of A M O R C

MUSINGS
A LO N G

The Mystic W ay

by

F ra.

Thor Kiimalehto, F.R.C.

First Secretary'General of A M O R C

T H O R K I I M A L E H T O , K. R. C.
F rater Kiiraalehto has the distinction of being one of the oldest members, in point of time, in the Rosicrucian O rder since its re-establishment in North America. H e w as an active co­ w orker of the Imperator when the Supreme Lodge w as located in N ew York City twenty years ago. He was the first G rand Master of the O rder during its present cycle, and he directed the publication of the former American Rosae Crucis magazine, and headed the Pub­ lishing Department of the O rd e r at that time. He is now a Grand Councilor and Inspector General of the Order. In F rater Kiimalehto is exemplified a rare combination of business ability and mystical temperament. He has also been a member for many years of the Freemasonic and Martinist Orders. ( Courtesy o f T he Rosicrucian Digest.)

Page I I 8

THE R O SIC R U C IA N FO RU M
D e c . ^ 3 7

ried on by the Rosicrucian Order. Finally one of the most advanced of research w orkers present mentioned the fact that the great “ W h i te M o n a ' stery” w as undoubtedly releasing again m any of its valuable documents for the instruction and guidance of th e tru e seeker. O u r F ra ter wishes to know more about the “ W h i te M onastery.” If it w ere not fo r the fact th a t during th e coming year there may ap p e ar in certain mystical publications, and in some learned books by historians and r e ­ search workers, fu rth e r mention of th e name “ W h i te M onastery,” I w ould hesitate to bring the subject before all of our members in this manncr, because I am very definitely limited in w hat I may say about the W h i t e M onastery. B ut since there may be a great many others in o u r Forum family w h o will hear the term and be tem pted to w rite to o u r various departm ents asking for furth e r information, I w ould like to ta k e this o p po r­ tu n ity to avoid this correspondence by stating that it is impossible for any of us to say anything about the W h i t e M onastery in any letter or printed form. Those w ho should know about it, do know about it, and those w h o do n ot know anything about it at th e present time are not ready to know anything if they are to know a n y ­ thing at all. M ore than this I may n ot say.

through functioning on the Cosmic plane. F ra te r Kiimalehto became th e first G ra n d M aster of the N e w York G ra n d Lodge of A M O R C , and later became the first N o r t h A m erican Inspector G e n ­ eral of the Order. It w as he w ho made such elo­ quent appeal in behalf of the establishment o f the N ational Lodge of o u r O rder, by which those living in small cities and communities w ould have a very large portion of our instruction and secret guidance through correspondence; and at the first National C onvention held in Pittsburgh in 1917 the charter granted by the Supreme Council w ith the vote and approval of the entire C onvention was granted to F ra ter Kiimalehto, making him the first M aster or director of the N ational Lodge. His indefatigable w ork in behalf of the O rd e r ever since, has resulted most logically an d n a t u r ­ ally in his appointm ent to the position of A ctin g G ra n d M aster during th e incapacity of o u r be­ loved G ra n d M a ster Clement Le Brun. T o all of us at H eadquarters w ho have k no w n of the deep, sincere, loyal attitude, and p rofound interest of T h o r Kiimalehto in everything tru ly Rosicrucian, it certainly does seem thrilling and significant once more to see those same intriguing and im portan t initials signed again to im portant A M O R C documents.

O u r B eloved “ T . K .”
N o w that o u r beloved F rater T h o r Kiimalehto, F. R. C., is w ith us again at H eadqu arters in San Jose as “ A c tin g G ra n d M aster,” his familiar and greatly valued letters signed w ith his full name or w ith the initials T . K. will become of great in ­ terest and value. M a n y years ago letters, docu­ ments, cards of special identification, and other papers w e re signed by him w ith his familiar ini­ tials, and throughout the past tw e n ty years his initials have appeared in connection w ith a few articles, or a few secret documents issued by him in behalf of the O rder. F ra ter Kiimalehto, as a p rofound student and active w o rk e r in F re e ­ masonry, and as a M artinist and member of sev­ eral secret mystery schools, first associated h im ­ self w ith me in 1915 and helped me to establish the first active Supreme Council of our O rd e r to supplant the one th a t had been at w ork on a foundation for a revival of A M O R C since 1909. H is many contacts w ith prom inent persons throug hout the country, and his membership in certain circles with w hich I w as also identified brought him in contact w ith the legate and emis­ sary from India who presented to me some of the most im portant documents of au thority now pos­ sessed by o u r organization, and th e three of us constituted a secret sacred triangle that was changed only by the transition o f the legate from India, w ho nevertheless has continued assisting

S everal N ew B ooks
I feel rather strange in standing before the F orum this afternoon and announcing tw o n ew books w ritte n by myself. But, after all, every author and every w riter has to tell someone about the new book he has w ritten or it will never get into circulation. If he is a private individual he will take it to a publisher or to a printer, and tell him about it, and perhaps succeed in getting it in printed form so that th ere may be a few readers of it. C ertain it is that if an a uth or does not feel that his book has a message in it for someone else other th a n himself, and does n ot feel that h e should announce the existence o f the book, he does have one good reason for keeoing silent and hiding the book in the bottom of his trunk. O f course, it is not every author w h o can make his announcem ent to thousands of persons at one time and find many of them anxious to read w h a t he has w ritten. P erhaps I am a little boastful now, and a little egotistical, b ut I hapDen to know that in the case of one of these new books there have been hundreds n o t only w anting it, b u t scores w ho have sent money to the A M O R C Supply D ep a rtm en t for the book even before its first chapter was entirely completed, and that in the case o f the second book it was purposely w ritte n to answer a dem and for th e i n ­ formation it contains. So, after all, I may be ex­ cused for speaking about my own tw o new books.

THE R O SIC R U C IA N FORUM ~

Page I 1 9

the. universe or a large portion of it, it will be because C o d and the Heavenly Hosts and the Cosmic have sanctioned it, and decreed it, and supported it, a n d w a n t it, and in such a case I will willingly submit to it because an intelligence, superior to my own, will have willed it. A n d in that case, the p ow er and influence that will be exerted will be good and loving and merciful and just, because G o d would decree and sponsor nothing less.

O u r Sove reig n G ra n d M a s te r
W e have h ad a number of questions come to the Forum recently regarding o u r Sovereign G r a n d M aster. Some w a n t to know how to pronounce his n am e correctly, some w a n t to know how old he is or where he was born and so forth. A lth o u g h I have know n him intimately for tw en ty -tw o years or more, I have found him very reluctant to give any interesting outline of his past life in a n y connected form. H e is very modest and retiring in this regard, and I doubt if he ever w ould have done w h a t I have recently done in presenting a biographical sketch of his y o u th fu l life here in this incarnation. B u t I may say a few things th a t I know are interesting, and to which I am su re he will n ot object. First of all, his nationality is Finnish, and Finland represents his Fatherland. H e w as born on A u g u st 30, 1877. H is name is T h o r Kiimalehto. T h e last name is pronounced as though it were spelled Kee-mah-let'-oh.” H e is familiarly called “ B rother Kiim” by his intimate companions here and he very often signs his official notations with the brief w o rd “ Kiim.” W h e n these fo u r letters are w ritten in handw riting, the w o rd is often mistaken for “ K u m ” w ith tw o dots over the “ u” . H e has been deeply interested in mysticism an d occultism since a young man, a n d v ery early in life became an initiate of the M a rtin ist O rder and a Freemason. H e is still an active member of the Freemasonic F raternity and still a member of the M artin ist O rd e r, and his pastimes and hob­ bies have been research w ork in the fields of philosophy, mysticism, occultism, ritualism, and oriental literature. By profession he became an expert ty p o g rap h e r and finally an expert printer in the field of the highest grade p rin tin g done in A merica, and u p to the time of his coming to San Jose to w ork w ith us permanently, he w as en ­ gaged by some of the leading book publishing and other business houses in N e w Y ork as an advisor, designer and cre ator o f n ew typographical effects. I t was in connection w ith the first plans I made for unusually good printing m atter in connection w ith the earliest publications issued by me re­ lating to the re-establishment of the O rd e r here in America in 1914-1915 that I came in contact

w ith Brother Kiim, and realizing at once, as he did, that the Rosicrucian O rd e r and M artinist O rd e r had always been affiliated, his deep inter­ est in these fields o f study was instantly awakened and he threw his entire heart and mind into co­ operation w ith me in laying the foundation for the new cycle of Rosicrucianism in Am erica and became my earliest com panion and co-worker. T h ro u g h o u t all these years h e has been an active w orke r and supporter of A M O R C here in N o rth America, often silently and efficiently carrying on secret and confidential w ork, and on occasions making public addresses and directing public lectures and even traveling to various cities in the East, at his ow n expense of time and money, to f u rth e r the interests of the Order. H e became the first G r a n d M a ster of the N a ­ tional Lodge or the correspondence division of our activities, and was honored in this regard at the first N ational C onvention of the Rosicrucians held in Pittsburgh in 1917. H is w ife w as also a member for many years until h er transition, an d his young daughter T h y ra w as the first colombe of the Supreme Lodge in N e w Y ork City, and remained a colombe up until the time of her m ar­ riage. H e has been an Inspector-General o f the O rd e r, and at times has been a S uprem e Secre­ tary, and even G ra n d M a ster of the N e w York jurisdiction. T h ere has always been the closest companionship and sympathetic understanding between us, and I have always found him to be not only a faithful and loyal w orke r but an e n ­ thusiastic one. H e was well acquainted w ith all of the cor­ respondence, the visitations on the p a rt of the first ambassadors of the Rosicrucian O rd e r throughout the world who contacted me in N e w York after my retu rn from Europe, and witnessed many secret conferences an d participated in many private sessions wherein the most im p o rta n t stones of the A M O R C w ere laid in the years 1915 to 1918. M o re than any other individual in th e o r ­ ganization today, he is familiar w ith the earliest activities, the many long hours and days of hard labor and stud y and sacrifices that w ere necessary to establish the organization, and naturally he is the most familiar w ith th e early attacks and criticisms th at were made and the early attem pts that w ere made to wreck and ruin the organiza­ tion on the p a rt of so-called societies and bodies. For these reasons he was well qualified, n ot only in the studies b ut in every oth e r way, to function as Sovereign G ra n d M a ster of the O rder. But until his daughter was married and comfortably settled in her ow n home in N e w Jersey, and he w as free from other business obligations in the East, i t was not convenient o r advisable for him to move to California and become a p a rt of. our staff here at Headquarters.

Page 120

THE R O SIC RU C IA N FO RUM

A s soon as it was known th a t our late Sover­ eign G r a n d Master, Dr. LeBrun, would never be able to return to his office again because o f his age a n d failing health, w e invited Brother Kiim to come and live here in San Jose and be per­ manently' a p a rt o f o u r staff. It required some little time for him to make the necessary a r­ rangements, bu t he finally came, and his hosts of friends throughout the O rder, w ho had met him and enjoyed their contact w ith him, acclaimed him th e right man in the right position, and of course I am personally delighted in the fact th at I have w ith me at m y side, and for consultation an d advice, not only a tru e and loyal friend and associate, arid one well versed in the principles of o u r teachings and the ideals of our organization, b u t one w h o has heen w ith me and a t my side th r o u g h o u t many of my trials and tribulations, an d m a n y of my glorious experiences and happy hours. W h e n e v e r visitors come to H eadquarters to visit Rosicrucian Park, if they call at the A d ­ m inistration Building during the hours of the daytim e, they are always welcomed by Brother Kiim to go into his sanctum and have a personal an d cheerful interview w ith him — unless he is engaged a t the time in the preparation of the lec­ tures w hich he has to send to all of the Masters of C h a p te rs an d Lodges throughout the country, o r in answering his large mail, or in conducting some ceremonies in the Tem ple, or otherwise de­ voted to some routine activity that must be per­ formed a t certain definite hours of each day and each week. But usually by w aiting an hour or so, or sp ending that period in visiting the M useum and o th e r buildings here at Rosicrucian Park, the visitor is sure of a personal interview which B ro th e r Kiim welcomes, and in which he finds sincere delight and pleasure, as do all of us w h e n ­ ever these interviews are possible. A fte r the close o f the day there are certain nights of the w eek w h e n he is occupied here w ith T em ple cere­ monies or scientific research or some other activi­ ties w hich prevent personal interviews, and on oth e r nights of the week he seeks the necessary relaxation, meditation, hours of study and investi­ gation w hich all of us must have to keep u p w ith o u r w ork, b u t which w e find it more difficult to enjoy o r obtain as each week of the year pass­ es by.

C h e a p e r C ost o f L iv in g in California
T h is afternoon I w a n t to take u p w ith the F orum a m a tte r that is n ot altogether Rosicrucian in n atu re , and yet it is one th a t seems to be of great interest to many of o u r members through­ ou t N o r t h and South America. Members con­ stantly w rite to us and ask w hether it is true that

the cost of living is cheaper in California th a n in most p arts of th e U nited States. In answer to this question, o f course, we m ust agree that there are several essential fundamentals in the cost of living th a t are cheaper on this Pacific Coast. In the first place, the absence o f snow, sleet, and ex­ tremely low tem peratures throughout the w inte r makes it unnecessary to buy many tons of coal an d have extremely heavy overcoats and u n d e r ­ w ear a n d many other things that are needed w h ere there is a long period of bitterly cold w inte r weather. T his afternoon, December 29, while all of us are celebrating more or less the spirit of the holi­ days between Christm as and N e w Year, the w in ­ dow to my sanctum is w ide open and th e su n ­ shine is pou ring into my office here, and m y very companionable dog is lying in a patch of sunlight near the door w atching me carry on, and making sure th a t I do n o t stroll around outdoors or throug h other p arts of the building w ith o u t h a v ­ ing him accompany me. W e can walk out of our doors today, as w e have been all of th e past weeks, an d as w e did on Christmas D ay, w ithou t overcoats, and look at the flowers blooming and the green lawns th a t remain green throughout the w inter, and adm ire the beautiful sky and the w arm sunshine. T h e n again, th e fact that there is more than one crop of fruits and vegetables each year means that w e have an abundance of fruits and vege­ tables, an d th a t means th a t w e have lower costs for these things th a n in sections of the country where there is only one crop a year, and where fruits and vegetables become scarce and high priced in the wintertime. M a n y forms of amusement are lower in price, because it is too easy here througho ut the w inter, as well as the summer, to get into our automobiles an d ride am ong beautiful scenery or to the sea­ shore or the m ountains and enjoy n atu re and o ut­ door pleasures, instead of paying high prices to sit in stuffy theaters and partake of other forms of amusement. W e can even enjoy our meals by sitting an d eating in open-air restaurants instead of in costly and closed places. F or only a nominal expense w e can go to the seashore and indulge in all kinds of inexpensive amusement th a t w ould cost a great deal o f money if w e tried to dupli­ cate it in other states at the same time of the year. T h e n w e must remember th a t California has an abundance of fruits and vegetables upon which the persons living here prefer to live, and live happily and healthfully. Because it is so tempting to live on fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the year, the average individual does n ot crave a large am o unt of meat, and this has resulted in the western m eat houses being forced to keep the prices of meat at a reasonable figure in order to

Page 162

TH E R O SIC R U C IA N FORUM ^ tw v e , \ c) 3.S

Greetings!
V
D
ear

V

V
and he served in th a t capacity for a num ber of years, finally becoming G ra n d M aster of the N e w Y o rk jurisdiction and then rising to his present high position. A tw enty-third anniversary is not much of a celebration. T h e r e are many organizations, many movements, many national and state affairs in this co untry th a t have had one hun d red and tw enty-third birthdays,- or seventy-fifth birthdays. In comparison w ith them, a tw enty-third birth­ day is the birthday of an infant. B ut it is to be noted th a t there is no other metaphysical organ­ ization, no o th e r organization pretending to be or actually dem onstrating itself to be, a channel an d representative of the G re a t W h i te B rother­ hood, that has ever had a tw enty-third birthday, o r that is a fraction of th e age of A M O R C . M a n y of these so-called mystical, occult, m eta­ physical and spiritual cults or movements come one year and disappear th e next. A few of them have survived tw o birthdays and then disappeared into oblivion. O n e or tw o of them have slowly diminished over a period of three or four years an d then disappeared. N o n e of them has re­ mained active and increasingly active for five years. T h e A M O R C today may be an infant in age as compared w ith older A m erican founda­ tions, b u t it is a husky, growing in fa n t that has every reason to believe th a t it will continue to grow for another hun d red years, or a little less, when it will take on its te m porary cycle of outer inactivity, and remain a closed, inner, secret organization. In the tw enty-three years it has been active before the A m erican public, the A M O R C of this W e s te rn W o r l d has battled m any storms because of the superstitions, the doubts and skepticisms of learned persons, an d the conservative attitude of those w'ho had been deceived and misled by pre­ tending organizations. T h e A M O R C has care­ fully avoided an y semblance of cultism, any in ­ dulgence in fanaticism, any conduct that could be misinterpreted or properly considered as scan­ dalous or unmoral. I t has deliberately and con­ sistently avoided and evaded anything and every­ thing that dealt w ith delicate subjects of morals or sex subjects. I t has consistently refrained from religious and political controversies. I t has upheld an d maintained the dignity of the -ancient tradi­ tions and ideals of the Rosicrucian O rder, and it has diligently, sincerely and profoundly prac­ ticed the principles w hich it teaches, and dem on­ strated to the w o rld that its principles do work

F

ratres a n d

So r o r e s :

T oday, as I prepare these greetings for the June issue of the Forum magazine, I realize th a t it is the first of A pril, 1938. M y secretaries and the F orum E ditor are at w ork preparing extracts from all of o u r Forum discussions of the last few days an d p repa rin g for other discourses during the next few weeks to appear in this June issue of the F orum magazine. But as I sit here in my sanctum today, on A pril 1, I am mindful of the fact that just tw enty-three years ago on A pril 1, 1915, there w as held a meeting in the C ity of N e w Y ork composed of about sixteen men and women w h o had made a very careful study of all of the preliminary plans and teachings, principles and docum ents of the Rosicrucian Order, and who had pledged their cooperation and assistance in m aintaining the Rosicrucian O rd e r in America. O u t of this number, those assembled on A p ril 1, 1915, w as formed the first Supreme Council of the A M O R C in the U nited States for the new cycle. T h e re had been a few other preliminary meetings, particularly one on F ebruary 8 of the same year w h e n an official manifesto was issued proclaiming th e establishment of the O rd e r for the n ew cycle, and there had been previous meetings for the examination of documents and papers received from France and India, and many eminent men an d women, including Elbert H ubbard and Ella W h e e l e r W ilcox, D r. Julia Seton and others, had gone over all of the plans and suggestions th a t I had brought back w ith me from E urope an d w hich I had received during the years 1909 to 1915. I t required a num ber of years of careful translation and interpretation of all of the ancient documents, constitution, by-laws and fundamental teachings before a definite step tow ard the m a­ terialization of the revival of the organization could be made. In fact, the years 1909 to 1915 w ere the most intense in regard to analytical stu d y and research. T h e valued assistance I had in those years will never be forgotten, and w hen the climax came on A pril 1, 1915, when the principal w orkers and associates w ho had assisted me formed themselves into the first Supreme Council an d voted upon the perm anent establishment of the first constitutional principles, and the per­ m anent officers of the organization, we felt that th e foundation walls of the great structure had been properly laid. O n th a t occasion F rater Kiimalehto, our present Sovereign G ra nd Master, was elected as Secrctary-General of the Order,

THE R O S IC R U C IA N FORUM

Page 163

and do bring a bout the manifestations th at are claimed for them. In a material sense the organization has g ro w n stronger, sounder, more finan­ cially dependable, and more active in all of the charitable, h u m a n e and educational activities of this country. I t has gradually attracted and com­ m anded the respect and admiration of the highest officials of the government, of men of science and learning, a n d o f institutions a n d organizations th a t are conservative and respected. T h e A M O R C has no t always been inactive or pacific in its a ttitu d e , b u t has been militant in re ­ gard to m atters th a t mislead the innocent and searching minds of the public, and in regard to practices and institutions and principles th a t de­ feat the purposes of evolution, and interfere or tend to in te rfe re w ith the operation of Cosmic laws an d Cosmic manifestations. I may be pardoned for the above outburst of enthusiasm, because admittedly I am proud of w h a t has been accomplished u n d er m y direction in th e present cycle. H o w many m ore years I may be perm itted to be the chief director of the activ­ ities of A M O R C is of little concern to me, as long as I know th a t I have laid a good foundation an d as long as I believe th a t I am adding to that foundation each d ay and preparing for a continu­ ance and p erpe tuation of the w ork w e have al­ ready done a n d have planned to do in the future. I fully believe th a t the continuance an d perp e tu ­ ation an d f u tu r e integrity and soundness of A M O R C is n o t dependen t upon m y personality or m y leadership. I do no t believe and cannot be made to believe that at the time of m y transition th e present so u n d status and high integrity of the organization will be weakened or lessened. There are too m a n y h un dreds of sincere, loyal, a d ­ vanced members and workers ready to give every­ thing they possess and ready to sacrifice even life itself to see th a t the A M O R C continues its glori­ ous w ork, a n d there are too many specially p re­ pared officers a n d associates w ith me here at H ea d q u arters w h o are ready w ith every sacrifice to see th a t th e present ideals, th e present teach­ ings, the present fundamentals and the present standards o f the organization, including all of its material assets th ro u g h o u t the country, are main­ tained intact and free from interference by schisms or by individuals. For, unlike o th e r organizations or cults th at are quickly born and soon pass away, the A M O R C is n ot a one-man organization. It is n ot the in ­ vention an d creation of one man. I t is n ot built and m aintained on the theories and ideas of a self-appointed leader. I t is not a movement of glorification of a self-aggrandized hum an being or of a hu m a n idol. I t is something th a t is firmly built in the hearts and souls of m any thousands an d hundreds o f thousands, n ot only in America

bu t throughout the w orld, and some of the most advanced of our members an d the most prepared to continue the great w o rk of this organization are those w ho have been a n d are today the care­ ful readers and members of our F orum magazine an d Forum family. So I look upon each and every one of you who receives this publication every other m onth as a p a rt of the group of those w ho a re sitting w ith me from day to day and week to week in o u r F orum discussions, an d attem pting to adjust your lives and to demonstrate in your lives the p r in ­ ciples and ideals of Rosicrucianism, and I know that such a foundation, such a preparation, such a sincere interest will rem ain a perm anent thing for many years < come. .o Fraternally, H. S p e n c e r L e w is , Imperator.

W a n te d : A H o m e F o r T h is Y o u n g G irl
Some months ago I w ro te an article for our publications commenting o n the ra re privilege that childless men and w om en had of adopting a little child and tu rnin g their homes into a useful haven and heaven. T h e response to my suggestion was very w onderful indeed, and each y ea r w hen I make that suggestion, m a n y childless couples do ad o p t children and help to make some children happy and successful in life. B ut I have before me toda y a request fo r a home. O n e of our members temporarily adopted . a little girl some years ago, a n d now she finds th a t it is necessary to find a n o th e r home fo r this girl. Let me briefly outline th e story: T h e young girl is the d a u g h te r of an American girl an d an Italian arm y officer. T h e parents w ere unmarried, and the y o u n g army officer dis­ appeared. T h ere is n o thing new or strange in that p a rt of the story. T h e m o the r married later, and could no t keep the y o u n g girl in her home, so the grandm other temporarily adopted the child, w ho is now fifteen years old. I t is claimed th a t she is a beautiful and healthy child, of proper normal habits and tendencies, a n d of average intelligence and efficiency in h er school w ork except that she has a very definite leaning tow ard music, especial­ ly the beautiful an d the classic. She has a fairly good voice that promises to be extraordinary if given some development a n d training. U n d o u b t­ edly she has inherited this musical tendency from her Italian father. T h is is something that w ould be expected, and is a perfectly n atura l condition of her inheritance. T h e y oung girl lives a t the present time in A rizona w ith her grandparents. She is healthy and strong, a n d has the appearance

T h e A m erican O rd e r Rosae C ru d s
w e let th e w o rd s "G od is L o v e a n d L o v e is H A T arc th e aim s a n d objects of G o d" be a L I V I N G realization a n d n o t a dead th e O rd e r Rosae C rucis? is a ques­ le tte r o u r lives w ill'“ p u r e r a n d b e tte r fo r the be tion- often asked. T h e a n s w e r 'is so w orld as a whole, for o u r neig h b o rs an d also sim p le and y e t so co m prehensive for o urselves, b rin g in g us n e a r e r perfection. If th a t m a n y volum es could be w r i t­ each a n d e v e ry one of us does n o t accom ­ ten in reply. ,T h e k e y n o te is revo­ plish m o re in this w orld b u t th e conversion lu tio n in a m o ral a n d social sense. A re v o ­ of one b r o th e r or sister o u r life h a s n o t been l u t i o n o r repla ce m en t' of th e d y nam ic driving in vain. T h e tim e will then com e w h e n o u r force in n a tu re . ‘ T h is d y nam ic d riving force force of love has b e c o m e -th e p r e d o m in a tin g is a cre a tio n of-th e cosmic m ind of w h ich you pow er, th e d ynam ic force, the a t o n e m e n t of_ a n d I a r e p a r ts o r atom s. W e a re th e crea­ the spirit of the cosm os, and th e r e su lts w ill to r s a n d i t is u p to us to ch a nge this force, be far different. T h e p ic tu re y o u will th e n or, if y o u please, spirit, if w e find th e results see will be w o rth y o u r w hile to look at. T h is n o t to o u r satisfaction. rep la ce m en t of love fo r fe a r is w h a t w e do in T h e d y n a m ic force w hich h a s beeh p re­ the O rder, n o t th r o u g h do gm atic teachings, b u t d o m in a n t in the cosmic m ind is F E A R . W e th r o u g h education of the individual. W e hold co m e into th e w orld w ith vib ratio n of fear the opinion th a t no te ac hing is p e r m a n e n t th a t c o n tro llin g b u r life force, w e a re held in bonds docs n ot give a th o r o u g h k n ow ledge of cause of fear as children, fear of the rod. fear of t h e , an d effect in all d e p a r tm e n ts of N a tu r e fro m dark , and fear of fa th e r and m othe r. As we the b eginning of life up to the h u m a n species. g ro to o u t o f the childhood fears w e arc con­ In this w ork, u n d e r o u r p re se n t economic fro n te d w ith fears of God and o u r neighbors. conditions, m a n y q u e s tio n s arise th a t m u s t be W e d o r ig h t n o t because w e w a n t to do so, b u t dea lt w ith intelligently, and a m o n g -the fo re­ bec au se w e fear w h a t so and so w o uld say m o st is economics, o r in o th e r w o rd s, to fo r ­ a b o u t us.- F e a r of sta rv a tio n keeps u s w orking a n d fea r of d ea th is alw a y s s ta r i n g us in the ever dispel f e a r of h u n g e r, economic freedom face.. F e a r is -the keynote, fear is the a to n e ­ m u s t be attain ed . M a n y have devised schem es for th e ^ solution of this im p e rtin e n t question m e n t o u r so u ls a re v ib r a tin g to, a n d th e r e ­ s u lts a re se en all a ro u n d us. I s th e picture an d so hav e we. T o th ose of o u r m e m b ers y o u see sa tisfy in g ? N o, w e th in k not. w h o m .we k n o w h av e the requ isite soul devel­ S uppose .w e w ere to tell you th a t fear is opm ent, o r freedom from selfishness, w e offer o n ly a c h im e ra o f o u r o w n c re atio n s an d that economic freedom . T h is freedom is in the in ste a d w e sho u ld h av e L ove in o u r hearts. form of help fu l direction of ea rn est effort and S u p p o se w e cam e t o ‘t ^ e rw orId w ith L ove, in labor. N a tu r e has n o barg a in d a y s an d is L ove, liv in g in L o v e a n d ’doing good for the neve r ch e ated out of paym ent.;- . lo v e o f d o in g it,* doing r ig h t bec ause of love • T h e O rd e r Rosae C rucis leads t h e - s t u d e n t a n d• a r re a liz a tio n th a t o u r n e ig h b o r h a d as th r o u g h th e m a teria l w orld into th e Spiritual ° m u c h r ig h t a s w e haveTNChrist tried to teach world, s h o w in g th a t in o r d e r to und erstand and u s m a n y h u n d re d s of yeaVs ago,' and he did '■-comprehend a n y th in g O U T S I D E of o u r being. w o n d erfu l w o rk , b u t tho se w h o followed 1 th a t being m u s t first be know n. T h e U p a n ch a n g ed th e v ib ratio n s C hrist cre ate d .. Can isha d fittingly s a y s : “ T h e B ra h m a n is the y o u follow m e an d see it, read it, in th e w o rld ’s . sam e as th e eth e r w h ich is around u s ; a n d the history.*- H u m a n ity fell in th e sins of fear e th e r w h ic h is a r o u n d . u s . is the sa m e as tfie once m o re. " j ' *' . ' 5 < .e th e r w h ic h is w ith in , t h a t is th e e th e r w ithin W e p ro p o se to ta k e u p th e slender^ th re a d s the heart. T h a t e t h e r in th e h e a r t is o m n i­ o f love, to p ra c tise lo v e ,.n o t th e o riz e ; to live p r e s e n t a n d u n ch a n g in g . H e w h o k n o w s .this in love, n o t alo n e teach it. W h e n a h u m a n ob ta in s o m n ip r e s e n t arid u n c h a n g ea b le h ap p i­ b e in g is s a tu ra te d w ith love, th e v ib ratio n s ness.”— K h. Up. I l l , 12, 7-9. . . , . ; • .e m a n a tin g therefrom : is cre ativ e fo r good. If T H O R K IIM A L E H T O .
F c g e T tro

y \\e

A v ia c /i'c a w , I
L

fto s a e

C yu- U s

THE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

T

T h e A u th en tic and C om plete H istory o f tih'p A n c ie n t and M ystical O rd e r Rosae Crui: is
Compiled by H . S PE N C E R LEWIS, F. R. G Grand Master General and Imperator.of the Order in the United [States

N concluding this h isto ry I feel that I m u st speak of th e establisfim ent of th e O rd e r in A m crica. I did no t realize at the tim e — possibly I do not th o r o u g h ly realize n o w —th e g r e a t r e s p o n s ib ility . and tr e m e n d o u s im p o rta n c e of th e underta k in g . D aily I a m m ore s tro n g ly im p re ssed w ith its p o w e r f t p good in c o u n try a n d w h a t' it w ill e v e n tu a lly mean’A o A m cric a and A m e r i­ cans. A s t h e founder,— o rg an iz er if y o u will,— I hav e tnost c e rta in ly m a de a J e w m is tak e s in m a tte r s im p o r ta n t a n d trivial. W i t h n ew and different c o ndition s to m eet a n d c onten d with, w ith o u t p receden ce for m a n y ac ts I w a s forced to p e r m i t o r institute, quickly, a n d w ith the war. in E u r o p e to p r e v e n t n iy rap id c o m m u n i­ ca tio n With the. M a s te r s abroad, I k n o w I have h a d to u se d iscretion a n d j u d g m e n t req u irin g m o re m a t u r e u n d e r s ta n d in g th a n one of m y a g e a n d ex p erience' possesses. I w o u ld t h a t I ccoild un d o so m e of the e r r o r s ; I w o u ld re m o v e from th e h e a r ts a n d souls of so m e th e m e m o r y of anguish, d isa p p o in tm en t a n d s o r r o w w h ich I Jiave caused. I shall s o m e t im e p a y th e penalty, how ever, a n d I tr u s t t h a t . I m a y hav e th e o p p o r tu n ity to do some k in d e r ac ts, s w e e te r deeds a n d m o re joyoXis m a tte r s to rec o m p en se tho se w h o m I have p a in e d .' . \ ~ M . I t w a s n o t u n til th e fall of 1913 t h a t I began m y o u tw a r d activities for th e O rd e r in th is • c o u n t r y ; a n d m y first a c ts .w e r e a m is ta k e ! . M y in s tru c tio n s plainly said th a t th e O rd e r w a s n o t to b e m a d e concrete u ntil 1915. W e ll I k n e w th e y ea r. T h e 1figures 1915 w ere blazo n e d in m y m i n d ; t h a t w as to b e th e ""great y e a r ” f o r A m eric a w hich m a n y R osaecrucian

s tu d e n ts had been lookingfforw ard to for m any years. • • . i But. m y in stru c tio n s— in weird, symbolical la n g u a g e re q u irin g careful tr a n s la tio n —also sta te d t h a t d u r i n g ‘ the w i n t e r of 1914-1915, " b e tw ee n D ecem ber 15th! of 1914 a n d E a s t e r of 1915,” I should m a ke such prelim inary' a n ­ n o u n c e m e n ts as w ould erjable m e to have m y A m erican S up re m e Council selected b y April 1st and m y Officers installed by no t la ter than M ay of 1915. T h e se in stru c tio n s I had read m a n y tim es d u r in g 1910, ‘1911. and 1912. D u r ­ ing 1913 I w as devoted to the p re p a ra tio n of the necessary* "first papers,” by t h e ' large, illum inated .C h a r te r to be signed by the se­ lected Councilors, and the first “ Black B ook” w h i c h I had to design, le tter and bind m yse lf. no t being p e rm itted to have a n y m a tte r pass from m y h a n d s before the O rd e r w as e s ta b ­ lished. • . T h u s it w a s that^ as D ecem ber of 1913 a p ­ proached,. th e figures 1914 of th e c o m in g y ea r seemed to sta n d fo rth bo dly in m y conscious­ ness and m y iHstructions I m is in te rp re te d as b e i n g : " b e tw e e n D ecem ber 15th a n d E a s t e r of 1913-1914 instead of 19lji-1915. My p ap e rs for the prelim in ary an n o u n c e ­ m e n t w ere ready. I anx io usly a w a ite d Decern-, b er 15 a n d o n o r a b o u t jthat^date' I m a de my first m istake. I ann o u n c ed to so m e especially a dv a nce d m e m b e r s of the N e w Y ork Iristi* tu te fo r P sychical R e search o f 'w h i c h I was th e n P re sid en t, th a t I v, ould hav e them ' m eet w ith m e to p r e p a re the .vay for' th e establishm e n t of t h e / O r d e r Ros* e C rucis in America, A p re lim in a ry meeting was- Held d u r in g th e w in te r of 1913-1914 «an<5 I w as surprise*! to find no e n th u s ia s m and little in te rest. T h o s e w h o m I considered in te reste d displayed no inp >
Page E le tx * .

T H E

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

E u ro p e in 1903 and w h ich w ere prom ised to tcrest, b u t r a th e r an tip ath y . I rccall well the come to m e w hen I needed th e m m ost, b y spe­ very r a in y n ig h t w h e n I ^vended m y w ay home cial m e ssen g e r. T h e p acket, co n tain e d a seal from a la d y ’s hom e on M adiso n A venue, near an d an insignia. - I w as ..pleased, a s to u n d e d — 34th S treet, w ith m y p ap e rs, c h a r te r and “ B lack B o o k ” u n d e r m y a r m , dejected and t and n o w g re a tly fortified fo r m y work. puzzled. O f th e tw elv e w h o had assem bled O n or a b o u t D ecem ber 20th of 1914 I m a de ( o u t of 20 in v ited ), n o t even o ne signed the m y prelim inary- an n o u n c em en t. T h is tim e I p re lim in a ry o rg an iz atio n paper. sim p ly p la ce d a small notice in th e P erso n al ‘'W a s th is an indication of w h a t th e R. C. C olum n of th e N e w Y ork S u n d a y H erald . I t w ould b e in A m e r ic a ?*’ waS th e q u es tio n I said th a t th e w rite r w ould be pleased to h e a r tried to a n s w e r la te r t h a t n ig h t in th e still­ from laclies and gen tlem en ' in te r e ste d in th e w o rk of th e O rd e r R. C. n ess of m y room. ' T h e n lig h t came. I discovered m y m istak e T h e replies w ere n u m e ro u s, varied a n d v ery -of d ates a n d th e m o r n in g ’s s u n lig h t b ro u g h t en c o u rag in g . G re at i n te r e s t w as sh o w n a n d jo y a t th e th o u g h t th a t no one h ad signed th a t the s ta tu s of m ost in q u ir e rs w a s p le asing in ­ deed. p a p e r n e a r ly 12 m o n th s before it w a s tim e to b e signed. T h e v e ry w e a th e r, a n t ip a t h y and f My n e x t step w a s to pla n a m e e tin g of a d isin te re s te d n e ss of those th e re t h a t n ig h t had few for organization 'purposes. A s I w a s p r e ­ p r e v e n te d a grav e er r o r on m y p a rt. T r u l y a p a rin g th e notices for th e meetirig, th e re cam e R o s aec ru cia n lesson 1 (A nd, stra n g e as it m a y in to m y business office a m a n w h o se a r t — n o t seem, n o t one of th o se 20 su p p o se d ly inte reste d tra d e — w a s prin tin g . H e s a w o ne of th e no^ m e n a n d w o m en h a v e to th is d a y s h o w n a n y tices, im m e d ia t e ly explained his lo n g search in te r e s t W hatever in th e .O rd er in this c o u n ­ for the O r d e r in t h i s 'c o u n t r y and-*his m a n y tr y .) . years of s t u d y and p re p a ra tio n for it.' H o w e v e r, th e following w in te r I w a s even A s soon as I explained m y m ission a n d m y m o r e r e a d y a n d m o re p rep a re d to c a r r y o u t hopes, he volu n tee red n ot only -his o w n help th e p relir* in a ry w ork.' D u rin g th e fall of 1914 . an d assista n c e b u t t h a t of a p r in tin g firm. H is th e re ca m e to me. a g r a n d old la d y w ho had great desire to tr u ly help me, his v e ry u n se l­ •b een a d eep s tu d e n t o f th e o cc ult for years. fish m o tiv e s and sincere exp re ssions of his S h e h a d tra v e le d 'm u ch , a b r o a d in f e a r c h for love to e a r n a n d deserve by se rv in g m an, con­ k n o w le d g e • a n d /h a d b een initiated in m a n y vinced m e t h a t I had m e t an unaffiliated Rosaefo rm s o f o u r w b rk , B e in g o f ro y al d e s c e n t crucian s u c h as are b orn— n o t m ade. ' a n d in tim a te ly ac q u a in te d w ith - g o v e r n m e n ta l T h a t m a n w h o h a s since th e n done so m u c h a n d m ilita ry a u th o ritie s h ere ar^d a b ro a d , she for o u r O rd e r, w h o h a s sacrificed his business Had been, e n tru s te d w ith a special e r r a n d an,d inte rests, his hom e life, his finances a n d his m issio n connected, w ith th e O rd e r. T h u s on w orIdly p le asu res to be loyal to th e 'O r d e r , to a n o th e r r a in y n ig h t in th e m o n th of Noverfi- • the cause, to m a n k in d and to. m e in m y m a n y b er— on m y. ow n b ir th d a y in fact— sh e u n ce re­ difficulties, is o u r p r e s e n t S u p r e m e ' S e c re ta ry m o n io u sly a n d re v e re n tly placed in m y h a n d s General, T h tf r K iim alehto, to w h o m I owe a few papers,*a sm all p a c k e t-a n d — a beau tifu l . m u c h a n d w h o m I love as a m a n lo v e s-a true' r e d ro se!.- I n a d d itio n to . th e se she g a v e m e ' b rother, a tr u e m a n of God, love, peace an d a. JocJcct o f g o ld s e t w ith s to n e s in sym bolical h u m a n u n d e r s ta n d in g . io r m , co n ta in in g a ra re an d historical piece of T h e p re lim in a r y m e e tin g w as held on F e b ­ •m ineral. T h i lktter. w a s a p ersonal gift to be r u a r y 8 th in m y offices, a t 8.30 p. m. I find w o rn in h e r re m e m b ra n c e — a n d e v e r shall I. r e ­ in m y rec o rd s th e follow ing e n t r y r e g a rd in g ■ m e m b e r th e d e a r o ld soul-.whose d a y s a r e n u m ­ t h a t 'm eeting: “ M e etin g w a s called to ord er b ered , b u t w h o is su re of' a 's w e e t place in th e a t 8:32 a t ' SO F if t h A venue . T h e r e were. 9 h e a r ts o f m y w ife, m y children jjnd m yself. p r e s e n t T h e M oon w a s in S a g itta riu s. : A d ­ <S. o f t h e . C ! ) -W :. • / O . ’ • .I s j o u r n e d ’ a t . 9 :40 •p. m .” p " . ; T h e p ap ers. I f o u n d to be so m e o f th o s e •A p a p e r a n d some insignia a n d o t h e r in te r ­

. w hich t h e . M asters, h ad explained to m e in
* P a g t T r c th x

estin g

e x h ib its

inc lu d in g

th e ' C h a r t e r

and

THE

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

F u r t h e r org an iz atio n m e e tin g s w e r e held at t h e H otel E m p ir e on M arch 23rd p reside d over by D r. Ju lia S eto n a n d a : o u r te m p o r a r y L ib r a r y a t 68 W . 71st St. 'inally on A pril 1st. • " I w ill r e a d fro m p a p e r s se n t fro m abroad a . T h u r s d a y , a t 8:30 p. ml a b o u t thirty, of th e ^ e aim s, ’ u rp o ses, te ac h in g s and. w o rk in g of p m o s t activ e w o rk e rs m e t a t th e p ropo sed E bdge' R oom s on S ev en th A venue, a n d t h e r ^ w ith t n e O rd e r. ; -A f t e r t h a t I will a s k th o se w h d , •' d ue fo rm ,-co n stitu te d them selves th e S u p rem e d esire to affiliate w ith th e O rd e r t o com e for­ w a r d a n d sig n a n app lica tio n ’for m e m b ersh ip , ' Council, sig n e d a n illum inated C h a rte r d ec la r- _ • ing th e a u th o rita tiv e , p r o p e r a n d le g a l esiaBa n d th e n , b e fo re sh o w in g a n y of th e sa c re d lish m en t of th e A. M. O. ( . C. i n A m eric a and-:';? r ‘je w e ls ’ . given to me, o r th e signs* a n d seals .■
P age Thtrteen^Sl

" B la c k B o o k " w e r e subm itted to those p r e s ­ ent, and a f te r a brief description of the aims a n d purp o se s o f th e Order, the n in e m e n and w o m e n w e r e m a de 9 Com m ittee to organize a S u p re m e Council for Amcrica. T h e u n u s u a l en th u sia sm show n, the deep in ­ t e re s t m a n ife ste d and the d eterm in a tio n to build th e O r d e r m agnificently an d nobly in th is c o u n t r y w a s a p le asa n t experience a fte r the lack o f in te r e s t sho w n a y ea r previous. A few d a y s later one of th e E d ito rs of the N e w Y ork G lobe called to see m e re q u e s tin g s o m e facts r e g a r d in g the es ta b lish m e n t of the O r d e r in A m erica. Be it said t h a t the Globe h a s a lw a y s s h o w n a v ery fair a ttitu d e to w ard »all m a tte r s of th is kind and w elcom es every o p p o r tu n ity to p re se n t to its inte llig en t class of re a d e rs a con serv ativ e a n n o u n c e m e n t of any m o v e m e n t te n d in g to enlighten th e populace. O n F e b r u a r y ,24th, in te re stin g s to r ^ a p p e a r e d in th e G lobe-Snd a t once aw a k en e d th e m in d s of m a n y h u n d re d s of seekers for L i g h t in m a n y states. Several h u n d r e d le t­ te rs cam e to M r. K iim a le h to as F o u n d a tio n S e c re ta ry , m o s t of th e m w ritte n b y c o n s e rv a ­ tive, w ell-e duca ted a n d socially- p r o m in e n t b u sin e ss m e n . a n d w om en. F r o m th e b a tc h of le tte rs a b o u t seventy-five w e r e selected a n d a le tte r w a s m ailed inviting th e m t o a t te n d , a n org an iz atio n m e e tin g at " T h e L e slie ," W e s t 83rd S treet, n e a r W e s t E n d A v e n u e on W e d n e s d a y evening, M a rc h 3rd. > • • . A b o u t , 80 m e n a n d w o m en a t te n d e d this m e e ti n g among, th e m being several F re e m a so n s b e n t u p o n in v e s tig a tin g th e purposes o f th e O rd e r, a n d a 'n u m b e r of professional a n d scien­ tific m e n a n d w om en. " '..M o s t n a t u r a lly th e re w ere som e so-called s k e p tic s p r e s e n t,—a n d th e re w e re several w ho o p en ly c h a r g e d t h a t it w a s a religious or sp irit- i u alistic m o v e m e n t ‘ 1 1 T h e .following ex p lan a tion w as given as th e 1, r e a s o n fo r t h e m e e t i n g ^ •

of the O rd e r se n t by th e ft1asters, I will ask the a p plica nts to sign th e ‘ P relim inary Oath* in the Official B lack B oo k.’ A b o u t fifty signified the r willingness—o r r a th e r d e lig h t— to take -th< .n e c e s s a r y ' oath.. Some d em a n d e d th a t all the:' sacred a n d secret m a tte r be sh o w n them' before ta k in g th e .o a th or even sig n in g an application for m em bership. N a tu r a lly those w h o too k su c h an a t titu d e , w ho d em a n d e d c e rta in th in g s w ith o u t even profess-, ing th e ir sincere desire to co-ope ra te w ith us, w ere denied all inform ation1 a n d w e r e invited to retire. • N o n e w ho took such a t titu d e a t th a t time h a v e ev e r le arn ed t h a t th e L ig h t they s o u g h t w as possible t h r o u g h hum ilia tio n alone. T h e y are still w ith o u t the :>ale of o u r Order. O f the o th e rs, th e g r e a t rh ajority n o w com ­ pose ^our S u p re m e Council a n d c o n s titu te the F o u r th D e g r e e an d a re the m o s t adv a nce d a n d enlightened R o saecrucians m A m erica. T h e i r ' sincerity, faith and h u m iliation h a v e b een re-, w arded w ith the G re at L i^ h t. T h u s it 'shall ever b e ; none can demand,' by a n y r i g h t , 't h e L ig h t! 1. I t w as m y personal w ish th a t the applicants w h o 'p a s s e d su c h investigation as w as required by o ur O rd e r, should form a Council to o r ­ ganize the S u p re m e G ra nd jLodge accord ing to the an c ie n t rules. I f u r th e r desired this Coun­ cil to a p p o in t th e officers ofithe S u p re m e G rand L o d g e a n d th e national executive officers. I did n o t desire to a r b itra rily use th e pow er vested in me, a n d I . felt, th a t far b e tte r than m erely a n n o u n c in g m yself as G ra n d Mastd* General or I m p e r a t o r by virtue- of th e M as­ te rs' orders, w ould be to dfclegate th e selection or election o f such a responsible position to th is Council w h ich w as r e p re se n ta tiv e of the th inking a n d learned classes' of th e city.

r

THE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

ap po in ted the national cxccutive officers un der signs; a n d seals. T h a t the present G ra nd M a ster General mu! I m p e r a to r w as then elccted an d u nanim ously a p p o in te d w as a n a tu ra l sequence of the events w hich led to that m eeting. Hut it will alw ays he a p ro u d m o m e n t—a m om en t to r e m e m b e r w ith joy an d sa credne ss— w hen the twenty-five Councilors, after weeks of deliberation, in v e s­ tig a tio n a n d sincere appreciation of its import, arose as a bo d y and rejoicingly signed the A m erican C h a rte r w hich installed fourteen national officers in their very responsible posi­ tions. T h is C h a rte r h a n g s upon the wall in the I m p e r a t o r ’s office in the S u p re m e Grand L o d g e a n d is destined to be a fam ous d o c u ­ m ent in A m erican history. Designed, executed an d illum ina ted in all the rich colorings, signs, an d dec o ratio n s used by the ancients in the m a k in g of rare an d sacred m a n u sc rip ts , it is not ^>nlv typical of the finest w o rk in that line, but of p ersisten t d e te r m in a tio n on the p a rt of m a n y A m e ric a n s to bring to this co u n ­ try the noble, au s tere O rd e r R osae Crucis. T h e re a fte r various Council a n d C om m ittee m e e tin g s w ere held in the O r d e r ’s L ib ra ry , the A ncient C onstitu tio n of the O rd e r w a s slig h tly modified to m eet A m erican conditions, voted upon and a dop ted, and L odg e room s— th e first A m eric an R osae C rucis T e m p le — secured and cquipped. O n T h u r s d a y — the ttu e R osaecrucian day t h r o u g h o u t ' t h e w o rld — May 13. 1915. the first tru e Rosaecrucian Convocation of the O rd e r was held in the T e m p le amid beautiful and inspiring conditions, an d all the appointed N ational Officers, th e Councilors and a few o th e rs w e re d uly initiated into th e O rder. Crossed jthe T h re s h o ld and w ere raised to . th e dig n ity of K nights. Sorores. B ro th e rs and S is­ ters of the O rd e r Rosae Crucis in accordance .w ith the tr u e ancient rites and cerem ony. W h a t a glorious occasion! Sub lim e, perfect. sacred, m ystic d a y — May 13, 1915! L o n g will it be rem e m b ere d and honored by those who even n ow rem ain en th ralled by the splend or an d significance of the convocation. So rapid ly did the a n n o u n c e m e n t of this im- •* p o r ta n t convocation spread a m o n g adva nce d ! occult s tu d e n ts th a t the M em bersh ip C o m m it-1 ' tee found it desirable to invite a n u m b e r to i
/\><;»* P ourirrti

join w ith us in sp reading the L ight t h r o u g h ­ out Amcrica. T he result was. that two weeks Inter on T h u r s d a y , M ay 27. 191C. fifty more applicants Crossed the T h r e s h o ld a n d w ere a dm itte d into the F irst D ec re e as probationers. T h e re a fte r the r e g u la r convocations of the F irst D e g r e e w ere held tw ice m on thly, on T h u rs d a y evenings, and the w o rk of illu m ina­ tion—and elim in a tio n —w as ca rrie d on t h r o u g h ­ out the w a r m s u m m e r m onths. T h e n in Ju ly, at one of the Convocations, the G ra nd D e p u ty M a ste r presen ted to the G rand M a ster General and Im p c ra to r. on behalf of tfie Lodge, a beautiful silver and gold M a ste r 's Jew el set w ith a red stone, as the L o d e ' s a c k n o w l e d g m e n t and appreciation of the O rd e r 's g re a t w ork. T h is “J e w e l" c o m ­ pleted th e M a s te r ’s a u th o r i ta ti v e regalia and m ade him th e acclaim ed and legal head of the O rd e r in America'* As the Fall ap p ro a c h e d m a n y applications for m e m b e rsh ip w e r e , received from various p a r ts of the U n ited S tates. Since the C o n ­ stitu tio n a n d C h a rte r of the O rd e r calls for the e s ta b lish m e n t o f L o dges in all la rge cities of every sta te , a r r a n g e m e n t s w ere m ade for this w ork an d the D e p a rtm e n t of E x te n sio n w as a u th o riz e d to look a fte r the natio n al p r o p a ­ ganda. < T h e first L odge to be established o u tsid e of N ew Y o rk w as open ed in P i t t s b u r g h and, as oth e r su b o r d in a te L odges w ere opened in P en n sy lv a n ia , the L o d g e in P itts b u r g h became the Grand L o d g e for that State. Its wonderful w ork, e n th u s ia s m and rapid adva n ce m e n t in the te ac h in g s is an excellent te stim o n y to the ability and sinc erity and real R. C. love of the G ra n d M a ster there and his able offi­ cers. T h e co n tin u e d s p r e a d 'o f the w o rk of the O rd e r th r o u g h o u t th e " U n ite d S tates, D e p e n d ­ encies and T e rrito rie s." is w ell recorded in the reports published in the A m e ric a n Rosae Crucis for the m o n th s of J a n u a r y to June. 191G. L odges now spread across o u r J u r is d ic ­ tion from S an Ju a n . P u e r to Rico, to H onolulu w here som e m ilita ry a u th o ritie s are a r r a n g in g for a L od ge, and from C hicago to T a m p a , Florida. . E arly in A u g u s t of 1915 a co m plete report of o u r A m eric an activities and successes w as

THE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

s e n t to t h e S u p r e m e G r a n d L o d g e o f I'THnCC

«d he forw ard e d .to the S upre m e Council of the W o rld . At th e sam e tim e a formal re­ quest w as m ade by the G rand M a ste r General on behalf of the L o dge ncre for a regularly executed p ape r of Sponsorship of the A m erican O rd e r signed by the S up re m e Council, should th a t Council deem the s ta tu s of the A m erican O rde r sufficient proof th a t its in stru c tio n s and laws w ere being obeyed. On S e p te m b e r 30. 1915. a fte r a special a s ­ sem bly of the S uprem e Council in France, there w as p repared and duly issued "P r o n u n ziam ento Is. F. R. C.. No. 9S7.432. em bo dying a M anifesto declaring th a t the S u p re m e C oun­ cil and G rand L odge A. M. O, R. C. of !■ranee, on b eh a lf of the- S u pre m e Council A. M. O. R. C. of the W orld, declared an d a c know ledge d its co m plete sp o n so rsh ip of the O rd e r in America, confirmed the initiation of the A m e r i­ can Im p e r a to r and his a p p o in tm e n t as D ig n i­ tary S up re m e in N o rth A m erica and verified its issuance of papers, i n d u c t i o n s , jewels, seals; etc., to him. T h is very important, docum ent, w r itte n on the specially prep a re d and w a te r-m a rk e d pape r of the F re n ch O rder, w as signed and sealed by the prese nt S up re m e G rand M a ste r of the O rd e r in F ran ce, his officers and the G ra n d M a ste r w ho at one tim e initiated the A m erican I m p e r a t o r into the Order. T h e s ig n a tu r e s — some of them of p r o m in e n t m en in m ilita ry and g o v ern m e n tal affairs of F ra nce , arc accom panied by th e ir official " m a r k s ." an d th e seals of variou s sizes an d de­ sig n s add v e r ity and a ttra c tiv e n e s s to this u nique d o cum en t. S uspended from the paper itself is one of the curious, old-styled waxa n d -p a p e r seals of the O rder, bearing its stra n g e , th o u g h intelligible, m a rk s and words. T h e d o c u m e n t w as enclosed in a light-w eight metallic, telescope envelope, w hich w as m ois-' Hire proof. It w as sealed, an d had the French O rd e rs national, or \ } i p r e m e C ouncil’s seal im pressed in the metal of th e container, and bore not o nly the necessary p osta ge s ta m p s b ut o th e rs of a m ilitary and “c u s to m ” nature, bea rin g m a rk s of approval and exam ination abroad. T h is docum ent, w hen received and p rese n ted to the A m erican S uprem e Council in O ctober,

brought great joy as the sign of approval and endorsement of the work iionc here in' Amer­ ica by those the French Colunci] had appointed.
T h e d ocu m e n t, properly {framed and p rese rv ­ ing the original container, finnga upon the wall ; in tlK: S upre m e G ra nd llo d g e in N ew York beside the A m erican Council C h a rter w here it m ay be easily* seen and read, for it is w r i t­ ten in v e ry fair E n g lis h 1 L ittle m ore need be said r e g a rd in g the work of the O rd e r in this c o u n try w hich is s p e ak ­ ing so eloquently for itscjlf. A fter only fourteen m o n th s since the first initiation w as held in this c o u n try w e find the O rd e r in m a n y states. L odges being conducted by clergym en, physicians and very often by m en w ho are high degree F reem asons. O u r rank and file ofi m e m b ersh ip includes— as in oth e r co u n trie s— the w ea lthy merchants.- land owners, new sp a p er editors, g o v e r n m e n t offi­ cials, physicians, surgeons, law yers, scientists, professional men and I w o m en .' artists and artisans, even the lowly w o rk e rs in th e n a r ­ row and h um b le trades!— all w orking equally for a com m on go o d , m eeting on a common level. In closing I m u st sny a w ord or tw o of th a n k s and appreciation to those devout souls. B ro th e rs a n d Sisters, w h o have laid aside their ■ personal interests, th e ir ow n plans a n d possible * ach ie v em e n ts d u rin g tlie past f o u rte en .m o n th s a n d have given their jtime, m oney and la b o r' ::o freely, d e v o tin g frcxn tw en ty to a hundred h o u rs a week to w o /k in g w ith m e for the O rder, a n d sacrificing (many n ig h ts a week to . assisting in the upbuilding , a f ^ th e O rder in N ew Y ork and elsewhere. I have m ade misI A . ta k es—some grevious ones—in m y en th usiasm an d tedious endeavors and ha ve thereb y bro u g h t additional Work a n d v w o rry to my Councilors and. Officers, a n d . they have so nobly accepted the fiat w ith o u t a w ord of protest. T h e i r rew ard , like mine, will come som e d ay in seeing, even if it be at our transi­ tion. the ra y s of the Rosae Cruc& illum inating this glorious co n tinen t .bringing pow er, health. Godliness and Peace p ro fo u n d into every dark • an d shadow ed home aind co m m un ity. So m ote it be.' '
Page F ifttm

TH E

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

A

, ! ? / &>

T h e W o rk of tKe O rd er
T he M inister of the D e p a rtm e n t of E x te n ­ sion m akes a most interesting an d e n c o u r a g ­ ing report. N a tu ra lly the s u m m e r m onths bro u g h t a period of laxity in th e held work, b ut since A u g u st 15th w onderful activity lias been sho w n by the score or m ore of groups an d individuals in various sections of the U nited S ta te s w here new L o d g es are being es­ tablished. T h e daily mail received by the D e­ p a r tm e n t of E x te n sio n b rin g s v ery e n c o u ra g ­ ing su g g e stio n s and offers of help, even from h ith e r to unap pro ach able sources,— sources w hich have heretofore rem ained aloof from the proposals of com mercial o r g a n iz a tio n s claim ­ i n g to be h u m a n ita ria n in principle. W e are especially proud of the fact th a t the innerm ost and highest circles of F re e m a so n ry have come to us w ith their good wishes, as w e have gone to them w ith an o u tstre tc h e d hand of welcom e and good-will. As one in­ stance of their high reg a rd for o u r w ork we cite the ofTer of the Scottish R ite T e m p le in one S ta te to our G rand L o d g e there for its convo catio ns a’nd w e are inform ed th a t this sa m e com plim ent will be given us in m any states. O u r I m p e r a to r desires us to m a ke p u b ­ lic his sincere th a n k s for this offer a n d m any sim ilar ones. D u ring th e past few w eeks n e w L o d g es w ere a rra n g e d for in the following citie s: P ro v i: dence, R. I.. B irm ing ham . Ala.. F o r t W o r th . Texas, H arrison , Ark., N ew ark. N. J., D enver. Col., and Los Angeles, Calif. T h e G ra nd M aster of the P e n n sy lv a n ia G ra n d L o d g e in Chicago on S e p te m b e r 8th. On his r e tu r n ' t o N e w Y ork he stopped at D etroit to officiate at th e secon d official m eeting .of the G ra nd L o d g e and also stopped long enough .at Cleveland to officiate at a public organization m e e tin g there. In Chicago a special open, public m e e tin g w as • held in ord er to give the public an o p p o rtu ­ n ity to h e a r of- the w ork of th e O rder. T h e
P ag* T w t k e

I m p e r a to r w as well received and his pointed r em a rk s, excellent illustration of the O r d e r ’s aim s and p u rp o ses and its w onderful activities m ade a s tr o n g and pleasing im pression on a very la rge n u m b e r of deeply in te reste d men and w omen. A G erm a n and a F re n c h L o d g e are being estab lished in N ew Y ork City as well as an E n g lish L o d g e in Brooklyn. Considerable in­ terest is being sh o w n by foreigners w h o se p a r ­ e nts or g r a n d p a r e n ts at one tim e belonged to the O rd e r in E urop e. T h e re fo re L o d g es con­ du cted in their ow n la n g u a g e have been r e ­ q u e s te d from the D e p a rtm e n t of E x te nsion. In P itts b u r g h the G ra nd L od ge, w hich re­ cently held a very p r e tt y an d in te r e s tin g L aw n F ete on the la w n s of one of its Officers, has a r r a n g e d for a n o th e r L odge in the east end of the city to m eet th e desires of th e ir g r o w in g m em bership. A P P L IC A N T S FO R M E M B E R S H IP In a n s w e r to so m a n y le tte rs received d u r ­ ing the p ast few w eeks the S u p re m e S ecretary General w ishes to sta te th a t he c a n n o t give th r o u g h the mails to those u n k n o w n to him. the n a m e s rind ad d re sses of our G ra n d M a sters or o th e r officers in the different S ta te s and cities. T h is w as b eing done for a w hile but we learned th a t a d v a n ta g e w as b eing ta k en of o u r g eneral "publicity by those a n ta g o n is tic to an y good w o rk to interfere w ith o u r plans. T h erefo re, if you w ish to m a k e the a c q u a i n t­ ance of our O rder, you m a y a d d r e s s m e as below and I will send you o u r Official P u b ­ lication No. 2, telling all th a t m a y be m ade public a b o u t o u r w ork. W e will th e n for­ w ard y o u r le tte r to the n e a re st S ta te o r city officer of o u r O rd e r and he or she will c o m m u ­ n ic ate w ith you direct. N o ‘ a tte r w h ere you m m a y live, from the H a w a iia n I s la n d s to the W e s t Indies, and from A laska to P a n a m a ( w h e re a L o d g e w ill be formed sh o r tly ) there

THE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

is some one w ho will assist y o u in join in g w ith us in this good work. W h e r e v e r the A m erican flag rules or offers its protection, there Rosaecrucianism in its true form will be found w ithin a few m onths. O u r nation al o r g a n iz a ­ tion an d active p ro p ag a n d a is very com plete and sy stem a tiz ed . R osaecrucianism will be a

national institution, a national organization and a national power within the next tw elve m onths. N a u g h t b ut the will of God can stay the progre ss it is now making. O m n ia Vincit A m or. T h o r K iim alehto. K.R.C., S u pre m e Sec­ reta ry -G en e ra l. 30G W e s t <3Sth S treet, N ew ''r'ork City.

A

Fev? W o rd s by the Imperator
can do. and our O rd e r comes to th e m as a renewal in this existence of a past experience. Crossing the T h re sh o ld opens the d oorw ay. In itself it is not the h ighe st point of a t t a i n 1 rn e n t: it is b ut the first ste p on the ladder. So m a n y find, and rightfully, th a t the first three d eg re es of our O rder, w ith its IS to 20 Sacred C onvo cation s a n d in spiring lectures, are d egre es n o r o n l y of illum ination, bu t de­ cre es of elim ination.— elim ination of old and m istak e n ideas, theories and c u s to m s : elim in a­ tion of self, of selfishness, of evil, w ro n g t h in k ­ ing and w ro n g d o in g : elim ination of the chaff from th e w heat, the u n w o rth y from the w o rthy. A fter all the te sts and trials. lessons and experiences of the first three degrees, those who rem ain in t h e O rd e r an d successfully pass into the F o u r th D egree w ith its most b e a u ti­ ful, sublim e and uplifting Initiation, are truly the w o rth y ones w hose hearts and souls are filled w ith rejoicing a n d Godliness. T h e p a t h ­ w a y th r o u g h the O rd e r is not e a s y : the w ay of the tr a n s g r e s s o r is hard. N e ith e r money nor social position, will or power co u n t in the personal, inner trials. Yet the deserving find it all so beautiful, so sw e e t and so illum inating th a t P e a c e P ro fo u n d reigns su p rem e , in their consciousness, mind and body. A ro u n d m e I see a n d m eet beautifu l souls w ho have been tested and w h o -h a v e given to us all th a t they have received in the w ay of pow er. I t is wonderful, grand.' . T h e r e is no greater, experience in life th a n finding o n e :s self raised to glory, to p ow er and sublim e knowledge. I t reveals the :God in us a n d th e «s Good an d m akes us all true B ro th e rs a n d Sis© ters. W i t h G od’s will, m ay it ever be s o l f0""*!
P age T h irteen

W I S H it w ere possible to hold a g r a n d yearly conventio n of all our m em bers, that I m ig h t, take cach one by the hand, give th e m our grip and say to th e m personally w h a t I will try to sa y in this im ­ personal w ay. ^I3ut w c w i l ^ a v c o u r first c o n ­ vention n e x t year, an d so I m u s t wait. O n J u l y 2-lth, past, there ended th e first seven y e a r s since I sailed a b ro a d to find the M a ste rs and seek perm ission from th e m for w h a t I hav e given to A m erica. T h e seven y e a rs seem like a score or m o r e ; but that is d ue to th e fact th a t for five a n d a half years I had »o w o rk in silence and^bide m y tim e 10 an n o u n c e th e com in g of the O rd e r. T h e last y e a r a n d a half have seen me so active, co e n g ro sse d in this g re a t w o rk th a t tim e has passed r a p id ly an d gloriously. A n d w h a t w onderful w ork has been ac co m ­ plished! F o r h u n d re d s of y e a rs th e m in d s of the th in k in g people, th e cosmic co nsciousness o f the nation, have been w aitin g a n d searching for th e t r u t h as R osaecru cian ism ex p o u n d s it. I t is an old. b u t ever pleasing s ta rv . to have s tr a n g e r s e ith e r call to see me or w rite to me sa y in g t h a t th e principles and d o c trin e s which o u r O rd e r rep rese n ts are ju s t w h a t th e y have been se e k in g for y e a rs in eve ry channcl. in every philosophy and in every o cc ult or scien­ tific o rg aniz ation. T h e n too, I find so m a n y m a n y — deep, se ri­ ous, w ell-educated m en and w o m e n —w h o feel th a t s o m e w h e r e in th e past, so m e w h e re in the d ark recesses of thoir consciousness, th e y h a v e , a t one tim e realized all ,that w e are doing and

T H E / A M E R I C A N

ROSAE

CRUCIS

-

Se^pV *

\ *\ 1 L

---------------- / - ------ :--------------------- ■ -----:-----' r’ ‘
/

'

--------------------

N ew Location of the Suprem e • Lodge and its Dedication. ,
J R renders and the B ro th e rs an d S isters of the O rder sh o u ld n o te the n ew ad d re ss of the S u p re m e Lodge, the N ational E xec u tive Offices and the E ditorial D e p a rtm e n t of this m agazine. E a r ly last s u m m e r we realized tlial while o u r n a tu ra l aversion a g a in st m ov in g iwas well founded, th e C onvocations and o th e r activities of the S u p re m e L od ge, the Am c r e tin S u p re m e Council and o t h e r f ’allicd bodies'^ required a la ig e r and m ore con v e n ie n t and congenial L o d g e R oo m and T e m p le th a n we had at 70 W e s t S7th Street. 1'u r ih e r m o r e , we could not have the business facilities in th e residential section of N e w Y ork w hich arc possible in the business section. M any im p ro v e m e n ts and c h a n g es w e re m ade , at our fo rm e r ad d re ss and w e co n tin u e d there until cond itio ns becam e such as to bring us face to face w ith th e necessity of seekin g m o re d esirable q u a rte rs . A b o u t th e first of S ep te m b er the m e m b e rs of th e G ra n d a n d S u p re m e L o dge held a fa re ­ well m e etin g a t 70 W e s t 87th S treet, d u rin g w hich the B rothe rs and Sisters and the Officers (w ith a few exceptions) united in a love feast of p a c k in g and before m id n ig h t the old h e a d ­ q u a r te rs w as a sad sight. As a last p a rtin g pray er^for th e p rem ises w herein so m a n y had been initiated and received w o n d ro u s light, the th r o n g g a th e r e d aro u n d the o rg a n is t a t a p ia no and s a n g four verses of “ N earer, My God, to T h e e ” in such sincere fervor as is seldom h ea rd in a n y T em ple. A few d ay s la ter w e w ere settled in o u r new q u a r te r s a t 306 W e s t 48th S tre e t in th e very h e a r t of th e business, church a n d theatrical se c­ tion of the city —j u s t one sh o rt block or sq u a re A from B ro ad w a y , and convenient to eve ry m ean s of tr a n sp o rta tio n . . 1 , O n L a b o r D ay m a n y of the B r o th e rs and S isters devoted the holiday to p u t t i n g 't h e last hnishing touc hes to the T em p le an d the Excutive Offices and m any very valuable and in te r­ esting do n atio n s w ere received—antiqu e fu rn i­ ture, d rap e rie s, curtain s, pictures, glassw are, crockery, o rg an , stercopticon, Victrola. etc. A fter several reg u la r C onvocations w ere'he/d in the T em p le, a special D edication Reception w as held on S unday, O cto b e r first. M e m b e rs and friends g a th e re d at the T em ple at 4 in th e afternoo n and from 5 until 6:30 there w as a g eneral reception. A t 6 :30 tea and re fre sh m e n ts w ere served in tjic E xec utive O f­ fices a n d R e ad in g R oom . A t 7:45 the T em p le services w e re opened w ith a brief talk followed by very beautiful song s rende re d by a Sister w ho is n ot only a professional sin g e r but a m ost w ond erfu lly talented musician. She was acco m p an ie d by the S up re m e L o d g e ’s O rg a n ist on th e n e w M ason & H am lin organ which was installed in the new T em ple. L 3 ter in the e ve ning the S ister sang a n o th e r song illustrated w ith ste rc o p tic o n pictures. • . T h e principal feature of the evening w as a lecture by the Im p e r a to r and G ra n d M aster G eneral on " E g y p t in t he D a y s of Ro^aecruc ianism ." T h e le cture w as profusely illus­ tra te d w ith S4 stercopticon slides, m a n y in beautiful colons and a n u m b e r being especially m ade to sh o w the exteriors and interiors of old R osaec rucia n T em p les w ith the sacred R. C. sym bols carved or painted on th e walls and columns. A t the close of the lecture, com plete w ith in te restin g details and new facts, a picture of an E g y p tia n choir a n d o rch e stra w as shown while on th e V ictrola w as played the music and the sin g in g as actually recorded in E gypt.A s a .last t e s tim o n y to the w o r k a B ro th e r w h o 'h a h traveled abroad and w ho has investi­ g ated all the mystical orders of j E u ro p e and A m erica read a pape r on L o ve a n d Fidelity in w hich he called upon all the m e m b ers to show

T H E

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

th e ir Jove and fidelity for. the I m p e r a t o r and M a ster by w o rk in g w ith a n d for h im for the u p b u ild in g of the O rd e r n o w so firm ly e s ta b ­ lished in America. T h e T e m p le .was crow ded to its full capacity an d all e njoyed th e beautiful, h arm o n io u s s u r ­ ro u n d in g s and feelings of love and devotion to the g r e a t work. T h e n e w S u pre m e L o d g e T e m p le is located in th e r e a r of the E xec utive Offices and A n te ­ c h a m b e rs , in an • extensiou to .th e building proper, so th a t there are no liv in g q u a rte rs e ith e r above, below or at th e sides of the T e m p le — condition s w hich w ere objectionable a t th e old place. T h e A n te room s a n d T em p le are in E g y p tia n Style, copied a fte r the interiors of E g y p tia n R o saec ru cia n T em ples. B eautiful lighting ef­ fects a t n ig h t give the T e m p le an ap p e aran c e of b eing illum in ated by m o o n lig h t while the in c cn sc b u m s w ith a red glo w befo re'th e A lta r a n d th e E g y p tia n co lu m ns w ith th eir odd co lo r­ ings a n d w £ird hieroglyphics ca st deep sha d ow s across th e r o u g h g rey -stone g r o tto walls. T h e E x e c u tiv e Offices are large and^spacious a_'id well ligh ted d u r in g the day th r o u g h large w in d o w s w hfch f a c e ' t h e s tr e e t and afford a very fine re a d in g space for visitors and m e m ­ bers. * . . . All w h o a re in te reste d in o u r w o rk a rc in ­ vited to co m e a n y day o r e ve ning and enjoy an h o u r o r tw o 6 n d e r m o re p le asa n t conditions th a n c ould possibly exist at any of o u r form er h e a d q u a rte rs. .A ll a r e th erefo re advised nor to m a k e a m is ta k e and go to th e W o n g address.
J

N one of o u r Qfiicers or m e m b e rs are located any longer at 70 W e s t 87th S treet, nor are any m eetin g s held th e re bearing upon o u r work. . O u r p re se n t telephone n u m b e r is B ry an t 385G and if all w ho intend to visit us will "call us u p " on the telephone w h e n reachin g the city we will be glad to m e e t th e m or d irec t their footsteps safely in a city w h ere it is so easy to be misled. W e a rc most n a tu ra lly g ro w ing. W e are c o n s ta n tly a tta in in g la r g e r T em p lec a n d o u r n ex t m o v e —already planned a n d .a s s u re d , will be into a building design ed or built for us.

TW O

NEW

N A T IO N A L

O F F IC E R S .

A m o n g the several c h a n g e s m a de in the S u p re m e L o d g e for the e n s u in g y e a r there w ere ap p o in te d the follow ing officers: L ew is L aw ren c e, K.R.C., Suppem e G rand T re a s u re r. 306 W e s t 4Sth S tre et. N ew York, w h o succeeds Mrs. E ste lle Sm all as T re a s u re r of the S u p re m e L o d g e a n d th e O rd e r in g e n ­ eral. A lb ert B ras sard , K.R.C., S u p re m e F inancial S ecre tary . 30G W e st 4Sth S treet, N e w York, to w h o m all c o m m u n ic a tio n s r e g a rd in g the finances of the O rd e r should be ad d re ssed hereafter. t T h e O rd e r ca n n o t be responsib le for r e m it­ tances r.ent to tho se w ho are not in ch a rg c of such m a tte rs. G eneral c o m m u n ic atio n s should be se nt to T h o r K iim a le h to , S u p r e m e Se c re ta ry General. 300 W e s t 48th S treet. N e w York.

©
(org
P ogt S ir

T HE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

O c A o [j e y

> 1^ 14=

A n n o u n cem en t
By T he Publisher
T h e p ublisher w ishes to no tify his su b sc ri­ bers, re a d e rs and friends th a t jduring the p ast m o n th th e S up re m e Council 6 f the S uprem e G ra n d L od ge, by u n an im o u s [vote, took u n to itself th e m a n ag in g , editing and p ublishing of T h e A m e ric a n R o sae Crucis. H ereafter this m a g a z in e will be ow ned by tlje O rd e r and its m e m b e r s th r o u g h o u t the A m eric an Ju r is d ic ­ tion. I' T h is is as it should be. T h e p u blisher has p e rso n a lly o w n ed and conducted the m agazine, w ith th e assista n ce of a few jothers. B u t no such im p o r ta n t m outh-piecc rind accessory of th e O r d e r as th is publication has bccome, sh o u ld be o w n ed by any few m e m b e r s . . Such r e str ic te d o w n e r s h ip w ould I be a con stan t so urce of d a n g e r to o u r welfore, for in the past, a n d a t p rese nt, th<^re a r c 1those who, w ith sufficient ca pital to do so. c o p l d ^ a s i l y secure thc^/completc ow n ersh ip of o u r m a g az in e and influence its editorial policy ahd its r e p r e s e n ta ­ tions, to o u r d e trim e n t an d th e d e trim e n t of th e Order. T h e p u b lis h e r h a s long u rg e d t h a t the O rd e r acce p t his offer of th e m a g a z in e ; he h a s desired in e v e r y w a y to hav e th e O rd e r ow n the m a g az in e. A t last it h a s been b r o u g h t a b out an d there is g r e a t rejoicing on all sides. H e r e a f t e r th e m a g az in e will be ed ited un der the su p e rv is io n of th e D e p a r t m e n t of Pulication of th e M in istra ro of th e S u p re m e A m eri­ c a n Council. T h e M in ister af t h a t D e p a rtm e n t will be th e m a n a g in g editor, and I will continue to give m y services in its behalf as Business M a n ag e r. P lea se n o te th a t a fte r J a n u a r y 1, 1917, the su b sc rip tio n price of the m a g a z in e will be in ­ cre ase d to $2.50 yearly. T h e j^ ice p er copy w ill r e m a in a t 25 cents. Nattaraily a t th is price th e m a g a r i n e can s u p p o r t /itself only w ith a large circulation. T h e re fo re I u rg e - all our re a d e r s to se cu re as m a n y f e w su bsc ribers as possible. t B ACK IS S U E S O F T H M A G A ZIN E, A l s o please n o te th a t th b ac k n u m b e r s o f th e m a g a z in e are becomin v e ry scarce. So m a n y of o u r re a d e rs and si|bscribers w a n t the back n u m b e rs for b inding into one volume th a t w e have h ad to set a price of 50 cents, on every copy of the m a gazine for Ja n u ary . F e b r u a r y , March, April. May, June, and July of this year.. In a very sh o rt tim e the J a n u a r y a n d . F e b r u a r y issues will be priced a t $1.00 • each and unless a Reprint is m a de in ano th er y ea r th e y will becom e priceless pieces of R osaecrucian literature. T o encourag e new su bsc rip tio n s im m e d i­ ately,' however, those w h o subscribe for 1916 and 1917 com bined,— tw o years subscriptions at S I.50 and $2.50—a to ta l of $4 for th e two years, will rcceivc all th e back n u m b e rs at once as well as the m a g az in e for th e n ex t 15 m onths.. r N o m ore back n u m b e rs can .be mailed to tl20.se w h o su bscrib e for o nly one y e a r a t $1.50 an d w ish to have their subsc rip tio n s s t a r t w ith last Ja n u a r y . All one y e a r su b sc ription s re^ ceived here after will begin w ith the issue cu r r e n t at the time the su b sc rip tio n is received. I w ish also to call a tte n tio n to the fact th a t I have a r r a n g e d to have 100 b ound vol­ um es prepared c o n ta in in g the 12 copies o f th e 191G m agazine. E a c h volum e will h a v j th e 12 copies indexed, well trim m e d at th e edges, .bound as if one book, w ith a b in d in g of le ath e r sta m p e d w ith gold. Such volumes w ill ’ ake com plete encyclopaedias of R osae­ m crucianism w o rth a h u n d r e d dollars or more. T h e price will be $10 per volume. Please o rd e r now , in advance, if you w ish a volume. T h o se w ho w ish to bind to g e th e r all the 191G copies in one durable binder, will find an ex ­ cellent b in d e r described in an ad v e rtise m en t on th e last pages o f this issue. IN T E R E S T IN G F E A T U R E S T O COME. B e g in n in g w ith our n e x t issue w e will start a series of illustrate d lessons on the tru e in ­ te rp r e ta tio n of the E g y p tia n H ieroglyphics, w ith' a com plete a lp h ab e t a n d g r a m m a r of the H iero g ly p h ics as a language. Of all the a t ­ te m p ts m a d o by E g y p t o lo g is ts and philologists an d othe rs to give the E n g lis h people a correct a lp h ab e t ahd a correct in te rp re ta tio n of eachPage N in e

T H E

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

le tte r o r elfin used in the E g y p t ia n writings, aJi h a v e failed to give the exact m e a n in g s w hich - will be revealed in this series of lessons to b eg in n e x t m onth^ W h e n com p leted the series w ill form an easy and reliable guide for trans' l a t i n g th e w ritin g s on all th e E g y p tia n m o n u m e n ts, tom bs, walls, obelisks, m a n u ­ scripts, etc. A nd, for th e first tim e the EgvptiaH R osaecru cian signs and hieroglyphics w h ich also a p p e a r o n ' th e w alls of m a n y T e m p le s and m o n u m e n ts, w ill be included in th e a lp h ab e t an d in te rp re tatio n s. In the n ex t issue will also begin a n e w and e x t r a o r d i n a r y scientific trea tise ca lle d ; "S u p er S e c r e ta ; S p iritn s S a n c t u s ; R osae Crucis; P h ilo so p h o ru m L ap id e.” w r i tte n by H en ri K h u n ra th . Mr. K h u n r a th w a s one of the most fam o u s of the G erm a n R o saec ru cia n s and founder- of th e first R osaec ru cia n L ib r a r y in E u ro p e . H e w ro te m a n y im p o rta n t scientific R osaecru cian and philosophical w o rk s d u rin g his life (1560 to 1630 A. D.) and the treatise w e will pub lish w as left a t his tr a n sitio n p artly u n co m pleted. I t cam e into th e h a n d s of C ount L o rg e o v e r a h u n d r e d years la ter and h as been c a re fu lly preserved. I t h a s n e v e r been p u b ­ lished before and n o w com es into our han d s w ith Tull privilege to publish as a R osaecrucian book ( a s w a s in te n d e d ). T h e r e arc m a n y a t ­

tra c tiv e a n d in te re stin g diagrAms a n d illu s tr a ­ tio n s a c c o m p a n y in g th e m a n u s c r ip t a n d those of us w h o hav e exam ined e x tra c ts of the tran slatio n being m a de by o u r I m p e r a to r from the L a tin an d R. C. sym bolical lan g u ag e in w hich it w a s w ritte n , find it to be replete w ith the m o st valuable in stru c tio n for h ealing all bodily tro u b le s b y a v e ry simple' process, of foretelling m a n y c o nd itio ns a n d events, of w o rk in g m iracles w ith th e use of a philosophers stone, w hich m a n y can find ac co rd in g to the m e th o d described, and of p ro d u c in g w o n d e r ­ ful oils, sa lts and m inerals b y aid of th e R . C. crucible. I n m a k in g th e tra n sla tio n reference will be m a de to the Sym bolical A lp h a b e t as given to all o u r m e m b e r s in th e 2 nd degree, so th a t some of th e m a tte r m a y be k e p t unrcvealcd to the u n in itia te d . Y et m uch, n o t so h idden v^ill be of g r e a t value to all our readers. T h is one fe a tu re alone will m a ke o u r n e x t ten o r m o re issues w o rth m o re th a n the su b sc rip ­ tion for th e w hole year. In o rd e r to m a k e possible such ra re tre a ts as these it is necessary for all o u r re a d e r s and m e m b e rs to increase th e su b sc rip tio n list as rap id ly As possible. M ake the n ex t tw o ,m o n th s m e a n double th e circulation at l e a s t . T H O R K IIM A L E H T O .

'T o Smoke or not to Smoke?
" Y o u sm o k e t h ir ty c ig a r e tte s a d a y ? ” “ Yes, on th e av e rag e.” " Y o u d o n ’t blam e th e m for y o u r ru n -d ow n co n d itio n ? ” " N o t in th e least— J blam e m y h a rd w o rk .” T h e p hy sic ia n sh q 6k' his head. H e smiled in a vex ed w a y . — h e n he took a leech out of a T g lass jar. j “ L e t me show’ y o u s o m e th in g ,” he said. " B a r e y o u r a r m .” T h e c ig a r e tte sm o k e r b a r e d ' S j s pale arm an d th e d octor laid th e lean black leech upon it. T h e leech fell t o w o rk busily. I ts b o d y began to swell. T h e n , all of a sudde n, a kind, of s h u d ­ d e r convulsed it, a n d it fell to the floor—dead. “ T h a t ’s w h a t y o u r blood did to th a t Icech,” said th e physician. H e took up the little corpse b e tw e e n his finger and th u m b . . ‘‘L ook a t it,” h e said. “ Q uite dead, you see. Y o u poisoned i t.”
Page Ten

“ I guess it w a s n 't a h e a lth y leech in the first place,’ said the c ig a r e tte sm o k e r, sullenly. .’ " W a s n ’t h ea lth y , eh? W e ll, w e ’ll tr y ag a in .” A n d th e p h ysic ia n clapped tw o leeches on the y o u n g m a n ’s thin arm . " I f th e y both d ie." said the patien t, “ I'll s w e a r off— or a t le ast I ’ll c u t dow n m y daily allow ance from -thirty to ten." E v e n as he spoke, the sm aller leech shivered a n d dro p p ed on his knee, dead, an d a m o m e n t la te r th e la rg e r one fell beside it. “ T h is is g h a s tly ,” said th e y o u n g m an, “ I am w o rs e th a n th e pestilence to th e se leeches." “ I t is th e e m p y re u m a tic oil in y o u r blood.” said th e medical man. “A ll c i g a r e tte sm o k e rs h a v e it.” “ D o cto r,” said th e y o u n g m a n , r e g a rd in g the th r e e dead leeches th o u g h tfu lly , “ I half believe y o u ’re( r ig h t.”

G
(VV)

£2

THEl

AMERI CAN

ROS A E

C R U C I S ~ OC+ o

, \° [ \ b

S T A T E M E N T O F T H E O W N E R S H IP , M A N A G E M E N T , C IR C U L A T IO N , ETC ., • REQUIRED .BY T H E A C T O F C O N G R E S S O F A U G U S T 24. «9«a.
O f T h e A m e ric a n Uo-<i' C n ic ls , p u b lish e d m o n lh ly a t N ew Y ork. X . Y.. f o r g e t . 1, 1010. STATE O F N E W Y O K E . <V>r.\TV O F XKTV Y O R K : K«. N efo re m e. a C o m m is sio n e r o f I»ecd*, I n n d f o r t h e S t a t e n n d c o u n ty a f o r e s a id . p e rs o n a lly nppi-an- T h o r K l i m a l e h t o . l a w . d e p o s e s a n il w h o , h a v in g l« v n d u ly s w o rn n c c o rd li •'.ivs t h a t lie I ' th e e d i to r o f th e A uie c a n l t o \ a c C r u c i s . a n il t h a t th e fo llo w in g Is. to (lie l>est o f I Ills k n o w led g e ntid IW fef. a t r u e s ta t e m e n t o f (fie ow ner>*if|ii m a n a g e m e n t (anil If a «l*ll.r p a p e r. th e c i r c u la t io n ! , e tc .; o f ftlie a f o r e s a id p u h llr a t i o n f o r th e d a t e s h o w n In th e n l-o ro J a p tlo n . t-emilri-d by t h e A rt o f A u g u s t 24, It* 12. em l*odled In I s e c tio n 44.1, P o s ta l I .aw a a n d K e g u la tlo n s , p r in te d o n th e r e v e rs e o f th is fo rm , to w i t : 1. T h n t t h e n a m e s a n d a d d re s s e * o f Jie p u b lis h e r , e d llo r. n n d b u s in e s s m a n a g e rs a r e : I 'u b l l s h c r : C u lt u r e -Cubl. Co.. StW W. <Stli S t.. X ew Y ork, X. V. E d i t o r : T h o r K llm n lc h to . 2 .!t t i l t h S ltro o k ly n . X. V. M a n a g in g K d l t o r : T h o r K lfro aleb fo . Itu s ln e x s M a n a g e rs : N one. 2 . ‘ T h a t th e o w n e rs a r e : (t.'lv c n a m e s n n d a d d r l s s e s o f In d iv id u a l o w n e rs , o r. If a ro r|v o r n tlo n j g iv e Its n a m e n n d t h e n a m e * n n d a d d r e s s e s o f stockholder}* o w n in g o r h o ld lu g t p e r c e n t, o r m o re o f th e t o t a l a m o u n t o f s to c k .) C u ltu r e l*ilW. C o., 3tHJ W e st 4 S th S t.. N ew V ork X. V . : 1C. S . l.cw l*. Ilra n le h to , 2.‘I4 0 7 th 1.10 lV u t A r e ., N ew Y ork. X. Y. ; T h o r S t., ltr o o k ly n . N . Y . : A. C. C am p b ell. ^ • 8 ^ ,4 1 1 1 A ve., M t. V e rn o n . N . V .; C . C . lt r a u n . S k n r a . Swi S. T h a t t h e k n o w n b o n d h o ld e rs, r r U S j ^ s . a n d o th e r s e c u r i ty h o ld e r s o w n in g Of h o ld in g 1 i*r'Crxit. o r m o re of t o t a l a m o u n t o f b o n d s , m o rtg a p v s , o r Ibf-r s e c u r itie s a n - : ( I f t h e r e a r e n o n e , s o s t a t e .) • N one. • . 4. T h n t t h e tw o p a r a c r n p h s n r i t ab o v e , p ly in g th e n a m e s th e o w n e r s , s to c k h o ld e r s , a n d s e c u r ity h o ld e r* . If a n y . c o n ta in n o t o n ly th e lis t o f s to c k h o ld e r s ntafl s e c u r ity h o ld e rs a s th e y n p p■ear u p o n th e l*>oks o f th e 'r o m n ttn r b u t a ls o . enr l*>oi;s ‘c o m n n In e a s e s w h e re th e s to c k h o ld e r o r s e c u r ity - h o ld te r npjwar-< ld u p o n th e b o o k s o f th e coni|>*ny a s tr u s te e b r In a n y o th e r tid llc ln ry r e la tio n . th e n a m e o f ilie i>er>on o r c o r p o r a tio n fo r w h o m s u c h t r u s te e Is a c tin g . Is g iv e n : a ls o t h a t th e s a id tw o p a r a g r a p h * c o n ta in s t a t e m e n t s . e m b ra c in g a tf la n t's fu ll k n o w led g e a n d N -llef a s to th e c ir c u m s ta n c e s a n d c o n d itio n s u n d e r w h ic h s to c k h o ld e rs a n d s e c u r i ty .h o ld e r s - w h o d o n o t a p p e a r u|>on th e b o o k s o f th e c o m p a n y nV tr u s te e s , b o ld s to c k ati<l s e c u rltl« v* In n r a p a c ity oih*-r th a n t h a t o f a b o n a ride o w n e r ; n n d tills n n ia tlt h a s n o m a so n to b eliev e t h a t a n y o th e r p e r s o n , n sso e ln I Ion. o r co rjK irn llo n h a s a n y I n t e r n e d ir e c t o r In d ire c t In th e hU| , | s to c k . Is in d s . o r o th e r s e c u ritie s t h a n a s so s t a t e d b y h im . T h a t th e a v c ra c « \n u m l> e r o f c o p ie s o f e a c h Is su e -o f th i s p u b lic a tio n so ld o r d is tr i b u te d , th r o u g h t h e m a lls o r o th e r ­ w ise. to p a id su lw crll* ers d u r in g t h e Klx m o n th s p rv o -d ln g th e d a te s h o w n aN>vf> I s . . . . ’............. ( T h is In f o r m a tio n Is re q u ire d fm m d a lly p u b lic a tio n s o n ly .) T M O R E llM A L E M T O . S w o rn to n n d
IfUO.

iliscrlb e d b e fo re m e th is COth d a y o f S e p t..

rSeal.l

TM OM AS P . M l t E E . C o m m is sio n e r o f r*.s>d<. C ity o f X ew Y ork.' lie s ld ln g In X ew Y o rk C o u n ty . • C e r tif ic a te s 0 le d N ew Y ork C o u n f.r Xi>. l!*o. X ew Y ork R e g is te r X o, lti(Xfc>. . (M y C o m m is sio n ’ e x p ire s M ay 2 . I f llS .)

J .T h is m a g a z i n e : and all busine ss in terests o f the Culture P u b l. Co. w ere sold to the S u p re m e G ra n d L od ge, A. ffl. O. R. C., a f t e r th is s ta te m e n t w as issued- to the Post-office a u th o ritie s . .

* i.

S

o
fV '.-

u

l

f

u

l

l

O

r

g

a

n

s

For Temple or H om e

T h e i r la no B io alc q u ite as s w e e t. q u i t e a s I n s p ir in g a n d h a r m o n io u s w ith th v ib r a tio n s o f th e C o s iu lc C o n K lo u sn ew a a a t h a t 'g lr r n fo rth b y 'a n o r g a n . _ "■* T h e rn u a lt-.o f the o rg an la n o t o n ly r v s p o n s lv e .J o (lie te rn p ern m e n t o f th e p e rs o n w h o l i g h t l y 'o r s e r io u s ly totiehea Ita kp y a, b ut the v e ry jia tu rt- o f I ts v lb r n t lo n s a t t u n e I ts s o f t n n d tu e liw llo u s s o u n d s w ith th e B n e r v ltira a uniii 'utui If.' kouI In < ‘.vj>nwsl<>« Js H iu ih Jlk e i h e s o u l o f m a n ; fo r I t Hon* o f *11 ntiitirr. T h e orgn srn c lm in lw * « , h a rm o n ize s and fin d s a t ltn l ty w ith th e Id e a l e x p r e s s io n s o f t h e d iv in e in tu a n . K v e rv jm s s lb le e m o tio n , p ic tu re , aentliuent d I n s p ir a t io n c a n b e b e a u tif u l ly , n o b ly a n d s u b t l y e x p r e s s e d w ith a •w ell-m ad e. prc*i>erlx toned o rg a n . . Such an organ—In various s ty le s a n d s ls e s , a t a w id e r a n g e o f p r ic e s —tiro m a d e b y o n e tlrm . T h e - M a s o n anti lla m lln ’ Organa liavr an u v la b le r e p u t a ti o n a t t a i n e d b y y e a r s o f te s t jjm l a p p r o v a l b y t h e g r e a t e s t m u . . . xlclana and th e moat capabl J u d g e s o f r e a l, s o u lf u l m u s ic . . . Tn th e Suprem e Omnd LffJ g e o f t h e A. M . O .- U . C . In X e w Y o rk , o n e o f th e s e O r g a n s h a s d e m o n s tr a te d It a a b ility to exprepa the JIa te r* ’ m y s ti c to n e s n n d c h o r d s a s n o o t h e r o r g a n m ig h t d o . A u d e v e r y m e m b e r o f th e Order, e re ry rrmlrr o • t b j * in a g o x ln e , dc*lrJu jp f o b n r'e u m o d e r n rvpJJea o f th e m u s ic o f t h e a n c ie n t* , d u p lica tin g lt« aweetneaa, we n in e s * a n d h a r m o n y , s h o u ld h a v e n M aso n a n d H a m lin O r g a n . , C a b in e t *U e* f o f th e hom e; .larger and |«nverft 1 o r g a n s f o r t h e T e m p le o r C a th e d r a l. 'W r i t e f o r O a ta lo r o f 'H l u a tr » tl o n » f u d I’r l w . ,

( P lm w

m e n tio n A m e r ic a n R o a a e C rucfa.J-

on and Hamlin Co
O rg a n D e p a rtm e n t - .

N ew York C ity
13E V 3Zfr* f' ii 5B r' *
Page iThirty-cne

T H E

AMERICAN JrO SAE

C R UCIS

(n/qV .

\ ^ I jt

N O If I C E
T h e Key to Reincarnation
H E R E w as a formal a n n o u n c e m e n t in the M arch issue of this m agazine of the com pletion of a form ula by o u r I m p e r a t o r by w hich the birth date of one's p i e sent life could be . used, a s tro lo g ita lly to m ake an strological m ap or horosco pe of o n e ’s previous in c a rn a tio n s on this earth! T h o se interested in such m a tte rs w e re invited to w rite to us and it w as p la nned to let all k n o w how” and where f u rth e r w o rk of th is kind m ig h t be secured. It seems th a t so m a n y m is u n d e rsto o d and be­ lieved th a t the I m p e r a t o r wlas/prcparcd to m a ke individual horoscopes of pastjttves or else ready to give th e form ula for th e process to all w ho w ro te for it. Sev eral h m d r e d letters have been received since last M rch in reg a rd to this m a t t e r and it has been in possible for the Imp e r a to r or his S e c re ta ry t > a n s w e r all of th e m o r g r a n t the r e q u e s ts mac e. A r r a n g e m e n ts hav e becft m a de now for those w h o w ish horoscopes or b i r t h m aps m a d e ac­ c o rd in g to this form ula. T h e I m p e r a to r has given th e form ula to one of o u r B ro th e rs well versed in g en eral a s tro lb g y so th a t he may m a k e a n u m b e r of careful te sts and thereby prove th e c o rrec tn ess of th e form ula. T his B ro th e r, w h o w ish e s to rem a in kno w n o nly as " M y s tic A stro ,” will, therefore, be pleased to h e a r from th ose w h o sincerely w ish to hav e a m ap m a d e of th e ir la st ihc arnatio n in accordance w ith this m y stic fc rm u la . B u t the Imp e r a to r has insisted th a t th e B r o th e r w h o .h a s offered to do th is shall receive, some slight co m pensa tion f o r ' t h e ti ie he will expend on each m a p a n d in te rp re tatio n . Plea se b e a r in m in d that, to m ake a careful m a p of one’s p a s t or prejvious life,-to discover its im p o r ta n t revelations to in te r p re t th e 'sig n s of th e place of birth, tim e, conditions, etc., and itemize th e se in r e a d a b le _ form , necessitates from five to ten h ours] w o r k fo r each map. A nd it is tedious, m a th e m a tic a l and fatiguing w o rk w h e n done a fte r the usua l w o rk of the day. A nd w hen the h o u r of the p rese nt birth is n ot know n or only a p p ro x im ate d the w ork is considerably m ore difficult and lengthy. T herefore, the I m p e r a t o r h a s su ggested that r those d esiring the R ein c arn atio n M aps should feel obligated to the B r o th e r in accordance with the following scale: 1. R eincarnation M ap m a de of past life based on the exa ct h o u r and date of p rese nt life ...............................................$2.00 R e inc arnation M ap m a de of p ast life . based on p r e s e n t date of birth w ith ­ o u t the kno w n h o u r of birth. In such case a p h o to g r a p h m u s t be sent so that the ex a ct h o u r of present birth m ay be d e t e r m i n e d ....................$3.00

2.

In o th e r words, if y o u do n ot kn ow the exact h o u r of birth of y o u r p re se n t life, y o u m u s t send a p h o to g r a p h a lon g -with y o u r re q u e st for m ap and an ex tra c h a rg e is m a d e for w orking out the h o u r of bjrth, ap p rox im ately , for you. B u t if y o u do k n o w th e ex a ct h o u r o f 'b i r t h of y o u r p re se n t life, as well as th e birth date, then on ly $2 need be se nt for a map. In sen ding y o u r re q u e st fo r these maps please be sure to send y o u r full nam e, w h e th e r a m e m b e r of the O r d e r or not, yo u r com plete address, place w h e r e born (city, state, c o u n try an d co n tin en t), date of birth. 3nd, if possible, the h o u r of birth. Send y o u r le tte r registered and sealed, w ith the info rm atio n and money carefully, enclosed. D o no t se n d such letters a n y - o th e r w ay th a n registered and seaied, and do not send checks o r m o n e y orders, for w e do n o t desire s tr a n g e r s to k n o w of y o u r personal m atters. A d d r e s s ’all such le tte rs to “ Mystic A stro, care of the R o sae Crucis S u ­ p rem e Lodge, 306 W e s t 4Sth S treet, N e w Y ork City.” All mail w ill be s e n t y o u properly sealed also. * • •; T H E S E C R E T A R Y .'
Page Thirty-cue

the M aster Digit, nine, possesses in itfc d ia m e­ ter and circum ference the o nly w hole num be rs th ro u g h w hich it m a y be absolu tely q u ad ra te d — G.561 and 20,612. T h e q u a d r a tu r e of the circle, as d e m o n ­ str a te d by P a r k e r , t h a t is to say, a ci cum ference w hich will divide by four w ith o u t frac­ tions, is the m ost valuable and far-reaching discovery in th e m a them atical world; du ring the nin eteenth ce n tu ry . P a r k e r says t h a t the Q u a d r a t u r e " w a s kn o w n to the E g y p tia n s , but has neve r been reached by the m o d e m geom eters fori the one plain reason th a t in the c o n s tru c tio n of the sy stem itself, all the elem ents of the -Q uadra­ tu re w ere rejected, set aside and left out. It is

as plain, sim ple and co m prehensive a problem, w h en the properties of curved lines a re c o n ­ sidered, as a n y th in g co n tained in Euclid. It .is s im p ly th a t the circle and the eq uilateral tri­ angle (th e first tw o shapes pro d u ce d by N a ­ tu re ) are opposite one a n o t h e r in the elem ents of their co nstruction and hence, in th e ir frac­ tional relations to the square, th e y arc opposite one a n o th e r in ratio of the sq uare of their dia m eters." T he Q u a d r a tu re of the Circle lies at the very root of all geom etrical science, and to discard it is to deprive ourselves of a valuable p a r t of the science, bccause cxact ju stice and equity m u s t u ltim ately rest upon E x a c t M a them atic al Law .

T h e W o rk of the O rd er
U R I N G the p a s t m o n th th e w o rk of the O r d e r has been unuslially a c ­ tive and productive. L o d g e s have been p la n n e d a n d p re lim in a ry steps ta k en in five cities. ReqUeST^; for th e privilege of o rg a n iz in g L o d g e s have come from fo u r o th e r cities and o ver fifty req u e sts from th o se seeking to help organize L odges h av e bee n received. I n P h ilade lph ia D elta L o d g e No. I opened its ow n T e m p le early in F e b r u a r y and the I m ­ p e ra to r and S u p re m e Secretary-G enerbl visited th e L odg e on S u n d ay , F e b r u a r y 4th.j A g e n ­ eral m eeting w a s held and ad d re ssed by the I m p e r a t o r In th e a fte rnoon , follow ed by a very beautiful feast in o ne of the p r e tt y dining room s of the city. I n th e evening th^ I m p e r a ­ to r gave a le ctu re to the .m e m b e rs of the T h ird D egree. T h e T em p le is beautiful in its h arm on ious a n d m y stic d eco rations and in addition to the L o d g e R o o m there are th e usual ■Chambers and a v e ry cosy re a d in g a n d rest • room. Delta No. 1 is to be con gra tula ted upon having acquired and com pleted its ovin T em p le so soon and in so ap p ro p ria te a m anner. I n San Ju a n , P u e r to Rico, the G ra n d L odge held its In itia tio n s a n d an opening of its ow n

( December

T em p le on J a n u a r y 25th w ith additional I n itia ­ tions on F e b r u a r y St?i. A R e p re se n tativ e of th a t L o d g e called upon the I m p e r a t o r and ex­ pressed the w ond erful e n th u s ia s m w h ich the m e m b ers there show in all th e w ork. N early all of the B ro th e rs in th a t L o d g e are S c o t­ tish Rite M asons w hile the Sisters are g e n ­ erally m e m b ers of the E a s t e r n Star. A L od ge in Cuba is being considered by th e .P u e r to .R ic o ■G ra nd Lodge. In Cleveland, Ohio, the G ra n d L odge w as institu te d on F e b r u a r y 8th ( th e second a n n i­ v ersa ry of the first F o u n d a tio n M eeting held in A m eric a). T h e cerem ony, as rep o rted by th e S ecretary, w as very beautiful a n d a g r e a t n u m b e r w ere given perm ission to e n ter as N eophytes. T h e G rand M a s te r of th e P e n n - ' sylvania Jurisdiction! conducted the cerem ony and th e O hio Grand" L o d g e presented h im w ith a beautiful solid gold Cross for his g r e a t help in s ta r t in g the L o d g e o n its good work! In Chicago the Illinois G ra nd L o d g e has re­ ceived a request for a C h a rte r for a n o th e r . L o d g e in th a t City to care for th e g re a t n u m ­ ber of applicants being considered. T h e G ra n d L o d g e has'filled its entire m e m b ersh ip and the m e m b ers w rite to the S ecretary a n d I m p e r a t o r .
Page Tw enty-seven

TH E

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CR. UCIS

v e ry e n th u sia stic ally a b o u t th e w o rk being don e by th e G ra nd M aster. T h e L od ge has en tered th e Second D egree w ork. In O m a h a the N eb rask a G ra n d L o d g e is co m p letin g its o rg aniz ation w o rk and the G ra nd M a s te r is more e n th u sia stic th a n ever since he h a s succeeded in e s ta b lish in g a firm foundation. In H a r la n , Io w a , the G rand L o d g e is now rea dy for th e Second D egree w o rk and those w ho hav e been steadily a d v a n c in g arc very enco uraged. In W y o m in g , w here m a n y of o u r B ro th e rs an d S isters from various L o d g es hav e been s e t­ tlin g w ith in the past few m o n th s , there are sufficient m e m b e r s to estab lish a L odge, and a re q u e st for a C h a rte r has been se nt to the I m p e r a t o r b y th e M a ste r of P a r a g o n L od ge No. 2 in W ilm e rd in g , Pa. H e will probably become M a s te r of the L o d g e in W y o m in g , w h ich w ill e v e n tu a lly become a G ra n d Lodge. O u r m e m b e r s living there in th e R osacc rucia n C olony a re h a p p y and delighted w ith the land w hich has been d onated for th a t p u rpose. W i th G o d ’s g r e a t good n a tu ra l b ea u tie s a n d r e ­ sources a r o u n d th e m and w ith a R osaec rucia n T e m p le in th e w ilderness of th a t open c ountry, th ese B r o th e r s and Sisters will live a life to be enyied b y all of us in th e g r e a t cities. I n Salt L a k e City. U ta h , th e G ra n d L o d g e is :^dy now rea dy fo r its in stitution ce rcm o n ie s and

first Initiations. T h e re p o rts of the G ra nd S ccrc tary of th a t L o d g e are very en c o u rag in g indeed. T h e D e p u ty G ra nd M a ster of the P e n n s y l­ vania G ra nd L odge a n d his wife visited the S upre m e L odge T e m p le d u rin g the m o n th and rep o rted the keen in te re st being taken by their m e m b ers in the w ork an d in the com ing C o n ­ vention. T h e good S iste r h as been a g r e a t help in su c h affairs as these an d wc know th a t she is p la nn ing m a n y helps for those w h o will be s tr a n g e r s to the city of P itts b u r g h in July. In the S o u th and th e W e s t th e w o rk is going on v ery well an d n o w th a t the holidays are over, keen inte rest is b eing ta k en in m a k in g o u r slogan “a G ra nd L o d g e in eve ry S ta te for 1917" an established fact long before th e y ea r is ended. In C a n ad a r e q u e sts for L o d g e s are being prepared, and from M exico co m es a sim ilar request. A nd so the good w o rk p ro g re sses against m a n y o b stacles and m u c h opposition at times. B ut w ith o u t u n d u e haste, force o r concern ail obsta cles a re overcom e by G oodness alone, for Love c o n q u e rs all things. ( R e q u e s ts for in fo rm a tio n c o n c ern in g any L o d g e of o u r O rd e r m u s t be ad d re sse d to the S u p re m e S ecre tary -G e n eral. 30G W e s t 43th S treet. N e w Y ork City.)

M o d e rn A dvertising
T h e old a n d re n o w n e d ad v a n c e a g e n t or “ p ress a g e n t ” for th e B a m u m & B aily circus w as a m a s t e r of th e a r t of m a k in g forceful a p ­ peals t h r o u g h cleyerly w o rd e d a d v e rtise m en ts. H is s tr o n g e s t m e th o d w a s odd a n d w a s often c o m m e n te d u p o n by s tu d e n ts a n d m a s te rs of t h e E n g lis h langu age. Such m e th o d s w ere a p ­ propriate, t h o u g h U nique;to circus advertising. B u t w h a t a re w e to th in k of a sim ila r style be­ ing' applied to th e ad v e rtisin g of a sa cred N e w T h o u g h t c h u rc h . F o r in sta n c e : th e follow ing a d v e r tis e m e n t appeared ;in th e N e w Y o rk ’ T im e s for S a tu rd a y , D ec em b e r 9. u n d e r “ R e ­ ligious N o tic e s ” and am id th e m o s t conse'rvative of c h u rc h a n n o u n c e m e n ts:
f t itjr T tftn ly - fig h l .

M • NEW THOU GHT i C R I T E R I O N T H E A T R E . B r o a d w a y at 44th Street. S e a r s ’ sacred scientific sa y in g s sn a re sinners, save souls, sa tisfy seekers. S o m e th in g ' signific antly sa lu ta ry , su p re m ely sup erio r, sub lim ely su s ta in in g , su p e rb ly s u p p o r t ­ ing, s t u p e n d o u sly stim ula tin g, s u p e m a l l y s o o t h ­ ing, sc a rin g ly sta rtling , su p e rlativ ely stirrin g, su itab ly safe, solid, st ro n g , su b s ta n tia l, sensible, se rviceable, specific, sincere— sagely, sanely, .s p o n ta n e o u s ly , spark ling ly, skillfully, seriously said, Sun da y, 11:15 A. M. F . W . S E A R S . Speaker. (S o m e sp e a ker.) Special services,, select su rro u n d in g s, splendid singing. S t a r t soon. Se ­ cure seats. _ Sp e n d silver. Sure success.
Su b je ct: "M AN— H IS O W N C R E A T O R .”

THE!

A M ER IC AN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

3

A *v\- \ S

/

,

T h e Secretary-G eneral Resigns
H E follow ing le tte r has been placcd on file in the reco rd s of our O rder. I t is of inte rest to all o u r m e m b ers w h o h a v e k n o w n a n d loved our S ecretary-G eneral since the e s ta b ­ lis h m e n t of the O r d e r in this co u ntry . T o the R e spec te d I m p e r a t o r arid M o st W o r ­ shipful G ra n d M a ster General A. M. O. R. C. of A m e r ic a : I D ea r B r o th e r and S ire : } Before th e Sign of the C ro ss: G re e tin g s I I t is w ith the deepest feelings of r esp e ct to you personally, a n d w ith full realiza tio n of the im p o r ta n t ste p n o w taken, th a t I h u m b ly re ­ q u e s t the favor of b eing r ele ase d from the d u tie s of S u p re m e S ecre tary -G e n eral of our beloved O r d e r to ta k e effect a W n e b eginn ing of th e new fiscal year. D u rin g t h e tw o years I h a v e occupied th is position I: have faithfully tried to d isc harge m y duties to the b e s t of m y abilities a n d m eans, and th e w o rk done may b ea r w itn e ss w h e th e r or n o t this e n d e a v o r has bee n in vain. I fee 1 th a t the w elfare of th e O r d e r de­ m a n d s this im p o r ta n t ste p by me, k n o w in g th a t m y la b o r is d esire d in o th e r capacities. M y d e a r Sire, I p ra y you thaj th e sa m e close f riendship a n d love t h a t have Existed betw een u s d u r in g th e s e try in g y e a rs m a y be f u rth e r ce m e n ted b y th is ren u nc iatio n1 of an h o n o r I h a v e dee p ly felt as a sacred d u t y a n d w hich I hav e h u m b ly striv e d to fill. B efore th e S ign of th e Cross I a s s u r e you, m y beloved superior, th a t m y sole e n d e a v o r in th is in c arn atio n will be an unselfish labor in th e in te r e s t of o u r beloved O r ^ e r to th e g lo ry of God and th e u pliftm en t of h u m a n kind. W i t h P eac e P ro fo u n d , T H O R K I I M A L E H f O , K.R.C., S ecre tary -G e n eral A. M. O. I . C. of America.
Given u n to se a / th is th e 26th d a y of F e b r u a ry , A. D. 1917, and of o u r O r d e r 3269. N e w York , N. Y.

realized th a t th e w ork of his office w as a great b u rd e n upon B r o th e r K iimalehto. H e h as fu l­ filled his duties so w onderfully, so un tirin g ly a n d so en th usiastically th a t the O rd e r in this c o u n try ow es to him a d eb t w h ich it can never repa y except w ith the love, the k in d n e ss and goo d n ess w hich it gives to all. B r o th e r K iim alehto has d u r in g th e p ast tw o yearp given his entire tim e free of ch a rg e to the p erfo rm an ce of his d u ty as Sec re tary General, realizing the inability of the O rd e r a t this tim e to pay for clerical service, and he has been u n tir in g in his efforts to spread th e G re at L ig h t. H e likewise b egan the p ublish ing of this m agazine, w hich is now o u r p ro p erty , and w e u n d e rsta n d th a t th r o u g h condition s caused by the w a r in E urope, he has been th r o w n on his ow n resources for the su p p o rt of his family. T h e I m p e r a to r has r e p e ate d ly expressed his personal love an d adm iration for B r o th e r K iim alehto and his high ideals a n d ste ad fast-ness. H e has alw a y s been fair, ju s t, co nsider­ a te nnd self-sacrificing. In accep ting the above resig n a tio n the I m ­ p e r a to r directed th a t re solutio ns should be a d o p te d an d p rese nted to the S ecre tary -G e n ­ eral b y the S upre m e Council and desires that all w ho have felt the sam e d eb t to him should w rite him and express th a t appreciation th a t he m a y have in his p ersonal files the le tters of love. In f u rth e r appreciation of his w ork th e I m ­ p e r a to r h as appoin ted B r o th e r K iim alehto G ra n d M a ster of the N ew Y ork G ra nd Lodge. T h a t L od ge is n o w b ein g form ed in New, Y ork an d B r o th e r K iim a leh to will be d u ly 'and fit­ tin g ly k n ig h te d as G ra nd M a ster at th e N ew Y e a r festivities in th e S u p re m e L o d g e on M a rc h 21st. " W e feel th a t, the o rg an iz atio n w o rk on th e E m p ir e S ta te is in good han d s, and e x p e c t to • be a b le to r e p o r t th e e s ta b lish m e n t of m a n y " lodges in th e State. j . A n n o u n c e m e n t of th e election of th e new Secretary -G eneral will be m a d e in a n o th e r issue. j I I T H E E D IT O R S .

1

'

T h e fo re g o in g le tte r cam e gs a g r e a t shock to th e S u p rem e C ouncil of A m erica, y e t - we

I

* '•

Pag t\ Eleven

t h e

A

m e r i c a n

,

r o s a e

c r u c i s

[ \ / ov/ .

I ^ ^

The . Work of the Order
The Resignation of the Suprem e .Grand M aster
A R eport by the
: r r t a r y of th e A m e r ic a n S u p r e m e Council . 'if ’ M a s te r General of this O rd e r by th e ch a rtc r m e m b e rs and founders of the O rd e r, I have w o r k e d 'd ilig e n tly in th e ca p ac ity — the dual cap ac ity — of tw o Officers.' Soon after b y election as G ra n d M a ste r G en ­ eral the C h a rte r M em ber* of this, th e first L o d g t of o u r O rd e r in this C o u n try , created an d m a de n ecessary th e high office of I m ­ p e ra to r for o u r O rd e r so th a t the provisions of the C onstitu tio n th e n being ado p ted m ig h t be m ade operative.

N im p o r ta n t m eetin g w as held by th e A m erican S u p re m ^ Council in the S uprem e G ra n d L o d g e on the e v e n in g of O cto b e r 25, 2917. O f­ ficially the m e etin g is j recorded as th e 21st L a t e r a n Council. I T h e m e etin g w as opened by thb I m p e r a to r an d for som e tim e th e Council devoted its tim e to the consideration of a p a p e r su b m itte d by m e m b e r s of the O hio G ra n d L o d g e and the r e p o r ts of th e M in istraro in connection w ith it. A fte r a s a tisfactory disposition of the m a tte rs p e rta in in g to the s a jtf/p a p e r and^ its rela tio n to m alty of the m o s t fu n d a m e n ta l principles of o u r O rd e r, th e Council u n a n i­ m o u sly e n dorse d the w o rk b eing Idone by the M in is tr a r o and gav e a s ta n d in g vote of th a n k s to th e M in isters of the M in s tra ro for their ef­ ficient services at practically all n o u rs of the day. T h e n th e I m p e r a to r asked for he q uiet atte n tio n of th e Council w hile he lead a paper w h ich he desired to have m a d e p a r t of the official records of this m eeting. T h e C ouncilors anticipated an jth e r of the I m p e r a t o r ’s m o n th ly m e ssage s of helpfulness a n d ' inspiration, bu t w ere g re a tly surp rised to h e a r th a t it w as, in fact, a resignation. T h e follow ing is a copy of th e p a p e r then read and recorded: T o th e S u p re m e Council of th e O rd e r for N o rth A m e r ic a ; Respected Officers and B ro thers an d S iste rs: I s ta n d on this a lta r i n 't h e E a s t of o u r T e m ­ ple to -n ig h t as one w ho has served y o u well, so far as m y abilities and w illingness have p e r ­ m itted, an d I hav e striv e n unselfishly to give y o u th o se th in g s w h ich I pledged to m a ke the w o rk of m y life. F o r tw o yea rs, six m o n th s and tw e n ty -f o u r days, o r in o th e r w o rd s since A pril 1st. 1915, w hen I w as elected G rand

A t t h a t tim e I w as declared to be, and later d uly recognized, as th e I m p e r a t o r of th e O rd e r for this Ju r is d ic tio n ; and the ratification and adoption of our C onstitu tio n a t o u r recent N ational C onvention have given en d o rse m e n t to th a t declaration of th e C h a r t e r Member*, som e of w h o m are p re se n t here to n ig h t a t th it tw enty-first L a te r a n Council. O u r C o nstitu tio n plainly sta te s th a t the Of­ fices of I m p e r a t o r and S u p re m e G ra nd M a ster G eneral or G rand M a ster General, m a y be held by the sam e B r o th e r by election. B u t it is evi­ dent, b y the te rm s of th e C on stitu tio n , th a t g r e a te r efficiency in th e w ork of th o se offices w ould result from a distin ct se p aratio n of the two. I h av e recognized a n d shall alw a y s deeply a p preciate th e h o nor I have enjoyed an d the ra re ple asures th a t hav e been m in e in s e r v in g . this L o d g e a n d th e O rd e r generally as S upre m e G ra n d M aster. B u t I w o u ld be selfish, I w ould be unappreciative, if I did no t also recognize the fact t h a t in the e n jo y m en t of such h o n o r in the future, I will be depriving this L o d g e and especially the O rder, of th a t efficiency, th a t executive ability and t h a tn d d e d ^ e ia f ic e w hich will come th r o u g h th e M iv isio n of th e se tw o offices and th e s h a rin g o ^ th e h o n o rs w ith one w h o is j u s t as capable, j u s t as loyal, and j u s t as w illing to serve us all a s sj h av e been.
Hagr Two H und^rd and T u /tn ty th r e t

And so, tonight. B ro th e rs and Sisters, I w ish to offer to this Council m y resign ation as S u p re m e G ra nd M a s te r of this L o d g e and of th is O rder, to take effect a t once, w ith in y o u r im m ediate presence and w ith in the of­ ficial consideration of this tw e n ty -first Council. T h is in no wise co n te m p la te s a w ith d ra w a l from the active service I so g rea tly e njo y in y o u r behalf. It does not affect m y position as I m p e r a t o r . o f the O rd e r so long as it is y o u r desire th a t T retain th a t Office and th a t r e s p o n ­ sibility. T h e resignation now offered and in c o rp o r­ ated in this special a d d re ss to you, p erta in s only to the office of G ra n d M a ste r General or S u p re m e G ra nd M a ste r as th e office is now in ­ dicated in the adop ted C onstitution. I shall still serve y o u in all w a y s possible. I shall, w ith y o u r perm ission and the'pt*rmission of he w h o m ay succeed m e as S upre m e G ra nd M a ster of this S u p re m e G ra n d L odge, c o nduc t the le ctures of the h ighe st degree op erating h ere and upon call or invitation, a d m in is te r an y ri te j t or give anV lectures th a t m a y be d e ­ sired. ■But y o u r acceptance of this resignation will relieve m e of m a n y of those executive duties w h ich have become too g re a t a n d too r e sp o n ­ sible for insufficient a t te n t io n a t the h a n d s of o n e . w h o ;is . tr y in g , w ith evident difficulties, to o c t u p y ‘and c o n d u c t tw o offices of this O r d e r a t the sam e tim e.- I t will in fact ad d g r e a te r efficiency to th e Office of th e I m p e r a t o r a n d to th a t'o f th e S u p re m e G ra nd M a ster, a*d will r e ­ m o v e . t h a t inc ongruous ele m e n t of Having the I m p e r a to r, upon appeal, ac co rd in g to th ? C o n ­ stitu tio n , review th e ac tio n s an d decisions m ade b}r th e S u p re m e G ra nd M a s t e r while the tw o offices nre\held by one B rothe r. A ccording to o u r C onstitu tio n the S uprem e Council of o u r O rd e r h a s th e sole p o w e r of electing a S up re m e G ra n d M a ster. T h e te rm of office as sta te d th e re in is tw o o r m ore years. W e r e it w ith in m y p o w e r "to app o in t he w ho should succeed me I w ou ld hav e little difficulty in a s sistin g yp:i to h av e a n e w S upre m e G ra nd M a s t e r tonight,- and a t once. B u t y o u are b o u n d t o d u ly elect y o u r S u p re m e G rand M a s ­ ted from" a m o n g th o se in th is bo d y , and I ca n ­ n o t do~rnore th a n m a k e a sincere sug g e stio n
■Page Ttuo. M attered and .T v e n ty -fa u r

or recom m end ation, p r a y in g th a t y o u heed this re c om m enda tio n in y o u r consid erations, b ea r­ ing in m in d m y th o ro u g h u n d er sta n d in g of the pro b lem s of the office an d the fitness of p e c u ­ liar capabilities of those w ithin th is Council. T h erefo re, B ro th e rs and Sisters, w ith yo u r perm ission I do m a ke a re c o m m end a tion, which you m ay ju s tly and w ith o u t hesitancy ignore if y o u so desire. W i t h th is u n d e r s ta n d ­ ing I su b m it to you as m y r e c o m m e n d a tio n for the office, o u r good, loyal and unselfish serv an t-b ro th e r, K n ig h t C onrad H. L in d s te d t, the S u p re m e G ra nd C o n d u c to r of th is Lodge. F o r m a n y m o n th s — in fact since th e early d a y s of our w o rk —he h3S been w i t h us. H e has stood loyally by us in o u r tim es of distress, no t to a n y degree u n u su a l for on e w h o has pledged as w e have pledged, a n d n o t to a d e­ gree g r e a te r than t h a t w hich h a s m a rk e d the loj’a l ty o f all of you. B ut he h a s sh o w n ab ility to fill certain duties a n d bec ause of h i s ex p e ­ rience and train in g as a M a s te r of a Masonic L o d g e and an execu tiv e in th a t bo d y , and b e­ cause of his o th e r special abilities. I am c o n ­ vinced bey o n d cavil of his special fitness for the office stated. I feel th a t it w ill be an honor to have so good a b r o th e r and so loyal a w o rk e r succeed m e and w ork w ith m e in the conduct of our O rder. M a y I p ra y , th e n th a t y o u im m ed ia te ly ac­ cept m y resignation, a n d th a t y o u fo rth w ith proceed to n om inate a n d then elect m y succes­ sor th a t m y action i r a y be d u ly recorded in the p roceeding s of th is tw e n ty -first L a te ra n Council? W i th L ove and the m o st sincere w ishes for Peace a n d P o w er, h ea lth and p r o s p e r ity for each of y o u , and w ith th e k in d e st re m e m ­ bran c e of c u r associations, I desire to retire as y o u r S u p re m e G rand M a s te r and b e s to w upon y o u m y blessin gs an d m y v ib ra tio n s of Cosmic A ttu n e m e n t. Y o u r h um ble se rv a n t and b rother, ’ 1 H. S P E N C E R L E W I S . S upre m e G ra n d M aster. THE E L E C T IO N OF THE NEW ‘

SU PREM E GRAND M ASTER. W h e n th e last w o rd w a s rea d a n d th e v ib r a ­ tions of the. voice becam e in audible, th e re w as

T HE

AMERICAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

p rofound silence in the T e m p le ; and in the eyes of more th a n one could be seen tears. N one cared to sp e a k ; it seemed im possible to fully realize the problem th a t c onfronted th e m any B r o th e rs and S isters assem bled. T h 3t B ro th e r L e w is w as justified in seeking relief from the b u r d e n s and responsibilities of tw o im p o rta n t positions in the O rd e r, has been evident to those associated w ith him. T h a t he v o lu n ­ ta rily labored u n d e r con ditions w hich few of us could cope w ith, has also been evident. But n ow th a t w e w ere face to face w ith the nec es­ sary' cha n g e, a change long cxpectcd, we felt t h a t one of the m o st im p o r ta n t sessions of the Council w as aw a itin g our calm a n d ’ careful action. T h e S u p re m e G rand Chaplin w as the first to speak, a n d w ith evident appreciation of the m o ve he w a s m aking, q u i c t l ^ t f a d e a motion th a t th e resignation of the 'S u p r e m e G rand M a s te r be accepted w ith reg rets. T h is motion w as seconded by the S u p re m e G ra nd D ep u ty M a ster. a n d before it could be voted upon B r o th e r G ra nd M a ster K iim a le h to arose and pleaded for time. H e *poke elo quen tly of his n rsocia tions w ith B r o th e r L e w is from the very first ste p in the o rg aniz ation of the O rd e r in th is c o u n try a n d detailed th e man}' pleasant, t h o u g h a rd u o u s labors in w h ich he and B ro th e r L ew is h a d rcjoiced. H e w e n t on to say th a t it h a d a lw a y s been his fond hope to see B ro th e r L e w is co n tin u e as S u p re m e G ra n d M a ste r u n ­ til, a t least, all th e m e m b e r s of the S upre m e G ra n d L o d g e had reach ed th e 12th D egree. H e w a s re lu c ta n t, he said, to accept th e resignation of B r o th e r L ew is, n o tw ith s ta n d in g -the fact t h a t th e w o rk entailed b y th e tw o officers w as far b e y o n d th e h u m a n possibilities of one man. H is w o rd s moved th e C ouncilors to te a rs and t h e v e ry h e a r t th ro b s of love a n d kindness t o ­ w a r d th e I m n e r a t o r could be felt'in the tem ple d u r in g those m in u te s w hen B r o th e r K iim a l­ e h to praised th e w o rk of the- S u p re m e G rand M a ster. H e referred to th e so lidarity of the L o d g e a n d th e good w ishes and love expressed u n a n im o u sly by th e m e m b e rs of th is and oth e r L odges. T h e q u estion of th e resignation w as p u t to y vote a n d carried u n a nim ously, how ever, and a n o t h e r m otion w as m a d e th a t all Councilors sho u ld rise an d extend to B r o th e r L ew is deep

appreciation of the w o rk he had done for the m em bers and the O rd e r generally and for his unselfish, w h ole-h e arted and em in en tly kind ad m in istra tio n of the O r d e r ’s activities. Councilor R oeber then n o m in a te d S uprem e Grand C onductor L in d s tc d t to fill th e office of S u p re m e G rand M aster. In m a k in g his n o m ­ ination he spoke e n th u sia stic ally of the effic­ ient w ork heretofore d o n e - b y B r o th e r L inds te d t and of his u n w a v e rin g loyalty, sincerity and kindness. T h e nom in a tio n w as seconded by C ouncilor A n derso n and m a n y o th e r C o u n ­ cilors endorsed and added to th e praise of B r o th e r L i n d s t e d t ’s w ork as a m e m b e r of the E ig h th D egree and as an Officer and C oun ­ t cilor. No o th e r no m in a tio n s w ere m ade, so the n o m ina tions w ere closed and th e I m p e r a t o r de­ clared B r o th e r L in d s tc d t duly elected th e S u ­ prem e G ra nd M aster, to w hich d e c la ra tions the entire Council acceded. I t w as ann o u n c ed th a t B r o th e r L in d stc d t w a s elected to such office for a period of tw o years, in ac co rdance w ith xhe C onstitution. I m m e diate ly follow ing th is im p o r ta n t action, the I m p e r a t o r anno u n c ed th a t he had another paper to read. M any feared th a t th e Im perj t o r w a s a b o u t to acccdc to the w ishes of his most in tim ate B ro th e rs and S isters and offer to th e O r d e r his resignatio n as Im p erato r. Such an action has been a nticip ate d for the p ast six m o n th s and it is the only act w hich the A m erican S upre m e Council looks upon w ith considerable concern. W h ile justifiable in m a n y w ay s in the face of the s tr e n u o u s work an d m a n y unfair and u n re a so n a b le te sts and trials c o n s ta n tly b r o u g h t to him personally, still it is generally felt and ex pressed th a t there is no oth e r B r o th e r in th e O rd e r to d a y to take his place, an d a vacancy of even one h o u r in th e Office of I m p e r a to r w ould b r in g grief and peril to tHe A m eric an S u p re m e Council and the S upre m e G ra nd Lodge. B u t the I m p e r a to r b r o u g h t g re a t happiness s n d jo y to o u r hearts b y quietly, and w ith o u t th e slightest forew arnin g of a n g kind, read in g an official P ro n u n zia m c n to , n u m b e re d 101, th e te x t of w hich is as follows ( ex c ep t for- such phrases or signs as m a y n o t be publicly p rin te d ): • • ’ ■ ‘
P a jr T tfo H undred and Tu'<nty^fivf

©

%

E 3

T H E

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

P R O N U N Z I A M E N T O . N o. 101. Before th e Sign of the Cross, G reeting I

Know all B ro th e rs and Sisters of this O rd e r in N o rth A m erica th a t I have this d a y p r o ­ claim ed an d duly established th a t B E L O V E D K N I G H T T H O R K I I M A L E H T O , G ra nd M a s te r of the O rd e r for the Jurisd ic tio n of N ew Y ork, shall be honored and respected, obeyed an d hen ceforth recognized w ith full a u ­ th o r ity a s I L L U S T R I O U S S O V E R E I G N IN S P E C T O R - G E N E R A L of the A N C I E N T S O V E R E IG N C H A PTER S O F T H E IL L U ­ M I N A T I A M E N H O T P I I (R . C ) . and th a t as the principal directing executive of the said I l ­ lu m in a ti in the Jurisdiction of N o rth America, he shall have the pow er, the a u th o rity and legal r ig h t to g r a n t, sign and give C h a rters for the 66 (sixty-six ) C h a p te rs of the said I llu ­ m ina ti A m e n h o tp ii of N o rth A m erica, a c c o rd ­ ing to the C onstitu tio n of th e said Illum inati, an d to app o in t or com m ission o th e rs as S o v e r­ eign D e p u ty In sp e c to rs General and Sovereign C o m m a n d e rs in accordance and com pliance w ith th e said C o n s titu tio n ; a n d he is to be in all m a tte r s of the said C h a p te rs the chief advisor, councilor and d irector u n d e r th e d ire c ­ tio n of th e I m p e r a t o r of the A. M. O. R. C. for N o rth Arperica. F u r th e r m o r e , be it know n th a t it shall be* the d u t y a n d th e pleasure of o u r beloved artel re ­ spe cte d K n i g h t . T h o r K iim a le h to to establish a n d p ro claim the es ta b lish m e n t of the C h a p ­ te rs of th e said Illu m in ati A m enho tpii t h r o u g h ­ o u t th e Ju risd ic tio n of N o rth A m erica, and to im m e d ia te ly a n d hen ceforth th r o u g h o u t a!) tim e an n o u n c e b y P r o n u n z ia m e n to s the e s ta b ­ lis h m e n t of all rules, law s and decrees in a c ­ co rd a n ce w ith the au to cratic p o w e rs of th e I m ­ p e r a to r a n d the office of th e Illu s tr io u s Sove r e ig n ln s p e c to r - G e n e f a l of th e said Illum inati. A n d, f u rth e rm o re , o u r beloved and illustrious K n ig h t T h o r K iim alehto, by v ir tu e of this P ro n u n r ia m e n to and the p ow er conferred upon him a t this hour, shall have full p o w e r to co n­ fer up o n all Illu m in ati th e v ario u s degrees an d h o n o rs of th e said Illum inati. S ig n ed a n d Sealed this 25th d a y of O ctober, 1917, A. D., R . C., 3270, a t o ne h o u r before m idd ay, a t th e S upre m e G ra n d L o d g e T em ple. i ( S i g.) H. S P E N C E R L E W IS , I m p e r a t o r for th e N. A. Ju r is d ic tio n ."
P a ^ e T w o H u n d r e d a n d T \v e n ty -tix

W h e n th is p a p e r w as slow ly and carcfully read there came into the co untenance of B r o th e r K iim alehto the s tr a n g e s t and m ost perp lexed expressio n ever seen by any of the Councilors. H e w as n on-plussed, surprised an d se em ingly stricken w ith the realization of the g r e a t responsibility so sud d e n ly th r u s t upon him. H e, like m a n y of us. h ad often w o n dered w h o w as to assist th e I m p e r a t o r in the w ork of the Illu m in a ti and m a n y hoped, or r a th e r ex­ pected, th a t for th e first y ea r or so the I m p e r ­ a t o r him self w ould retain control of the I llu m ­ inati. B u t this choice, th is selection, gave us sufficient evidence of B r o th e r K iim a le h to ’s a d ­ van c e m e n t in the w o rk of o u r O rd e r, a n d his high a t ta i n m e n t s in o u r arts. T h e I m p e r a to r m o st ce rtain ly considered well his act and as th e fact d aw n e d upo n all of us w e w aited for th e w o rd s w hich w ere to com e from h im so g re a tly honored. But B ro th er K iim a le h to could say little. R ising w ith bow ed hea d he m u tte r e d , w ith tre m b lin g voice, a few w o rd s of app reciation a n d then, s ta n d in g erect w ith noble mien and facing th e E a s t like a tru e M a ster, he pledged his allegiance to the principles of th e O rder, the S u p re m e Council a n d the I m p e r a to r, de­ clarin g th a t he w ould a lw a y s, to th e end of his ea r th ly existence, hold sacred and d ea r the tr u s t, confidence an d p o w e r placed in his hands. T h e n , slow ly ap p ro a c h in g the E a s t, h e w as d uly rccog nized by the shook hands w a r m ly Im perator and w ith the per­ He m itte d to ste p upon the tr ia n g u la r dias.

I m p e r a to r,

th a n k e d him m o st cordially a n d then, in a s p o n ­ ta n e o u s m a n n e r , kissed th e I m p e r a t o r on the ch e ek and retire d to his station. I t w as a sol­ em n m o m e n t neve r to be fo rg o tten , and w h e n th e session w a s closed B r o th e r K iim alehto re« ceived th e c o n g ra tu la tio n s of th e C ouncilors as did th e .Supreme G ra n d M aster. LETTER TO T H E I M P E R A T O R FROM '

T H E S U P R E M E GRAND MASTER.

T h e follow ing is a copy of the le tte r officially a c k n o w le d g in g his election, se nt by th e Su* p re m e G ra n d M a s te r :

THK

AMERI CAN

-ROSAE

CRUCIS

H. S p encer L ew is. Esq., R e sp ec te d I m p e r a to r and Sovereign Pontiff A. M. O. R. C. N o rth A m erican Jurisdiction. R espected Sir and D early Beloved B r o th e r: Before the Sign of the C ro ss: G re etin g s! . F ra te rn a l

Since the S upre m e G rand Council of the N o r t h A m eric an Jurisdiction in Council a s s e m ­ bled, up o n y o u r resignation as S upre m e G rand M a s te r G eneral, an d upon y o u r respected rec­ o m m e n d a tio n , saw fit to elect y o u r m o s t h u m ­ ble s e rv a n t to this im p o rta n t office, it is w ith full realiza tio n of the im portance of said office an d the du tie s an d responsibilities placed upon me, and w ith a sincere appreciatio n of the h o n o r conferred upon and the confidence re ­ posed in me, th a t I express m y profoundest g ra titu d e . B e fo r e th e Sign o f the Cross: M o s t r e sp e c t­ ed a n d beloved Superior, I b e g w ^ s s u r c y o u of m y u n d iv id e d loyalty in the p rese rv a tio n of th e h o n o r a n d dig n ity of o ur A ncie n t I n s t i t u ­ tion, and of an unselfish la b o r in th e great p r in ­ ciples o f ! . L IG H T . L IF E , and LOVE

a universal phen om en a, atta c h in g to intelligent, se n tie n t life, u nder norm al conditions. A care­ ful stu d y and analysis d e m o n str a te s th a t Love is ?n expression of the sam e principle w hich re­ fines m a tte r, increases v ib ra to ry actions, g e n e r­ ates life, an d individualizes intelligence. Love, therefore, is the sensation and em o tio n which accrue to conscious intelligence w h en vib ra­ tory correspondence obtains. W e ob serv e also, th a t there is no know n principle or process in N a tu re th a t can com pel love betw een the very m e an e st o f N a tu re 's children. L ove is th e ex a ct rev e rse of com p u l­ sion. It is the one p h en o m en o n in N atu re which, from its low est to its h ig h e st expession, defies eve ry phase of force, w h e th e r th a t force be physical, sp iritua l or psychical. T h e im m o rta l E m e rs o n sa id : “ Love is our highest w ord, and the sy n o n o m of God. . . . I t is a fire that, kin d lin g its first em b ers in the n a r r o w nook of a p rivate bosom, c a u g h t from a w an d e rin g sp a rk o ut of a n o th e r p rivate h e i r t . glow s and en larg es until it w a r m s and beam s upon m u ltitu d e s of men and w o m e n , upon the universal heart o f all, and so lig hts up th e whole world an d all N atu re w ith its g en e ro u s flames . . . . Love, w hich is the essence of God. is not for levity, bu t for the total w o rth of Man." T h e h ighe st expression of h u m a n L ove is te rm ed A ltru ism . T ru e A ltr u is m is th a t state or condition of the Soul in w hich all of its en ergies and activities are centered upon the needs a n d r e q u ire m e n ts of our com m on H u ­ manity. It is th a t sta g e of develo pm en t w here the well-being and adva n ce m e n t of o th e rs be­ come th e n orm al o ccupation of intelligence. It is. indeed, th a t sta g e of experience w here pleasure, recreation, and e n te r ta in m e n t are found in L a b o r for O th ers. I t is th a t p o in t of individual life beyjond which o u r h appiness consists in ex p lana tion and tran sm issio n of T r u t h we h av e learned and th e benefits w e have enjoyed.
r

in a n d for o u r glorious and beloved Country. M a y Peace ProFound be w ith us in all our u n d e r ta k in g s . I ! 4 Y o u rs fori T r u t h and L ib e rty , (S ig n e d ) C O N R A D H. L I N D S T E D T . O c to b e r 27. 1917. | ADDRESS BY TH E SUPREM E ■MASTER. GRAND

T h e follow ing ad d re ss w as m a d e by the S u ­ p re m e G ra n d M a ste r to tHe m e m b e rs a s ­ sem bled in th e first convocation o f th e L o d g e u n d e r his M a ste r sh ip : B eloved S isters and B ro th e rs: T h e g r e a t com m on sense of the w orld tod a y is d e m a n d in g of Science t h a t it shall give an a c c o u n t of universal p h e n o m en a w h ic h shall a c ­ co rd w ith practical experience a n d w ith the c o m m o n im pulses, asp irations a n d ideals of m a n k in d . E v e r y 1intelligent s tu d e n t and oh-. s e rv e r of life has come to realise th a t L ove is

I

1

I am here rem ind ed of an expression made by T h o m a s Je fferso n : " N a tu re in te n d e d me for the tra n q u il p u rsu its of Science, by re n d e r­ ing th e m jmy su p rem e delight. A p a r t of m y occupation, a n d by no m e an s th e le a s t’pleasing,' is th e direction of th e studies of su ch y o u n g m en as ask it. I n ad vising th e course o f th e ir readings, I en deavo r to keep th e ir a tte n tio n
Page T w o H undred and Twenty-eeve*

+

THE

AMERI CAN

ROSAE

CRUCIS

fixed on th e m ain objects of all Science— the F re ed o m and H ap p in e ss of M an." T h u s, tru e A ltru ism is th a t s ta te of being in w hich our Soul increases its h ap p in ess th ro u g h w h at it m ay bestow ra th e r th a n th ro u g h w hat it m a y gain. I t is, therefore, a jo y and a privi­ lege, not a d u ty o r a sacrifice. T h e individual w ho gets "outside of him self" is th e unusual one. but he or she is as w elcom e as sunlight a n y w h e re and everyw here. T o an enlightened individual, A ltru ism is a practical occupation, as well as a recrcation and pleasure. T o such an one, H u m a n i ty is his family, th e w orld is his field, and to do good is his religion. Such A ltruism m akes U n i­ versal B ro th e rh o o d a splendid possibility, and *n etern al hell a hideous impossibility. W isd o m , K now ledg e, T r u t h belong to him w ho ta k es it, after w hich use and service de­ term ine its value and its security. W i t h o u t use it a tro p h i e s ; w ith m isuse it d e s tro y s even its possessors. T h e " J u d g m e n t of O sir is" is a b ­ solute and unfailing, and his scales are as s e n ­ sitive to a m otive as to a m o u n ta in . T o help people "c om e dow n from the c lo u d s" and up from th e slum s, a n d to establish th e ir feet u p ­ on th e bnsis of N a tu ra l, L o v in g -k in d n ess. is the H e rcu lean L a b o r of ev e ry true Waster, or L o v e r of M ankind. G enuine H u m ility has ever been the Mark of th e tr u e M aster. M a d am e B la v a tsk y told of one stu d e n t w ho desired k n ow ledge along •pecial .lines and w as directed to "o n e who k n o w s* In a far d is t a n t city. H e m a d e the long jo u r n e y a n d found th e A d ep t po orly clad and engaged in sw ee p in g s tre e t crossings. Un­ d a u n te d , _th e stu d e n t p rese n ted his request, while th e A d e p t referred to his m enial c on di­ tio n a n d said, " y o u m u s t be m is ta k e n .” T he stu d e n t, rem a in in g firm a n d u n d a u n te d , he wa;> t a k e n : i n [ c h a r g e , found “ d uly qualified,” and given “ t h a t w h ich he had so long s o u g h t” . T he “ M a rk of th e M a s te r ” is n ot alw a y s symbolized on h is.b re a s t, b u t often hidden deep w ith in his h eart. . I t i3 Intrinsic.. , T h e . p rin cip les a n d practices o f . H um ility , L ove a n d A ltru ism h a s of .old b e e n th e c h a r ­ a c t e r i s e s , of th e A ncie n t and V e n e ra b le O rd e r

of w hich w c enjoy th e good fo rtu n e and p riv i­ lege of being m em bers. Such w a s th e c h a rac­ ter of the life a n d te ac h in g s of the G re a t Rosaecrucian M aster, T h e Christ, w hose w hole ex ist­ ence w as an exemplification of Com passion. Kindness, L ove and A ltruism . I t w a s the sam e principles w hich im bued o u r beloved Im perator. B r o th e r H. S p encer L ew is, to establish the O rd e r in N o rth A m erica, a n d w h o h a s so nobly an d unselfishly d e m o n s tr a te d this spirit to us in the p ast th re e yea rs, b y an u n tir in g devotion an d w ork for o u r benefit. B ro thers and S iste rs: Filled w ith th e Spirit of tru e L ove a n d A ltru ism , let us proceed in the G reat W o r k w e h av e u n d e r ta k e n , and suc­ cess and hap p in ess shall cro w n o u r h u m ble ef­ forts. A nd, as w e a re ac q u irin g th e K n o w l­ edge and E x p e r ie n c e b y o u r in d ividual L abor, stu d y and exp e rim en ts, let us ev e r be m indful of the fact th a t o u r privileg e is S acred in its Devotion to " H u m a n i t y , to w h o m w e have pledged our h u m b le assista n c e in th e Search for L ig h t. T r u t h and H app iness. O n e n e v e r finds o utside of him self w h a t is not w ithin, a n d as lon g as th e re is a w r o n g to be righted, a sufferer to be h ealed a n d c o m fo r t­ ed, a child to be ta u g h t, or, in w id e r te rm s, any s trin g of th e H a r p of B r o th e r l y L o v e to be a t ­ tu ned to th e v ib ra tio n s of U n iv e rsa l Love, ly ­ ing right at o u r door, in th e m id s t of o u r fa m i­ ly or social circle, o u r individual d u ty .lie s r ig h t there. If our life, s tr e n g th , influence, w ere needed elsew here, we w ou ld hav e found our* selves elsew here, or o u r c irc u m sta n c e s so a d ­ ju sted as to leave no room for d o u b t as to w hen and to w h o m o u r influence, d e votion and assistance w e re due. L e t me conclude w ith the beau tifu l th o u g h ts of th e p o e t: + T ru e w o rth is in being, n o t seem ing, I n do ing each d a y t h a t goes b y Some little g o o d —n o t in d rea m in g O f g re a t th in g s to be don e bye-and-bye. F o r w h atever, m en say, in th e ir blindness, . A nd spite all th e fancies of y o u t h — T h e r e ’s n o th in g so king ly as K in d n ess . . A nd n o th in g so ro y al as T ru th .

P agt .T w o H undred ctj*d. T w e n ty-fieh l

Ancient Symbolism
REFLECTIONS O N T H E ESOTERIC R O SIC R U C IA N CROSS
By
F
ra

. T

hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

F.R.C.

First Secrctary-G cneral o f A M O R C for N o rth Am erica

The

U R m o d e rn la n ­ g u a g e is w h o l l y in ad e q u a te to c o n ­ v e y all the shades o f either the w rit­ ten w o rd or the s p o k e n sentence, a n d to give to our im a g in a tio n th e p ro p e r impetus for m e n ta tio n . T h e sym bols c on stitut­ ing our m o d e r n a lp h a b e t are monobasic in nature, o r one-expressive. E v e r y idea expressed e ith e r b y speech or in writing is d uplex in its nature. I mean that each idea c on tains a material envelope a n d a spiritual essence, the letter and the spirit, o r t h e exotericism a n d the esotericism. H e r e m y R osicru­ cian friends can re a d ily recognize the basic law of N a tu r e , t h a t all force c a p a ­ ble of manifestation m u st possess tw o a n tipod ean qualities. T h e m odern lan­ g uage can express a th o u g h t b u t only in its external a n d most incom plete form. A grammatically c o n stru c te d sentence is a series of w o rd s a n d so u n d s faintly con­ veying the idea, but w ho lly in a d e q u ate to give the essence o f the th o u g h t. F o r example, you m ay r e a d o r h ave re a d to you a play from S h a k e s p e a re . W h a t

R o s ic r u c ia n ^ ou w 9et out ^ w i^ o n ^ a sm a^ fraction com pared w ith w h a t y ou w ould D ig est receive seeing it e n a c te d on the stage. D ecem ber T h e reason for this is th a t the a c to r sup1932 plies the soul of th e th o u g h t, som e­

thing the p rin te d w ord can n ot supply. N o w let us tu rn to our M a ste rs, the ancients of old E g y p t. T h e y had in­ a u g u r a te d a series of graphic characters or images called by us h ie ro g ly p h ic s, th a t suggest a n d direct mentation. T h e s e ch a ra c ters are triune in n ature. T h e y are phonetic, symbolic a n d hieroglyphic, a n d lastly sacred a n d hieratic. T h e y w ere selected a n d composed with the greatest skill, a n d are today the w o n d e r a n d adm iration of our E gyp to lo gists a n d stu d e n ts of a ncient lore. T h e r e are few m ortals outside of the great B ro th e r­ hood w h o can tru ly interpret them. In this connection I w a n t to point out th a t the H e b r e w language, w hich is an o u tg ro w th a n d a n a d a p ta tio n of the E g y p tia n system, is to d a y the most scientific o f languages, because it s u p ­ plies the soul th a t o u r d ead letters do n ot give. E a c h cha ra c ter possesses a phonetic value a n d a numerical value. W h e n the c h a ra c te r stan d s alone it re pre se nts a positive idea, a n d w hen it is joined with o th e rs it has a relative value. C a b a la teaches th a t each character a n d w o r d h a s a talismanic power, a n d thus combines th o u g h t, speech a n d action. Be th a t as it may, it is still w o r th y of stu d y a n d speculation, for one single c h a ra c ter a n d w o r d is an inexhaustible fountain for m entatio n a n d meditation. T h e ancient philosophers a n d w riters o f sacred literature w ere a w are of the facts here sta te d th a t our form o f la n ­ g uage w a s m ore d ead than alive, a n d therefore too k recourse to parables.
F our hundred tw e n ty -fo u r

fables a n d stories, a n d th us fired the go ras gave it to his disciples u n d e r the im aginations a n d m e nta tion s of their nam e of T e T r a c T y s . o r the triple tau. In H in d u it is Rama, in E g y p tia n Amum, he a re rs or readers. Symbolism is therefore the on ly true in C h a ld e a n Baal, in S yrian A d a d . Even expression of thought. A m o n g the oldest the m ore m odern lang u a g e s h av e four a n d most sacred symbols k n o w n to men letters to express G o d . H e rm es T r is is the C ross. It is no t m y intention to megistus is sup p o se d to be the o r ig ­ re p e a t here the Rosicrucian in terp re ta ­ in a to r of th e symbol of the cross, and tion, because the m ajority of m y readers to him it indicated eternity. T h e cross w a s also have that, b u t merely the s y m b o l of light to point out th a t it con­ tains all th e ancient ( L V X ) , because the w isdom of a n y m ystery letters are formed by school no m atter w h a t th e cross. T h e H e r ­ its nam e m ay be. T h e metists re g a rd e d it as holding the secrets of cross is found in all p a rts of the globe and the p h ilo so p h e r’s stone. v e n e ra te d by all p e o ­ In a ll th e m y s te r y ple. From early H in schools unity is found do sta n w e learn th a t in the cross. T h e y all mean the sam e thing, th e g od of fire, w hose even thou gh their e x ­ n a m e w as Agni. used pressions are different. a cross like our Roman A ll forms of divine letter X as its symbol. w o rship com bine into T h e ancient H ermetic one universal religion. philosophers h a d the greatest veneration for A s all system s of p h i­ th e cross. T o them the loso ph y harm on ize in four arm s w ere s y m ­ the unity of science, so bolic of the four ele­ all m en a n d wom en m ents air, w ater, earth form the unity of H u ­ a n d fire, a n d also sym ­ m anity. T h e individual bolic of the four a p o ­ is but a cell or a n atom calyptic animals, eagle, in th a t g reat body , a n d m an, bull a n d the lion. as atom s form all parts T h e i r cross w as square, T h e A n c ie n t R o s y C ross Is V e r y D ifferen t a n d o rg a n s of the h u ­ F rom A n y R eligious E m blem consisting of six q u a d m an b o d y so does the ral parts, four vertical a n d one on each individual form the different p a r ts in the side of the second sq ua re , m aking three g reat b o d y of H u m a n ity . It is up to us horizonal. If you will d r a w this symbol to find o u r place a n d w o r k in h a rm o n y on a piece of paper a n d cut it out and a n d assist in making th e b o d y function th en fold the squares to g e th e r y o u will well a n d good. find that you have a cube. T h e cross to T h e six -p o in te d S ta r upon th e C ross them w as an unfolded cube, the perfect is also called the S e a l of Salom an a n d is ashlar, the embryo of all life. In recent years the A M O R C has th e symbol of the M acrocosm , o r the reat w o rld in c o ntradistinction to the used the v e ry old estoteric form of the v e -pointe d star, the p en tagram , the R o sy C ro ss in connection w ith its high spiritual activities in the w o rk of the sign of th e small w orld or M icrocosm . In the S e a l o f S a lo m a n w e h ave th e two C a th e d r a l of the Soul. T h e cross in this esoteric form is the triangles p ro p e rly joined in e qu al o p p o ­ im age of q u a rte rn a ry law, w hich is c o n ­ sition. T h e triangle sta n d in g on its b ase c ealed in th e T e T r a g r a m m a T o n , the re pre se nts all asc en de n c y forces, it s y m ­ four lettered uncom m unicable name. bolizes fire a n d h eat a n d also the a sp ira ­ T h i s is th e lost w o rd of the m ystery tions o f m a n to w a rd his creator. It also schools. It is in H e b r e w Y o d -h e -v a u -h e , re p re sen ts th e evolution of physical forces from the center of the e a rth to a n d with us the I. N . R. I. T h e C a b a lists called it Rota. It is th e g re a t A th a - the cen ter o f the p la n e ta ry system — the nor, the A z o th of the H e rm etists. P y t h a ­ Sun. I t e x p resses the n a tu ra l re tu rn of
F o u r hundred tw e n ty -fiv e

forces both moral a n d physical to the principle from w hich th e y emanate. T h e triangle sta n d in g on its apex rep resents all th a t divinely descends. It is the symbol o f Cosmic moisture, the universal solvent. In the spiritual w orld it represents P ro vidence, o r the action of D eity upon H is cre a tu res. In the physical w orld it r e p re se n ts the po w er of involution from the S u n to w a rd the center of our p la n e ta r y system to the center of the ea rth. C om bined, these tw o triangles re p re se n t equilibrium, the systolic a n d th e diastolic motions, the generation a n d the re g e n e ratio n through w'ater and fire, a n d the consequent fer­ mentation. T h e tria n g le s a re the symbols of unity. E ach side m a y serve as a base w hose term ination is th e point. T h is signifies th at no n ation , no people or co m m u n ity, o r n o in d iv id u a l w a y claim the exclusive m onop oly of T r u th . It also teaches th a t the a tta in m e n t of truth m ay be h a d by a n y individual o r com munity of individuals w h o se aspirations tend upw ard s. T h e aim of the different schools of initiation is to do a w a y with the r e ­ ligious quarrels, o r th e suprem acy of o n e cult over a n o th e r, a n d to establish unity a n d tolerance a m o n g all members of the h u m a n family th r o u g h intelli­ gence. Science as well a s Religion must finally unite in ra tio n a l kn ow led ge. T h e cabalistic th e o g o n y sa y s th a t each m an is a reflected molecule o f hum anity, and contains in himself a n A d a m , the source o f the will (this is th e b r a i n ) ; a n Eve, source of the intelligence (th e h e a r t) ;

and he should b alance th e h e a r t b y the brain, a n d the brain b y the hea rt, to become a c e n te r of divine love. A s h u ­ m anity w a s the b o d y o f A d am , E v e his life or soul, so also th e U niv erse is the bo dy of G o d ; h u m a n ity is the soul of G o d; G od himself is the spirit of G o d . From this w e recognize th e P a n ­ theistic opinion th a t G o d w as the U n i ­ verse. But w e also see their error, w hen th e y refuse to ack n o w le d g e tin Him a n y inn ate consciousness. F o r as the consciousness o f m a n is in d e p e n d e n t of the millions of cells o r atoms w hich compose the b o d y , so the consciousness of G o d is in d e p e n d e n t o f the molecules of the universe a n d o f m an which forms its b od y a n d its soul. W e m ight d e ­ stroy the universe w ith o u t destro ying the D ivine P e rso n a lity , even a s the limbs can b e c u t from a m an w ith o u t ■his losing consciousness or his p e r s o ­ nality. T h is is w h y S c h o p e n h a u e r a n d H a r tm a n n a re p a r tly erroneous. It is on this p oint the h a r d h e a d e d materialists find th e m o st force in their a rgum en ts a g a in st th e idealistic thinkers. According to H e n r i W r o n s k i in his “A po dictiq ue M e ssia n iq u e ," m a n is com posed of a n acting, anim ated b o d y . If w e think of a m an a s a b o d y only, w itho ut a n im a tio n o r consciousness, its reality d isap p e a rs. I t is no lo n g e r a man. A n d , on the o th e r h and , if w e consider the anim ating force only, the reality once more d isapp ears, because it is a n immaterial, infinite force t h a t is unlimited, a n d c an n o t be limited b y a n ything else th a n the b o d y it anim ates.

V

V

V

S P A N I S H R O S IC R U C I A N B O O K S
W e are p leased to sa y th a t a n o th e r volum e of the R osicrucian L ib ra ry in S p an ish has been added. T h e ex trem ely p o p u la r book, "L em uria, the L o st C ontinent of the Pacific," has ju st been shipped to us. It is well printed a n d well bound, though cheaper, of course, th an o u r binding and printing in this c o u n try . It m ay be h a d for those w h o en jo y reading S p a n ish o r w h o w ould like to give a book in S panish as a gift to a friend for the econom ical p rice of $1.60. It m ay be m entioned w ith pride th a t these books h a v e been translated in to th e b e st C astillian Spanish, and have been com m ented on v e ry h ighly by their readers.

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e s t D ecem ber 1932

T H E M A N IN S ID E
T h e above is th e title to a new folder, a ttractiv ely p rep ared , th a t is now available to all R osicrucian stu d en ts, m em bers o r o u r friends w h o w ish it for distribution. W e think you will be pleased w ith the unique design of the folder and its subject. If you w ish som e of these folders for distribution, m erely w rite to the R osicrucian E x te n sio n D epartm ent, S an Jose, C alifornia, a n d a q u a n tity will be sent to you. F o u r hundred tw e n ty -s ix

Keep Y our Feet On The Ground
A N ADDRESS G IV EN A T T H E 1936 C O N V E N T IO N
By T
h or

Kj im

a le h t o

,

F. R . C.

T IS am using that the topic for this discussion should be, “ Keep Y o u r Feet On The G ro u n d ." T h is has b een a n d still is a favorite expression of mine. In fact, more th a n once a mild raillery has been directed to me b y the officers at H e a d q u a r te rs because of my fondness for saying, "K eep y o u r feet on the g ro u n d ." Just as chickens come home to roost, so this topic h a s retu rn ed to me to p resent to you a t this time. I have not given up my practical, m atter-o f-fac t view-point. I am more convinced th a n ever th a t most of o u r m em bers need a cold sho w er of common sense a n d e v e ry -d a y realism. O n e of th e po pu lar books on the m arket is entitled. " W a k e U p a n d Live." T h a t should be our slogan for today. T h a t is the m e ssage w e need. T h e first fundam ental error of stu­ d ents is to underestim ate material p ro g ­ ress a n d physical well-being. O u r aim a n d object has a lw ays been a balanced d ev elop m en t of the personality. T h e sequence of the m o nog rap hs is p la n ­ ned w ith th a t object in view. Physical a n d m ental developm ent are of equal im po rtance w ith spiritual a n d psychic developm ent. In fact, the latter is de­
T h ree H u n d red N in ety -o n e

pen den t up on the former. Y o u should hav e good 'health a n d a so u n d mind. V ita lity a n d a strong mind are im pera­ tive for psychic a n d even for spiritual developm ent. T e m p e ra m e n t, disposition, personality, a n d the attitu d e tow ard life, will be influenced by the state of y o u r health a n d the d egree of y o u r m ental developm ent. O u r Colleges a n d U niversities recognize this psychological law, a n d therefore m ake physical train­ ing a n d athletics p a rt of their curri­ culum. T h e d a n g e r of lack of b alance is more imminent a n d menacing in o u r Rosicrucian system of education. T h e N e o p h y te is often d ra w n to the O r d e r through various ex pectations. A g re a t m any a re a ttra c te d to the O r d e r because they ex­ pect to receive a secret form ula w hereby th e y can get w h a t they desire at will, and, often, a t th e expense of their fellowman. I am h a p p y to sa y th at most of our p e rm a n e n t m embers enter the w o rk of the O r d e r with a desire to learn a n d im prove their k n ow led ge a n d u n d ersta n d in g of life a n d its problems. It is true th a t y o u will get th a t secret formula, bu t it is only th ro u g h diligent s tu d y a n d application of our principles th a t you come in possession of it. T o repeat, the first error th a t m any of our stu d e n ts m a k e is to fail to realize the necessity of a b alanced develop­ ment. T h e se co n d error is the retention of ideas a bsorb ed from other system s of tho ug ht, such a s C h ristia n Science, N e w

T h o u g h t, Spiritualism, H in d u Cults, a n d O r th o d o x Religious teachings. A great m any of y ou will in d ig na ntly ob­ ject to these state m e n ts of mine, b u t I assure you, m y friends, th a t it is im­ possible for yo u to take th e right atti­ tude tow ard the aim a n d con tent of our course of instruction, if y ou are condi­ tioned by y e a rs of living in the spirit of other systems of th o u g h t. If you are go in g to retain fatalistic ideas a n d p re d e te rm in atio n , h ow can you develop the essential qualities of in­ dependence a n d self-reliance? If you honestly believe th a t it is all-sufficient to rely upon p ra y e rs , affirmations, and faith in the g oo d n e ss of G o d a n d in Divine guidance, h o w can you cultivate initiative? H o w can you consider it im­ p o rta n t to do research w ork, to increase y o u r knowledge, to be informed? W h e r e will you get the initiative to act? If you believe with the H in d u s, th a t the mortal bo dy must be crucified a n d su b ju g a ted in order to attain spirituality, h ow can you be enthusiastic a b o u t developing your potentialities? O u r fu n dam en tal principles a n d pre­ mises are com pletely o pposed to those of o th er system s of th o u q h t. Y o u are a segm ent of the Divine G od-force, a n d y o u r b od y is the o nly medium through which you can ex p re ss G o d . F o r that reason, it is not only y o u r privilege, but your du ty to k n o w y o u r ow n b o d y and how to keep it well a n d in excellent con­ dition for p ro p e r expression. W h a t e v e r can be achieved th r o u g h exercise of personal initiative, in d e p e n d e n t effort, and obediance to w e ll-k n o w n a n d th o r­ oughly tested n a tu r a l laws, will not be gra n te d through p ra y e r, o r affirmations, or other spiritual m eans alo n e . If fresh air, exercise, p r o p e r food, or rest, for example, is nee d e d for increase of vital­ ity or restoratio n of health , mere C a th e ­ dral C o n ta c t a lo n e will n o t suffice. In seeking e m ploym ent or a d vancem ent you m ust b e able to fulfill the d em ands of the position. In asp iring to social success yo u m ust consid er w o rld ly con­ ditions a n d requirem ents. KEEP YO U R FE E T O N TH E G R O U N D . Be sensible. D o n 't live in The R o s ic r u c ia n w or^ m ake-believe. D o n ’t w aste your time in reverie or in d ay-d ream s. D ig e s t D o n 't think th a t ro m an c e exists only in N o v e m b e r books, or in m o ving pictures, or that glamour belongs o nly to the A rabian 1936

N ig h t's T a le s. A s C h arle s H a d d o c k said: " T u r n a H u rric a n e on H a llu c in a ­ tions.” D o n ’t m isu n d e rsta n d m y in ten ­ tion. D o n 't misquote me, or think th a t I disapprove of moving pictures, the theater, novels, and the imaginative flow of poets a n d artists. A ll these arts are w onderful for in te rp re ta tio n of life a n d for relaxation, prov id ed y ou clearly realize th a t living y o u r life a n d solving y o u r problems comes first. O f course, if you are c o n te n te d with w h a t y ou have and w h a t you are, a n d y ou a re able to spend your d a y s beautifully, indulging in philosophy, poetry, music, art, and literature, yo u m ay be considered fortunate. M o s t people n eed all th e y have, and w h a t th e y are. to solve the difficult problems confronting them . T h e y m ust concentrate on w h a t will be of material assistance in meeting life's challenge a n d they m ust be able to differentiate b e ­ tw een w h a t is of prim ary a n d w h a t is of seco ndary im portance in their p e r­ sonal lives. K now in g th a t in the course of a lifetime m an y desires m a y meet with un e x p e c te d fulfillment a n d that w h a t is no t completed in o n e in c a rn a ­ tion m ay be accom plished in another, should be of sufficient c onsolation for the seeming restrictions a n d limitations of o u r immediate e nvironm ent a n d cir­ cumstances. It is com p ulsory th a t w e overcome a n d w ork out of e v e ry limita­ tion, restriction, a n d problem c o n fro n t­ ing us. Let us summ arize th u s far. T h e F I R S T E R R O R th at w e m a k e is to fail to realize the necessity of a balanced developm ent of body, mind, a n d p e rso n ­ ality. T h e S E C O N D E R R O R is the retention of ideas a b so rb e d from other systems of tho ug ht. T he T H IR D F U N D A M E N T A L E R R O R is a b e ­ lief th a t m aterial a n d w o r ld ly success is inevitable if y ou are a faithfu l student, a n d th a t lack of success is equivalent to failure a n d m eans a w a s te d life. T h is point of view is w r o n g . M a te ria l success is n o t th e true y a rd stic k . It is true th a t m ost of us h a te failure. W e w a n t to do the rig h t thing all the time. W e w a n t to avoid difficulties, h a r d ­ ships, a n d defeat. W e seek g oo d advice a n d guidance con stantly . W e w a n t the appro val of friends a n d relatives for each step w e take. W e get a mistaken notion from certain religious system s
T hree H u n d re d N in e ty -tw o

%

th a t th ro u g h F A I T H all obstacles can be either avoided, eradicated, o r easily overcome. O n e of life’s fundam ental p urpo ses is com pletely overlooked— th a t o f training a n d developing the personality. W h ile a smooth life is see&ingly very pleasant, on the w hole it paralyzes the individual. Incentive is lacking for developing of character, for strengthening th e body, for exercising initiative a n d resou rceful­ ness, for overcoming defects o f te m p e ra ­ m ent a n d disposition. F a ilu re C O M P E L S a complete c h a n g e of view-point. F a ilu re C O M ­ P E L S reexamination of basic principles. T h r o u g h illness w e freq uently concen­ tra te for the first time in our lives upon the laws of health. Because of failure in one profession or in one line of busi­ ness, w e are compelled to s tu d y o u r ­ selves a n d develop our potentialities. A jo b th a t w e loathe, or a forced associa­ tion with difficult or u n p le a sa n t people, m ay give us an insight into affairs a n d men th a t can never be a tta in e d in a n y o th e r w a y . T h e re is som ething mellow­ ing a n d broadening in being am o ng the sick a n d the defeated, the u n h a p p y , the m alad ju sted, the discouraged, a n d the discontented. From these people a n d such experiences we learn m uch about the laws of life, about the m otives that p ro m p t the hearts of men, a b o u t the conditions existing in the w o rld in the various walks of life. W h e n you have p assed thro u g h a serious physical, m ental or spiritual crisis, all life seems different, a n d you look a t every human being w ith new eyes. T h o s e w ho have been uniform ly fo rtu n a te seem very unreal a n d s u p e r­ ficial a n d limited. W e all adm it th a t it is v e ry h a rd to go th ro u g h difficult ex­ periences. W h il e y ou a re passing th ro u g h them yo u imagine t h a t the end will never come, a n d th a t y o u can bear no more, bu t if you look b a c k u po n the difficult experience th a t y ou h av e had, you will find th a t as a result y o u have a tta in e d very real benefits in physical,

mental, a n d spiritual development. You know better h o w to take care of y o u r­ self; you a re more a w a re of your limi­ tations; y o u u n d e rs ta n d people and conditions better; you are m ore tolerant; you are more controlled; y ou have achieved a philosophy of life. Y o u are a better a n d a more valuable human being even th o u g h y ou m ay not be a material success. T o conclude, these a re the three p rin ­ cipal errors I h a v e found limiting the developm ent a n d preventing the solu­ tion of difficulties of those w h o have come to me for advice a n d assistance. Because I have stressed three im portant principles in o u r course of study, do not for a m om ent en tertain the thou gh t that I am u n a w a re of m an y other aspects th at I hav e not mentioned. D o n 't ask me w h e th e r I believe in prayer, faith, hope, charity, mercy, love a n d mutual helpfulness. I certainly do. E m p hatical­ ly so. B ut these virtues can be positive a n d active a s well as negative and passive. T h e m iddle a g es of simple, childlike faith is no more; the fear of hell is gone; the renaissance of initiative, in d e p e n d ­ ence, a n d perso nal developm ent has flowered. O u r ideal is a bro th erh oo d of harm oniously developed masterful h u ­ man beings, each contributing the beau ty of his personality and the fruit of his genius to the w orld. Such beings make G o d manifest on earth. C arlyle in “ S a r to r R e s a rtu s ” speaks o f passing th ro u g h the black d esp o n d ­ ency of the E verlasting N a y a n d the C e n te r of Indifference. T h e n the light d aw ned a n d h e entered into the E v e r­ lasting Y e a of Self A w aren ess. H e h a d found his place in the W o r l d . T h is is the k eyn ote of the N e w Age, this is the trum pet call of the O r d e r . W e w a n t to know, to realize a n d u n d e rstan d our w ork. W e w a n t to k no w our place in the N e w W o r l d . W e w a n t to do our w o rk w ith joy for the glory of G o d a n d M an.

tp""......................... ..................... ......... .................... ..... ................. ..... ............ ............................................Q

S P E C IA L N O T I C E T O M E M B E R S O F T H E H IE R A R C H Y
I \ Special m eeting of all m em bers of th e H ierarch y will be held on the evenings of N o v em b er 29. D ecem ber 6. D ecem ber 11, D ecem ber 22, and D ecem ber 29 a t 8:00 o ’clock, Pacific S tan d ard T im e. | = j

0 “.......................... ........................... — ....... ......................................................................... ..........................[f
T h ree H undred N in ety -th ree

Misconceptions
H O W TH EY P R E V E N T PEACE A N D HAPPIN ESS IN O U R LIVES
By
T
h o r

K iim

a leh to

,

F. R. C., A cting Grand M aster
O u r aim has a lw a y s been the truth. W e have never been ham pered, as religious institutions, universities, a n d individuals frequently are, b y national aspirations, vested interests, or a n inflexible creed, from which only limited deviation is possible. If experience pro ved a concept to be true, w e accep ted it; otherw ise, w e rejected it. O u r attitu d e a n d our m e th ­ ods a re scientific. Y o u should not be surprised, therefore, in fact you should expect, as y ou proceed th rough the grades, to find it necessary to slough off some ideas, revise others, a n d even a c ­ cept ideas entirely n e w to y ou. Y o u r mind must be o pen to make the neces­ s a ry changes, adjustm en ts, a n d a d ­ ditions. If y ou tr y to hold on to both the old ideas a n d the new, yo u will find y o u r ­ self in a dilemma. Y o u will have to d e ­ p artm entalize y o u r mind. In one corner yo u will have one b o d y of inform ation, d ea r to you because y ou are accustom ed to it. In a n o th e r corner y o u will have a n o th e r b od y of inform ation irreconcil­ able w ith the first one a n d m aking y ou feel th ro u g h ly uncom fortable. In o r d e r not to be torn b y the conflict, you will unconsciously begin to rationalize ( a s psychology term s the process) y o u r holding of incompatible points of view. W h e n y ou rationalize, y ou a re sim ply bolstering y o u r o w n point of view in­ stead of seeking only w h a t is true. Y o u will eventually no t perm it y o u r left
F our H u n d red F o rty -six

N M Y Convention talk, I pointed out t h a t one of the stum bling b l o c k s in the path of s tu ­ de n ts w a s the a b ­ sorp tio n of ideas f r o m o t h e r sys­ tems of thought. It is difficult for them, a fte r having lived for y e a rs in the spirit of other teachings, to enter the different m ental atm o sp he re of our w o rk and to take the rig h t attitu d e to ­ w a rd the aim a n d c o n te n t of o u r system of instruction. A t this time I shall ex­ patiate on this point. A lth o u g h it may seem destructive, it s h o u ld be rem em ­ bered th a t even th e divine creative force of the w orld h a s its constructive and destructive aspect. In o u r desire to help you, w e m ust n ot on ly build up right ideas, but w e m ust be ju st as careful in up rooting faulty id eas t h a t are certain to be obstacles to a s a f e a n d balanced developm ent. Since it is difficult to have a sound conception o f the r a n g e a n d aim of our studies unless all the nine grades of w o rk a re com pleted, I in no wise The blam e those of o u r s tu d e n ts who, not R o s ic r u c ia n having been w ith us v e ry long, read into D ig e s t o u r lessons ideas fo reign to them. Ja n u a ry In our course o f s tu d y w e give you the tried a n d tested w isdom of the ages. 1937

h a n d to k no w w h a t y o u r rig h t h a n d is doing. W h i l e the principle is admirable in the giving of ch arity, it is indefensible in building up a n intelligent outlook up o n life. T h e time must come, if you are p ro ­ fiting at all from o u r course of instruc­ tion, w h en you will be compelled to c h a n g e y o u r attitu d e to w a rd sectarian c re e d s a n d schools of th o u g h t of limited r a n g e a n d outlook. Y o u can recognize the g oo d th a t yo u originally derived from them; you can see their value for Souls th a t have n o t found, or a re not r e a d y for, the g r e a te r light. Y o u can use them as a c hannel for service to the com m unity, but in y o u r m ind you must r e a d ju s t y o u r w hole scale of values. I shall list a few o f the ideas th a t are derived from o th e r sources a n d that R osicrucian stu d e n ts m ust eventually d iscard. In the first place, m an y of our stu d e n ts with an o r th o d o x religious b a c k g ro u n d have a conception of G od th a t is too personal a n d a nthropo m o rph ic to coincide with th e Rosicrucian con­ ception. G o d is a divine pow er, mani­ festing on e arth th ro u g h m aterial p h e n o ­ m ena a n d thro u g h h u m a n beings as instrum en ts. T h is p o w e r w o rk s th rough universal law. By keeping in h a rm ony w ith this pow er y ou can make yourself a channel for its flow. By learning the law s th a t govern this universe you can utilize this pow er to a certain extent. T h e Rosicrucian ph ilosop hy c a n n o t ac­ cept the idea of p r a y in g for personal n eed s to a p ersonal G o d , w h o may c h a n g e H is laws a t th e v a g a ries of each individual. D o n ’t ask for divine g u id a nc e every step of the w ay. T r y to help yourself. T h e r e is plenty of go od information available on every su bject for ev e ry -da y purposes. T h e r e are sh o p p e r s in the de­ p a rtm e n t stores to help y ou select y o u r clothes. T h e r e a re ex cellent books to teach you how to k eep house a n d how to cook. If you w a n t a job, prepare y ourself for a definite k in d of work. M a k e every effort to find a position yourself. It is legitimate to use every bit of influence that yo u have. W e should perm it o u r tastes, abilities, a n d talents to guide us in life. W e sho uld n ot ask the Cosmic to keep us well while we
F our H u n d red F o rty-sev en

ignore e v e ry physical req uirem ent of health. If you need rest, tak e it. If you need sleep, you m ust get it. If you need food or fresh air, yo u m ust h a v e them. T h e r e is no sin in eatin g meat. I t is sometimes very essential, as it will in­ crease the resistance a n d the magnetism of the b ody. Be well a d ju s te d to y o u r environm ent. Let y o u r religion be one of kindly deeds. D o no t w o r r y a b o u t y o u r p a st in carnations. Y o u will do y o u r w ork b e tte r to d a y if yo u a re no t ha m p e re d with the m em ory of the dead h a n d of the past. A bove all, be yourself. D evelo p y o u r­ self as much as yo u c an in th e time al­ lotted to you. O th e rw is e y o u are only a medium for other personalities a n d for oth er p eo ple’s ideas. T h e more devel­ oped a n d successful a p e rson a lity y ou are, the b e tte r instrum en t can y o u be for good a n d the b e tte r the Cosmic can use you. D o n ot im agine th a t y o u live on the psych ic plane. D o not h o p e to c o n ­ verse w ith the M a s te r s every m inute of y o u r life. T h e y do n ot do tha t. D o n 't let y o u r p h a n ta s y ru n a w a y with y o u r sense of proportion. Y ou a re h ere on earth a n d th a t is w h ere you should sta y . Keep y o u r feet on the g rou nd . It is ridiculous to w o rsh ip th e heroes of books a n d p rom ine nt public figures w h e n there are men in the family th a t need our help, our cooperation, a n d our moral support. Im a g in a ry trials a n d tests a re ridiculous. Life furnishes ple n ty of hardships, h eartach es, a n d sorrow s. D o n ’t rom anticize the O r d e r or its o f­ ficers. T h e aim of the O r d e r is to help you live y o u r life successfully, n o t to provide an e scape from y o u r problems. T h e O r d e r is no t divine, a n d the officers are not gods. Y o u only e m b a rra s s them w h e n you take th a t childish attitu de. T h e y sometimes m ake m istakes. T h e y have different opinions a n d see the w orld th ro u g h the medium of their ow n experiences a n d te m p e ra m e n ts. T h e y have all m a d e m istakes in their own lives a n d they h ave all suffered sorrow s a n d losses. M e m b e rsh ip in the O r d e r will not give y ou a magic alteration in y o u r a p p e a ra n c e , y o u r cha rac ter, a n d y o u r personality, health, environm ent, a n d position in life. Y o u r am bitions will n ot materialize over night. T h e O r d e r

can only sho w y ou the wT T h e s e good ay. th in g s must be person ally atta in e d through kno w led ge a n d effort. Be human. T h is w orld is the w o rld o f love a n d beauty. It is a magnificent w o rld of s u n ­ shine. trees, flowers, children, a n d lov­ ing h um an beings. W e c an make it a paradise th ro u g h sensible cooperation a n d determ ination. W e d o n o t need psychic experiences for th a t. .H u m a n a d v e n tu re s a re just as interesting. W e d o not need psychic com panions. O u r friends, neig hb ors a n d relatives are s u f ­ ficient on this earth. M o s t of us do no t need psychic pow ers. W e h a v e not d e ­ veloped all o u r h u m a n talen ts a n d capabilities. W e m ust Jearn to live in this world. W e m ust learn to be efficient in our w ork. W e must m aster the laws of nature. W e must lea rn to keep o u r bodies in g oo d condition. T h e s e are th e tasks of most people to d a y . W re have not learned all th a t o r d in a r y h um an life h a s to teach us. W e still do not com pre­ hend h um an n a tu r e in its complexity. W e still have n o t completely conquered the material w o rld and su b d u e d it. W e still have not learned w o rld cooperation. In the second place, w e a re absolutely opposed to the policy o f certain sects o f shutting o u r eyes to t h e evils o f the world a n d ignoring the distress in the lives of o th e r people a n d the lack o f ha rm ony in o u r ow n lives. T h is is the policy of the ostrich th a t sticks its h e a d in the sa n d. W e b eliev e in facing co n ­ ditions calmly a n d try in g to overcome them. T h e slums w ould never disap pear from our cities if public-spirited citizens did not get to g e th e r a n d compel th eir demolition a n d the b u ild i n g o f m ore sanitary dwellings. F ra n k lin D . R oose­ velt is o u r P re sid e n t to d a y because th e people elected him. O u r teaching is th a t G o d w orks th r o u g h h u m a n beings a n d th a t hum an beings b y their th o u g h t a n d action can express th e divine on earth. A s the p r o p h e t said: “ W o e to those w h o cry ‘P eace, Peace!' w hen there is no peace." The R o s ic r u c u in D ig e s t January 1937 In the third place, w e are o pp o se d to stud ying the m ind p o w e r m erely for the purpose of getting w h a t y ou can ou t of life. T h o s e o f you w h o h av e practiced the principles for y e a rs k n o w th a t there

a re so m any limitations to th e use of divine p ow er for personal e n d s th a t it is advisable no t to em ploy it except in an extremity. A s has been p ointed out frequently. G o d a n d th e C osm ic know best w h a t is good for us to g e t a n d have, but that fact should n o t d e te r us from asking a n d seeking a n d petitioning G od a n d the Cosmic to o b ta in th e desire of our hearts. T h e re are m any re a so n s w h y a cer­ tain lack exists in y o u r life. P e r h a p s it is the sp u r that inc ite s y ou to effort. P e rh a p s you owe a certain d u t y to cer­ tain people a n d therefore y o u a r e not free to step out and take w h a t y o u w ant. P e rh a p s you need the exp erience a n d the know ledge to be g a in e d from y o u r restricted environment, n o t b ecause of Karma, but because th a t k n o w le d g e will help you become a b e tte r le a d e r in your community or in y o u r field o f activity. If you do n o t even k n o w th a t such a menace to decent busin ess as a “r a c k e t” exists, how can yo u h elp erad icate it from y o u r city? If y o u h a v e never h e a rd of w hite slaves, h o w can you help b reak up w hite-slave rings? P oets a n d w r ite r s g o o u t o f their w ay to gain th e experiences in life a t which you, perhaps, rebel. Jo hn Masefield, the present poe t-la ure ate of E n g lan d , once w o rked in a b ar-ro o m in Y onkers, N e w York. T h e late V a c h e l L indsay tram ped through the S o u th enchanging his verses for a n ig h t ’s lo d g in g . W a l t W h itm a n sought for b u s drivers a n d ferry pilots as a source o f inspiration. C arl S an dbu rg, a u t h o r of th e famous poem, “ C hicago," w o rk e d a t a n y menial task th at came his w a y . A n o u tsta n d in g exam ple of w h a t a blessing hardships can be in the life of an individual is the case of C harles Dickens. A s a b o y of nine he w orked in a sh oe-blacking fac­ tory. H is father w a s th r o w n into prison for debt. T h e s e childh ood experiences formed the content of his m ost po w er­ ful novels, a n d the la w s o f E n g la n d w e re actually ch an g e d as a result. In the fourth place, w e believe that the purpose of p ra y e rs, affirmations, meditation, a n d the reciting of Psalm s is psychological; to help p u t y o u into a harm o niou s frame of mind, to help you gain emotional control, t o h e lp keep
F our H u n d red F o rty-eig h t

y o u r vibrations high, to help keep your a tte n tio n directed to qualities you sho uld cultivate in yourself. Y o u can achieve ju st as much peace a n d h a rm o n y b y listening to beautiful music, co m ­ m uning with nature, re ad in g inspiring books, associating w i t h interesting people, a n d eng ag in g in some form of creative w ork. T h e h a p p ie st people are th o se w ho are v ery active in the com­ m unity doing g oo d w h e re v e r th e y can or w h o are completely abso rbed in c re a ­ tive w ork. T h e s e people d o not n eed to sp e n d hours listening to inspirational speakers, n o r w a s te h o u rs re a d in g all the inspirational m agazines on th e m a r ­ ket. because th e y themselves a re a n in ­ spiration to o th ers th ro u g h the good w ork that th e y a r e doing. In the fifth place, w hile w e realize the fact th a t the Soul is more im po rta nt th a n the body, a n d th a t the b o d y is but the instrum ent of th e Soul to function on the material plane, from a practical point of view w e em phasize know ledge of a n d care of the b o d y . If y o u r health is reliable, if y o u r b ra in is developed, if the coordination of b o d y a n d b ra in is sm ooth, y o u r b o d y will serve a s a su ­ perior medium for the functioning of the Soul. A s the mystics tell us, w e a r e here to develop a d e g re e of heart, a degree of mind, a n d a d e g re e of will. E v e r y noble deed we do develops the h e a r t— every bit of k n o w le d g e th a t w e gain d e ­ velops the m ind— every task t h a t w e set before us a n d accomplish develops the will. W e could n o t develop heart, mind, or will w ith out the medium of the body. A n excellent k n o w le d g e of the m e ch a n ­ ism of the b o d y will r e p a y us in good health a n d high spirits. W e should cul­ tivate a s m any go od h a b its a s possible. W h y should w e sco rn to m a k e our bodies attractiv e a n d efficient in s tru ­ ments for use in this w o rld? Is a re aso n necessary? T o q u o te E m e rso n in " T h e R h o d o ra ": "T ell them, dear, if eyes are m a d e for seeing. T h e n b e a u ty is its o w n excuse for being." Sixthly, w e em phasize com m unity service. It is the d u ty of a Rosicrucian to be a force for go od in his o w n circle a n d com m unity just as far as he can. It
F our H undred F orty-nine

is n o t sufficient to do a kind deed w h e re v e r y ou can. Y ou m ust cultivate a w o rld-view -point. Y o u must realize the d a n g e ro u s limitations of being in­ sular-m ind ed o r provincial in outlook. Y o u must have an intelligent u n d e r­ standing of local, national, a n d in ter­ national cu rre n t events. In a splendid book, " N e w F ro n tie rs ” published only tw o y ea rs ago, H e n r y A . W a lla c e , our Se c re ta ry of A griculture, points out th a t the o n e big obstacle to u np re c e d e n ted p rospe rity in this c o u n try is th e com ­ plete ignorance of m ost of o u r people of the double e n try bookkeeping re lation­ ship existing b etw een the U n ite d S ta te s a n d th e countries of E u ro p e . O u r citizens do n ot really u n d e r s ta n d the fu n d am ental issues involved a n d the physical facts behind o u r m o n e ta ry policy, the tariff, a n d the question of private a n d public ow nership of basic industries. T h r o u g h know ledge, th ere ­ fore, you can be a trem end ous force for good. Lastly, w e em phasize the developm ent o f o u r potentialities to the utmost. W e positively con dem n crucifying the bo dy o r living a n u n w o rld ly life, or being a recluse, hermit, o r in a n y w a y s e p a r a t­ ing ourselves from our fellow men. V e r y few of us h ave developed to the point w h e re w e can d isp ense w ith the e x p e ri­ ences th a t the w o rld can still give us. N o m atter w h a t o u r sta g e of develop­ ment, the w o rld certainly need s w h a t w e have to offer in service. If you h av e a talent, it is y o u r d u ty to cultivate it a n d to use it for the en ric hm e n t of m a n ­ kind. If you h ave th e ability to make m on ey justly, it is y o u r d u ty to become rich. T h e w o rld certainly n eed s men w h o can e arn m oney ethically a n d dis­ tribute it am ong noble causes g e n e r­ ously. T o sum up, a Rosicrucian is a leader, a thinker, a n d a doer. T o be as effective as he can in his sp h e re of service, he g u ard s his health, trains his mind, an d develops his latent abilities. H e will serve for love of G o d a n d n o t for glory. H e will serve in joy a n d n ot merely out of a sense of du ty. C o n te n t w ith w h a t ­ ever sphere of service K a rm a permits him. he will be a source of inspiration to all w ho k n o w him, a n d th ro u g h his beautiful c ha ra c ter a n d self-effacing

service he wi]] p o in t th e w a y to the greater Light. T h e goal of o u r O r d e r lies w ithin the G a rd e n of T r u t h . It is the purpose of our O r d e r to lead y ou along this path and take you to the g rea t portals of that G a rd e n a nd , if possible, help you to cross the threshold a n d enter. N o t until w e are all within the G a r d e n , w h e re the flowers of T r u t h c o n sta n tly bloom and the w eeds of F a lsity have all been re­ moved, will the M a s te r s a n d ' F o u n d e rs of this O r d e r be satisfied with their work. In the G a r d e n of T r u t h there are no purple flowers o f person al opinion.

there a re n o yellow flowers of selfish d e ­ sires, there are no blood-red flowers of passio nate bias a n d self-deception— just the blue a n d white spotless flowers of tru th a n d fact, purity a n d k no w ledg e symbolized. T o attain th a t G a r d e n w e have come together th a t w e m ay jo u r ­ n e y there together. Y e t som e o f us feel th a t w e m ay be lonesome th e re w itho ut o u r favorite colored flowers a n d so w e tak e some seeds along w ith us on our jo urn ey , to p lant as w e go on a n d on, dropp in g them here a n d th e re a n d c h e r­ ishing the familiar blossom s as children of our fancy.

V

V

V

Important W arning!
DO N O T BE DECEIVED BY N E W S P A P E R R E P O R T S By T h e E g y p t i a n
E H O P E th at none of o u r m e m b e r s is being deceived by the continuous p u b l i c a t i o n in A m e r i c a n n ew s­ p a p e rs and m a g a ­ zines of r e p o r t s a n d featured sto­ ries telling of the " th r e a te n in g w a r c o n d i t i o n s ” in E u r o p e a n d v a ri­ ou s p a rts of the world. D u rin g th e p a st six m onths w e have h a d a repetition of w h a t occurred in the fall a n d w in te r of 1935, w ith new s items telling us th a t alm o st ho urly a n d certainly w ithin the w eek, th e w hole of E u ro p e w o uld be p lu n g e d into a great international w a r. Y e t the fall a n d w inter of 1935-36 p a ssed w ith ou t a n y general w ar, a n y n e w w a r, or a n y The serious conflict. D e sp ite th e n ew spaper R o s ic r u c ia n predictions t h r o u g h o u t 1934 a n d 1935 D ig est th a t resulted in the p o stpon em ent of [a nuary m any tours th ro u g h th e M e d ite rra n e a n , those w h o did n o t believe the stories 1937
T
our

S e c re ta ry

a n d sailed through the M e d ite r r a n e a n never h ea rd the shot of a single gun nor sa w the least sign of conflict. If yo u or a n y of y o u r friends have been p ostponing joining with us on our tour a ro u n d the M e d ite r r a n e a n a n d th ro u g h E g y p t, Palestine, a n d other m ystical la n d s early this com ing winter because y o u have believed th a t new w a rs a n d w a rrin g conditions w o uld b re ak ou t in various p a r t s of E u ro p e a n d from points a r o u n d the M e d it e r ­ ranean. you should give u p y o u r fears at once a n d show th a t y ou h av e faith in the Cosmic revelations a n d faith in h u m a n n ature. T h e people of E u r o p e d o not w a n t a n y more w a r a n d th e y a re c o n sta n tly negotiating for more peace pacts, more peace agreem ents, a n d m ore peaceful conditions th a n they have h a d in past years. T h e few rem aining w a r lords of the w o rld a n d w a r profiteers a re still hoping th a t each can m ake a n o th e r trillion dollar fortune b y scaring some of th e countries of E u r o p e into w a r a n d then drag ging the U n ite d S ta te s of A m erica into it also. N e w s p a p e r s a n d
F our H u n d red F ifty

Planning Y our Life
HAPPINESS DEPENDS U PO N TH E IN D IV ID U A L By
T

F

rater

T

hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

F. R. C.

O W m an y of you are a cq uai nt ed w ith the life of Anna H o w a r d S haw ? W h e n she w as a child in a small mid-w estern town, h e r g r e a t a m b i t i o n w a s to be a preacher. She w ould go into the w oods a n d preach to the trees. But to attain h er d e ­ sire she h a d to go to college. H e r p a r ­ ents objected, however, a n d refused to help her. U n d ism ayed , she not only a t­ tend ed college, b ut after gradu atin g w ent to Boston to m atriculate in a th e o ­ logical sem inary. W h i l e the y ou ng men w ere prov id ed for b y th e school, she h a d to find b o a rd a n d lodging elsewhere a n d p ay all her ow n expenses. She h a d such difficulty in earning m oney that she did not h ave e nough to eat, and her streng th failed so th a t in climbing the stairs to h er class-room she w a s compelled to rest at each landing. O n e d a y a w o m an saw h er sitting pale a n d dejected on the steps. A f te r talking to her a little while she promised to procure for her suffi­ cient funds to enable her to complete her course of stu dy w ithout w orking after school hours. U p o n g ra d u a tio n she had to accept a very minor position, since she w a s a
T w e n ty-n in e

w o m an. She m et w ith twice a s m a n y difficulties as the a v e ra g e young minis­ ter. Revealing sp le n d id executive abil­ ity, she obtained in a s h o rt time a better pulpit. L ate r sh e w a s able to tak e care of tw o co ngregations. In o rd e r to be of g re ate r service to the com m unity she studied medicine a n d did much social service w ork am o ng the poor of Boston. It w a s only na tu ral th a t she be a ttra c te d to the cause of w o m a n suffrage. H e r ability as a s p ea k e r a n d organizer w a s so o u tsta n d in g th a t S u sa n B. A n th o n y , the g re a t cham pion o f w om an suffrage, became interested in her and p e rsu a d e d her th a t it w a s h e r d u ty to devote all her time and e n e rg y to th a t cause. A n n a H o w a r d S h a w c onsented. She resigned from her position a n d a rra n g e d lecture tours for p a rt of the y e a r in o r d e r to e a rn m oney en o u g h to b e able to devote the rem aind er of th e y e a r to touring the c o u n try for the cause. H e r efforts w e re c ro w n e d with sup rem e success for she w as p re se n t on the d a y th a t w om an suffrage w a s w ritte n into the c on stitu­ tion of the U n ite d States. O n ly a few y e a rs before this g re a t event did the p a r ty become sufficiently affluent to give h er a n d other w o r k e r s a very m oderate sa la ry so th a t it w ou ld no longer be nec e ssary for them to earn a living while w orking h e a rt a n d soul for the cause. I m ight h av e selected the story of any successful man o r w o m an . I chose the

story of A n n a H o w a r d S h aw because she w as a pioneer a n d had to surm ount the difficulties c o n fro ntin g every pioneer, in addition to th e h a n d ic ap s incumbent on her sex. In h er life w e have a p ra c ­ tical d em onstratio n of the principles of truth, w h ic h are the principles of life. M a n y are u n d e r the impression th at liv­ ing life is one thing a n d that following the principles o f tr u th is another. T h e principles of tru th a re the principles of life m ade concrete a n d systematized. W e are all o f us following principles of action in o u r lives on ly with gre a te r or lesser d eg ree of consciousness. T h e greater o u r a w a re n e s s of w h a t w e are doing a n d w h y , the su rer the success. T h e more h a p h a z a r d w e are in our aims and m ethods, the m ore likely th e re will be irretrievable b lu n d e rs and confused a n d u n sa tisfa c to ry results. T h e first g r e a t principle of life is D E S I R E . D esire m ust be present. It must be so overw helm ing that it gives direction to the entire life. It m ust be po tent so th a t b o th m ind a n d will can be focused on m aterialization. D o you think th a t it w a s e a sy for D r. S h a w to refuse to yield to h er p aren ts' wishes? D o you th in k th a t it w a s easy for her to enter a n ew profession for women? D o you th in g it is e asy to be faithful to an ideal no m a tte r w h a t the cost? As M a tt h e w A r n o ld a p tly said: “A n d tasks in h o u rs of insight willed m a y be thro u g h h ours of gloom fulfilled." Y et on ly desire so tremendous, so overw helming, will b ring results. Such desire, especially w h e n linked to the ideal of unselfish service, h a s the force of love be h in d it. G r e a t love makes every n e c e ssa ry sacrifice seem sweet. Spurred b y overw helm ing desire, the mind becomes keener, the will becomes stronger a n d firmer. E v e ry possible avenue of a p p r o a c h is patiently e x ­ plored. T h e sc h o la r will travel th rough d an ge rou s c o u n try a n d deserts to get the one m a n u s c rip t th a t he needs. T h e scientist will un falteringly experiment for y e a rs to b e able to a d d just one line The to the k n o w le d g e of the world. Let us R o sic ru cia n say that y o u desire to take a trip to D ig est E u rop e. If y o u r desire is strong enough, February y ou will m a k e every n e e d e d sacrifice to save or to obtain the necessary money. 1937

Y ou will compromise in m a n y w ay s at the office in order to get th e time off t h a t y ou need. Y o u will seek people w h o have made the trip a n d discuss w ith them their e x periences with the g re a te st interest. Books of travel and c atalogs of steamship com panies will become more fascinating th a n a novel o r a detective story. E v e r y detail of every aspect of the trip will be of the u tm ost importance. B e fo re y o u step on b o a r d the boat, you will h a v e g one over the trip innumerable times in y o u r mind. In the m onths a n d p e rh a p s y e a rs that you spend thinking a n d p lanning , you will find th a t interesting inform ation a n d helpful advice will com e to you u n ­ e xp ectedly from m a n y sources. O n e friend will speak to a n o th e r . O n e p e r ­ son will introduce y o u to a n o th er. Som etim es delightful surp rise s occur, like getting a seco nd -class cabin at a tourist rate, or a due-bill for a hotel. A s the time aproaches for th e trip, you find th a t in m an y w a y s yo u h a v e been more successful than you e x p e c te d a n d th a t y o u r trip proves more glorious than you h a d d a re d to dream. W e have all h a d similar experiences on a larger or smaller scale. N o t e h ow the pro c e d u re is identical w ith th a t fol­ low ed b y A n n a H o w a r d S h a w in the achievem ent of her life’s am bition. First, desire stre n g th e n e d b y love; second, c o n c e n tra ted th o u g h t o n the achieve­ m ent of the one p u rp o se until m a te rial­ ization results; third, d o in g w h a te v e r is possible u n d e r the circu m stances. In these three steps yo u a r e sow in g the seed. U nless you falter, unless y o u r d e ­ sire g row s dim. the h a r v e s t m u st be sa t­ isfactory. Immediate fulfillment of a h e a r t ’s desire is frequ en tly ne ith e r feas­ ible nor possible. T h e position of r e ­ sponsibility that yo u a re striving for, m a y dem and training a n d experiences th a t you do not y e t possess. H o w can the sincerity of y o u r p u r p o s e a n d the p u rity of your motives b e p ro v e d except th ro u g h test a n d trial? T o th e great souls of the earth a lifetime d e d ic a te d to one noble aim, to one g r e a t cause, did n o t seem too long. O f t e n th e c h a n g e s th a t m ay come into y o u r life a fte r you ha v e earnestly resolved in y o u r Soul to p u rs u e some lofty aim, a re for the p u r ­ pose of helping y o u acq uire th o s e q u a li­ t i e s - o f cha ra c ter a n d of he lping you
T h ir ty

gain those experiences t h a t y o u will need in the w ork th a t you plan to do. T h u s far w e h a v e practically illus­ tr a te d th e following principles of truth th a t yo u u n d o u b te d ly have h e a r d m any times: 1. All possession is b a se d on c o n ­ sciousness. 2. All gain is a resu lt of ac­ cu m ulated consciousness. 3. All loss is a result of scattering consciousness. 4. M in d is creative, a n d conditions, en­ vironm ent, a n d all experiences in life a re th e results of the pre d o m in an t m ental attitude. T h e attitu d e o f mind d epend s upon w h a t wre think, a n d th e re­ fore,, all p o w e r of achievem ent a n d pos­ session d e p e n d s upon our thinking. L e t us consider the fourth po in t p ra c ­ tically. E nv iron m e nt is the result of the p r e d o m in a n t mental attitud e. Y o u r p re se n t e nvironm ent is d isc o rd a n t and u n h a p p y . H o w c an you im prove it? H o w can you c h a n g e it? If th ere is a sensible, simple w a y of ste p p in g o u t or m aking th e change, do it. D o not in­ voke all th e p o w e rs of heaven a n d earth a n d raise agonizing cries over trivial an n o y a n c e s th a t yield to obvious re m e ­ dies. W i l l study a t n ig h t help y o u in your w ork, bu t y ou lack vitality a n d energy? T h e n spend a y e a r in building up y o u r s tre n g th a n d vitality. D o e s such a course of action m ean th a t social life and diversion m ust be curtailed? V e r y well, yo u m ust m ake a choice. W h a t comes first in y o u r life will win. If y ou do n ot like the a p a r tm e n t in which yo u live, move out. If y o u do not like the people w ith w hom you a r e a sso ­ ciating, g ra du ally build up a n o th e r social circle. If you have u rg e d y o u r child to take a course in high school or college for w hich he is unfitted, let him change. B etter a y e a r or tw o sp e n t in making up lost g ro u n d th a n th e ag o n y of m a la d ­ ju stm en t later. If the reasons for y o u r dissatisfaction are irrational a n d y ou are m aking con­ s ta n t c h a n g e s because of fickleness, n e r­ vous irritability, a n d a childish desire to escape irksome duties a n d responsibili­ ties, y ou will find the sam e difficulties confron ting you time a n d time again. If there is a lesson th a t yo u m ust learn, if there is a n experience you m u st have, you will not escape it. You m u st b ear patiently the m any an n o y a n c e s t h a t are
T h irty -o n e

strew n in th e p a th of every h u m a n b e ­ ing. W i t h ju st a little self-control you can refrain from sw earin g a t th e h eat of sum m er a n d grum bling a t the cold of w inter. You can m ake yourself oblivious to the barking of y o u r neigh bo r's dog. Y o u can try to resign yourself cheer­ fully to a movie o r to reading a book w h e n an im p ortan t d a te falls th roug h. Y ou can try to be p le a sa n t w h e n a bor­ ing neighbor or relative calls. Y o u can get over the h ab it of s qu a nde ring money thoughtlessly w h e n it is necessary to live w ithin y o u r m eans, a n d y ou can overcom e the equally reprehensible habit o f m aking a scene in the fruit store because the celery costs a p e n n y more th an yo u expected. If y ou cultivate the habit of looking a t every situation from the other fellow’s view -point, y ou will u n d e rs ta n d people a n d situations very much better, a n d y ou will autom atically d estro y m any forms o f a n n o y a n c e s at their source. If you scrupulously avoid compromising situations, if y ou m ake a point of never indulging in gossip u n d e r a n y circumstances w hatso ever, if you try not to be critical a n d captious, you will find y o u r relations with people im­ proving immensely. A tale-bearer, a slanderer, a sh a r p - e y e d critic a re all avoided like the p la g u e b y every one. U n d e rs ta n d in g , sy m p a th y , a n d love w h e n genuine invite confidence a n d re­ ciprocal affection. M o s t of us h ave been so badly b a tte re d on the rocks and shoals of life th a t w e a re deeply g r a te ­ ful for a kind a n d e ncouraging w ord, for the w a rm clasp of true friendship, for the eye of love th a t sees virtues and talents which w e a re too timid to e x ­ press. Suppose you a re a tte n d in g an a f te r ­ noon circle of a w o m a n ’s organization, a n d w hile refreshm ents a re being served, everyb od y is joining in the g ra n d sport of “m ud-slinging.” Y o u m ay feel that it is impolitic to get up and w alk out; but yo u really do n ot h av e to listen. Y o u can pre te n d t h a t y o u a re listening. Y o u can keep pe rfe c tly silent while y o u r th ou gh ts w a n d e r in more beautiful realms. Y o u can sometimes succeed in changing the conversation. If y ou are well-informed on books, plays, a n d c u r ­ rent events, you can frequently prevent the conversation of a n y g roup to w hich

you belong from falling into d isrep u­ table channels. D o not believe every evil w ord th a t you h e a r a b o u t other people. Remember th a t there a re alw ays tw o sides to a sto ry, a n d th a t some people, because of idleness or a desire to be dramatic or sensational, take a malicious pleasure in blackening the r e p u ta tio n of people g enerally wellth o u g h t of. D o n ot im m ediately say, " W h e r e there is smoke, there must be fire." D o not w e a r y o u r h e a r t bn your sleeve, as the old sa y in g goes, a n d do not air your troubles for everyone to hear. T h e s e age-old bits of advice m a y seem so h oary a n d obvious th a t I am positive­ ly asham ed to repeat them, bu t no one can be more am azed th a n I am th a t such advice should be nec e ssary in the most cultivated circles, a n d th a t such counsel m ust still be h a n d e d o u t to m embers of the Rosicrucian O r d e r fills me with mortification. In addition, if you try n ot to be too sensitive, if you m ake a resolution to ig­ nore snubs a n d forget insults, if y o u do not insist on y o u r rig h ts a n d be p u g n a ­ ciously offensive a b o u t the last privilege due you, if you do n o t obviously seek appreciation, honor, a n d re w a rd , you will avoid much h e a rta c h e a n d u n h a p ­ piness in y o u r life. Is it too m uch to ex­ pect that a Rosicrucian o f several y e a rs ’ stan ding should be above repro ach in these little faults o f tem p eram ent, c h a r­ acter, a n d disposition? Y o u will dis­ cover in the course of y e a rs th a t selfrestraint in these respects will make y o u r life more h a rm o n io u s at home, at work, and in the w orld. If yo u will scrutinize these fine p oints of conduct, you will find th a t th e y all come within the law of love. C o n sid e ra tio n , tactful­ ness, a n d honesty a re qualities of love m ade concrete for d aily living. T h r o u g h developing the neg a tiv e virtues o f re­ straint a n d self-control, a n d the positive virtues of consideration a n d cheerful­ ness, y ou will g ra d u a lly in the course of time change y o u r m ental a n d emotional habits. Y ou can ac tu a lly ch a n g e your character a n d improve y o u r personality. T h e corresponding c h a n g e in y o u r en­ The vironm ent, in the a ttitu d e of people to ­ R osicru cia n w a rd you, in the few er disagreeable oc­ D ig e s t currences, a n d in th e more harm onious February a n d peaceful a tm o sp h e re enveloping you. will be strikingly a p p a re n t. 1937

Just as you can take y o u r character into y o u r ow n h a n d s a n d c h a n g e it, so the future is in y o u r pow er. It is n ot a t the mercy of a n y capricious external p ow er such as p la n e ta ry influences, or predeterm ined destiny. P o w e r goes h a n d in h a n d with responsibility. Each w ord, each deed, each th o u g h t, each
e m o tio n is a s e e d bea rin g fr u i t a fte r its

kind. If the h a rv e st is no t manifest to ­ day, it will become m anifest tomorrow. W h a t wre experience to d a y is the fruit of y e s te r d a y 's sow ing. T h e re f o r e , we m ust patien tly e n d u re the so rro w s of life w ith the kn ow led ge th a t life can be more beautiful a n d inspiring, a n d very often w e can create much b e a u ty a n d joy rig h t now . N o t only the law o f r e t­ ribution m ust be considered w hen we contem plate the checkered p a tte r n of our lives, bu t also th e fact o f B ro th er­ hood. Since all life is o n e life, a n d all Souls are segm ents of th e one w o rldsoul, w e c a n n o t escape the d u ty of r e ­ sponsibility. " A m I m y b r o th e r 's k eep­ er?" is no t for the Rosicrucian to ask. T h e w orld is collectively a n d individual­ ly w h a t w e h a v e m ade it. Just as w e share in the joys a n d s o rro w s of o u r family a n d friends, so do w e share the joys a n d sorrow s o f the w o rld . T h e r e ­ fore, w e cann ot look up on o u r lives as isolated p henom ena. W e m u st consider our plans a n d actions in reference to the social g r o u p s with w hom w e belong. W e must co n sid e r ourselves in the fram ew ork o f society. H o w difficult it is, yo u m a y say, to live in th e light o f all th ese principles. N o t so difficult as it m ay seem a t finst glance. O n c e a truculen t y o u n g m an came to the g re a t scholar, Hillel, a c o n ­ tem p ora ry of Jesus, a n d said: “ T e a c h me the entire law while I s ta n d on one foot." Hillel replied: " D o n o t un to thy neig hb or w h a t tho u w o u ld s t no t th a t th y neigh bo r do u n to th e e .” I shall close w ith an old sto ry . " O n c e a fox w alking a long th e river b a n k said to a fish swimming in the stream below. W h y d o n ’t y o u tak e a w a lk w ith me on the river bank? A r e n 't y o u tired of the w a te r a n d escaping from th e big fish?' T h e fish replied, ‘I can no t accept your invitation. If I meet w ith d a n g e rs a n d difficulties in this element with w hich I am familiar, ho w much m ore difficulty
T h irty -tw o

will I e x p e r ie n c e in a n u n f a m ilia r ele­ m e n t! ’ ” L ik e w ise w ith o u rselv e s, fellow m e m ­ b e rs. If w e w ith so m e k n o w l e d g e of the la w s o f life m e e t w ith difficulties a n d d istre ss, shall w e m a k e o u r lives a n y e a s ie r b y t h r o w in g all r e s t r a i n t a n d in­

h ib itio n s o v e r b o a r d a n d ac ting like th e u n d e v e lo p e d c h i l d r e n o f the w o r l d in u t t e r s e r v i t u d e t o ca p rice , m o o d , a n d im p ulse? L e t u s t r y to look a t o u rs e lv e s in th e lig h t o f t h e e te rn a l. W i t h life e v e r la s tin g b e f o r e us, w h y s h o u ld w e be im p a tie n t a n d w h y s h o u ld w e d e s p a ir ?

IN T R O D U C IN G O U R N E W E D IT O R
A fte r six y e ars of faithful and painstaking service as E d ito r o f T h e R osicrucian D igest and the F orum m agazine, and chief of our E ditorial S taff in th e p re p ara tio n , revision, and am plifications of o u r lectures a n d m onographs. S o ro r C a ro l B ra d le y retires from this im p o rtan t position beginning w ith the F eb ru ary issue of the D ig e st. So ro r B radley and her husband, w ho has been a valuable aid in the N atio n al M em ber­ ship D efense C om m ittee a s legal adviser, have been tw o of o u r enthusiastic w orkers at H e ad q u a rters e v er since th ey becam e m em bers. S o ro r B ra d le y ’s retirem ent from the E d ito rsh ip is due entirely to her desire to devote more time to h elping her husband in his im portant affairs, and to give m ore time also to her home and dom estic life. She will con­ tinue to be a consultant of the E dito rial D epartm ent, and a w o rk e r in o th er departm ents of our general activities. T h o u sa n d s of our m em bers w h o h av e m et her a t C onvention time and a t other periods th ro u g h o u t the year will rem em ber th e v e r y congenial, goodnatured, happy, willing w orker w h o did so much to help en te rta in them during their visit. W e shall be glad to h av e her w ith us at all of our future C o n v e n tio n s and special cere­ m onies. A vote of thanks th ro u g h o u t the entire o rganization is due S o ro r B radley for her excellent service. It is now our pleasure to introduce as the successor to this im p o rta n t position, S o ro r V irg in ia O 'N eill. S o ro r O ’N eill has been a m em ber of the O rd e r for a g re at m an y y e a rs. She com es to us now from C hicago w here she h a s been living for some tim e d oing editorial w ork, and h a s contributed v ery larg e ly to publications containing prose a n d p o e try . Some y ears a g o her residence w as in L os A ngeles, and she w as one of th e e arliest m em bers of H erm es L odge N o . 41. D uring her m em bership in H erm es L odge she becam e editor of a R osicrucian m agazine published b y that o rganization w hich is one of our ch artered lodges in Southern C alifornia. She h a s had a w ide experience in th e field of literature and in editorial w ork. O u r new E d ito r already has a host o f frien d s th roughout the o r­ ganization, and I am sure th at w ith the passing of the m onths a n d y e a rs S o ro r O 'N eill w ill gain the large circle of friendship th at has been a ttrac ted to S o ro r B radley in the p ast. W e all w ish her the utm ost o f success in h e r v e ry im p o rta n t a n d difficult position. — T H E E D IT O R IA L B O A R D .

M E N T A L P O IS O N I N G
O u r read ers w ho w ould like to secure sep arately a co p y of the book entitled, "M en tal Poisoning." w hich explains th e psychological processes by w h ich m an y persons u n ­ w ittin g ly inhibit their consciousness w ith superstitious fears, m ay secure a co p y from the R osicrucian S upply B ureau for the nom inal sum of $1.25 p o stp a id . T h e book is a t­ tractiv ely bound, contains o v er one hundred pages w ith several in te restin g photographs. T H E B O O K W IL L B E G IV E N F R E E for a new six-m onths’ sub scrip tio n to " T h e R osicrucian D igest." R ead the advertisem ent on the inside back c o v e r of this issue.

T h irty-th ree

the C a the d ra l of the Soul for rest, medi­ tation a n d contem plation, we not only gain th a t b r o a d e r view p oint bu t w e also come into a ttu n e m e n t w ith the U n iv e r­ sal mind a n d th e Cosmic Consciousness. T h e re is peace, health , a n d power. If we make it a d aily practice to d e ­ vote a few m inutes m orning and nigh t in silent meditation, w ith o u t disturbance from without, w e th e re b y a ttu n e our bodies a n d m inds w ith th e g re a t a n d pow erful Cosm ic force of health a n d harmony. A t a n y of the C a th e d ra l hours listed in th e free book, "Liber 777," th e re are th o u sa n d s of persons all over the w orld sitting in silence a n d e x ­ tending their consciousnesses in the

th o u g h ts of peace, p o w e r, health, and s tre n g th to w a rd this one Cosmic point. U n ite d effort in a n y direction is of u n ­ told value and especially a t this time w h e n all th e world is sh arp e n in g the p lo w sh a re s into d e a th -d e a lin g instru­ m ents a n d greed and fear w alk ra m p a n t in o u r midst. W e need G o d as w e n e v e r did b e ­ fore. W e need faith a n d conviction th a t love, truth, a n d justice shall pre­ vail. W e n eed th e univ ersal h a rm o n y a n d love attainable o n ly in th e a ttu n e ­ m en t w ith the A bsolute. Let u s o f the W h i t e B rotherhood lead th e w o rld in eliminating fear a n d g re e d from the h u ­ m a n consciousness.

V

V

V

Getting Along In Life
By
T
h or

Kj i m

a leh to

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
medium a n d technique of their p a rtic u ­ lar talent, to be able to express their ideals w ith maximum efficiency. T h r e e of our m em bers cam e to me ab o u t "w riting." O n e w a s in terested in creative writing. O n e w a n t e d to enter the field of journalism. O n e w a n te d to p re p a re a book for publication. T h e im­ pulse in each case m ay h a v e been g e n u ­ ine. It is quite possible t h a t th e y did have the gift of e xpression. It is also possible th a t they d id h a v e som ething w o rth w h ile to offer th e w orld. But the s tra n g e thing in each c a se w a s th a t not o n e o f these three y o u n g men w a s a m aster of th e English la n g u ag e . C o n ­ sidering the fact th a t th e y w e re no t n a ­ tive-born A m ericans, th e y spoke and w ro te th e English la n g u a g e v e r y well fo r all practical p urpo ses; but, from the po in t of view of a publisher or a n editor, their k now ledge of th e la n g u a g e w as un deniably unsatisfactory. I h a d to tell them th a t their first task w a s to perfect their know edge of the la n g u a g e . O n ly in exceptional cases will th e editor tak e th e trouble to have a n article completely re w ritte n by a p ro o f-re a d e r. T h e i r sec­
N in cty -* ix

I N C E our members have r e s p o n d e d f a v o r a b l y to the ty p e of practical ta lk s th a t I have given, I shall c o n ­ tinue in the same w a y today. I find th a t m any of o u r m embers come to me with problems w hich reveal com ­ plete ignorance of th e practical w orld and its d em an ds. T h e y obviously n eed instruction in h ow to m a n a g e their lives and affairs sensibly. T h e y are pow erful souls with high ideals, b ut unw orldly and impractical. T h e y d o n o t know h o w to tran slate th e ir ideals in to actualities, in the practical, e v e r y d a y life. I believe in ideals a n d I k n o w t h a t a life w ith out ideals is like a stre e t w ith o u t light. I b e ­ The R o sic ru c ia n lieve, too, t h a t the m en of dream s a n d vision sh ou ld influence th e world, b ut D ig est they m ust kn ow ho w to exert an influ­ A p ril ence. T h e y m ust m a s te r sufficiently their p artic u la r field of interest, and the 1937

o nd task w as to stu d y the field of w riting th a t interested them most. M o st universities give extension courses in these subjects, a n d for those w h o c a n ­ n o t a tte n d in person th e re a r e corres­ p on de n c e courses. T h e r e a re handb oo ks available which list the English p erio d­ icals a n d publishing houses of the world w ith exact inform ation as to the ty p e of w o rk each firm publishes. U n til you h av e created y o u r o w n public y ou must sup ply w h at the m arket dem ands. W r i t ­ ing is a craft a n d m ust be studied like a n y other art if you w a n t to use it as a w a y of earning a livelihood. T o be und er the im pression th a t th e Cosmic can b estow literary success up on you as a free gift is not sensible. T h e Cosmic c a n inspire you with ideas bu t yo u must have sufficient k no w led ge of th e tech ­ nique of expression to tra n s la te these ideas into novels, plays, poem s, or essays. T h e first requirem ent, then, for suc­ cess is a thorou gh kn ow ledge of your field of work, w h e th e r a tra d e , a n art. o r a profession. Some people can p ut their h an d to any th in g th a t tu rn s up but h av e m ade a special s tu d y of no one thing. O n e member, a y o u n g m an of the highest ch a ra c ter a n d integrity, has been content to d o odd jobs for the last few years. H e h a s never m a n a g e d to rise above the subsistence level of existence. A lth o u g h a resid ent of N e w Y o rk City, he w a s completely u n a w a re of the faculties of th a t great city to p e r ­ fect himself in a special tr a d e or v o ca­ tion a t night w itho ut a n y cost. H e did not even read tr a d e jou rn als o r books to keep a b rea st of w h a t w as being done in th e field of labor. H e w a s very a n xious to get married, b u t w a s un ­ successful socially, too. H o w could he expect the superior y o u n g woman, w hom he w a n te d , to be in te re sted in such a n unprogressive individual? T h e second requirem ent fo r success in life is an effective personality. You d o n o t need to be a s h a n d so m e a s the A pollo of Belvedere or th e V e n u s de Milo. Y ou can achieve an effective p e r ­ sonality. T h e first step is im maculate grooming. I, for one, am no t such a fanatic and bigo t as to take the point of view that attentio n to n e a tn e ss and cleanliness, a n d an e y e for color h a r ­
N in c t y-seven

mony, necessarily implies lack o f sp ir­ ituality a n d unbecoming a n d excessive interest in th is world. I love a n a s ­ sem blage o f h e alth y , w ell-dressed m en a n d wom en. A s S h a k espeare said, " C o stly th y h a b it as th y purse can buy, bu t not e x p r e s s e d in fancy; rich, no t ga u dy , for t h e a p p a re l oft proclaims the m an." I th in k a h o m e , too, should be ju st as beautiful a s y o u can afford to m ake it. Y o u r home e xp resses y o u r p e rsona lity just a s much as y o u r clothing. T h e d e ­ sire of people fo r becoming clothes a n d charm ing h o m es a n d artistic home d ec­ orations is a n inspiration to o u r artists a n d d esigners. W illia m M o rris, of M o rris C h a ir fame, one of the m ost v er­ satile geniuses of V icto ria n E n g la n d , a fte r y e a rs of activity as a w rite r a n d social reform er, came to the conclusion th a t to uplift the populace it w a s es­ sential to m a k e people beauty-conscious. T h e r e u p o n h e established a p rin tin g press to p rin t beautifu l books a n d o p e n ­ ed a factory to design beautiful fabrics a n d create artistic, y e t com fortable fur­ niture. In a n c ie n t d a y s b ea u ty w a s r e ­ served for th e temples of the G o d s a n d the palaces a n d tom bs of kings, a n d for the m ansions of the rich. O u r ideal is different. W e w a n t to see b e a u ty th e h e rita g e of th e masses. A s E m e rso n said, " B e a u ty sho uld be the b irth -rig h t of every m a n a n d w o m a n born into this w o rld ." In a w o rld w here b e a u ty reign s p o v erty m ust vanish. T h e secon d step in making the p e r ­ sonality effective is good speech. T h e ability to e x p re ss o n e ’s self correctly a n d fluently is a n asset in the business w orld a n d in social life. Speech to d a y is con sidered a m ajor subject in o u r schools. M a n y of o u r m embers a re salesmen or a r e in ch arge of a staff of men. I d o n o t hav e to tell them h o w vital it is fo r them to use speech a s a m eans of influencing people. I do n o t have to tell o u r teachers how im p orta n t it is for them to express themselves w ith th e utm ost simplicity a n d correctness. T h in k of the m inisters of y o u r c om m un­ ity. T h o s e w h o can get their m essages across to th e ir c ongregations e x ert th e w id e st influence. E ve ryo ne will adm it th a t o u r P r e s i d e n t ’s influence fo r good is p artly d u e to his skill in using the

E nglish lan gu a ge with telling effect. W h e n y o u listen to o u r P re sid e n t on th e radio, or to w e ll-know n speakers like H a r r y E m erson F o sd ic k o r Dr. Stephen S. W is e , or gifted a c to rs like G e o rg e Arliss, do n o t be a sh a m e d to imitate th eir speech. Im itation is a m ethod of learning. R o b e rt Louis S tev ­ enson tells us th a t in his y o u th he p la y ed th e “sedulous a p e .” T o know th a t y ou a re speaking correctly ^ i l l give you u n d re a m e d -o f poise a n d self-con­ fidence. O n e evening a w eek for a period o f six m onths will accomplish w o n d e rs in self-improvem ent. D o not be discouraged because y o u w e r e born in a n o th e r country. Joseph C o n ra d , one of the greatest novelists a n d stylists in th e E nglish la n g u a g e w a s b o m in Po land , a n d he did n o t le a rn E n glish until he w a s eighteen y e a rs old. It is said th a t he rew rote a c h a p te r in o n e of his novels tw e n ty -o n e times. T h e title pag e of a n insurance pu blication reads “ M illion-D ollar P r o d u c e rs a r e n 't su p e r­ men; th e y are s u p e r-w o rk e rs.” W h i l e l am on the sub ject of speech, m ay I request those officers of C h a p te rs, w hose d u ty it is to r e a d o r speak, to perfect themselves f o r th eir tasks th ro u g h stu d y o r practice? It is a pleasure to listen to a th o r o u g h ly - p r e ­ pa re d speaker or to a re a d in g t h a t is clear, distinct, a n d easily h e a rd no m a t­ ter w h e re you m ay sit. I t is a n ac t of consideration for y o u r a ud ience to m ake yourself easily un d e rsto o d a n d h e a rd w ith o u t difficulty. T h e third factor in m ak in g for suc­ cess in life is know ing h o w to get along with people. In this co nnection it is in­ teresting to note th a t a recent publica­ tion, “ H o w to W i n F r ie n d s a n d In ­ fluence P eop le.” b y D a le C arnegie, is listed a s a best-seller b y leading bo ok ­ sho ps o f th e cou ntry. P e o p le a re b e ­ coming conscious of the fact th a t one can develop in oneself th e ability to m ake friends. T o m ake a child “ socialm ind ed " is one of th e aims of m o d e m education. T h e w'ider y o u r circle of friends a n d ac q u a in ta n ce s th e p le a s a n t­ er, if no t easier, will be y o u r progress The R o sic ru cia n t r o u g h Som e people, o f course, can be h a p p y alone, com pletely abso rb ­ D ig e s t ed in their w o rk o r their interests, bu t A p ril most people complain to m e a b o u t not 1937 ha ving enough friends. M a n y of our

m embers— men a n d w om en of superior ch a ra c ter a n d ability— have b een com ­ pelled to lead so restricted a p ersonal life, o r have h a d such limited hu m an contacts th a t they a re ig n o ra n t of the elem entary principles of hu m an in ter­ course. M a n y of them look only for people of their ow n intellectual a n d spiritual level. T h e y do n o t th in k it w orthw hile to b o th e r wnth a n y o n e else. T h is is a mistaken notion. W h i l e I a g re e th a t yo u should be selective in th e choice of a mate, o r a p a rtn e r, o r a bosom friend, it is to y o u r in te re st to have as wide a n d as varied a circle of acquaintances as possible, a n d even more to y o u r interest to create goodwill in y o u r co m m u n ity b y being ju st as ag reeable as yo u can to everyone. In o rd e r to kno w h o w to h a n d le people you m ust u n d e r s ta n d h u m a n n a ­ ture. Such k n o w le d g e you can gain th ro u g h experience a n d books. Y o u should make a deliberate effort to in ­ crease your hu m an contacts. D o n o t be co nten t with the few people th a t y o u kno w . D o not b e diffident a b o u t taking th e initiative w h e n y ou a re am on g strang ers. T h e p leasure derived from y o u r successful o v e rtu re s will m ake u p for an occasional rebuff a n d lack of r e ­ sponse. If you a r e alone in th e w orld th e re is no o th er w a y of getting started . S a y a pleasant w o rd to the elevatorman, the bell-hop, the d oorm an, th e teleph one op erato r, a n d th e manicurist. A sk the w aiter w h e t h e r he is making a living. T h e desire fo r the w'armth o f a friendly h u m a n c o n ta c t is universal. Sometimes th e people m ost difficult of access long for it the most. In some u n ­ fo rtun ate w a y th e y h a v e lost the ability to communicate easily w ith their fellow men. T o use th e la n g u a g e of th e m y s ­ tics, look upon each h u m a n being w hom y ou contact a s a n ave n u e to ex press y o u r love of G o d a n d y o u r desire to be o f service to th e w o rld. A s G o d is im ­ personal. so y ou s h o u ld aim to be im ­ personal, showing n o distinction in race, creed, social class, o r color. Y o u should speak kindly w o r d s a n d do kindly d eed s for love of G o d a n d h u m a n ity a n d from no ulterior motive. N ev erth eless, the rewra rd is rich a n d sure. T h e love th a t
N in e ty -e ig h t

people b e a r y ou m ust reflect in y o u r p er­ sonal life in m a n y w ays. Y ou c an learn m uch from books. I feel th a t practical people are pron e to un d e re stim a te the k n ow led ge to be d e ­ rived from books. T o think that all kn ow ledge is derived from personal e x ­ perience in life is just as much a n e x ­ a g g e ra tio n a s to believe th a t only the k n o w le d g e derived from books is im­ po rta n t. A b a la n ce must be struck. E x pe rie nc e in life will prove more v a lu ­ able a n d te a c h us m o re if we a re primed w ith the in form ation th a t other people can give us th r o u g h th e books th e y have w ritten. M o r e th a n ever a re people interested in how the h u m a n m ind works a n d how hu m an n a tu r e reacts. People w h o have m ad e a s tu d y of h u m a n beings have much to offer us in the w a y of guidance a n d practical information. M a n y of the books on th e m arket to d a y are definite­ ly w o rth w h ile a n d helpful. T h o s e of our m embers w h o feel the need in their lives for a b e tte r know ledge of hum an beings sho uld re a d these books and cor­ relate w h a t th e y re a d with their own observation a n d experience. T w o ex­ cellent bo ok s a re “A b o u t O urselves,” a n d “ Influencing H u m a n Behavior,” by P ro fe sso r H a r r y M . O verstreet, H e a d of

th e D e p a r tm e n t of P h iloso phy of the College of the C ity of N e w Y o rk . Psyc h o lo g y , in all of its b ra n ch e s, is no t on ly fascinating b ut practical and valuable. E v e r y b o d y needs psychology, p a rtic u la rly th o se of us w h o long to m ake th e w o rld a b e tte r place to live in. A s P r o fe sso r O v e r s tr e e t points ou t, “ If th ere a re effective w a y s of aro using the in te re st of people, w h y s h o u ld n ’t these m eth od s be em ployed by th o se w h o w a n t to influence th e public for g o o d ? ” T o sum m arize th e main p oints o f this talk: W e should tr y to make o u r dream s come tru e by m a s te ry of o u r p articular field of interest. T o pu t o u r ideas across it is ne c e ssary to m ake o u r personalities effective th r o u g h careful groom ing, cor­ rect speech, a n d e ase of h um an contacts. K n o w le d g e th a t w e a re above reproach in these respects will give us poise a n d self-confidence. W e should le a r n all th a t w e can from life a n d books. T o conclude: It is pe rfe c tly legitimate for a Rosicrucian to use every device t h a t e x ­ perience h a s s h o w n to be effective to im prove his p e rso n a lity a n d to increase his success a n d h a p p in e ss in life. In im­ proving y o u r o w n personality a n d your ow n perso nal life y o u are th e r e b y m ak­ ing y ou rself a m o re effective instrum ent for the p u rp o se s of th e Cosmic.

T H E M O D E R N M Y S T IC
A n ew periodical h a s just been issued in E n g la n d , entitled " T h e M odern M y s tic ." It is well p rin te d and illustrated, and its editorial co n te n t p a rtic u la rly a p p ea ls to students of p h ilosophy, m etaphysics and m ysticism . W e are su re it will d ev elo p rapidly and have the success it rig h tly deserves. W e are proud to announce th a t th e publishers of this new m agazine are R osicrucians of the A M O R C jurisdiction in E n g la n d . T h e a d d re ss of this interesting publication is " T h e M odern M y stic ," 35 G t. Jam es S treet, B edford R ow , London, W . C. 1, E ngland. R ead a copy.

T H E C O U R IE R C A R
T h e R osicrucian C ourier C a r is leaving on its third tran sco n tin en tal tour to v isit the p rincipal cities th ro u g h o u t the entire U nited S ta te s. T h e staff acco m p an y in g it consists of a n ew personnel and they are prepared to lecture on the R osicrucian principles and teach in g s to the m em bership in the vario u s cities they will visit, a n d dem onstrate a s well m any of the scientific and m etaphysical principles w hich the O rd e r expounds. T h e lec­ tu res a n d dem onstrations are new , as are th e special m otion p ictu res w hich th ey will exhibit. T h e y will also hold a num ber of public lectures th ro u g h o u t th e U nited S tates, during w hich th ey will exhibit unusual sound m otion p ictu res a n d dem onstrate, w ith uniquely designed scientific ap p ara tu s, some of n a tu re ’s stra n g est phenom ena. M em bers in the cities to be visited w ill be notified in advance.

>'TwranviuiVA'>v>w/l '/,*'i'A<r V*'<fe'i;ft'nkT<fcV*'aarivrA''ife'i»'i.'*:>y & 'A

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
BROTHERHOOD

|

By

T

h or

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
music or art, o r w h o w a n ts to lead a more refined o r spiritual life. T h e s e people do not desire to shirk their duties a n d responsibilities. O n e w e a ry day a f te r an o th e r passes in the most sordid a n d uninspiring environm ent. A n y a t­ tempt on their p a r t to raise people to their level is m et w ith jests a n d jibes a n d a stream o f sarcasm . H a v e not these people a r ig h t to seek congenial friends? Shall w e sa y that th ey are w rong w hen th ey seek them in the O rd e r? D o vou think th a t it is in ac­ cordance witn the spirit of o u r teachings to m aintain th a t th e aim of the O r d e r is merely to teach p eo ple how to help themselves? D o n 't y o u think th at th e O r d e r is more th a n a system of instruc­ tion? T h a t it is also a b ro th e rh o o d in the full meaning o f t h a t beautiful word? D o you remember. B ro th e rs a n d Sis­ ters, just ho w you felt w h e n you first heard of the R osicrucian O rd e r? D id yo u not enter with th e most eager ex­ pectations a n d liveliest hopes? Did you n ot aw ait y o u r first co n ta ct w ith real Rosicrucians w ith a b eating heart? I rem em ber well my first reaction. I h ad read of the w o n d e rfu l k no w ledg e in the possession of the O r d e r . I h a d re a d of the great men of old w h o h a d been b ro th e rs of the O r d e r . I discovered that glorious volume of M a r ie Corelli, "Life E v erlasting," a n d m y soul so a re d to the heights. T h is w a s the w orld of my
T
uk)

T T I M E S the o p portun ity to ren ­ d e r unusual s e rv ­ ice lies right a t our door. W e m ay n o t have the op­ p o rtu n ity to do the spectacular t h i n g th a t d epen ds u pon •wealth or e x tr a o r ­ d in a ry skill. W e m a y not have the o p p o r t u n i t y to build the greatest b rid ge in th e w orld, e n d o w an ex p e ri­ m ental school in e ducation, or p erform an u nusual operation. F o r tu n a te ly for m ost o f us w ho c a n n o t as y e t aspire to such heights, life affords innum erable occasions to do the little th in g s t h a t m a y m ean m uch in the life of a friend o r a neighbor. O n e v e ry im portant reason w h y m any people join the Rosicrucian O r d e r is th a t th e y seek friends a n d ac q u a in ta n ce s o f a h ig h e r type. D o n ’t yo u think. B rothers a n d Sisters, th a t this reason is just as legitimate as th a t of gaining health o r learning h o w to find y o u r rig h t place in life? W e m a y a s well The R o sicrucian frankly adm it that su p e rio r people c a n ­ n ot fit easily into an a v e ra g e en viro n­ D ig e s t ment. T h e r e are m a n y persons w h o are A ugust the on ly one in a n entire family w h o loves to s tu d y or re a d, or w ho loves 1937

h u n d r e d se v e n ty - fo u r

dream s. T h is w a s H e a v e n up on earth. Such w ere men a n d wom en w o r th y of the name. I read a n d reread th a t volume until I knew it practically b y hea rt. T h e man whom I a d m ire d most, the hero of my dream s, the companion of m y w a k ­ ing hours, w a s the c h a ra c te r whom the O r d e r depicted as a typical Rosicrucian M a s te r — Aselzion. O n e of m y b urning desires as a y o u n g member w a s to find Aselzion. T o me a Rosicrucian w a s a superior being, one of G o d ’s elect. H e loved all wisdom, lived a life of humility a n d service, and w a s a b ro th e r to every su f­ fering soul. H e u n d e rsto o d all diffi­ culties and problems. Y o u did not even have to talk. H e looked a n d he knew. H e sensed just w h e re the ache w as in y o u r heart. H e knew just th e right w ord to say and allay it. It w as fo rtun ate th a t for y e a rs I had to w o rk alone a n d came into intimate contact with n o member of the Rosi­ crucian O r d e r . B y the time I did I had developed to th e point w h e re I had learned to take people as th e y are and to ad ju st myself to their level of u n d e r ­ standing. T h in k , F rie n d s, of the sh a tte rin g dis­ illusionment such an a rd e n t soul e x ­ periences w h o, a f te r m onths a n d p e r ­ haps y e a rs of planning, ac tu a lly m a n ­ ages to a tte n d a C h a p te r meeting. H e expects sy m p a th y , u n d e r s t a n d i n g , w arm th, love of a r t an d music a n d sci­ ence, a n d a b ov e all, friends— hosts of gentle, kind, c ourteous friends, each and every one a beautiful and superior soul. H o w frequently does his dream world crash a t his feet. O f course, B rothers and Sisters, w e are all a w a re of the fact that o u r visio nary idealist m u st learn to be more sensible a n d realistic. H e learned th a t b itte r lesson a long time ago in the w orld. H e did no t think he w ould have to learn it all o ver again in the ran ks of th e O rde r. O u r y oun g members, I know , should be given p le n ty of time to orient them ­ selves to the ideals and s ta n d a r d s of the O rd e r . E v e n they can frequently a d ju st themselves with g re a t rapidity, having learned the law of love in other schools of th o u g h t. But surely, Brothers and Sisters, have w e n ot the right to expect a little more from m em bers w ho have been w ith us for five y e a rs or more? By th a t time you should know
T w o hundred se v e n ty -fiv e

the im po rtance of cultivating extrovert qualities. Y o u should realize th a t it is one of y o u r d u tie s to be interested in o th e r people a n d to take the initiative in c ontacts w ith them. Y o u sho uld no longer be diffident in ap proaching th e newcomer and making him feel at hom e. Y ou should never permit a n y o n e to sit alone looking u n ­ com fortable a n d forlorn. If there is no group to w hich y o u c an introduce the person, then ta k e it upon yourself to ac t as h o st a n d guide. Sit down beside him a n d find o u t w h a t his personal p ro b ­ lems a n d interests are. W i t h th e rig h t kind of q ue stion s you can easily get him to u n b u rd e n himself. V e r y fre­ q uently all th a t will be necessary will be th a t you act as a sym pathetic listener. Y ou m ay h av e come to the C h a p te r that d ay to re a d a book, o r to talk to a friend, or to s p e n d an h o u r in peaceful meditation. H e r e is a hum an being w h o needs you. H e r e is a test of brotherly love th at G o d H im self has sent. H ere is a test of y o u r sym pathy, kindliness and tact. H e r e is a test of y o u r soul developm ent as much as a n y psychic or occult test. See ho w successfully you can minister to th a t groping soul! T h a t is one of o u r m a jo r purposes— to train you to be of service to mankind. A s you develop m en ta lly a n d emotionally and spiritually, y o u r u n d e rsta n d in g im­ proves, y o u r sensitivity becomes more a p p a re n t, a n d y o u r intuition becomes m ore reliable. Y o u can learn only through practice a n d experience. You will be a w a r e o f y o u r development only through practice a n d experience. T h o s e of y o u w h o w o rk to gether d a y in a n d d a y ou t should be more t h a n fellow -w orkers a n d casual a c q u a in t­ ances. Y o u can invite each o th er to tea. Y ou can rem em b er each other on b ir th ­ days a n d on special occasions. Y o u can visit each o th e r w h e n ill o r in bereave­ ment. W h e n a member has a tte n d e d regu larly for w eek s a n d even months, and then is absent, should you not call up to find o ut the reason? Y ou can make new c o m ers feel th a t they have indeed e n te re d a new family, a n d th a t th e y h av e fo u n d true b rothers and sistrs such a s th e y th o u g h t never existed in the w orld. D o y ou th in k th at expenditure of time a n d m o ney a n d effort w asted? Perish the th o u g h t. A s Elbert H u b b a rd

said: " O n ly th a t is tru ly y o u rs that you have given a w a y ." N o loving w o rd or th oug ht or deed can ever possibly be w a ste d . P e rh a p s yo u have he a rd the beautiful poem b y R o b e rt Browning, P ippa P asses. A little mill girl on her one vacation in the y e a r p asses th ro u g h the tow n singing, a n d h er g a y song has a decisive effect on th re e people, each of whom is experiencing, a t the moment, a crisis. A s E m e rso n said: i " N o r k no w e st th ou w h a t argu m ent T h y life to th y n e ig h b o r’^ creed has lent." O n e never k n o w s from w’h a t source blessings m ay come. O n e never know s w h a t p art a h um an being con tacted most casually in the co u rse o f d a ily routine is destined to play in one m a n 's life. O ne never k no w s w h e n o n e en tertains an angel unaw ares. N o t th a t w e should do good for the sake of re w a rd . Such a th o u g h t is indeed u n w o r th y of a s tu ­ dent of th e P a th . B ut so is the w orld constituted. Such is the moral law. " C a st th y bread upon the w a te rs and it shall return u n to thee a fte r m any d ay s." Such is the on ly w a y to com ­ pensate for m a n y m istakes of the past. Such is the su rest wra y of rising above the pangs of o u tra g e o u s fortune. Such is the m ost direct w a y of expressing G od in one 's life. " B e a r ye one a nother's b u rd e n s," said the gentlest m aster of them all. T h e r e is no m ore p o ig n a n t emotion th a n th a t of re g re t. It can break the spirit a n d d a rk e n life. T o realize a situation in a to tally u n exp ected light, to be a w a r e of the w o r d you m ight have spoken, of the little deed you m ight h ave done, are h e a rt-b re a k in g experiences. In th e press of inn um erable activities, in the multitude of so uls a bout us, w e are

often unable to tell w h o needs us most or w h a t d u ty should be a tte n d e d to first. T h e only safe rule is to be just as help­ ful as w e can to each a n d every one we contact, a n d let experience a n d in­ tuition be our guides. T h e im portant thing is th a t w e should m ake a decided effort to be genuinely interested in other people. H o w w on derful to k n o w that your little gift bro u g h t a smile to the lips of a d espo ndent soul! H o w rew a rd in g to k no w th at y o u r invitation w a s an event in a lonely p erso n's life! W h a t joy to k n o w that th e w o rd you uttered, the little courtesy you e x ten ded, the little help yo u offered, w a s like a cup of cold w a te r to a w ea ry traveller in a parched land. F riend s, there is so much dis­ c ou ragem en t on every side. So many souls are bew ildered, crushed, and w h e re v e r you tu rn y o u find u n h a p p i­ ness, illness, and po verty . Some day, of course, all men will function in a h a r ­ monious society. Some d a y all people will k n o w how to take care o f them­ selves a n d illness will be a thing of the past. Some d a y p o v e rty will be b a n ­ ished. But in the meanwhile, let us not close o u r eyes or stop o u r ears. Let us n o t sto p to blame. L et us n o t say harshly, "Y o u b ro u g h t this upon y o u r ­ self— you must suffer th e consequences." R ather, with the utm ost compassion, let us speak very gently, a n d let us act quickly, a n d let us tr e a d v ery softly to bind up the w o u n d s a n d su p p o rt the stumbling and s tre n g th e n the w eary hearted. L et us indeed be children of the light. Let the love in o u r h e a rts radiate to all w hom w e contact. O f all the virtues, love is suprem e. W i t h o u t it w e a re as tinkling b rass a n d cymbals.

S E A T T L E R O S IC R U C I A N R A D IO B R O A D C A S T
W e are p leased to announce the beginning o f a series o f radio bro a d ca sts o v er a num ber of leading stations. W e h a v e just com pleted p ro g ram s o v er ra d io station K F R C in S a n F ran cisco ; and beginning Saturday, A u g u s t 7, w e w ill b ro ad cast daily at 8:45 p. m. o v er rad io statio n K ]R a t Seattle, W a s h .— 309.1 m eters or 907 kilocycles. T hese p ro g ra m s are exceptionally interesting to m em bers and their friends and acquaintances. T h e y consist of a series of discourses entitled " T h e M y sterie s of L ife." E ac h discourse is com plete in itself, helpful and inspiring, and th e p rogram also in­ cludes a splendid m usical arrangem ent. T r y a n d h a ve as m a n y o f y o u r friends and acquaintances as possible listen in. W atch fo r a nnouncem ents o f R osicrucian, A M O R C broadcasts in o th e r p a rts o f the U nited S ta te s.
a .A - * .* .

The R osicru cia n D ig e s t A ugust 1937

i 1 <

^

T w o hundred se v e n ty -six

cover y o u r mistake too late in life to take a d v a n ta g e of the truth ab o u t the sh ape of our earth. So you stu d y geo­ g ra p h y a n d learn th a t the earth is n ot flat, a n d th a t w e canno t fall off of an

edge. w ith, these begin life.

H a v in g th a t kn ow ledge to start you build from there on. So keep few th o u g h ts in mind w h e n you to build a perso nal philosophy of

V

V

V

Common Misconceptions
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
the first step. It is n ot enough for a dietitian to k n o w food values and food combinations. H e or she m ust know how to pre p a re food. It is no t en ough for the violinist to k n o w the h istory of music, the lives of great musicians, a n d the laws of h arm o ny. H e must actually kn o w ho w to play the violin. T h e m astery of an art, or science, de­ m an d s serious interest, c o ncentrated a t­ tention, a n d a terrific am ou nt of d r u d g ­ ery. T h e d ru d g e ry , how ever, is not w ith o u t its com pensation. T h e re is a solid satisfaction in holding yourself to a given task, in g ra du a lly correlating theo ry a n d practice, in slowly attaining skill in a technique th a t yo u w a n t to master. T h e time element, too, is im portant. T h e first y e a r of a n y stu dy , w h e th e r science, language, art, or mathematics, is purely in tro d u c to ry a n d elementary. T h e succeeding y e a rs give a d d e d k no w l­ edge a n d a certain am ou nt of skill. But it is the stu d e n t w ho has completed the course of stud y, w h o is in a position to test the principles in every possible com­ bination of circum stances, w h o can do creative w o rk. T o play w ith ideas, to tr y new combinations, to do creative w ork, m eans th at the principles have been th o ro u g h ly a b sorbe d a n d the tech­ nique h a s become secon d nature. T h e artist on the violin can p la y with inspir­ ed interpretation because he h a s com­ pletely m astered both th e score and the instrum ent. People are a w a r e of the fact th a t it takes time to m a ste r a musical instru­ m ent or a foreign language, but they are not yet aw are of the fact th at the same thing holds true of a n e w w a y of think­ ing a n d living. It is n ot e n ough to listen

HROUGHOUT m y tw e n ty y e ars in the O r d e r I have i d d i s c o v e r e d that one of the chief o b s t a c l e s to the p r o g r e s s of t h e stu d e n t is a mis­ un d erstanding of the spirit and p u r­ pose of our O rd e r. O u r stu d e n ts have been connected with every type of mystic a n d occult organization. T h e y have read w idely in the literature of the subject. M a n y have not had sufficient scientific training to know w h a t consti­ tutes proof a n d w h a t constitutes a fact or a fallacy. T h e y have accepted w h a t they h ave re a d in inspirational m a g a ­ zines, a n d w h a t th e y have h e a rd from inspirational lectures, in the same u n ­ critical w a y in w hich they formerly a p ­ p roached religious dogma. T h e y enter the O r d e r , in m a n y cases, w ith a w rong point of view a n d with m any misconcep­ tions, as to fund am ental principles, which c ann ot be cleared up until the entire course of s tu d y is completed. M e re ly to m aster the nine grades of stu d y intellectually is insufficient. O n ly part of the w o rk h a s been accomplished. First of all, the concepts must be tr a n s ­ lated into term s of daily living. O f w h a t use a re rules of gram m ar unless they a ctually help you to speak and w rite correctly? O f w h a t use is it to master the steps of an experim ent in chemistry or physics unless you can actually d e m o n stra te it in the la b o ra ­ tory? Both in science and in the arts the intellectual m astery of ideas is but

o

T

Three hundred e ig h ty -sev e n

to inspirational sp e a k ers, it is not enough to read inspirational m ag azines and books, it is not e n o u g h even to s tu d y the Rosicrucian lessons. Y o u must learn by doing. You must learn h ow principles w ork out by observing the consequences of y o u r ow n actions a n d those of y o u r fellow men. Y o u m ust be patient. Y ou must a d o p t the lo n g - r a n g e view a n d know th a t co nse qu e nc e s are certain even though no t im m ediate. T h e am ou nt of m isinform ation in oc­ cult and mystic lite ra tu re is unbeliev­ able. T h e av e ra g e s tu d e n t h a s 'a b so lu te ­ ly no w a y of d istinguishing b etw een fact and fancy. T h e w r ite rs of occult fiction have either no t k n o w n w h e re fact ends and fancy begins, or h a v e no t been able to make evident to th e re a d e r the d e f ­ inite line of d e m a rc a tio n . W h i l e we realize the good t h a t inspirational o r­ ganizations e v e ry w h e re a re accomplish­ ing by teaching people a n e w outlook on life, w e feel th a t the O r d e r should state plainly a n d b lu n tly w h a t it accepts a n d w h a t it c a n n o t a c c e p t of the occult a n d mystic ideas afloat tod ay . O n e of these ideas is a b o u t th e M a sters. M a s te r s Several occult o rg a n iz a tio n s h ave a d ­ vanced peculiar th e o rie s a b o u t spiritual M a ste rs w ho directed e v e ry h u m a n b e ­ ing, a n d h u m a n affairs in general. O th e rs have claimed th a t a M a s te r had been born in the flesh— a second M e s ­ siah. T h e M e ssia h in question, w ho had been advertised for several y e a rs and for w hose s u p p o r t th o u s a n d s of dollars had been collected, em ph atically denied such M a ste rsh ip a n d furthe rm ore dis­ claimed a n y k n o w le d g e of bo ok s p u b ­ lished a n d circulated u n d e r his nam e as author. W e have re ad o f g ro u p s organized for the special p u rp o s e of going to India — which seem s to be the p la y ­ g ro u n d of the M a s te r s , bo th in and out of the flesh, n o tw ith s ta n d in g its miser­ able social a n d econom ic condition— and of the w o n d e rs d o n e b y these M a ste rs for the benefit o f th e investigators. O u r objection to such tales is th a t M a ste rs The R o sic ru c ia n and A v a ta r s like Jesus a n d B ud dh a w ould not d e m o n stra te in th e physical D ig e s t b o d y a n d sp eak to a few inquisitive N ovem ber persons for the sole p u rp o se of con­ vincing them of th e possibility of the 1937

life hereafter. F u rtherm ore, w e dem a n d proof that such ha p p e n in g s a re more than mere dream s. T h e truth of the m atter is t h a t there are “ ministering spirits se n t forth to do service" as the Bible says, b u t o n ly very seldom a n d in extrem e cases d o these M a ste rs contact hum ans. A t n o time is the individual free will in te rfe re d with, a n d such co n ta c ts occur on ly in the psychic sphere. P lanes Y o u also h e a r a n d read m uch of dif­ ferent planes, such as the a s tra l plane, the psychic plane, the spiritual plane, a n d an indefinite nu m b e r of planes. Some schools a n d w riters tr y to create the impression th a t there a re a nu m b er of planes betw een the e a r th a n d the spiritual kingdom on which p e rso n s can dwell consciously from time to time, a n d c a rry on m any forms of psychic e x p r e s ­ sions. In reality, there a re o nly tw o classifications, the earth plane a n d the C osm ic plane. T h e y a re no t really planes upon w hich the soul o f man, while in the bod y, can live, or to w hich the soul of m an jo urneys a f te r transition a n d carries on a long period of e x ist­ ence, but they a re simply divisions of spiritual unfoldm ent, and th e re fo re e n ­ tirely different from the k in d of planes that these o th e r o r g a n iz a tio n s talk about. P rob a bly a b e tte r w o r d w ou ld be "sections" to describe the divisions of the Cosmic C on sciou sn ess a n d the Divine C onsciousness of th e spiritual kingdom. B o d ies W e now come to the th ird miscon­ ception, namely: bodies. W e h e a r of astral body, psychic body, atom ic body, a n d spirit body; a n d you n a tu r a lly w o n ­ der, as I have, h o w m a n y b o d ie s are there to a h u m a n being? T h e O r d e r does not recognize more th a n o n e bo dy — the physical b o d y — a n d a sta te of b e ­ ing which is n o t m aterial a n d limited w hich w e call Soul. Y o u m u s t realize th a t when w e sp eak of th e soul of man o r the soul of the universe, w e do not refer to the psychic b o d y of a n y in­ dividual person, b u t w h e n w e s p e a k of the psychic b ody of man w e m e an to in­ clude -all the divine essences a n d sp ir­ ituality which are a ttrib u te d to th e soul. T h e soul or the psychic m a n consists of
T h ree hundred e ig h ty -e ig h t

«

cover y o u r mistake too late in life to take a d v a n ta g e of the truth ab o u t the sh a p e of our earth. So you stu d y geo­ g ra p h y a n d learn th a t the earth is n ot flat, a n d th a t w e c anno t fall off of an V V

edge. w ith, these b egin life. V

H a v in g th a t kn ow ledge to start you build from there on. So keep few th o u g h ts in m ind w hen you to build a p e rso na l philosophy of

Common Misconceptions
B y T h o r K j i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand M aster
H RO UGHO UT m y tw e n ty y ears in the O r d e r I have d i s c o v e r e d that one of the chief o b s t a c l e s to the p r o g r e s s of t h e stu d e n t is a mis­ un de rsta n ding of the spirit and p u r­ pose of our O rde r. O u r stu d e n ts have been co n n e c te d with every ty p e of mystic and occult organization. T h e y have re a d w idely in the literature of the subject. M a n y h av e not had sufficient scientific training to k no w w h a t consti­ tutes proof a n d w h a t constitutes a fact or a fallacy. T h e y have accepted w hat they have read in inspirational m ag a ­ zines, a n d w h a t th e y have h e a rd from inspirational lectures, in the same u n ­ critical w a y in which they formerly a p ­ proached religious dogma. T h e y enter the O r d e r, in m a n y cases, with a w rong point of view a n d with m any misconcep­ tions, as to fun dam ental principles, which cann ot be cleared up until the entire course of s tu d y is completed. M e re ly to m aster the nine grades of stu dy intellectually is insufficient. O n ly part of the w o rk h a s been accomplished. First of all, the concepts m ust be tr a n s ­ lated into terms of daily living. O f w h a t use a re rules of g ra m m a r unless they actu ally help you to speak and w rite correctly? O f w h a t use is it to m aster the steps of an experim ent in chemistry or physics unless you can actually d e m o n stra te it in the la b o ra ­ tory? Both in science and in the arts the intellectual m astery of ideas is but
T h r e e h u n d re d e ig h ty - s e v e n

the first step. It is not enough for a dietitian to k n o w food values a n d food combinations. H e or she must know how to prepare food. It is not enough for the violinist to k n o w the history of music, the lives of great musicians, and the laws of h a rm o n y . H e must actually kn o w how to play the violin. T h e m astery of an art, or science, de­ m an d s serious interest, c oncentrated a t ­ tention, an d a terrific am ou nt of d r u d g ­ ery. T h e d ru d g e ry , how ever, is not w ith o u t its compensation. T h e r e is a solid satisfaction in holding yourself to a given task, in g ra d u a lly correlating theo ry a n d practice, in slowly attaining skill in a technique th a t you w a n t to master. T h e time element, too, is im portant. T h e first y e a r of a n y study, w hether science, la ng uag e, art, or mathematics, is purely in tro d u c to ry a n d elementary. T h e succeeding y e a rs give a d d e d know l­ ed ge a n d a certain a m o u n t of skill. But it is the stu d e n t w'ho has completed the course of stu d y , w h o is in a position to test the principles in every possible com ­ bination of circum stances, w h o can do creative w ork. T o p lay with ideas, to tr y n e w combinations, to do creative work, m eans th a t the principles have been th o rou ghly a b s o rb e d a n d the tech­ nique has become second nature. T h e artist on the violin can play with inspir­ ed in terpretation because he has com­ pletely m a ste re d bo th the score a n d the instrum ent. People a re a w a re of the fact th a t it takes time to m aster a musical in stru ­ ment or a foreign language, but they are not yet a w a re of the fact th a t the same thing holds true of a n e w w a y of think­ ing and living. It is n ot e n ou gh to listen

%

t o in s p ir a tio n a ls p e a k e r s .it is not enough to read inspirational m ag azines and books, it is not en o u g h even to stu d y the Rosicrucian lessons. Y o u m ust learn by doing. Y o u must le arn how principles w ork out by o bserving the consequences of your own actions a n d those of y o u r fellow men. Y ou m u st b e patient. You must a d o p t the lo n g - r a n g e view and know th a t con se q ue nc e s are certain even though no t im m ediate. T h e am ount o f m isinform ation in oc­ cult a n d mystic lite ra tu re is unbeliev­ able. T h e ave ra g e s tu d e n t h a s 'a b s o lu te ­ ly no w a y of d istinguishing b etw een fact and fancy. T h e w r ite rs of occult fiction have either no t k n o w n w h e re fact ends and fancy begins, o r h a v e n ot been able to make evident to the r e a d e r th e d ef­ inite line of d e m a rc a tio n . W h i l e we realize the good t h a t inspirational o r­ ganizations e v e ry w h e re are accomplish­ ing b y teaching peop le a n e w outlook on life, w e feel th a t th e O r d e r should state plainly a n d b lu n tly w h a t it accepts and w h a t it c a n n o t a c c e p t of th e occult a n d mystic ideas afloat tod a y . O n e of these ideas is a b o u t th e M a s te rs . M a sters Several occult o r g a n iz atio n s have a d ­ vanced peculiar theories a b o u t spiritual M a sters w ho directed e v e ry h um an be­ ing, a n d h um an affairs in general. O th e r s have claim ed th a t a M a s te r had been b o rn in the flesh— a second M e s ­ siah. T h e M e ssia h in question, w h o had been ad vertised fo r several y e a rs and for whose su p p o rt th o u s a n d s of dollars had been collected, em ph atically denied such M a s te rs h ip a n d fu rthe rm ore dis­ claimed a n y k n o w le d g e o f books p u b ­ lished and circulated u n d e r his n am e as author. W e have re a d of gro u p s organized for the special p u rp o s e of going to India — w hich seem s to b e the p la y ­ g round of the M a s te r s , bo th in and out of the flesh, n o tw ith s ta n d in g its miser­ able social a n d econom ic condition— and of the w o n d e rs d o n e b y these M a ste rs for the benefit of th e investigators. O u r objection to such tales is th a t M a ste rs The R o s ic r u c ia n and A v a ta r s like Jesus a n d B ud dh a w ould not d e m o n stra te in the physical D ig e s t b o d y a n d sp eak to a few inquisitive N ovem ber persons for the sole p u rp o se of con­ 1937 vincing them of th e possibility of the

life hereafter. F u rtherm ore, w e dem a n d proof that such ha p p e n in g s a re more than mere dream s. T h e truth of the m atter is th a t there are “ministering spirits sent forth to do service" as the Bible says, b u t on ly very seldom and in extreme cases d o these M a ste rs contact hum ans. A t n o time is the individual free wrill in te rfe re d w ith, a n d such con ta cts occur only in the psychic sphere. P lanes Y ou also h e a r a n d re a d m uch of dif­ ferent planes, such as the a s tra l plane, the psychic plane, the spiritual plane, a n d an indefinite n um ber of planes. Some schools a n d w rite rs t r y to create the impression th a t there a re a n um ber of planes betw een the e a rth a n d the spiritual kingdom on w hich p e rso n s can dwell consciously from time to time, and carry on m any form s of psychic e x p re s ­ sions. In reality, there a re o n ly two classifications, the earth plan e a n d the Cosm ic plane. T h e y a re n o t really planes upon w hich the soul of m an, while in the bo dy , can live, o r to which the soul of m an jo u rn e y s a f te r transition a n d carries on a long period of e x ist­ ence, but they a re simply divisions of spiritual unfoldm ent, a n d th e re fo re e n ­ tirely different from the kind of planes th at these o th e r o r g a n iz a tio n s talk about. P rob a bly a b e tte r w o r d w ou ld be “ sections" to describe th e divisions of the Cosmic C on sciou sness a n d the Divine C onsciousness of th e spiritual kingdom. B odies W e now come to the th ird m iscon­ ception, nam ely: bodies. W e h e a r of a stra l body, psychic body, atom ic body, a n d spirit body; a n d you n a tu ra lly w o n ­ der, as I have, h o w m a n y bodies are there to a h u m a n being? T h e O r d e r does n ot recognize more th a n o n e b o d y — the physical b o d y — a n d a sta te of b e ­ ing which is n ot material a n d limited which w e call Soul. Y o u m u s t realize th a t w hen w e sp eak of th e soul o f man o r the soul of the universe, w e do not refer to the psychic b o d y o f a n y in ­ dividual person, b u t w h e n w e sp e a k of the psychic b ody of m an w e m e a n to in­ clude ‘all the divine essences a n d spir­ ituality which are a ttrib u te d to th e soul. T h e soul or the psychic m a n consists of
T h ree hundred e ig h ty -e ig h t

«

vibrations on ly as a musical ch ord , the essence of w hich m ay a t times assum e a c o u n te r p a r t of the material being. If you have a clear a n d definite un d e rsta n d in g of the m eaning of m a­ terial a n d immaterial it will be very much easier for you to s e p a r a te the w h e a t from the chaff in y o u r readings. By m aterial w e must conceive som e­ thing concrete which is limited, having form-existence. B y immaterial w e real­ ize som ething th a t is unlimited a n d in­ definite, h aving no form a n d no t limited by space or time. Just a being, a n exist­ ence, som ething th a t simply is, like a musical composition, a n opera, a song, etc. A song, or a composition like " N e a r e r M y G o d, to T h e e ” exists inde­ p e n d e n t of time a n d place, a n d c an only be realized a n d recognized by us when we have the medium for expression, as a musical instrument. T h e b o d y is material; the Soul is im­ material, a n d limited only by the body. In other w ords, the instru m e nt or the vessel limits the immaterial force— the Soul. A s soon as you conceive of a n y ­ thing th a t is different from something else it becomes definite, concrete, and must be material. W i t h i n our ow n being there is a large d eg ree of the consciousness of G o d and the Divine E ssen ce th a t is distributed th ro u g h o u t the universe. T h i s fact does n ot make y ou G od , or a G o d , an ym ore than a drop of w a ter can be considered as the ocean. T o o m a n y on the path have the idea th a t the g re a t goal of our q u e st lies in some s tr a n g e mystic condition th a t is o utside of ourselves. T h e y feel th a t un ­ less th e y lift themselves up from this earth plane th e re is no possibility of coming into a ttu n e m e n t with an im agin­ a r y Cosmic plane. T h is is a serious mis­ take. It is all within you. So m a n y have an idea that a Rosicrucian should spend the largest p a rt of his d a y thinking, m editating, practicing exercises a n d liv­ V V

ing a peculiar life of solitude, and doing all kinds of " h o c u s-p o c u s.” T h e s e ideas are derived from the E a s t a n d b ro u g h t out b y w riters a n d speakers w h o say that unless w e sit all d a y on a b o a r d of nails or broken glass, o r sit folded up with criss-cross limbs in a corner a n d think of nothing else than the “w h a tn ess of the n o th in g " w e will never be h app y. N o w a perfectly natural, normal, healthy, h a p p y R osicrucian is one who gives just as m uch atten tion every day to his duties, his obligations, the n e c e s­ sities a n d p leasures of life, his business, his social affairs, his prom otion of e d u ­ cation. a n d other constructive things of life, as he gives to his own personal studies. First a n d foremost, above everything else, come p ro p e r eating, proper drinking, a n d p ro p e r sleeping. But the bo dy also needs exercise like w alking a n d b re a th in g . Y o u c a n n o t be h ealthy sitting cross-legged in the c o r ­ ner of your sanctum with incense b u r n ­ ing a n d the air foul for hours. A few minutes of p ro p e r incense bu rning is sufficient d uring meditation, b u t you also need fresh air a n d plenty of it. G oo d healthy air from o utdoors with sun shining is im p o rta n t to p ro p e r a d ­ justm ent of the b o d y . A n d then again, the spirit a n d soul of an individual should have as much lau g h te r a n d s u n ­ shine in it as it h a s serious thoughts, prayer, a n d meditation. A good h ealthy laugh a n d inn ocent fun contribute as much to the h a r m o n y a n d poise of the body, mind, a n d the soul, as a n y th in g else th at can be done. T h e r e is a b solute­ ly no harm in a tte n d in g concerts, m ov­ ing pictures, dances, parties a n d other things th a t please the mind a n d ch an g e the trend of th o u g h ts a n d help us to get a balanced c o n ta c t w ith other people. N o r is it necessary for the mystic to practice every d a y all of the exercises that h ave been ta u g h t him. O n c e more I say "K eep y o u r feet o n the gro u n d ." Be practical a n d reasonable. V

S U M M A R IE S O F S C IE N C E
( C o n tin u e d from P a g e 382) system P r o fe sso r S idgw ick p oin te d out th a t " T h e moon is much too small for life to b e possible: M e rc u r y is p ro b a b ly too small a n d too hot; Ju piter a n d the
T h ree hundred eighty-nine

outer planets too cold. T h e only places in the so lar system w h e re life is po s­ sible seem to b e th e e a rth and o u r tw o neighbors, M a r s a n d V e n u s ."

The Lost Horizon
By T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
C C A S IO N A L L Y a p la y o r a picture a p p e a r s th a t fills th e h e a r t of th e m y s tic w ith de­ light. I remember T h e L a d d e r,a play th a t illu stra te d the them e of rein­ carnation. I recall t h e picture D e a th T a k e s a H oliday. a n d T h e R etu rn o f P eter G rim m , both the play a n d the picture. E a c h illus­ tra te d one point in the m ystic philoso­ p h y of life. N o w a picture has a p p e a re d w hich a ctually dram atizes the entire cycle of soul development. I s a w the picture twice. T h e first time I w a s completely a b so rb e d b y the problems a n d struggles of the people in­ volved. I sa w m a n 's terrific struggles w ith a seem ingly hostile environment, m a n ’s in ner longing for som ething better, a n d the opposition he m eets w ith, even am ong his ow n people. A s the Bible tells us, " A m a n ’s enemies are of his o w n ho usehold.” I s aw a bit of a utopian fairyland in a hid d e n valley of the lofty m ountains of T ib e t. In this unbelievably lovely village of S h a n g riLa peace a n d b e a u ty a n d love a bound. T h e stru g g le for existence has ceased. All is harm onious grow th a n d selfexpression. C h ildre n learn in the open fields. W h e n w eary, th e y th ro w off th eir g a r ­ m ents a n d swim in a n e a r b y lake. M e n
F our hundred seventy-three

a n d wom en, godlike, with serene c o u n ­ ten an ce a n d dignified step, tre a d the even p a th s of daily life. A ll is beautiful, u n h u rrie d a n d soul-satisfying. The w o m a n of fifty looks like tw enty; the man of a h u n d re d is active, in the prim e of life. G reed, fear, envy, a n d jealousy hav e d isa p p e are d . T h e r e is no reason for th e se vices to exist. E a c h h a s all th a t he needs for a h a p p y life of p e r ­ fect self-expression. M o n e y is m e a n in g ­ less. G o ld a b ou nd s, b u t no one so much a s sto p s to pick it up. Divorce does no t exist. It is courteous for a m an to let his w ife go w h e n h er h e a rt is elsewhere. Since cost n eed not be considered a n d profits a re u nnecessary, every th in g b ears the impress of love a n d beau ty . T h e w alls a re covered w ith magnificent tap estries a n d paintings, the halls a re a d o r n e d with statues, every dish is a w o r k of art, a n d every g a rm e n t is a thing o f b e a u ty . T h e village ab ou n d s in inviting w alks, trellised arb ors, ex­ quisite flower g arden s, a n d fountains gleam ing in the brilliant sunshine. T h e music of the bells a n d the deep o r g a n tones from the temple overlooking the village a d d sanctity to the joy a n d the beauty. I n to this p a ra d ise comes a p a r t y of five, th r e e E ng lishm en a n d tw o A m e ri­ cans. T h e y w e re escaping from a local revolution in C h in a , a n d the plane, in­ ste a d of ta k in g them to S h an ghai, took them to S h a n g ri-L a . S tra n g e to tell, the high la m a k n e w th a t th e y w e re coming a n d h a d everything in readiness for them. T h e p lan e b roke dow n, a n d a

i

rescue p a r ty from S h a n g ri-L a came the n e x t m orning with th e p ro p e r equip­ ment, clothing, a n d food. T h e refugees w e re R o b e r t C o n w a y , a British diplo­ mat; his bro th e r G eorge; a M r. L ovett w h o w a s a retired teacher of geology; a n A m e rica n fugitive from justice w h o se firm h a d collapsed in the m ark et crash; a n d a sick wom an, a n A m erican, w hom the doctors h a d given only six m onths to live. All, except G eorge, yield to the en­ c h a n tm e n t of the n e w environm ent. R o b e rt finds a cherished, h alf-fo rg o tten dream come true. T h e geologist joyfully organizes classes to teach the subject close to his heart. T h e ru in ed financier, w h o h a d sta rte d life as a plumber, is b u sy w ith p lans to install a m od e rn r u n ­ ning w a te r system for the village. T h e sick w o m a n feels b e tte r a n d m ore ch eer­ ful. O n l y G eorge, a typical p ro d u c t of a tw e n tie th -c e n tu ry city, a lover of noise, confusion, excitement, a n d crow ds, c a n ­ n o t en d u re the peace a n d quiet. H e considers the whole situation a n o u t­ ra g e . H e rebels vociferously. W i t h the aid of one of the girls of S h a n g ri-L a w h o h a s fallen in love w ith him, he m an ag es to bribe p o rte rs to guide him thro u g h the m ountains. T h is girl, w h o in reality is a n old w om an, has been told th a t she will sta y eternally y o u n g as long as she is c o nte nte d to s ta y in S h a n g ri-L a , a n d will rev ert to her n a t ­ ural a ge as soon as she leaves. S h e does n ot have faith in this sta te m e n t a n d accepts G e o r g e ’s w orldly view s readily. G e o rg e c a n n o t p e rsu ad e the geologist or the plumber, o r the sick w o m a n to leave, b u t he does finally prevail upo n his b ro th e r R obert b y a p pe a ling to his bro th e rly love. T h e high lama, a v ery a g e d m an, a person of e x tra o rd in ary sw eetness a n d spiritual b e a u ty , just befo re he died, h a d a sk ed R o b e rt to succeed him. Robert, too, fo u n d the girl of his dream s. Y e t G e o rg e succeeded in convincing him t h a t he h a d been deceived. T h e three leave S hang ri-L a. In fact th e y take flight. A severe snow storm drives furi­ ously th ro u g h the passes. T h e guides The R o s ic r u c ia n a re brutal. T h e passes a re treacherous. T h e storm s are violent a n d unrem itting. D ig est T h e girl c a n n o t e n d u re the difficulties of January the journey. She ages ov er n ig ht a n d 1938 perishes in the cold. G e o rg e becomes

m ad a t th e sigh t of his a g e d love, his conscience is a w a k e n e d to his fearful error, he loses his balan ce, falls do w n the m o un tain -sid e of sn o w a n d dis­ a p p e a rs forever. T h e guides lose their lives in a n avalanche. R o b e rt alo ne is eventually rescued. B u t the w o rld of stru gg le a n d g re e d h a s becom e utterly r e p u g n a n t to him. A f te r m o nths of heroic effort, in c o n sta n t peril of his life, he finally finds the w a y back. A t first glance the s to r y seem s one of a d v e n tu re a n d romance. T h e n one sees th a t it is a picture of utopia, a delightful fairy-tale land; a d re a m in a p o e t’s heart. T h e n one becom es a w a r e of the fact th a t the entire s to r y is a sym bol of the jo u rn e y of the soul th ro u g h life. It is a m o d e rn P ilgrim ’s P ro g re ss. It is the s to r y told oft before b y mystics of the w orld. It is th e s to r y to ld in a n ine­ teenth cen tu ry se tting in W i l l G a r v e r ’s A B ro th e r o f the T h ir d D e g r e e a n d M arie Corelli's L ife E v e rla stin g . It is the g re at a d v e n tu re o f life. I t is the quest of the ages, the s e a rch of th e soul for G od , th e a tta in m e n t of evolution. It is the flight of the a lo ne to the Alone. W h e n the y o u n g soul a w a k e s to life in this w orld , it k n o w s n o t for the m om ent w h ith e r it is b o u n d . It finds it­ self a b reathing , stru g g lin g h u m a n being on an u n k n o w n quest. It is buffeted in the storm s of a dversity. It is b e se t w ith doubts a n d fears. It is so im m ersed in the turmoil of the e v e ry d a y w o rld th a t it completely forgets th e celestial realm from which it came a n d th e divine n a ­ ture of the q u e st on w h ic h it is bound. O n ly a faint longing rem ains, a longing th a t g n a w s a t m a n ’s h e a r t in quieter m oments w h e n he ta k e s time to think a n d reflect, b u t w hich h e im patiently suppresses. It makes th e s tr u g g le a b o u t him seem hideous, a n d th e life a b o u t him seem m eaningless a n d sordid. T h e ju g g e r n a u t of m odern civilization counts its victims b y the millions. O n every side h u m a n beings collapse like the leaves in a u tu m n . T h e w e a k a re ru th ­ lessly elbow ed aside o r tra m p le d u n d e r foot or pu sh e d to the w all. T h e s e h u m ­ ble a n d simple souls, th e se frail children of G od , in their d e sp a ir a n d anguish, seek refu ge ben e a th th e w in g s of the A lm ighty. T h e y lay th eir b u rd e n s a t the feet of G o d. T h e y find the kingdom of heaven th a t is w ithin; th e y experience
F o u r h u n d re d s e v e n ty - fo u r

th e suprem e ecstasy of illumination. T h e w ealth y, the powerful, a n d the successful often fail because they are h inde re d by their pride, their egotism, a n d their spiritual blindness. T o rely exclusively upon reason is to miss the w a y . R e a so n frequently impedes s p ir­ itual vision and silences the promptings of intuition. T h e poor, the unfortunate, th e lowly, even the thief a n d the scarlet w o m an can. therefore, enter easily the s tra ig h t a n d n a rro w gate that leads to union w ith the G o d within. T h e distractions of the world are not the only barrier. T h e r e is a struggle in the man himself. " T h e good th a t I w ould d o I do n o t," says the apostle Paul, " a n d the evil I would not do I do ." M a n has bccome habituated to the brutal w orld a bout him a n d its primitive sta n d a rd s . H e fears the adjustm e nts to h ig h e r sta n d a rd s. Inertia prevents him from m aking the neccssary effort. Even w h e n he has once glimpsed the beauty a n d the light of the eternal, his carnal n a tu re can still d rag him down. O n ly one thing rem ain s— to control resolute­ ly his low er n a tu re a n d make his body serve his will. In the story' Robert a c tu ­ ally has to knock his b rother G eorge dow n to prevent him from doing vio­ lence. a n d even then G eorge finally pre­ vails upon Robert to leave Shangri-La. It is obvious th at R obert a n d G eorge rep rese n t the tw o aspects of a hum an being, his higher self a n d his lower self, D r. 7ekyll a n d M r. H y d e . T h e tw o girls of S h a n g ri-L a express the same sy m ­ bolism. T h e one w h o falls in love w ith G eorge, alth oug h she has lived in S h a n g ri-L a for ye a rs, is tem pted to leave. A purely e a rth ly love, a love b o u n d b y physical attraction alone, can completely divert the soul from its original course in life or from pursuing h ig h e r aims. As far as the girl w ho falls in love with Robert is concerned, she re p re sen ts the m ystic bride, the soul t h a t w aits for the d a y of union with the bridegroom , the o u te r personality. T his is the chymical m arriage of w hich the mystics write. T h is is the complete in­ tegratio n of personality as the mystics know it. T h is is th e complete h arm o n ­ ization of the outer personality a n d the inner personality. M ind, heart, a n d b o d y become instrum ents of the soul.
F o u r h u n d re d s e v e n ty - fiv e

T h e w h o le p e rso n a lity becom es a c h a n ­ nel for divine wisdom, love, a n d in­ spiration. W h e n R o b e r t yields to his b r o t h e r ’s fran tic p ro te sts, C h a n g cries to the desp airin g m aiden, " H e will r e tu r n .” Salv atio n is th e e n d of the journey. T h e h u m an being m a y stum ble again a n d a gain. B ut if he sincerely aspires to the divine, G o d m eets him half w ay . T h e glorious fact is th a t m an does no t have to m ake th e entire jo u rn e y alone a n d unaid ed. H e finds t h a t his coming w a s expected. A place h a s been p r e p a re d for him. In th e sto ry th e plane bre a k s d o w n b e fo re it rea c h e s S han gri-L a. T h e rescue p a r t y is a t h a n d w ith s u p ­ plies a n d e quipm ent. M a n is helped to attain. A s th e medieval Spanish m ystic poet said: " B efo re I rea ch e d Him, H e c am e to meet m e.” T h e ruined in d u s ­ trialist w h o m th e w o rld called thief e n ­ tere d easily a n d glad ly into th e new en vironm ent, a n d found peace a n d c o n ­ ten tm en t. T h e M a g d a le n e w h o stum bled on the p a th of life a n d w h o needed help every step o f the w a y , a tta in e d a n d likewise rejoiced in th e c o n te n tm e n t a n d p eace of S h a n g ri-L a . W e m u st b e a s little children. C h il­ d re n accep t th eir hom e, their pa re n ts, a n d the p la n s of their p aren ts. W e children of a la r g e r g ro w th m ust accept th e w o rld a s it is, G o d , a n d H is plans. O u r faith m u s t b a n ish suspicion, fear, a n d te m ptation. W e m ust not set our w ill a g a in s t divine w ill. W h e n w e find th a t w e a r e going in a direction opposite to the direction w e expected, or find our p la n s o v e rru led a n d altered, w e m ust n o t be re sen tfu l a n d rebellious. W e m u st realize t h a t D ivine Love a n d W i s ­ dom can w ill o n ly w h a t is b e st for each a n d e v e ry o n e of us. T h e g roup of refu g ee s e x p e c te d to travel east, a n d th e y fo u n d t h a t th e y w e re travelling w e s tw a r d . T h e y expected to go to S h a n g h a i, a n d th e y found th a t they w e r e in S h a n g r i- L a , R o b e rt C o n w a y d re a m e d o f b eing a foreign s e cre tary of E n g la n d . H e fo u n d th a t he h a d been selected to rule S h a n g ri-L a . T h e r uined financier, th e M a g d a le n e a n d th e poor re tire d te a c h e r th o u g h t th a t life held n o th in g m ore fo r them, y e t th e y fo u n d joy b e y o n d their w ildest dream s in S h a n g ri-L a . T h e r e w a s even a place for G e o rg e b e c a u se he accom panied R obert.

T h e r e is n ot a sheep t h a t is forever lost in all the w orld . E v e r y soul can a spire to all th a t th e universe affords. In fact, a tta in m e n t is his divine h e rita g e a n d d estiny. B u t h e m u st h ave confi­ dence in divine justice. H e m ust have faith thro u g h even th e severest tests a n d trials. H e m u st h a v e a n eye on the ultimate goal. H e m u st let the la rg e r point of view be reflected in every w ord , deed, a n d th o u g h t. H e m u st a r d e n tly desire the fulfillment of this magnificent plan for all as well as for himself.

T h o u g h d a r k be the nig ht, he m ust con­ fidently aw ait the d a w n . Though m aro o n e d in th e gloomiest hamlet, th o u g h lost in the m aelstro m of a d e a f ­ ening city, let us all joyfully seek o u r S h an g ri-L a. In closing let me s a y a w o r d of a p ­ preciation a n d gra titu d e to th e producer, th e entire cast, a n d to all w h o assisted in the beautiful sta g e se ttin g s a n d e x tra ­ o r d in a r y p h o to g r a p h y a n d last, bu t no t least, to the author.

V

V

V

“Fret Not T h y s e lf
By

V. W .

B e n n e tt,

F. R. C.

"Fret n ot thyself, it te n d e th to evil doingO R R Y , in m y e x ­ perience, seem s to b e th e fa th e r of perversity, for as su re ly as one w o r ­ rie s o v e r s o m e practice in life th a t seem s w ro n g , just so s u re ly will h e c o n tin u e th a t practice or, w o rse yet, increase it. A m a n w orries over th e s t a t e o f h is health a n d, lo, he discovers n e w pains. H e w orries over the s ta te of his finances a n d goes deeper in debt. A n eighb or fails to g reet him as is the custom , he w orries a n d others p a s s him by. H e becomes disc onte nte d with him ­ self a n d all his affairs a n d people, no t know ing w h y , shu n the circle of his negative vibrations. O n l y th o se w h o love him a s a b r o th e r rem ain close to him a n d even th ey find it h a rd to toler­ ate his viewpoint, m uch less his t a n ­ trums. T r u l y he feeds on th e h u sk s of his o w n ignorance, n o t seeking light. The T a l k n o t to such a m a n o f atonem ent. R o sic ru cia n T o him it is of little use. H e is n o t ro b ­ D ig e s t bing the poor, keeping others h u n g r y or January in a n y w a y shirking his du ty. B u t— he is developing a faith in fate th a t s h a ­ 1938 d ow s a n y g oo d action, a n d if he con­ tinues to do good it is o nly th ro u g h the exercise o f will. T e ll him n a u g h t o f attu n e m e n t. H e will place G o d a n d the M a s te r s in a far a w a y place a n d himself a p a rt, a n d a l­ w a y s his m ind will dw ell in tw o places, shifting rap id ly until his h e a d aches a n d w o r r y a n d troubles increase. T e a c h him a new O n to lo g y . T e a c h him th a t G o d is a p a r t of himself, closer th a n h a n d s a n d feet, t h a t deep within himself the light of Being is shining brig htly . T e a c h him to cease his outer seeking, his conscious willing. T e a c h him to a d ju s t his w h o le m ind a n d h e a rt to this n e w concept a n d get quiet before th e trem endo us in ner tru th . M a y h a p he will feel a s u d d e n stirring a n d discover love a n d peace w ithin his soul until he hears th e life w ithin calling from the east a n d th e w e st, the n o rth a n d the south, the he ig h th a n d the dep th , t h a t which is all his ow n. T e a c h him this a n d rem ind him to ask the small things first in a spirit of love a n d willingness to sh a re a n d serve. T h u s shall the cross y ield its fruit. T h u s shall he find the pearl of g re a te st price. " F o r in the d a y of trou ble he will keep me secretly in his pavilion— a n d I will offer in his tab ernacle sacrifices of joy.
F o u r hundred se v e n ty -six

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
W E M U ST STA N D ALONE

p

B y T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand M aster
H E M O S T difficult lesson th a t life has to teach us is th a t w e must s t a n d alone. E v e r y c r u ­ cial experience in life m ust be passed t h r o u g h alone: birth, m a r r i a g e , death, a n d illumi­ nation. If w e w ish to be fed, w e m ust eat our ow n food. If w e w is h to learn, w e m ust make the n e c e ssa ry ef­ fort. E v e r y bit of developm ent in every w a y m ust b e achieved th ro u g h indi­ vidual exertion. W e m u st e n te r th e P a th on o u r own initiative. W e m u st continue of our ow n free will. C oercio n is never exercised. V e r y fre q u e n tly th e re is n o e n c o u ra g e ­ m ent from a n y source. O fte n there is no u n d e r s ta n d in g o r sy m p a th y on the p a r t of others. Y o u m ust s ta n d a b s o ­ lutely alone. Y o u m ust continue because a n y o th e r course of action is u n th in k ­ able. Y o u m u s t continue b ecause you m ust be tru e to yourself. Y o u m ust c o n ­ tinue th o u g h the goal a h e a d seems very Th remote, for life in a n y oth er direction R o s ic r u c ia n nQ ]o n ger seem s attractive. Life outside D ig e s t 0 f the P a t h seem s to one w h o h a s gone F ebruary b u t a little w ay, aimless, u n b ea ra b ly 1938 trivial, irrita tin gly superficial. H enri F abre, the g r e a t n aturalist, in his fascinating book, " T h e Social Life o f the Insects." d escribes a species of caterpillar th a t cling to one a n o th e r in a long line. R o u n d a n d r o u n d th e y go in circles, totally blind to a n y th in g a fraction o f an inch b e y o n d their ken. So do average h u m a n b eings seem to one w ho h a s irrevocably placed his feet upon the P a th . H o w can people spend an afternoon in inco nsequ en tial c h a tte r a n d bridge games w h e n there is so much w o rk to be done in th e w o rld? H o w can people see stup id pic tu re s a n d re a d tra s h y books w h e n th e re is so much w on derful k n o w le d g e to be gained, so m a n y interesting fields of explo ratio n in every kind of h u m a n activity? H o w can people see the evil all a b o u t them, h ow can people read of th e ty r a n n y a n d o p ­ pression prev alent in the w o rld a n d no t be moved to e ra d ic a te it? H o w can in­ telligent, refined a n d e d u c a te d people absorb malicious p r o p a g a n d a , hold b ase prejudices, a n d u n th in k in g ly u tte r re­ m arks th a t a re s a b re -th ru sts ? H o w can people en jo y w a r m th a n d c o m fo rt a n d ease w hen starving a n d suffering h a n d s beat upon the door? O f course, it is true th a t w e c a n n o t w a lk a r o u n d w ith a chip on o u r sh o u ld e rs a n d refu se to re c ­ ognize every little re la x a tio n life affords, or arbitrarily try to force a c h a n g e in o u r social system. Y o u r fu ry rises a t th e conceit, vanity, a n d smug self-satisfaction ev id ent on
T h ir t y - tw o

every side. A b urn in g desire consum es y o u to sp e n d every m om en t tellingly. Y o u m ust m ake up for lost time. A n d w h e n you h a v e inw ardly taken the vow th a t forever binds yo u to a n e w life, yo u find th a t you s ta n d alone. N o one will c o n g ra tu la te you on the n e w resolu­ tion th a t y o u have taken. N o one will com m end y o u for lifting a lance in the b a ttle of r ig h t a g a in st w ron g. N o one will a p p rec ia te y o u r spiritual strivings or give you cou rage to dare, to struggle, to p ress on to the heights. N o one will s a y joyfully, " A n o th e r cham pion to fight the b attles of the L o rd !” E v e n the people w h o love yo u will h a m p e r y o u every step of the w a y . "Y o u m ust proceed slow ly," they tell you. " Y o u m ust avoid conflict. Y o u must avoid friction. Y ou m ust be diplomatic. Y o u m ust th in k of yo urself first." You, yourselves, can a d d the time-worn, s h o p -w o rn cliches th a t w ell-m eaning friends hurl a t aspiring souls. W i t h the b est intentions in the w orld, th e y w ou ld clip th e e a g le ’s w ings. T h e y w o u ld d e ­ s tr o y the y o u n g d e e r ’s fleetness of foot. T h e y w o u ld d am p e n the a r d o r of the h e a rt b u rn in g with love a n d zeal. Y o u must s ta n d absolutely alone. Y ou m u st find y o u r s tre n g th w ithin. You m ust believe in yourself. A n y o u tw a r d su p p o rt p ro v e s to be the reed o f E g y p t t h a t pierces the h a n d th a t leans up on it. Y ou m ust learn to listen to y o u r heart. Y o u m ust le a rn to follow th e p ro m p t­ ings of y o u r soul. Y o u m ust learn to look for g uida n c e from w ithin. T h e ju d g m e n t g ro w s stro n g th ro u g h exer­ cise. T h e intuition develops thro u g h obedience to its prom ptings. T h e p o w er to s ta n d alo ne is the fruit of loyalty to y o u r ideals despite fierce, unrem itting opposition. H e n rik Ibsen in a powerful play, " A n E n e m y of the P e o p le ," depicts a p h y ­ sician w h o discovers t h a t the w a te r of the town is polluted. T h e tow n earns its livelihood th ro u g h the sick people w h o come fo r the healing w a te r s of the bath s. W h e n the people of the tow n learn of the p h y s ic ia n ’s discovery, they tu rn a g a in s t him like a p ack of wolves. T h e y call him " a n enem y of the people." T h e y fear th a t the income of the town will be affected.
T h irty-th ree

John G a ls w o r th y , in an equally p o w ­ erful play, " T h e M o b ,” p o rtra y s a true patriot w h o co u rag e o u sly opposes the intention of the go vern m ent to en te r u p ­ on an u n rig h te o u s w a r of a n n e x a tio n . H e is killed b y a fanatic. T h e final scene sho w s a sta tu e erected in the p u b ­ lic sq u a re in his honor. It is h a r d to believe that yo u are right w h e n m ultitudes opp o se you. It is h a rd to remain u n sw erv in g ly loyal w h e n lo y­ a lty m eans th e sacrifice of everything th a t yo u hold de a r. It is h a r d not to falter, no t to feel d o u b t as to w h e th e r the cause is w o rth w h ile w h e n loyalty m eans severing the ties that h ave b e ­ come rooted in the soul. W h e n w e come to the p a rtin g o f th e w ays, w e m ust bid ourselves be str o n g a n d of good c o u r­ age. W h e n the time comes to w e a r the crown of th o rn s, tho ug h deep be our despair, w e m u s t unflinchingly say, " T h y will, n o t mine, be done." You m ust s ta n d alone. Y ou m ust take the course y o u r soul dictates. Y o u must follow the s t a r th a t shines for you alone. T h e d e e d s of others w h o stood alone will be y o u r inspiration. T h e lives of others w h o sto o d alone will be y o u r encou rag em en t. T h e patience, the forti­ tude, the sublim e firmness with w hich o thers faced m a rty rd o m will s te a d y the trembling h a n d t h a t shrinks from taking the cup of tears. W h e n the h o u r comes, y ou m ust s ta n d alone. O p e n y o u r Bible. O n p ag e a fte r page y ou are told o f th e fight th a t m ust be fought alone. A b r a h a m h a d to leave his fa th e r ’s house a n d his b irthplace a n d jou rney to a l a n d w h e r e he w a s a n utter stra n g e r. Joseph w a s cast into prison on a false charge. M o se s, as an a d o p te d son of the d a u g h te r of P h a r a o h , h a d a brilliant court c a re e r in his v ery hand; b u t his h e a r t m a d e him identify himself with a d esp ised a n d rejected slave people. N a t h a n , th e proph et, step ped before the guilty king a n d m ade the ac­ cusation th a t h a s ru n g do w n the ages, " T h o u a rt th e m a n ." A h ab , King of Israel, tu rn ed u pon E lijah, the p rop het, a n d cried tau n tin g ly , " A r t thou he th a t troubleth Israel?" Jeremiah w a s struck b y a priest in th e temple a n d w a s put into the stocks to be jeered a t b y the mob. In the pe rfo rm a n c e of his divinely

r

flict, a n d opposition. By no means. W h e n wre s ta n d for rig h te o u sn e ss and justice, w e m ust be p re p a re d to oppose "W o e is me, m y m other, th a t thou hast borne un righ teo usn ess a n d injustice. W h e n me w e s ta n d for tru th , w e m u s t be p r e ­ A. m an of strife a n d a m an of contention to the p a re d to fight falsehood. W o u l d w e be w hole earth! free men, w e m ust be e te rn a lly vigilant. [ have not lent, n e ith e r h a v e m en lent to me; A people careless of its liberties will Y et ev ery one of them d o th curse me." find them tram p led upon. T h e exploiter, — Jerem iah, C hap. 15 v . 10. the usurper, th e dictator, like hissing snakes, ever a w a it the o p p o r tu n ity to T u r n the p ag e s o f history. H a s the strike. W o m e n gained t h e long due lot of th e reform er, th e thinker, the pio­ rig h t of suffrage a fte r y e a r s o f struggle. neer ever been easier? F ra n c e let her O u r cou ntry h a d to pass th e a g o n y of savior, a fair y o u n g girl, go to the stake. Civil W a r to free th e slaves a n d m ain ­ Picture th e trial in w hich she h a d to ta in th e U nion. face all those lea rn e d d octo rs of the law. It is test a n d trial all alo n g th e w ay. H e n r y H u d so n , in th e v ery b a y t h a t he O n l y the stro n g e st can survive. It is discovered, w a s c a s t a d rift in a boat th e final test of y o u r soul developm ent. with his son. Lincoln w a s shot in the T o be right a n d to k n o w t h a t y o u are hour of victory. T h e p a g e s of history rig h t w h e n e v e ry b o d y else is w ro n g . T o drip w ith the blood of its benefactors. be faithful to th e rig h t in pov erty, in W il l yo u say . d e a r friends, th a t they exile, a n d in suffering. T o c a r r y on w ere w ro n g a n d t h a t th eir accusers a n d th ro u g h the h o u rs of d e e p e s t d e p re s ­ jailers a n d to rm e n to rs w e r e right? N a y , sion. T o c a rry on in loneliness, dis­ society w a s w r o n g , a n d these lone couragem ent, a n d tears. figures w e re gloriously right, rig h t in W h a t is th e aim of this fiery d is­ the eyes of conscience a n d of God, and cipline? You become a b so lu te ly d e ­ vindicated y e a r s la te r b y m ankind, pendable. Y o u r will becom es like te m ­ slowly catching u p to their vision o f the pe re d steel. Y o u r nerves a r e u n d e r p e r ­ truth. fect control. Y o u a re b e y o n d th e po w er W h a t is the lesson for us to learn? A of a n y influence th a t w o u ld sw e rv e yo u very stern one, b ro th e rs a n d sisters. W e from y o u r a p p o in ted ta sk . Y o u s ta n d must be faithful to the tru th as w e see unim pressed b y the th o u s a n d conflicting it. W e m ust n ot expect the plaudits of forces a n d influences in th e w o rld . You the m ultitudes. W e m ust n o t depend k n o w y o u r ow n mind. Y o u k n o w y o u r upon th e a p p ro v a l of friends o r family. ow n soul. N o specious a r g u m e n t can W e m u st in w a rd ly stre n g th e n ourselves ever s w a y you. to face criticism, reproach, a n d opposi­ W h e n you consider th e se ideas, m a n y tion. T a k e as simple a m a tte r as diet. question s arise in the m ind. H o w shall T o d a y diet is o n e of th e s ta n d a r d m e th ­ you k n o w th a t y ou are rig ht? H o w shall ods o f tr e a tm e n t of th e medical pro fe s­ you k no w th a t y ou are ta k in g th e rig h t sion. W o u l d y o u believe t h a t th e first course? H o w shall you k n o w th a t you men to a cq u a in t th e public w ith w h a t a re exhibiting real in d e p e n d e n c e a n d diet can d o w e re ou tsid e the ra n k s of n o t m ere stu b b o rn n ess a n d obstinacy? the medical profession? W o u l d yo u b e ­ H o w shall you reconcile s ta n d in g alone lieve th a t th eir sensible ideas w e re ridi­ w ith s h a rin g in the ta sk s o f th e group? culed a n d sco rn e d b y physicians? F rie n d s, there lies th e p a r a d o x o f the W o u l d y o u believe t h a t people th re w spiritual life. T h e r e lies th e en ig m a of stones a t th ese pion eers in the streets soul developm ent. O n ly y o u r soul can of N e w Y o rk C ity? D o y ou k n o w th a t tell you. A n d o n ly time c a n p ro v e th a t in N e w Y o r k S ta te th e medical society yo u a re right. H e w h o h a s fo u n d the still relentlessly r u n s every n a tu ro p a th In n e r L ight a n d he w h o recog nizes the Tht „ . . out o f tow n? T h e ch iro p ra c to rs a re also V o ice of the Cosmic o w e s allegiance to R o s ic r u c ia n p e rse c u te d . Conscience a n d to G o d alone. H e is b e ­ D ig e st M a n y of us a r e u n d e r the false im­ y o n d a n y m a n -m a d e law. H e becomes February pression th a t living th e life of truth and a te a c h er of the w o rld like th e p ro p h e ts love will ex em p t us from struggle, con- of old. 1938 imposed d u ty such b itte r opposition w as his lot th a t in de sp a ir he cried aloud:
T h irty -fo u r

Is Peace Possible?
By T h o r k i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
VERYW HERE y ou go yo u hear t h e question, "Is P e a c e Possible?" W e w a n t to be­ lieve th a t it is pos­ sible even against o u r b e t t e r ju d g ­ ment. A s far back a s h i s t o r y takes us, m en h a v e fo u g h t w a rs of a g g r e s s i o n with w e a p o n s of in­ creasing deadliness. N e v e r h a s there been a period free from strife a n d bloodshed. T h e corridors of time re­ sou nd w ith the tram p of armies, the cries o f th e w o un de d a n d dying, the lam ent o f the w ido w a n d the w ail of the o rp h a n bereft by w ar. T h e mailed fist h as d o m in a te d history. A statistician h a s p ointed ou t th a t since the L e a g u e of N a tio n s w as formed a t the conclusion of the W o r l d W a r , tw e n ty - f o u r w ars, both declared and u ndeclared, have been w a g e d . T h e L eague h a s p roved itself ineffectual. Italy's w a r in Ethiop ia w a s one of u n ­ w a r r a n te d a g gression. T h e interference of Italy a n d G e r m a n y in S p a in 's civil w a r is uncalled for. J a p a n ’s inhum an w a rf a r e in C h in a is o p e n ly p re d a to ry a n d h a s e a rn ed h er th e con tem p t of all civilized n ations. Russia, G e rm a n y , and Italy have become totalitarian states in w hich m inority rights a re ruthlessly su p p re sse d . T h e clause on minority rights in the tre a ty of V ersailles, con­
S ix ty -th r e e

sidered the high w a te r- m a r k o f in te r­ national relationships, has become a dead letter. W i l l a tre a ty h e re a fte r be more th a n a sc ra p of paper? W i l l w a r s exist w ith o u t being declared? T h e Jews of P o la n d a n d G e r m a n y a re being mercilessly exterm in ated. T h e r e is no one to u tte r a protesting w o rd or raise a helping h and . D espite the s p r e a d of education, d e sp ite n ew spap ers, the radio, a n d the screen, the m asses of the people th ro u g h o u t the w o rld a re th e victims of malicious p ro p a g a n d a . T h e serpent of p o w e r a n d w ealth o penly r e ­ veals its fangs. N a tio n s are stra n g le d in its to rtu ro u s coils. A lone voice here and there has been lifted in the cause of peace. T h e p ro p h e ts o f Israel envisioned the time w h e n men shall b e a t their sw ords into p lo ugh sh ares, a n d their spears into p ru ning-h ook s. C hristia n ity ta u g h t "B lessed be the p e a c e m ak e rs” ; also " H e th a t killeth with th e s w o rd must be killed w ith the sw o rd ." T h e effect u po n p rofe ssin g C hristian n a tio n s has been slight indeed. B uddhism preach ed n on -resistan ce, b u t this lofty religion soon becam e corrupted, a n d the fantastic sup erstitio ns o f the people bear little resem blan ce to the g r a n d e u r of the original doctrines. A religion to which m ere lip-service is rendered, a code of ethics im posed from above, a glowing sp e a k e r hypnotizing the m ulti­ tudes for the m om ent, have n o lasting effect. W i t h h e a r ts u n re g e n e rate the most beautifu l ideals remain mere

w ords, the most m eaningfu l ceremonies become empty ritual. O f w h a t avail a re the teachings of peace w hen the causes of w a r still exist? W h e n men have little concern for the w eak , the helpless, a n d th e u n fo rtu n a te in their midst, how c an g re a te r r eg a rd for the stra n g e r be expected? W h e n m en exploit their fellow citizens, ho w will they deal justly w ith the citizens of an o th e r country? W h e n lynch in gs a n d h a n ging s a n d e l e c t r o c u t i o n s d r a w crow ds, h o w can a sto p b e p u t to the h orrors of war? C a n w e expect, the men t h a t participate in the nam eless h orrors of a Brow n H ouse to love the u sag es of peace? C a n w e ex p e c t th e men w h o e njoy a bloody bull fight to desire peace in earnest? T h r o u g h o u t the w o r ld those w h o have, brutally exploit th o se w h o have not, in the name o f Jaw a n d order. Is o u r ow n country sh o w in g a more a ltr u ­ istic spirit? C a n w e be p ro u d of the c o n ­ dition of the s h a r e c ro p p e rs in the South? C a n w e b o a st of the tre a tm e n t of the miners? T h e h is to ry of the labor m ovement in our c o u n try is one o f u n ­ ceasing strug gle a n d violence. T h e w o rking m an has h a d to fight e very step o f the w a y for even th e slightest im­ provem ent in w ages, ho u rs, a n d decent w o rking conditions. T h e la w prevailing in the economic w o rld seem s to be, "Let everyone grab w h a t he can, a n d hold as long as he can." T h e m an of w ealth seems to feel th a t he is th e pow er, the glory, a n d the m ight. T h e m ost vicious element in the p re s e n t d a y situation is the control that the m an of p o w e r e x e r­ cises over the instrum en ts of p o w e r — the press, the radio, the moving picture, the munition factories, th e steel mills, a n d the oil wells. E v e n th e school room is no t un contam inated, a n d the mouth of the church is m uzzled. E v e ry o n e is in terro r of losing his job. H is needs keep him silent a n d subservient. H o w can the vicious circle b e broken? W h o will pu t the fear of G o d into the he a rts of the rulers o f th e w orld? W h o will straigh ten the spines of o u r toiling The millions a n d fill their h e a rts with the R o s ic r u c ia n spirit of courage, indep end en ce, a n d D ig e s t self-respect? W h e n D a v id , th e king of M arch Israel sinned, N a t h a n , the prophet, stood before him a n d p o in te d the finger 1938

at him, crying, " T h o u a r t the man!" W h o will po in t the finger a t the m en w ho d a r e to sum m on s ta te tro o p e rs to fire at striking miners, the men w h o sham elessly subject the sh a re-c ro p p ers to virtual p e o nage, th e politicians w h o su p p o rt g a n g s te rs a n d racketeers, the industrialists w h o e n g a g e in large -sc ale plunder? T h e indifference of the m an in the street is d ish e a rte n in g . T h e spiritual leth a rg y of the middle class is a d a n g e r ­ ous sym ptom . E a c h one seem s to be in­ terested only in his o w n p e rso n a l w e l­ fare a n d in his ow n b r e a d a n d butter. T h e callousness of th e u p p e r classes is heartb reak in g. T h e p o pu lation s o f the world let them selves be driven like sheep. T h e y do n o t k n o w the ex act issue a t stake. T h e m en o f p o w e r seem imbued w ith the spirit of devouring wolves. T h e mailed fist of fascism has a lre ad y stru ck Brazil. W h e r e will the lightning strike next? Is w a r inevitable? O sorrow ful a f te r m a th of a w a r w a g e d to set the w o rld free for democracy! T h e hoofs of the galloping steeds of the F o u r H o rse m e n of the A p o c a ly p se can still b e h e a rd . Is p eace possible? H o w can w e cry h a lt to o u r w a r lords? C a n w e keep free from foreign e n ta n g le ­ ments? Is it possible for us to lead the way? C a n w e n o t c re a te a h a v e n of peace a n d a r e fu g e for the w e a r y a n d the o p p re s se d of th e w o rld? C a n w e not rem ain loyal to the ideals of our foun ding fathers? W e can if w e e x e rt o u r will. Let peace be the h e a rtfe lt desire of all our c o u n try m e n a n d it will be ours. T h e desire for peace m ust b e s t r e n g t h ­ ened b y kn o w le d g e of th e issues in­ volved. I g n o ra n c e will m ake us the dupes of the unprin cipled p r o p a g a n ­ da of selfish g ro u p s a n d forces th a t sh re w d ly cloak th eir fo reign invest­ ments a n d possessions in patrio tic v e rb i­ age. In o r d e r to be correctly inform ed, freedom of speech a n d the press is im ­ perative. Linder n o circum stances m ust w e p e rm it th e rig h ts g u a ra n te e d to us by the C o n stitu tio n to be abro g a te d . W e m u st ab solutely refuse to c o u n te n ­ ance even th e su gg e stio n of intolerance. W e m u st deliberately c re a te a peace psy chology. W e m u st use every c h a n ­ nel available. W e m u st assist every m ovem ent th a t is militant fo r peace. W e
Sixty-four

must learn to look a t every problem from the viewpoint of the w elfare of the w orld a n d not m erely from the view ­ point of our national interests o r capi­ talistic aspirations. W e must rem em ber th a t all n a tio n s a re m a d e u p of hum an beings. W e must rem em ber th a t every hum an being, no m a tte r w h a t his race or color is a child of G o d. N o hum an being can be in ju red w ith impunity. E v e ry o n e is p rotected by K armic law a n d reactions. N a tio n s m ust cultivate the philanthro pic spirit tow ard one a n ­ other. A generous person sh a re s w h a t ­ ever he h a s with one less fo rtun ate than himself. A generous nation should learn to do likewise. If Brazil h a s a surplus crop of coffee, if th e S outh has more cotton th a n she can sell, let them h and the su rp lu s p rodu ct o ver to the n e e d y populations of other countries. W h e a t fields need not be plow ed un der, coffee need no t be th row n into the sea. T h e need y nations can give in ex ch ang e w h a t th e y have to spare. W e m u st be willing to make in behalf o f peace th e sacrifices th a t w e cheer­ fully m a d e in time o f w a r. W e had m eatless d a y s and w he a tle ss days. W e did w ith o u t w hite flour a n d w h ite sugar. W e b o u g h t Liberty Bonds. T h e nation w a s un ited in su p p o rt o f the arm y . T h e aim w as victory, a n d it w a s achieved. T h e same spirit must an im ate u s to p re ­ serve peace. W e m ust unite to make w a r impossible. Let us first clean our ow n house. Let us abolish poverty, u n ­ em ploym ent a n d slums. Let us find use­ ful w o r k for our y o u th , a n d for every one willing to work. D o no t sa y th at the task is impossible. D o n ot sa y th a t the cost is prohibitive. W e h a d plenty of m oney to finance th e w a r. O u r crime bill is fifteen million dollars a ye a r. Let us sh ow th e nations of th e w o rld that w e can m aintain peace a n d create p ro s­ perity w ith o u t fascism, dictatorship, or war. A b ra h a m Lincoln said th a t a n a ­ tion could not be p a rt slave a n d part free. Similarly, the w o r ld c a n n o t be p a rt slave a n d p a r t free. W a r in one m ajor c o u n try precipitates w a r in other countries. A low s ta n d a r d of living in one c o u n try affects a d v e rse ly a high sta n d a r d o f living in a n o th e r country. D isa ste r in one co un try is immediately felt in the next. It is for th e interest of the w orld th a t each c o u n try be a s h a p ­
S ix ty -fiv e

py, a s p ro spero us, as contented as p o s ­ sible. W e need more than a u n ite d n a ­ tions o f the w orld, w e need w o rld un ity thro u g h realization of brotherhoo d. W h a t a r e the causes of w a rs? T h e r e is b u t o n e — G R E E D . G reed, w ith its ramifications of profit, trade, expansion, etc. T h e greed, the arrogance, a n d the b ru ta lity in the soul of m an t h a t blind him to th e in h u m a n ity of prejudice, e x ­ ploitation, a n d the vilest cruelty, p r e ­ cipitate w a r s , w a rs th a t have d e stro y e d civilizations, d e v a sta te d the w o rld a n d w ip e d ou t populations. T h e atrocities th a t w a r r in g n a tio n s have inflicted on one a n o th e r h av e been no m ore terrible than those th e y h ave inflicted u pon their ow n m em bers. T h e s to r y of C ain is symbolic of all m a n k in d , " W h e r e is Abel, T h y b r o th ­ er?’’ " I k n o w not; am I m y b r o t h e r ’s keeper?” W e r e the G reeks w h o m erci­ lessly tro d u po n the helots their b r o th ­ e r s ’ keepers? W e r e the R o m a n s w h o bullied a n d p lu n d e re d the provinces th a t e n ric h e d them their b ro th e r s ’ k e e p ­ ers? W e r e the aristrocratic B ra h m a n s th a t to le ra te d a pariah class their b r o th e rs ’ keepers? W e r e the medieval lords a n d b a ro n s w h o took from th e serfs all b u t th e little needed to keep b o d y a n d soul to g e th e r their b r o t h e r s ’ keepers? A t the beginning of the in ­ du strial revolution w ere the m en w h o tied c h ildren six y e a rs old to th e loom their b r o t h e r s ’ keepers? T h i n k of the revolting pu n ish m en ts th at w e re legal am ong th e people of all ages. T h i n k of the S p a n ish Inquisition! W e need no t m arvel th en a t the avarice a n d c ruelty disp layed b y Spain am ong the A z te c s of M e x ic o a n d the Incas of P e ru, b y E n g l a n d in India, a n d by Belgium in the C o n g o . W e need not be su rp rise d th a t the - followers of the P rince of Peace s o u g h t to s p re a d the G ospel w ith the w e a p o n s o f w a r a n d the b a ttle -c ry of Islam “ th e K oran or the sw o rd .” C a n m unition m an u fa c tu rers be u n ­ a w a r e o f the d estination of their p r o d ­ uct? H e w h o profits b y w a r c a n n o t think o f the ultim ate consequences of his acts. H e c a n n o t sincerely believe in the b ro th e rh o o d of man. T h e exploiters of ev e ry clime a n d a ge a n d race k now not the b ro th e rh o o d of man. T o re p e a t the stirring p h ra se of W illiam J. B ryan,

"m a n h a s been crucified o n the cross of G o ld .” O u r pre se n t legislation is inad eq uate. A n aggressive m ino rity can seize the reins of po w er a n d n ullify every liberal law. T h e N a z is have r e p u d ia te d every noble tradition of p r e - w a r G erm a n y . T o rely on leaders, d ictators, a n d men in high places is futile. M e n a r e suscep­ tible to bribes a n d flattery a n d the lure of ambition. P e a c e m ov em ents alone c a n n o t be the solution. O rg a n iz a tio n s a re no b e tte r th a n th e m en w h o compose them. H isto ry h a s p ro v e d time a n d a gain th a t institutions a n d movements with the n oblest aim s a n d ideals have become c o rru pt or h a v e petrified, a n d their la tte r e n d is fa r rem oved from the simple a n d altruistic b e g in n in g . T h e y become rent with dissention. Schisms arise. T h e ir leaders disag ree. Pride, vanity, a n d am bition ta k e the place of service. G re e d is ever present. C a n w e eliminate g r e e d from the h u m a n heart? or r a t h e r th e incentive a n d the necessity for greed? Y es, w e can, thro u g h e du c ation a n d legislation. If congress w o u ld p a s s a o n e h u n d re d per cent inheritance ta x a n d a n e ighty per cent gift tax la rg e fortunes could not remain long in individu al h an ds. If w e m ade the g o v e rn m e n t the beneficiary of o u r accum ulated w e a lth a n d effort, w e would pu t every o n e on an equal footing. M a k e b r o th e r h o o d more than a p retty phrase. Let it sink into the heart. W o u l d th a t G o d m ig h t open the eyes of o u r men o f w e a lth a n d power! H o w long will the w e a lth b e in y o u r ha n d s a n d in the h a n d s of y o u r family? H o w much peace of m ind a n d spirit h a s the w ealth b r o u g h t you? W h a t sacrifices of principles a n d of conscience h as it cost you? A r e yo u su re th a t y o u will be able to sta n d before the b a r of y o u r soul w ith clean h a n d s? H o w long is the space of one life? B u t a few brief years a n d the d a y comes w h e n y o u m ust give account of the h a rm y ou a r e directly a n d indirectly resp onsib le for. A re you sure th a t it will m e a n n o th in g to you th a t men h ave lost th e ir lives in defense The of y o u r mines o r oil w ells, y o u r su g a r R o s ic r u c ia n a n d tobacco p la n ta tio n s, a n d other D ig e s t foreign concessions, th a t women hav e M arch become w ido w s, th a t c hildren have b e ­ 1938 come orp h a n s, th a t w o r k e r s have been

crippled for life? W ill y o u r conscience be at ease a t the th o u g h t of the bribes employed to influence legislation for the benefit of y o u r profits? A r e yo u sure you will be indifferent to the fact that yo u r w ealth w as m a d e th ro u g h the ex­ ploitation of child la b o r a n d w hole populations? T h e soul does no t die. It is immortal. It possesses perfect mem ory. F re e d from the b o d y it sees w ith c le a re r eyes a n d from a n impersonal view point every heinous offense. Its selfishness is gone a n d it feels with k e e n e r p a n g every sigh, every cry of woe. It sees th e bed of th o rn s th a t it h a s w ith its o w n h a n d s p repared. W il l the m em ory of a few fleeting y e a r s of w e a lth a n d p o w e r give you pleasu re then? E v e r y joy th a t w as p u rc h ase d w ith the te ars of o th e r s will turn into w orm w ood a n d rue. E v e ry heartless laugh will become a cry of anguish. T h e e a rth ly p a ra d is e will turn into a p u rg a to ry . T h e p le a su re s o f the flesh will prove a delusion a n d a snare. G o d is not mocked. Y o u m ay n o t b e ­ lieve in the soul bu t it exists n e v e r th e ­ less. T h e m oral law m a y be im ag in ary in y o u r opinion, b u t it is a fact all the same. Y o u m ay think the g r a v e c o n ­ ceals all crimes a n d e n d s all life. Y o u only deceive yourselves. Y o u sow a w ind a n d you will re a p a w hirlw in d. T h e g r e a t tru th s of life a re the spiritual truths. T h o s e professing religious b e ­ liefs m ust take them seriously. T h e y must become a law to live b y a n d n ot m ere utterances of w o rd s. M a n m ust recognize the existence a n d th e divinity of the soul a n d all life. H e m u st realize the necessity of purify in g his o w n m o ­ tives. H e must realize th e su p r e m a c y of love. T h e law th a t m ust gov ern w o rd a n d speech a n d deed. T a k e greed from th e h e a r t o f men. T a k e profits out of business. R ecog nize the fa th erh o o d of G o d a n d th e b r o th e r ­ hood of man. A ccept th e m oral la w th a t you a re y o u r b r o th e r ’s k eep er, a n d the d a y of w a r f a r e is gone. T h e p eace in each m a n ’s h e a rt will r a d ia te to all the w orld. W h a t e v e r m akes for tolerance, w h a te v e r will b re a k d o w n th e b a rrie rs of race, creed, n ationality, will m a k e for peace. W h a t e v e r m akes for h e a lth a n d happiness, w h a te v e r m akes for selfexpression a n d self-fulfilment will m ake
S ix ty -s ix

for peace. Joy a n d peace go h a n d in han d . W e need a w o rld w id e faith that will unite all m ankind. W e need a un ited n a tio n s of the w o rld th a t will tre a su re the gifts of the spirit th a t each V V

na tion can offer — in music, a rt, lite ra ­ ture, dancing, science a n d sc holarship. W e need a w o rld -w id e ph ilo so p h y th a t will recognize m a n ’s spiritual origin a n d destination. V

PAGES FRO M T H E PA ST
(C o n tin u e d from P age 62) others. W h e r e the will is set upon it, th e re will be no room for malpractices." " R ich e s a n d h o n o r are w h a t men d e ­ sire; b u t if th e y arrive a t them by im­ p r o p e r w a y s, they should n o t continue to hold them. P o v e rty a n d low estate a re w h a t men dislike; but if they arrive a t such a condition by im proper ways, th e y sho uld n o t refuse it." " O n e m ay h ear the rig h t w a y in the morning, a n d at evening die .” " T h e scholar w h o is intent upon le arning the r ig h t w a y , a n d w h o is yet a s h a m e d of p o o r attire a n d poor food. V V is n ot w o r th y o f being disco ursed w ith ." T s a i Y u . a disciple, used to sleep in the daytim e. S a id the M a s te r , " O n e m ay h a rd ly c a rv e ro tten w oo d, o r use a trowel to th e w all of a m a n u re y a rd ! In his case, w h a t is th e use of re p rim a n d ? " T sz e -lu th e n said, "I should like, sir. to h e a r w h a t y o u r h e a rt is set u p o n ." T h e M a s te r replied, " I t is this: in r e g a rd to old people, to give th em quiet a n d comfort; in re g a r d to friends a n d associates, to be faithful to them ; in re g a r d to the y o u n g , to tre a t th em with fostering affection a n d k in d n e s s.” V

Is Genius Attainable ?
By F r a t e r H e rm a n M . S c h a tz m a n E S. genius is atta in ­ able; b u t w e must be willing to pay th e p ric e . As s o m e o n e said , " G e n iu s is ninety per c en t p ersp ira­ tion a n d ten p er c e n t inspiration.” T h e perspiration p a rt c o n s i s t s of u s i n g all of our time a n d e n e r g y for o u r c h o s e n field. T h e r e are only tw e n ty - f o u r hours in every da y, w h e th e r y ou a re a scientist, a philosopher, or a thoug htless laborer. T h e fruits of genius bloom only through concen tration . T h is concentration must be immune to the tem p tations of luxury, a n d to the diversified pleasures of the m aterial w orld, such as: clothes, food.
S ix ty -s e v e n

money, riches, honor, fame, dign ity, etc. E v e ry th in g m u st be s u b m e rg e d in this om n ip re se n t desire to k n o w , to un d e rsta n d , a n d to p o r tr a y in som e form som e of the infinite tr u th th a t y o u h ave torn from the confines of th e universe. A s for th e ten per cent inspiration, it is the r e w a rd of the nin e ty p e r cent perspiration! T h e fruit of o u r c o n c e n ­ tration, with its training to w a r d m inute a n d critical'discernm ent, m akes us se n si­ tive to the q uiet pro m p tin g s of th e inner man. T h is so u rc e of. all k n o w le d g e b e ­ comes a r e a d y a ssista n t to o u r p e r ­ sistent inquiries for more tru th . T h i s small voice sp e a k s as "in s p ira tio n ,” the illusive q uest of the av era g e m a n w h o h as no t the c h a r a c te r a n d d e term ination to m ake the small voice a c o n s ta n t friend. H a p p y is the man w h o c a n p a y the price of genius, for w h a t he loses in the finite, he gains a h u n d re d fo ld in the infinite.

Rosicrucian Behaviorism
B y T h o r K j i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand M aster
H E T H E R w e wish to o r not, w h e th e r w e like it or not, w e find ourselves co nsidered as re p ­ resentatives o f the groups to w h i c h we b e lo n g . O ur family, our society, o u r church will be j u d g e d favo rably or u n fa v o ra b ly according to o u r speech a n d actions. In E u ro p e , for exam ple, it w a s cu stom ­ a r y a t o n e time to despise A m ericans b ecause of the m a n y w e a lth y a n d u n ­ cu ltured people w h o h a d the time a n d m on ey to s p e n d on travelling. H otel keepers a n d stores took a d v a n ta g e of A m e ric a n travellers until th ey lost the A m eric a n to urist tra d e . I t is a common failing for people to generalize hastily a n d fallaciously. P eo p le s a y of P re s id e n t Roosevelt, “ Y o u can tell th a t he h a d his training in G ro to n a n d H a r v a r d . ” People think th a t m usicians m u st be tem peram ental, artists immoral, a n d w riters eccentric. People th in k t h a t teetotalers m u st be peculiar a n d extrem e. The W e d o n o t w a n t to b e ta g g e d w ith R o s ic r u c ia n u n s a v o ry ep ithets such a s V e e r " or fan atics b efore th e public has a n o p ­ D ig e s t p o r tu n ity to get a c q u a in te d w ith our Ju ly aims a n d course of instruction. W e do not w a n t people to be afraid of us b e ­ 1938 cause they h av e h e a r d th a t mystics dis­ approve of m e a t-e a tin g o r of certain facets of the m a rria g e relationship; th a t mystics are ascetic, u n w o rld ly , im prac­ tical. a n d unsocial. W e do no t e x p e c t m a n k in d to attain illumination in o n e gen eration. T h e r e is a long stretch b e tw e e n th e b e g in n e r on the p a th a n d th e s tu d e n t ripe for il­ lumination. A n y o n e , for example, can learn to u n d e r s ta n d a n d a pp reciate music o r art w ith o u t m a k in g it a p r o f e s ­ sion a n d it is n o t difficult to le a rn to play one in stru m e n t m o d e ra te ly well. T h e kn ow ledge is a p le a su re besides making you a finer ty p e of individual. It is better th a t o u r n a tio n be m a d e up of music lovers a n d people w h o enjoy spending leisure h o u rs in p racticing an instrument. It is b e tte r th a t o u r nation be m ade up of lovers o f a r t a n d people w h o like to d abb le in paints, clay, a n d w a te r colors a n d u n d e r s ta n d w h a t a lithograph, a w o o d c u t, a n d an etching are. W h a t an in spiration it w ou ld b e for our artists a n d m usician s if w e w e r e a nation of music lovers a n d a r t lovers! T h e sam e principle holds true with mystic studies. W e w a n t the w o r ld to be interested in mysticism, to adm ire and respect m ystics, to a p p rec ia te the aims of mysticism, to h o n o r th e great mystics of the w o rld . W e w a n t th e co­ operation of m a n k in d . It is n o t im­ p o rta n t a t p re s e n t t h a t ev e ry m an a n d w om an reach the sublim e h e ig h ts in this incarnation. It is n o t n e c e ssa ry t h a t all
T w o hundred th irty -fo u r

reach the v e ry a d v a n ce d s ta g e w h e re a strictly ascetic life is necessary. F o r a long time stu d e n ts of mysticism can live very much like the a v e ra g e h u m a n b e ­ ing. enjoying in m oderation all th a t the w o rld has to offer. In fact, it is p a r t of the h u m a n education on e a rth to explore the aven ues of the senses, th a t th e y m ay become neutralized by a conscious u n d e r ­ sta n d in g . H e w h o lives entirely a p a rt from the w o rld can no t u n d e r s ta n d the problems, perplexities, a n d difficulties th a t h u m an b eings m ust face in d aily life. W e w ho h av e d r u n k deeply of the w a te r s of the well of life k n o w t h a t even a little must bring refre sh m e nt to the p a rc h e d lips of m an kind . E v e n a little kn ow ledge of the W a y . the T r u t h , and the Life will m ake life h a p p ie r on earth. Just a little kindlier feeling, ju st a little more compassion, a little more sy m ­ p a th y for the w eak, the helpless, the d e ­ feated. the frustrated, will completely cha n g e the n a tu re of o u r civilization. W i t h all our m echanical im provements, with all our societies, foundations, schools, hospitals, a n d clinics, o u r civil­ ization is still ruthless a n d barb a ro u s. N ie tz sc h e 's cruel dictum still seem s to be the guiding motif: " T h e w e a k must go to the wall a n d w e m ust help them th e re to .” T h e r e is so much needless suffering in our lives caused b y indifference, c a re ­ lessness. a n d lack o f consideration. M u c h of the m isery in m a rriag e w ould d is a p p e a r if each p ut the w e lfa re of the oth e r first. F o re m e n a n d tea c h e rs could keep their enthusiasm on a high pitch if principals a n d sup erv iso rs did n o t treat them like irresponsible beings a n d im­ pose upon them rules a n d regulation s or a uniform m ethod like a s tr a ig h t jacket. S uperiors a re not a n d sh ou ld n o t play the p a rt of an infallible G o d . T h e w orld of politics a n d business is h oneycom bed w ith graft, corruption, a n d d o w n rig h t dishonesty. It is quite ev id ent th a t people do not take either G o d or the m oral law seriously. T h in k ho w our w o rld w o u ld be tr a n s ­ form ed over nigh t if w e could inspire m ank in d to accept G o d a n d the moral law, if w e could im plant into the w o r ld ­ consciousness the d octrine of rebirth a n d the law of cause a n d effect. W o u l d a man steal if he realized th a t he wfas on ly stealing from himself? W o u l d a
T w o hundred th irty-five

m an sla y if he knew th a t the w e a p o n w o uld be turned a g a in st himself? W o u l d a m an gamble if he k n e w t h a t the u n e a rn e d w ealth m ust all be given up? W o u l d a m an exploit o th ers if he knew th a t rebirth w ou ld p lace him am ong the exploited? W o u l d a m an be utterly indifferent to the needs a n d s e n ­ sibilities of w om en if he k n e w th a t he w ould h av e to take his place some d a y in th eir ra n k s in o rd e r to b e m a d e to u n d e rs ta n d all emotions a n d sufferings? W h e r e experience a n d realization have no t opened o u r eyes, w e a re u n ­ im aginably callous a n d even cruel. T h e light th a t mysticism h a s to give is sorely n e ed ed. T h e g re a t institutions of the past h a v e broken d ow n. T h e y no lo ng er exert th e influence w hich th e y did previously. T h e church h a s lost its in­ fluence. F e w tak e church d octrine seri­ ously. Society is still u ndem o cratic a n d competitive. T h e schools still g ro pe blindly for aims a n d m ethods. O u r b e st schools a re distinctly snobbish in spirit. Science is still coldly im personal, a n d indifferent to the immoral uses of its gifts. T h e home is n o lo n g e r a little sa n c tu a r y with the p a re n ts the g u a r d ­ ians of the h earth. C h ildre n fre q u en tly must be saved fro m the pernicious in ­ fluence o f the home a n d th e p a re n ts. T h e w o rld w e have cre a te d is o u t of h a rm o n y a n d equilibrium. W e a re all like A lic e - in - W o n d e r la n d , a n d w e do not k n o w w h e th e r w e a re com ing o r go ­ ing. F o r w h a t shall w e e d u c a te our children in an insecure society? H o w can a w o m a n d ream of w ife h o o d or m otherho od w h en men p r e fe r selfcentered a n d sensual lives? H o w c an a man be honest in a society of c u t-th ro a t competition or the m a ss-p ro d u c tio n of machine-like corporations? W h a t the w orld n eeds is soul e d u c a ­ tion, spiritual e nlightenm ent, simple ethics a n d morality. U n til the d re g s of h u m a n ity are ’ redeem ed, a n d w e s to p creating the gulf betw e e n the v e ry p o o r a n d the very rich, th e re will b e no peace for a n y of us. U n til ru th less w a r ­ fare ceases, there is no place for th e a c ­ complishments of culture. U n til the w orld is safe a n d sane, a n d o rd e rly, there is no happiness for a n y o f u s or our n e ar ones a n d d e a r ones. W e m ust learn to regard all m an kind a s n e a r or dear, as b ro th e rs a n d sisters.

T h a t is the m essage w e w a n t to put across. T h a t is the salvation th e world needs. T h a t is all wre w a n t to d o at present. T h a t is all wre w a n t y ou to do. It is suicidal to ig n o re th e n eed s o f the w o r ld ’s sub m erg ed masses. W e , as m embers o f the Rosicrucian O r d e r , can lend a h a n d in this mighty a n d divine task. Let us concentrate on essentials. Let us h a m m e r on th e great moral law. Let us teach people the fal­ lacy, the sham e of callousness, cruelty, a n d heartless selfishness. Let us not exam ine our m em bers to see w h e th e r th e y lack a n y angelic qualifications. L et us not w a ste time on doctrinal in terp re­ tations. F o r g e t a b o u t m eat-eating, be­ cause it is sometimes found necessary. O u r strict v e g e ta ria n s a re as un c h a rit­ able as the a r r o g a n t B rahm ins to w ard the m eat-eaters. T h e storm a b o u t mari­ tal continence is u n n e c e s sa ry a t present. Society has n ot y e t re a c h e d th e state of development, y ou will all adm it, w here m arriag e is un n ecessa ry. In fact, we need a revival of th e institutions of m a r­ riage. All the v irtu es th a t a beautiful home a n d family life e n g e n d e r a re sore­ ly needed in o u r m a d ly materialistic so ­ ciety. Individualism r a m p a n t m ust be curbed. It is pro ven a d e a d ly menace. Psychic pow ers, too, a re unim p ortan t at present. T o live in N e w Y o r k a n d do business in C h in a b y projection are fan tastic a n d gross e x a g g e ra tio n s of mystical teachings. W e do no t w a n t to lure members b y m isrepresentatio n or a n appeal to cu pidity o r the promise of miracles. W e d o n o t give o u r members a secret formula for in sta n tan e o u s suc­ cess or happiness. W e do no t w a n t to w in m embers b y false promises. W e w a n t Rosicrucianism to be a w a y o f life em phasized. W e w a n t ethics, morality, a n d ch ara c ter tra in in g stressed. Let the w o rld learn to live in th e ligh t of the highest ideals it a lre a d y possesses. Since th e w o rld will ju d g e Rosicru­ cian claims b y m em bers of th e Rosi­ crucian O r d e r , let us m ake a n effort to be w o rth y of the m e ssa g e th a t w e have elected to give. L e t us scrutinize our ow n co nd uct rem orselessly. L et us be Th< R o s i c r u c ia n ” os] e y e f u l in th o u g h t, in w o r d a n d deed. Let us be a s n e a t a n d dignified in D ig est a p p ea ran ce a n d a ttire as the w orld de­ Ju ly m ands. Let us c ultivate refinement in 1938 m ann ers a n d speech. L et us be gentle,

courteous, and a s co nsid e ra te as w e kn o w how. Let us act in the m a n n e r we have a lw a y s dream ed a n d im agined and expected real Rosicrucians to act. As th e p o et said, " W e g ro w like unto the thing w e co ntem plate.” It is frightfully disillusioning to n e w m em bers a n d to people w h o h ave no t y e t e n te re d the O r d e r to h e a r a m em ber talk r u d e ly to his wife, o r to see officers o r members a c t coldly to each other, o r disinterested in the problems o f th eir b rothers. Let us tr y to lead sup e rio r lives. Let us sp e n d o u r leisure in beautifu l w ays. Let us cultivate the arts. L et us learn to love re a d in g an d s tu d y a n d good books. I said to a m em ber recently: " W h y d o n ’t yo u re a d more? W h y d o n 't you bring y o u r inform ation up to d a te ? ” He replied, "I used to re a d much. I have m a n y bo ok s in m y library, b u t I have no time to re a d .” R e a d good n e w s­ p a p e rs a n d m agazines. K eep a b re a st of times. K now w h a t is going on in the w orld. Be intelligent a n d inform ed in conversation. People do n o t h ave to ag re e w ith you, b u t th e y sho uld respect y o u r ability to m aintain y o u r point of view. T h e y should be forced to adm it t h a t you try to live up to y o u r ideals. L et the w o rld see th a t m em bership in the Rosicrucian O r d e r m a k e s a definite, unm istakable im press u pon y o u r p er­ so n a lity a n d y o u r life. Let y o u r light so shine am ong men t h a t th e y w ill be con strained to p ra ise the Lord. You h a v e no idea h ow c a re fully people w a tc h y ou and h o w w ide y o u r circle of influence is. If yo u m ake a n effort to re p re s e n t the ideals of th e O r d e r a d e ­ quately , if y ou a re no t a f r a id to be militant in y o u r d efense a n d p ro m u lg a ­ tion of Rosicrucian principles, y o u will be a tru ly w o r th y se rv a n t o f th e Cosmic. Y ou will be a channel for Cosm ic p u r ­ poses. Y o u will be a light to all men. If you love hum anity, can a n y cause b e nobler? C a n a n y cause b e more w o r t h y of y o u r sup rem est efforts, your co n c e n tra ted support? W i t h th e help of p ro fo u n d conviction, it is n o t too diffi­ cult to live in the light of th e highest th a t w e know . It is n o t too difficult to do the task assig ned us e ith e r in the O r d e r or in the w o rld . N o t if w e truly love blun dering a n d suffering m ankind. N o t if w e tru ly love G o d . T o love, no task is too great, no sacrifice too much.
T w o hundred th irty -six

The Occult Forces In Music
(Lecture Delivered at the 1938 Annual Convention, Accompanied on the Hammond organ by Soror Violet Cowger.)
By
T
h o r

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
T h e entire history of music is outlined, all the great com posers a re discussed, the hidden effects a re a n a ly z e d , a n d the course of music in the future is outlined. T o re a d the book is to m ake one keenly aw are how much one w h o h a s not been an a rd e n t devotee of music h a s missed. O n e is filled w ith the desire to stu d y . O n e is o verw helm ed b y th e conviction of a pow erfu l source of joy, inspiration, a n d o f creative forces. W e can find G od in a sunset, a poem , th e test-tu be, in a mathem atical form ula, in p ra y e r, but the most beautifu l w a y is to find G o d in song, for the soul to so a r u p ­ w a rd on the w in g s o f melody. H o w pitifully n a rro w is the life o f the a v e r ­ age h u m a n being! H o w much more beautiful w h e n enriched w ith art, poesy, a n d song! T h e book is v e r y interesting, b u t must be read w ith a n u n d e r s ta n d in g heart, and can be a p p r e c ia te d b y one versed in mystic lore a n d Cosm ic law. I can no t begin to re c o u n t all the in ter­ esting d a ta , a n d can m entio n only a few of the most surprising facts. T h e a u th o r begins b y po sing this question: " H o w is it t h a t in each period of musical histo ry a p a r tic u la r com p oser has c on tacted a n d selected a p a rticu lar set of ideas, the a g g r e g a te of w h ic h has co nstitu ted w h a t is no w k n o w n as his individual style? H a s his selection been purely the outcom e of individual tem p eram ent a n d taste, or h a s it been
T w o hundred e ig h ty -six

The R o sic ru c ia n D ig e s t S eptem ber 1938

H E g r e a t e s t fas­ c i n a t i o n in t h e s tu d y of the ph i­ loso ph y of m ysti­ cism is th a t it em ­ b races all life, all k n o w le d g e , and all art. B e y o n d every m o u n t a i n p e a k lo o m s a higher, a g ra n d e r, a m o r e imposing ran g e . T h e h o ri­ zon recedes as w e app ro ach it, a n d the ea g e r soul is lured to jou rn ey on. W e have studied the mystic p hilosophy of life. W e k n o w its relationship to religion, to science, to psychology, to life problem s a n d to lit­ erature. W e k n o w th e mystic value of sound. W e k n o w th a t m a n y g re a t a r ­ tists h ave e x p re s se d mystic principles a n d ideals in their pa intings. B ut few know the intim ate connection betw een music a n d occult forces. T h e o th e r d a y I cam e across th e book " M u s ic " w r itte n b y C y r il Scott, th e well know n E n glish com poser, a n d it w a s a revelation to me. I felt a s K eats did w hen he first d iscovered C h a p m a n ’s H om er:
"T h en felt I like som e w a tc h e r of the skies W h e n a new p lan e t sw im s into his ken, O r like sto u t C ortez, w h e n w ith eagle eyes He stared a t the Pacific—a n d all his men Look'd a t each o th e r w ith a w ild surm ise— Silent, upon the p e ak in D arien ."

influenced b y pow ers exterior to him­ self?” T h e a n s w e r c a n be found on ly in the esoteric history of music. T h e a u ­ th o r m akes the s ta te m e n t t h a t the M a s t e r K u t- H u - M i , the h ighe st k no w n initiate, w h o g ra d u a te d a t O x f o r d in 1850 a n d now resides in Shigatse, T ib e t, tak es a special interest in the evolution o f W e s t e r n music. In d ee d he co nside rs it advisable th a t stu d e n ts of occultism o f all schools sh o u ld more fully a p p re c ia te the g re a t im portance of music a s a force in spiritual evolution, a n d to this end h e h a s revealed much th a t h a s hitherto n o t been revealed and th a t c a n n o t fail to p rov e of p a ra m o u n t interest to all music lovers. H o w e v e r this s ta te m e n t m ay be, w e can o n ly ac­ cept it as given b y th e au th or. T h e mes­ sa g e alon e interests us a n d it is o f su f­ ficient im portan ce a n d interest to d e ­ m an d o u r m ost e a rn e st attentio n. T h e sta te m e n ts of P la to a n d A ristotle in r e g a r d to music are fun dam en tal esoteric principles. "M u sic a l tr a in in g ” w rites P la to , "is a more p o te n t in stru ­ m ent th a n a n y other, b ecau se rh ythm a n d h a r m o n y find their w a y into th e in­ w a r d places of the soul, on w h ich they mightily fasten, im p artin g grace, a n d m ak in g th e soul graceful of him w h o is rig h tly e d u c a te d ." S o p ro n o u n c e d w a s P la to 's opinion of the effects o f music th a t in a n o th e r p a r t of his "R e p u b lic ” he sa y s: " T h e intro du ctio n o f a new kind o f music m ust be sh u n n e d as im­ perilling th e w hole S tate ; since styles of music a r e never d istu rb e d w ith o u t a f ­ fecting th e most im po rta nt political in­ stitu tio n s." A risto tle w rote: "E m o tio n s of an y kind a r e p ro d u c e d b y m elo dy a n d rh y th m ; therefo re b y music a m a n b e ­ com es accusto m ed to feeling the right em otions. M u sic h a s thu s the p o w e r to form cha rac ter, a n d the various kinds of music b a s e d on the various modes, m a y be disting uish ed by their effects on c h a ra c te r. O n e , for example, w o rking in th e direction of melancholy, a n o th e r of effeminacy, one en c o u ra g in g a b a n d ­ o n m e n t, a n o th e r self-control, a n o th e r e n th u sia sm , a n d so on th ro u g h the serie s.” T h e r e is no d o u b t th a t each specific ty p e o f music has exercised a p ro ­ n o u n ce d effect on history, on morals, a n d on culture; t h a t music is a more
T w o h u n d r e d e ig h ty -s e v e n

potent force in the moulding of c h a ra c te r th a n religious creeds, precepts, o r moral philosophies. M u sic operates on the mind a n d em otions of m an th ro u g h the m edium of su g g e stio n . T h e pa rtic ula r emotion w h ic h a given piece of music depicts is re p ro d u c e d in ourselves. It o perates th r o u g h th e law of c o rre sp o n d ­ ences. N o t o n ly the emotional co ntent b ut the e s sen c e o f the actual musical form te n d s to r e p ro d u c e itself in h um an conduct. " A s in music, so in life.” T h e r e a re several ty p e s of music w hich o perate on th e mind. T h u s B ach's music h a d a v e r y definite effect on the m e n ta l­ ity, for in a c c o rd a n c e with o u r axiom, as B ach's a r t is of a n intellectual type, it pro du ces a n intellectual effect. A n e xam ination of h isto ry proves th a t an innovation in musical style h a s invari­ ably been follow ed b y an innovation in politics a n d m orals. In E g y p t a n d G reece, for exam ple, the decline of music w a s follow ed b y the complete d e ­ cline of th e E g y p ti a n a n d G recian civ­ ilizations them selves. H a n d e l 's music influenced the c h a r ­ acteristics o f th e V ic to ria n era. It w a s, in fact, his ex a lte d mission to revo lu ­ tionize the s ta te o f E n glish morals. H is music insp ired a w e a n d reverence. T h e k ey no te of B a c h ’s genius w a s p r o f u n d ­ ity, one replete w ith high inspiration a n d inventiveness. H is music h a d a m a rk e d influence upon the m entality. T h e m a th e m atica l ingenuity of his fu g u e -w ritin g alo ne contributed g re a tly to this influence. F ro m the d a y th a t B a c h ’s music s p r e a d abroad, d ates the v a stly in c re a se d intellectuality of the G e rm a n peo ple a n d the e nd eav ors of some of the g re a te s t thinkers. H is music likewise w a s responsible for the rich h a rv e st o f s u b s e q u e n t G erm an com ­ posers. B ach w ith his musical logic aro u se d a re m a r k a b le taste for philoso­ p h y in the T e u to n ic people. Bach first intellectualized th e G e rm a n s, then H a n ­ del a p p e a r e d a n d conventionalized them. B e e tho ve n's mission w a s to p o r tra y in s o u n d e v e ry v a r ie ty of hum an em o ­ tion. F o r this re a so n it w a s essential th a t he sh o u ld be born to suffer, b o rn w ith m anifold difficulties a g ain st w hich to conten d; difficulties of tem peram ent, o f e x te rn al circum stances, a n d corporeal difficulties. In o r d e r to express the e n ­

frain because it w as u n co nventio nal. He tire g a m u t o f h u m a n em otions in the cipher of music, he h a d first to experi­ inspired the in a u g u ra tio n of societies ence, if not all, a t a n y r a te most of them. co nnected w ith intellectual o r artistic T h e rest w a s ach ieved th ro u g h the pursuits. imagination. B e e th o v e n ’s music, then, C h o p in 's influence u p o n w o m e n w as induced sy m p a th y on a scale hitherto especially appreciable in G e rm a n y and unk n o w n , a n d m ade possible the intro­ E n g la n d . N e ith e r the G e r m a n n o r the duction la te r o n o f th e science of p sy ­ E ng lish w o m e n of th e p e rio d w ere, as choanalysis. I t w a s in fact, the fore­ a rule, m entally cultured. T h e r e w a s in ru n n e r of this therapeutical science. H is th e V ic torian era seldom a n y true music g a v e p eop le th e pow er to feel friendship b e tw e e n h u s b a n d s a n d wives. with a n d n o t m erely to fe e l for. F u r ­ T h e men feared G o d, the w o m e n feared therm ore, it w a s th e tolerance-inspiring G o d a n d th eir h u s b a n d s . I t therefore effect of B e e th o v e n ’s music which gave becam e n e c essa ry t h a t a s u b tle r influ­ rise to th e w ritin g s o f H avelock Ellis, ence should be e m ployed to b r e a k d ow n Forel, K ra fft-E b in g . Bloch a n d o th e r s — this debilitating d e p e n d e n c y —’th a t influ­ those p a in sta k in g a n d self-sacrificing in­ ence w as C hopin. H e affected women, ve stig a to rs of sexual psychology. thou gh unbeknown to themselves, M e n d e ls so h n , th o u g h so different in thro u g h his refinement, his delicacy, his c ha ra c ter from B eethoven, w orked u n ­ aestheticism. H e a w a k e n e d th e desire consciously to the sa m e end — the instil­ fo r culture b y p o r tr a y in g th e p o e tr y of ment of s y m p a th y . B eethov en 's great refinement a n d th e in h e r e n t ch arm of a r t w a s to a w a k e n com p assio n by p o r ­ p o etry itself. T h e result w a s t h a t w o m ­ tray in g the w r e tc h e d a n d the d estitute en w h o h a d been p e rfe c tly c o n te n t to in all their misery; M e n d e ls s o h n ’s w a s s ta y a t hom e a n d m ak e th e h om e b e a u ­ to achieve th e sa m e re s u lt b y p o rtray in g tiful b e g a n to join societies for th e better u n d e rsta n d in g of p o e tr y a n d th e fine them m a d e h a p p y . T h a t M e n d e lsso h n en h a n c e d the sy m p a th y -a ro u sin g effects arts. It w a s the beg in n in g o f th e e m a n ­ of B eeth o v en 's music is obvious from cipation of w om an h o o d . the even g r e a te r in c re a se of charitable M u s ic even influenced th e education institutions w hich b e ca m e m anifest some o f children. T h a t th e k in d e r g a r te n b e ­ tw e n ty y e a rs a f te r h e h a d p assed aw ay . came a p o p u la r institution w a s in p art Between th e y e a r 1879 a n d 1904 no less d u e to the influence of R o b e r t S c h u ­ th an 58 c h a rita b le institutions w e re in­ m a n n 's music, w hile m uch la te r on, the a u g u r a te d in L o n d o n alone. M o n te sso ri system w a s a c tu a lly inspir­ Chopin w a s the musical poet p a r ex­ ed by th a t influence. It cry stallized at cellence of refinem en t— n o t a superficial, last the realization th a t ch ild re n a re all b u t an inner refinem ent o f soul. H e w a s different from one a n o th e r , a n d hence m ust be tre a te d in d iv id ua lly a n d not the first to n e -p o e t in th e tru est a n d most specific sense. H e w a s an unconscious en masse; t h a t children c a n n o t b e e d u ­ medium for th e asp iratio ns, longings cated b y a n y o n e else, a n d " t h a t th e im ­ a n d th w a r te d spiritu al desires of the in­ pulse to learn m ust com e from w ithin telligentsia of his d a y . In the dom ain of their o w n m in d s’*; t h a t c h ild re n a r e so painting his music indirectly inspired co nstitu ted th a t " g iv e n p r o p e r condi­ th e P re - R a p h a e lite B ro th erh o o d an d tions th e y pre fe r e d u c a tin g them selves Burns-Jones; in th e d om ain of literature, to a n y o th e r o c c u p a tio n .” S chu m ann the stylistic refinem ents o f F la u b e rt, w a s the tru e poet o f th e child-soul, of Rossetti, P a u l V e r la in e , M ae te rlin ck th e c hild-nature, of th e child-life. H is a n d others. T h e influence o f C h op in music h a s a m a rk e d effect o n children; up on m a n n e rs w a s a s p ro nou nc e d if no t it affects their su b c o n sc io u sn e ss in a as a p p a r e n t a s his influence upon litera­ m a n n e r in which none h ith e rto h a s been ture a n d art. H is music h a d a n aestheti- capable of affecting it. It is th e only cizing effect. T h u s C h o p in w a s respon ­ music so far conceived w h ic h is a ttu n e d The sible for a s te p in th e rig h t direction — to the child-m ind, a n d f o r this reason R o sic ru c ia n it is the o nly music c a p a b le of educatin g he had a lte r e d a n d refined th e motive. D ig e s t T h a t people sh o u ld re fra in from doing th e child. S e p t e m b e r a thing b e c a u se it w a s unbeau tiful w a s Like C hop in , R o b ert S c h u m a n n has b e tte r th a n t h a t th e y s h o u ld merely r e ­ exercised a m arked effect on th e pic1938
T w o h u n d re d eighty-eight

to n a l art. H e w a s la rg e ly responsible for th a t ty p e w hich w a s k n o w n as Jugendstil ( Y o u t h - s t y l e ) . It w a s in evidence in th e final d e c a d e of th e last century, b ut since then it h a s u n d e rg o n e developm ent a t the h a n d s of a v a rie ty of artists. B u t even m ore h a s S c h u m a n n been responsible for m oulding the p ostimpressionist painters, a n d m a n y of those w h o h a v e followed. If w e exam ine the spirit of p ost-im pressionism w e n o ­ tice th a t its o u ts ta n d in g fe atu re is naivete, a n d th e d ra w in g s a n d p a in ting s inspired b y its influence look a s if they h a d been e x e c u te d b y children — the trees, houses, figures, all su g g e s t the ha n d a n d m ind of a child. T h i s is noticeable in th e w o rk s of G a u g u in a n d V a n G o g h , a n d also m ore so in th o se of Picasso. T h is primitiveness, this sim pli­ city o f conception, h a s s p r e a d fa r a n d wide in all countries. It w a s indirectly inspired b y S c h u m a n n , as th e preR aphaelites w e r e in directly inspired b y C hopin. It too k lon ger to materialize, but S c h u m a n n ’s music w a s n e v e r so extensively p la y e d as t h a t of C hopin. Beethoven h a d p o r tr a y e d hum an love, Bach a n d H a n d e l h a d p o r tr a y e d religious d ev otion o r love for G o d. W a g n e r w a s th e first to to p o r tr a y th a t Love is G o d , th e D ivine Love, or w h a t in certain schools of occultism is term ed the Buddhic. O n l y an Initiate is in a position to kn ow the spiritual v alue o r altitu d e of a given piece of music. N o n -in itia te s can only feel it a n d ju d g e b y the effects on themselves. T h o s e w h o are able clairaud iently to h e a r music o f th e h ig h er spheres, h e a r no t on ly one m elody, b ut countless melodies sim ultan eo usly, a n d all b le nding to g e th e r in subtle h arm on y. T h e music o f e a rth w h ic h m ost closely resembles t h a t of these h ig h er planes possesses th e g r e a te st spiritual value. W h e n the in g e n u ity of a co m p oser is such th a t h e c an inte rb le n d several beautiful m elodies so t h a t th e y c an be play ed sim u ltaneou sly to p ro d u c e one harm onious w hole, th e n th e spirituality of his music is assured . Some of the effects of th ese spiritual po rtions in W a g n e r ’s music h a v e com e into m anifestation , as all those m ove­ ments, h a v in g u n ity or b ro th e rh o o d as their ideal, a re th e result of his influ­ ence. H is music also a ro u s e d the feel­
T w o h u n d re d e ig h ty-n in e

ing of intense n ationalism for w hich the G e rm an s becam e notorious. F ro m the point of view of th e occult stu d e n t, the foregoing is a d e a r dem on stration of the responsibility w hich rests upon the co m ­ poser w h o is blind to th e effects his music creates. T h e psychological puzzle of W a g ­ n e r's c h a ra c te r is solved th ro u g h o c ­ cultism. Because he possessed su c h a strong desire to help m a n k in d he e a rn e d the r ig h t to be u se d b y th e M a s te rs , w ho recognized in him th e finest musical medium th e y w ere likely to h a v e fo r the n ex t fifty y e a rs or more. W e h av e n o evidence to sho w t h a t he w a s a w a r e of this o v ersh ado w ing , n o r of th e fact t h a t he w a s so extensively used b y the Cosmic, which is e n o u g h to acc o u n t for traits in his c h a ra c te r w hich h a v e called forth such stro n g criticism from som e of his later biog ra p h e rs. I t often h a p ­ pens t h a t Cosmically inspired people lose their sense of p ro p o rtio n a n d values a n d become im bued w ith w h a t a p p e a r s to be intense egoism a n d selfishness. T h i s is largely b ecau se th e y are c e n ­ tralized a n d d o n o t sw ing to th e e x ­ tremes o f polarity. A ttrib u te s su c h as m od esty o r its opposite, conceit, p la y no p a rt in their consciousness. T o " g e t th e m essage a c ro ss" is all th a t c oncerns them. T h u s the c h a ra c te r w h ic h W a g ­ ner sh o w e d to th e w o rld w a s n o t exclu ­ sively his ow n. It w a s in p a r t C o sm ic ­ ally do m inated. R ic h a rd S tra u ss a c c e n tu a te d the G erm a n race-feeling w h ic h m uch of W a g n e r 's music h a d been in stru m e n ta l in em phasizing. B y a g ran diose p o r ­ trayal of battle th r o u g h the m edium of music, h e glorified w a r a n d strife, c re a t­ ing th e re b y a th o u g h t-fo rm w hich w a s used b'y the D a r k F o rc e s to h elp p r e ­ cipitate th e w a r itself. T h e music of both W a g n e r a n d S tra u ss stim ulated the love of freedom. C o n se q u e n tly all those freedo m -asp iring m ovem ents in­ cluding the d e m a n d for easier divorce laws a n d m ilitant suffrage cam e into prominence. A ll high Initiates h a v e the p o w e r, b y m eans of th o u g h t-tra n sfe re n c e , to im ­ press upon the minds o f such persons as are sufficiently receptive a n y ideas th e y m ay th in k fit. But w h e n w e s a y im press, w e u se the w o rd in a suggestionistic sense, a n d in no other. T h e y su g g e st

ideas to the poet, musician, painter, w rite r or philosopher. T h e y do n ot force ideas upon him. T h e recipient is often quite unconscious of w h e re his inspira­ tion comes from, a n d h a s no suspicion th a t he is either th e sub ject of th oughttran sference or tem porarily "o v e r­ s h a d o w e d ” b y a n u n seen Ego. W i t h i n com paratively re c e n t y e a rs certain of the M a s te r s w h o specialize in the arts h av e d eem ed it e x p e d ie n t to inspire a ty p e of music calcu lated to augm en t spirituality b y m e a n s 'o f know ledge. T h r o u g h music m a n should a t least come to sense t h a t o th e r w orld w ith its millions of incorp oreal denizens existing c o nc u rre ntly w ith th e physical. T h e v ib ration s of music actually a f ­ fect the occult constitution of man. T h e q u a rte r-to n e of In d ia n music especially affects the m ental b o d y , hence the d o ­ main of mind, philo sop hy , metaphysics. T h e th ird -to n e of an c ien t E g y p tia n music especially affected the emotional bod y, hence the dom ain of the emotions — ritual, music a n d occult know ledge. T h e h a lf-to n e of E u ro p e a n music especially affects th e sensations, the physical body , he n c e th e domain of m at­ ter. mechanics, go vern m en t of men. practicality. N o r is th e reason fa r to seek. T h e q u a r te r - to n e is the most subtle division o f the note, therefore its influence is the most subtle of the h ig h­ er bodies. T h e th ir d -to n e is a less subtle division a n d th e re fo re it influences the c orresp o n d in g ly less subtle emotional body. T h e h a lf-to n e is the least subtle of all a n d th e re fo re it influences the physical. “A s above, so b e lo w ." W h a t is a c tu ­ ally h e a rd of music is only its physical m anifestation d e p e n d in g upon its v ib ra ­ tions, w hich p e rta in to the "below "; in o ther w o rd s, w e perceive the effects of those musical vibratio ns on the physical plane, b u t w e do n o t perceive the more fa r-re ac h in g effects created b y th a t music o n th e h ig h e r planes. It is just these " a b o v e ” vibratio ns w hich influ­ ence our v ario us su b tle r Bodies a n d our ch aracters, b ecause th e y influence those planes them selves. T h e s e effects can be The R o sic ru c ia n perceived b y th e tra in e d seer a n d a s ­ sume bo th form s a n d colors com m en­ D ig est su ra te w ith th e a rtistic value a n d em o­ S ep tem b er tions w hich the music expresses. But 1938 the following point sh ou ld be especially

noted. W h e r e a m an is entirely lacking in a pa rtic ula r quality, a n d hence in its c orresp on ding color, th e n in t h a t p a r tic ­ u lar resp ect the subtler m a n ife sta tio n s of music can not affect him. W e r e it o th e r ­ wise. the most unevolved souls would develop w ith an a s to u n d in g rapidity, pa rtic ula rly in the la rg e cities w h e re there a re concert halls a n d o pera houses. T h a t even the m ost undiscip lin­ ed c h a ra c ters a re susceptible to the beneficial influence, h o w e v e r slight, is v e ry noticeable, a n d for th is reason even h a n d - o r g a n s serve a useful p u r ­ pose in the slums. O n e v e ry im p o rta n t p o in t w e have still to a d d . namely, t h a t the s u b tle r e f ­ fects of played music, the colors a n d forms p rod u c e d on the em otio nal plane, e n d u re for some time a f te r th e actual s o u n d s hav e died a w a y . It is for this reason th a t it is u n n e c e s sa ry for a p e r ­ son to b e within e a r s h o t o f music in o rd e r to benefit to som e e x te n t b y its effects. T h in k , friends, of th e e x t r a ­ o rd in a ry implications of these s t a t e ­ ments. W e are affected b y th e music in our neig hb orho od even if w e d o not h e a r it. T h e edu catio nal possibilities a re overw helm ing. If, to b e in the n eig h b o rh o o d of music is so potent, h o w m uch more so if w e h e a r a n d u n d e rs ta n d ! E v e n g r e a te r will be the effects of patien tly stu d y in g music a n d practicing it d a y b y da y . W h a t g re a te r incentive can a n y o n e w a n t to ap p ly himself im m ediately to this m o st inspir­ ing of all the arts? C e s a r F ra n c k w a s a m a s te r of th a t form of improvisation w h ic h Initiates k n o w to be the C osm ic ty p e . H e is the brid ge b etw een th e h u m a n evolution a n d th e psychic. O n e re s u lt of his achievem ent w as the diffusion o f p r a c ­ tical mysticism th r o u g h o u t E u ro p e w hich b e g a n to w a rd the e n d o f the last century. M a n k in d in g e n e ra l is averse to accep ting a n y th in g n e w . N o t on ly is the objective m ind in re sista n c e to it. b ut still more so th e sub con sciou s. It w a s this resistance in th e subconscious w hich C e s a r F ra n c k w a s in stru m e n ta l in b re a k in g dow n. H e h e lp e d to in­ sin uate into it th o se v e r y id eas w hich later on so m any people cam e to accept. F ra n c k w a s an Initiate, b u t w ith o u t clairvoyance. H e w a s a n in te rm e d ia ry betw e e n the Cosmic forces a n d h u m a n ­
T w o hun d red n in ety

ity a s E d w a r d G rieg w a s a n in ter­ m ediary betw een the n a tu re forces a n d hu m a n ity . It w a s G rieg w h o p a v e d the w a y for F re d e ric k Delius, C laude A chille D e b u ssy , S tra v in sk y a n d others, a n d finally for Scriabin — one of the g re a te st exp on ents w h o h a s so fa r a p ­ pe a re d in the field of art. H ith e r to even the most ad v a n c e d h a v e only b een able to "b ring th ro u g h " a small p ortion of the music of the spheres, a n d th a t is w h y the h y p e r-m o d e rn s s o u n d so dis­ c o rd a n t to us. Since D e b u s sy a n d Ravel h a v e sp re a d a b ro a d their influence, a perceptible c h a n g e in the attitu d e to w a rd s the " u n s e e n ” h a s taken place. P o p u la r m ag azines p rin t articles dealing w ith the su bject of F u rie s as possible objective realities a n d no t merely as figm ents of the im agination. T h e in te re st in folk­ lore h a s w id e ly increased. L e a rn e d men ha v e published books on th e folk-lore of the various countries. T h e nu m b e r of people w ith psychic p erception is in­ creasing. a n d instead of being scoffed at as visionaries, their assertion s a re taken with a degree of seriousness w hich for­ m erly w ou ld n ot h ave b een accorded them . T h e chasm betw e e n th e unseen a n d the seen is g ro w ing ever n arro w er. Scriabin becam e th e g r e a te s t ex p o n ­ e n t of psychic music. H e w a s also the first E u ro p e a n com poser w h o combined a theoretical k now ledg e of occultism w ith the tonal art. H e k n e w th a t he h a d a spiritual m essage to con vey to th e w orld, a n d th a t th ro u g h music it could be given. H e w a n te d to benefit the hu m an race. H e died a t th e age of 44 w ith his g re a te st w o rk u nacco m ­ plished. U n lik e F r a n c k , S criabin w as n o t a tra in e d initiate, a n d hence in con­ tacting the C osm ic planes h e subjected his delicate physical vehicle to such a strain th a t he laid himself op e n to the a tta c k s of th e D a r k F orces. N o t being clairvo yant a n d possessed of the neces­ s a r y k n o w le d g e he w a s u nable to keep alive. T h e disson an ces of m o d e rn music are accomplishing a n o th e r im p o rta n t occult purpose. T h e y help to d e stro y d estru c ­ tive th ou gh t-form s. It is a n occult musi­ cal fact t h a t discord (u sed in its moral se n se ) can alone be d e stro y e d b y dis­ cord. T h e reason for this is th a t the vibrations of intrinsically beautiful
T w o h u n d re d n in e ty -o n e

music a re too rarified to touch the com ­ p a rativ ely coarse vibrations of all th a t pe rta in s to a much lower plane. T h u s the w o r k of destroying these noisome m oral g e rm s h a s been allotted to S t r a ­ vinsky, Scho nb erg a n d o th e r u ltramodernists. T h e y a re also helping to bre a k d o w n th a t conventional thinking w hich is the g reatest obstacle to sp ir­ itual prog ress. A lth o u g h c o n v e n tio n a l­ ity w a s indispensable as a m e a n s of e stablishing law a n d o rd e r a f te r the R esto ra tio n , it h a s n o w served its p u r ­ pose. Just a s H a n d e l w a s u s e d b y the Cosm ic to pro d u c e it, the h y p e r-m o d e rn s have been likewise " u s e d " to abolish it. T h e ir dissonances, atta c k in g th e h a r d outlines o f the mental bodies of r e a c ­ tio n a ry people, r en d e r them m ore pliant a n d receptive to n e w ideas. M o d e r n music is in a transition stage, a n d w e still a w a it the time w h e n c oncord a n d discord shall be united in p erfe c t h arm o ny . It is interestin g to note th a t th e music of M o u s s o r g s k y a n d the Ballet w ith all its e n th u sia sm -c re atin g r h y th m s a n d to ne-color helped to precipitate th e R u s ­ sian revolution. It m a y be a d d e d th a t all son gs w hich a re genuine son gs, a n d no t a species of recitative, superim posed upon an accom panim ent, tend to inspire s y m p a th y , give poise a n d balance, a n d su sta in th e gentler side of life. E v e n street music is valuable in th a t it helps to e d u c a te unevolved souls. Cyril S c o tt’s comm ents on jazz are hig hly illuminating. A cco rding to him it w as p u t thro u g h b y the D a r k F orces. A s a result, a v e ry m arked decline in sexual m orals becam e noticeable. T h e orgiastic elem ent a b o u t its s y n c o p a te d rhy th m , entirely divorced from a n y m ore e x a lte d musical content, p ro d u c e d a h y p e r-e x citem e n t of the n erv e s a n d loosened th e pow ers of self-control. It gave rise to a false exhilaration, a ficti­ tious e n d u ra n c e , an insatiability r e s u l t ing in a deleterious moral a n d physical reaction. I t caused a setback in m a n 's n a tu re to w a r d the instincts of his racial childhood. Jazz-music a t its h e ig h t v e ry closely resem bled the music of primitive savag es. A fu rth er result of it w a s its su gg e stio n of sensationalism w hich has so g re a tly increased. A s jazz itself w a s m a rk ed ly sensational, the public h a s come to d em a n d "thrills" in the form of

"crook d ra m a s " a n d plays, the only d ram atic interest of w h ic h is connected with crime, m y ste ry a n d brutality. T h is also applies to se nsa tio na l fiction, the w id e sp re a d a n d e x a g g e ra te d interest tak en in prize-fights a n d o th e r s y m p ­ toms of sensationalism . T h e question m a y b e asked: “T h e n w h y did the h ig h e r p o w e rs p erm it Jazz to ‘come th r o u g h '? " Let us ve n tu re a reply. If w e take tw o n o te s o u t of a chord, sa y an F a n d a B a n d p la y them sim ultaneously th ey pro dup e a discord, b u t if w e a d d the re m a in d e r o f the notes the effect is a concord. Similarly, if w e can only perceive th e isolated p a rts of a g re at spiritual schem e, those p a rts in themselves m a y a p p e a r evil, b u t in con­ junction w ith the w h o le th e y are really good. It w a s n e c e ssa ry for the spiritual evolution of the race t h a t bo th men and wom en should a c q u ire a m easure of judicious control, e n tire ly for its ow n sak e a n d n ot in v iew of a n y o th e r con­ siderations. C o n d itio n s to d a y give yo un g people practically all the freedom th e y w a n t. Jazz-m usic h a s te n d e d to make th a t lesson r a t h e r more difficult a n d consequ en tly th e lea rn in g o f it all the more meritorious. A n o th e r c h a p te r of e x tra o rd in a ry in­ terest is th a t o n m usicians a n d their subtler bodies. T h e psychological o r­ ganism of the artist, be h e cre a to r or interpreter, differs from th a t of the av e ra g e m an. A r tis ts function in the sy m p ath etic system a s opposed to the cerebro-spinal; in th e emotions ra th e r th a n in th e mind. T h e a v e ra g e success­ ful musical e x e c u ta n t is e n d o w e d with psychic receptiveness w hich is no t so highly develop ed in th e ave ra g e man,

hence those d isturbances which so o ften assail his passional n atu re. T h e ex act science of sound, being as y e t u n k n o w n in the W e s t , composers a n d e x e c u ta n ts alike, a r e n o t alw ays able to d iscrim ­ inate am on g the innum erable influences to w hich their subtler vehicles a re open. T h e r e h a s a lw a y s been a certain stream o f inspiration em anating from the W h i t e Lodge, b u t w h e th e r it is, o r h a s been, successfully c o ntacted by a n y given com poser d ep end s, a n d h a s d e p end ed , upon the s ta te of his o w n inner develop ­ ment. In this w a y only can the h ig her forces be contacted, a n d all influences of a less d esirable n a tu re will b e e x ­ cluded. T h i s is the only recognized line w hich will have the cooperation of the W h i t e Lodge, as it w a s fo u n d th a t an earlier m eth od w hich consisted in arousing the physical centers to a sta te of a w a re n e s s prov ed e xceedingly d a n ­ gerous in irresponsible or u nsc ru p u lo u s people. T h e music of the n e ar future will te n d to becom e more h a rm on io us t h a n th a t o f recent years, a n d inspired w ith th e idea of helping m an to obtain g r e a t­ e r poise in a n d control o f his low er vehicle. O n l y w h e n such poise a n d control h av e been to a v e ry considerable m easure a tta in e d will the H ig h e r F o rc e s deem it s afe o r possible to allow the B u dd hic music to be given to the w orld. W e r e it " p u t th ro u g h " p re m a tu re ly th e re is g ra v e risk of u nd esirable r e ­ actions up on u nb alanced te m p e ra m e n ts. T h e future e xpo nent of sou nd , w ith m ind fully controlled, will project the Self into the hig her sp h e re s for in sp ira ­ tion a n d guidance, a n d bring d o w n into m anifestation the music of the spheres.

H E R M E S L O D G E C E R E M O N IE S
H erm es Lodge, R osicrucian (A M O R C ) T em ple, of Southern C alifornia, located at 148 N o rth G ra m erc y Place, Los A ngeles, will conduct a num ber of interesting cerem onies this fall. I t extends a n invitation to all m em bers of th e G ra n d L odge at large, w h o reside w ithin the vicin ity of Los A ngeles, to p a rticip a te in and a tten d the cerem onies. It is only n ecessary for a m em ber to present credentials, show ing th a t he or she is a n a ctiv e m em ­ ber of the O rder, to sh a re in these privileges. O n S eptem ber 18. 1938, a t 11:00 o ’clock a .m ., a n interesting R osicrucian christening cerem ony will be held. R osicrucian m em bers w h o are p a ren ts will be interested in ob­ serving th is cerem ony, a n d p erh ap s in a rran g in g to h a v e th eir children p a rticip a te in it. O n O c to b e r 2, 1938. a t 4:00 o'clock p .m .. a v e ry beautiful sym bolical a n d m ystical F irst D egree T em p le Initiation will be conducted a t th e above address.

The R o sicrucian D ig e s t S eptem ber 1938

T w o hundred n in e ty -tw o

Our Youth Groups
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
It is true th a t the seed of race hatred exists in o u r own country. T o our sh a m e , be it said, we have not yet e ra d i­ c a te d it. Discrimination exists openly in pra c tic a lly every w alk of life. W e driv e people into certain fields of activ­ ity. a n d then we accuse them of mono­ polizing those trades. Search your hearts, m y friends. A s k of yourselves, " H a v e I d o n e a n ything to intensify p re ju d ic e a n d discrimination? H a v e I elim inated them from m y ow n h e a rt and consciousness? Do I d r a w the color line? D o I consider my religion the only tru e one? D o I consider m y race s u ­ perior? A m I influenced by externali­ ties, such a s the college a man g ra d u ­ a te d from, the country club to which he belongs, a n d the neighborhood in which h e lives?" L et us exemplify dem ocracy in our speech, in our conduct, in o u r homes a n d in o u r communities. Let us be g u a r d ia n s of the sacred fire at least on o u r o w n he a rths. T h e r e is one big thing th a t w e can do for o u r cou ntry, our people, a n d our O rd e r. W e can train a b r o a d m in d e d , liberal, tolerant, forew ardthinking nucleus for the next g e n e ra ­ tion. M o s t of us w ho entered the Rosi­ c ru c ia n O r d e r as a dults had to re­ e d u c a te ourselves painstakingly. W e h a d to c h a n g e our thinking processes a n d o u r emotional reactions. W e had to c h a n g e radically our attitu d e tow ard life. W e can train the children to live th e Rosicrucian life naturally, to be le a d e rs in their spheres of action, to be the b e a re rs of light in their circles.

N T H E S E trying times it is n e c e s­ sa ry t h a t w e b e interested in s o m e ­ thing bigg er th a n self - developm ent. P ray, do no t m is­ u n d e r s ta n d m e. I am perfectly aw a r e of the truism th a t if each in di­ vidual in a c o u n try could be m ade in ­ d e p e n d e n t , m ost of the problem s of the nation w o uld be solved. O u r age is at the crossroad s. M o d e rn civilization, particularly m odern dem ocratic ideals, are being challen ged . All th o u g h t of self must be cast aside. H u m a n ity m ust come first. Do w e w a n t to see modern civiliza­ tion collapse as did ancient Babylon a n d Rome? M u s t n a tu re begin the long, slow, u p w a rd march again? A re there not enough decent, kindly, unselfish people r e a d y to sacrifice all th at th e y have a n d a re to salvage the ideals of compassion, generosity, a n d an u n d e r ­ sta n d in g a n d forgiving sy m p a th y so p atiently ta u g h t b y the a v atars of G od? W e shall no t mention the u n s p e a k ­ able horrors, the nameless brutalities, a n d the unbelievable atrocities. T h e problem is to keep the frightful p lague of h ate from spreading. H o w shall the poison be kept from corrupting the g row ing generation? T h in k o f s a t u ­ rating the minds of little children with vile slander, with race hatred, a n d r e ­ ligious prejudice.
F our h u n d re d fo r ty - s e v e n

O u r civilization could be tra n sfo rm e d over night, could w e bu t reach the chil­ d ren in the p ro p e r w a y . T o train th e necessary teachers, to c h a n g e the m e th ­ ods o f e ducation, to w in over school boards, principals, a n d preju diced citi­ zens, is a slow, uphill task, p a rt of the entire problem o f s p re a d in g divine W i s ­ dom. T h e re fo re , w e m ust begin w ith o u r ow n children. W e m u st begin tod ay. W e m ust m ake spiritual pioneers of our boys a n d girls. Let us c o n c e n tra te o n o u r Y o u th groups. W e w a n t as m a n y o f the chil­ dren o f our m em bers a s c a n possibly be reached. If th e re is n o g ro u p in y o u r community, o rg a n iz e o n e immediately. W e kn ow th a t R osic ruc ia n p a re n ts are educating their c hildren a t home in the R osicrucian principles. B u t g ro u p in­ struction is b e tte r. T h r o u g h the g ro u p the child learns to tra n s la te Rosicrucian ideals into the term s o f actual living situations. O u r ch ild re n d r a w n from all s tra ta of A m e rica n life m u st come to ­ gether, get a c q u a in te d w ith each other, a n d learn to like each other. T h e y m u st learn to be to le r a n t of differing creeds, nationalities a n d races. P rejudice, intol­ erance, a n d discrim ination m ust be n ip ­ ped in the b ud . O u r c h ildren m ust learn to a b h o r these u g ly a ttitu d e s a s th e y w ould leprosy. L ove m ust become p a r t of their soul equipm ent. M a n y p a r e n ts w h o a re n ot m em bers of the O r d e r will h a v e n o objection to having their c hildren join th e y o u th groups. T h e y o u th g ro u p s a re a vital p a rt o f the O r d e r . T o build up one of these groups is o n e o f th e m ost signifi­ c an t tasks th a t y o u c an u n d e rta k e , not only for the benefit o f th e O r d e r b u t also for the benefit o f the co un try . T h is task a t p re se n t is so essential th a t 1 w ould implore each a n d e v e ry one of you to find a child to s e n d to the T o rc h b e a r e r s ' grou ps. D o n o t let the groups become too larg e so th a t the in ­ timate spirit b e tw e e n le a d e r a n d m em ­ b er is lacking. B r e a k u p a la rg e g roup into smaller groups, a n d let m ore m em ­ bers volunteer to ta k e c h a r g e o f them. E n c o u ra g e com petition b e tw e e n the groups. Intelligent ch ild re n are e x tr a ­ The R o s ic r u c ia n ordinarily receptive. T h e y have no p r e ­ judices to overcom e. T h e i r minds a re D ig est open. T h e y long fo r loving a n d inspir­ J a n u a ry ing leadership. T h e i r e n th usiasm is easily aroused. T h e y tak e a keen inter­ 1939

est in the Rosicrucian principles, a n d th e y a re fascinated by the exercises. It is a jo y to w atch their minds develop, th e ir souls grow u nder y o u r v e ry eyes. T h e education given in o u r schools t o d a y is too n a rrow ly practical. I n ­ spiration is missing. T h e r e a re so m a n y tabo os, rules, a n d regulations th a t in m a n y sc h o o ls education h a s become formalistic, factual, a n d materialistic. In o u r efforts to avoid the p re ju d ic es of e v e ry g roup in our com m unity, w e r a ­ tionalize or b end b ac k w a rd s a n d e m a s ­ cu la te o u r school system of all idealism. T h e r e is no strong system o f c h a ra c te r tra in in g . T h e r e is n o definite m e th o d of inculcating high ideals a n d a ltruism of c h a ra c te r. W e A m erican s still w o rsh ip m aterial success. W e h ave n o t w h o le ­ h e a rte d ly accepted a spiritual in te rp re ­ ta tio n of life. C h ild re n 's potentialities a re ignored. C h ild re n ’s individual n eeds a re n o t considered. T h e ste am -rolle r process is a p p a re n t in every la rg e public school. Society is equally indifferent. F r o m the Rosicrucian view point, both school a n d society a re lacking. L e t u s sup ply the missing elements. L e t u s m ake the effort w ith o u r y o u th g ro u p s. F o r th a t p u rp o se w e n e e d the w h o le h e a rte d cooperation o f all the m o th e rs a n d ed ucators in the O r d e r . W e n e e d the cooperation likewise of o u r m en. E d ucation is a vital m a tte r for b oth m en a n d w omen. If n e c e ssa ry , w e shall w o rk out a n e w course o f in stru c ­ tion for o u r children correlating lite ra ­ ture, art, music, science, histo ry , bio­ g ra p h y , a n d psychology. W e shall give them c h a ra c te r training. W e shall in­ culcate a lofty idealism. W e shall give them a b ro a d b a c k g ro u n d of culture. W e shall train them for service in the c o m m u n ity and in the O r d e r . W e shall tra in them to be channels for divine in­ spiratio n. W e w a n t o u r c h ildren to be lovers of t h e arts, to b e lovers of the b e s t t h a t w a s ever th o u g h t o r a c c o m ­ plished in the world. W e w a n t them to live th e good life n a tura lly from p e r s o n ­ al incentive. W e w a n t them to c a r r y civilization one step fo rw a rd . W e need a r d e n t souls, eager to serve m an kind . W e n e e d enthusiastic children to w hom th e w e lfa re of the w o rld is of gre a te r c o n ce rn th a n their o w n p e rs o n a l a d ­ v a n c e m e n t. W e w a n t altruistic souls, e a g e r to dedicate them selves to a g re a t cause, impatient to th ro w them selves
F o u r hundred fo rty -e ig h t

into the thick o f the fight, bu rning to stam p ou t w r o n g a n d to hold the torch of civilization aloft. If there w e re some w a y to s t a r t a g r e a t Y o u th movement! If w e could a ro u se the e n th usia sm of o u r Y o u th for peace, fellowship, service, a n d the dem ocratic ideals for w hich men like T h o m a s Jefferson, Benjam in F ran klin , a n d A b ra h a m Lincoln stood! A t least, let us begin in th e rank s of the O r d e r . Let us b egin w ith the children of our o w n m em bers. Let us tak e a renew ed interest in the T o r c h b e a r e r groups. Let us in a u g u r a te a cam paign in o u r own com m unity. Invite the p a re n ts to visit th e groups. Let them observe a lesson. Let the c hildren p re p a re p ro g ra m s illus­ tratin g w h a t th ey learn. Let them have their o w n choirs, a n d let them a r r a n g e their o w n social events. C h ild re n tra in e d in Rosicrucian p r in ­ ciples w o u ld be proo f a g a in st all p r o p a ­ g an d a , w o u ld be uninfluenced by vicious n e w sp a p e rs or moving pictures, and w o u ld ho ld th eir o w n in the conflicting cu rren ts o f th o u g h t in the world. T h e y w ou ld n o t lose y e a rs in h a p h a z a r d and aimless drifting. T h e y w ould n o t go a s tra y b e c a u se of w ro n g philosophies a n d w o rth le ss viewpoints. T h e y w o uld k n o w th e re a so n for their existence in the w orld , a n d they w o uld go ab o u t their tasks energetically. W e teach them the fath e rh o o d of G o d a n d the b r o th e r ­ hood of m en. W e teach them the basic similarities in all religions. W e teach them th a t all the religious teachers a n d leaders in the w o rld are fellow w o rk e rs in the L o r d ’s v in eyard . W e teach them the c onstructive life a n d the h a b it of positive th o u g h t. W e teach them the b e a u ty of peace a n d kindliness a n d gentleness. W e teach them high ideals of citizenship a n d the highest s ta n d a r d s of friendship. W e w o uld create the dream t h a t the y o u th fu l A K H N A T O N h a d more th a n five th o u sa n d y e a rs ago — a sta te d e d ic ate d to the service of God and M an. Better th a n time spent in acquiring psychic p o w ers is w inn in g a child. V

B etter than exercises a w a k e n in g p re ­ m aturely p ow ers t h a t w e c an no t control is training a child. S u p e rio r to overrapid ad v a n c e m en t for ourselves is helpinq the new q e n e ra tio n to be better than the last. W e h ave po in te d o u t several fields of service for th e c a rr y in g out of Cosmic plans. A t the C o n v e n tio n w e spoke of music, both s tu d y in g music a n d s p r e a d ­ ing the love of music. N o w comes a n ­ oth e r g re a t ta sk — w in n in g o u r youth. Let us all c o o p e ra te w ith the brothers a n d sisters w h o a r e a lr e a d y eng a g e d in the beautiful task. L e t us show an in­ tense interest in w h a t th e y h av e already accomplished. T h in k of the j o y of training our y o u n g folks to g ro w stra ig h t, u nw a rpe d mentally or em otionally. T h in k of the miracle of a g e n e ra tio n un touched by prejudice or the slime of a c orrupt e n ­ vironment. T h i n k of evil destro yed at th e root. T h in k o f prejud ice a n d dis­ crimination c u t off a t th e source. E n ­ courage o u r y o u th g r o u p s in every way. Let them use the b o o k s in our ch ap ter libraries. P r e p a r e little treats o r su r­ prises for them. T a k e them in g roups to see inspiring p lay s a n d pictures a n d to h e a r inspiring co ncerts. G ive them o p­ portunities to m a k e life-long friends. G ive them o p p o r tu n ity to express th em ­ selves. T h e y c an h e lp sp re a d Rosicru­ cian ideas effectively, bo th in a n d o ut of the school room. T h e y can set a high s t a n d a r d of speech a n d con duct w h e r ­ ever they go. Let us see w h a t e v ery chapter can ac ­ complish betw e e n n o w a n d the A nnual C onvention. Let us see if the m em ber­ ship of children c a n be doubled. Since the m eetings are h eld o n ly once in two w eeks, a tte n d a n c e will in n o w a y inter­ fere with o th e r activities. Let us pool the fruits of o u r e xperien ces so th a t we can build up th e finest child-training program 'in the w o rld . If A m erica is destined to lead th e w a y , then the chil­ dren of to d a y m u s t b e trained to be the ty p e of citizen t h a t A m erica needs for tom orrow. V V

O u r w h o le social life is in essence b u t a long, slow striving for the victory of justice over fo rce.— John G a lsw o rth y .
F o u r h u n d r e d fo r ty - n in e

The Romance of Love
By T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand M aster
O M E T I M E S life a p p e a rs so tra­ gic that only the lam entations of a J e r e m i a h or t h e d e s p a i r of a Job can adequ ately e x ­ press its woe. A s the poet S h e l l e y cried: "I fall upon the thorns of life. I lift our eyes from the thorns to the rose of life. L et us drink in its intoxi­ cating perfum e, its glorious b eauty a n d color. T h e s o rro w s of life m ay be the thorns, b u t love is the beauteous rose, the p earl of g re a t price, the magic elixir. Love is m ore th a n doing kind deeds, being harm less, a n d exercising com pas­ sion. T h e s e qualities, as w e know, are indispensable to a noble character. T h e r e is a love, however, th a t is akin to ecstacy, th a t is positive a n d creative, th a t w r a p s the whole soul in flame a n d that m akes o n e feel a s G o d m ust h av e felt in the h o u r th a t H e created the world. T h i s love th at lifts one to the stars, th a t m a k e s the n ig h t r a d ia n t with beau ty , th a t m akes the feet long to dance a n d the voice to sing, lies slum ­ bering in the h e a r t of every hu m an b e ­ ing. T h i s un c onditioned love m other a n d child feel for each other. Boys and girls in their first rap tu re experience it. A few g r e a t souls have felt it in their hearts for th a t great o rp h a n H u m a n ity . W a r s a n d kings a n d victories are com ­ pletely forg otten , b u t th e g re a t lovers of the w orld a re fam ed in so ng a n d story. T h e fu n d a m e n ta l im pulses of the h u ­ m an being c a n n o t be p e rm a n e n tly su p ­ pressed. T h e y seek o u tle ts w h e n legiti­ mate c ha n ne ls a re denied . T h e more strenu ou s the s upp ression, the more vio­ lent will be the final eruption. Sublim a­ tion is possible b u t difficult. T h e re fo re let us take to h e a r t th e ancient injunc­ tion to k n o w ourselves. Let us r e g ard ourselves calme t a n d objectively. Let us bleed." L ly u s tear off the m ask of co nv entio n a n d t r a ­ dition, a n d let us seek th e child of G o d w h o lives for love a n d b e a u ty , w ho is at home in all the w o rld , w h o is o n friendly terms w ith b ird s a n d b e a s ts a n d flowers, w h o is r a d ia n t w ith joy, w h o has pierced the veil of w o rld ly illusion. All the w o rld loves a lover. Rom ance never loses its a p p e a l. T h e most p o p u ­ la r son gs a r e th e love so ng s. T h e m o st po pu lar pictu res a r e s w e e th e a rt stories. W h o re ally c ares for a love sto ry th a t does not h av e a h a p p y ending? W h o can resist the im pulse to glance a t the last p age first to see w h e th e r difficulties are a d ju ste d? T h e n o n e gains courage to re a d th e rest. P e o p le w h o m aintain th a t traged ies a re realistic a n d rom ances are but fairy tales a n d avenues of escape, h a v e su c c u m b e d to a defeatist outlook upo n life. P i ty the prosaic in­ dividual w h o h a s o n ly a n indulg ent smile for rom ance. H e is old before his time. H e has n ot c a u g h t th e spirit of eternal youth. A m an s h o u ld b e in love with life till the v e ry last h o u r a n d even b e ­ yond. T h e r e is no re a so n for a m an to grow old befo re he h a s even b egun to

[89]

live. T h e fact th a t old ag e is decrepit is an accusation a g a in s t our civilization a n d o u r entire ou tloo k upon life. O ld age sho uld be a se c o n d blossoming, g a y a n d cheerful. It is said th a t N in o n de L ’Enclos fa scina te d men even a t the a g e of ninety. Such a n old age is tru ly a d mirable — a p e r p e tu a l youth, enriched with all the w isdom a n d all the ex p e ri­ ences g a rn e re d from the ye a rs, very u n d e rsta n d in g a n d tolerant, y e t w ith a divine h u m o r a n d the h ea rt of a child. W h e r e c a n w e find this beautiful love that is im m ortalized in song a n d story? W h y do w e seek rom an ce in moving pictures, in novels a n d in p op ular songs? W h y a re w e re lu c ta n t about seeking its response in h u m a n beings? H u m a n r e ­ lationships are m a r r e d b y m a la d ju s t­ ment, m isu n d e rsta n d in g , a n d strain. U niversities give courses on h o w to get along w ith people a n d on h ow to im ­ prove m arital relationships. C h u rc h e s have op ened psy chiatric clinics. Q u e s ­ tionnaires a r e d istrib u te d to discover w h a t facto rs m ake for h ap piness a n d un h a p p in e ss in m arriage. E la b o r a te statistics a r e d r a w n up ta b u la tin g r e ­ sults. In one of th e se surveys it w a s d is ­ covered t h a t a h a p p y tem p eram ent th a t does not take offense easily is of prim e importance. T h i s factor p ro ved more essential th a n social b a c k g ro u n d , in­ come, a n d religious affiliations. M a n y people a re of the opinion th a t h a p p in e ss is impossible w ith o u t freedom from financial difficulties. Y e t no one will deny th at people w h o have economic se ­ curity become d e sp o n d e n t, suffer from melancholia a n d even commit suicide. W h a t is the cause? M a n y factors are involved, n o do ubt, b u t the chief one is the lack of love a n d faith. T h e r e a re o r ­ ganizations for w o m e n alone a n d for men alone. T h e r e a r e very few w a y s in the a v e ra g e city for men an d w o m e n to become a c q u a in te d with each other. M a n y m en th in k it time eno u g h to m arry w h e n th e y reach m iddle-age. T h e n th e y m a r r y girls y o u n g e n o u g h to be their d a u g h te r s . T h e s tr e n g th of you th h a s been s q u a n d e r e d . T h e e b b ­ ing life is given to their wives a n d their The R o s ic r u c ia n children. A girl is cautioned th a t a m an must be able to provide for h er. H e D ig est must come from th e right family a n d A p ril belong to th e r ig h t church. In the m e a n ­ 1939 while, the y e a rs slip by. a n d if n e u r ­

a sth e n ia does no t result, th e emotions g r o w cold. T o enter m arriage in this cool, p r a c ­ tical, calculating spirit is a trav e sty . T o ignore utterly the call o f th e h e a r t is u n ­ n a tu ra l. If m arriage tu rn s into a w e a ry squirrel-cage existence, if o n e d re a r y y e a r follows a n o th e r, if fru stra tio n a n d disillusionment creep in, it is evident th a t genuine love w a s lacking. I n n u m e r­ a ble difficulties in m o d e rn social life w o u ld d isa p p e ar if m en a n d w om en so u g h t their h ap piness in each o th e r a n d cherished genuine love for each other. T h e eternal trian g le is still th e b e s t — h u sb a n d , wife, a n d child. T h e s e divinely instituted relation ships a re th e m ost s a t ­ isfying, the m ost soul fulfilling, the sources of perp etual joy, a n d the fo u n ­ tain of eternal y o u th . E v e n th e stern puritan poet, John M ilto n , sa id th a t P a ra d ise w a s the love o f h u s b a n d a n d w ife w hen clasped in each o t h e r ’s arm s. T h e m ost beautiful gifts in th e w o rld m a y be h a d for the a sking; n a y , a re w o n b y giving. T h e atm osph e re of the a v e r a g e h o u s e ­ hold w ou ld be com pletely c h a n g e d if the spirit of ro m an ce w e r e p e rm itte d to enter. R om eo a n d Juliet n e e d n ot be im ­ m u re d on the cold p rin te d p a g e n o r rele­ g a te d to the s ta g e of m ake-believe. T h e y can symbolize m arrie d love as well a s love’s y o u n g d re a m . C h ristin a Rossetti e xp ressed the se ntim e n t in a c harm in g couplet: " I f I w e r e a queen, w h a t w o u ld I do? I w o u ld make yo u m y king a n d w a it on y ou ." T h e spirit of rom ance c an glorify the hum blest home, lift to th e s ta rs the hum blest couple, tra n s f o r m th e m ost sordid environm ent. T h e spirit o f r o ­ m ance is v ery precious. Like the m o rn ­ ing glory it opens its h e a r t o n ly to the sun. It m ust be n o u r is h e d w ith daily acts a n d w o rd s o f love. L ove never w earies of loving. It m ust seek the w e l­ fare of the beloved. A place m u st be m ade for it in y o u r life. Y o u m ust be r e a d y to devote time a n d e n e r g y to keep the lamp of love b u rn in g . A m an w'ill immerse himself w h o lly in bu siness, r e ­ serving no time for c o m p anion ship w ith w ife a n d children. A w o m a n will plan a w h o le pro gram of activities w ith no consideration for h e r h u s b a n d ’s n eeds a n d preferences.

f90]

4

T h e ho m e is as im p o rtan t as the ofnce. T h e love of w ife a n d child should be c h e rish e d as d ev o te d ly as the g oo d­ will of the em ployer. A m an has no rig h t to e n te r into m a rria g e in a wholly utilitarian spirit, p r o m p tly relegating home, w ife, a n d child to secon d or even the last place in his life. T h e same criti­ cism ho ld s tru e for th e w ife, of course. I t is w r o n g for h e r to e n te r into m a r ­ ria g e solely for the p u rp o s e of having a h om e in w h ic h to e n te rta in her friends, to sh o w th e w o rld t h a t she, too, can win a h u s b a n d , o r to h a v e a fa th e r for her child. M o s t m a rria g e s w ith m utual ef­ fort can g r o w into a w a rm , harm onious relationship. It is possible to salvage a m a rria g e if even o n e m a k e s a supreme effort a n d sacrifice, s tu d y in g th e n a tu re of the u n re sp o n siv e m a te a n d using every lu re to a w a k e n the d o rm a n t em o­ tions. If y ou m a inta in u n w ea ried ly the emotional tone th a t y o u desire, you will find e ve ntua lly th a t y o u r w hole environ­ m en t resp o n d s. T h e s u rro u n d in g vibra­ tions a t la st harm on ize w ith yours. T h is co nsu m m atio n m a y ta k e m a n y years, I adm it. T o th e one to w hom cut-anddried relatio nships a re u nend u ra b le , it is a p rize w o r th striving for. T r u e love is recognition of soul beau ty . T r u e love is unaffected by time o r circum stance o r o u tw a r d pomp. T r u e love k n o w s no w earin ess, n o r sad patiety. T o tru e love th e face of o n e ’s m ate is e v er d e a r a n d beautiful. T o true love th e belo ved is ever desirable. T r u e love m e a n s com panionship. T r u e love m eans g en tle speech, consideration, a n d a tte n tio n to th e little th in g s th a t delight a lover's he a rt. T r u e love tu rn s the hum blest meal into a sa c ra m e n t a n d a sacred com m union. T r u e love makes the h u m b le st life a s precious a n d as valuable a s the gold a n d ivory a n d the precious sto n e s th a t the Q u e e n of Sheba b r o u g h t to the g r e a t King Solomon. T r u e love is n ot a s h a m e d to u tte r loving w o rd s th a t w a rm the b e lo v e d ’s heart, to

smile even w h e n affairs are pressing heavily, a n d t r a g e d y itself is in the offing. T h a t w o m a n is blessed w hose throne is her h u s b a n d ’s h e a rt. T h a t m an is blessed w h o sees in his w ife the girl of his d ream s. T h a t couple is blessed to w hom hom e is a h a v e n of peace a n d a f ­ fection, a refu ge to w hich they n a tu rally and instinctively tu rn . S u ch a m arriage, such a home, p re a c h a serm on m ore po w erful th a n w o rd s . T h e y o u n g p e o ­ ple look a t such a couple a n d a re in ­ spired to m a r r y a n d to m a rry yo un g. T h e y le a rn in th e m o st beautiful a n d most n a tu ra l w a y in the w orld w h a t true happiness a n d love are. T h e w a rm th of such love r a d ia te s th ro u g h a n entire com munity. Riches m a y disap pear, you th m a y fade, a n d p o w er m a y vanish, but love th a t is a n attrib u te of G o d H im self exists forever. T r u e love does n o t p la y with hearts. T r u e love is no t selfish a n d brutal. T r u e love is n atu ral, w holesom e, sincere, a n d uplifting. T h e touch of tru e love ele­ vates. It n e v e r d eg ra d e s, n o r d isparag es, nor humiliates. Let us em brace the joys th a t G o d b e sto w e d . Let u s rekindle th e a r d o r of love. Let us sum m on the spirit of ro m a n c e to o u r aid. Let us see H e a v e n once more in our belov ed's eyes, let us thrill on ce m ore a t our belov ed 's touch. L et us fo rg e t the y ea rs a n d be you ng once more. T h e sw iftest a n d the surest p a th to G o d is th e p a th o f Love. W h e n love reigns suprem e, service a n d devotion a re a joy a n d given unp rem e d ita te d ly . Love raises t h e vibrations, love aw a k e n s th e intuitions. Love unlocks the secrets of natu re. Love rescues the sheep th a t a re gone a s tr a y . Love creates w o rld s in its o w n im age o f b e a u ty a n d delight. Love makes every d a y a S o n g of Songs. O h u n g r y h e a rts o f th e w orld, fill y o u r souls with love of b e a u ty , love of life, love of y o u r fellow men, a n d love of G od .

V

V

V

M e n a re ta tto o e d with their special beliefs like so m a n y S o u th Sea Islanders; b u t a real h u m a n h e a r t w ith divine love in it beats w ith the sa m e glow u n d e r all the p a tte r n s of all e a r t h ’s th ou sa nd tribes. — O . I V . H olm es.
[91 ]

Our Democracy
B y T h o r K h m a l e h t o , S o v e re ig n G r a n d M a s t e r I T H E R T O it h a s been th e policy of th e R o sic ru c ia n O r d e r to r e f r a i n as fa r as possible from taking sides in political c o n tr o ­ versies. O u r a im h a s been to e d u ­ cate o u r members so th a t e a c h one m a y be a force for g o o d in his ow n sp h e re of action. T h e political situ atio n to d a y is fa r more serious th a n m a n y of o u r m embers r e a l­ ize. It is n ecessary, consequently, to state the R osicrucian po in t of view u n ­ equivocally th a t o u r m embers (in the U n ite d S ta te s ) m a y k n o w w h e re their d u ty lies. O u r c o u n try is pledg ed to democratic institutions. T h e D e c la ra tion of I n d e ­ pendence, th e Bill of R ig h ts a n d the C o nstitutio n with its a m e n d m e n ts h ave estab lish ed dem ocratic principles as the fo un datio n of our governm ent. T h a t there a re deviations from th e dem ocratic ideal in variou s p a r t s o f o u r cou ntry is obvious. A s long a s dem ocracy is our ideal, how ever, there is a possibility th a t th ese blem ishes on th e n ational esc u tc h ­ eon will b e erased. O u r simple d u ty as citizens, w h e t h e r na tiv e -b o rn o r n a tu r a l­ ized, is to be loyal to the principles of o u r go vern m en t a n d to try to bring f bout c a n 9 e,S ,t h l o u 9h . ^ lh lution, n o t th ro u g h revolution. It is the d u ty of officials of the g ov ernm ent to c a r r y out th e law s of o u r c o u n try in the dem ocratic spirit in w hich these la w s w ere conceived. I t is th e d u ty of the schools to p re p a re th e y o u t h of th e c ou ntry to take th eir places in a d e m o ­ cratic society w h e n th e y step ou t of the schoolroom. I t is the d u ty of o u r social a n d religious agencies to b e vig ila n t in the protection a n d p ro m u lg a tin g of dem ocratic principles. T h e Cosm ic law is th a t w e o w e a genuine loyalty to th e c o u n try in w h ic h w e live, a re edu cated , o r w hich w e have ado pted, a n d w hich g ave us th e privi­ leges a n d opp ortunities th a t w e enjoy. L oyalty, of course, does n o t imply a narro w , bigoted, su p e r-p atrio tic spirit th at is blind to the n e e d s a n d r ig h ts of other nations. It does m e a n how ever, th a t if our c o u n try is com m itted to democracy, w e hav e a b so lu tely no m oral rig h t to tr y to introdu c e s urreptitio usly fascism or communism, o r to h a m s trin g the efforts of c on gre ss to solve the difcult problems c o n fro n tin g o u r country, or, to be b r u ta lly fran k, to s ta b the P re sid en t in the back. N e ith e r fascism n o r com m unism is in h a rm o n y w ith the principles of dem oc­ racy. Fascism w o u ld re d u c e the la b o r­ ing class to serfdo m . Since H itle r cam e into pow er, the labo r u n io n s in G e r ­ m any w e re s m ash ed, th e w o rk in g ho u rs w ere increased, a n d w a g e s w e r e r e ­ d u c ed and living c o n dition s low ered. Fascism m akes its ap p ea l th ro u g h race h atred, religious intolerance, a n d b ru ta l oppression. C om m unism is b a se d on the economic in terp retation of h isto ry a n d atheistic materialism , b u t it does no t foster race h a tr e d n o r seek to d e g ra d e the w orking m a n a s does fascism. W h i l e our c o u n try is n o t com m itted to

The R o s ic r u c ia n . D ig e s t M ay 1939

[ 130]

a n y one religion, it definitely recognizes G o d as S up re m e Being. Com m unism rejects the principle o f priv ate p ro p e rty a n d profits. It is a form of g overnm ent possible only in a com m unity of men w h o se he a rts a re purified, w h o s e m o ­ tives a re w ho lly altruistic, a n d w h o no longer need a n y incentive for toil except the w e lfa re of their fellowm en. T h e o f­ ficers of the Soviet g o v e rn m e n t are b e ­ ginning, a fte r tw e n ty y e a r s of the e x ­ perim ent, to realize th e tr u th of this statem ent. Com m unism w h e n applied b y average hu m an b e in g s h a s been tra n sfo rm e d into a to talitarianism no different from th a t pre vailing in Italy or in G e rm a n y . Stalin is a d ictator. T h e appeal to fear is n ecessary, so bloody p u rg e s a n d concentration cam ps are r e ­ sorted to. D e m o c ra c y m eans t h a t w e accept every hum an being a s p a r t of the b ro th e rh o o d of m ankind. It is his in­ alienable right to w o r s h ip G o d in his ow n w a y . W h a t e v e r privileges a n d o p ­ portunities the c o u n try affords should be sp rea d a s w idely a s possible. E a c h m an must be p erm itted to rise to his o w n level. In a d em o c ra c y it is im p e ra ­ tive th a t every citizen c oo pe rate w ith his fellow-citizens a n d w ith th e g o v e rn ­ ment. Sectional a n d class interests are a d ang er. A ro usin g p re ju d ic e a n d race h a tre d on a n y p re te x t w h a ts o e v e r is a national crime. Id en tifying A m erica w ith a n y one group o r political p a rty in this c o u n try is u n -A m e ric a n . T h e a d ­ vertisem ents in o u r n e w s p a p e rs openly labeled " f o r C hristia n s o n ly ” a n d " P r o ­ te sta n ts o nly need a p p ly ” a r e a b so lu te ­ ly u n-d e m o c ia tic a n d u n - A m e r ic a n in spirit. H e w h o discrim inates will be d is­ crim inated against. A c o n siste n t A m e r ­ ican should make e v e ry effort to o ver­ come in his o w n h e a r t a n d soul p r e ­ judice, intolerance, a n d cruelty. H e should m ake every effort in his person al life to b r e a k do w n b a r rie r s of race, sect, color, a n d creed. T o raise ba rrie rs deliberately is to precipitate karmic conseq uen ces. T h e citizens of a dem ocracy m u s t n ot be labeled because of their race, color or creed. W e are all citizens o f th e g r e a t­ est republic in th e w o rld. W e a re participato rs in the g re a t A m e ric a n e x ­ periment. W e a re all p le d g e d to the

A m erican w a y of life. W e w a n t the great A m erican experim en t to succeed. T r u l y A m erican personalities a r e men like G e o rg e W a s h in g to n , T h o m a s Jef­ ferson, Benjam in F ranklin, a n d A b r a ­ ham Lincoln. T h e y are m en r e n o w n e d for their b ro a d h um anity, their m a n y sided interests, a n d their genu in e d em o ­ cratic spirit. N o t one w a s a dictator. N o t one ad v o c a te d or c o n d o n e d o p p re s­ sion a n d brutality as a political in stru ­ ment. E a c h one h a d the w e lfa re of the w hole c o u n try sincerely a t h e a rt. W o m ­ en like Jane A d d a m s of H u ll H ouse, S u sa n B. A n th o n y w h o d e d ic a te d her life to the cau se of w o m e n ’s suffrage, a n d E le a n o r Roosevelt w h o w o rk s a t her h u s b a n d 's side, a re typical of the A m e ric a n spirit. If w e w a n t A merica to rem ain dem o­ cratic, w e d a re n ot be o n ly tolerant. T o le r a n c e m ust be tra n s f o r m e d into friendship. Let o u r co un try , Q u a k e rlike, be a society of friends. Let us cultivate the good neig hb or spirit. Let us take the initiative in prom otin g g o o d ­ will a m o ng the religious g ro u p s in our com m unity. Let us e n c o u ra g e th e ministers, the rabb is a n d th e priests to ex c h a n g e pulpits. E n c o u ra g e th e m em­ bers of y o u r church to visit th e service in a c hurch of a different denom ination. Let us look for the basic similarities. Let us adm it th a t differences for the m ost p a r t are superficial. S urely, no m a tte r w h a t our partic u la r religion m ay be, a s good A m erican citizens, w e can unite on the platform of faith in a living G o d , faith in the b ro th e rh o o d o f all m an kind, a n d acceptance o f th e pledge in th e salute to the flag, " O n e nation indivisibJe w ith liberty a n d justice to all.” O u r P re sid e n t is the r ig h t m a n to lead our c o u n try in this crucial hour. H e believes in dem ocracy. H e w a n ts to fulfil his duties in the d em ocratic spirit. H e is in a position to see f a rth e r th a n the m ajo rity of people in th is cou ntry. H e is in touch w ith conditions n o t only in every section of this c o u n try b u t also in every p a r t of the w o rld. H e is in daily conference w ith ex p e rts in bo th natio nal a n d international affairs. T h e unem ploy ed m an interests him just as much as th e farm er a n d th e railroad m ag nate. D em ocracy is his platform by conviction.

[ 11] 3

M a n y of o u r citizens a re unable to estimate fairly the h u m an itaria n projects of our Pre sid e n t. T h e y re g a r d situations a n d policies entirely from the viewpoint of their personal interests. T h e y have no kn ow led ge of w orld affairs a n d do not see the relation ship betw een n a ­ tional a n d internatio nal events. T h e y cann ot see, for exam ple, h ow the defeat of the democracies th ro u g h o u t the w orld will menace th e existence of our dem oc­ racy. T h e y h a v e n o k now ledge of the forces w ork in g b e h in d the scenes. T h e y do not u n d e rs ta n d t h a t eternal vigilance is the price of liberty. L iberty m ust be dem an ded, d e f e n d e d a n d w on. T o be an intelligent citizen of a democracy, alertness, inform ation, a n d social m in d ­ edness are essential. N o other form of governm ent m akes su c h de m a nd s on the individual. L et us be frank w ith ourselves. A r e w e go od citizens? D o w e take o u r obligation seriously? D o w e u n d e rs ta n d th e issues a t stake in local a n d n atio nal a n d international a f ­ fairs? A re w e a w a r e of the disruptive forces a t w o r k in o u r country? D o yo u k n o w th a t o ver e ig h t h u n d red a n ti­ dem ocratic o rg a n iza tio n s are ready to u n ite to fo rm a d efin ite political p a rty in this c o u n try ? A s a R osicrucian, w h a t is y o u r re­ action to this challenge? D o yo u b e ­ lieve in the dem ocratic form of go vern ­ ment? A re y o u r e a d y to cooperate w ith the P re sid e n t in his efforts to pre v e n t the sp re a d of fascism? N o w is y o u r o p ­ portu nity to be a lead er in a crucial time. T a k e the initiative in prom oting go od ­ will. P re v e n t u n -A m e ric a n movements from gaining h e a d w a y . Be realistic a n d recognize th e fact th a t to permit such organizations to g r o w is to help dem oc­ ra c y commit suicide. Let us fo rg e t th e birthplace of our fathers a n d o u r g r a n d f a th e rs . W e a re immigrants all, A m e ric a n s all. L et us ap preciate the c u ltu re of every racial group. Let us see th e good in every r e ­ ligion. L et us a c k n o w le d g e the unique w o rth of ev e ry h u m a n being. T h e p r in ­ ciples of d e m o c ra cy a r e divine p rin ­ The ciples. T h e y w e re form ulated b y R o siR o sic ru c ia n crucians in the R osicrucian spirit. T h is D ig e s t republic w a s esta b lish e d according to M ay divine plan. L e t us b e channels of th e Cosmic in keeping the c h a ra c te r of our 1939

go vern m ent intact, in up ho ld in g the h a n d s o f our Pre sid e n t, a n d in co­ operating with him in his g r e a t h u m an i­ tarian enterprises. Let us consider the W . P. A . projects briefly. T h e y have received m ore u n ­ thinking criticism th a n a n y o th e r project for the public welfare. P e o p le s a y th a t ind u stry can a b so rb m a n y of the men a n d w om en w ork in g for th e W . P. A. T a k e the people on the th e a tre project, the music project, the da n c e p roject, the w rite rs ’ project, th e a r t a n d arch itecture project. C a n in d u stry a b so rb th ese peo­ ple? M u s t all our gifted w o r k in offices a n d in shops? T h e s e a r t p ro je c ts have built up a national culture. T h r o u g h them h u n d re d s of co m m unities have seen a rt exhibitions, w itn e sse d stage productions, h e a rd concerts, fo r th e first tim e; an d , in m any instances, p e rm a n e n t a r t galleries, com m un ity th e a tre s a n d orch e stra s have resulted from this initial inspiration. O n e such project. T h e F e d ­ eral A r t T h e a tr e , is n o w p a y in g its w a y in m any parts of the c o u n try a n d at times even m aking a profit (a s in the case of the C hic a g o p ro d u c tio n of T h e M ik a d o featuring a colored c a st) so th a t it m ay well become a n a sse t to the G overnm ent. F u rth e rm o re , p riv a te in­ d u s tr y can abso rb th ese p eop le only w h e n the public is r e a d y to spend m oney on p a intings a n d concerts a n d dance recitals a n d plays, th a t n o w are re g a rd e d as luxuries. O u r citizens are still too materialistic to con sid er th e arts essential to living. H o w ev e r, even in G reece, the home of b e a u ty , th e great w orks o f a r t w ere n ational p ro jects. In renaissance Italy, the g r e a t paintings w e re o rd e re d b y P rin ces a n d P re la te s of the C hurch. It is cruel to harn e ss Pe g a su s to a d r a y cart. S h all m an live on bre a d alone? If G o d th o u g h t fit to c reate b e a u ty in line, in form, in color, in sou nd , in m ovem ent, shall w e deign to consider the a rts as u n n e c e s sa ry or as luxurious? T h e spirit n eeds nou rish ­ m ent a s well as the b o d y . T h e W . P. A . projects a re the only o p portun ity for som e people to escape discrimination of race, creed, a n d color so prev alent in this cou ntry. A s long as o u r civilization is m a te rial­ istic a n d people a re selfish a n d greedy.

[132]

it will be ne c essa ry for the governm ent to step in to help the people w h o d o no t fit easily into our m achine age. T r u e dem ocracy does n ot mean th a t on ly the go-g etter, the business man, the sales­ m an, the in dustrialist have a chance to succeed. It m eans th a t every hum an being should h ave a place in the sun, an o p p o rtu n ity to exercise his divine gifts a n d faculties. T h e W . P. A . h a s a t ­ tem p te d to rectify the social a n d eco­ nomic crimes o f o u r b ru ta l age.

O u r P resid e n t is fighting h a r d ag ainst gre a t odds. H is enemies will stop at nothing in o rd e r to oppose him a n d in­ jure his reputation. G ive him a helping ha n d in his h o u r of trial. Let him know th a t w e u n d e r s ta n d him a n d a g re e with him. It is true th a t in every generation idealists have been m a rty re d . T o d a y let there be an exception. L et u s show more u n d e rs ta n d in g a n d help the b e a u ­ tiful dream of a truly public-spirited P re sid e n t to come true.

V

V

V

As One Human To Another
By F ra tb r

J. C.

L a f f e r ty , F.

R. C.

A I T , m y friend, put do w n y o u r gun a n d let us c o n ­ sid e r th in g s as th e y are, a n d not as w e h av e been le d to b e lie v e . W h y do w e h ate a n d desire to kill each other? O r do we? W h y do we go to w ar? A r e we dem ons spew ed from t h e b o w e l s o f the earth, to h a te , to kill a n d destro y, or a re w e so ns of G o d — P rin c e s o f the K in g d o m —b r o u g h t to e a rth to love, a n d laugh, a n d build a nobler universe? Com e, friend, w h a t is y o u r a n sw e r? A r e we n ot p ro ne to the sam e ills and w e aknesses of th e flesh? D o w e not suffer the sam e p ains a n d so rro w s, kn ow the same joys, the sam e desires to love a n d be loved? H a v e y ou n o t looked in w o n d e rm e n t upon a d a y 's d a w n in g , or sto od e ntra n ce d a t a su nset, k n o w n the stin g of M a r c h w in d s, b een d re n c h e d b y A pril rains, thrilled to th e first rob in 's song? D o w e no t ask th e same th in g s of life, a c hance to w o rk , play, love, a n d find a m ea su re of hap piness? T h e n w h y sh ou ld w e h ate a n d kill each other, a n d w h y sh ou ld w e go to w ar?

I'm sure if 1 w ere h u n g r y a n d knock­ ed a t y o u r door y ou w o uld give me to eat, a s I w o uld give to you, because I, too. h ave kn ow n h u n g e r. If I h ave more th a n enough of som ething y o u need, is there a reason I should not s h a re with you? W h a t m a tte rs w hich of us is strongest, which the w eakest? W e have s p r u n g from the sam e source, a n d w e are fated to descend into the sam e earth w h e n w e die. W h o know s, p erchance w e m a y lie d u m p e d to g e th e r in the sam e shallow grave. So w h y do w e hate a n d kill each other? W h y do w e go to war? N o m atter on w h a t soil o u r feet are plan ted, my friend, be it n orth , or south, o r east, o r w est, y ou a n d I a re still citi­ z en s of a g re a t nation, a c o u n try more v a s t — w e are in h a b ita n ts of th e earth. So h e re is m y h a n d , friend, ta k e it a n d try to u n d e r s ta n d th a t I d o n ’t hate or w a n t to kill y ou, b u t I do adm ire you fo r y o u r courag e a n d for w h a t you are. I kn ow from m y ow n experiences th a t in meeting th e challenge of life, you h ave w on m ore glorious battles th a n a n y we fight w ith gu ns. So w h y do w e go to w a r? F o r food, shelter, Jove, beauty, glory? H o w sh o u ld it be considered?

[ 133]

The Mystic W ay
A review by the Sovereign Grand Master, Thor Kiimalehto
W O of th e m ost p r o v o c a t i v e vol­ um es in the R osi­ c ru c ia n lib ra ry . “T h e T e c h n i q u e of th e M a s te r " a n d “T h e T ech­ n ique of the D is­ c ip le ," a re th e w o r k of the Bri­ tish G r a n d M a s ­ ter, Ra y mu n d A n d r e a . A third v o lu m e h as a p ­ peared, w o r th y o f a p la c e beside them. H is books a n d his articles have revealed him to be a g e n u in e mystic, w hose know ledge is d erived from perso nal e x ­ periences a n d a tta in m e n t. E v e ry w ord th a t he w rites is b o th en ligh ten in g a n d inspiring. “T h e M y stic W a y ” gives the R osi­ crucian stu d e n t th e p ro p e r orientation both to his stu d ie s a n d to his life. In ­ terest in the v ario u s b r a n c h e s of occult­ ism is w id e sp re a d to d a y . In fact, it is a n accepted p h ilo so p h y o f life. It is meeting a n e e d in m o d e r n life, p a rtic ­ ularly since the decline of the influence of the church. It is all th e more im­ p o rta n t, th e re fo re , t h a t ex a c tly w h a t mysticism m ea n s in term s of daily living a n d spiritual a s p ira tio n be know n. F irst of all, th e a u t h o r em phasizes the fact th a t mysticism is n o t m erely a n in­ The R o s ic r u c ia n tellectual in te rp re ta tio n o f life, it is a w a y of living life. D evelo pm ent, a d ­ D ig est vancem ent, a n d a tta in m e n t d e p e n d June w h olly on the e x te n t to w h ic h one suc­ 1939 ceeds in living the m ystic life. A soun d m ind in a sou nd b o d y is im perative. M a tu r ity of soul a n d w id e life-experience a re necessary for the a s p i r a n t to w o r k effectively in the w o rld. T h e s t u ­ d en t m ust be p re p a re d for a tr a n s v a lu a ­ tion o f values. H e m u st b e re a d y to r e ­ interpret his entire life-experience a n d Iife-expression according to th e d e ­ m and s of the m ystic w a y . “ T h i n k ho w w e a re h edg ed in b y w h a t w e believe, w h a t w e are, w h a t o th e rs th in k w e sho uld be; ho w w e w a tc h o u r go od nam e a n d re putation b ecause o th ers h av e given them to us, w ith w h a t a nim al ferocity w e fight to score a point, to w h a t lengths w e go to w in a little p r e s ­ tige, a n d w ithal, the p rid e w e h a v e in our self-righteousness. . . . T h e love of the soul w hich the c o n tem plativ e life a w a k e n s is a flaming sw o rd w h ic h d e ­ stro y s all this.” (p. 4 0 ) “T h e la w of the soul is indifferent to relative g o od ness, relationships a n d perso n a l r e p u ta tio n ." . . . . “ A n d if th e a spira tio n is stro n g a n d the will resolved, n o th in g else m a t­ ters; neither pain, n o r loss, n o r d is a p ­ pointm ent, ridicule o r a n y o th e r o bstacle o r h indrance, will deflect th e a s p ira n t's firm s te p a n d p ro g re ss o n th e m ystic w a y .” (p. 43) M ysticism is s h a rp ly d ifferentiated from pseudo-m ysticism . A n d r e a d e p r e ­ c ates in n o uncertain term s th e p h e n o ­ m ena associated w ith spiritualism , a u to ­ m atic w riting, a n d m edium ship. T h e s e psychic ph e n o m e n a m a y be gen uine, bu t th e y h av e no place in the life o f th e s tu ­ d e n t w h o se aim m ust b e to b ecom e s p ir ­ itually positive so th a t the divine fire in his ow n soul m ay a w a k e n a n d he be-

[174]

come susceptible to divine inspiration. D ifferent souls flower in different gifts, b u t the clim axing gift, acco rd in g to A n d r e a , is t h a t of inspired u tterance. W h y sh o u ld so few possess it? “ I t is b e ca u se th e person al life h a s n o t yet su r r e n d e r e d itself com pletely to the compulsive fire o f the inform ing soul. W h a t is lacking is the simplicity, the s e lf-a b a n d o n m e n t a n d th e divine p a s ­ sion o f th e soul r e su rre c te d from th e d a rk tom b of se lfh o o d .” (p. 54) T h e r e is n o difference b etw e e n m y s­ ticism a n d occultism. T h e y a re tw o a s ­ pects of th e sam e science, the sam e w a y of life. T h e form er is k n o w n as th e w a y of the h e a r t a n d the la tte r as th e w a y of the head . B oth are essential. L ove m ust be inform ed b y W i s d o m , a n d W i s d o m m ust b e h u m a n iz e d b y love a n d com ­ passion. M y s tic o r occult studies lead to " th e a w a k e n in g fire,” A n d r e a explains. “ H o w d o es the o pe ra tion of the tech ­ nique con d u c e to this aw a k e n in g ? T h e w o r k of th e a d v a n c e d soul in evolution establishes a claim u p o n su p e r-n a tu re , a n d u n d e r th e law of com p en satio n th a t claim is met. T h e r e m a y be no c o n ­ sciousness of claim o r r e w a r d , b u t the law reco gn izes the claim a n d th e re is re w a rd . T h e technique w o rk s from o u t the realm o f su p ern a tu re , a n d in the in­ tere st of its o w n efficiency it furnishes a basis of p o w e r a n d inspiration which en su re s th e a d v a n c e m e n t of itself. T h e mind, b rain , a n d n e rv o u s system cann ot of them selves give these. T h e y a r e the in stru m e n ts o f inspiration, n ot th e in ­ spiring a g e n t. T h e y m ust b e fortified b y the fiery essence of the indw elling spiritual self. A n d the d aily consecrated use of th e s e instru m e nts of th e self in th e w o r k o f raising a n d inspiring h u m a n life sp o n ta n e o u sly releases this essence.” (pp. 61-62) T h e disciple is like th e creative artist. H e is com pletely im bued w ith th e c re a ­ tive spirit. H e is ab le to think , sp eak a n d a c t w ith com plete im perso nality r e ­ g a rd in g issues th a t c o n fro n t him. T h is p o w e r o f d e ta c h m e n t is the creative soul w o rk in g according to spiritual tru th . A n o th e r q u a lity t h a t em erges in the a w a k e n in g soul is t h a t o f fearlessness. T h e fe arlessn ess of the disciple is com ­ plete indifference to a n y consequences w hich th re a te n him th ro u g h following his o w n light. A m a jo r e xp erience in

the evolution of th e soul is th a t kn ow n a s " th e D a r k N i g h t . ” It a w aits every m an w h o a p p r o a c h e s th e indwelling fire of G o d. It is a tim e w h e n all th a t a m an has g ained seem s to fall a w a y . It is a time w h e n h u m a n n a tu r e is perfected thro u g h suffering. I t enables him to iden tify h im s e lf u n d e r s t a n d s g l y with all stru g g lin g life. T o d a y h u m a n life is steep ed to such a n e x te n t in distress a n d suffering, d isillusionm ent a n d perp lexity th a t the d a r k n ig h t is descen ding u p o n a ho st of souls, u n d e r Karmic decree a n d for a special p u rp o se instead of up on a few as in form er times. T h e y will be called into th e light of a la rg e r service to am eliorate w ith com pleted experience a suffering w o rld . In real discipleship th ere is u n d e rs ta n d in g response to all. T h a t is the mission o f the d a r k night, w h a te v e r form it ta k e s in the individual life to reach it. It is th e m ystical p artici­ pation of the soul in the w orld. It is a term of som e du ration for the pe rson a lity is tried in its m ost v u ln e r­ able p a r t a n d rebels a t th a t w hich it h a s evoked. W h a t e v e r c h a n g e s th e p u r g a ­ tion o f th e d a r k n ig h t m a y w o r k in him, one c a rd in a l v irtu e will emerge, the spirit of m ystic love. T h e disciple m ust be the e x p o n e n t o f love. D u rin g the term o f the d a r k n i g h t w e seek in vain w ith o u t fo r con solatio n or assistance. W e a re left alone to find our o w n w a y . It is no t a to k e n o f s tre n g th a n d devel­ o p m en t to r e st u p o n others. T h a t is w h a t th e d a r k n ig h t h a s to teach us. A s difficult a n d a s d ra stic a s this experience m ust be, y e t is it a spiritual privilege offered to th e few for w hich th e m a n y on th e w a y a r e n o t y e t ready. T h e v e ry h e a r t o f th e m ystic w a y is love. Love o p e n s all doors. It is th e o n ly k e y to o th e r souls. T h is a ttitu d e o f living in a n d w ith o th e r souls develops in the disciple a n insp iration al inclusive­ ness, givds a n u n e rrin g insight into their p sy c h o lo g y a n d inspires him to rig h t th o u g h t a n d actio n in th eir behalf. T h e term im personal love is u se d m uch in mystic literature. I t h a s been misin­ terpreted. “ If th e re is a n y th in g this w o r ld n eeds it is love, p e rs o n a l love, th e Jove o f C h rist. H i s love w a s person al e no ug h. T h e im personal love of m a n y h a lf -e d u c a te d a s p ir a n ts is g ro u n d e d upo n a refined selfishness o r a r e p r e ­ hensible se lf-rig h teo u sn e ss . . . . or a n

[175]

ab je c t fear to express w h a t throbs a n d a c h e s w ithin their o w n h e a rt.” (p. 88) T h e divine fire w o rk in g w ithin, h o w ­ ever, will release the disciple from all inhibitions a n d th e soul will love after its own Jaw, san ely, sublimely, intelli­ g e n tly a n d inclusively. T h e term mystical participation is frequ ently u se d in reference to the life of the disciple. It m e a n s spiritual identi­ fication w ith the w o rld of men a n d p e r ­ h a p s with the w o rld o f n a tu re , too. It is n o t sentim ental em otionalism. T h e r e are tw o types of pa rticipation — negative a n d positive. T h e disciple m ust be far too m anifestly sane, practical a n d u n ­ d e rsta n d in g in all his co n ta c ts to be c o n ­ sid e re d ab no rm al or pathological in o r d e r to meet the ex a c tin g exigencies of his time. T h o s e w h o a r e capable o f this ty p e of discipleship a r e n e eded . O ne of th e chief h in d ra n c e s is fear. W h y should a disciple be a f r a id to express w h a t is in him? P a rticipa tio n in hu m an life, an intimate co n ta c t w ith its p e r ­ plexities, sorro w , a n d suffering is the o n ly w a y to th a t d e p th a n d fullness of n a tu re w hich m akes a disciple the friend of souls. H e m ust be s tro n g enough to go forth a n d e n te r into o th e r lives with a wise fo rgetfu ln ess of himself. H o w m a n y a sp ira n ts , A n d r e a asks, realize th a t w h e n ente rin g up on the novitiate o f th e m ystic w a y , they are a ctually in training for a spiritual c a m ­ paign? H o w m a n y k n o w th a t th e y are c a n d id a te s for a life o f ordeal a n d battle? C h rist, for exam ple, w a s a w a r ­ rior of the first m a g n itu d e . T h e h um il­ ity, gentleness, a n d com passion of C h r is t w e love to dw ell u p o n . . . . bu t th a t is on ly one a s p e c t of his manifold n a tu r e a n d m aste rh o o d , a n d alone w o uld never h av e fulfilled H is mission. H is a u ste rity o f speech a n d directness of action, H is unqualified utte ra n ce s of rebuke a n d criticism, H is sw ift exposure o f subtle a n d h id d e n influences w o rking a g a in st him, a n d H is cool indifference to all consequences, give a vivid im pres­ sion of th e militant spirit e n g a g e d in conscious co m b a t w ith the principalities a n d po w ers a r ra y e d a g a in s t H im . If w e The accept one asp e c t of this g re a t c h a r­ R o sic ru c ia n acter, w e m ust a ccept th e others o r place D ig est H im in a false ligh t a n d deprive o u r­ June selves of h a lf its force a n d inspirational 1939 value.

B eethoven w a s a creativ e disciple, a n d th a t is w h y he p o ssessed a militant spirit. N o m an c an be a creative d is­ ciple or do m uch for the w o rld unless he h a s a m ilitant spirit. T h e love needed is the spirit of G o d in action . T h e scripture of mysticism is re p le te w ith militant terms. “ B e w a re of f e a r.” “ H o ld firm." " H a v e m a s te r y ." “A g a in a n d ag ain th e b a ttle m ust be fo u g h t a n d w o n ." W h y all these e x h o r ta tio n s to p re p a ra tio n for battle a n d to b a ttle it­ self if there a re not p o te n t a n d m enacing forces r a n g e d in th e w a y o f a d v an c e w hich require coolness, circum spection, toug hn e ss of fibre, c hallen ge a n d u n r e ­ lenting opposition to overcom e them? Shall a disciple fear to u tte r th e tr u th he know s b ecause he m ay give offense or in cu r the opposition o f little minds? T h e key no te of the disciple’s life is sanctified service. I t is th e o n e thing th a t b rings him n e a r to th e m aster, no m atter w h a t th e w o rld c ho oses to point as failings a n d shortcom in gs, a n d it is the one justification of him in th e eyes of the w o rld unseen. T h e disciple m ust learn to seek illu­ mination fro m his o w n soul. W h a t his ow n soul teach es him is of m ore value th a n the voices of a u th o rity or the dogm a of books. Q u ie tn e ss a n d recep­ tivity o f m ind perm it the so ul to teach. T h is is the m ystical q u ie tu d e spo k e n of in m ystic literature. T h e r e is a differ­ ence be tw e e n mystical q u ie tu d e a n d mental vacuity. T h e r e is also a vital difference betw e e n m ystical quietude a n d renunciation of life a n d its ob liga­ tions. " T h e disciple on th e w a y in the w e st considers it a d ish o n o rab le thing to ren oun ce circum stances to w hich he k n o w s h e is karmically b o u n d , a n d an u n p a rd o n a b le sin to r e p u d ia te th e ulti­ m ate relationships of perso nalities to w hich he k n o w s he m u s t re m a in true. N o e a rn e st a sp ira n t d o u b ts th e tr u th of this in his h e a rt n o m a tte r h o w difficult it m ay be to live. H e m ust n o t m ind the difficulty b u t a ccept it. H e will never realize th e mystical q u ietu d e of disciple­ ship until h e does. It is fo rtitu d e in cir­ cum stances th a t s e a r his so ul a n d p a ­ tience in accepting all t h e y entail in his life, a n d th a t will u n fo ld in him the true resign atio n of spiritual peace. T h e flower of m ystical q u ie tu d e g ro w s in

[176]

silence d u rin g the storm of the a sc e n t on the w a y .” (p. 135) A n d r e a closes on a note of challenge. T h e m ost im porta nt q u a lity n e e d e d in the disciple of to d a y is t h a t o f spiritual militancy. T h e forces of reaction a re in the sa d d le . W h e r e is the m ilitant mystic to c o n fro n t them? "In d e e d , it is a troubling th o u g h t t h a t for all the w id e ­ s p re a d interest in a n d following of the m ystic w a y in m a n y land s, all eyes a n d ears a re in te n t upo n th e b ru tish p e rs o n ­ alities o f b lo o d-m ind ed d ictators, a n d there is no t a single inspired apostle com bining in himself th e m a s te r q u a l­ ities of C h r is t a n d m an, w ith a m essage of such compelling force a s to seize up on a n d compel public opinion. I t is hum iliating to p o o r h u m a n ity t h a t with all its aspiration, b lind or enlightened,

to w a rd s the divine, there has n ot b een v o u c h sa fe d to it o n e m an of s u p e rh u m a n c h a ra c te r a n d p e rso n a lity a n d dynam ic forcefulness to s ta n d forth a n d a rre st th e action o f inso lent ty ra n ts w ho , w ith m achiavellian astuteness, tram ple up on th e soul a n d h o n o r of men. . . T h is is the n o te on w h ic h I close this book. A different n o te m ig h t d o more ho n o r to the mystic, b u t n o t to the common h e a rt of h u m a n ity in w h ic h the mystic m ust live. Y e t w e on th e w a y , even in o u r help lessn ess,m ay do som ething. W e can combine o u r th o u g h t forces into a n in ­ tense a n d m ilitant a n d living p o te n cy a g a in s t those w h o commit foul rapine in h ig h places a n d d e fra u d the sons o f men of their b irth rig h t, a n d resolve, in th e w o rd s of th a t illustrious son of freedom, to 'b ring their devilish m achinations to n a u g h t ’.” (pp. 141-142)

V

V

V

A n Invitation to Living
By F r a t e r C l a u d e B i d g o o d
O S T m en s p e n d a lifetime acquiring a n index of values. S e p a r a tin g r i g h t from w r o n g , gold from d ro s s ; p i­ g e o n - h o l i n g the go od m en a n d the bad. P h i l o s o p h y in ­ te rp re ts the un i­ v e rse b y analysis a n d s y n t h e s i s of the stre a m of c o n ­ sciousness, b ut the g re a te r v alu es of life d e fy the scalpel of th e mind. F in e a r t loses its virility b y critical in te rp re ta tio n a n d a g r e a t s y m p h o n y is not a p p re c ia te d by listening to o n ly a few ch ord s. T h e S o n g of S o n g s m ust be h e a rd in its e n tirety , if y o u w o u ld ca tc h the strain s of the u n d e rly in g m elo dy of G od . M a n lives in a w o rld o f symbols. T h e s e a r e in te rp re te d b y his conscious­ ness a n d c o n stitu te his w o rld of reali­ ties, b u t just a s a g re a t painting o r w o rk of music c o n v e y s an impression o f a n ethical ideal, y e t the m asterpiece itself is com posed of th e elements of ea rth , a n d is on ly a c o p y of the intangible e s­ sence, so it is w ith m a n 's realities. W e c a n n o t find th e "th in g in itse lf” b y se p a ra tin g " t h in g s as th e y a r e ” a n d then reassem bling th e puzzle. U p o n w h a t b a sis then, can w e c o n ­ stru c t a n a d e q u a te philosophy of life? Science offers us ceaseless activity; philosophy, a sq uirrel cage; fine art, alone, conceived in th e w om b o f the he a rt, offers us the premium of becom ing g re at b y im m ersing o u r personalities into the w o rld of universals. Let b e a u ty be o u r g uide a n d w e can turn this b u si­ ness of living into a fine art.

[177]

B

SANCTUM MUSINGS
M EM ORIES O F TH E LONG A G O

I
f

By

T

hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
w holly physical experiences of the first few m onths of life. S o rro w a n d care are erased in the co u rse of time. W e a re then able to sum m on up n e w courage a n d m ake a fresh sta rt. Burning re sen t­ ment, shame, a n g u ish are better for­ gotten th a n p e rp e tu a lly k ept in mind. It is easier to "forgive a n d fo rg e t” w hen w o u n d s a re he a le d b y th e balm of forgetfulness. M e m o r y is hampering. M e m o ry d e stro y s sleep a n d peace of mind a n d c asts a s h a d o w over perfect love. W h e n w e p a s s thro u g h an e x ­ perience, a n im press is left on the mind, on the nervo us sy stem , on the very soul. A n o th e r fact h a s b een a d d e d to our storehou se of inform ation. O u r point of view h a s been modified, if ever so slig ht­ ly. T h e im p o rta n t thing is th a t our lives have been en rich ed a n d th a t our c h a r ­ acters hav e been stre n g th e n e d . It is u n ­ necessary to b e a r pe rp e tu a lly in mind the endless stre a m of experiences. It is sufficient th a t th e y a re stored in the subconscious mind, available w hen needed. Y ou Jcnow th a t you must have toddled before you learned to walk. Y o u k n o w th a t yo u must h av e patiently practiced y o u r letters befo re you learned to w rite. It is eno u g h no w th a t you can w alk a n d w rite. P erfect m em ory dem a n d s a wellbalanced p e rso n a lity with sound mind, firm will a n d s te a d y control over the emotions. It d e m a n d s the ability to be impersonal a b o u t ourselves, to regard

N F I R S T le arning of r e i n c a r n a t i o n the stu d e n t n a t u ­ rally w o n d e r s at the course of his ow n developm ent. W h o w a s he in a previous in c a rn a ­ tion? W h e r e w a s he? W h y does he n o t rem em ber? P aul B r u n t o n in one of his bo oks describes a m e th ­ od u se d in the E a s t for re su rre c tin g memories of the past. T h e m e th o d is similar to th a t of psychoanaly sis. T h e s tu d e n t p a tie n tly traces b ack his m em o­ ries, one b y one. E ach d a y he goes b ack as far as he can. H e continues the p ro ­ cess for m onths, even for y e a rs . E v e n t u ­ ally the soul mem ory is a w a k e n e d , a n d pictures of the storied p a s t clearly a p ­ pear. P a u l B runton comments, h o w ­ ever, t h a t for practical p u rp o se s both m eth od a n d the result a re a w a s te of time. B e a r in m ind th a t the process of for­ ge tting is just as much a gift of k in dly n a tu re as rem em bering. H o w m uch does one rem e m be r of the immediate o r the rem ote past? T h e experiences o f the p r e - n a ta l period a n d of in fa n c y co m ­ pletely d ro p out of mind. N a t u r e closes the door th a t w e m ay not be h a m p e red in o u r daily living by rem ind ers of the

[ 303 ]

o u r past actions objectively. H o w m any hom es have been w re c k e d because of the u n e arthing of an u n f o r tu n a te mem­ ory? In the p la y " T h e W i l d D u c k " by Ibsen there is one c h a ra c ter, a yo un g m an, w h o is determ ined to tell the tru th re ga rdle ss of consequences. H e reveals to a y o u n g blind girl the fact that h er m o th er deceived h er fa th e r in letting him think th a t she w a s his child. T h e p o o r girl is cru sh e d a n d humiliated at the discovery a n d ta k e s h e r life. C ould you feel the sa m e to w a rd a b ro th e r or a friend if y o u k n e w th at an u n u tte ra b le w r o n g in a previous in c a r­ na tion had b ro u g h t y o u to g e th e r again? H o w would yo u feel if b r o u g h t face to face w ith a p erso n you h a d injured or even m urde re d in the p ast? Let us not w o r r y a b o u t the p a st experiences of the people associated w ith us today. Let us re g a r d each h u m an b eing a s someone for us to help a n d to love. Some people h av e glimpses of scenes from a previous incarnation. O th e r s h a v e n ot one. W h e n o u r cha ra c ters are p e rfe c ted , complete m em ory will be ours. U n til then, let us b e co ntent to w o r k on th e improvement o f o u r personalities a n d o u r ch aracters. T h e principles th a t m o ulded us in the p a s t a re no different from th e principles t h a t m oulded us to d a y . W e a re the p ro d u c t of the past, b o th im m ediate a n d remote. F ru g a lity m a y be ingrain ed in u s because o f stra ite n e d circum stances in childhood. W e m a y b e excessively tid y because of strict ho m e training. W e c an easily trace one q u a lity a fte r the o th e r which is the p r o d u c t o f childhood train in g a n d env iro nm ent. W i t h a little th o u g h t w e can becom e a w a r e of w h a t influences a re m od ify in g o u r p e rso na li­ ties today. T h e c haracteristics w ith w h ic h w e w e r e b o rn w e r e developed in a previous inc a rn a tio n . W h e n a child is interested in rea d in g a t a n early a ge th ere is no d o u b t t h a t such a n interest w a s carried o ver from th e past. Let me tell yo u a re m a rk a b le sto ry th a t came to m y a tte n tio n recently. A y o u n g e m ig ra n t boy, th e son of a poor The farm er, discovered in th e g a rre t o f his d • • hom e a n an c ie n t p r a y e r book in a o stc ru c ta n s t r a n g e la n g u a ge. H e w a s so fascinated D ig e s t k y th a t book th a t he lock ed it a w a y a n d S e p t e m b e r k e p t it as a tre a su re . S e v e ra l y e a rs a fte r 1939 he h a p p e n e d to s h o w it to a m an w h o

he th o u g h t w a s of the same r a c e a n d a sked to receive instruction in th a t l a n ­ gu ag e so th a t he could re a d his h e ir­ loom. H e learned this s tr a n g e la n g u a g e with am azing facility a n d con tinu ed his studies until he w as able to w rite b e a u ti­ ful p o e try as well as original prose. T o d a y this m an is living in Buffalo. N . Y., a n d re g a rd e d as one of the g r e a t ­ est scholars in th a t language. T h e r e is no d o u b t in my m ind th a t this e x t r a ­ o rd in a ry kn ow led ge of a foreign l a n ­ gu ag e w a s acquired in a previous in ­ carnation , a n d the sight of th e old p r a y e r boo k a w a k e n e d the old d eep interest. T h e children w h o p la y a musical in­ stru m e n t divinely as soon as th e ir fin­ gers a re s tro n g enough to control the in strum e nt are reviving an ability g a in e d in th e p ast. T h e b o rn m a th em atician , the born artist, a re also e x a m p le s of souls c on c e ntra tin g on one field o f s tu d y o r activity for several incarnation s. Is it no t inspiring to kn ow th a t n o good thing is lost? P eople are reluctan t to s tu d y music or a r t in middle life. T h e y th in k th a t th e y a re too old. T h e y think t h a t the time nec e ssary for p ra c tic in g is w a ste d . A f te r a lapse of tw e n ty y e a rs a w o m a n took u p the s tu d y o f music a n d the p iano a n d found th a t in a few m onths e v ery bit of her form er ability re tu rn e d . In fact, her tech niqu e w a s far b e tte r than it h a d been in c hildhood. It w a s enriched by a deeper em otional n a ­ ture a n d a m ore m ature a p p reciatio n of music as a n art. M e n w h o h av e g one into business, w om en w h o h ave becom e w iv e s a n d m others, frequ ently reg ret the cu ltural studies o f their high school a n d college da ys. P e r h a p s the time w o u ld h av e been s p e n t more profitably on more practical subjects. O f course, practical subjects a re useful; bu t n o one n e e d r e ­ gret a n y th in g th a t he h a s ever learned, o r experienced, or done. E v e r y th in g h a s helped us. E v e ry th in g will some d a y prov e useful. T h e g re ate st u s e f u l­ ness, o f course, m ay occasionally be re­ served for a fu tu re incarnation. It is b e tte r to c o n c e n tra te on the fu tu re ra th e r than on the p ast. R e in ­ c a rn a tio n a n d K arm a give u s control over o u r future destiny. D o w e seek o p ­ po rtunities to grow a n d ex p re ss ou r-

[304]

selves a n d be of service, let us m ake the most of o u r lives now . L et us develop our m inds. Let us make all the friends w e can. Let us be a force for good in the lives of as m a n y people as w e can. In this w a y w e p re p a re opportunities a n d sph e re s of influence for ourselves in the future. It is also im po rtant to liquidate our past. If w e make a sincere effort to lead the life of love a n d of service, o p p o r­ tunities will present them selves to liqui­ d a te th e past. People come o u r w a y w h o n eed just w h a t w e can give. Situa­ tions arise that o bviously h a v e a mes­ sage for us. O p p o rtu n itie s arise th a t enable us to utilize w h a te v e r know ledge a n d experience w e have. In the last analysis c h a ra c te r is habit. Little d aily u nrem em b ered acts have m a d e us w h a t w e a re to day . W e be­ come w h a t we do. W e a re w h a t w e do. T h e entire school of Behaviorism is built on this fact. It is th e k e y to the upro otin g of undesirable h a b its a n d the pla n tin g of good habits. Repetition is the process that m akes a n indelible im­ p r in t on the nervous system . Repeti­ tion will build for us th e personality, disposition, and te m p e ra m e n t t h a t we desire. D o w e w a n t a g a y a n d cheerful disposition th a t will w in for us friends? W e m ust cultivate the h a b it of cheer­ fulness. W e must look cheerful and sp e a k cheerfully; the emotion will follow. If w e a re n a tura lly solitary, w e may have led an isolated life in a previous incarn atio n. If w e find it h a r d to u n d e r ­ s ta n d the w orld w e live in, or to meet people, w e may have led restricted lives or w e m ay have been bookw orms. W h a t e v e r life it w a s th a t w e led in the p a s t a n d which g ave us o u r present limited personalities, th e im p o rta n t thing is to grow , to continue w h e r e w e left off, a n d to e x p a n d in as m a n y directions as w e can. T h e average individual e x e rts himself no more th a n is n ecessary . H e follows the p a th of least resistance. H e learns e nough to get a job a n d then is content

to rem ain on th a t level for the rest of his life. L et us scorn this mole-like, b a t ­ like existence. Let u s fill ourselves w ith ambition, courage, a n d the desire for progress. D o n o t interpret p ro g re ss to mean g ro w in g merely in fame or for­ tune. T r u e p ro gre ss means grow ing mentally, em otionally a n d spiritually. It is go od to ru n the gam ut of the e m o­ tions so t h a t w e m ay u n d e rs ta n d them a n d tra n s c e n d them. It is good to hav e m an y experiences in life. T h e y b eat upon o u r n e rv o u s system a n d raise o u r vibrations. It is good to explore n a tu re a n d control her. A bove all, it is good to s tu d y ourselves. A know ledge of our ow n m a k e -u p gives us the k ey to the universe. A s the macrocosmos, so the microcosmos. E a c h in c a rn a tio n is a p a g e in the book of life of the soul. T h e s e p a g e s do not follow each o th e r h a p h a z a rd ly . E ach p a g e h a s its theme. E ach in c a rn a ­ tion h a s its keynote. O u r d e stiny is the completed karm a, the ripe k a rm a of previous incarnations. A lth oug h much m ay be b e y o n d our immediate control, there is ro om fo r the exercise of initia­ tive, free-will a n d independence. R e ­ stricting circum stances a n d a n a r r o w e n ­ vironm ent a re a challenge to th e creative im agination, to th e firmness of our p u r ­ pose, a n d to th e p o w e r of the ideals th a t w e h ave m a d e o u r ow n. E a c h in c a rn a ­ tion b rin g s us a step n e a re r to the a rc h ty p e in the D ivine M ind. W e m a y choose to develop slow ly or rapidly. If, how ever, w e u n d e r s ta n d the divine pla n, accept it, a n d act u po n it, w e can h a ste n o u r developm ent consid­ erably. W e c an consciously co-op erate w ith th e forces of evolution. D o n o t say, " W i t h ete rn ity before me, th e re is no n eed for me to make h a s te .” W i t h m ank in d a t the crossroads, every w o rk e r is n eeded. Let us resolve to make the most of our p re se n t incarnation. Let us d o the most trivial task as unto the Lord. Let the light of th e divine plan a n d the b e a u ty o f th e so ng of creation illuminate our lives.

V

V

V

G o d gave man a n u p rig h t countenance to su rv e y the heavens, a n d to look u p w a r d to the stars. — O v id .
[ 305 ]

The Christmas Spirit
By T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

S o v e re ig n G r a n d M a s t e r guise, re je c te d b y the C h u rc h t h a t p r o ­ fessed to w o rsh ip H im . T h e bishop th a t recognizes H im a n d follows H im is driven from his pulpit. S orry , indeed, is the p icture th a t c o n ­ fronts o u r gaze. T h e most b ru ta l w a rs of the a g e s a re b eing fought in E u ro p e a n d in Asia. T h e corruption of the G ree k C atholic C h u r c h w as one o f the causes of the revolution in Russia. In the recent w a r in Spain, “ good C h r is ­ tia n s” d id n o t h esitate to b u tc h e r the va n q u ish e d in th e p a g a n spirit of the H u n s a n d V a n d a ls . C hristian E u ro p e h a s m a n y a sin a t its door in the tr e a t­ m ent of the n ativ es o f its colonies a n d p ro tecto rates th r o u g h o u t the w o rld. T h e h a ug hty, race-conscious A r y a n is brutal, oppressive, a n d bellicose. Som e political parties h av e fra n k ly throw n C h ristia n ity a n d all religions o verb oard. T h e y m ake no p re te n se a t all to spirituality. T h e y are o p e n ly materialistic, atheistic, a n d opportunistic. In A m erica, few realize how , u n d e r the p r e s e n t economic set-u p it is p r a c ­ tically impossible for the artist, the musicians, the actors, the d an c e rs, the w riters, the sch olars, a n d th e middlea g e d w o rk e rs to be abso rbed by the commercial w o rld. Big in d u stry h a s no place for them . M o d e r n society in a period of dep ression c an n o t su p p o rt the a rts a n d sciences ad eq uately. In no p e r­ iod of histo ry w e re g r e a t civic a n d com ­ m unal pro jects th e result o f private enterp rise alone. M a n y a successful A m erican business man is a self-righ teous hypo crite and snob. Profits m ean more to him than people. H is religion is for S u n d a y only,

A D . indeed, is the h e a rt of the mystic a t th e a p p r o a c h o f t h e C hristm as s e a s o n . T o h im C h ristm a s is more th a n t h e outw ard gaiety of a holiday p e r i o d . Beautiful is the e v e r g r e e n tree in the home, spark ling with sil­ v e ry o r n a m e n t s . D e a r is the tale of S a n ta C laus. Joyful are the family g a th ­ erings a r o u n d the festive board, the e a g e r eyes of children, their m erry play, the g re etin g s of friends, the h a p p y re­ unions. It is a d a y o f g la d n e ss a n d joy. universally o bse rve d in C hristendom . E v e n the p riso n e r in his gloomy cell looks f o rw a rd to the Y uletide. Even those w ho h a v e d rifted fa r from the c hurch a n d from a n y religion a tte n d the solemn a n d inspiring C h ristm a s service. O n c e m ore th e tale of th e C hrist Child a n d the Blessed V irg in will be told. Beautiful is the story, beautiful the festive ritual, beautiful the d a y —bu t the tru e significance the w o rld has y e t to lea rn a n d to live. W o u l d the M a s te r of G alilee be acc e p ted in m o d e rn Christian society? H a s the C h u r c h learned the lesson of th e S erm on on th e M o un t? N o d o u b t the M a s t e r Jesus of infinite pa­ tience a n d love u n d e r s ta n d s H is erring c hildren a n d forgives them , bu t can H e be content? W h e r e is the love th a t w as H is g reat m e ssag e to the world? M arie Corelli, in “ T h e M a s te r C h ristia n ” de­ picts the C h r is t Child, coming in dis­

[407]

m erely formal observance. H e atten ds service, he sup p o rts th e church, he o b ­ serves the ritual; b u t the spirit he has completely missed. H o w can he recon­ cile his C h ristia n ity w ith m embership in the so-called C h ris tia n - f ro n t o rg a n iz a ­ tions, anti-Sem itic a n d fascistic in n a ­ ture, pe rse c utors of minority racial and religious gro ups? H o w can he reconcile his C h ristia n ity w ith the large num ber of social evils, cry in g to be remedied? H o w can w e reconcile our C hristian ity w ith into leran ce in social life a n d p re ­ judice a n d discrim ination in the business a n d professional w orld ? H o w c an we reconcile o u r belief in the b ro th e rh oo d of m an with the do c trin e of isolation? H o w can w e reconcile our C hristian ity with acute p ov erty on every side of us? T h e M a s t e r C h ristia n loved the poor, associated w ith publicans a n d sinners a n d he a le d th e sick. H e rebuked the smug, the rich, the a rr o g a n t, a n d drove the m o n e y -c h a n g e rs from the T em ple. H e ple a d e d with those w h o loved Him to b e merciful, to be charitable, to give freely, to b e patient a n d long suffering, a n d to dwell in peace w ith one another. B rothers a n d Sisters, the m essage of tw o th o u sa n d years, n a y of four th o u ­ sa n d y e a r s ago, is ne e d e d w ith equal u rg e n c y to day. W e still need to learn to be patient, to be kind, to be forgiving, to be merciful, to be charitable, a n d to be hum ble. W e still n eed to learn to be generous, to open o u r h a n d s a n d pock­ ets, n ot to let the left h a n d kn ow w h a t the r ig h t h a n d is doing. W e still need to learn th e lesson of b ro th e rh o o d — not to discrim inate in o u r social a n d bu si­ n ess relationships. W e h a v e yet to learn to pu t the C h ristian ethic into practice in o u r d aily lives. T h e divorce problem, for example, sh o w s th a t th e lesson o f Jove is still n ee d e d in m arital relationships. Intolerance, prejudice, a n d discrimina­ tion reveal th e lack o f love in o u r social a n d political life. T h e c o n sta n t n e e d of reform legislation a n d the ineffectuality o f the c le rg y a r e evidence th a t people on the w h o le d o no t tak e th eir C h r is ­ tianity seriously. B ro th ers a n d Sisters, I k n o w th a t you a s stu d e n ts of the Rosicrucian O r d e r The R o s ic r u c ia n accept the m ystic p hilo so phy of life, the life of love a n d service, the life o f humil­ D ig e s t ity. I k now th a t y ou a ccept Jesus as one Decem ber of the g r e a t A v a ta r s a n d M a ste rs. You 1939 h av e e n te re d up on the P a th . Y o u are

treading the w a y to Liberation. Y o u seek liberation n ot on ly for yo urself bu t for others. A s G o d d e sire s salv atio n for all, so w e desire salvation for all. As the M a s t e r w a s c o nc e rn e d ab o u t the one lamb th a t w e n t astra y, so are w e c o n ­ cerned about those w h o go a stra y . W e long to help th e M a s te r s in their diffi­ cult, ag e -o ld u n re m ittin g labors. W h a t b e tte r w a y is th e re th an b y practicing the C h ristia n life? T h e havoc w e see on e v e ry side is the inevitable consequence of th e atheistic a n d m a te r­ ialistic p hilosophy of life. It is th e de a d sea fruit o f selfishness a n d callousness. H e a d a n d h e a r t d o no t w o r k to gether. T h e h e a rt is frozen, u n re sp o n siv e to the needs o f h u m a n b eings. Let us learn from the chaos e xisting in the w orld today, the h o rro r of a p h ilo so p h y th a t emphasizes self, the w ill-to -pow e r, a n d ruthlessness; th a t rejects the w o rk in g of divine law s, th a t rejects th e existence of the soul, th a t rejects d ig n ity o f the hu ­ m an being a n d th e preciousness of hu m an life, t h a t does n o t recoil from cruelty, persecution, a n d torture. “W h o k now s w h a t is rig h t? " the b e ­ w ildered man in th e s tre e t asks. T h e a n s w e r is found in the he a rt. A s k y o u r soul, y o u r conscience, y o u r innerm ost self. C a n a p h ilo so p h y th a t leads to p urg es a n d c o n c e n tra tio n cam ps be right? C a n a p h ilo s o p h y t h a t se n d s mil­ lions into exile for no o th e r re a so n s th an birth a n d religion b e right? C a n a p h i­ losophy th at is g ro ssly indifferent to the n eeds of the a g e d , of th e sick, of w om en, and little child re n be right? C h ristian ity, a b o v e all, s ta n d s for the sa c re d n e ss of h u m a n life. T h e V ir g in M a r y is a sym bol o f the sa c re d n e ss of m otherhood. T h e divine C h ild is a s y m ­ bol o f the s a n c tity of in fancy. T h e C h ristm a s tree is a sym bol of the im­ m ortality of th e soul, of life ev erlasting. T h e w in te r solstice re m in d s us o f the spiritual S u n b a c k of th e m aterial sun, of the spiritual p h e n o m e n a b a c k of all m aterial ph eno m ena, o f the d ivine p u r ­ pose b ack of all ph ysical p h e n o m e n a, of the divine p u rp o se b a c k of all life, a n d o f e v e ry m an ife sta tio n o f n a tu re . S a n ta C lau s climbing th e ch im n e y symbolizes the divine gift o f the s a c r e d fire, th e fire th a t b oth e nlig htens a n d d e stro y s, the tree of k n o w le d g e t h a t is b o th good a n d evil. T h i s p o w e r is th e fruit of th e m y s­ tic life. W h e n w e utilize it in the spirit

[408]

of love a n d service, w e become as gods. W h e n w e seek to use it to gain pow er, it becom es a consum ing fire th a t d e ­ stro y s us. It is n o t on ly the m essag e of the C h ristia n faith. It is the m essage of e very faith. It is the m essage of the u ni­ versal p h ilo so p h y of m ysticism . It is the m essag e th a t every A v a ta r c am e to teach. I t is the life th a t every mystic m ust lead if he desires to attain libera­ tion, if h e desires to become a se rv a n t of the m a ste rs, if he desires to become a helper o f m an kind . Y ou n eed n o t call it th e C h r is tia n life. Call it b y a n y n am e yo u will. O n l y accept it a n d live it. A c c e p t it b e c a u se you believe in the b e a u ty a n d holiness of mercy, pity, com ­ passion, self-sacrifice, a n d love. A ccept it b e c a u se y o u k n o w th a t the stro n g will d estro y e a c h other a n d the meek will in­ herit th e ea rth. A c c e p t it as the only fo u n d a tio n o f a life of loveliness, joy, a n d b e a u ty . A c c e p t it as the o nly foun­ dation o f a life of peace a n d security, a life th a t e n c o u ra g e s all the gifts of m a n ­ kind — a r t a n d architectu re, music a n d sculpture, religion a n d po etry, a n d the d a n c e a n d n a tu re stud y, a n d science a n d glorious friendships. M a n y a p o e t h a s su n g of a w o rld at peace, o f an eternal sprin gtid e of love a n d joy. M a n y a ph ilosopher has d e ­ picted his la n d of U to pia, his lost A t ­ lantis. E v e r y p ro p h e t h a s d re a m e d of the time w h e n " th e lion shall lie dow n w ith th e lam b, w h e n the lion shall eat s tra w like the ox a n d a little child shall lead th e m .” T h e time of joy a n d peace, the la n d o f jo y a n d b e a u ty is a deepse a ted faith of the h u m an heart. It is a vision o f th in g s to come. It is a c o n ­ sum m ation to be achieved, let us hope, in the n o t too far d ista n t future. T h a t is th e dream of the O r d e r , th a t is the p u rp o se of o u r course of study.

W e d o not w ish to train occultists alone. W e do n o t w ish to train the intellect alone, im p ortan t as it m ay be. W e do n ot w a n t our stu d e n ts to aim on ly a t p ersonal success a n d pow er. It is tru e w e teach the laws of health a n d h a p p i­ ness a n d success in life. W e enco urag e delving into n a tu r e ’s secrets. W e teach yo u h o w to evoke the inner, the hidden power. B ut w e w a n t p o w e r to b e the instrum e n t o f love. W e w a n t occultism linked w ith mysticism. W e w a n t H e a d a n d H e a r t w orking in unison a n d check­ ing each other. W e w a n t k n o w le d g e in the service o f hum anity. W e w a n t men o f compassion, sy m p a th y a n d love. W e w a n t to train citizens of th e W o r l d of T o m o rro w , the divine, cooperative sta te o f th e future. W e w a n t th e ideal city th a t Ik h n a to n so u g h t to build, th e r e ­ public o f w hich Plato dream ed, the H o u s e of Salomon th a t Sir F ra n c is Bacon d escribed a n d the N e w A tla ntis th a t he p lan ned a n d w o rk e d for. W e , too, w o rk for the n e w age. W e , too, build for th e future. W e , too, w a n t to aid in training the citizens of the A q u a ria n Age. T h i s is the message of C h ris tm a s to the w orld. T h i s is the m e ssage of C h ristm a s to the m embers of the R osi­ crucian O r d e r . Let u s a d v a n c e the st a n d a r d of the O r d e r in every land. Let us intensify the circle of light a ro u n d the w orld . L et us help the w o rld achieve th e ideal se t forth b y th e g re a t Prin ce of Peace. M a y th e joy of the Y uletid e seaso n e n te r the h e a r t of every h u m a n being. M a y all n a tu r e sh a re in th e divine joy a n d peace. M a y the g race of G o d il­ lumine our minds a n d h e a rts th a t w e m ay the b e tte r serve. M a y the coming y e a r w itness p eace on e a rth a n d go od will am on g men. S O M O T E I T BE.

F O R Y O U R B E N E F IT
T h e R osicrucian R esearch L ib rary at R osicrucian P a rk , w ith its a ttrac tiv e facilities, is a v ailab le to all A M O R C m em bers. T h is lib rary contains a n especially chosen collection of se v e ra l thousand books, m an y of w hich are unusual and rare. T h e ir subjects em brace the ph y sical sciences, the a rts, philosophy, R osicrucianism , m ysticism , occultism , history, an d biology. T h e L ib ra ry is open daily, w ith the exception of S atu rd ay and S u n d ay , from 1:20 to 5:00 P. M „ and on W e d n e sd a y and F rid a y evenings from 7:00 to 9:30 P. M.: S a tu rd a y from 9:00 A .M . to 1:00 P .M . Its appointm ents include the latest scientifically designed chairs, correct illum ination, and a ir conditioning. R osicrucian m em bers w ho can not a tte n d , or w ho live a t a distance, m ay benefit from this library as well. T h e subject m atter o f these books can be m ade available to you by a unique plan. W rite and ask the librarian a b o u t this plan.

[ 409]

»

§

»

»

I

I

I

T h e B ib le o f M a n k i n d
(A Study by Thor Kiimalehto, F. R. C.)
H E first step in the f e l l o w s h i p of faiths is t h a t we l e a r n to u n d e r ­ sta n d some other r e l i g i o n besides the one in w h ich w e w ere born and bro ught up. A man w h o is of a wholly scientific or artistic t y p e of mi n d should try to un ­ d ersta n d th at urge in the human h eart which finds ex p res­ sion in religious devotion. D espite the prevalence of agnosticism a n d m aterial­ ism, reliqion is too fundam ental a need of the human soul for a n yo ne to succeed in eradicating it perm anently. Religion is a divine method of e d ucating the soul. All the great w orld teachers of religion were highly developed a n d illuminated souls, born w ith a definite mission to educate their generation in the spiritual laws of life. T r u t h is universal, but it must be re-stated in each g en eration to meet the changing needs of the time. T h e forms of religion, expressed in ritual and ceremony, are at first a living embodiment of the inner truths. Later there is a tendency to emphasize ritual at the expense of the truth it symbolizes. W h a t may have been a necessity in one age becomes utterly meaningless in a later age w hen social conditions have entirely chan g e d W h e n man becomes receptive to inner guidance, w hen love becomes the law of his n ature, he will no longer have need of a religious s y s ­ tem or a religious teacher. He will stu d y the laws of life in the schools of ancient wisdom, a n d he will interpret the a p p li­ cations according to the needs of the day a n d his conscience. W h e r e love prevails, there will be neither injury nor conflict. E ach a v atar or teacher of religion came to bring a m essage to his g e n e ra ­ tion and to emphasize a certain aspect of universal truth. T h e life of every a v a ta r is w orth studying. T h e sto ry of each one is both inspiring and illum­ inating. T h e a v a ta rs represent the n ob ­ lest souls of our hum anity. In their own lives as in their message they reveal an ew the age-old m essage of love and service. C om parative religion should in­ terest the esoteric stu d e n t as much as the h istory of philosophy, the arts, and the sciences. T h e true mystic is a t home in every religion. E v erv shrine is to him a sacred edifice. All ritual is symbolic of great spiritual truths, a n d every Bible is a divine revelation. T h e s e noble utterances come from the heart a n d go straig h t to the heart. T h e divine voice seeks m any channels, and he w h o is a t ­ tuned hears the divine note in the p raver of every faith. T h e one needful quality is sincerity. T h e one high ideal is the life of love and service. T o quote W a l t W h itm a n :
I hear the A rab m u e;:in . calling from the top of the mosque; I h e ar the C hristian priests at the a lta rs of their churches — 1 hear the responsive bass and soprano: . 1 hear the Hebrew, reading his records and psalm s. 1 hear the rhythm ic m yths of the G reeks, and the stro n g legends of the Romans;

f «53]

I hear the tale of the divine life and bloody death of the beautiful G od— the C hrist; I h e ar the H indoo teaching his favorite pupil the loves, w ars, adages, transm itted sa fe ­ ly to this d ay , from poets who w rote three thousand y ears ago."

R udolf Steiner tells us in his K n o w l ­ ed ge o f the H ig h e r W o r ld s that the s tu ­ de n t should not fail to give his soul the n u rtu re th a t comes from the inspired teachings o f spiritual investigation. “ If our eyes c a n n o t follow the w oods in their m antle of green, every spring, d a y by da y. w e should, instead open o u r soul to the glorious teaching s of the B h a g a vad G ita or of St. Jo h n ’s Gospel, o r of St. T h o m a s a K empis.” T h e esoteric stu d e n t should acquire a new u n d e r­ sta n d in g for all th a t the great teachers of h um anity h a v e u ttered . “ T h e sayings of the B u d d h a a n d the Gospels, for in­ stance, p rodu c e a n e w effect on him. T h e y p ervad e him w ith a felicity of w hich he h a d not dream ed before. F o r the tone o f their w o rd s follows the movements a n d rh y th m s which he has himself form ed within himself. H e can no w have a positive know ledge th a t a B u d d h a o r the E vangelists did not utter their own p ersonal revelations, bu t those w hich flowed into them from the in ner­ most Being of all things . . . . T h e m a n y repetitions in the sayings of the B ud dha are not com prehensible to people of our present evolu tion ary stage. F o r the e so ­ teric stud en t, how ever, th e y become a force on w hich he gladly lets his inner senses rest, for they correspond with certain m ovem ents in the etheric body. D evotional s u rre n d e r to them, with p e r ­ fect inner peace, creates an inner h a r ­ mony w ith these movements, a n d b e ­ cause the la tte r are an image of certain Cosmic rh y th m s w hich also at certain points repeat themselves a n d revert to former modes, the individual listening to the wisdom of the B u d d h a , unites his life w ith t h a t of the Cosmic mysteries." A most w elcom e contribution to the literatu re o f C o m p a ra tiv e Religion is T h e Bible o f M a n k i n d , edited b y the P ersian mystic, M irza A h m a d S ohrab. It comprises selections from the bibles of nine of the g re a t w o rld religions w ith an introduction to each one by a recognized scholar of t h a t pa rticular religion. T h e nine religions com prise H induism , Z o r o ­ astrianism . B uddhism . Confucianism , T aoism . Judaism. C hristianity. Islam, a n d the B ahai C ause. As you read these

selections from the bibles of the w orld, th e striking feature is th e similarity a n d universal appeal of the m essage in each one. T h e em phasis in each one m ay differ. H ind uism em phasizes th e unity o f life: Buddhism, universal law and duty; Z o roastrian ism , p u rity of thought, speech, a n d conduct; Judaism, justice a n d social righteousness: Christianity, love; Islam, destiny; C onfucianism , filial piety a n d reverence; a n d T a o ism , d e ­ tachm ent a n d balance. T h e religions of the w o rld com pose a celestial harm ony, a n d each religion strikes its note. Y et the entire melody can b e found in any one faith. E ach religion is a p a t h w a y to G od. E a c h religion has its inner a n d o uter teachings. W e m ust no t perm it the w eeds of superstition th a t accumulate a b o u t it in the course of time to blind us to the b e au ty a n d the tr u th w ithin. T h e source of religious inspiration is so lofty th a t every bible is replete with passages of compelling b e a u ty a n d power. E v e ry religion sounds the tru m p e t call to action th a t m an m ay a p p r o a c h G o d a n d that he m ay convert the w o rld to an ea rth ly paradise, reflecting the joy a n d h a rm o n y of celestial spheres. A s I tu rn the pages, one noble p a s ­ sag e a fte r a n o th e r g re e ts the eye and n ourishes th e soul. T h e H i n d u prays:
"L ead me from the un real to the real! L ead me from darkness to light! L ead me from death to im m ortality!"

In the K h a n d o g a U p a n is h a d is a parable explaining the divine essence in all m atter:
"F etch me from thence a fruit of the nyagrodha tree." "H e re is one, sir." “ B reak it." " It is broken, sir." " W h a t do you see there?" “T h e se seeds, alm ost infinitesim al." "B re ak one o f them .” “It is broken, sir." " W h a t d o you see there?" " N o t a n y th in g , sir." T h e fath er said: “M y son, th at subtle essence w hich you do not perceive there, of th a t very essence does this g reat n y a g ro d h a tree exist. Believe it. m y son. T h a t w hich is the subtle es­ sence, in it all th at exists h a s its self. It is the T ru e . It is the Self; a n d th o u a rt if."

In de p e n d e n c e th ro u g h reliance on the inner voice is stressed b y B u d d h a in his final c h arg e to his disciples:
'T h e re fo re , be ye lam ps to yourselves. Be a refuge to yourselves. B etake y ourselves to no e x te rn a l refuge. H old fast to the T r u th as a lam p. H old fast as a refuge to the T ru th . Look

[454]

Dot f o r r e f u g e t o a n y o n e b e s i d e s y o u r s e l v e s . .

It is they, am ong m y disciples w ho shall reach the very topm ost H eig h t."

A nd this com m andm ent have w e from him: T h a t he w h o loveth G od, loveth his brother also."

T h e w hole d u ty o f m an has been stated for all time b y the p ro ph et Micah:
" W h a t doth the L ord require of thee but to do justice, to love m ercy and to w alk humbly with thv G o d ."

T h e good life as depicted Koran is similar:

in the

Ecclesiastes adds:
"W h a tso e v e r thy hand findeth to do. do ii with thy m ight."

H osea is more explicit:
"F o r I desired m ercv and not sacrifice, and the know ledge of G od m ore than burnt offerings."

"G od hath preferred those w ho are strenuous w ith their w ealth and their persons to those w ho sit still." "Be sincere in yo u r w orks, for the divine test is v e ry keen. T he hardest p a rt of an action is to secure the p u rity of m otive. W ith o u t sincerity all w orks are valueless. Let good deeds be y our com panions."

Confucius states in the S h u King:
"W h e n a co u n try is w ell-governed, poverts and mean conditions are things to be ashamed of."

M encius teaches:
"R ighteousness is m an ’s path ."

In Ex od us. C h a p te r 22. a ppears a verse startlingly p e rtin e n t to the most urgent need of today:
“T h o u shalt neither vex a stra n g er nor op­ press him. for ye w ere stra n g e rs in the land of E gvot."

D euteronom y. C h a p te r 33, consoles us:
"T h e eternal G od is th y refuge, and under­ neath are the everlasting arm s

Despite the moral laxity of a reaction­ a ry age such as ours is. the value of the T e n C om m a n d m e n ts s ta n d s firm. D e ­ spite a prevailing p aganism , more people know the T w e n t y - T h i r d Psalm than any other passage in literature T h e L o rd ’s pray er is unexcelled for its classic sim­ plicity a n d humility. T h e vision of a world at peace in the millennium that Isaiah depicts w hen men shall beat their sw ords into p lo w sh a re s a n d nations shall not go to w a r a n y more is still the dream of m ankind today. N o message is more sadly needed to d a y bv our brutal, aggressive, an d pow erful indus­ trial barons a n d d ic ta to rs than the Ser­ mon on the M o un t. W o u l d that these immortal w o rd s from John (I. Chap. IV ) could be e n g ra v e d on the walls of every council ch a m b er in the world today:
' Beloved let us love one an o th er, for love is of God: and everyone th at loveth is bom of God and know eth God. Beloved, if God so loved us. we ought also to love one another. If w e love one another. G od dw elleth in us, and his love is perfected in us. H ereby know that we dw ell in Him. and H e in us. because He hath given us of his Spirit. if a man say. I love G od and hateth his brother, he is a liar. F o r he th at loveth not his brother w h o m he hath seen, how can he love God. w h o m he hath not seen7

E ach religion centers about a pe rfe c t­ ed pe rsona lity — Z o ro a ste r. B uddha. M oses. Jesus, C onfucius. L ao -T ze. a n d M o h a m m e d . E ach religion teaches the perfect man, the superior man. the ideal to which every human being should aspire. T h e righteous life, the life of love a n d service, is the path to a perfect m anhood, to th a t state of h a rm on y w hen m an is united in the bonds of love both to G od a n d his fellowman. Let us take the nourishment th a t all these religions offer. Let us not stu d y from one book alone. W e can gain in u n d e rsta n d in g , in breadth of vision, in insight, th rough familiarity with all the bibles of the w orld. M o st of us need a note of inspiration with which to begin o r close a d a y of w orldly cares or a r d u ­ ous toil. W h a t better method th an to read a c h a p te r from some classic, sa n c ti­ fied by countless devout hum an beings, a passa g e from the B ha g av a d-G ita . the G a th a s of Z o ro a ste r, the K oran, the U p a n is h a d s. the O ld T e sta m e n t, or the N e w T e s ta m e n t. A s you read, you will find the pa ssa ge s th at have inspired the great w rite rs and thinkers of the w orld — D a n te . Sir F rancis Bacon, S c h o p e n ­ hauer. T o ls to v . E m erson. E d w a r d C a r ­ penter. a n d W illia m Butler Y eats, to mention but a very few. T o immerse o n e ’s soul in these classics is as ele­ vating as the s tu d y of music or of art or the contem plation of great w o rk s of architecture. T h e a r r o g a n t E uropean may d is p a r ­ age the O rien t. Y et the truth remains unchallenged th at w hatever is sublime in w estern tradition comes from the philosophies a n d the religions of the E a st. Civilization and unrestrained in­ tellect have throw n the modern world into c h ao s a n d confusion an d lawless destruction of hum an beings: even the helpless, the w omen, and the children. W h o can d a re deny that a beautiful soul

is w o rth more th a n all the w ealth of C roesu s, a n d a beautiful w a y of life is of g re a te r im portance than all the inven­ tions of the W e s t , a n d the H e a r t is more im p ortant th a n the H ead? E g y p t, India, C hina, Persia. P a le s ­ tine, a n d A ra b ia hav e given the w orld its g r e a t religions a n d the loftiest se n ti­ m ents ever reached by the soul of man. T h e s e countries w e re the seats of flour­ ishing civilizations in the past. T o d a y th ey are seething with the un rest of a transitional period. T h e goad of p e rse ­ cution a n d oppression is driving them to unity, h arm on y, a n d self-aw areness. T h e y are passing through the trial by fire. T h e y a re being p re p a re d for a tre m e n d o u s resurgence of their genius a n d culture. H ail to the light that a p p e a re d in the East! Its rays have encircled the world, quickening into life w h a te v er land they have touched. T h e Light shines for all w h o have eyes to see and hearts to feel. T h e r e is no rest. T h e Light moves ever on w a rd . T h e spiral is about to be com ­

pleted, a n d the Light shall d a w n once more in the E a s t on a n e w d a y n o t so far aw ay. L et us take the gifts th a t G o d has show ered up on the w orld . L et us drink a t the fount of w isdom , no m atte r in w h a t gard e n w e find it. M o th e r Asia, tho u h a st n ourished a t th y bre a sts the children of all m an kind , a n d th y sons have been the noblest t h a t this w orld has y e t seen. E v e n to d a y the noblest experim ents in gov ernm en t are being tried in P alestin e a n d in India. T h e pioneers of P alestin e hav e literally tu r n ­ ed the desert into a blossom ing garden despite indifference a n d opposition. T h e people of Ind ia h ave united u n d e r M a ­ ha tm a G a n d h i, h av e abolished the a n ­ cient w ro n g of caste w ith o u t civil w ar o r bloodshed, a n d will achieve political indep end en ce w ith o u t revolution. A nd the greatest sta te sm a n in the w o rld to ­ d a y b y common consent is the spiritual M a h a tm a G a n d h i. H e tow ers above his co ntem poraries as the sn o w ca p p e d H im ­ a la y a s to w er over the m ountains of the w orld.

V

V

V

" T h e reason I came into the O r d e r a n d have rem ained all o f these y e a rs is to find more w a y s of improving myself. I tak e it for g ra n te d th a t the reason most of yo u a re in the O rd e r is because th ere is some dross yo u w a n t to b u m out. some w e a k n e ss yo u w a n t to overcome, some strong point you w a n t to build up. W e can soon realize th a t while there are w e a k n e sse s in all of us, w e are no t all alike— n either good n o r bad. W e a re just different, a n d each individual h a s his or her r ig h t to be different in a w a y th at is in acco rdance w ith th e light of his u n d e r s ta n d ­ ing a n d developm ent.” —D r . H . Spe n c e r Lew is, late Im p e ra to r of A M O R C .

V

V

V

P R O V IN G

M Y S T IC A L T R U T H S T O (C o n tin u e d from P a g e 451)

S C IE N C E

new ly formed atom s travelling a t nearly the sam e velocity as light. H o w ? W h y ? H e r e is how a n d w hy. T h e en e rg y The r a y s on striking the heavier atm osphere R osicrucia n a re slow ed, imperceptibly, b y the atomic D ig e s t a n d gravitational effect a n d in this w a y January enable the accum ulation of p h o to n s to 1940 form a v e ry intense concentration of

e n e rg y in th e respective orbits before the n e w ly form ed system is carried a w a y b y the rotating gravitational field of th e earth. T h i s gives rise to th e theo ry that the pho to n is the smallest unit of m atter and th a t m atter is. really, only a form of energy.

[456 ]

l
By

SANCTUM MUSINGS
T H E NEED OF TH E H O U R
T h o r K iim a le h to ,

Sovereign Grand Master
I t p resum ab ly h onors the S up erm an, bu t the S u p erm a n of N ietzsch e is not th e one w h o m th e A v a ta r s of every a ge ta u g h t us to emulate a n d to love. N ietzsche describes the S u p e rm a n as being be yond good a n d evil, a law unto himself, above the C h ris tia n ethic, re­ joicing in his s tre n g th a n d in his life. T h e S up erm a n is indeed b e y o n d good a n d evil, h aving reconciled th e pairs of opposites: he is, indeed, a law u n to him ­ self because the law is e n g ra v e d in his heart. H e h a s become identified w ith divine love a n d wisdom, a n d his joyous stre n g th is m otivated b y divine love a n d wisdom. T h e ph ilosophy th a t exalts brute stre n g th alone is th a t of primitive man. It belongs to a n earlier a n d less spiritual sta g e of developm ent. It m a rk s re tro ­ gression, no t p rogress. It is a step b a c k ­ w a rd . no t fo rw ard. It is necessary to be m ost discrim­ inating as to w h a t th o u g h ts w e perm it to e n te r our consciousness. It is e a sy to be led a stra y w h e n specious a rg u m e n ts are p re se n te d brilliantly a n d the w h e a t is mingled with the chaff. W e m ust sta n d firm on the fu n d am ental principles of the Rosicrucian philosophy. If w e are perplexed, w e m u st reject w h a te v e r is n ot in h a rm o n y w ith o u r fun da m e nta l principles. If the " S o r ro w s o f Y o u n g W e r t h e r " b y the y o uthfu l G o e th e in ­ fluenced the y o u n g men to com mit sui­ cide, this book, tho ug h a classic a n d the w ork of a genius, is fu n d a m en ta lly false in tone. If S c h o p e n h a u e r affects the ]

H I S a ge is one of responsibility and op po rtunity. T h a t w e a re in the very throes of a titanic conflict is evident to even the least o b se rv a n t. T he implications of this s t r u g g l e are be­ c o m in g c le a re r daily. W h a t makes t h e s t r u g g l e so p o rte n to u s is that more than the possession of land is in­ volved. W e r e the s tru g g le on the p hy si­ cal plane alone, it w ould no t be so ominous. W h a t is of g re a te r significance is that two philosophies of life are in­ volved. O n e p hilo sop hy is th a t of Power and the other t h a t of Love. O n e philosophy is fran k ly b ased on race and blood a n d the a g gra nd iz e m ent of a m aster class. It rejects a n d even despises sy m p a th y a n d compassion and tolerance as evidence of w eakness. T h e other philosophy considers pow er di­ vorced from love as a menace to hum anlty ' T h e one p hilo sop hy subordinates the individual w ho lly to the state. T h e other considers each hu m an life sacred, t maintains t h a t th e function of the state is to p ro vide the n e c e ssary condi­ tions for each soul to achieve the maximum in developm ent so th a t in return ^ c h hum an being m ay utilize his genius tor the benefit of all. O n e philosophy o f life denies God, Scorns Christ, a n d ex alts brute strength.
[73

re a d e r w ith a profound pessimism, th oug h he is a genius a n d a re now ned philosopher, he must be read with dis­ crimination. If W a g n e r in his essays loudly proclaim s the p aram ou nt im por­ tance o f race a n d blood and exalts n a ­ tionality. w e m ust reject these basically w ro n g ideas a n d w e must not be blinded by the fact th a t he w a s a great genius in music. N ietzsche, too, must be read w ith g rea t caution because his ideas, th o u g h brilliant a n d brilliantly e x p re ss­ ed. are ad m itte d ly pag an. N o t that p a g a n concep tion s are alw ays w rong; b ut w h e n th e C h ristian ethic is openly d iscarded , th e mystic must exercise caution. N o r a re the w orks of these w rite rs a lone to be considered very carefully. T h e th o u g h ts of a n y man w ho has no t e m braced the mystic philosophy or w h o is n o t a g re a t lover of hum anity are b o u n d to be limited in scope and point of view. T h e conflict betw een the forces of good a n d evil is being dram atized on a w o rld -w ide scale. T h e evil in m an's h ea rt is e xternalized a n d is w rit large in the events o f th e day. T h e age-old c o n ­ flict be tw e en the qualities of the self a n d the qualities o f the Divine Self that m arks the p ro g re s s of every hum an b e ­ ing a n d ev e ry nation a n d mankind as a w hole h a s rea c h e d a crisis th roug ho ut the w orld. T h e h um an race has reached the sta g e of the hum an being w h o is p re p arin g for Initiation. T h e d a y comes w hen the individual is sufficiently m a ­ ture to decide once a n d for all w h e th e r he will d ed icate himself w holly to the hig her a n d b e tte r life, w h e th e r he will c onquer once a n d for all the selfish a n d th e evil in his n ature, w h e th e r he will tak e himself in h a n d and consciously and willingly p r e p a r e himself for Initiation. T h e sa g e s tell us th a t the first great event in th e life of man is his individ­ ualization from the animal kingdom. T h e next g re a t event in the unfoldm ent of the soul is Initiation. D u ring this long process o f development m an is acted up on by o uter forces. H e is the victim of circum stances; his develop­ ment is h a p h a z a r d a n d necessarily slow. In this long period of m any in c a rn a ­ The R o sicrucian tions. his will is g ra d u ally stren gthened , his m ind becom es a keen instrument, D ig e s t a n d his em otions become more con­ M a rc h trolled. F ro m being wholly self-centered 1940 he becomes g ra d u a lly more a n d more

social-minded a n d selfless. H is con­ sciousness steadily e x p a n d s. In this period of slow develop m ent m an is more o r less passive a n d is d e p e n d e n t upon the care a n d guid an ce of the patient G u a rd ia n s of the h u m a n race. Just as there comes a d a y in the life of a child w hen he can s h a re the re­ sponsibilities th a t his p a r e n ts have a s­ sum ed. so there comes a time in the de­ velopment of the h u m a n being w h e n he is able to u n d e rs ta n d a n d cooperate willingly with the D ivine P la n for h u­ manity. Just as life in the w orld is far more interesting th a n th e make-believe of the k in derg arten, so the life of the man w h o is p rep a rin g to e n te r into his divine heritage is far more interesting a n d satisfying th a n th e aimless, selfcentered life of the m an in the prelim ­ inary stages of developm ent. W h e n man is r e a d y to g ro w into tru e m an­ hood, w hen his consciousness is re a d y to e x p a n d into superconsciousness, and w hen he is able to c o o p e ra te w ith the Divine P lan of evolution, life th e n truly becomes the G re a t A d v e n tu re a n d the G rea t Romance. H is to r y assum es a new significance, a n d e v e ry hu m an being gains an a d d e d interest. W h e n man en te rs u p o n this stag e, he becomes a helper a n d need no longer be a bu rden. T h e E ld e r B ro th ers have hitherto borne the b u rd e n practically alone. T h e y can d o much, b u t th e y can do more with every h u m a n w o rk e r a d d ­ ed to the ranks. T h e y m u st w o rk within the divine laws of evolution. T h e y may not interfere w ith th e K a rm a of a n y in­ dividual or with th a t o f h u m a n ity al­ though a d ju stm e n ts a r e occasionally possible. T h e first crisis in th e stru g g le betw een the forces of good a n d of evil on this planet occurred in the A tla n te a n period. A t that time the h u m a n race w a s not sufficiently developed intellectually or spiritually to u n d e r s ta n d fully the is­ sues involved. T h e resu lt w a s th a t the crisis w a s p rolong ed a n d te rm in ate d in the sinking of the co ntin ent. T o d a y , we are informed, the h u m a n race is suffi­ ciently developed bo th intellectually and spiritually to w o rk o u t its accum ulated h eavy K arm a in a s h o rt time. T h e w orld situation to d a y is similar to that occurring in the life of the c a n d id a te for Initiation. H is a c c u m u la ted K a rm a is c oncentrated into a sh o rt period o f his

[74]

life so th a t he m ay be free the rem ain­ ing years of his life to devote himself to the larger tasks a n d g r e a te r responsi­ bilities th a t aw ait him. O n c e mankind w orks through this p erio d of test and trial, it will be enabled to m ake tre m e n ­ dous strides fo rw a rd both intellectually and spiritually. A Karmic condition, however, need not be u n d u ly p ro lo n g e d or cruel or painful. T h e evils afflicting the w orld today w e re n ot im posed from without. T h e y are o u tw a rd m anifestation s of in­ ner corruption. Like poison in the sy s ­ tem it m ust be eliminated. T h e n ext step in the developm ent of mankind is a federation of w orld states, at least some sort o f p la n n ed economic set-up a n d a recognition of the rights of every group to a place in the sun. T h is next step will prove the only solution for the ills affecting society the w orld over. T h e U n ite d S ta te s of America and the British E m p ire are exam ples of successful ty p e s of federations. T h e supporters of the sta tu s q uo chose to precipitate a w o rld -w a r. T h e occult hierarchy could no t pre v e n t this crisis. It is a p la n e ta ry test. T h e w orld p o p u ­ lation must p ass th ro u g h this test su c ­ cessfully. It can p a ss th ro u g h this test successfully provided e v e ry hum an b e ­ ing w h o u n d e rsta n d s the issues involved cooperates. T h e conflict is terrific b e ­ cause of the u tte r unscru pulou sn ess and the deadly effectiveness of modern methods of w a rfa re . Every hum an being u n d e rsta n d in g the issues involved m ust cooperate in some way. H e should e x e rt every' bit of influence th a t h e possibly can. N o one dare be either indifferent or neutral. M any are w averin g because they do not see the issues clearly. M a n y are the victims of m isinformation a n d vicious propaganda. W e as members of the Rosicrucian O rder certainly desire to ra n g e o u r ­ selves under the b a n n e r of the forces of light. W e certainly desire the speedy triumph of the forces of light. W e are ready to do all th a t is h u m a n ly possible to cooperate with o u r fellow -workers throughout the w orld. W e are r e a d y to be instruments in the h a n d s of Cosmic t°rces. W e are e a g e r to bring this Period of test an d trial to a close so that ^ 5 ® aY help in the m ore beautiful task 0 building a new w o rld order. First,

the conflict must be term inated. W a r m ust end a n d peace m ust be established. N o t the peace based u pon the triumph of the a n ti-C h rist is o u r aim. T h a t p h i ­ losophy must be p roved to be false and vicious a n d forever discredited a n d rejected. F orm m ust become a vehicle for life. M a tte r must be a medium for spirit. T h e Lords of Form, if such do exist and serve a purpose in th e D ivine P la n of evolution, m ust be forever subject to the Lords of Love a n d of Com passion. P o w e r m ust serve constructive a n d not destructive purposes. A s for a practical plan of action, the first step to ensure the w o rld victory of the constructive forces in all na tio n s is th a t all w ho accept th e philosophy of Love should unite, no m atter of w h a t race, nation, creed, o r color. T h e sec­ ond step is to ensure th e victory of lib­ eral forces in our o w n country. E ach a n d every one of us m ust su p p o rt some w orld federation w o rking for b r o t h e r ­ hood a n d peace; a n d w e must at the sam e time supp ort some n ational o r g a n ­ ization, w orking m ilitantly for toler­ ance, freedom, a n d spiritual values. N o w is the time to w ork. In o u r own co un try for the pre se n t w e have free­ dom to function. W h e n our ow n c o u n ­ try is united in its su p p o rt of th e dem o ­ cratic philosophy of life, the ca u se of freedom th ro ug ho ut the w o rld will be stren gthen ed . A n d then the w o rk e rs for light, life a n d love th ro u g h o u t the w orld must ex tend helping h a n d s a c ro ss the frontiers of w a r to their b re th ren w h o are muzzled by hostile governm ents. In some w a y w e must help them c onquer in their countries. T h e ave ra g e stu d en t of occultism has a tend en cy to u nderestim ate the im por­ tance of his own sh a re in the universal task. H e thinks th a t it is sufficient to rely on the divine plan a n d on the invisible w orlds. O u r sle nd e r k n o w l­ ed ge of the divine p la n sho uld m ake our activity more intelligent, a n d th e help of the invisible forces sh ou ld preven t the paralysis of futility a n d discouragem ent. It should in no w a y affect the intensity of our efforts along e v e ry possible c h a n ­ nel. A s in a school the curriculum is not be yond the capacity of the a v e ra g e stu ­ dent, a n d it is safe to predict th a t the m ajority will gradu ate, a t the same time even though the teachers give their ut-

[ 75 ]

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
SOUL D EV ELOPM ENT

|

By T h o r K j i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
A N Y people when first reading about th e lives of th e great holy men of the E a s t a n d the g re a t occultists of the w orld are a t ­ t r a c t e d by th e tales o f u n u s u a l p o w e r which they possessed. M a n y s t u d e n t s en ter upon o c c u lt c o u r s e s of stu d y to acquire these unu su a l powers. M a n y stu d e n ts feel t h a t the acquirem ent of these unusual p o w e rs is a main purpose in occult study.* T h is point o f view is a misconception. It is true th a t high ly developed souls have m anifested psychic pow ers. It is true th a t psychic po w ers are latent in every hum an being a n d eventually, w h e n the time is ripe, will ap pear. T h e y must no t be so u g h t a s an end in them ­ selves. T h e ir m anifestatio n m ust not be precipitated p rem a tu re ly . Occult studies must be e n te re d upon for b r o a d e r and more noble motives. T o cause the cen ­ ters th ro u g h w h ic h psychic pow ers manifest to function p re m a tu re ly through * exercises o r w h a t is k n o w n a s "athletic R o s ic r u c ia n p ro ced ure," p ra ctice d by some E a ste rn D ig est ------------r-j » ‘ B e c a u s e of th e m a n y q u e s ti o n s w e r e c e iv e p e r ta in uecem oer j n a to th is s u b je c t, w e a r e h e r e m a k in g a v a i l a b l e to
1940

in attendance a t Lodges an d Chapter*

° Ur m om ^>er* a » ~ o Q e . « c e n « l y h e a r d b y th o s e

schools, is d a n g e ro u s to physical a n d m ental health. T h e psychic p o w e rs must g o h a n d in h a n d with so un d physical health, emotional a n d mental control, a firm will, a b alanced n a tu re , a n d a s o u n d philosophy of living. O th e rw ise the possession of psychic p ow ers m ay ac tu a lly r e ta r d soul developm ent and even precipitate their p ossessor into in­ san ity. Psy c h ic illness is more difficult to control th a n a n y o th e r type of m a la dy . T h e r e are few a t p rese n t w ho c an u n d e r s ta n d or tr e a t psychic maladies properly. T h e r e are more sufferers of this type th a n the public is generally a w a r e of. F a r sup e rio r to psychic p ow er is soul developm ent. A t the p re se n t state of the evolution o f the h u m a n race, soul developm ent is more significant a n d more essential. T h e g r e a t n eed o f the w o rld is for su perior h u m a n beings; b ro a d m in d e d , b ig -h e a rte d , courageous personalities w h o have the w elfare of h u m a n ity a t heart, w h o have a tolerant a n d loving u n d e rsta n d in g o f the a v e r ­ a g e m a n 's limitations a n d needs, a n d w h o can sink self into w h a te v e r task life req uires of them. W e n eed talen t and genius. W e need the beautiful soul gifts th a t talen t a n d genius afford. W e need a type o f society th a t a p p re c ia tes a n d e nc o ura ge s soul gifts. W e need people w h o really en jo y their accomplishments a n d a re enthusiastic a b o u t cultivating them. T h e a m o u n t of su p p re sse d and

f 432]

uncultivated talent in this w o rld is a p ­ palling. People, on the w ho le, do not consider it w orthw h ile to cultivate their gifts w h e re th e re a re no m o n e ta ry a d ­ v antag es. T h e y do n ot even take the trouble to discover w h e th e r th e y have a n y gifts; a n d if th e y h a v e any, they make no effort to utilize them. H o w m a n y people, for example, h a v e a good ear for music or a voice of fine quality, or a good eye for color a n d yet think musical or artistic training absu rd. O n th e whole, people re g a r d a rtistic tra in ­ ing as valuable only for children and un ne c e ssary for ad u lts unless “ it p a y s .” It is difficult for an u n tra in e d person to a pp reciate the finest w o rk s of genius. T h e m ore one k n ow s of an art. the more one can ap preciate a masterpiece, T h e s e literary, artistic, a n d scientific gifts are p a rt o f soul evolution, an d are divine, just as much as psychic powers. T h e cultivation of these gifts makes for soul refinement, the raising of one's vi­ brations, a n d for beautiful a n d inspiring leisure. T h in k how much more beauti­ ful life in a n y place w o uld be if it re­ volved a ro u n d the a r t g allery a n d the concert hall and the university, instead of the moving picture theater. N o t that moving pictures do not possess their na tu ral an d educational values. T h e tone a n d artistic qu ality of moving pic­ tures have un m ista k a bly improved in the last few ye a rs. All the moving pic­ tures could no t possibly be worthwhile. Y et a large proportion of o u r population a tte n d the moving pictures more than once a week. In addition, to a tte n d a moving picture is a passive form of leisure-time activity. It is equivalent to "s p ec ta to r sp o rts .” Passive activities should be b alan ced b y active interests. O n e should not co n s ta n tly absorb. O n e must find avenues of exp ressio n of cre­ ative activity. It is absolutely essential for every oc­ cult stu d e n t to be a lover, a p a tro n , and even a stu d e n t of ju st as m a n y of the arts as he possibly can find time for. T h e life o f love a n d of service m eans just as much the e n c o u ra g e m en t of all th at is beautiful a s to feed the hu n g ry a n d clothe the naked. It w a s a n eastern mystic w h o said, " I f you have but two coins, sp e n d one for a loaf of b re a d and one for a lily.” O u r A m e rica n civiliza­ tion is still too m aterial, to o physical, too

prosaic despite noble atte m p ts in the arts here a n d there. It is our d u ty to make the effort to raise th a t level at least as far a s w e a re personally c o n ­ cerned a n d as m uch as w e can in our sphere o f influence. In our p re se n t type of civilization th e a rts are a luxury. T h e y a re d e p e n d e n t on people’s income. In a period of depression the a rts are among th e first to suffer. A s fa r as some of o u r b usin e ss m en are concerned, judging from the violent a n d w holly u n ­ justifiable a n ta g o n ism to n ational w o r k projects, th e y w o u ld remain totally u n ­ moved if e v e ry musician, artist, poet, writer, architect, a n d actor h a d to forgo his one divine gift a n d become a d is h ­ w a sh e r o r stre e t-sw e e p er. N o t th a t m u ndane, e v e r y d a y tasks are u nn e ce s­ sary , or the experience unprofitable, b u t of w h a t avail to compel the m ajority of gifted y o u n g folks to enter fields a lre a d y o vercro w d ed? W e do n ot see the tra g e d y th a t o u r coarse age inflicts upon countless souls b ecause for one reason o r a n o th e r w e h av e become insensitive a n d b ru ta liz e d in the struggle for exist­ ence. T h e g re a t lesson of frustration should b e to o p en our h e a rts to the needs of others. W e should feel w ith others. W e s h o u ld help to change c o n ­ ditions so th a t these frustrations should be forever impossible. O t h e r civiliza­ tions h a v e utilized the gifts o f their citizens a n d there is no reason w h y our age sho uld b e so b a r r e n except th a t of dullness of spiritual vision. T h e g r e a te st mystics of the w orld have been m en of w on de rfu l soul devel­ opment. T a k e Sir F ra n c is Bacon. H e w a s law yer, jud ge, poet, dram atist, sci­ entist, ph ilosop her, statesm an, a n d oc­ cultist. H e g a v e E nglish civilization its stam p a n d form. T a k e an earlier h is­ toric p erso nality , th a t of L eo n a rd o da Vinci, one o f the greatest o f the Italian R e n a issa n c e period. H e enriched every field to w hich h e tu rn ed his attention. W h e n he stu d ie d music, h e im proved the instrum ent. W h e n he w o rk e d on his paintings, he exp erim ented w ith colors a n d types of v a rn ish . H e experim ented in physics a n d chemistry. H e studied optics, h y d ra u lic engineering, a n d a n a t ­ omy. Like G o e th e , all kn ow ledge w as his province. H e w a s creative in every field. T h is rich developm ent, no doubt, w a s the flower of seeds sow n in previous

[ 433 ]

The R o sic ru cia n D ig est D ecem ber 1940

incarnations; b u t each a n d every one of us m ust some d a y be g in som ewhere. It is a sham e to p erm it y e a r after y e a r to go by, incarnation a f te r incarnation to go by. a b so rb e d o n ly in th e needs of the physical man, indifferent to the n eeds of the spirit, d e a f to the call of the soul. Let u s no t be on c ultural “ relief," th a t is, co ntent with th e b a re st minimum. Let us d e m a n d a m aximum culture. T a k e the great m o d e m occultist. R u ­ dolph Steiner. H e w a s most diligent in correlating occultism w ith dram a, poetry, the dance, a n d the lite ra ry arts. I hav e m ention ed on ly three p e rso n a l­ ities of compelling interest because of their manifold developm ent, their rich­ ness in gifts, th eir g re a t contributions to culture a n d civilization. T h e s e three great men w ere, in addition, profound stu d e n ts of the occult sciences. M a d a m e Blavatsky, to m ention one more, w a s also a n accom plished musician, a gifted writer, a profou nd stu d e n t of co m p a ra ­ tive religion a n d ph iloso ph y, a n d a n in­ defatigable traveller. In fact, w e m ay safely state, th a t the g re a te r the occult­ ist, the richer th e p e rson a lity is in many, even widely diversified, fields. A s the great R om an p la y w rig h t, T e re n c e, said: “ N o th in g hu m an is alien to me." Such w a s the motto of th e s e great a d o r n ­ ments a n d b e n e fa cto rs of the hum an race. Let us con sider one more p h a se of soul developm ent. Soul developm ent also includes a spiritual outlook upon life, a ch a ra c ter in w hich altruism is ingrained, to which the life of love a n d service has become habitual. I m m e d i a t e l y there come to mind the g rea t saints a n d a v a ­ tars of the a ges — Z o r o a s te r, B u dd ha, Confucius. M oses, a n d Jesus. W e think of St. F rancis of A ssisi a n d Joan o f Arc. W h a t are th e qualities th a t m ake for a spiritual personality? I should place first of all, a genuine love of h um anity —no t a passive ty p e o f interest th a t is content to express itself in h ig h -so u n d ­ ing terms, but a d y n a m ic type th a t is not afraid to be in d ig n a n t at the sight of great w ron gs, t h a t is vigilant in c h a m ­ pioning the cause o f th e poor, the d ow ntroden. the p ersecuted , the homeless. V V

a n d the o ppressed. T h e true lover of m an kind does n ot p re fe r peace w h e n it m eans indifference to the w oes of suffer­ ing hum anity. T h e fu nd am e n ta l p rin ­ ciple of the mystic ph ilosophy is the u nity of all th a t lives. T h e physical w o rld is the garm ent of the ever-living G o d. H e w h o loves the F a t h e r ’s c re a ­ tion h a s re g a r d for all th a t lives, no m a tte r ho w humble or insignificant. H e w h o studies the miracle o f the universe m ust be filled w ith love. A s L eo n a rd o da V inci tells us, “ K no w led ge begets Love." S u re ly with g ro w in g know ledge a n d with love in our h e a rts w e m ust d e ­ sire the h app in ess of all. W e m ust not overlook the smallest deed o f good-will. W e must n ot be deaf to the feeblest cry of the helpless, the bew ildered , the o p ­ pressed. G o d pours H is blessings upon m ankind th ro u g h willing h an ds. M o s t of us, though w e m ay have been stu d e n ts for m a n y years, a re v e ry far from this exalted ideal of g re a t soul d e ­ velopm ent. W e are very fa r from m ani­ festing o u r soul qualities, our latent genius, w h a te v e r it m ay be, a n d from achieving the h e ig h t of a beau tifu l spir­ ituality, Let these tw o p h ase s o f devel­ opm ent be o u r goal. Let us strive to b e ­ come b en efactors of m ankind . Let us s tu d y the n eed s o f men t h a t w e m ay learn to love them. O r, filling our h earts w ith love, let us be d r a w n to the m any p a th s of service so sorely n ee d e d today. T h i s is the ideal for the w orld today. Let us forget a b o u t psychic pow ers for th e present. L et them develop n aturally . Let us w a it for the d a y w h e n w e are r e a d y for the personal guid an ce th a t even the g re a te st stu d e n ts ha d . T o m ake the utm ost o f our ow n po tentiali­ ties, to do the u tm ost in o u r chosen field o f w ork, will be a lifetime job for most o f us. Let me assu re y o u th a t th e re is no joy in the w o rld com parable to the joy o f doing a ne c e ssa ry task. T h e r e is no joy like th a t of creative activity. T h e r e is no jo y like th a t of the d a y s w ith loving tasks a n d loving friends. W i t h these ideals, w e help the world, w e p re p a re the w a y for initiation a n d discipleship. V

H e is the happ iest, be he king or p easant, w h o finds peace in his hom e.—-Goethe.

SANCTUM MUSINGS
= - ■ = : r=-.

$
=Z

By T h o r

PRAYER K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
world, for com m union with the G od within, the divine principle within us. for thanksgiving a n d a doration. G o d has instituted laws in n a tu re a n d one of them is "cause a n d effect." W e cannot therefore p ra y to G o d to relieve us of the effect from se lf- c r e a te d causes. P ra y e r need not be the traditional form of set w ords. Intense interest is a form of p ray er. A spiration is a form of prayer. Action is a pow erful form of prayer. If you are deeply interested in a c e r­ tain subject, m aterial will come to you from all over the w orld. T o read books on the subject, to correspo nd with p e o ­ ple equally interested, to accum ulate in­ formation y e a r a fte r year, will do you more good th a n all the affirmations a n d p rayers in the w orld w hen not coupled with action. If yo u insist on brea k in g the law s of health, is it logical to expect to be healed p e rm an e ntly th ro u g h prayer? Illness is a sign th a t the law s of n a tu re a re being broken. T h r o u g h illness w e are co m ­ pelled to learn these laws a n d live in harm o n y with them. A n illness seem ­ ingly cured th ro u g h faith or p ra y e r or the po w er of th o u g h t m ay not be a real cure a t all. Such a cure m ay be similar to the relief th a t comes from taking medicine or d ru gs. T h e seeds of the ill­ ness remain on the psychic plane. T h e physical m anifestation is tem porarily prevented from expressing itself. T h e illness m ay b reak out more virulently some o th e r time. It is b etter to let the

E C E N T L Y I re­ c e iv e d a p ra y e r f r o m a neophyte. B rother Field says in his letter that he c o m p o s e d it and h a s it h a n g i n g over his bed. and r e a d s it e v e r y night before retir­ i n g . H e r e it is: " M a y the G od of our h e a rts send H is divine bless­ ing to nigh t on all w h o suffer and who a re in need. M a y the sacred teachings of the G r e a t W h i t e B rotherh ood be sp re a d to all the co rners of the earth so th a t all men m ay learn those things which are sacred a n d d e a r to them. M a y the grace of G od a n d the teachings of the M a s te r Jesus forever a n d ever e n ­ lighten m an. M a y the B reth ren of the Rosy C ross diligently c a rry the light which shines so brightly, a n d may it never grow dim on the P a th ." T h e s e beautiful th o u g h ts led me to consider the v e ry vital subject of prayer. M a n y conflicting opinions are ram p ant as to its efficacy. Some con sider pray er necessary a n d m an y consider prayer un ­ necessary. W e w a n t to know the truth a bout the subject from an occult point The of view. P e rh a p s the conflicting points R o sic ru c ia n of view m ay be reconciled. D ig e st Let me state at the outset that prayer January is prim arily for the pu rp ose of a ttune1 941 ment with the divine forces of the

f -*7-4 ]

impurities be d rained out of the system a n d to let n a tu re a p p ly its healing process. If you w a n t to enter one of the p ro ­ fessions, if you wish to become a civil service employee, if you w ish to choose one of the arts, it is obvious th a t prayer m ust be fortified b y the fact th a t you meet all the requirem ents, th a t you have the necessary aptitud e, training , a n d ex­ perience. T h e n o nly can you apply a dom inant will for success. Let me rep eat a s ta te m en t th a t 1 have m ade more th a n once. M a d a m e Blavatsky did not consider p r a y e r necessary. She considered conviction sufficient to sustain a man in the trials a n d tribula­ tions of daily life. C on victio ns as to w hat, you m ay ask? C onvictions as to the fundam ental law s a n d principles of life — the law of reincarn ation , karma, a n d m a n ’s relation to the various king­ doms of nature, m a n ’s place in the scheme of evolution. If o u r one aim is to help in the w ork of evolution, to live in harm ony with the divine principles of the universe, to do the ta sk for which w e incarnated, our very aspirations, our daily lives are a co nstan t prayer. Each one of us contains a divine prin­ ciple. T h e purpose of life on earth is the union of our souls with this divine prin­ ciple. T h is is illumination. W h e n this great experience is a tta in e d , w e live naturally in accord an ce w ith the divine laws of the world. W e a re reborn. O u r convictions become the solid foundation of our lives. Instead of sp e n ding hours a t prayer, w e sp e n d h o u rs in fruitful action. In the p resent crisis in the world, action is necessary; daily, unremitting action. Both individual a n d united ac­ tion is necessary. W e m ust w ork to bring about a better sta te of society after the w a r is over. T h e w o rk of rescue is urg en t. W h e n the individual consciousness is a ttu n e d to peace and realization of b ro th erho od, there can be no strife or w ars. O u r w o rk is to em­ phasize a n d sp re a d th is conception. W e r e a divine m essen ger to bring the w a r miraculously to a close today, the w ar would not really be over. T h e seeds of w a r w ould still lurk in m odern so­ ciety. T h e causes of w a r m ust be for­ ever eliminated thro u g h understan ding and cooperation. M a n m ust evolve be­

y o n d his p re se n t sav a g e state of greed, selfishness, a n d cruelty. M a n m ust learn to be social-m inded a n d w orld-m inded. T h e individual man m ust have a con­ sciousness in his h eart of his o w n unity with all life, a n d his active responsibility thereto. T h e g re a te r the num ber of e n ­ lightened h u m a n beings in the w orld, the more impossible does w a r become. People p r a y a rd e n tly for peace a n d y e t nourish h a tre d to w a rd s their b r o th ­ ers. People p ra y a rd e n tly for peace a n d y e t rem ain ig n o ra n t of the causes th a t produce strife. People p r a y a rd e n tly for peace a n d y e t lift not a finger to help the w o rld in its dire need. W e a re h e r e in the w orld th a t our faculties m a y develop th rough use. If w e do n o t use them, th e y will atro p h y . Such is n a tu r e 's law. W e shall achieve more u n d e r s ta n d in g w h e n our intuition functions. T h e intuition, also, develops thro u g h life experience. T h e child w ith freedom to p la y a n d to experim ent, the child w ho is given responsibility, will d e ­ velop more ra p id ly than the child w h o is co n sta n tly supervised a n d w hose food is pred ig ested for it. so to speak. N o t to ta k e a ste p w ith o u t the guidance of an astrologer, o r a medium, or a practitio n­ er. of one so rt or an o th e r is eventually paralyzing. H o w shall one develop ini­ tiative? H o w shall one develop creative ability? H o w shall one become c o u ra ­ geous? It is b e tte r not to lean on the invisible w o rld s . Lean rather o n the divine w ith in ourselves. R ead the first c h a p te r of th e p rop he c y of Isaiah, a n d also the fifth. T h e interpretation of these passages from an occult view point teaches us th a t G o d has given us every spiritual a d ­ v a ntag e. E v e r y religion has its savior, its Bible, its sacred traditions a n d te a ch ­ ings. T h e g re a t a v a ta r s have come to teach us the divine principles of the uni­ verse. O b se rv a n c e of these laws brings ha rm o n y into the life of the individual a n d the nation. Disobedience brings every ty p e of karmic consequences. P r a y e r c a n n o t avert karmic conse­ quences. A d h e ra n c e to the forms, the ritual, the traditional observances, the o u tw a rd ceremonies of a religion cann ot avert karmic consequences. First a n d foremost, the heart must be cleansed, a n d the h a n d s must be clean.

[47*]

W e c an not deceive people socially or politically, w e can no t exploit o u r w o r k ­ ing classes, a n d steal or d e frau d , and expect punctilious observance of church ceremonies to balance our soul-account. W e m ust rig h t the w ro n g s of which we know w e a re guilty. W e m ust be as truthful a n d as honorable as w e can in our business a n d social relationships. W e must be u p rig h t as citizens. W e m ust coo perate to the best of our ability in erad icating vice a n d crime a n d the various forms of social injustice. T o fight a g ain st racial a n d religious p re j­ udice is more im portant than to a tte n d church regularly. T h e purpose of church service is to remind us of our moral and ethical obligations. If church a tte n d ­ ance a n d sup p o rt make us feel th a t w e have fulfilled o u r d u ty to G o d a n d man then the purpose of the church is lost.

Let us examine our lives, our thoughts, our motives, as a p ro o f-re a d er examines a manuscript. Let us come a little nearer every d a y to the ideal of th e life of love a n d action. Let us a w a k e n the divine within ourselves. Let us not hesitate to seek spiritual nou rishm en t in the Bibles of the world. Let us in terp ret the text spiritually in the light of o u r occult studies. D o not think th a t I advocate n o n -a tte n d a n ce of c hurch services and prayer. E v ery b reath you take should be a p ra y e r of th an ksgiving , a n d every meal you eat should be a communion with God. T o live in accordan ce with divine principles m eans to increase our k no w l­ edge a n d utilize it in d a y - to - d a y living. K now ledge lights th e w a y . stre n g th e n s convictions, a n d bu rn s up ignorance. T h r o u g h enlightened action karmic e f ­ fects can be a d ju ste d , tra n s m u te d a n d balanced.

V

V

V

W h e r e there is freedom there is nothing to stop g row th, th erefore men hold it first, a n d greatest of all. G r o w th is the river of life, a n d liberty the channel in w hich it r u n s .— /. W illiam Llo yd.

V

V

V

R E L A X A T IO N A N D IN S T R U C T IO N
T im e passes quickly, and you will soon be m aking definite plans fo r y o u r vacation. W h y not this y e ar m ake special plans to com bine in y o u r vacation a period of instruc­ tion from capable teachers and the relaxation of three or four w eeks spent at R osicrucian P ark? In stru cto rs will be ready at the beginning of the term c f the R ose-C roix U niversity to teach you. T h ere will be special courses in philosophy, physics, m usic, biology, and m any o th er subjects to o num erous to m ention. F urtherm ore, in all these subjects you will receive instruction from one capable to present the subject and to relate it directly with the R osicrucian teachings. In addition to the regular instruction, there will be special lectures by the Suprem e officers of th e O rd e r and special L odge sessions in the T em ple, presided o v er by the G rand M aster. All these hours of instruction, inspiration and re ­ lax a tio n a w a it all m em bers planning to attend the R ose-C roix U n iv e rsity in its term from June 23 to July 12. W rite to d ay for y o u r copy of 'T h e S tory of L earning," if y o u do not have it, and include in y o u r plans the attending of the R osicrucian C onvention, w hich im m ediately follow s the U n iv e rsity from July 13 to July 19. T h o se w h o cannot come to R osicrucian P a rk for th e full p eriod of the U niversity session and th e C onvention are urged to include in their vacation plans at least sufficient time to a tten d the C onvention.

The R osicru cia n D ig e s t January 19 4 1

[476]

Reincarnation
By T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
(I c r a v e th e r e a d e r s ' in d - i g e n c e lo r th e u s e o i th e p e r s o n a l p r o n o u n in w ritin g a b o u t my r e a c tio n to th e d o c t r i n e o l r e i n c a r n a t io n .)

H E N 1 first became

a c q u a i n t e d with the philosophy of mysticism, one of the most inspiring of its teachings to me w a s t h e doc­ trine of rein c a rn a ­ tion. It came as a sort of revelation. It s t r u c k me immediately as being an eternal truth, a s o l u t i o n to t h e m any enigmas of life. It was the a s s u r ­ ance of immortality th a t my inner self w as unconsciously seeking. I w on de re d that I could ever have doubted the e x ist­ ence of the soul, the purpose of life on earth, the inherent justice of the Divine Plan. I had sought the solution for life’s ills in the m any schools of philosophies and religions, and in the various theories of economics, but not one had satisfied both the inquiring a n d reasoning mind and the aching heart. A philosophy of life w ithout a spiritual basis seemed to lead merely to fitful efforts to g ra sp as niuch of this w orld's goods and p leas­ ures as circumstances permitted. It led to a decided lowering of moral and e th ­ ical s ta n d a rd s of conduct. T h e n I learned about the divine life force and h ow it manifested in matter'— *n an impulse of e n c rg v and rest, energy and rest, ad infinitum. I s a w the s e a s o n s come a n d go. a n d recognized in n ature the same law of activity a n d rest. M y

own b ody unconsciously m anifested the same law. T h e h e a rt action, the pulse beat, all d e m o n stra te d the natural law of life. Activity a n d rest an d activity again w ithout end. Life is eternal and can not be d estroy ed , onlv its e x p re s­ sion changes. T h e doctrine of reincar­ nation completely c hanged mv outlook upon life. Previously I had chafed bit­ terly against the limitations of my lot and place in society. T h e r e w ere so m any things I h a d a rdentlv. even fierce­ ly. desired. W h y w a s one born to suffer sickness a n d distress, and a n o th e r with health and w e a l t h 7 A glimpse of the truth flashed across my inner conscious­ ness. O n e lifetime w a s but a single page in the volume th a t m ade up the life of the soul. A nd m y turbulent spirit w as at peace. N o t a single limitation in my life had been removed, and yet I felt e m a n c i p a t e d . Life had c o m p l e t e l y c hanged its aspects. I r e g ard e d with new interest my own cha ra cter a n d per­ sonality. my environm ent, a n d the peo­ ple with w hom I came in d aily contact. W h a t had I bro u g h t w i t h me from the past? How' could I build a better future? Life had seemed a s e n s e l e ss a n d dull affair, but n ow it s u dd e nlv b e c am e very exciting. I h a d learned that the p er­ sonality progresses verv sl o wl y through the early incarnations. T h e conception of c o n s c i o u s n e s s d eve l o ps gra du a lly through nature. T h e dav of e n lig h te n ­ ment comes to all of us. W i t h effort and purpose it can a c comp l i s h in one incar­ nation w hat had previously taken fifty.

w h e re no incentive existed. T h a t acted losophy of the E a st. T h e r e w-as a new a s a sp u r a n d a challenge. W h y take bo n d n o w b e tw e e n me a n d m y old fifty incarnations if it can be done in favorites. T h e earth is a school a n d every soul less? T h e n I learned th a t nothing is lost. is learning a lesson. All n a tu r e is h e lp ­ E v e r y n e w idea is a p e rm a n e n t posses­ ing us learn our lesson. W e are on the sion of the subconscious mind. E very road to unim agined b e a u ty a n d splen­ little achievem ent leaves an impress. dor. W e a r e on the ro a d to perfection. E v e r y a t t e m p t m akes future efforts W h a t a tre m e n d o u s incentive to co­ easier a n d more fruitful. I found a new op erate with the forces of n ature, to interest in every s tu d y , in every activity. participate in th e g r e a t plan for th e e v o ­ O ld ag e th a t 1 h ad pitied a n d dreaded lution of hum anity. I h a d been so a b sorbe d in m y ow n n o w seem ed as beautiful a n d as full of o p p o rtu n ity as youth. T o me it w as a problems a n d troubles th a t it did n ot beautiful th o u g h t th a t one could grow occur to me t h a t o th e r people w e re a n d s tu d y a n d improve rig h t till the struggling ju st a s d esperately. 1 b e ­ v e ry last d a y on earth, a n d even beyond. came conscious o f the fact th a t others T o p lan in terms of incarnations w as w e re strug glin g w ith greater handicaps, a n intoxicating tho ug ht. T o think th a t w ere stum bling u n d e r g re a te r burden s. the horizons of life a n d of experience H o w b e a utiful it is w h e n w e strug gle sho uld s u d d e n ly h av e so unim aginably together, w h e n w e lighten one a n o th e r ’s burd en s, w h e n w e w alk to g e th e r on the expanded! T h e tho ug ht of death h a d been ever P a th leading to Love a n d Joy a n d like the clutch of an icy h an d . But now Liberation! AH these th o u g h ts came to me w h e n I no lon ger feel so rry for one w h o p a ss­ es on. I feel so rry for those w h o are I accepted reincarnation. It w a s a g re a t bereft. Some day. 1 kno w , even that shock to discover th a t o th e rs did not so rro w will vanish. W h e n know ledge react in the sa m e w a y to this g re at o f th e conditions a fte r transitio n b e ­ truth. T h e y w e r e a fr a id o f re in c a rn a ­ comes m ore prevalent, w h e n people tion. T h e y did n ot w a n t to re tu rn to th e lea rn h ow to become "e n r a p p o r t" with w orld to continue their development. those on the plane of soul, transition T h e law of com pensation th e y looked will be re g a rd e d in its tru e light, as upon a s divine vengeance. T h e y did m erely the passing from one state of no t like the idea t h a t their ow n past h a d consciousness to a n other, a s the clos­ sh ap ed th eir p resent, a n d th a t the p r e s ­ ing of one period of developm ent, and ent w a s shaping their future. I p on d ere d long over this u nex pected the b e g i n n i n g of an o th e r period of reaction. I cam e to the conclusion th a t development. It is w o n d e rfu l to k n o w th a t d ear they w ere a fra id of responsibility. P e r ­ friends are never lost. It is w on de rfu l h ap s th e y w e r e even lazy. T h e y w a n te d to k n o w th a t love does last for ages. It to eat their cake a n d still h av e it. T h e y is w o n d e rfu l to k no w t h a t the cynics w a n te d to yield to all their b a s e r im­ a n d the pessimists a n d the killjoys are pulses a n d escape th e consequences. suffering from m yopia, spiritual blin d­ T h e y th o u g h t n a tu r e very cruel in n ot ness. T h e y grope in the d a rk like bats perm itting us to e a t as much as o u r a p ­ a n d moles. T h e y th in k th e w orld is petites w ould like, o r to drink a s heavily black because th e y a re blin d to the as w e w o u ld like, or to sm oke too light. It is w o n d e rfu l to kn ow th a t the much, o r to tu r n n ig h t into da y , o r be seers, th e p rop hets, a n d th e p o e ts spoke utterly reckless o f the n eeds of the the truth. T h e lo fty sta te m e n ts of the body. I h a v e v e ry rarely h e a rd such g re a t thinkers of the a ges assu m e d a people a d m it t h a t th e y have broken n a ­ n e w m eaning, an a d d e d significance. I tu re ’s law s a n d n o w th e y m ust live more tu r n e d o ver the p a g e s of Plato , Goethe, intelligently. The Such attitu d e is indicative o f im m atur­ P n d r r u r i n n S h a k e sp e a re , W illia m Blake, W illiam W o r d s w o r t h . E m erson a n d W a l t W h i t ­ ity. It is a child's point of view. W h a t D ig e s t m an w ith n ew interest. S tr a n g e th a t I sort of w o rld w o u ld it be, w e re there no F e b ru a r y h a d n ot noticed h o w s a tu r a te d these such law as t h a t o f cause a n d effect? 1941 g re at souls w e re w ith the m ystic p hi­ W h y shou ld it b e more an no y in g to
f 28]

care for the b o d y intelligently than to care for the family car or the heating system in y o u r home? W h y should w e be too lazy to make a n effort to control thought, a n d speech a n d action? E very relationship in life requires a sense of responsibility for its consummation. You cannot be a sa tisfa c tory p a r e n t w ithout a sense of responsibility. Y ou cannot be successful in y o u r business or profession w ithout a sense of responsibility. O u r country w ould be a far finer place in which to live h a d w e more citizens with a sense of responsibility. D em ocracy a n d our C o nstitu tion will survive only if enough people are r e a d y to take the responsibilities seriously of upholding it. T o be r e a d y to assum e responsibility is a sign of m aturity. It is a sign that we are begin ning to g r o w up. A s we are re a d y to assum e responsibility for our various duties of life, so must w e be ready to assum e responsibility for the evolution of our souls, for our relation­ ships with others, for the evolution of hum anity as a whole. Life on earth is a vast cooperative enterprise. As each one improves, so is the w o rld benefited. As each one helps, so is the burden of the world lessened. E ach soul is needed. N o soul is superfluous. T h i n k not w h a t an insignificant unit you are, or that your efforts d o n ot count, or th a t no one will miss you. T h in k r a t h e r of the peo­ ple that need you, of the causes that wait for y o u r interest a n d activity, of the p art th a t yo u are destined to play in the w ork in g out of the divine Plan. E very one has his allotted part to play in th e unfolding of the divine Plan. O u r experience in life is training us for this great work. If w e a re r e a d y to take ourselves in h a n d , if w e a re re a d y to a s ­ sume responsibility, if w e a re rea d y to give the ne c e ssa ry time a n d make the required effort, w e can qualify all the sooner for this g r e a t task. If w e love the world, if w e love o u r fellowman, we should be r e a d y a n d e ager to p la y our Part, to do o u r share. T h e w orld to d a y in the slough of despond. Civilization seems in the process of dissolving before our very eyes. T h e s h a d o w of w a r daily comes closer. M o s t people are helpless a n d bew ildered. It is painful to realize th a t one must share the responsibility for the present

debacle. It is painful to realize th a t in­ difference a n d a p a t h y perm itted the forces of evil to gain control, th a t the purpose of life is no t indulgence in physical p leasu res only, th a t interest in one's own p rivate affairs alone is suici­ dal for the nation a n d for the world. T h e cataclysm in the w o rld to d a y is the inevitable consequence of person al in­ terests a n d national interests taking p r e ­ cedence over w o rld w elfare. It is the inevitable consequence of living for greed instead o f for service. W e must aw ake. W e m ust become responsible h u m a n beings. W e must realize th a t every link in a chain is necessary. In fact, a chain is as strong as its w e a k e st link. O u r actions envelop us like a cloud. T h e evil th at w e d o be­ comes mire aro u n d our feet, d ra g g in g us dow n a n d delaying our progess. T h e good th a t w e do gives us w ing s on which to soar. K arm a has a gloom y n ote only for the irresponsible, fo r the selfish, for the lawless, a n d for those w h o delight in evil. It w o rk s for good as well a s for evil. It b rings jo y a s well as sorrow . It makes for g re a te r opportunities. I t c re ­ ates genius. It b rin g s liberation nearer. Let us do the task w e love, a n d our genius will become m anifest. Let us do faithfully the task a t h a n d , a n d n e w o p ­ portunities will a p p e a r. L et us s tu d y the A ncient W i s d o m a n d learn to live in a c ­ cordance with n a tu re 's laws. Let us live the life o f love a n d service, a n d help m ake the w o rld a b etter place to live in. As long as we refuse to realize th a t law is the fo undation of the w orld, w e must learn th ro u g h blood a n d tears. W h e n w e are r e a d y to realize t h a t the only joyful w a y is G o d 's w a y , w e transm ute experience into w isdom , a n d w e dis­ cover the isle of s a fe ty in the m idst of the storm. T h e storm is w ho lly of b lundering a n d ign oran t m a n ’s creation. M a n plays w ith dy nam ite a n d is a ppalled to dis­ cover th a t dy n a m ite explodes. W e can make this w o rld a b e a utifu l place to live in. W e can m ake it a fascinating la b o r­ atory w h e re every m o m en t w e learn new things. W e can m ake it a n or-

(Concluded on Page 34)
]

[ 29

dividuals w h o can b u d g et neither time, money, n o r effort. T h e ir youth is spent in the m a d w hirl of getting a thrill, a n d w ith old a g e they cry that life w a s " u n f a ir ." Since the w orld ow es no one a n y th in g , each must be responsible for his p r e s e n t as well as his future. H e w h o s q u a n d e r s his talents and abilities, his time a n d his money, to d ay cannot expect to have a storehouse of wealth tom orrow . F in a lly there is the individual w h o lives o n ly in the future. H e m ay be a religious zealot w ho ignores the im­ p o rta n c e o f the b od y a n d life on this e a r th ly p la n e in the false belief th a t this mortal existence does not count, or he m ay be sim ply the individual w h o b e n d s all his energies to amassing a fortune to en jo y w h e n he can retire. N e e d I cite the h u n d r e d s of misers w h o saved a n d stinted, d en y in g themselves every p le a ­

sure in life only to die before enjoying one single luxury, to prove the error of this type of philosophy? T h e individual w ho builds up such habits of hoarding rarely ever e njoys a n y luxury, even if he lives to an a g e w h e n he can retire. T h e time never comes in his conscious­ ness w h e n he can s p e n d freely for him ­ self or a n y o n e else. H is ' fu tu re " takes on the miserly a sp e c t of his present or his past w hen it actu a lly materializes. O n ly b y p ro p e rly com bining the v ir­ tues a n d c orrectly correlating the past, the present, a n d the future, can we e n ­ joy the fullest m ea su re of happiness and contentm ent. W i t h an u nd e rsta nding of w h a t each c on tribu te s to the sum total of m a n ’s existence, w e shall be qualified to give credit to o u r forbears, profit by our o w n p ast m istakes, enjoy the pleasures of the present, a n d plan grea te r h app in ess for the future.

V

V

V

I F M Y B U S IN E S S M E T H O D S A R E W R O N G — (C on tin u ed from P a g e 32) will be applying the fire of the crucible to them . M a k e it y o u r business to lift y o u r practices higher a n d high er each day. n o t b y n eg ating the business, not by casting it aside a n d ab an d o n in g it to those w h o have no heart, no active c o n ­ science, b u t b y becoming the saviour of yo u r business, the leader in the e volu­ tio n a ry c h a n g e s th a t must be w o rk e d ou t slo w ly a n d carefully. E ach time yo u a r e forced to use a practice, a m ethod, a principle th a t you recognize as u n ­ so und , d o it with y o u r consciousness c o n c e n tra te d upon its u n so un dn e ss a n d V V make it sta n d ou t in all its crimson d is­ tinctiveness a n d th e re b y isolate it from the o th e r principles a n d m ethods which are good a n d true. Little b y little these m a rked things will be s e p a r a te d a n d you will h ave a g ro u p o f b ra n d e d practices, condem ned, o s t r a c i s e d a n d rejected. T h is will be p a rt o f the process of evo­ lution o f y o u r bu sin e ss a n d you will be one o f those like the m any in the past ye a rs w h o h av e a id e d in similar w a y s in m aking all our business, social a n d e d u ­ cational system s b e tte r a n d more ideal than th e y w ere h u n d r e d s o f y e a rs ago. V

R E IN C A R N A T IO N ( C o n tin u e d from P a g e 29) The R o sicrucian D ig e s t F e b ru a ry 1941 c h e stra o f trem endous b e a u ty a n d p o w ­ er. W e can make it a p arad ise, a g a r ­ d e n o f p eace a n d joy a n d loving fellow­ ship. All these beautiful things a r e p os­ sible if w e a re re a d y to assum e re s p o n ­ sibility. if w e a re ea g e r to train o u r­ selves for o u r s h a re in the g re a t project, if w e a re r e a d y for a w o rld fellowship, a n d if w e are r e a d y to th in k in terms of incarnations in stead o f years.

[34]

W ho Is a Mystic?
By T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
E B S T E R sa y s th a t "a m y s t i c is o n e having f r e q u e n t m y s t i c a l experi­ ences, a follower, often an e x p o u n d ­ er, of a m y s t i c a l w a y o f life." A s s t u d e n t s o f th e high er th o u g h t w e s a y th a t a mystic is one w h o v olun ­ tarily em braces a c e rta in ty p e of life. H e chooses a certain w a y of liv­ ing because of his outlook upon life. T h e fu n dam en tal principles of the m ys­ tic’s philosophy a re the u n ity of all that lives, a n d the life of love a n d service. T h e unity of all th a t lives m ay be in ter­ preted in m a n y w ays. It m ay be in­ terpreted to m ean the fa th e rh o o d of G od a n d the b ro th e rh o o d of man. It m ay be in te rpre ted to mean m an 's re­ sponsibility to his fellow m an . It m ay be interp reted to mean the divine sp a rk in every h u m a n being, the sacred ness and inviolability of hum an individuality, the place th a t ev e ry hum an being has in the scheme o f things. It n ecessarily follows th a t if each man has his place in the sun, then each man has his divinely appo in ted w o rk to do. N o hu m an being is superfluous. A man m ay no t m easure up to his obliga­ tions. A m an m a y be w ro n g ly placed in life. Failure a n d m a lad ju stm ent do not mean th a t he h a s lost his place in the family of hum an ity. M a n is his b ro th e r ’s keeper. T h e old er souls help the souls y o u n g er in evolution. E a c h helps in his ow n w a y a n d to the best o f his ability. E a c h does the tasks th a t life a ssigns to him as conscientiously a s he can. T h e mystic develops thro u g h the service th a t he renders h um anity. T h e genuine mystic, therefore, is a lover of h u m a n ity a n d a m an of action. H e aspires to be a se rv a n t of hum anity. T h e beginn er on the P a th m a y not fully reveal all the qualities. H e is learning the first lessons in th e life of love and service. H e m ay be following the P a th of Know ledge. S tu d y of the principles m ust eventually lead him to th e point w h e re he feels compelled to b rin g his life into h a rm o n y w ith his philosophy. H e m ay be following the P a th of D e v o ­ tion. Love of G o d m ust eventually bring him to the point w h e re he desires to serve m ankind, the sheep of th e Divine Shepherd. H e w h o loves G o d must w o rk in H is v ineyard . H e w h o loves G o d shares in the great cooperative en­ terprise of the evolution o f the race. T h a t is m a n 's crow n of g lo ry w hen he know s his divinely a p p o in te d ta sk a n d does it joyously. H e m ay be following the P a th of Action. If he is a stu d e n t o f mysticism, he must eventually realize th a t rig h t ac­ tion is th a t w hich fu rth ers the divine plan. R ight action is done for love of G od a n d for love of man. W h e n the one tho ug ht is to fu rth e r the Divine Plan, selfish desires a n d personal aims d isa p ­ pear. T h e r e are lofty levels of conduct for one w ho is on the P a th of Action. A s “ Light on the P a t h ” teaches, he

[ 5 7 ]

must learn to w ork with ambition a n d concentratio n. A s the ' B h a g a v a d -G ita " teaches, he m ust learn to give up the desire for the fruit of action. H e must sow the seed, u nperturb ed by the fact th a t there is no immediate rew ard or harvest. R esults lie in the lap of time. T h e r e is n o cause w-ithout its effect. K now ing the law. he can be patient. H e th ro w s himself into his share of the a p ­ pointed tasks until he becomes a p a rt of the P a th himself. If he chooses the P a th of Beauty, his destination is the same. T h r o u g h the b e a u ty of the physical w'orld. he learns to p en e tra te the veil of m atter a n d see the b e a u ty of the SDiritual world. F in ­ ally he discovers the divine b e a u ty — G o d as artist. T o know G od as artist is to see b e a u ty in all creation, and to love all G o d 's c reatu res because they are the w o rk o f H is h a n d s a n d therefore b e a u ­ tiful. H e w h o sees the b eauty of c re a ­ tion h a s a g re a t desire to share his vision w'ith his fellowmen. H e w ho sees the love a n d b e a u ty of G o d in every living thing has no desire to injure, or torm ent, or destroy. H e reg ards all life with reverence. E v ery flower, every bird, every w o od la n d creature is sacred. N o m a tter w h a t path the stu d e n t chooses, eventually he finds his w a y to the h e a rt of God, and there he learns to r a d ia te the divine love to all th a t lives a n d b reath es. T h e person w h o sits a ro u n d in soulful contemplation, w a it' ing to go to heaven, is a beginner. It does not take very long, if he sincerely applies himself to his studies and even to his contem plation, for him to become a w a re of the fact that his supreme duty is to try to make a heaven of earth. All illuminated souls have testified to the fact that one of the first revelations is that each is directed to the place w here he h a p p e n s to be, for service. Just there is his plot of qround to cultivate to the best of his ability. It is time for the public to realize that the mystic is dedicated to the good life a n d the unselfish life. T h e mystic is harmless. T h a t is, he tries to be just as harm less a s his aw a re ne ss of the needs The of others permit. H e certainly cannot R o s ic r u c ia n be obviously wicked, or heartless, or D ig e s t bloo dthirsty, or cruel. M arch It is w ro n g , a n d even a gross libel a n d an act of injustice, to r e g ard a man 1 94 1

dedicated to selfish e n d s and ruthless m ethods, as a mystic. H e m ay be a visionary. H e m ay be m ad. H e may even be a genius in evil, but he is cer­ tainly not a mystic. D oes he feel the oneness of all th a t lives? D oes the love o f h um an ity dom inate his heart? Is he gentle, merciful, a n d compassionate? “ By their fruits shall ye kn ow th em .” W e w h o love the mystic philosophy, w e w h o feel th a t it is the most inspiring philosophy in the w orld, w e w ho feel called upon to prove o u r love throuqh service, w e w ho a re m aking strenuous efforts to be more efficient in service, object to the misuse a n d the misinter­ pretation of the w o r d “ mystic.” T h e g reat mystics of the w o rld are the great philanthrop ists a n d the saviors of the w orld. T h e g re a t mystics are the dedi­ cated souls of the world. D o you know the s to r y of the great N e g ro chemist. G e o rg e W a s h in g to n C arv er? H e has qiven n e w life to so u th ­ ern agriculture thro u g h the uses he has found for the Deanut a n d the sweet potato. It is said th a t he has discovered over 200 uses. H e h a s qiven his d is ­ coveries as a gift to the farm ers of the South. H e h a s taken n o paten ts: he has claimed n o royalities. T h a t is the spirit of the genuine mystic. P ie rre and M a rie Curie, w ho d edicated th eir lives to the discovery of radium , a n d then gave their discovery as a gift to mankind, m ay have know n no th in g of mysticism, but their self-dedicated task w as in the spirit of genuine mysticism. T h e mystic k now s th a t true ha p p i­ ness is found only in self-forgetful se rv ­ ice. T h e more w e c an lose ourselves in a great task, the deeper the happiness w e feel. H e w h o is a bsorb ed in his w ork is indifferent to w e a th e r and e n ­ vironm ent, is oblivious of the usual p e tty trivialities a n d a n n o y a n c e s of d aily living. T h e r e is more joy in the p a n g s of creative labo r th a n in all the am u sem en ts of the world. It is said that L eon ard o da V inci sp e n t y e a rs on M on a Lisa a n d the Last S upper. It is said that M ilton sp e n t all his life on Pa ra d ise Lost; th a t G o ethe spent all his life on Fau st. It is said th a t Joseph C o n r a d re­ w rote one c h a p te r in one of his novels tw e n ty -tw o times. T h e r e is no greater joy than to bring b e a u ty to birth, to give to th o u g h t a substantial form. All his

[ 58]

life W a l t W h i t m a n w rote, rew ro te and revised his one volume. "L eaves of G r a s s .” In the N e w Y o rk T im e s M ag a z in e section of Jan u a ry 26. a p p e a re d an in­ terview b y E lizabeth R. V a le n tin e with our V ice -P re sid en t. H e n r y W a l la c e . In the course of the interview the V iceP resid en t w a s asked w h e th e r he con­ siders himself a mystic. T h e interview ­ er then states: " T h e V ic e - P re s id e n t him ­ self is am used and a little irritated by the term m ystic.’ T o him a mystic is a person w h o sits a ro u n d in soulful c o n ­ templation. w aiting to go to heaven. M r. W a lla c e indicates th at he has no time for this sort of thing, a n d that, since the he re a fter is highly p ro blem a­ tical, it w ould be more practical to try for 'heaven on e a r th ’.” W e w h o accept the mystic philosophy know th a t the h e re a fte r is a definite condition of consciousness. T o reduce the h e re a fter to the gloomy su persti­ tions of the middle a ges is foolish, and to ignore it completely is equally fool­ ish. T h e sensible pro ced ure is to stud y the states of consciousness know n as the he re a fter so th a t w e need not fear them, so th a t we m ay be p re p a re d for them, a n d so that w e m ay be a s useful as possible when the time comes for us to leave o u r physical plane of activity. T h e greater our know ledge, the greater will be our usefulness. T h e " h e re a f te r ” m ay also m ean the further d e stiny of the soul, which is re­ incarn atio n— the return to earth in a new b od y to continue the training of the soul. T h e r e are very definite condi­ tions controlling rebirth. If w e are in­ terested in our destinies, the sensible thing is to stu d y the laws controlling re­ birth so th a t we m ay merit opportunities for development, for g ro w th , a n d for increased service. A s long a s the a v e r­ age human being refuses to recognize the existence of a n y th in g th a t he can­ not see a n d feel a n d hear, as long as he refuses to recognize the application of laws to planes other th a n the physical, as long as he refuses to recognize states of consciousness higher than those he experiences daily, he will h ave difficulty V

in u n d e rsta n d in g life as it is a n d in controlling life. T h e w orld, as a whole, is in the process of learning through w h a t is know n as bitter experience. T h e d a y must come w h e n m an will be w e a ry of drifting w ith o u t com pass or ru d d e r on the w aves of circumstance, being buffeted here a n d there by conditions and environment. T h e n he will be re a d y to investigate the k now ledge that to d a y he lightly scorns or ignores. In the m eanw hile w e must be u n ­ affected by the slurs of unthinking p e o ­ ple. no m atter ho w fine or intellectual or w ell-know n th ey m ay be. Prom inence in politics or aviation does not crow n the hum an w ith su perior know ledge in all questions of life. In G o d 's school souls are re g a rd e d according to their deqree of evolution, according to their light, a n d n ot according to o u tw a rd pomp and circum stance, wealth or fame. E verv soul is learning its own lessons in life. E very soul is more developed in one direction than in others. W e have our limitations according to our ray and degree of developm ent. In the western world more souls a re incarnating w ho are extrovert in type, eag er to be with people and "to d o th in q s.” T h e v m ay have a capacity for w o rk and an execu­ tive abilitv far b ey o n d their capacity for a b stra c t thought. M a n y w h o th ro u g h a previous e a s t­ ern incarnation h ave a comprehensive u n d e rsta n d in g of philosophic principles and an inn ate ability for contemplation, meditation, a n d c oncentrated thought are no w in a w e stern incarnation le a r n ­ ing to a d d their ability and engage in constructive action. Let us bear in mind th a t the men of the W e s t for all their fine and ne c e ssa ry qualities have much to learn from the E a s t. T h e ir horizon is still too limited to w h a t their physical senses an d th eir logical u n derstand in g can grasp. F o r all the work of modern psychologists a n d psychiatrists they have yet to e xplore the subconscious mind a n d the super-conscious mind or "C osm ic C o n sc io u sn e ss.” T h e student of the mystic p hilosophy has a great w ork to do in the w e ste rn world. V V

Prejudice is the poisoner of reason a n d the a ssassin ator of justice.” — Validivar.

{ 59]

i
By

SANCTUM MUSINGS
T hor

I

BROTHERHOOD K h m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
on a g ra n d scale, a n d a t th e sam e time a n a ncient culture am azing ly preserved. H e felt th a t he h a d gazed into the fu tu re of o u r world. In addition, Brazil h as succeeded in solving a problem that h a s offered a special challenge to our gen eration. T h is solution a t once invests Brazil w ith a special intellectual and m oral s ta tu s among all th e n a tio ns of the w orld. Let me continue in the w ords o f the au th or, Stefan Z w e ig . . . It consists of the a n s w e r to the sim plest a n d a t once most n e c e ssa ry of all questions: H o w can m en live to­ g e th e r in peace on this ea rth , despite all the different races, classes, colors, creed s, a n d religions? It is a problem th a t time a n d again imperiously faces ev e ry community, every state. Because of circum stances of special complexity, it con fro nted Brazil in a particularly d a n g e ro u s form, a n d no c o u n try has solved it in more felicitous a n d exem­ p la r y fashion than Brazil. T o m y own w a y of thinking Brazil h a s solved it in a w a y th a t com m ands not o nly the a t­ tention but the admiration o f the world. “ H a d Brazil taken over th e E u ro p e a n m ania of nationality a n d race, it should h av e become, on the basis of its own racial structure, the m ost strife-torn, restless a n d discordant c o u n try in the w o rld. W a lk in g the streets a n d m a rk e t­ places. one can still clearly distinguish th e various races th a t go to m ake up the po pu lation. T h e r e are the de sc e n d a n ts of the P o rtug uese w h o co n q u e re d a n d

N E W periodical has come to my attention, “ D eci­ sion," e d i t e d by Klaus M a n n , one of the large num ­ b er of b rillia n t men compelled to seek refuge on our shores. A n article th a t w a s of more th an casual inter­ e s t to m e w a s “ Brazilian Im pres­ sions," by S te fa n Z w e ig . H e begins by saying th a t o riginally his ideas about Brazil w e re th e a r r o g a n t ideas common to the a v e ra g e E u r o p e a n a n d N o rth A m erican; t h a t B razil m eant one of a nu m b e r of S o u th A m erican republics, not readily distinguishable one from the other, its climate h o t a n d unhealthy, its political situation a lw ay s disturbed by revolutions, its finances desolate, its a d ­ ministration c o rr u p te d a n d slovenly, ha lfw a y civilized o nly in the coastal cities; in a w o rd , a land for desperate ch aracters, e m ig ra n ts a n d settlers, b u t by no m e a n s o n e from w hich to expect intelligent stimulation. H is visit p ro v e d a complete surprise. T h e lan d in g a t R io proved one of the The R osicrucia n most pow erful im pression in his life. In fact, his descriptio n is so alluring th a t I D ig e s t desire to visit th e S outh A m erican R e­ M ay publics. H e f o u n d a new civilization. H e found n ew th in g s done boldly a n d 1941

C 150]

colonized the land; th e re is the native Indian populatio n w hich h a s inhabited it since time immemorial; there a re the millons of N e g ro e s b r o u g h t over from Africa in th e time of slavery; a n d since then th e millions of Italians, G e rm an s and even Ja p a n e s e w h o came as settlers. "F ro m th e E u r o p e a n view point one might expect each o f these g roups to adopt a hostile a ttitu d e to w a rd the others— th e earlier arrivals a g a in st the later ones, black a g a in st w hite, A m e ri­ can a g a in st E u r o p e a n , b ro w n a g a in st yellow. O n e m ight expect majorities and minorities to be locked in u nen d in g struggle for rig h ts a n d privileges. T o one's u tte r surp rise it becomes a p p a r e n t that all these races, se t off from each other b y the v e ry color of their skin, live together in complete harm on y; th a t d e ­ spite their different origins th e y outdo one a n o th e r in their efforts to discard their form er peculiarities a n d become Brazilians a s quickly a n d completely as possible — a n e w a n d uniform nation. Brazil h as re d u c e d a d absurdum in the simplest w a y the race problem w hich haunts o u r E u r o p e a n w o rld — a n d the significance of this great experim ent s e e m s to m e t o b e t h a t it i n v i t e s emulation. “ Brazil h a s sim ply ignored the a l­ leged validity of this problem. W h i l e in our old w o rld th e insanity of breeding men ‘racially p u r e ’ like race -h o rses or dogs pre do m in a te s more th a n ever, the Brazilian nation h a s for centuries been based on ly on th e principle of free a n d unrestrained interm ixture, of complete equality betw e e n black a n d white, brown a n d yellow. W h a t in other countries h a s been comm itted to p ap e r and p a rc h m en t m erely in th e o r y — a b so ­ lute civil equ ality in public as well as in private life — here in Brazil is visibly realized: in the schools, in the g o v e rn ­ ment, in the churches, in the p ro fe s­ sions, in the arm y, in the universities. It is touch in g to see even the children come hom e from school arm in arm , re p ­ resenting ev e ry sh a d in g of the h um an skin—chocolate, milk a n d coffee; a n d this physical a n d mental sense of unity reaches up into the h ig h e st places, the academ ies a n d g overn m ent offices. T h e re is n o color line, n o segregation, no a r r o g a n t stratification, a n d nothing illustrates m ore characteristically how

generally accepted is this intermingling th a t the total a bsence o f a n y d e r o g a to ry w o rd in the lan g u a g e . W h i l e am ong ourselves n ation a f te r n a tio n h as in­ vented spiteful or m ocking designations for the o th e r — the ‘d a g o ’ or th e boche' — the Brazilian vo c a b u la rly u tte rly lacks a n y deprecating term for th e 'N ig g e r' o r the Creole; fo r w h o w o u ld c are to bo a st of absolute racial p u rity here? . . T h is alle g e d ly destructive prin­ ciple of m iscegenation, this h orro r, this crime a gainst th e b lo o d ' o f o u r o b­ sessed racial theoreticians — h e re it is consciously utilized a s th e c em en t of a national culture. F o r fou r centuries a nation has been su re ly a n d ste a d ily ris­ ing on this fo un dation; a n d , miracle of miracles! this c o n sta n t interm ingling a n d mutual a d a p ta tio n , u n d e r similar condi­ tions of life a n d climate, h a s given rise to a thorou gh ly individual type, totally lacking in the 'd e g e n e r a te ' c h a ra c ter­ istics proclaimed b y lo u d -m o u th e d fa­ natics of racial p urity; ra r e ly in the w o rld are more b e au tiful w om en and children to be seen th a n a m on g the halfbreeds, delicate in s ta tu r e , g en tle in d e ­ meanor. It is a joy to look into the d u s k y faces of s tu d e n ts a n d th e re to see intelligence paired w ith a q uiet m odesty a n d courtesy. T h e r e is a certain s o ft­ ness here, a gentle m elan cho ly th a t forms a n e w a n d h ig h ly p e rson a l con­ tr a s t to the s h a r p e r a n d m ore active ty p e of the N o r th A m e ric a n . T h e only elements to ‘d e g e n e r a te ’ in this inter­ mixture a re the v iolent a n d therefore d an ge rou s contrasts. T h i s system atic breaking up of closed n a tio n a l o r racial g ro u p s — closed especially for purposes of conflict — has g re a tly facilitated the creation of a u niform n atio nal spirit; a n d the complete e x te n t to w hich the second generation a lr e a d y re g a rd s itself as purely Brazilian is tr u ly astonishing. It is alw ay s the facts w ith their indis­ putable, visible force th a t re fu te the p a p e r theories of ,the do g m atists. T h a t is w h y the moral a n d m aterial success o f the Brazilian ex perim ent, w ith its complete a n d conscious neg atio n of all differences of color a n d race, h a s p e r ­ h a p s re nd e re d the o u ts ta n d in g contri­ bution tow ard disposing o f a m ania that h a s brought more m ise ry a n d conflict upon our w o rld th a n a n y other. “ . . . T h e visitor w h o h a s just escaped from E u ro p e 's crazily e x a g g e ra te d ir­

[ 151]

ritability is a t first incredulous at the total a b sen c e o f all spitefulness in public as in private life, b ut then he welcomes it as som eth in g infinitely soothing. T h e fearful tension w hich has now been tugg in g a t o u r nerves for a decade is h e re alm o st completely eliminated, for here all conflicts, even those in the social sphere, lack the sh a rp edge and, above all, the p o iso ne d barb. T h e stra n g er's initial surprise is repeated d a y after d a y — in h o w friendly a fashion, with w h a t u tte r lack o f fanaticism the people live to g e th e r w ithin this enormous space. U n d e r the so othing influence of th a t spacio usn ess a n d of the climate, the B razilian race m a y indeed be endow ed to a lesser d e g re e with those qualities w hich a r e often to d a y praised as the o n ly true virtues of a people: bru tal striking p o w e r, disciplined organization, a n d u n re s tra in e d dynamism; but the r e ­ sults s h o w t h a t th e prevailing sta n d a rd s of conciliation s ta n d up better than the a gg ressive m entality. “ F o r more th a n a c entury Brazil has resolved all b o r d e r disputes with its n e ig h b o rs — w ith the single exception of th a t P a r a g u a y episode senselessly p ro ­ voked b y a militarist gone mad — b y m e a n s of friend ly ag reem ent a n d appeal to in tern a tio n a l arbitration bodies. Even its in ner u p h e a v a ls a n d changes of gov­ e rn m e n t h ave taken place almost entire­ ly w ith o u t bloodshed. W h a t e v e r the form of governm ent, the chief charac­ teristic of this n ation has alw ays p re ­ v a ile d — its desire for balance and h u ­ man u n d e rsta n d in g . . A dic ta torship today, it has the least ty ra n n ic a l of all contem porary dic­ tators. N e v e r h a s the peace of the world been th re a te n e d b y the policies of Brazil a n d even in a p erio d as full of surprises as o u r o w n one can h a rd ly imagine th at th e re could ever be a change in this basic principle o f Brazilian national life — this desire fo r tolerance, for getting a long w ith o th e rs. T h a t is w h y one of o u r m ost prom ising hopes for the future civilization a n d pacification of our w orld rests in th e existence of Brazil, a coun­ tr y t h a t still h as room for millions upon The millions of n e w citizens, th a t is only R o sicru cian no w b e ginn in g to assert its w orld im­ D ig e s t portance. A n d w h e re v e r w e see moral M ay f o r c e s a t w o rk , w h e r e v e r w e s e e gro u n d s for s tren g th e n in g our convic­ 1941

tion t h a t en o u g h a n d too m a n y millions of people have a lr e a d y been sacrificed to dim -w itted ideologies of segregation — there it is o u r task, in turn, *0 s tre n g th e n such tendencies. W h e re v e r in o u r d istu rb ed era w e see hope of a n e w future in n e w zones, there it is our d u ty to point ou t such possibilities to the conscience of th e w o rld ." B ro th e rs a n d sisters, I hav e quoted at le n g th from this article b ecause 1 feel th at w e so rely n eed this lesson in our lives to day . If w e are to remain uncon­ tam in a te d by th e filthy p r o p a g a n d a is­ suing from the publicity departm en ts of the w a rrin g factions, w e m ust w ork for gre a te r unity in o u r o w n ranks. T here is entirely too m uch racial discrimina­ tion a n d religious a n im o sity existing in o u r c o u n try to day. T h e seeds of hatred c a n n o t sp ro u t w h e re th e re is no soil to nourish them. T o be h o n est because it is the best policy d o e s n ot make for spiritual a d v a n c e m en t. T o decide on national a n d w o rld issues merely on g ro u n d s of selfish, m aterial considera­ tions reveals a basic spiritual deficiency, a lack of genuine altruism in the nation­ al cha ra c ter, a lack of a feeling of true bro th erhoo d. I am compelled to sp e a k frankly. T h e r e is a color line in this co un try and everyone k no w s it. E v e n in N e w York C ity , w h ich is s u p p o s e d to be more cos­ m opolitan th a n most cities, in middleclass a p a rtm e n t-h o u s e s w ith a doorman, e v e ry n e g ro is con sidered a domestic a n d o r d e re d to go th ro u g h the basement a n d take the service elevator. O u r A m e ric a ns of R e v o lu tio n a ry descent con sid er N e w Y o rk , b e c a u s e of its cos­ mopolitan population, a foreign city. It is disgraceful th a t a m o n g o u r minority popu lations such c o n d i t i o n s s h o u l d exist. P a u l Robeson, th e brilliant negro actor, a Colum bia U n iv e rsity graduate, Phi Beta K ap pa, a n d a successful law­ y er, tells in the s to r y of his life, the p e tty discrim inations to w hich he was subjected. H e w a s h a p p y o nly in E n g ­ la n d a n d in F r a n c e . H e tells th a t if one of their n u m b e r sho uld be w hite enough to p a ss as a w hite m an, his fellow negroes will never give him aw ay by ackn ow ledging him in public. T h e finest e m ploym ent agencies will no t register Jews, no m a tte r h ow bril­ liant a n d refined. T h e Jewish young

[ l» ]

men a n d w om en are driven to th e s u b ­ terfuge of c h a n g in g their nam es, a s s u m ­ ing a different religion, a n d h av in g their faces o p e ra te d o n in o r d e r to g e t a job for w hich th ey a re fitted. D o I blame these people? I d o not. E v e r y hum an being is entitled to reach th a t level th a t his ability, his c h a ra c ter, a n d his efforts entitle him to. T h a t jobs sh ould be h and ed out o n the basis of racial a n d religious affiliation, family connections, and social b a c k g ro u n d is a disg race for a democratic coun try, the v e r y c onstitu­ tion of w hich w a s d r a w n up to erase forever these distinctions t h a t have proved the curse of E u ro p e a n d of older civilizations. In a nc ien t G re e c e a n y o n e who w a s no t a b o rn G re e k w a s c onsid­ ered a b arbarian. In a nc ien t Rom e there was no statu s o utside of th e "C ivic Rom ans," the R o m a n citizen. T o d a y a philosophy of an a g e th a t is p assed, a philosophy th a t m a rk s a m oving-back, not a m o v in g -fo rw a rd of the h a n d s of the clock of p ro gress, is a tte m p tin g to make people race-conscious, is n o w a t­ tempting to d ra w a r r o g a n t distinctions betw een A r y a n a n d n o n - A r y a n .

T h e genuine A m erican spirit is th at of A b ra h am Lincoln, the m an of the people, the simple, genuine love of all mankind, a n d of W a l t W h i t m a n , w h o made no distinction of race, creed, color, o r b a c kground. T h e spirit of other groups, p revalent in certain sections of our country is n ot th e genuine Am erican spirit. T h e political a n d economic prob­ lems of em igrants in their native coun­ tries should no t be tra n s p la n te d here a n d become seeds of differences. W e as stu d e n ts o f the Rosicrucian philosophy k n o w th a t Cosmic law p re­ vails. C au se a n d effect a re predom inant. Let us search o u r o w n souls. Let us examine o u r ow n actions. H a v e w e u p ­ rooted every w e e d of discrimination, prejudice, a n d intolerance? A re w e rea d y to re g a r d e v e ry problem in the light of universal h u m a n needs? A re w e r e a d y to m ake the necessary sacri­ fices so th a t liberty a n d justice shall prevail? A s the p ro p h e t M ic a h said, " H a th no t one G o d m a d e us? A re w e not children of o n e fath er?" Let us learn the first principle of B rotherhood through love, n o t th ro u g h the w hip of tears a n d blood a n d a gon y.

A M E R IC A N I N D I A N D A Y
T h ere is a grow ing realizatio n upon the p a rt of studious conscientious A m ericans th at they, as citizens, h av e a debt to the A m erican Indian. In the e arly d a y s of A m erican N atio n al expansion, the Indian w a s often sham efully m istreated b y unscrupulous individ­ uals in a u th o rity . T h e re is m uch th a t can be done to aid his p resen t plight. T h e first need is recognition by the populace of the Indian's circum stances. T o make the A m erican public conscious of this obligation, a Bill know n as S-1240, h a s been introduced by the honorable U nited S ta te s S e n a to r T hom as, of O klahom a, designating the F ourth S atu rd ay in Septem ber of each y e a r as A m erican Indian D a y . T h e Bill h a s been re ad tw ice, and h a s been referred to th e C om m ittee on Indian affairs. If it is passed, th e P resident will proclaim the above d a y as a m em orial to the aborigines of this nation. W e . therefore, request th a t e v ery R osicrucian m em ber in the U nited S tates, as well as our readers, kindly w rite to his o r her U nited States S e n a to r in W a s h in g to n . D . C. o r to U nited S ta te s S e n a to r T h o m a s, of O klahom a, in W a s h in g to n . D .C ., assuring full ap­ p roval of the Bill a n d urg in g its passage. M ention Bill S-1240 w hen w riting.

T O M O R R O W ’S C I T I Z E N S
E v ery o n e realizes th a t to d a y 's children are tom orrow 's la w m akers and leaders. P a r­ ents, how ever, often d o n o t a p p reciate th at they mold national c h ara cte r by the training which they give their children. G reed, selfishness, and b ig o try often begin in early child­ hood. L ove o f children a n d th e desire t o have them succeed in life is n o t enough. A child can neith er be lashed n o r a lw a y s reasoned into a sta lw a rt c h ara cte r o r em inent personal­ ity. T h e subconscious functions of a child's mind, and the kind of appeal necessary to the v a rio u s p lanes of intellect a t different ages, m ust be understood. T h e effects of en­ vironm ent m ust also be an aly ze d . T h e C hild Culture Institute p ro v id es this helpful in­ struction for th e inner d e ve lo p m en t of children. It consists of sim ple and easily under­ stood advice. F o r those w h o a re to become parents, there are also especially helpful sug­ gestions. essential to the p ro p e r a ttitu d e of mind. W rite for the free booklet, explaining how you m ay receive this inform ation. A ddress Child C ulture Institute. C ollege H eights, San Jose. C alifornia.

[ 153]

I
S

SANCTUM MUSINGS
— --------------------

|
= i

T H E QUEST OF COSM IC CONSCIOUSNESS By T h o r Kj i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
H E R E a r e tw o sta n d a rd books on this subject which all stu d e n ts are advised to become familiar with. O n e book, entitled T h e Q u e st o f Cosmic Consciousness, is by the w ell-know n E n g lish w rite r, Paul Brunton. T h e second book is a careful analysis of exactly w h a t is m e a n t by the state of consciousness k no w n as Cosmic C o n ­ sciousness. a n d a stu d y of m a n y of the g re a t men a n d w om en know n to have m anifested Cosm ic Consciousness in their lives a n d w orks. T h e title is C o s ­ mic Consciousness, a n d the a u th o r w a s a physician. D r. Bucke. All evolution is an expansion of con­ sciousness. I t is said that, in the min­ eral, consciousness is in a trance state. In the plant, consciousness is in the state of deep sleep. In the animal, con­ sciousness aw ak es. In man. conscious­ ness becomes self-consciousness. E vo ­ lution does n ot sto p with the state of simple self-consciousness of the average hum an being. From being conscious The R osicru cia n only of himself m an rises to the state of identifying his consciousness with that D ig e s t of every living th in g on earth. T h i s is June consciousness universalized. T h is is 1941 Cosmic C onsciousness, or illumination. T h i s is the consciousness of th e man in h a rm o n y with the divine currents of th o u g h t which he expresses in works of genius. A man in h a rm o n y w ith cosmic th o u g h t currents is a w a r e of the divine inspiration pouring th ro u g h him, and h e is able to sp eak with au th o rity . T h e pro p h ets, for example, sp e a k em phat­ ically in the n a m e of G od. Jesus spoke w ith autho rity. T h e m ost outstanding instances of Cosmic C onsciousness are th e geniuses w h o express divine in­ spiration in their g re a t w o rk s of art a n d music, in their philosophies, poetry, a n d plays. Cosmic C onsciousness is not a mere w ord. It is a n actual experi­ ence a n d a d eg ree of u n d e rsta n d in g . H e w h o has been th ro u g h this w o n­ d erful experience lives his life on a loftier plane, lives in th e light of spir­ itual ideals, and sees life from a universal view point. H e no longer sees life only from the view point or his ow n needs, interests, a n d experiences. T h e great a v a ta r s of the w orld certainly e x p e r t enced Cosmic Consciousness: Z o r o ­ aster, G a u ta m a the B u d d h a , Confucius, M o h a m m e d , a n d M oses. T h e g re a t phi­ losophers of G reece, such as Socrates, Plato, a n d Aristotle, h a d reached this d e g re e of unfo ld m ent. Cosm ic C o n ­ sciousness w a s the source of Leonardo da V in c i's magnificent paintings, the M o n o Lisa and the Last S u p p e r. It w a s a fte r attain in g illumination th a t Sir F ra n c is Bacon w a s enabled to w rite that

[ 192 ]

immortal series of plays, em bracing so e x tra o rd in a ry a ra n g e o f living c h a ra c ­ ters, replete with the m ost inspired p o ­ etry in the E n glish la n gu age. In M a c ­ beth, for example, there is complete u n ­ de rsta n ding of the stages o f th a t vill­ ain's deterioration. In H a m le t, the souls of G e rtru d e , the Q ueen; C laudius, the King; Polonius, the Councillor; Ophelia, his daug hter; a n d H o ra tio , H a m le t’s bosom friend, a re p re se n te d w ith equal vividness. T h e y a re living, h u m an b e ­ ings with such frailties as flesh is heir to. T h e y are no t merely types. N o r are they subm erged in the b a c k g ro u n d because of the principal fiqure, H am let, the m elancholy D an e . T h e men a n d women of the various p la y s a re as re­ now ned and a s real as if th e y w ere his­ torical personages. C o n tr a s t, for ex­ ample. the cha ra cters in the novels of Charles Dickens, w h o is considered of first ran k in English literature. H is most striking personalities a re men, p a r ­ ticularly those of the low er classes, or unfortunate men. In A Ta le o f T w o Cities, for example. S id n e y C a rto n , the drunken law yer, and D r. M a n e tte , the pathetic prisoner of the Bastille, are far more vivid a n d effective th a n C harles D arn ay , presum ably the main character. H is heroines a re all cut a fte r th e same pattern, yo un g, e xactly 17. pretty , an d with no more definiteness of character than w ooden dolls. Cosmic C onsciousness m anifests clear­ ly in the p o etry of W a l t W h i t m a n . N o other poet has been dom inated so com ­ pletely by the theme of o nen ess with all that lives a n d the miracle of even the least of creation.
I believe a leaf of grass is no less perfect that the journey w ork of the sta rs . . . And a m ouse is m iracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels." I embody all presences o u tlaw 'd or suffering, See myself in prison shaped like a n o th e r man, And feel the dull uninterm itted pain. For me the keepers o f convicts shoulder their carbines and keep w atch; *t is I let out in the m orning, a n d b a rr’d at v, ^ g h t. Not a m utineer w alks handcuff'd to jail, but I am not handcuff ’d to him and w alk by his side:

A skers em body them selves in one, and I am embodied in them ; I project m y h a t, sit sham e-faced, a n d beg.*

Let me qu o te a few verses from the pro phet Jeremiah. C h a p t e r 9 (verses 23 a n d 24):
"A w ord from the E te rn al: A w ise m an must not glory in his w isdom , n o r a w a rrio r in his strength, nor the rich m an in his riches: he w ho glories is to g lo ry in this, th a t he has insight into me. th at he know s th at I am the E ternal, dealing in kindness, justice, and goodness upon e arth — for these are m y delight."

T h a t p o w e r in L e o n a rd o d a V inci which e nabled him to g ra sp the soul of M o n a Lisa, th a t e x tra o rd in a ry ability of W a l t W h i t m a n o f instantan eou s friendship w ith a n y h u m a n being, th a t sense of identification w ith eternal val­ ues th a t the p ro p h et Jeremiah expressed a n d th at ena b le d him w ith ou t a feeling of o utra g e in us to declare. “T h u s saith the E te r n a l’’— a re evidences of Cosmic Consciousness. Som e have but a touch as Ralph W a l d o E m erson, for all his intellectual u n d e r s ta n d in g a n d b e au ty of style. T h e m an w h o w rote the re m a rk ­ able essays of C om pensation a n d T h e O v e r - S o u l w a s never able to m anifest these qualities in his personal life. In his personal life he w a s the recluse a n d scholar. Some have entered into the full glory of identification w ith the divine in life a n d of u n d e rs ta n d in g and com­ passion w ith all t h a t lives. Such w e re the great A v a ta r s of all ages. Such were the great geniuses, the flower of the hum an race. N o r did these illumined souls ex p re ss their genius in philosophy o r religion o r p o e try or a r t alone. Some m anifested their genius in m ighty w orks of architecture, some in stup end ou s feats of en gineering , some in rem arkable codes of law. some in suprem e s ta te s ­ manship. A n d some w ere the inspired teachers. H e w h o h a s experienced illumination has one disire: to b ring the vision th a t has tra n s fo rm e d his life to his fellowmen still stru g g lin g in the valley. H e clothes this vision in th e form native to his genius. H e gives as an offering of love a n d jo you s self-expression to the w orld the fruit th a t Cosmic C onscious­ ness ripened, th a t never w ould have ap •Q u o tatio n s from L ea ves o f Grass by W a lt W hitm an .

N ot a youngster is taken for larc en y , but I go U too, and am tried and sentenced. . . . P. °t a cholera patient lies a t the last gasp, but I also lie a t the last gasp; . . .

rm i

p eared but for the illumination. T h e poet scribbles his uninspired verse. T h e n illumination comes a n d he w rites his masterpiece. T h e p la y w rig h t follows all the rules of his craft. Yet, the play is dead. It a w a k e n s no t a n answering emotion. T h e n illumination comes, and his plays live a n d stir every soul that sees them. T h e thinker speaks, b u t no one heeds. T h e n illumination comes. W i t h m aster h a n d he p lays upon the he a rts of men. H e stirs their emotions, kindles th o u g h ts of fire, a n d becomes the father of a great m ovement o r a new religion or a school of tho ug ht. Cosmic C onsciousness gives him appeal to every hum an heart. H e u n d e rsta n d s hum an beings; he e xp resses them; he elevates them. Cosmic C onsciousness is superior to mind, no m atter ho w brilliant. T h r o u g h the rational mind you can realize the fact of Cosmic C onsciousness a n d its desirability a n d its b e a u ty . Y ou may determ ine to lead the life th a t will find its culmination in illumination. T h e r a ­ tional mind, however, m ay not lead you into the Prom ised L and. Like M oses it leads you thro u g h the w ilderness to the very edge of the River Jordan. T h e n the lotus blossom flowers, a n d the G olden H e a r t a pp ears. T h e r e a re several aspects to Cosmic C onsciousness. First, there is illumina­ tion. which is a realization of the God W i th in , a feeling of oneness w ith the divine. T h e n there is the realization of the divine in everything, the immanance of G od. Finally, there is the feeling of identification with all th a t lives, with every h um an being, with every beast a n d bird a n d stone. W i t h the realiza­ tion of the divine in everything, comes the realization th a t nothing is dead. A s there is a center in the nervous system for each psychic power, so is there an actual o rg a n through which illumination m anifests, a n d th a t o rg an is located in the heart. Let him w ho is perfectly su re of his s tre n g th of mind a n d will w o rk a t the o pening of the psychic centers. M y personal opinion is th a t it is b e tte r for th e un tried a n d soli­ ta r y stu d e n t to gain his soul powers Thy R o s ic r u c ia n 9ra d u a llY thro u g h the experiences of life. T h e stu d e n t w h o is w orking alone D ig e s t does no t kno w w h e th e r his practice is Jun e correct or not. H e does not k n o w w hen 194 1 he is strain in g himself. If he gets into

trouble, in all probability there will be no one for him to tu rn to for aid or for advice. N o one will even understand just w h a t is w ro ng . T h e n is he truly in d a n g e r o f becoming bew ildered a n d dis­ couraged. A cquiring psychic pow ers is like acquiring skill in playing an instru-' ment, in swimming, in learning a foreign language. F o r most people w h atever U gained alone is imperfect. T h e greatest genius in music needs the instruction of a n expert. T e c h n iq u e requires training a n d m astery. W h e n th e stu d e n t is ready, the M a s te r ap pears. T h e r e is much that the stu d e n t can do to p re p a re himself. Nor are psychic pow ers necessary for the ex­ perience of illumination or for discipleship. E a c h student has a major task in disciplining his o w n n a tu re a n d in teach­ ing himself to feel a universal brother a n d in training himself for useful serv­ ice in the world. Illumination is the mark of a ripe soul. T h r o u g h illumination the soul is enabled to express its genius. T o achieve illumination, then, w o rk steadily at the task that is nearest a n d dearest to you. Love m akes for identification. Love opens up the channels of inspira­ tion. Love makes you receptive to every new th o u g h t a n d idea. Love annihilates time a n d space. Love makes concentra­ tion easy. T h r o u g h love of y o u r task you will achieve the maximum th at can be achieved a t y o u r degree of soul develop­ ment. A s a stud e nt of the A ncient W i s ­ dom yo u n a tu ra lly select a task in har­ mony w ith divine purposes. A s a busi­ ness m an you conduct y o u r affairs in the light of mystic principles. A s a m other you m an ag e y o u r home and raise y o u r children in the light of the A ncient W is d o m . A s a n artist you paint pictures th a t teach people to see G od in m an a n d n ature. A s a musician yo u r aim is to inspire and to uplift. A s a com poser y o u r aim is to catch the divine harmonies, to help .people through your music to become one with all that lives th a t people m ay become refined, gentle, com passionate, and composed. A s a tea c h e r you emphasize those a s­ pects of y o u r subject th a t are vital from a mystic viewpoint a n d you minimize those aspects th a t a re useless from the mystic viewpoint. E ve ry o n e m ay no t be ab solutely free to do exactly as he w ish ­ es. M u c h can be accomplished, how-

[ 194]

p e are d but for the illumination. T h e poet scribbles his uninspired verse. T h e n illumination comes a n d he w rites his masterpiece. T h e p la y w rig h t follows all the rules of his craft. Y e t, the play is d e a d . It a w a k e n s not a n answ ering emotion. T h e n illumination comes, and his plays live a n d stir every soul that sees them. T h e thinker speaks, b ut no one heeds. T h e n illumination comes. W i t h m aster h a n d he plays u pon the h e a rts of men. H e stirs their emotions, kindles th o u g h ts of fire, a n d becomes the father of a great m ovement or a new religion or a school of th ou gh t. Cosmic C onsciousness gives him appeal to every h um an heart. H e u n d e rs ta n d s human beings; he expresses them; he elevates them. Cosm ic C onsciousness is superior to mind, no m a tte r ho w brilliant. T h ro u g h the rational mind you can realize the fact of Cosmic C onsciousness a n d its desirability a n d its b e a u ty . Y o u may determ ine to lead the life th a t will find its culmination in illumination. T h e r a ­ tional mind, however, m ay not lead you into the Prom ised Land. Like M oses it leads you thro u g h the w ilderness to the v ery ed ge of the River Jordan. T h e n the lotus blossom flowers, a n d the Golden H e a r t appears. T h e r e are several aspects to Cosmic C onsciousness. First, there is illumina­ tion, which is a realization of the God W ith in , a feeling of oneness w ith the divine. T h e n there is the realization of the divine in everything, the immanance of G o d . Finally, th e re is the feeling of identification w ith all th a t lives, with every h um an being, w ith every beast a n d bird a n d stone. W i t h the realiza­ tion of the divine in everything, comes the realization th a t nothing is dead. A s there is a cen ter in th e nervous system for each psychic power, so is th e re an actual o rg a n through which illumination manifests, a n d th a t organ is located in the heart. Let him w h o is perfectly sure of his s tre n g th of mind a n d will w o rk a t the opening of the psychic centers. M y personal opinion is th a t it is b e tte r for the untried a n d soli­ ta r y stu d e n t to g ain his soul pow ers The R o s ic r u c ia n 9 ra d u a l,Y th ro u g h the experiences of life. T h e stu d e n t w h o is w ork in g alone D ig e st does not kn ow w h e th e r his practice is Ju ne correct or not. H e does n o t k now w hen 19 41 he is straining himself. If he gets into

trouble, in all probability there will be no one for him to turn to for aid or for advice. N o one will even understand just w h a t is w rong. T h e n is he truly in d a n g e r of becom ing bew ildered a n d dis­ couraged. A cquiring psychic powers is like acquiring skill in playing an instru-' ment. in swimming, in learning a foreign language. F o r m ost people w hatev er is gained alone is imperfect. T h e greatest genius in music needs the instruction of an expert. T e c h n iq u e requires training and m astery. W h e n the stu d e n t is ready, the M a s te r a p p e a rs. T h e r e is much that the stu d e n t can do to p re p a re himself. N or are psychic pow ers ne c essa ry for the ex­ perience of illumination or for discipleship. E a c h stu d e n t has a m ajor task in disciplining his own n a tu re a n d in teach­ ing himself to feel a universal brother and in training him self for useful serv­ ice in the world. Illumination is the mark of a ripe soul. T h r o u g h illumination the soul is enabled to express its genius. T o achieve illumination, then, w o rk steadily at the task th a t is n earest a n d dearest to you. Love m akes for identification. Love opens up the chann els of inspira­ tion. Love m akes you receptive to every new th o u g h t a n d idea. Love annihilates time a n d space. Love m akes concen tra­ tion easy. T h r o u g h love of y o u r task you will achieve the maximum th a t can be achieved a t y o u r deg ree of. soul develop­ ment. A s a stu d e n t of the A ncient W i s ­ dom you na tu ra lly select a task in har­ mony w ith divine purposes. A s a busi­ ness m an y ou conduct y o u r affairs in the light of mystic principles. A s a m other y ou m a n a g e y o u r home and raise y o u r children in the light of the A ncient W is d o m . A s a n artist you paint pictures th a t teach people to see G o d in m an a n d nature. A s a musician your aim is to inspire a n d to uplift. A s a com poser y o u r aim is to catch the divine harm onies, to help .people through your music to become one with all that lives th a t people m ay become refined, gentle, com passionate, a n d composed. A s a te a c h e r you emphasize those a s ­ pects of y o u r subject th a t are vital from a mystic view point a n d you minimize those aspects th a t are useless from the mystic viewpoint. E v e ry o n e m ay not be absolutely free to do exactly as he w ish­ es. M u c h can be accomplished, how-

[ 194)

ever, merely b y a shift in emphasis, by wise omissions, a n d b y a ch an g e of spirit. T h e n in the course of time the o p p o rtu n ity comes to d o a litte more. W h e r e y ou feel th a t very little can be done, you can be a silent w itness of the truth w ithin y ou b y y o u r conduct. O n e of o u r m em bers w a s v ery much s u r ­ prised w h e n a friend said to her s u d ­ denly, It is quite evident th a t yo u are living a c c o rd in g to s ta n d a r d s different from ours. W h a t is it?” People w h o have k n o w n y o u will be a w a re o f all the little w a y s in w hich you have c h ang ed . T h e y m a y even be in ­ spired by y o u r exam ple to learn more of the m ystic life. A t least th e y will learn something of it a n d respect it if n ot a d ­ mire it. Some, of course, m a y become hostile. T w o types of people become hostile: first is the sensual type. T h e y are w e d d e d to their appetites. T h is type says. “ I ’d ra th e r die th a n give up my favorite dishes. W h a t is left in life?" T h e second type is the intellectual. T h e intellectual is hem m ed in b y the limita­ tions o f the rational mind. H e is a slave to a method k no w n as scientific method. W h a t can be readily gra sp e d b y the scientific mind a n d w h a t c a n n o t be eas­ ily d e m o n stra te d b y the scientific tech­ nique he refuses to believe c an be p os­ sible. H e h a s no t y e t reached the limits of his po w ers a n d methods. T h e g reat intellectual or the great scientist has reached the point w h e re he is aw are that pioneering is ne c essa ry in frontier projects. H e is no longer so sure of w h a t the reason can explain a n d w hat scientific m eth od can dem o nstrate. H e is. therefore, r e a d y to a d v a n c e in humil­ ity. A man like Dr. A r th u r H . C o m p ­ ton. the N obel prize-w inner in physics and head of the D e p a rtm e n t of Physics in the U niversity of C hicag o, is ready to admit divine principles a n d is re ad y to admit the limitations of physical sci­ ence. N o t so the average intellectual or scientist. H e scoffs because he is a c tu a l­ ly unable to realize spiritual experiences. H e refuses to consider a n idea until it has the stam p of au th ority. T h e re fo re, ■when you discover the ra n k materialist ° r sensualist or atheist, d o n ot argue with him. H e m ay a w a k e n some day, hut his a w a ke n in g will no t be due to argum ent; it m ay be due to a shatterm g life experience. T h e re is no nobler task th a n the fash­

ioning of a soul. T h e r e is no n ob ler gift th a n a beautiful soul. T h e n , bro th e rs a n d sisters, let us all join in the glorious ta sk of fashioning o u r souls so th a t w e may become r e a d y channels for Cosmic tasks. All good a n d useful w o r k is the M a s te r ’s work. Be the b e a re r o f light w herever yo u a r e — in y o u r home, in y o u r church, in y o u r com m unity, w h e r­ ever you perform y o u r daily tasks. Let your life be sanctified b y y o u r sublime goal. Let every th o u g h t, ev e ry w ord, every motion, every act, n o m a tte r how humble, be inspired b y the light of T r u th , b y y o u r g r e a t purpose. T h e beautiful thing is th a t th ro u g h living the life of love a n d of service, all qualities are eventually a d d e d to one. T h e life necessary to achieve even a partial il­ lumination, for exam ple, helps one to b e ­ come intuitive. M ed itatio n, d ra m a tiz a ­ tion, a n d identification — th e methods helpful in developing the intuition are also helpful in leading to illumination. T h e shortest ro ad is th a t of devotion, utter love a n d devotion to a g r e a t cause that is in h a rm o n y w ith the g re a t cause, or to the g reat cause itself. F o r g e t the personal benefits, forget the personal goal, forget the psychic po w ers. T h in k only of this beau tiful c a u s e —he lping the human race to evolve. Is there a greater cause to w hich a m an can d ed icate his life, his pow ers, his th o u q h ts. a n d his aspirations? T h in k n ot of th e millions unillumined. T h in k ra th e r that from one light m an y lights m ay be kindled. H o w m any causes b e g an w ith a small, a rd e n t group, a n d to d a y th e y sw eep the world w h e th e r for evil or for good. H ith e rto the illumined souls h av e been few and still are c o m paratively few. W e are still in the Kali Y ug a, the A g e of Iron. W e are still in a cycle of materialism. W e have sp ad e w o rk to do. W e h ave to keep the w a v e rin g a n d the doubtful from falling com pletely a p re y to the vicious ideas circulating th ro u g h the cou ntry and, th ro u g h the w orld. W e must reach all w h o a re r e a d y for light a n d the truth. W e m ust train them also to be inspired w orkers. W e m ust unite the w o rkers th r o u g h o u t the w orld . W e must b e ar w itn e ss to the ph ilosophy firmly o pposed to the atheism, the m a ­ terialism, a n d the n a r r o w intellectualism of the age. W e a ccept the moral law as the foundation o f the universe. W e ac­ cept the divine A rchitect of the universe.

[ 195]

Education
By
T
h or

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
ence is rapidly making our educational system s obsolete. O u r educational system, as consti­ tuted a t present, is b ased on the p r e ­ mise that childhood a n d youth a re the proper times for learning. W h a t a re the consequences of this erroneous a ss u m p ­ tion? Despite the com pulsory e d u c a ­ tional laws, despite the most expensive educational equipm ent in the w o rld, d e ­ spite well tra in e d teachers a n d a d ­ vanced m ethods of instruction, our population, on the whole, is no t really educated. T h o s e w h o attain the com ­ prehensive b a c k g ro u n d a n d develop­ ment of mind a n d will, to be expected of an educated person, are v e ry few in­ deed. E d u c a to rs a n d people interested in the w elfare of o u r cou ntry have been deeply concerned a bout this serious situation. O u r system of go vernm ent dem and s for its smooth functioning a n d p e rm a ­ nency an intelligent a n d well-inform ed citizenry. O u r citizens must have the know ledge, the desire a n d the will to elect the pro p e r kind of men as public officials. Political cha rlata ns are alw ays r e a d y to take a d v a n ta g e of uninform ed voters. O u r citizens must hav e wide information to u n d e rs ta n d the eco­ nomic a n d political problems of the day. W ire le ss, radio, a n d aviation have m ade time a n d space negligible factors in modern life. W h a t h ap pen s in a n y part of the w orld is know n almost in sta n ­ taneously every w h ere else a n d exerts an immediate effect. T h e daily n e w s ­ papers have become a universal m eans of keeping people informed. T h e radio, too. has become a n im portant m eans of

N E of the fields of k n o w l e d g e in w h ic h d r a s t i c c h a n g e s m ust oc­ c ur is th a t of e d u ­ c a tio n . S c ie n c e and in v e n tio n h a v e revolution­ ized m o d e r n life to the point w here it is i m p e r a t i v e th a t ev e ry mem­ b e r of o u r society p o s s e s s e s m uch information an d m a n y skills in o r d e r to fit easily into our civilization. E d u c a ­ tion, like every o th e r art, has developed in response to d em an d. F o r m a n y cen­ turies education w a s the privilege of the few. T h e P u r ita n s in tro d u ce d the idea of public education into this country because of their conviction th a t every person should be able to re a d the pray er-b oo k a n d the Bible for himself. Religion has been one of the stron gest factors in fostering education. In China, in India, a n d am on g the Jews an elab­ orate educational system w as developed because of the d u ty of e v e ry bo y to stu dy the religious classics. In this co un try , for a long time a higher education w a s only for those w ho intended e ntering the le a rn e d p ro ­ fessions, such as medicine, law, the ministry, a n d teaching. Later, a dvanced scientific training becam e ne c e ssa ry for the chemists a n d engineers. A system of free, com pulsory education h a s made our c o u n try one of the most literate in the world. O u r tre m e n d o u sly e x p a n d ­ ing k now ledge in every b r a n c h of sci­

[217]

gaining access to the public. Since it is so easy for men of w ealth a n d po w er to use the n e w sp a p e rs a n d the radio as in­ s tru m e n ts of p ro p a g a n d a , the average citizen m u st be able to differentiate b e ­ tw een tr u th a n d falsehood; he must n o t perm it himself to be a victim of rum or, p ro p a g a n d a , a n d d o w n rig h t mis­ re p re se n ta tio n a n d falsehood. H e must r e a d his n e w sp a p e rs with intelligence a n d discrimination. T o quote H e n r y A. W a lla c e , "In the dem ocracy o f the to ­ m orrow , people will have to be so in­ telligently free from, prejudice that ne ith e r the w ealthy , interested in private control of governm ent for personal ends, n o r dem agogues, interested in their jobs, will be able to create deception a n d illusion." T o be a n intelligent citizen d em ands k n o w le d g e a n d experience, a n informed m ind a n d a trained will. Y e t th e vast m ajo rity of our men a n d w om en get their o nly education in th e y e a rs w hen desire for k now ledge is feeble a n d the ju d g m e n t is immature. Y ea rs are c o n ­ sum ed in giving children only the f u n d a ­ mentals of an education. T h e various subjects ta u g h t in high school m ust be oversimplified to reach the average a do lescent intelligence. M a n y o f the subjects a n d problems are too remote for the interests a n d com prehensions of high school pupils. A b rig h t child w ith a capable instruc­ tor, w o rk in g alone or in a selected group, c an readily make the eight y ears of elem entary school in h alf the time. A n ambitious ad u lt atten ding a private p r e p a r a to r y school can complete the high school curriculum in tw o years. In content, too, our educational system is un satisfactory. E ach y e a r information becom es su perseded b y w id e r inform a­ tion, a n d m ethods a n d techniques b e ­ come obsolete so rapidly th a t even a college g r a d u a te finds in the space o f a d ecade th a t he is n o t in ste p with the times. O u r v a s t system of extension courses, co rrespondence courses, night schools a n d lecture system s h av e p a rti­ ally h elped to correct this deficiency. But th e fact still rem ains t h a t m ost of The the people w h o stu d y d o so for utilitar­ R o sic ru c ia n ian p u r p o s e s — the inform ation is n e ce s­ D ig e s t s a ry for tr a d e or profession. F e w peo­ Ju ly ple s t u d y to improve themselves as h u ­ 1941 m an b eings o r personalities; few adults

have the desire o r am bition to cultivate latent talents a n d potentialities. T h e y reach a certain level of development a n d security a n d become w h a t is known psychologically as "fixated." M o st peo­ ple have closed minds to n e w ideas in politics a n d economics, calling the mild­ est liberals " r e d s .” A n y o n e w h o has been active in a church k now s how im­ possible it is to effect a radical change, no m atter h o w essential it m ay be. T o sum up, th e a v e r a g e yo uth stops his education ju s t a t th e time w h en he is really r e a d y for it a n d c an appreciate it. D em ocracy , if it w ants to endure, m ust in som e w a y meet the problem. In some w a y th e voting a d u lt must be reached. T h e voting a d u lt needs the training in civics a n d history a n d com­ m unal responsibility th a t w e cram down the th ro ats of o u r y ou ng sters. O u r w o rk in g a d u lts need the training in speech a n d pe rsona lity th a t is almost w a ste d on o u r high school students. P h ilo so ph y w h ic h is just a " s n a p ” course to th e a v e ra g e healthy, happy college s tu d e n t is of deeper import to the m an w h o has h a d some experience in life. If o u r a d u lt population h ad the desire, th e time a n d the o p p o rtu n ity to read, to discuss, a n d to stu d y , o u r level of • civilization a n d culture could be s h a rp ly a n d ra p id ly raised. W e n e e d n o t w a it for educational practice to catch up w ith educational theory. A s stu d e n ts of the Rosicrucian O r d e r w e can educate ourselves. T h e main point is to recognize the fact that w e all need to continue our education in every p h a s e of life. Being a w a re of o u r deficiencies is the first step in selfimprovement. H a v in g th e desire to r e m e d y them is th e second step. P la n ­ ning a sy stem atic course of stu d y and sticking to it is the third. W i t h P ro ­ fessor O v e rstre e t w e m aintain that " a d u lt life will eventually come to be re g a rd e d n o t sim ply as a putting-intopractice of educatio n a lre a d y received, but as a pro ce ss o f continuing-educationw ith-living.” T h e necessity of continued self-education is em phasized likewise b y E v e r e tt D e a n M a rtin in his book. " T h e M e a n in g of a Liberal E d ucation." H e says: " O n e does n o t 'get' a n e d u ­ cation a n y w h e re . O n e becomes an e d u ­ cated person b y virtue of patient study, quiet m editation, intellectual courage,

[218]

and a life devoted to the discovery and simply to a tta in to th eir tru e human estate." service of tru th .” O u r a d v a n c e d m em bers w o rk in the It w a s the com m only ac c e p ted opinion that yo un g people learn more easily laboratory, in the stu d y , a n d in the than older people. A n old saying runs: w orld. T h e y increase the sum total of “If one learns as a child, w h a t is it like? kn ow ledge a n d of good in th e world. Like ink w ritten on clean paper. If one T h e tw o stro n g e s t impulses of the soul learns as an old m an, w h a t is it like? are to kn ow a n d to love. A real Rosi­ Like ink w ritte n on blotted p a p e r.” crucian s tu d e n t expresses the first Both scientific investigation a n d experi­ thro u g h continued s tu d y a n d the sec­ ence have proved the falsity of this o nd thro u g h public service. A typical R osicrucian w a s Benjamin statement for m ost b ra n c h e s of learn­ Franklin, o n e of the founders of our ing. W h e n e v e r reason, intelligence, and Republic. A s a y o u n g m an h e became experience a re necessary, the adult the o u tsta n d in g prin te r a n d journalist learns more readily. O u r Rosicrucian system o f education, of the colonies. L a te r he becam e active planned for the adult, h a s a lw a y s ac ­ in the affairs of P hiladelphia. H e sp o n ­ cepted the idea th a t the a d u lt is capable sored the org a n iz a tio n o f police, fire, of being educated. O u r system is emi­ a n d militia com panies, the first public nently practical in t h a t w e aim to train library, a n d a n a c ad em y, n o w the U n i­ every aspect o f the personality'—mind, versity of P e n n sy lv a n ia . H e w a s a c ­ emotions, a n d will. T h r o u g h o u r ex­ tive in scientific research. A ccording to periments w e aim to cultivate th e scien­ the well - k n o w n s to r y he identified tific. inquiring mind. T h r o u g h our lightning with electricity; this a n d other researches w on him m embership in every study of the emotions, b oth positive and im p ortant learned society in Europe. negative, w e aim to help the individual H e b e g a n his diplomatic career a t the to gain emotional stability. T h e effort necessary to tra n sla te these instructions ag e of fifty-one a n d sp e n t m ost of his rem aining th irty -th re e y e a rs in that into terms of daily livinq m ust develop work. H e se rv e d in London for a n u m ­ the will. ber o f years, then served for a short W e expect o u r stu d e n ts to develop time in the C o n tin e n ta l C o ng ress, and into the h ighest ty p e of citizens. B e­ cause of their developed social uncon­ then u n d e rto o k his historic mission to sciousness a n d inquiring minds, w e ex­ F r a n c e on w h ic h he secured vital mili­ pect them to be imm une to mob h y s­ ta r y a n d financial aid for the A m erican teria, incapable o f prejud ice an d intoler­ Revolution. U p o n his return he w as twice elected P re sid e n t of Pennsylvania ance, skeptical of p r o p a g a n d a , a n d open U niversity a n d se rv e d as a member of to new ideas affecting ev e ry branch of learning. W e expect them to b e am ong the C on stitutio nal C onvention. T h is m a n y -sid e d a n d fruitful life is the pioneers o f a n y w o rth w h ile move­ the result of deliberately cultivating ment, and w e expect them to be among the experimenters in every field of study. every aspect of y o u r personality. T o T h e kn ow ledge in possession of the develop the m ind a n d stre n g th e n the Rosicrucian O r d e r is th e result of the love of know ledge, find your field of in­ patient accum ulation of the w o rk of terest and w o r k in it. T o do y o u r d uty in service to the w orld, find the work countless students in m a n y ages. E ach th a t appeals to yo u a n d give it your advanced stu d e n t h a s m ade his contri­ bution. H e h a s a d d e d his quota not w h o le -h e a rted support. A s a beginner merely from a sense of d u ty b u t in the you m ay h av e to proceed slowly, you scholar's joy of disco very a n d verifica­ m a y have to be c o n te n t w ith routine tion. W e expect o u r m em bers th ro u g h ­ tasks. B ut rem em ber in w ooing know l­ out the world, as th e y achieve a certain e dg e a n d w e d d in g yo u rse lf to service, degree of developm ent, to tak e their you hav e e n tere d the most rew ard in g places in our ran ks a s produ ctive w o r k ­ aspects of life. Y o u have become one ers. As D r. M a r tin says: “T o sh a re in of a group of self-directive a n d inde­ the possession of this k n o w le d g e a n d to p e n d e n t personalities. Y o u have chosen work for its im provem ent a n d increase the only road th a t leads to th e con tent­ is to men a n d w om en of a certain type m ent of a full a n d useful life.
[219]

The Eternal Question
By
T
h or

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
self, or a more perfect channel for the expression o f Cosmic love, is a " r e ­ deem ed p e rso n a lity .” Just as th e light shines freely, unim peded, u n ob structed th ro u g h a clear glass, so the redeem ed person ality is forever expressing th e di­ vine love a n d fulfilling the divine p u r ­ pose. T h e g re a t a v a ta rs like B u d d h a a n d Jesus w e re redeem ed personalities w ho lived only to express the will of G o d on e a rth am ong men. T h e sh o r t ro a d to this consum m ation is th r o u g h the stre n g th en in g of the love-life in all its aspects. M a r r ia g e is both a symbol a n d a n object lesson. A h a p p y m arriage can be the d o o r w a y to divine union, for both. Lover a n d b e ­ loved lose themselves in each o th er, a n d yet the identity of each is enh an ced . E ach lives only for the other, a n d yet each enjoys perfect freedom, perfect self-expression, a n d complete self-fu l­ fillment. U n d e rs ta n d in g of each other is effortless. T h e physical union should a lw a y s be the physical expression of the harm o n i­ ous union of loving souls. O n l y such a union generates vitality a n d energy. O n ly such a union is true m arriage. It sho uld be a union on the physical, mental, a n d spiritual planes. If p hysi­ cal, mental, a n d spiritual h a rm o n y is not existent, the union is a compromise, a discipline, bu t not true m arriage. O n ly disciplined personalities are cap ­ able of perfect union. T h e obstacles to perfect union reveal the b arrie rs that our ow n personalities erected and w hich m ust be demolished. T h e quali­ ties th a t w e m ust p atiently cultivate to

O V E once more is th e them e of our discourse. So allem b racing is the principle of love, so multifarious are its m anifestations, th a t the stu d e n t of mysticism m ay a lw a y s find some n e w aspect to a p ­ ply to his life. T h e principle of p o l a r i t y is t h e principle of love. P o la r ity ru n s through all nature. T h e atom is a universe of positive a n d negative ch arg e s. N ig h t and day, h eat a n d cold, w e t a n d dry, summer a n d w inter a re familiar pairs of opposites. P la to spoke of these natural pairs th at con trol every phase of life. E m erson discussed one applica­ tion of the principles of polarity in his essay on " C o m p e n sa tio n .” P olarity is the g r e a t facto r in nature. T h e life force divides itself into the positive or masculine stream a n d the negative or feminine stream . Individual human beings a re o rg a n s of this Cosmic activity. M ale a n d female a re ever seeking each other. U n io n is their n a tu ra l tend ency a n d d estiny. T h e great self is ever seeking to make the little individual self a m ore perfect in­ strum ent for its activity. T h e happiness a n d salvation of the little self lies in recognition of this fact a n d in coopera­ tion w ith the life force. H e w ho achieves the task o f m ak in g himself a more perfect instru m e n t for the great

[291 ]

make a m a rria g e successful a n d hap p y are the v e ry ones th a t w e need to make possible the divine union. It is n ot the love of m o th e r a n d child th a t sym bol­ izes the blinding glory of divine love, b ut the love of h u sb a n d a n d wife. T h e relationship is th a t of m other a n d child so long as th e person ality is u nre­ deemed. T h e child requires care, train ­ ing a n d discipline, bu t the redeemed p erson a lity is to G o d as the w ife to her h usband. T h e la n g u a g e t h a t mystics have em ployed in speak in g of their love of G o d h a s been the sam e that lovers have used o f each other. T h e ir speech is a n epithalam ium . a song. T h e ir emotion is ecstasy. I q uote a m edieval poet: "I hav e so u g h t T h y nearness. W i t h all m y h e a r t have I called T h e e A n d going o u t to meet T h e e I found T h e e coming to w a rd me.” — Jehudah H a Levi. I quote an o th e r: “ F o r T h e e , O Living G od, m y being yearns, F o r T h e e m y soul consum es, my spirit b u r n s .” H e r e is a n o th e r song of th e same poet: “A rise, O m y rapture, a t d a w n I exclaim, G o seeking th e face of m y love, the King. I thirst a t the th o u g h t of H im , burn a s w ith flame, A n d c h a tte r like a swallow up on the w ing. “ N o gifts can I b ring save of heart or of writ, M y cause to m y lips I can only trust. D esires m y redeemer, a ritual fit, H o w sh ou ld I suffice w ho am based on dust. “ W h e n I w ith myself seek com­ munion. I shrink, W e r e I m ightier far I should still be small. Soul a n d s tre n g th in a d o rin g T h e e faint a n d sink , Y e t sing T h e e I m ust till the end of all." The « Solon Ibn Gabirol. — R o sicru cian D ivine u nion is to be w o n only D ig e s t thro u g h service to mankind. H e who S e p te m b e r has a tta in e d the intellectual love of G od 1941 will h ave u n m is ta k a b ly pointed o ut to

him the field w herein he can serve be fore he m ay w in illumination. A soul th a t h a s a tta in e d a certain d e g re e of developm ent desires both to serve m ankind a n d to b e united with G o d . Love a n d F a te point the w a y' W i t h this aim in mind y o u r life will be w holly transform ed, a n d y o u r point of view to w a rd ev e ry person a n d every incident in y o u r life will be completely •revolutionized. Life to the average h um an being is a series of reactions to people a n d events. T h e y h ave meaning for him insofar a s they arouse a reac­ tion in him. If th e y m ake no impres­ sion upon him, th e y do not exist for him. H e w h o h as taken his develop­ m ent in h a n d a sk s of each hu m an being w hom he contacts: “ H o w c an I serve H im ? ” H e asks of each event that he experiences: “W h a t can I learn ?” If the o p p o rtu n ity comes to do a kindly deed for one w hom y ou person­ ally dislike, you m u st d o the deed. You m ust ignore y o u r personal feelings. G o d can no t use y ou if y ou perm it your person al feelings to s ta n d in the way. W h e n you h ave time a n d time again spoken a kind w o r d a n d d one a kindly d eed to people w h o form erly a n ta g o n ­ ized you. or w ho did n o t exist for you, or w hom yo u disdained, Cosmic law gra du a lly becomes p a rt of y o u r soul equipm ent. W i t h the cultivation of Cosmic love, pride, p rejudice, intoler­ ance, impatience, lack of sy m p a th y and u n d e rs ta n d in g , coldness, h a rd n e s s and callousness disap pear. It no longer m akes a n y difference w h a t you person­ ally have to gain from a p erson or an event. T h e w hole w o rld becomes a vin e y a rd a n d y o u a w o rk e r therein. All w ho are fellow -w orkers in th e vineyard are closer to y o u th a n kin n o matter h o w far distant th e y m a y be. n o matter if y ou know them not. T o quote Emer­ son: ............ the eternal pole O f te nde n c y distributes souls. T h e y need no vow s to bind W h o m not each other seek bu t find. T h e y give a n d take no p ledg e or oath. N a tu r e is the b o n d of b o th .” T h e peace th e y hav e found in their personal lives th r o u g h u nity of being th e y long to tr a n sp la n t to the world. T h e y see b lu n d e rin g men beating their

[ 292 ]

heads va in ly a g a in s t the stone wall of irrevocable la w a n d their h ea rts ache. T h e y see the hollow ness, the vanity, a n d the futility o f m ost of the activities of men, a n d th e y long to open their eyes a n d to p oint o u t to them the w a y of escape from the la b y rin th of the world. T h e y see men c a u g h t in the tangled skein of d e stin y a n d they long to help them to unravel it. H o w m a n y a re th e difficulties th a t b e ­ set m ankind, a n d y e t h o w simple is the solution! W o u l d armies a n d navies be necessary if all nations co nsidered each other brothers? W o u l d tariff w alls be necessary? W o u l d co urts of law dot the land if each m a n ’s aim w a s to serve G o d a n d his fellowman? W o u l d the courts grind o u t divorces in a neverending flow if h u s b a n d a n d wife lived only to make each other h a p p y ? Love never fails. T o q uote C la u d e Bragdon: " H o w much time, th o u g h t, or attention do w e g i v e .............to love, to the e d u ­ cation o f the heart? O f h o w m a n y can it be said th a t th e y have given all to love, or th a t th e y have left all for love, or even th a t th e y h a v e loved much? H ow, until it h a s been tried, can love be said to h a v e failed? P e r h a p s after war, diplom acy, arb itratio n a n d rnindidolatry, ch urch ianity , hum anism , b e ­ haviorism, psy c h o a n a ly sis. Y o gi b r e a th ­ ing, g land g ra ftin g a n d all false re a ­ sons of this a g e of reason have run their course a n d revealed their hollow­ ness, w e m ight tr y the experim ent of organizing o u r lives, private a n d com­ munal, on the basis of love — for love is the g re a t re a lity.” O u r s tu d e n ts h ave en tered the O r d e r for m a n y reasons. Some seek personal happiness. Som e seek success in life. Some seek health. Som e seek psychic developm ent. D ifferent problems have bro u g h t each one to the foot of the same m ountain, b ut only one path leads to the m ou ntain top of illumination, the path of love a n d service. E ventually you will discover th a t y o u r aims coa­ lesce. T r u e health is achieved through harm o n y w ith life’s rh ythm s. T r u e happiness a n d success a re achieved V V

th ro u g h dedicating all th a t one is a n d h a s to serve the w o rld a s a c hannel for Cosmic love. Psy c h ic p ow ers begin with the d evelop m ent of the intuition a n d the e x p a n d in g of the field of c o n ­ sciousness, a n d th ese a re gained thro u g h cultivating th e he a rt. H o w ­ ever w e begin, w h ic h e v e r w a y w e are going, w h a te v e r o u r aims, eventually w e reach the g a te w a y th a t opens only to the loving he a rt. T h e m ind m ust be tra in e d to th e u tm o st o f its capacity, the will m ust become te m pe red steel —• b u t all for th e service o f love. Love m ust fashion y o u r outlook on life. Love m ust sh a p e y o u r attitu d e to w a rd people. Love m u st govern y o u r re a c ­ tions to situations. W e all meet o n the plateau of love in o u r climb to the m ountain top of illumination. W e a re fram ed b y love a n d for love. All n a tu re is a n epithalamium, all life is a song of love. G o d is th e G r e a t Lover from w h o se a rm s escape is im­ possible. G o d a sk s us nothing th a t is bey o n d our abilities to do. H e asks us to love a n d to be th e c hannels of H is love to others. W e m a y no t be clever — love will give us w isdom . W e m ay n o t be s tro n g — love will give us stre n g th . W e m a y be timid — love casts o ut all fear. Such is the m essag e o f a sincere m y s­ tic. It is a m essag e t h a t can b e a r in­ finite repetition a n d t h a t we, as Rosicrucians. can a p p re c ia te a n d welcome. It is a m essage th a t o u r sordid, w o r ld ­ ly, a r r o g a n t tw en tieth c e n tu ry sorely needs. It is a m e ssa g e t h a t reveals the sac red ne ss of sex, love, a n d m arriage. It is a m essage t h a t reveals h ow close to G o d h u s b a n d a n d wife are w hen united in the b o n d s o f love. T h e false attitu d e to w a r d t h a t is a relic of the M id d le A g es, a n d th e false attitu de to w a rd w om en t h a t comes to us from th e O rie n t m ust be u tte rly cast out. T h e y a re o pp o se d to the will of God. T h e y are sins a g a in s t th e law of love. O f th e m a n y gifts t h a t G o d h a s given m ankind, the joy of m arriage is the suprem est, a n d G o d h a s sho w n His a pproval b y perm itting it to be the p a th w a y to union w ith Him. V

T h e g re a te r the obstacle the more glory in overcom ing it.— Moliere.
[ 293 ]

The American Consciousness
By T hok K h m aleh to , Sovereign Grand Master
N A book review Mr. |am es Hilton, the au th or of the Lost H o r iz o n .” says. " W e are all p r i s o n e r s of the mood of our times, w h i c h is o n e of sou 1-d estro y in g doubt and disillu­ s i o n m e n t . ” T h is s t a t e m e n t is an indictment, bu t it is not true of the m a jority, especially in these our U nited S tates. Disillusionment is a result of blind ness and ignorance. It is a blind stree t with a sign, " N o th o ro u g h fa re .” A n d in the end it will force a greater u n d e rsta n d in g a n d insight. Is this mood not a result of materialistic thought a n d education? Is it not true that a g re a te r know ledge a n d higher ideals will in su re faith in G od and humanity? A re w e n ot G o d conscious? O u r F o u n d in g F a th e rs h a d that faith. It is th e one principle upon which all o u r institutions a re built. Faith in h u ­ m an ity is the cornerstone of democracy. If w e w a n t freedom, if w e believe th a t it is a noble ideal, if we have faith in its ultim ate victory, then we shall be a free people. F re e d om does not mean a n iron regim e i m p o s e d from w i t h o u t upon every man. w om an, and child. It does not m ean that m an is created to be s u b ­ T he R o sicrucian servien t to the state. It does not m ean th a t m a n ’s de stin y is to be an a u to ­ D ig e s t m aton, a robot, a cog in the wheel. It O cto b er does n ot mean th a t all must be forced 1941 to fit in to a pro cru stean bed. It does not mean citizens bereft of speech, will, self-expression a n d self-direction. It does not mean a go v e rn m e n t imaged in the likeness of a ncient S p a r ta with the common people d e g ra d e d to helots kept u n d e r the iron heel o f oppression and periodically decim ated. T h o s e condi­ tions were tried in the d is ta n t past, but hu m anity has o u tg ro w n ty ra n n y and oppression. T h e concept of the dignity of every hu m an being excludes the ph ilosophy of a m a ste r class a n d a slave class. Such is th e mood o r fashion of o u r m odern times — freedom to be or not to be. F reedom m eans th a t e v e ry human being is p erm itted to develop a n d ex­ press his inn ate pow ers. E v e r y human being has the privilege of making his unique contribution. T h e ta p e stry that freedom w eaves on the loom of history is a gorgeous m ulti-colored a n d varie­ ga te d design, rich in the heritage of m an y peoples. All the civilizations of the w orld have m a d e their contribution to A m erican culture. E v e r y race has a d d e d its strain to A m e ric a n blood. W e have made the experim ent and proven th a t all na tio n s c an live to gether in peace a n d h arm o ny . W e are indebted to the whole w orld. Shall w e keep what w e h ave for ourselves alone? Shall we not give of our experience to the world? Intelligence tells us th a t n o m an can live b y himself alone or for himself alone. N o nation can live by itself or for itself alone. E v e ry soul is a spark of divinity. O n the plane of spirit all spirits are one. T h e w elfare of one is the w elfare of all. T h e health or sick­ ness of the w hole affects every individ­

[ 328 ]

ual contained in th a t w hole. O u r planet, every kingdom of na tu re on this planet —m inerals, p lants, anim als a n d hum an b e in g s— are all expressions of one S u ­ preme C onsciousness. It is literally true that not so much as a sp a r r o w can fall w ithout th a t fall being registered in a consciousness. W h e n w e leave the physical plane, time a n d sp a c e a re non-existent. O n e m ighty W i ll exists alone. O n e purpose prevails th a t ru n s increasing through the ages. E v e r y step in evolution p r o ­ ceeds according to a universal a n d an all-em bracing Plan. N o r is this P lan of E volution to be c o nfuse d with a N a z i blueprint for th e control of a su bjug ated planet. T h e divine P la n is an ex p re s­ sion o f divine Love a n d W is d o m . T r u t h a n d love a n d b e a u ty a re the v ery foun­ dation stones. T h e r e is no one so w eak or so humble or so insignificant w hose ultimate w e lfa re is no t gloriously p r o ­ vided for. E a c h a n d every one is on the road to achieve the perfection mirrored in the divine archtyp e. T h e goal is the b ro th e rh o o d of beautiful souls, p e rfe c t­ ed souls, illuminating the w orld in color and tone thro u g h their inner life. E v e ry h um an being is destined to be not a ro b o t b u t a Son of G o d Himself, reflecting all the divine attributes. H e is no t a p u p p e t but a star, flashing light a n d following its own orbit. N o m atter w h a t p a th w e m ay elect upon reaching perfection, w e all remain in the c o n ­ sciousness of the S olar Logos. W e are destined to become creative w orkers and gods. W e are the seeds of a divine plant. T h e w o rk of creation is not com ­ pleted. In num erab le be in g s of various degrees of a ttu n e m e n t serve behind the veil of nature, trying to inspire a n d in­ fluence o u r activity. Just a little further on in evolution a n d a more united m ani­ festation can be accomplished. H u m a n beings will take a divine initiation to b e ­ come m ore useful to h um anity a n d the universal P lan of Evolution. In a w orld th a t is a living organism, not a conglomeration of disconnected parts, can there be a n y such p h e ­ nomenon as isolation? W h e r e the v a ri­ ous kingdom s are inextricably linked, w h e re there is an unceasing interch ang e of forces, can a n y g roup pro gress alone? T h e w o rld is a unity. T h e w orld o rd e r expresses h arm ony. E a r th nourishes all her children. E ach has his p a r t to play.

E ach has his unique service th a t he alone can perform. E a c h h a s his genius to en han ce the b e a u ty a n d the glory of all. U nion, h arm ony, a n d b ro th e rh o o d are the k ey w ord s of evolution. W h o w ould live for himself alone is like a leaf that falls from the tree. A na tion th a t tries to be w h olly self-sufficient w ould be like a b ra n ch lopped off from the trunk. A s soon as a n y atom, in­ dividual or n ation sto p s giving ou t a n d taking in force a n d p o w e r it signs its d e a t h - w a r r a n t —a tr o p h y sets in. T h e r e is desiccation in isolation. T h e r e is life in cooperation a n d union. W h a t will inspire cooperation is in h arm o n y w ith the divine Plan of Evolution. W h a t will ultimately prod uce a m ore perfect union is in h a rm o n y w ith the Divine P la n of Evolution. A s the fingers a re p a rt of the h an d , a n d the h a n d is p a rt of the arm, a n d the arm is p a r t of the body, so are individuals, races, a n d nations, united in the conscious Life th a t is G od. T h r o u g h our consciousness of G o d w e express a n d m anifest G o d here on earth. T h e pre se n t deplorable w orld conditions a re a result of our de struc ­ tive thinking a n d feeling. P ra y in g a n d wishful thinking a n d lip-service are not creative. It is only w h e n our a w a r e ­ ness a n d inner k now ledg e is d e m o n ­ strate d in our d aily lives th a t w e bring our little mite into th e spiritual a n d divine force th at manifests in the world. If the m ajority of hu m an beings h a d a deep-rooted consciousness of love a n d service, the godliness resulting th e re ­ from w ou ld overw helm ingly express in the world. D o w e w a n t to g ro w more surely to­ w a rd our divine a rchtype? T h e n let us cultivate friendship for all. Let us try to u n d e rsta n d a n d a p p re c ia te differ­ ences. O f the two types of governm ent a n d civilization in a life -an d-de ath struggle for m astery today, one belongs definitely to the W a v e of the P a st. O n e belongs definitely to the W a v e o f the F uture. N o r should it be necessary to point o ut th a t the W a v e of the F u tu r e is the one in h a rm o n y w ith the Divine Plan for Evolution. T h e n e x t step will be cooperation a n d friendship am ong nations, u n d e rs ta n d in g a n d ap pre c ia ­ tion am o ng the various religions of the world, a free intercourse am o ng all the

[ 329 ]

populations of the earth, pow er in the ha n d s of all, not an a rro g a n t few. It is o u r d uty, our responsibility a n d our privilege to make the g re a t A m e ri­ can d ream come true. T h e F o u nd in g F a th e rs w e re cosmically inspired. T h e Seal of the U n ite d States, the unfinish­ ed P y ra m id , is a visible symbol of the cosmic inspiration. In the Seal the top stone is still suspen ded in the air. I t is still in the w orld of ideals and symbols. It is in th e process of becoming m a te r­ ialized. H e r e is o u r great opportunity. Let us help set th a t'sto n e securely in its place. L et us help our country fulfill its share in the divine plan for the nations of the w orld. T h e stone above the P y ­ ramid does n o t mean Am erica for A m erican s only. It does not mean an A m erica cu t off from its bro th e r a n d sister na tions th ro u g h o u t the world. It does not m e a n a n America sm ug a n d secure a n d fat a n d w holly self-centered. It m eans the Am erica of the colonial days, w h e n our co un try w a s a refug e for the op pre sse d a n d persecuted a n d hopeless o f the earth. It m eans the America o f the Civil W a r period th a t w ould n o t to lerate a land half-slave a n d half-free. It m eans the America of freedom of speech, freedom of press, freedom o f religion, a n d freedom of a s ­ sembly. It m e a n s America th at did not hesitate to rebuke Russia a t the time of the Kishinev massacres in 1905. It means the A m erica that rose nobly to help the allies in the time of the first W o rld W a r. T h a t w a r w a s not bro u g h t to a suc­ cessful conclusion, because of avarice a n d h atred. It will not be ended before the four freedom s h ave full expression

in all countries of the w orld. It makes n o difference ho w m a n y so rd id mater­ ialists there m ay be, it m akes no differ­ ence ho w m an y traitors, like termites t r y to bore their w a y u n d e r our feet! W e m ust cherish the ideal in o u r hearts. W e must live the ideal in our daily lives. W e m ust th ro w on the side of rig hte ousn e ss a n d justice, th e side of G o d , all th a t w e have a n d all that we are. W e kn ow th a t g oo d thoughts are no t lost. W e kn ow th a t every feeling o f love a d d s its mite of pow er. Every action has its influence. T h e sum total of p o w e r is m ade up of all these innum­ erab le tho ug hts a n d feelings a n d acts on th e part o f the entire population. In the life -a n d-de ath stru gg le taking place betw een the forces of good and evil th ro u g h o u t the w orld, let us do our sh a re . Let us scorn to th a n k G o d that w e a re n ot y e t touched. Let us not fear to s ta n d up a n d be cou nted. Remember th a t on the la d d e r of life, a s w e stretch o u t one h a n d to those w h o a re above us, so must w e stretch ou t the other h a n d to those w ho a re b elow us. A s we w a n t aid, so must w e give aid. Let us help restore the w a n in g faith of our times. Let our light so shine th a t "our F a th e r in H e a v e n m a y be glorified and all m a y walk therein ." T h e A m erican consciousness is not a soul-destro ying doub t. It is a faith, a divine realization, an a w a re n e s s of the grace of G od th a t will more a n d more m anifest a n d ex press th ro u g h all human beings, a n d especially in th e American nation. W e here in the U n ite d States h a v e been chosen as light-brin gers to a suffering world. Shall w e be w o r th y of o u r sacred privilege?

E V E N IN G C L A SSE S A T T H E R O S E -C R O IX U N IV E R S IT Y
C lass in struction under the direction of the R ose-C roix U n iv e rsity w ill be given each W e d n e sd a y nig h t on the subject of P hysical Science, beginning W e d n e sd a y , Septem ber 24, and continuing through W ed n e sd a y , M a y 20, w ith the exception of the last tw o W e d ­ n esdays in D ecem ber. M em bers in the vicin ity of R osicrucian P a rk m ay p lan to tak e this course of instruction in its entirety. M em bers a t d istan t points w ho m ay visit S an Jose a t a n y tim e d u rin g this period m ay p lan to av ail them selves of the o p p o rtu n ity of a tten d ­ ing one o r m ore of these class sessions. W h ile the entire course is progressive, it is plan­ ned so th a t each W e d n e sd a y ’s class will be a u nit in itself. Full inform ation regarding these classes m ay be obtained by w riting to the D e an of the R ose-C roix U niversity. M em bers w ishing to attend classes should re p o rt to the R osicrucian R esearch L ibrary before 7:30 p. m. on the W ed n e sd a y nights th e classes are held.

The R o sicru cian D ig e s t O cto b er 1941

[330]

The Coming Age
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
thou gh ts a n d emotions into y o u r mental a n d emotional m ak e-u p. All educators have realized the v alu e of repetition. A s the Jesuits ta u g h t, "R ep etitio m ater studiorum est.” Repetition is th e mother of studies. In the opinion of M a d a m e Blavatsky, conviction alone w a s suffi­ cient as an incentive to action. N o t that a p r a y e r o r an affirmation does not have occult pow er. E v e r y s tu ­ d e n t knows th a t th e re is p ow er inherent in sound, that th e universe is the th o u g h t of G o d m aterialized, a n d that C hrist is the W o r d m a d e flesh. T h e av e ra g e student, how ever, h a s no t the ability to u tter an affirmation so th a t it is potent. A degree of concentration, of p urity a n d singleness of p u rp o se is nec­ essary, a degree of soul development, th a t the average stu d e n t does n ot p o s ­ sess is necessary. A g ro u p affirmation m ay prove more effective. Y ou may thereupon ask h o w healing frequently results from an affirmation. Cyril Scott in " T h e Initiate" series points out that one of the M a ste rs deplores a healing thro u g h affirmation alone. W h a t h a p ­ pens is that the d iso rd e r is tra nsfe rre d from the physical to th e psychic plane, to be precipitated even more virulently on an o th e r occasion. T h e M a s te r felt th a t it w as indicative of g rea te r strength of ch aracter to perm it the system to be cleansed of impurities on every plane; physically, m entally, a n d emotionally. W h e n w e s tu d y the situation in the world to d a y a n d w h e n w e contemplate the utopia destined to a p p e a r in the future, the conclusion to w hich w e are irresistibly d raw n is th a t w e must make every possible perso nal effort to bring the present state of chaos to a speedy

O U have heard m a n y tim e s th e s t a t e m e n t made th a t on this con­ tin e n t th e new race is beginning to be formed. You h av e h e a r d th a t w hen this w o rld ­ w id e s t r u g g l e has c e a s e d , the brave, n e w world of o u r d re a m s will em erge. You have h e ard of the Divine P lan for h u ­ m anity in w hich each race, each nation plays its p art. It is consoling and stren g th e n in g to k n ow th a t there is a Divine Plan, th a t o u r w orld will not d isa p p e a r in chaos, a n d th a t inspiring a n d helping us all along the w a y are the silent a n d invisible G u a r d ia n s of hum anity. T h e point to be borne in m ind is th a t these plans imply the cooperation of the hum an race. T h e r e is a te n d e n c y on the part of even u n d e rsta n d in g a n d in­ telligent people to rely almost w holly on the invisible worlds. T h e r e is a te nd e nc y to sit with folded h a n d s a n d rely on "hold in g a th o u g h t" a n d u tte r­ ing a p ra y e r o r an affirmation. F a r be it from me to underestim ate the pow er of a p ra y e r o r an affirmation. M a n y of the greatest occultists of the w orld, it must be remem bered, such as M a d a m e Blavatsky, felt th a t for the a v e ra g e stu ­ dent a p ra y e r o r an affirmation h a d o nly psychological value. It helped to keep a positive a n d constructive th oug ht before y o u r mind. It k ept y o u r co ur­ a ge up. It helped build constructive

[ 379 ]

termination an d to help usher in the age th a t we long to see realized. T h e p res­ ent situation. I feel, is a challenge to our u n d e rsta n d in g , o u r world-m indedness, a n d o u r ability to participate in cooperative action. T o take the right attitude to w a r d w o rld affairs, w e must actually be inform ed. W e roust dem and th a t the n e w sp a p e rs on which we rely print all th e n e c e ssa ry information. O s w a ld G a rris o n V illard. the distin­ guished ed itor o f " T h e N a tio n ,” w as shocked to discover tfiat the new spapers of the U n ite d S ta te s said very little of the m ass N a z i deportations. T h e s e w ere carried ou t in so cruel a manner th a t he felt the conscience of the w orld should h av e been aroused. It is tru e th a t the nations of the w orld have so w n the w ind and must now re a p the w hirlw ind. It is true that the K arm a of the h u m a n race is d e ­ scending upon it. I t is true th a t the old o rd e r must come to a close and the debris m ust be c le a re d a w a y before the new o rd e r c an arise. T h e horror a n d the pain a n d th e suffering, however, need not be so appalling nor so p r o ­ longed. H o w m a n y would stand b y unm oved if a child o r an animal were injured? Y e t colossal tragedies that shriek to high h e a v e n occur every mo­ ment of the d a y because the w orld is u ninform ed, indifferent, or criminally neutral. If d yn a m ite m u st explode u nd er our very feet th at w e m a y be galvanized into action, w e a re still intellectually a n d spiritually u naw a k e n e d . T h e Pil­ grim on the P a t h , as w e are well aw are, is d edicated to the life of love. H e must tr y to see go od in everything. H e must aim a t being impersonal and im­ partial. A t th e sam e time there are some thing s th a t th e mystical student m ust no lo ng er tolerate. T h e re are some th in gs th a t he m ust oppose with the m ight of his being a n d with his life, if need be. H e m u st oppose ty ra n n y , injustice, a n d oppression. H e must e x ­ pose cruelty. M a d a m e Blavatsky in “ P ractical O c c u ltism ” points out th a t one of the qualities d em and ed in the The R o sic ru cia n ca n d id a te for initiation is a re a d y r e ­ sponse to suffering. H e must cou rage­ D ig e s t ou sly cham pion the cause of the help­ N ovem ber less victims of persecution a n d of affliction. 1941

T o reiterate, w e must kno w w h a t is h a p p e n in g in the world to day. W e m ust u n d e rsta n d the issues involved. It is d a n g e ro u s to play the p a r t of the ostrich th a t hides its h ead in the sand. It is d a n g e ro u s to be ig n o ra n t o r indif­ feren t o r narrow ly nationalistic. Your indifference m ay make th e ta sk of the fighters all the more difficult. Y o u r in­ difference m a y prolong th e struggle. Y o u r indifference m ay be the cause of m a n y m ore millions suffering unneces­ s a ry cruelty. It is sad indeed w hen the unenlig htened citizen vehem ently de­ clares th a t he refuses to be concerned until the disaster is at his v ery door. It is tragic w h e n an enlightened individ­ ual e x presses a similar opinion. T h e hum an race is an organic whole. C a n y ou function efficiently if a limb is injured o r an org an is impaired? T h e w orld cann ot function sm oothly if any gro u p is p lu ng ed into needless misery. T h e w orld cannot function sm oothly if there is w id e sp rea d pov erty or fru stra ­ tion. T h e mystical s tu d e n t m ust not think o f himself alone. H e m ust think in terms of groups. Personal w elfare is b o u n d up with group w elfare. A chieve­ m ent is through the group. T h ro u g h trem end ou s effort I m ay be able to im­ p rov e m y ow n lot a little, b u t th a t same a m o u n t of .effort applied to the welfare of the g ro u p m ay aid in improving the lot of m any, even of h u n d r e d s a n d of th o u s a n d s as w h en the conditions of a w hole group are favorably altered. T h e G u a r d ia n s of h u m a n ity need w orld servers. T h e y openly ad m it that T h e i r efforts will be far more effective a n d conducive to speedier resu lts with ev e ry g roup of workers a d d e d to the ra n k s. T h e y inspire all public-spirited a n d philanthropically inclined people, it is true. Y e t it is self-evident th a t co­ operatio n on our part will be m ore ef­ fective if w e u n d e r s ta n d th e plans of the H ie r a r c h y a n d coop erate conscious­ ly. Unconscious efforts m ay prove abortive. It is said th a t the M a ste rs tried frequ ently to w o rk th ro u g h the fam ous novelist, G e o rg e S a n d , bu t with little success because she w a s absorbed in h e r ow n interests. T a k e , for ex­ ample, R ichard W a g n e r w h o was utilized b y the M a s te r s to b rin g to the public sublime melodies from the Buddhic plane. W a g n e r , too, w a s a n u n ­

[ 380]

conscious instrument. T h e M a ste rs did inspire him to w rite some beautiful p a s­ sa g e s w hich h ave a w o n d e rfu l effect upon those w h o listen to them. T h e y w e r e unconcerned a b o u t th e plots of h is operas. W h a t w a s th e consequence? T h e human, all-too-hum an W a g n e r ex­ pressed th rough the plots o f his operas a n d th ro u g h m a n y of his prose essays a philosophy th a t p ro ved to be the di­ r e c t inspiration for the vile conditions of today. T h e spirit of the music is m ost u n fo rtu n a te ly neutralized. As S h a k esp e a re said, " T h e evil that men do lives a fte r them. T h e good is oft in te r r ’d with their b o n e s .” C on sequently, a lth ou gh the G u a rd i­ a n s of hu m anity a re ever w orking for th e benefit of the w hole h u m a n race and a re ever seeking to inspire every one w h o is receptive to inspiration a n d will utilize every available c hannel for carry ­ ing out T h e i r noble p urp oses, yet it is to our a d v a n ta g e to b e informed, co­ operative, a n d conscious helpers. W e . too, are eag er that the world-conflict be speedily term inated. W e , too. are eager to help build the brave, n e w world. M u c h is learned through mistakes, it is true. In fact, life on e a rth is a process o f education th rough trial a n d error. I feel, however, th at the p re se n t crisis is too severe for a blu nderin g, uninform ­ ed, and unintelligent ty p e of coopera­ tion. T h e servers of the w o rld must w o rk with definite, clear-cut aims. E v e r y blow must count. P la n s must be far-reach in g, yet practical. T h e y must w o r k as a unit. T h e y m u st be ready for in sta n t action w h e re v e r necessary. T h e y must choose leaders in whom th e y have implicit confidence. T h e destructive forces of the world a r e organized, fighting ruthlessly and desperately, pursuing a plan of action th a t is satanic in its calculated outrage o f every human feeling a n d decency. T h e leaders d em a n d obedience and sacrifice. W h a t th e y n eed they con­ fiscate. T h e forces of light a re not so effectively a n d completely organized am on g men. A s y e t obedience and V

sacrifice a re v o lu n ta ry on their part. T h e y give a s much of their time a n d their effort a n d their m oney as they choose a n d n o more. It is n a tu r a l for people to unite in self-defense. W e m ust n ot w a it until our th ro a ts a r e in d a n g e r of being cut. W h e r e v e r the w o rk of the O r d e r is hindered, there are the enemies of light. W h e r e v e r m an m a y not w orship G od, there a re the enemies of light. W h e r e v e r the cultural values built up so slowly a n d painfully o v e r a period of tw o th o usa nd y e a r s a re being ruthlessly d e ­ stroyed, there are the enemies of light. W h e r e v e r the press a n d the rad io are completely muzzled, there are the en e­ mies of light. W h e r e the C h ristian vir­ tues a re scorned, there are the enemies of light. Civilization m ust be salvaged. T h e virtues i n c u l c a t e d b y the a v a t a r s th rough the w o rld religions m ust be affirmed. F re e d o m o f scientific research must be asse rte d . T h e unity of the h u ­ m an race m u s t be em phasized. T h e s e basic principles a re life to us. H o w can we live w ith o u t them? D o w e w a n t to live w ith o u t them? T h e r e f o r e , w e should arise in o u r stre n g th a n d com ­ m and the forces of evil to retreat. W h a t have w e to fear? Is no t G o d w ith us? T h e forces of evil for all their hellish pow er h av e o nly the stren gth of selfish­ ness a n d gre ed a n d brutality. W e have the w ill-to-good of the whole universe. W e a re in h a rm o n y with the Divine Plan for th e h u m a n race. T h e crisis is im perative a n d immedi­ ate. T h e op posin g forces are locked in a life -a n d-de ath struggle. Let us close our rank s. Let us forget labels a n d superficial distinctions a n d immediate personal aims. Let us exert every bit of influence th a t w e possibly can. Let the O r d e r be a pillar of fire in the m urky d arkness th a t exists th ro u g h o u t the w orld.' B ro th e rs a n d sisters, I call you once ag ain to im m ediate action. Let the m embership th ro u g h o u t the world unite for w orld action. V V

If, on self-exam ination, I find that I am not u prig ht, shall I not be in fear even of a poor m an in his loose garm ents of hair-cloth? If, on my self-exam ination, I find that I am u pright, I will go forw ard again st th o u s a n d s a n d te n s of th o u sa n d s. — M e n c iu s, C C S II.
[ 381 ]

Our Womanhood
By
T
hor

K jim

a lehto

,

Sovereign Grand Master
for the r e tu r n to the A bsolute, or to G od . T h is longing is called, "the flight of the alon e to the alon e.” T h e surest a n d m ost direct p a th is th r o u g h love. W h a t e v e r arouses love in our hearts furnishes a p a th for the return. O u r love m a y be kindled b y a h um an being o r a cause. T h e relationships e n g e n d ­ ered by love furnish a n incom parable school for the training of the soul in the no blest of virtues. T h e know ledge of love is th e highest w isdom . T h e " U p a n i s h a d s ” em phasize this point re­ peatedly. T h e serm on on the M o u n t deals w ith the qualities associated with love. S o cra te s in P la to ’s "S ym po sium " explains this same idea. E m e rso n r e ­ p e a ts it in his essays. Love, this beautiful a n d suprem e vir­ tue, is in reality a feminine principle. A lth o u g h Jesus is considered the great E x e m p la r, y e t love has a lw a y s been a s­ sociated w ith w om an. W o m a n sy m ­ bolizes love a n d compassion. M a n sym bolizes force a n d action. T h e time has come w h e n the feminine principle m ust prevail a n d w om en m ust take the lead. W o m e n must be th e s ta n d a r d b earers. T h e r e fo r e , the em ancipation of w o m an w a s a Cosmic necessity. O n ly a free soul can be a lead er or a s ta n d a r d b earer. W o m a n h a d to gain the selfk no w led ge a n d ind epend ence th a t come from choo sing h er ow n course in life a n d finding her work. W h i l e this move­ m ent for em ancipation m ay have meant g re a t h a rd s h ip , even pain a n d suffering in individual cases, while m any women look upo n indepen dence as a doubtful blessing, y e t this m ovem ent h a d to be. S u sa n B. A n th o n y w a s th e Cosmic

AYMUND AND­ R E A . the G rand M a s t e r of th e Rosicrucian O rder in E n g la n d , in his book, " T h e T e c h ­ nique of the D is­ ciple," points out th a t a sincere stu­ d e n t s h o u ld be q u i c k to r e c o g ­ nize the truth no ______ m atter w h a t the source m ay be. I, therefore, tak e g re a t pleasure in pre­ senting as the basis for m y discourse a book entitled. "D e lp h ic W o m a n ," w rit­ ten b y a w ell-kn ow n artist a n d theosophist, C la u d e B rag don . T h e theme of the book is the function of wom an in the cycle upon w hich w e h av e entered. T h e basic principles, o f course, are a l­ rea d y familiar to o u r students. You kno w th a t love is the suprem e emotion of the universe. O rig in ally the human being w a s bo th male a n d female as the poet, A ristop han es, explains in P la to ’s "S ym p osium ." T h e n G o d divided this being into two, male a n d female, and the tw o halves have ever since been indefatigably seeking each other. T h is sto ry symbolizes the fact th a t neither principle can function alone. Both ele­ m ents a re ne c essa ry for completion or fulfillment. T h e s to r y of the fall man sa y s th at the female principle caused The R o sicrucian the fall, a n d this also sugg ests that the redem ption or equilibrium m ust be a t ­ D ig e s t tained through wom an. D ecem ber M y stics have pointed out in every 1 94 1 age th a t the in nate desire of the soul is

[412]

medium for the pioneering w o rk that h a s gone on for several years. " F o r the moment, w om an is the vic­ tim o f her ow n victory: the d ark sh a d o w of h er n e w -b o rn freedom is her new loneliness. E s c a p e d from b o n d a g e , questing ev e ry so rt of kn ow ledge a n d experience, sh e h a s for the m o m ent ethically a n d culturally ou tstripped her com panion, m an , caug ht in the net of competitive industrialism. She is not un d e rsto o d b y him in all these new aspects; he re se n ts them, a n d b y him, all unconsciously, she is in her deepest n a tu re to rtu re d a n d crucified. M a n . m isu n d e rsta n d in g , alarm ed lest he lose his submissive, familiar, d e a r co m p a n ­ ion, has tried to d e n y to w om an her in­ evitable. n e c e s sa ry freedom a n d this has e n g en d e re d u n n a tu ra l rancors, delaying the e stablishm ent of a new equilibrium. . . . In the relation betw een the sexes, w o m an m ust become more than m other if m an is to become more than child — she will never w in him from his wolfishness if she be con tent a lw a y s to play the lamb-like p a r t." T h e g r e a t q u e s t of life is the quest of Cosmic love. In this quest as in life, it is not good for m an to be alone. M a n a n d w om an can u n d e rta k e this quest to ­ gether. M a n a n d w om an can help each other; in fact, th ro u g h the transforming pow er of love alone, each can achieve liberation. “ N o w , a lthough the G re a t W o r k is a n d m ust ever be self-initiated, singly p u rsu e d , an d solely consum ­ mated; a n d a lth o u g h it is a n d must be a via dolorosa in that it involves the im­ molation of th e personal self and a dis­ ciplining of the carn al nature, there is absolutely no re a so n w h y the love b e ­ tw een m an a n d w om an should act as a de te rren t to spiritual illumination; there is every reason on the other ha n d w h y it should act r a t h e r as a n energizing and accelerating force.” Since m an h a s become spiritually im­ potent, h y p n o tiz e d b y m odern industry, the n e w w o m a n m u s t tak e the initiative in helping h u m a n ity take its next evo­ lu tion ary step so th at eventually man a n d w om an m a y take it together. T h is n e w w o m an , w h o m the a u th o r terms the Delphic Sister after the ancient Priestess of the O ra c le at Delphi, is in­ tuitive. te n d e r o f heart, yet firm of will a n d clear of head. She m ust help man recapture their lost paradise. She must

be firm a g a in st all opposition. " T h e Delphic Sister w h o a b ro g a te s her s p ir­ itual a n d intellectual freedom in the nam e of love is love's w o rs t traitor b e ­ cause such freedom is necessary to e f ­ fect her ow n a n d m a n ’s regeneration. T h e secret of how this m ay be achieved is sealed up a n d hidden even from h er­ self w ithin her breast, b u t the new im age given the incentive of a great a n d mortal love, u n d e r the right c ondi­ tions will increasingly reveal itself.” Love m a y be the most pow erful of all a g e n ts of regeneration, a veritable fountain of new life. N o w the lover is preem inently " T h e follower of U n io n ” for the aim o f love is union; bu t if lovers desire o n ly union with one an o th e r as persons, the equilibrium is attained and love is e x h a u ste d in fulfillment. If, on the o th e r h an d, they desire union w ith the Divine thro u g h a n d b y m eans of one an other, instead of being like easily broken a n d quickly emptied bottles, th e y become conductors from an inex­ haustible reservoir o f life. Such a union can be en tered into on ly b y spiritual peers, lovers molded of the sam e moral paste. It is a love w ith o u t desire a n d w ithout fear. It is a love th a t brings “ the peace th a t p asseth all u n d e r ­ s ta n d in g .” T h e g r e a t lover is the g r e a t soul. T h e m easure of o n e ’s p o w e r to love is the m easure o f o n e ’s p ow er to live, a n d to diminish love is to impoverish life. E v e r y true lover know s in his h e a rt that love is a mystical experience. T h e great function o f Jove is first to crack and then d isrupt th e h a r d shell of perso n a l­ ity, perm itting the release of the sp ir­ itual nature. In this w a y personal love lead s to the love of the Divine. T h e p ath to the E te rn a l is th ro u g h the transitory. It is of the first im portance to realize th a t this m ost personal of all passions is really su per-personal: th a t love is not ours, th a t it does no t belong to us, but th a t w e belong to it. W e learn a bout love only by loving; a n d the more w e love the m ore w e Jearn. Loving greatly — th a t is, s u p e r-p e rso n a lly — m eans liv­ ing d a ng e ro usly; the overcautious and the c ow a rdly c a n n o t enter here. T h e future of the h u m a n race m ay d ep en d upon the perception of all this by a relatively few individuals, and their determ ination to serve love, to

[413]

sacrifice themselves to it, and. su b m it­ ting to a n inner control a n d direction, to follow " n o t a fra id with a n y a m a z e ­ m en t" w he re v e r it m a y lead. T h e b la s t­ ing a n d blighting pow er of love, w hen m ade subservient to the personal self, is well know n, bu t its regenerative a n d creative pow er rem ains to be revealed. W h e n lovers realize their deep desire for one a n o t h e r — the desire of a s u n ­ de re d god fo r self-realization th ro u g h reunion — th a t the p ath to this Divinity is for each through the other, a n d w hen th ey petition in a spirit of humbleness, " W h a t w ilt thou hav e us do?" — w ho know s bu t th a t they m ay be vouchsafed some a n s w e r w o nd e rful a n d new. H e re in lies the most m om entous a n d pressing of all h um an problems: h ow to love in o r d e r to receive the fullness of love's benison. O n e thing at least is certain: the a n sw e r must be so ug ht not in the n ig g a rd ly mind but in the op ulent heart. T h e n a tu re of this revelation, the a n s w e r to this p ra y e r, c a n n o t be guessed b y anyone, b ut initiation into the Lesser M y ste rie s of love is for all w h o ap proach the sa n c tu a r y in a spirit of self-dedication a n d w ho conform to no other ritual save th a t prescribed by the generous a n d ten d e r heart. T h e q uality of o u r love will depend upon o u r degree of a w a re n e ss. T h e M a s te rs a re those w h o open w ide the gates in­ stead o f stre n g th e n in g the dams. T h e education o f the h e a rt through love— w hich is the art of love— becomes most intensive a n d effective w hen un dertak en for the sa k e of and with the aid o f the beloved. Lovers help one an o th er most b y believing in one a n other; F a ith is a g re at facto r in a successful love re la ­ tion because th a t w hich is believed to be tru e com es true. A n d the best th a t can be th o u g h t o r im agined is also the truest, for u n d e r the stimulus of love a n d faith the high er self increasingly shines forth. T h e shell of selfishness is broken b y suffering, w hich is, therefore, a n e c e ssa ry a n d inevitable part of love in its initial stages. T h e w o rsh ip of E r o s a p p e a rs to have vanished from the w o rld, b ut th a t w o r ­ ship will be reestablish ed and on a new The R o sicru cian foundation w ith w om an for its high Priestess a n d Initiator. W o m a n is o r ­ D ig e s t dain ed a n d qualified for this office b e ­ D ecem ber cause she re p re se nts the love-aspect of the Divine nature; her b o d y is the 1941

temple o f love’s ritual a n d the treasury of the co ntin ued race. W o m e n of the Rosicrucian O rd e r, w h a t m ore beautiful mission in life can the C osm ic give you? T h is message su b sta n tia te s t h e t e a c h i n g s o f the O r d e r . It is the sam e message that M a rie Corelli preaches in her inspiring novel, "L ife E v e rla stin g ." ’ T h e sublimest relation in life is th a t w hich exists betw een a m an a n d a w om an w h o love each o th e r. But th a t relation is truly sup rem e o n ly w h e n the man a n d the w om an a r e bo th spiritually developed a n d pilgrims on the P a th . Sisters, you m ust mold yourselves into the model of the n e w w om an. Y o u must develop y o u r m ind a n d y o u r will power. You must live th e life of love a n d com pas­ sion. Y o u m ust develop y o u r potential­ ities a n d live the hig her life no m atter w h a t the obstacles m ay be th at confront you. Y o u m ust be tru e to y o u r highest ideals. Y o u will meet with opposition on e v e ry side, even from y o u r n earest a n d d e a re st. C a n you, nevertheless, be firm, O D elphic Sisters? Y ou will suffer from th e most cruel m ockery a n d ridi­ cule b y d a y , a n d at n ig h t y o u r pillow will be w e t with tears. C a n you still be firm, O Sisters? You m ust be the build ­ ers of the future. Y ou m ust exemplify the ideals of the new a ge in y o u r p e r ­ sonal lives. You must teach the mys­ teries o f love to all w h o are r e a d y for the m essage. You m ust develop your intuition. Y ou must d a re to live accord­ ing to the dictates of y o u r heart. W o m e n of the w orld, suffering has alw ays been your lot. C an yo u not suffer n o w in the cause of the highest and th e noblest? H e re is a cause th at is in h a rm o n y with y o u r deepest in­ stincts. C o n se c ra te y o u r souls to the task. D e d ic a te your lives to the g reat w o rk of redemption. T h e fall of man w as th r o u g h the w om an a n d the re­ dem ption o f m an is also thro u g h you. W e a re pilgrims on the P a th together. H o w beautiful if each c an have a com­ panion on the way! W o m a n has alw ays been the inspiration of genius. Petrarch had his L a u ra a n d D a n te his Beatrice. G o e th e h a d F a u s t exclaim: " T h e eter­ nal feminine leads us on." Become the ch a n n e ls of the Divine revelation. L ight the torch to sh ow us the w a y . Raise ( C o n c lu d e d o n P a g e 418)

[414]

to ry a n d w h a t im provem ents will be ne c e ssa ry to increase its effectiveness a n d usefulness. T h e criticisms of our stu d e n ts h ave been a valuable help. It is this spirit of cooperation betw een teacher a n d stu d e n t which has b ro u g h t a b o u t the a d v a n c e of the Rosicrucian O r d e r . All of us are students. W e s tu d y a n d learn th rough our m utual cooperative efforts. V V

Jt is o u r intention to p rese n t som e of this n e w d em o nstratio n equipm ent at o u r n ext Rosicrucian convention. It is o u r plan to present a t th a t time an e n ­ tirely new set of experiments, complete­ ly different from w h a t w e have shown in the past, so th a t y ou w h o a tte n d will be able to see the g ra d u a l evolution of o u r plans. V

OUR W OMANHOOD
( C o n tin u e d fro m P a g e 414) the c o n s c i o u s n e s s of the race-m an thro u g h the p o w e r of your love. D o not be discouraged by the tem ­ p o r a r y setbacks th a t women h ave e x ­ perienced th r o u g h o u t the w orld. H elp y o u r u n f o rtu n a te sisters in E u ro p e to regain their n a tu ra l rights. Be no t in ­ fluenced b y the casual and materialistic a ttitu d e to w a rd the love-relationship held b y so-called intellectuals a n d the sophisticated. T o do y o u r g re a t w ork you need complete freedom of thought, speech, a n d action. T o be faithful to y o u r D ivine mission you need a mate w h o is y o u r spiritual equal o r w h o is willing to rise to your spiritual level. V V D o n o t let the fear of loneliness or the h u n g e r of y o u r soul d ra g you d ow n or make you false to y o u r trust. Be the willing instru m en ts o f the Divine, and G o d will p rotect yo u a n d sustain you a n d guide you. It is only for a little w hile th a t you m ust w o rk alone. V e r y soon m an must a w a k e n to the realization of w h e re his tru e h appiness lies, an d , glad th a t the w o m an w a s firm in th e h o u r o f his w eakness, will join her in the quest of the ages w ith a love all the more in­ ten se because w ithheld for so m any years. V

C O N C E R N IN G H U M O R
(C o n tin u e d from P a g e 415) C ultiv ate it, for it is a fine w e a p o n in overcoming self-deception a n d the u n ­ conscious a tte m p ts to evade th e stiffer d em a n d s of life. T r u e hum or goes h a n d in h a n d with the original virtue, humility; to g e th e r th e y can offset the d an g e rs th a t lie in pride, vanity, desire for pow er a n d in so-called “ self-respect,” which is really self-love a n d self-adm iration. A conceited m an is alw ays guard in g his precious “ self-respect," for though he h a s little sense of hu m or himself, his v a n ity a n d self-deception cause m uch am u se m e n t to others w ith c o nse­ q u e n t misery to himself. O n the o th er h a n d , the n a tu r a l clown, the perp etual joker, w ith a h e a r t of gold, is a b e ­ The loved figure in e v e ry community a s well R o sicru cian as am o ng more famous personages. D ig e s t H o w w e all w a rm to his n a tu ra l m o d ­ D ecem ber e sty a n d b rotherliness. A n d w h o can s a y th a t his is no t the truer philosophy? 1941 It has been said th a t h um or is ir­ reverent. T r u e ; reverence is for things Divine while hum or is essentially a p a rt of h um an-n ess. Y e t a high Initiate has said th a t if G o d possessed no sense of h um or neither w o uld man, a n d any on e c an discover for himself th a t the sa y ­ ings of the greatest T e a c h e rs fairly sp a rk le with w it, even gaiety. A n d w h o a m o ng us does not hav e a n in sta n t in­ crease in confidence in a great leader, even a spiritual leader, if w e discover an occasional hom ely tw inkle in his eye. A n d w e a re right, for a true sense of h u m o r a n d sincere h o n e sty a n d selfless­ ness of p urpo se go together. T h e more w e are inclined to be ideal­ ists, o r the more sensitive w e are, the g re ate r our need for th e tension-reliever. Indeed, a s w e go along o u r w ay, living, loving a n d learning, it behooves u s all to sprinkle in p le n ty of laughter, also, to ease a n d illuminate o u r journey.

[418]

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
TH E RO SIC R U CIA N CITIZEN

|

By T

hor

K iim

aleh to

,

Sovereign Grand Master

T h e f o l l o w i n g a r t i c l e is -written in r e p l y to a q u e s t i o n a s k e d b y a m e m b e r . " I h a v e r e a d t h e a r t i c l e in t h e N o v e m b e r ' R o s i c r u c i a n D i g e s t ' b y t h e G r a n d M a s t e r t i t l e d ‘T h e C o m i n g A g e . ' I n t h e c l o s i n g p a r a g r a p h h e a s k s f o r t h e c o - o p e r a t i o n o f all m e m b e r s in t h e p r e s e n t c r i s i s o f w o r l d afTairs. I a m w r i t i n g to a s k if t h e r e is a s p e c ia l p r o g r a m o u t l i n e d o r j u s t w h a t i s e x p e c t e d o f e a c h one. W ill y o u a d v i s e m e p l e a s e ? " — M. A. G.

H E O rd e r has em­ phasized time a n d tim e a g a i n t h a t the western p ath is the path of ac­ tion. Action is the life o f love a n d service. Service is l o v e in a c t i o n . M etaphysics h a s taught us the n e ­ cessity of thoughts of love, p o s i t i v e and inspiring emo­ tions; a n d k i n d l y , encouraging, and tactful speech. N o m atter how restrict­ ed our en viro nm ent may be, no matter ho w little w e m a y possess of this w o rld ’s goods, w e can place ourselves definitely on the side o f the constructive forces of the universe, the forces for good. W e c an w o rk o n the psychic plane through our th o u g h ts o f love, our emotions of love, a n d o u r w o rd s of love. T h o u g h t, feeling, and s p e e c h are fun dam ental; y e t th e y constitute but the first step on the P a th of Service. M o st The of us can e n te r upon the next step. If R o sic ru c ian w e are, indeed, filled w ith love for D ig e s t m ankind; if w e do. indeed, desire to January help our suffering brothers and sisters 1942 th ro u g h o u t the w orld, if we w ould make

an earnest a ttem pt to be g uided b y the G o ld e n Rule, then o u r th o u g h ts, our emotions, and o u r p ro te sta tio n s of love a n d interest must lead to positive, con­ structive, and inform ed action. It is not enough to send a starving m an tho ugh ts of love. It is nec e ssa ry to feed him. T h e re is no need for m a n n a to descend from heaven, because G od has caused the earth to yield a b u n d a n t ­ ly. It is the d u ty of m an to distribute the food properly. It is not enough to s a y a w arm , e n ­ couraging w ord to a m an w h o w ears but one th re a d b a re suit a n d w hose shoes are no protection because th e y are so thin. It is necessary to provide him w ith a pair of shoes. It is not enough to s a y p ra y e rs and u tte r affirmations for a m an a b o u t to lose his home. It is n e c e ssa ry to make provisions for the lo dging of his family. Y ou have h e a rd it said, “ C h a r i t y b e ­ gins a t home.” Y ou h ave h e a rd it said, A n y rich man can furnish b re a d . Let u s be diligent in s p re a d in g T r u t h . ” B rothers a n d sisters, th ese statem ents w e re not m eant for a time of em ergency such as exists today. W i t h one h and w e must feed our families, with the o th e r the throngs of th e h u n g r y and

[ 474 ]

destitute. A t one a n d the same time we m ust end eav or to nourish both bod y a n d soul. O n th e one h a n d w e m ust make every effort to abolish p o v e rty in this c o u n try a n d w ipe out u n e m p lo y ­ ment. O n the o th e r h an d , com passion bids us aid the d estitu te a n d succor the stricken in the tragic are a s of w a r . T h e refugees are the g re a te st problem in the world today. W o r l d p la n ning is neces­ sary to provide for them ad eq uately, a n d w e as the m ost secure nation in the w orld to d a y must no t fail to cooperate. T h e lofty A m e ric a n tradition of the open door to the o pp re sse d a n d p e rse ­ cuted of the e a rth m u st no t fail. T h e d e p r e s s i o n h a s r e v e a l e d the w eakest spots in o u r social system . O u r musicians a n d artists are h a n d ica p p e d in procuring the expensive tra in in g nec­ essary a n d in finding productive c h a n ­ nels for their talent. A p p ro p ria tio n s for public libraries h ave been cut until it is impossible to b u y the new books in every field of th o u g h t w hich are the life-blood of the library a n d the com­ munity. In a tru ly democratic society there must be o pp ortunities for the gift­ ed both to develop their ta le n ts a n d to utilize them. T h e pro fessio ns should be open to all w ho a re sup rem ely fitted for them. E v e ry com m unity, no m a tter how small, should h a v e a d e q u a te athletic and social provisions for the youth. E ducation m ust be a true process of guiding the child in the developm ent of his own potentialities. It m ust no t be a mere pretense, a m ockery b ecause of large groups, in a d e q u a te equipm ent, and a s h o rt-sig h te d policy on the p a rt of boards of education. T h e r e should b e no such thing as a slum. T h e w o rld should be w h a t G od meant it to be, a home, a g a rd e n , a fruitful field, a p la y g ro u n d , a n d a school for all His children. A s the facilities of a home are open to all w h o belong to it. as the facilities of a school a re at the disposal o f all the children in the com ­ munity, so m ust the beauty, the fruits, and the privileges of the earth b e a t the disposal of all w h o live on it a n d are wiling to contribute their services to the best of their ability. N o individual alon e can b rin g these lessings to m a n k i n d . O n ly people working to gether can pu t love into the social order. If w e truly love m ankind.

we w a n t to im prove its physical, eco­ nomic. a n d social condition. W e w a n t to remove the conditions breeding crime and poverty a n d frustration. W e w a n t to arouse the people w h o a re selfcentered. s e c u r e , s m u g , a n d wholly w ra p p e d in their ow n private concerns. W e w a n t to e d u c ate people to be socialminded a n d con cern ed a bout the w el­ fare of the com m unity, their country, and the world. W e w a n t to p u t the whole w eight of o u r person ality into every movement in h a rm o n y with these ideals. B ear in mind t h a t the M a ste rs are in­ terested in the w e lfa re of h u m a n ity as a whole. T h e y a r e c o n sta n tly w orking tow ard the elevation of the masses. T h e y utilize every channel, every o r­ ganization, every g ro u p w o rking to­ w ard the im provem ent of conditions a n d for the helping of people. W h e n we engage in som e im p ortant co m m un ­ ity project, we a re doing the M a s t e r ’s work, w e are ac tu a lly helping to bring about the im provem ents th a t w e are thinking about a n d th a t w e a rd e n tly d e ­ sire. T h e Cosmic P o w e rs w o rk through hum an beings. T h e good th a t w e desire we m ust help to create. In o rd e r to decide w h a t are the most pressing reforms in our community, in o rd e r to decide w h a t m ovem ents a re in ha rm ony with o u r ideals, w e m ust be informed. W e m ust re a d n ew spapers, not one alone, but several. It is difficult to get a n a ccurate picture of events from one n e w sp a p e r alone. E a c h n e w s ­ paper, with all the good intentions of its publishers, a n d editors, is bo un d to be biased. W e must be familiar with the civic organizations in o u r community. A re they in harm o n y w ith the spirit of our Constitution? A re th e y in h a rm o ny with the law of love? C a n a Rosicrucian b e ­ long to them gnd s u p p o r t them? If they are not in h a rm o n y with the C o n stitu ­ tion, if they w o rk for discrimination, prejudice, intolerance, a n d suppression of the liberties g u a ra n te e d b y our Bill of Rights, w e should expose them. W e should be sufficiently well informed to know th a t they a re a menace a n d that they m ust no t be p e rm itte d to exist. T h is great d em ocracy m eans much to us Rosicrucians. W e a re pro u d of our share in the building up of its institu-

t 475}

tions. W e w a n t o u r country to con­ tinue in the spirit of th e founding fath ­ ers. W e w a n t a true brotherhood of man to be established here. W e deplore the forces th a t w o u ld undermine our unity and d e stro y o u r ideals. W h a te v e r difficulties w e suffer from now can be remedied b y a h e a rty spirit of coopera­ tion a n d of b rotherh ood . Just a little kindness, just a little willingness to share, to sacrifice for the good of all. just a little com passion for the suffering of our p overty-strick en neighbor, and the necessary a d ju stm e n ts can readily be made. T h e nobility a n d clergy of the French Revolution in refusing to share, lost all. T h e slav e-o w ners o f the South in re­ fusing to see the sinfulness of their position, lost all. T h e corrupt Czarist regime of the pre-W ^ar period in re fu s­ ing to consider the w elfare of the com­ mon people, lost all. W h y are men blind? W h y do they refuse to learn the a ge-old lessons of history? A n in carn atio n is so brief a period. B efore w e realize it. it is d r a w ­ ing to a close. W h a t e v e r of earthly possessions one h a s accum ulated must be left behind. Is it no t better to have the joy of sp e nd in g it while one is alive? As an ancient sa g e has taught. " T o give m oney a w a y in o n e ’s will is copper, to give it a w a y b efore one dies is silver, but to spend it w isely and generously in o n e ’s lifetime is g o ld e n .” T r y . b ro th e rs a n d sisters, to engage in some constructive, practical task, no matter how small. T h e p u r p o s e of A M O R C is to orient you to w ard life, to change y o u r point of view, to give you motives a n d incentives for action, to train you to be a w o rk e r in the world of men a n d deed s. Be an intelligent citizen. C a s t y o u r vote intelligently. Be able to discuss the issues of the day. Know the motives be hind civic org an i­ zations so th a t y ou can pu t the weight of your influence in th e right direction. Give your moral a n d financial support to as m a n y w o rth w h ile movements as you can afford. U n d e r s ta n d the policy The of our leaders. W a t c h the bills before R o s ic r u c i a n Congress. D ig est T o be a good Rosicrucian is to be a January good citizen o f y o u r country. W e w ant 1942 freedom to s p re a d Rosicrucian teach­

ings a n d ideals. W e w a n t freedom to live the Rosicrucian life. D ictatorship has a lw a y s been opposed to freem aso n­ ry a n d individual education. W e can function on ly in a free country. A good sister inquires, "W h a t shall w e do w ith these termites th a t bo re into o u r c o u n tr y ’s institutions?" T h e a n sw e r is simple. Be more active th a n they. W e h av e fa r more to offer. W e appeal to the noblest, the highest, a n d the best in ev e ry hu m an heart. W e ap p e a l to love a n d to brotherho od . W e ap p e a l to good sp o rtsm a n sh ip and a sense of fair play. W e appeal to the inn ate desire for peace a n d harm ony. W e scorn the philosophies th a t appeal to m a n 's basest a n d m ost selfish impulses. W e scorn those philosophies th a t de n y the sp ir­ itual in m an a n d in the universe, that see n o evidence for G o d , or the soul, o r spiritual values. W e rep udiate those philosophies th a t arouse racial discrim ­ ination, religious bigotry, a n d class dis­ tinctions; th a t call evil good a n d that accept c ruelty a n d torture. T h e r e is much th at you can do for A M O R C . Y ou can distribute o u r leaf­ lets w idely. You can explain o u r p rin ­ ciples to all w ho are interested. Y ou can help m ake our publicity c am paign s a success. Y o u can invite as m a n y p e o ­ ple as yo u can p e rsu a d e to a tte n d the public forum s th a t m an y lodges are in­ a u g u r a tin g this season. Y ou can be a genial h ost or a charm in g hostess. Y ou can help people feel a t home. Y ou can a r r a n g e talks to appeal to certain groups — such as the elderly in the community, the college youth, a n d parents. O f course w e w a n t m embers, but m em bers alone are not o u r aim. W e w a n t ju s t as much to pre p a re the con­ sciousness of our population. W e w a n t to p la n t ideas. W e w a n t to sta rt trend s a n d m ovem ents in certain directions. If o u r gu e sts should c a rry a w a y the ideas of reincarnatio n a n d karma, for e x a m ­ ple, o r if th e ideal of the life of love and service sh ou ld remain, the gathering will h a v e been w orthw hile. T h e motto of a g r e a t publishing h o u se w a s “ A w a k e a n d aw aken'"' Let th a t be o u r clarion cry: “ A w ak e, Rosicrucians, be spiritual m inute men that ye m a y the more easily aid in a w a k e n ­ ing o th e rs ! ”

[476]

|

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE S P I R I T U A L O U T L O O K

§

By T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , S o v e re ig n Grand Master
S W E lo o k b a c k over the centuries of h u m a n exist­ ence, w e c a n n o t help b ut feel the futility that o ver­ w helm s us. B ro th e rh o o d , justice, love, and service have been ta u g h t to men for over tw o thousand y e a r s , a n d a l l around us we see only expressions of greed, selfishness a n d intolerance. M a n y people are under the impression th a t to accept a spiritual outlook u p o n life, to believe th a t the heart of m an must be rege n e rate d b e ­ fore there c an be peace on earth and good will am o ng men. is to try to es­ cape from reality, to be 'unrealistic," a n d to p la y into the h a n d s of despots and exploiters. Such people are w holly mistaken. T h e y fail to realize the po w ­ er of an ideal, the far reaching effect of tho ug ht, a n d the enorm ous power con­ cealed in a w o rd or in a sound. People ask w h e re G od is in difficult d ay s such as these. T h e y point out that millions a re sta rv in g a n d have been u p ­ rooted a n d a re suffering the agonies of The R osicru cia n w ar. G o d does not rule as a ty ra n t o u t­ side of H is creation, but rules by e sta b ­ D ig e s t lished laws in nature. M a n , being the J u ly highest developm ent of nature, th e re­ 1942 fore. expresses G o d 's will according to his u n d e rsta n d in g of the God-consciousness within him. G o d has, there­ fore. n o direct responsibilty for the miseries and w ro n g s m an constantly brin g s upon himself. If m an cannot learn to realize God a n d live b y the good impulses he feels w ithin, and if his developm ent can be accomplished only through suffering a n d pain, it is profitable that such should come. T h e root of those evils inherent in o u r present economic and political struc­ ture is not entirely economic or political bu t also spiritual. T h e cause is a ma­ terialistic education a n d understanding fou nded upon the physical senses only. T h e cause is a soulless society based on mechanistic principles. T h e cause is selfishness, greed, a n d love o f power. T h e cause is a hard heart, the resur­ gence of animal passions, the survival of the fittest. T h e r e a re some w onder­ ful laws in the law books of the world, inscribed from h u n d re d s of y e a r s ’ evo­ lu tion ary development. O f w h a t benefit are they if people do n ot w a n t to obey them or make them effective? F o r ex­ ample. despite the a m e n d m e n t to the constitution giving negroes the fran­ chise. there are Jim C ro w cars and schools in the South, a n d the negro is prevented from exercising his legal rights. T h e g reat P h a ra o h Ik h n a to n tried to build an ideal city a n d formulate a w ho lly spiritual religion, b u t of what avail w a s it w h e n the people refused to

[ 230]

rise to the height of his ideal? H isto ry is replete w ith instances w h ere the le a d ­ ers e n d e a v o re d to institute im prove­ ments for the m asses before they were ready for it. M oses in the code th at he drew up for his people tried to make the oppression of a ruling class impossible. H e p la n n e d a theocracy. G o d w a s to be the ruler. N o king w a s ever to com ­ mand a n d have the p ow er to tax a n d to exploit. But the people w ere no t re a d y for such self-governm ent. T h e result was the a n a r c h y d u rin g the period of Judges. T o prevent exploitation a n d poverty for all time, he instituted the Jubilee. T h e people w e re not r e a d y for such a fa r-sig h te d economic concept. C onsequ en tly the institution of the Jub­ ilee becam e a d ead letter. It w as never observed. W h a t h as h a p p e n e d to International law? It has ceased to exist. T re a tie s have becom e mere scraps of paper. W h a t h a s h a p p e n e d to Religion? T h e Bibles of the world are rejected. T h e y have becom e mere ‘ literature.” G od Himself is denied. T h e most beautiful laws th a t m an can conceive will no t help the situation today. T h e u rg en t need is not for m ore law s b ut the observance of those a lre a d y on the statute books. W h e n a m a jority of people desire peace a n d dem and peace, there will be peace. W h e n a m ajority of people in­ sist th a t the C onstitu tion and the Bill of Rights be respected, d em ocracy will function, a n d intolerance and discrim­ ination will d isapp ear. W h e n the m a ­ jority of people in d ig na n tly repudiate exploitation a n d a social o rd e r based on profits ra th e r than h u m an needs, there will be peace betw een em ployer and employee, a n d the consum er will n ot be crushed b etw een the upp er a n d the lower millstone. W h e r e shall w e find people w h o are willing to live their lives in accordance with high ideals, w h o a re willing to put the needs of the hu m an first, a n d the tews second, w ho are willing to live co°Peratively a n d not competitively? T h e ^■ucation the h e a rt is needed, more nan the education of the head. Soul evelopment is needed, n ot more legis3taon, A n expansion o f consciousness needed, n ot a stro n g e r penal system. W h e n men are willing to accept the PJritual principles of the fatherh oo d of

G o d a n d the b ro th e rh o o d o f man, w hen they a re willing to conform to the im­ plications of these tw o sublime princi­ ples in their daily lives, in their relation­ ships with all th at lives, then exploita­ tion in every one of its form s will cease. Emotional developm ent stre n g th e n s the love-life in a m a n ’s h e a rt. E x p a n sio n of consciousness a n d d evelopm ent of in ­ tuition enable a m an to feel a n o th e r's needs, to sym pathize w ith a n o th e r's n a ­ ture. a n d to u n d e r s ta n d the limitations and the hand icap s o f a n o th e r hum an being. A merciful em ployer will be content to earn less provided t h a t his w orking people do not suffer. H e will w a n t his employees to be h a p p y in his employ. H e will w a n t their respect a n d affection. H e will shrink from e a rn in g m oney at the expense of their h ealth a n d h a p ­ piness. A merciful man will scorn to take ad v a n ta g e of w om en a n d p lay with their hearts. A w o m a n w ith a sense of honor will scorn to be a gold-digger. W h e r e affection is genuine, p are n ts do not have to be compelled b y law to take care of their children; children do not have to be forced to pro vide for aged parents. A g overnm ent com posed of upright men will ho n o r treaties, a ccept­ ed codes of law, a n d err on the side of generosity. T h e re is not one single problem that w ould not disap pear if th e people con­ cerned approached its solution in a spirit of love a n d coo peration a n d w ill­ ingness to sacrifice. A n y relationship becomes sanctified w h e n cem ented by sacrifice. H o w beautiful w hen husb a n d and wife remain faithful despite illness and poverty. H o w beau tiful w h e n chil­ dren are devoted to old or suffering or unfortunate parents. H o w b e a u t i f u l when b rothers a n d sisters make sacri­ fices for one a n other. H o w beautiful when th e com m unity c o o p e r a t e to rescue some u n fo rtu n a te family. H o w beautiful w hen one n atio n comes to the rescue of an o th e r w e a k e r nation. T h e world h onors R uth, the M oabitess. because she gave up every th in g for her mother-in-law, N a o m i. T h e friend­ ship of D avid and J o n a th a n h a s been immortalized. W e love the tales of the brave knight w ho goes forth to rescue the distressed damsel. W e all love the

[231]

The R osicrucian D ig e s t July 1942

s to ry of Romeo a n d Juliet even though it is a tale w ith a tragic ending. W e love Robert B row ning doubly th a t his love for his frail, invalid wife w as so perfect. W e love the maiden whom T e n n y s o n loved because she w a s faith­ ful for tw e n ty y e a rs before they were united in m arriage. W h e n Pierre Curie first proposed to M arie, she declined. H o w ev er, he w a s un da u n te d . In the face of such a r d o r a n d determination, M a r ie capitulated. P eople smile superciliously at ro­ mance a n d at fairy tales. T h e r e is no reason in the w orld w h y a fairy tale should be only th a t an d nothing more. Y o u can make it come true, E v e r y man is playing the part of a hero in the story of his life; every w o m an is playing the p a rt of a heroine in the story of her life. E ven the hum blest p a rt on the stage of life can be played with dignity, with beauty, a n d w i t h loving p e r f e c t i o n . E ven a tragic p a rt can assum e an epic tone w hen played in a spirit of humil­ ity a n d perfect tru st in divine love and wisdom as well as power. P e rh a p s you rem em ber the lovely, sunlit village of S h a n g ri-L a in the heart of the magnificent H im alayan M o u n ­ tains in T ib e t. " H o w unrealistic." some unimaginative people exclaimed. T h e clever n e w sp a p e r w r i t e r s knowingly shook their h ead s a n d deplored the d e ­ lightful p h a n ta s y as an escape from reality. T h e r e is nothing unrealistic about the vision a t all. It is a model of w h a t life can be if you so will it, and I so will it. a n d w e all so will it. T h ese poor, deluded, h a rd -h e a d ed , practical men of so un d common sense, they think they are right, bu t F a t h e r T im e laughs in his sleeve as the film rolls on. and th e y usually find themselves absolutely wrong. W e honor a n d love the heroes of his­ tory. the men a n d w om en w h o gave all for love, the men a n d women with com­ passion ate h earts, the men a n d women w h o dedicated their lives to a great ideal, to a noble cause. W h e n M oses sa w the E g y p tia n s oppressing the H e ­ brew s. his h e a rt gave him no peace until he could strike a blow in defense V V

of his persecuted people. W h e n G u ^ tama, the B u d d h a , sa w the sorrow, tfc* pain, a n d the distress in the world said, "I will n ot rest until I find the wav out for all m a n k in d .” Jesus w ashed th feet of H is disciples to inspire them to act hu m bly a n d graciously with each* other. -f K indness calls for kindness, hearf calls to he a rt, a n d love calls forth love.’ W h e n a vision of g re a t love dawns be­ fore our gaze b arrie rs melt, new worlds float into our ken, our h e a rts contain the w orld. W e tra n sc e n d o u r little selves O u r souls roam upon the heights. Our minds reach to the fiery stars, and our feet touch the c e n te r of the earth. W e become one w ith every blade of grass every bird th at sing s upon the leafy twig, every pe rfum e d flower th a t sways like a butterfly on its graceful stem. W e become one w ith every mother that smiles p ra y e rfu lly at the b ab e in her arms, every fa th e r th a t rejoices in the son at his side. W e are one with all f r i e n d s a n d h u m a n i t y . T h e tear in every eye is ours. T h e smile on every face is a reflection of our own. O , im patient man. w h y d o you chafe at these ties th a t bind yo u to your tasks? W e r e y o u r soul bu rning with love, you would rejoice a t every oppor-' tunity to pour y o u r love into another’s, life; the chains th a t seem to gall would caress; the m anacles th a t seem dark and h ea v y as lead w ould gleam with gold a n d seem light as g o s s a m e r e threads; the triple gates w o uld spring open at a touch. T h e g r a y sky would turn into o palescen t pearl. T h e rain­ drops w ould tu rn into h a n d fu ls of blos­ soms. E v e ry d a y would become a glor­ ious adv e n tu re. D e a th w ou ld become a tra n sc e n d e n t experience. A s the poet M asefield says, " D e a t h opens unknown doors. It is m ost g r a n d to die.” Love is still the w o rld 's g re a t need— the love the m ystic teaches — love of G od , love o f m an, a n d love of all crea­ tion. T h e n s trife will cease. All con­ flicts will be reconciled. T h e pairs of opposites a re then tran scen ded . The dualism m erges into unity. Peace pro­ found prevaileth. V

B U Y U . S. D E F E N S E S A V IN G S B O N D S A N D S T A M P S
r 232 ]

«

SANCTUM MUSINGS
H EA LTH A N D R IG H T LIVING

By T

hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
er a body as im porta nt as an a u to m o ­ bile. T h e r e are few people w h o are willing to give a b o d y the attentio n a n d care that they give a car. T h e y h an dle a b o d y as carelessly, as recklessly, as a d ru n k a rd an automobile. D o not m isu n d e rsta n d me. Respect for the b o d y does not m ean m aking care of the b o d y the principal in te re st in o n e’s life. It does no t mean living only for the body. T h e b o d y is th e instrument of the soul. It should be utilized for strenuous work. W h i l e it sho uld be kept clean a n d h ealthy there is n o need for indulgence of a n y kind, particularly indulgence th a t is pernicious in its ef­ fects. A t times, it m ust be cheerfully sacrificed, because the soul is a lw ays g re ate r than the body. T o sacrifice the b o d y for a great cause, how ever, is quite a different m atter from ruining it w ith d rink or drug s, or catering to b ase appetites. W e live in a universe of law. I n fra c ­ tions of the law cause a reaction. It is n ot punishm ent. It is not retribution. It is simply the universal w ork in g of the law of cause a n d effect. K n ow ledge gives us control a n d pow er. K n o w l­ edge of the laws g overning electricity has made possible all the mechanical a n d scientific w o n d e r s o f o u r age. T h r o u g h ignorance a man can be killed. T h e same laws can be used b oth to

N D E R normal cir­ cum stances health is t h e n a t u r a l state. Civilization h a s succeeded in m ak in g g e n u i n e health a n d vitality unusual. W e live in a sick age. T h e m o ney s p e n t o n i ll n e s s a n d lo st th r o u g h illn e ss in c re a se s every year. T h e r e m ust be a reason for this d e ­ plorable s ta te of affairs. In fact, there are m any reasons. T h e w o n d e r is that the hum an race sh ould survive a t all. T h e first cause of illness lies in the very nature of the a g e in which w e live. It is a materialistic age, w ith small respect for hum an individuality, a n d conse­ quently. no respect for the temple of the soul— the bo dy. W e ad m ire b e a u ty of form a n d feature, it is true. W e adm ire beautiful coloring of h air a n d eyes. W e are vain e n ough to desire becoming clothes. W e d o no t th in k it is im portant, however, to keep o u r bloodstream pure and untainted, to avoid preventab le dis­ eases. to u n d e r s ta n d som ething of the mechanism of the body, a n d to keep it healthy and vigorous as long as p o s ­ sible. T h e r e are few people w h o co n sid ­

[ 311 ]

benefit m ank in d and to destroy. T h e laws op erate impersonally. H ealth should be universal and the heritage of every hum an being M an himself has m ade it difficult to attain. W e h av e so little understan ding of w h a t constitutes n o r m a le v , genuine health, th a t we are perfectly well satis­ fied with a condition that is not far from semi-invalidism. It is a s t o n i s h i n g at w h a t an early a ge children need shoes with a rc h -su p p o rts, eye glasses, and e x ­ pensive dental work. T h e re is hardly a household w itho ut some one w ho has had to u n d e rg o an operation. A young member told me that the family he came from w ere so sa tu ra te d with medicine of all kinds a n d d e pe nd e nt upon doctors th a t all their e arnings were used for these purposes. T h e num ber of people w ho need a hospital is so great that statistically it m eans that practically every one p asses at least once in his lifetime th ro u g h a hospital. Tonsilectomies a n d appendectom ies are so fre­ quent th a t one often w o nders how our ancestors m anaged to survive without them. D espite the fact that the num ber of hospitals increases annually, and the research labo ratories increase and spend greater sum s of money, and the num ber of physicians keeps i n c r e a s i n g , the health of our population docs not im­ prove. T h a t more people w ear eye glasses a n d b u y expensive shoes and have their teeth exm ained regularly does not mean that their health is improved. G lasses a n d a rc h -su p p o rts and bridge w ork are crutches for organism s that can no long er function normally w ith ­ out them. C ru tc h e s must not be con­ fused with native vitality and genuine health. O u r n ational drug bill is a scandal. Read the a dvertisem ents on highways, buses or street cars. Listen to the a d ­ vertisem ents ov er the radio for h e a d ­ ache p o w d e rs a n d laxatives and alkalizers a n d cough medicines. Girls and women c a rry tins of various medicines in their h a n d b a g s. In homes the medi­ cine closet is a conglomeration of b o t­ The tles. |ars. a n d tubes. R o s ic r u c ia n T h e medical profession is only partly D ig e st to be blamed. D octors have to earn a Septem ber living, a n d if a foolish and frantic p a ­ 1942 tient insists on some drug that gives an

immediate feeling of relief, they are going to a n ta g o n ize him b y refusing O f te n such d ru g s may become hah forming. It is very difficult to male some people see that immediate relief from pain does not mean eradicating the cause or effecting a cure. It is difficult to make people realize the seriousness of remote consequences W r o n g livinn habits, devitalized foods, drugs, etc eventually d e stro y the health of the body. Some people are incapacitated al­ most immediately. T h e y are the for­ tu nate ones. T h e w h ip of pain drives them to g ro w up a n d be sensible about exerting a little self-control to keep the bo dy in good physical condition. Others of a n a tu ra lly stu rd ie r constitution do not break d o w n till later in life. They frequently b rea k dow n completely; their bodies a re bey o n d repair. T h e y bring to the next incarnation the seeds of an enfeebled constitution. You have he a rd m a n y times the sta te m e n t m ade th a t pain is friendly. It is a w a rn in g signal. If an automatic alarm w a r n s you that y o u r home or place of business is afire, you are not putting out the blaze by stopping the alarm. If you must take a drug to re­ lieve pain, at least make every effort to discover the cause a n d tak e the proper steps to eliminate the w ro n g habits that produced the pain — if you are not to become a victim of d r u g s a n d opiates. T h e r e are m an y causes of illness. O n e cause is physical. Depletion of vi­ tality a n d illness m ay come from lack of sunshine, fresh air. a n d insufficient sleep. Insufficient exercise, malnutrition due to insufficient food or the wrong food, overfeed in g, a n d constipation are prolific causes for disease. W h e n the cause is physical, a c h a n g e in living habits is an im mediate necessity. If the cause is an infraction of one of the simple rules of right living, no drug, vaccine, or serum is necessary. Go to bed if necessary. C le a n se the system with w a te r or fruit or v egetable juices. N e v e r interfere w ith a fever. Let a com­ petent physician consider its control. A fever is n a t u r e ’s m ethod to burn up the im purities of the body. A fever is proof th at the bo dy has vitality. A cute fevers are cleansing a n d healing. W h e n an

[312]

acute fever is b e y o n d the capacity of the body, then chronic ailments set in which are far more difficult to overcome. T h e English h abit of spen ding a w eekend in the c o u n try is beneficial: likewise the c o n t i n e n t a l custom of spending a vacation in w alking tours. Athletics in m o deratio n are excellent. W a lk in g is pre fera ble to a pastim e that keeps one indoors for hours at a stretch. T h e stud y of a musical instru m en t is preferable to the passive habit of s p e n d ­ ing several evenings every w eek in the moving picture th e a te rs. H y o u r w ork is of a mechanical nature, it is essential that you build up a rich social and cul­ tural life after w o rking hours. Constipation is the cause of a long train of ills. It is said that even insanity may result from a system clogged with poisons. W r o n g foods m ay cause very serious diseases. A s one g row s older, the daily requirem ent of protein and carb oh yd rates grow-s less. A void the devitalized foods. T h e y use up the vi­ tality of the b od y w itho ut giving n o u r ­ ishment. W h o l e w h e a t prod ucts are superior to w hite flour prod ucts. Brow n rice is superior to the w hite glazed rice. Brown su g a r is su p e rio r to w hite sugar. Use h oney as a natural sweetening. Use sparingly the fried foods, rich sauces, and e laborate combinations. T h e best diet is the simplest. In the foods that G o d gave m an. the fruits, v e g e ­ tables. nuts a n d w hole g rain s are the best. It is said th a t w hen man first came to earth, the angels ta u g h t him agriculture, p a rticu larly the pla nting of wheat. T h e E a ste rn e rs say th a t those w ho are p rep a rin g for initiation must live wholly on fruits, vegetables, grains and nuts. T h is com m and or advice may be founded upon living conditions in that climate, w h e re a mixed diet of cooked food of various kinds m ay be injurious. F o o d in itself has no power to raise spiritual vibrations, b ut does become the channel through which emo­ tional force manifests. T h e b o d y is a unit. Physical condi­ tions will affect the emotions a n d the mind. Em otional a n d mental states will affect the body. T h e m an y cures that the church. C h ristia n Science p rac ti­ tioners. mental healers, a n d psychiatrists fire able to report reveal the fact that the causes of m any physical disturbances

are emotional a n d m ental. N egative thou gh ts and em otions will affect the glands, the digestive system , a n d lower the tone of the entire system . N o matter ho w perfect o n e ’s food m ay be, a severe fit of depression, or a n ger, or fear, or sorro w will d estro y its value. P e rh a p s you know the incident of the mother w h o w as the recipient o f bad news while she w as nursing. H e r milk w as immediately poisoned, a n d the child had an attack of cramps. Y o u should not eat when you are o v e r-fa tig u ed or in a very great hu rry, or extrem ely upset. Emotional control can be gained in m a n y w ays. Some people like to take a walk, or be b y themselves. Som e people like to read a psalm or a c h a p te r from the Bible. Some people like to meditate on an affirmation. Som e people prefer to listen to music or to p la y o n a m usi­ cal instrument. W h a t e v e r m ethod helps you is worthwhile. T h e principal fac­ tor in self-control is. a fte r all. a p h i­ losophy of life. A ph ilosophy that has become a n atural conviction is a tree of life to him w h o grasps it. A no th er cause o f disease is karmic. T h e seeds or causes w e re p lanted in a previous incarnation. C ongen ital d e ­ fects are for the m ost p a r t karmic. C a n c er is frequently karmic. O n e of the causes of cancer is a life of cruelty in a previous incarnation. C a n c e r of the breast m ay be due to a life-time of resentment. It is most essentia!, th e re ­ fore. no m atter ho w deeply w e m ay be hurt, no m atter h ow rig hteo us our in­ dignation may be. th a t w e d aily cleanse our systems of all im pure a n d negative thou gh ts and emotions. T h e s e negative and destructive th o u g h ts a n d emotions are chickens that come home to roost. T h e y act as boo m e ra n g s, a n d w e are physically and m entally injured. T his information should no t make us callous, nor should w e ever condemn anyone. A fte r all. as long a s w e are nor adepts, we do not k no w the exact cause of a karmic ailment. P e r h a p s the hour of the soul’s release has come. W e have all h eard of miraculous cures. N o case can really be considered hopeless. Dr. Alexis Carrel tells of a cancerou s sore that healed before his very eves. A young chemist, w ho w a s blind from a tumor on the brain, w a s completely healed W e should not s h u t our eyes

a n d cars to the cries of suffering h u ­ m anity. W e m ust learn to listen and to help a n d yet rem ain inw ardly calm. W e m ust w ork ste a d ily for the amelioration o f physical a n d social conditions so that as m an y causes of maladjustm ent and of illness as possible may be eliminated. O u r social a n d e c o n o m i c system b a se d on profit has very little regard for the needs of a hum an being. Despite exceptions to th e rule, occupational dis­ eases a re sufficiently prevalent to be a menace to national health. O n ly an aw a k e n e d social conscience and social pla n n in g will eliminate the large num ­ ber of occupational diseases in this co un try . A w o m a n w rote to me that h e r h u sb a n d , w h o is a w orker on the assem b ly line of one of the largest a u to ­ mobile factories in this country, is so e xh a uste d a t the end of the d a y that his h a n d s sh ak e. H e is often unable to light a cigarette. Econom ic insecurity is a big factor in creating an emotional and mental state th a t predisposes to nervous and physi­ cal ailments of various sorts. It is n a t­ ural for y o u n g people to desire to marry a n d have a family. If this powerful n a tu r a l urge is th w a r te d for a n y reason, w h e th e r economic or social, emotional stability a n d physical health are bound to be affected. F o r the health of the n a ­ tion social p lan n in g is just as essential a s economic planning. It is absurd to think that a n y pill, vaccine, or serum, or bromide will counteract the evils of the economic o r social set-up of our civilization, w hich spiritually is still in the stage of the jungle. T h e first step, therefore, in improving the health of the nation is an aw akened social conscience, a genuine concern for the w elfare of o u r fellow citizens, a willingness to plan a n d share and sacri­ fice. so that n o one should be the victim of conditions th a t can be remedied. T h e n e x t step is public education. T h e physi­ cian of the fu tu re will be a teacher p rin ­ cipally. O n ly rarely will he be called upon to exercise his function as a heal­ er. It should be possible for an intelli­ gent person to tak e care of himself The R o sic ru c ia n u n d e r norm al circumstances. A proper u n d e rs ta n d in g of the bo dy a n d the D ig e st conditions m aking for health and dis­ Sep tem b er ease will enable an intelligent and se n ­ 1942 sible person to d iagnose his ow n con­

dition and take the pro p e r step to edy it. re®Y ou ou ght to be able to diSC0v w h e th e r you have ignored the phySir5 requirem ents for good health, o r h devitalized y o u r system b y de structi^ th o u g h ts a n d emotions, or whether tV ,* causes are genuinely obscure or b eyond y o u r ability to rem edy. T h e r e are manv system s of healing in existence todav T h e system ta u g h t in the established medical schools a n d sponsored by the A m erican M ed ical Association is onlv one of several systems. All systems have their g oo d points and their weak points. All system s claim to be helpful H o w e v e r from the point of view of the m an in the street a n d from the point of view of the A ncient W is d o m , the best system is th a t which complies more closely to basic n a tu ra l laws. Naturo­ p a th y . for example, is simple, sensible a n d one of the least d ang erou s. It de­ m a n d s intelligence a n d understanding. It is educational. You can often take care of yourself. W h a t the unevolved individual really desires is the privilege of breaking all the laws of health, keeping late hours, indulging in cocktail parties, smoking to excess, lounging in o v e rh eated apart­ ments, riding in cars instead of walking a few blocks briskly or participating in clean sports, w a tc h in g a baseball or football or b ask et ball game instead of participating in one. d ancin g in night clubs to jazz music, eating early and late of so-called nourishing food that in combination b rea k s every law of cor­ rect eating. T h e n instead of making a ne c e ssa ry effort to correct this living h a b it a n d control th o u g h ts a n d wild emotions, he w a n ts a pill or a “ sh o t” to do the trick. C hirop ractic a n d osteo­ p a th y are v ery good, better th a n a sys­ tem th a t relies heavily on drugs, ser­ ums, and operations. T h e y have done much good. A t the same time to rely on a n y certain m ethod w itho ut making an effort to cha n g e faulty living habits is w eakening. W h e n a disease is kar­ mic, w h en the causes have worked themselves out. the patient will contact w h a te v e r form of healing will prove helpful in his case. A n y form of healing w ith ou t correction of basic living habits will frequently prove of o nly temporary benefit.

[314]

T h e suprem e a d v a n ta g e of n a tu r o ­ p a th y is that it seeks to dispense with the n eed of drugs, vaccines a n d serums. It makes a man responsible for building up resistance, vitality a n d good health. N a tu r o p a th y must be combined in our modern life of strain a n d stress with mental a n d emotional r e - e d u c a t i o n . V a lu a ble w ork is being d one in light and color therapy. M a g n e tic healing, which is the basis of some system s, is also of g reat value. In magnetic h eal­ ing the physician actually a d d s to the vitality of the patient w ith his ow n vi­ tality. H ealing through hypnotism is not advisable. If a patient is too feeble for an a n a e s t h e t i c , t h e n hypnotism would be permissible a t an unavoidable extraction or operation. W h e n n atural methods of healing a re utilized, an op­ eration becomes a last resort. In the orthodox school of medicine, operations are recom m ended too frequently and unnecessarily. T h e finest and least ob­ jectionable w ork in su rg e ry is d one in the field of plastic surgery. M usic, too, is beginning to be used for healing purposes. Cyril Scott in his book on music tells us that in the future music will be composed for the various types of nervous ailments, particularly those caused by the noises of every large city. A t present music is being used in some hospitals a n d insane a s y ­ lums with beneficial effects. T h e Bible tells us th a t w hen King Saul w a s in one of his d a rk moods. D avid w ou ld be sum moned to play sw eet music u po n his harp. T h e psychological factor in disease is very im portant in this age. D r. H en ry C. Link in his book " T h e R eturn to Religion" tells us th a t he w a s a p p a l­ led at the tens of thou san ds of people who w ent to pieces at the time of the depression. In his w ork as psychiatrist for the people w ho applied for W . P. A. jobs in N e w Y ork City, he came into contact with large num bers of the vic­ tims of the depression. Previously he had not been interested in religion or in church membership. T h e n he realized the necessity of some form of moral and spiritual su p p o rt in time of reverses and trials a n d tribulations. T o one d e m o r­ alized individual after a n o th e r he had to recommend a return to some form of religion, church membership. A s a re­

sult he a n d his wife joined a church and sent their children to S u n d a y School. Dr. S tephen S. W i s e has a similar story to tell. O n the S u n d a y after the stock m arket c ra sh e d in 1929 he offi­ ciated at the fun erals of fourteen sui­ cides. Financial reverses are certainly no just cause for suicide. Suicide under such circum stances m erely denotes lack of moral stam ina. A s you perhaps know, such individuals in a later incar­ nation must p a ss th ro u g h a similar he art-rending exp erience once more u n ­ til the lesson is learn ed. G o d 's law of cause and effect c an not be side-stepped. W o n d e r f u l w o rk is b eing done with people w h o are k n o w n to be c ontem ­ plating suicide b y the S ave - a - Life League. R ecently th e S a tu rd a y E v e ­ ning Post h ad a n interesting article about ano th e r org a n iz a tio n that dedi­ cates itself to re habilitating d runk ards. Suicide, of course, is a n e s c a p e . Drink, too, is an escape. Bridge p la y ­ ing. novel reading, an d going to movies are also milder form s of escape. T h e re is nothing inh ere ntly harm ful in an oc­ casional escape into th e land of play and dream. T h e d a n g e r lies in the gradual dem oralization of the person so that he can no lon ger face the problems of life and no longer h a s the desire even to try to solve them. T o avoid this pre­ dicament a ph iloso ph y of life becomes indispensable. H e rein lies the great value of the mystic philosophy of life. W h e n w e s tu d y th e principles of the mystic philosophy, w e are actually learning to u n d e r s ta n d life. W e are not appalled by a feeling of futility. W e know that d eath is on ly a transition, a laying dow n of a n o u tw o rn garment. W e know that good must come out of evil. W e kn ow th a t there is a lofty purpose to all the trials and tribulations of life. T h e m ystic philosophy is a source of trem endo us stre n g th . It gives courage. It gives m eaning to life. W e know th a t th ro u g h illness our bodies and our souls are being purified. W e know that th rough trials our characters are being s tr e n g th e n e d . Life takes on the ch aracter of a magnificent game, and every obstacle becomes a challenge. W h e n this strong a n d com forting phi­ losophy becomes p a r t of o n e ’s very make-up. one is forever exempt from the host of em otional a n d mental ills

[ 315 ]

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e st S ep tem b er 1942

a n d ma n y physical ailments too, that dcscend like a plague upon the unf or ­ tunate men a n d women w h o are beset by terror a n d fear, w h o think that there is no G o d. a n d that life is meaningless, and that misfortune is due to chance, and that man is alone and adrift on a st ormy sea. Fortified by our convictions, we know that there is a place for each and every one of us in the world. T h e r e is no r e a­ son to envy any o ne or to be resentful. E ve ryo ne has his own innate genius. It is onl y a ma tt er of time for o n e ’s po te n ­ tialities to emerge. T h e r e is no reason for being di scouraged or depressed. T im e is limitless. W h a t is not com­ pleted in one incarnation will be com­ pleted in anot her. Loneliness is an il­ lusion. T h r o u g h our souls we are united to one a n ot h e r a n d to G o d Himself. It is onl y a mat ter of time a n d spir­ itual development for us to become awar e of the truth of all these wonderful teachings. A genuine interest in people, a g e n­ uine desire to make brot herhood a fact in one's life, a genuine desire to find o n e ’s place in life and be a factor in evolution will root one so solidly in the spiritual wor ld that he will al ways be in a st ate of har mony. Good health primarily is a state of ha rmo n y with the constructive forces of the u n i v e r s e . W h e n we a re in a state of harmony, we are c ha nne ls for a power that helps all who m we contact a n d helps us too. T h e r e is not hi ng more conducive to mental a n d spiritual health than to for­ get o n e ’s self completely. T h a t happy state comes from complete absorption in some w o r th wh il e project or activity. W h a t more constructive task than to w o r k wit h the constructive forces of the world, t h a n to k now that the small­ est thing o n e does is genuinely w o r t h ­ while? R e me mb er that every w ea kne ss is r ecorded in our auras. O n the inner side o ur failings a n d we akne ss es are a pp a re n t to every highly developed soul. M o s t of them are eas y to correct. T h e prime requisite is a desire to cor­ V

rect them, a desire to become matu desire to be a helper, not another*’ * valid. Even serious afflictions m a y k" courageousl y borne. You all know wo n d e rf ul stor y of Helen Keller p y* crt Louis St evenson wrote some of W most char mi ng talcs while suffer' 18 from h e mor rha ge s of the lungs. Car] ? was a lifelong victim of dyspepsia Let us never despair. T h e r e is a ] w a ys hope. T h e r e is often a way 0ut" Fr eq u e nt ly the effort to overcome an obstacle or limitation leads to glorious advent ur es of discovery and the gain ing of wisdom. In the meanwhile we are immeasurabl y strengthened. The heart of life is peace and serenity anj love. It is joy a n d beauty. If only the hearts of all could be lifted up to under­ stand. then the w a t e r s of healing would roll down in a mi ghty flood upon all the world. T h e glorious songs of the angels would be heard, a nd we would know that " u n d e r n e a t h are the everlasting arms. Recognizing these facts our late Imperator. Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, estab­ lished the Rose- Cr oi x Sanitarium, where members of the Rosicrucian O r d e r and their friends could find treatment and cure in h e a lt h y a n d harmonious sur­ r oundings. M a n y of you are well ac­ quai nt ed wit h the Sanitarium here in San Jose, having been here and enjoyed some of its m a n y benefits. T h e r e sureIv have been some splendid reports of the wor k that has been done there. Dr. Lewis h a d in mind healing through Rosicrucian methods, together with some other b r a nc he s of modern curative sci­ ence. recognizing the usefulness of many. H e felt that a need existed for a combination of t reatments embracing these factors u n d e r competent Rosicru­ cian a nd medical guidance, doing away with superstition or experimentation. H e often said t h a t as no such place ex­ isted he would like to see these ideals manifested in concrete form, and the results obtained at the Sanitarium have n ow proven that Dr. Lewis w a s right and justified in founding for us a place of this kind. V V

T o a t te mp t to put a w a y the vice and depr avi ty of a lifetime wh e n the sun of life is setting is like trying to extinguish a blazing wa go n - l o a d of hay with a cup of wat er. — F rederic B alfo ur ( T a o is m ) [

|
By

SANCTUM MUSINGS
. ... = . ...

I
t

T

Y O U TH A N D OLD AGE h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
a r d o r of youth a n d the experience of age. A s the bee takes h oney from many flowers, so the wor l d should welcome all that life provides t hrough both youth a n d age. If the world is ever to im­ prove. a place must be found for every h u ma n being. Yo ut h must have the op­ po rt un i ty to learn, to gain experience, to tr y its wings, to experiment. Age must have op po rtu ni ty to teach, to work side b y side with youth, to point out to y outh the most useful channels for its e n e rg y in the light of experience and wisdom. T h e modern wor ld is unique in the premium it placcs on youth. In one in­ d u s t r y after the other, employment is almost impossible for the man past forty. T h e reason is usually misplaced economy. Social g r o u p - i n s u r a n c e is paid b y the employer on the computed a g e level. T h e y o u n g e r the a ge level, the less is the cost. N o account is taken of the lessened efficiency of the plant. In no ot her period of the history of the w or l d have men a n d women made fran­ tic efforts to look far y o un g e r than their years. M e n a n d w o me n not only try to look y o u ng but they try to do the things t hat ar e becoming only to youth. Ther e is n o welcome and gr a dua l transition to a n e w level of living, to ne w interests, to less violent activities. N o t that old age has to be a pitiable objcct. It is possible to remain vigor­ ous. in good health, a n d mentally alert until the last d a y of one's incarnation.

O U N G people nev­ er t h i n k o f o l d age; middle aged p e o p l e d r e a d it: a n d old p eop le wait patiently for the inevitable end. M o s t people think o f old age in the n a t u r e of a c a ­ l a m i t y . as dim eyesight, d e a f­ ness, baldness, cracked v oice, snowy white hair, sh o rt memor y and general feebleness. T h i s at tit ude is. no doubt, an inherited race-reaction from remote antiquity w h e n a man was re­ spected in the tribe only as a warrior and hunter. Still, we find today that ma ny a y o u n g man has some of the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s a s c r i b e d to old age. T h e r e are young heart s b e a t i n g in breasts of old men, a n d old h eads on young shoulders. A h uma n being becomes more useful and more valuable as he gr o ws older. W h a t e v e r toll the ye ar s may take p h y s ­ ically is more than c o mpens at ed b y the gains in u nd er s t an di ng a nd spiritual growth. T h e world must learn to a p ­ preciate and utilize w h a t a ge can offer. The R o s ic r u c ia n N ot that appreciation of w h a t age can offer precludes recognition of the vir­ D ig e s t tues of youth. Yo ut h has its gifts to o f ­ O cto b er fer the world, even as a ge has its gifts. 1942 Both are needed. T h e wor ld needs the

[ 354 ]

T h e s e blessings must be earned. Y o ut h, too, mu s t earn these blessings. N o t every y o u n g person has good health and vitality a n d capacity for intellectual and spiritual growth. T h e limitations that a re usually associated w i th a n y particular period in life are usually the limitations of the individual a n d not of his age. Some of the most intolerant and r ea c ti on a ry individuals I have met have be en college students. Some of the most o p e n- mi nd e d f orward-looking men have be en men adva nc ed in years. M o d e r n psychol ogy tells us t ha t one of the d a n g e r s on the p a t h w a y of life is fixation. W e must be very careful to avoid fixation in any period of life. C e r ­ tain qualities, certain attitudes a re p r o p ­ er to each period of life. Cert ai n qual i­ ties ar e normal in children. T h e y are no l onger normal in the adolescent, in the adult, in the married man or w oma n. Difficulties in a djus tment in life are due to childish traits being carried over to later periods of life. De pe nde nc e is n a t ­ ural to the child. An older person must be able to as s ume responsibility. So me people adj ust themselves to every c h a n ge d e ma nd ed by life with ease. Some people find every c h a n ge painful. A g e makes no difference. T h e im po rtant thing is to plan one's life. Ch i ldr en live for the d a y alone. T h e i r p a re nt s do the planning. O l d e r people w h o tr y to live as carelessly as children do are precipitating difficulties. G o o d health must be achieved t hr ough selfcontrol, t hrough the patient cultivation of go od health habits. It will not help you to be resentful of the fact that some people y ou know Jived to ninety despite continued defiance of every law of health. It woul d be interesting to s t u d y the statistics of the number of people w h o be ca me incapacitated or w h o p a s s ­ ed on from wholly preventable diseases and accidents after the age of forty. T h e trouble is that the only people we see a rc those w h o are well and abl e to work. W e do not see the large a r m y in hospitals, institutions, and b e dr i dd e n at home. It seems to be almost impossible to ma ke people give as much attention to their bodies as t hey would to a m a ­ chine or to an automobile. F o r some u n k n o w n reason they feel that the b o d y should be able to e ndure every type of abuse a n d neglect. T h e diseases of m i d ­

dle ag e a n d old a g e are planted in youth. Ki dne y trouble. B r i g ht ’s disease, ulcers a n d cancers, for the most part, a re due to years of w r o n g living habits. T h e y do not descend mysteriously from heaven. N o t only is it n ec es s a ry to build good health habits, but to provide intellectual pursuits. E v e ry o ne should be expected a n d permitted to ha ve some other inter­ est besides that of his daily occupation. A w o m an must pr e pa r e for the d a y w'hen her children will no longer need her. A man must pr e pa r e for the d a y of retirement, if his wor k demands the vitality of youth. A man a n d a w oma n should have so m a n y interests that they look f o r w ar d wi th pleasure to the o p­ p o r tu ni t y of cultivating them. Age, for the most part, shoul d be merely a matter of the shifting of interests from one s phe re to anot her. E n th us i as m will keep an old man yo ut hf ul a n d interesting. Yo un g people wi t ho u t enthusiasm are not particularly interesting to anyone. O l d people with ent husi asms will serve as a good example to the community. T h e y can teach people h ow to live. T h e y can compel people to admire and respect old age. T h e r e is no more pathetic spectacle than the old man w h o is lost without his business, o r the old w oma n who is lost without her children. A man of my a cqua inta nce w a s unabl e to ma rr y b e ­ cause his mother w a s completely d e ­ p en de nt upon him for companionship. H e was her onl y interest in life. For ten y e ar s he courted the woman whom he did not d a r e to introduce to his mother. F ina ll y he married hu t was compelled to keep his marriage secret. M a n y y ou n g per sons have no friends because their p ar en t s have been so c o m­ pletely d e p e nd e nt upon them for com­ panionship. A y ou n g wife complained to me that she h a d to give up everv ac­ tivity u po n her marriage. H e r h us ba nd w an t e d her to s t a y home with him every night. A n o t h e r y o u n g woman sat at home a n d felt s or ry for herself because her h usb and c ame home late every night. She refused to entertain guests or go a n y w h e r e w i th o ut h e r husband. E v e ry h uma n being must have an in­ tellectual life of his own. O u r happiness must not be d e p e nd e nt upon the physi ­ cal presence of a n ot h e r individual, no

[355]

matter how dear. If we have much lei­ sure, then we are very fortunate. W e should utilise that leisure to the best a d ­ vantage. If business compels a man to keep late hours, he is going to feel much happier if he knows that his wife is busy a nd not weeping for the companionship that it is impossible for him to give. T h e r e is nothing more wo n de rf ul t han for husband and wife to sha re the same interests. M a n y problems t her eby dis­ a ppear . T h e re f or e, men a n d women must have their hobbies a n d projects, a n d they must not selfishly d e ma n d of each other a ny curtailment of interests. T h e man and woman with m a n y inter­ ests and ma ny friends, will not fear the loss of children, the inevitable changes of life, and old age. Re ga rd y ou r life objectively. S t u d y t he experiences that you ha ve had and t r y to discover the p att er n t h at your soul has been weavi ng on the loom of time. Anal yze y ou r c ustomary thoughts. T r y to be a w a r e of your habitual emo­ tional reactions. T h e r e wo u l d not be much point to this careful s crutiny of ourselves if this existence w er e the "end-all." But we are not living only for today. W e arc building for the future. Ev er y degr ee of mental strength t hat is cultivated, every degree of emo­ tional control a n d t h o u g h t c o n t r o l , every degree of will-power attained means a so much stronger charact er, a more effective personality with which to begin the next incarnation. T h i s con­ ception gives a tremendous impetus to living life fully here and now. Ev er y d a y is important, and vet length of life is unimpor t ant and old ag e is nothing to fear or dread. N e v e r give u p a c h e r ­ ished dream. Nour ish it in y ou r heart a n d it will spring up full b l own in the next incarnation. A l wa y s b e a r in mind t hat you are going to start in just wher e y o u leave off in this incarnation. Y o u r opening chord d epe nds on the closing chord. H er e is a glorious t ask for d e ­ clining years. M a k e that closing chord just as noble, as lofty, a n d as beautiful The as you can. Let it be a song of har mony. R o s ic r u c ia n of pcace, of faith, a n d of love. Let it D ig e s t include forgiveness for every hurt, every O cto b er wr on g , every tear. Let it include toler1942 ance for every human being. Let it in­

clude faith in y o u r divine destiny T it end in r apt ur e so celestial, jn ]0v et compelling, that y o u r transition wi]\ u° an inspiration to all who witness it If we a rc y ou n g, let us begin today to prepare for a healthy, contented old a g e by extending our interests. Let be active in a t least one organization5 Let us find at least one avenue of use' fulness to the community. There * ” not hi ng more stultifying nor ageing t ha n an idle life, or an extremely re_ stricted life. In personality as in other s phe re s of life, "to him who hath shall be given; from him w h o hath not shall be taken a w a y . " Y o u must either integrate o r disintegrate. You must use y 0ur forces a n d abilities, a n d a s you use them so will t h e y g r o w and expand. If y o u do not. t hey will atr ophy and what y o u possess will be taken away from you. W h e n we cultivate an interest it keeps us ment all y alive. It is wonderful h o w much people can accomplish under pr es sur e or in an emergency. It is won­ derful h o w people go to pieces physi­ cally and emotionally when life makes no d e ma n ds upon them and when they a re able to take the path of least resistance. M a n y of the problems of life should cease to exist for a student of the Rosi­ crucian philosophy. O u r studies should be sufficient to fill the life of any earnest s tudent. O u r studies embrace every a spect of life, ev er y field of thought and activity. Mys ti cis m embraces philoso­ phy, comparati ve religion, science, art, a n d practical w el f a re work. Reconcile your sel f to life as it is and to life’s methods, a n d p cace of heart and mind will be yours, a nd h a r m o n y will not be difficult to acquire. If you can devote your sel f to the O r d e r you need nothing more in life. Y o u have a philosophy t h a t gives purpose to life. You have studies to oc cu py a n d develop your mind. You have a channel through the local lodge or c h a p te r to be of service to the communi ty a n d y ou r fellow mem­ bers. All life can be a climbing of a lofty mountain r ange, and the last moment can be N e b o ' s majestic peak w h e r e G o d took M o s e s to Himself in a kiss divine.

[ 3^6 ]

Sir Francis Bacon
A STUDY
B
y

T

h e

G

rand

M

a ster

H E R E is h a r d l y a p e r s o n in t h i s count ry t h a t h a s n o t h e a r d of S hakespeare. E v e ry school child is f a m i l i a r w i t h some of his playsHis comedics and t ragedies Still a p ­ pear on the stage an d have been successfully p r o ­ d u c e d on t h e screen. It is still the ambition of every actor to play H am le t and of every act­ ress to play Juliet. Sha ke spe ar e still ranks first among English playwrights and poets. S h a ke sp ea re is still a big in­ dustry, and his plays have netted a for­ tune to publishers a n d producers. Yet scholars admit that less is known of this outstanding genius t h a n of any other great wr i te r in Engl ish literature. T h e Shakespear e tradition is firmly entrencha n d has become so deeply involved in men's reputations a n d pockets that it is difficult to pe rsu ade scholars to re­ examine the evidence on which the t r a ­ dition has grown up. T h e question conf r onti ng the student t oday is: W h o did writ e the shakespeare plays? O n l y five ba dl y written The R o s ic r u c i a n signatures are e xta nt of S h a k e s p e a r e ’s. T h e details of S h a k e s p e a r e ’s life before D ig e s t he left St rat f or d a nd af ter his retire­ Novem ber ment are unbelievably petty. Could a 1942 man of this limited education a n d u n ­
r

d e r s ta n di ng of life have written of a class of society he k n e w nothing of? Yet t he Sh ak es pe a re an plays are writ­ ten "in the most courtly, refined, and classical English, replete with learning, full of evidence of wide reading, deal­ ing wit h aristocratic life a n d manners, a nd instinct with poet r y of the very' highest o r d e r .” Sh ak es pe a re an scholars freely admit that the plays s h o w knowl ­ edge of the N e o - P la t o n i c philosophy, ar e full of Masoni c symbols, reveal a familiar k nowl edge of the Bible, a mas­ terly k no wl e dg e of the ancient world, a nd an e xt r a o r di na r y vocabulary. W i l ­ liam H. Furness, one of the greatest S h a k e s p e a r e a n scholars that ever lived, said: "I have never been able to bring his life a n d his plays within a planetary space of each other." T h e plays and sonnets, however, harmoni ze perfectly with the life, character, attainments, a n d lear ning of Sir F r a n ci s Bacon. T h e questions then are: Did Bacon write t he plays of Shakespeare? W a s he the s on of Sir Nicholas Bacon. Keep­ er of the Seal of Q u e e n Elizabeth? W a s he the true son of the Q ue en and w a s he the brother of the E ar l of Essex? W h a t is the truth ab ou t the trial that resul ted in his removal from the chancellorship? E v e r y textbook on Phi losophy and on E s s a y s has maligned the character of this e x tr a or d in a ry genius, the one man t ha t E n g la n d owes so much to, the one m a n w h o brought English life and letters into an honored a n d respected
]

372

place in the Christian world. O n pages 214-215 of " A St u de nt' s H i s t o r y of Phil os o ph y, ” a wor k in m a n y w a y s a u ­ thoritative. is the following sentence: " In Bacon's checkered c a r e e r — a career end in g in his disgrace a n d removal from the Lord C h a n c e l l o r s h i p — t here is r a t h ­ e r too obvious a lack of a n y ver y deli­ cate sense of personal h on or a n d di gn i ­ t y to arouse an unqualified respect . . . a nd Bacon was not a lwa ys able to rec­ ognize the value of their ( ot he r scien­ tists) work; he never a cc e pt ed the Cop e rn ic an theory, for e x am pl e . ” It is difficult for the college s t u d e n t to think t h a t the textbook placed bef or e him is w r o n g in m a n y r e s p e c t s , in p o i n t o f vi ew and in information; in fact that it is propagat i ng falsehood a n d slander. O n e scholar glibly r epeats t he misin­ formation a nnounc ed with the certitude of truth b y a not her distinguished schol­ ar. T h e curse of scholarship in ma ny w a y s is still authority, precedent , a n d conformity. Sir Francis Bacon w a s not only the gr eat est genius that ever a p pe a r e d in E n g l a n d, but one of the gr ea te st in the world. His scope of activities w a s p h e ­ nomena). H e w a s the most brilliant legal mind in E n q l a n d a n d rose to the position of High (Chancellor of the E n g ­ lish court. T h e great C o d e N ap o l e o n is b a s ed on his digest of law. H e w a s a gr eat statesman: he pr ev e n t ed the d e ­ population of En g l a n d ; a f o u n d e r of n e w states — the Vir ginias a n d the C ar ol ina s — thus making the N e w W o r l d Engli sh instead of Spani sh. H e e s t a b ­ lished the Royal Society o f S c i e n c e in E n g l a n d , in existence to this day. His w o r k in both phi losophy a n d science ma r ks the beginning of mod er n research w o r k in E ng la nd . His essays a re a mong the finest in English literature. T h e y are wri t ten in simple, t r e nc h an t modern prose, a cent ury before mo d er n prose a pp ea re d. T h e y are replete wit h w o r l d ­ ly wisdom. In addition to all these a c ­ tivities o f m a j o r importance. S i r F r a n c i s Bacon wr ote the Sh a ke sp e ar i an P l a y s a n d poems, a n d w a s the t r an s l at or of the King James version of the Bible, the classic text as far as b e a u t y of style a n d felicitous phr asing are concerned. P e o ­ ple say that it is impossible for one man to have done so much. T o genius n o t h ­ ing is difficult. T o a highly illuminated

soul, such as Sir Fr an c is Bacon was. is given the p o w er of e x tr a or d i na r y achievement that he may do his destined t ask in the world. W i l l D u r a n t , in his " S t o r y of P h i ­ l osophy, ” gives a brilliant sur vey of B acon' s encyclopedic mind a n d farreaching intellectual projects. " H e w a s a n orat or wit hout oratory. H e w a s ex­ cellent in debate. H e was an unusual diplomat, stat esman, lawyer, a nd judge. It is almost incredible t ha t the vast learning a n d literary achievements of this man were but the incidents a n d di­ versions of a t ur bul ent political career. A l t h o u g h phi losophy was his first love, he did not a dmi re the merely c on t e m­ plative life. Like Go et he he s corned k n o wl ed g e that did not lead to action. B a c o n s a y s in “A d v a n c e m e n t o f L e a r n ­ i ng " that men o u g h t to k n o w that in the t h e at er of h uma n life it is only for Go d s a n d angels to be spect ator s. ” Franci s Bacon w a s a well-balanced individual. Since he wa s a Rosicrucian, it does not surprise us to read in his es­ s a y s on Atheism: "I had r at h er believe all the fables in the legends, a n d the T a l m u d and the Alcoran, t h a n t ha t this universal frame is without a mind. . . . A little phi losophy inclineth a m a n ’s mind to atheism: but dept h in philoso­ p h y bringeth m e n ’s m i n d s ab o ut to reliqion.” In a no t he r place he says: " W i t h o u t philosophy I care not to live. Phil osophy directs us first to seek the goods of the mind, a n d the rest will either be supplied, or not much w a n t e d . ” H e dr ea ms of scientists c oo r di na te d in specialization b y c ons ta nt communion a n d cooperation, a n d b y some gr eat o r­ ganization holding them toget her to a goal. T h i s organizat ion must be inter­ national. Hi s gr eat dream is the social­ ization of science for the c on qu e st of n at ur e and the enl argement of the p o w ­ er of man. S o l om o n ’s H o u s e in " T h e N e w Atl ant is" is a description of an e xt raordi nari ly a dv a nc e d t ype of g ov ­ ernment^— a gover nment o f the people a n d for the people by the selected best of the people; a gove rn me nt b y tech­ nicians. a r c h i t e c t s , a s t r o n o m e r s , geolo­ gists. biologists, physicians, chemists, economists, sociologists, psychologists, a nd philosophers. T h e s e g ove rnor s are e n g a g e d in controlling n at ur e r at her t h a n in governing man.

f 373 )

• T h e w o r k s o! this a u t h o r a r e r e c o m re e n d e d to ers our read­ O n e oi his

boots, "The S e c re t H isto ry of T r a n c i s B a c o n " ($1 45) is n o w a v a i l ­ a b l e Irom th e

Rosicrucian
S up p ly B ureau

I shall summarize for you the results of Alfred D o d d ’s* researches. It may be of interest to you that this scholar is not a member of the Rosicrucian Or der . He also makes the st at ement that he began his research work severely prejudiced against Francis Bacon. Al fred D od d s pe nt ten years in the most painstaking research work to gat her the necessary d a t a . In the course o f his investigation he discovered that t he halo woven about S t r a t f or d- on - Av on is utterly spurious. It is not the birth house. T h e gloves ar e not the ones Sha ke spe ar e wore. T h e ring is not the right one. T h e C h a n d o s portrait is a fake. It is most difficult to get a n e ws ­ paper. or magazine, or publishing house to publish the true story. M r . D o d d begins b y telling us that he began his research severely p r ej u­ diced against Bacon. But after closely examining all available documents, after stu dy in g the various biographies pro a nd con. he unhesitatingly declares that Bacon ranks with the mar tyr s of the wor ld and that he w a s the victim of a plot as diabolical as ever stained the p ages of history. T h e r e is now a bu nd an t proof that not only did Francis Bacon believe that he w a s the Q u e e n' s son. but that others knew it also as a State secret. His father w a s Robert Dudley, later known as the Earl of Leicester. T h e Queen a n d the E ar l wer e married privately a n d the bo y w a s born four months later. At the age of fifteen Fr an c is accidentally learned the secret o f his birth. T h e n he was sent to France in the entourage of the A m b as s a d or to the French court. He t raveled over the v er y scenes immortalized in the S h a k e ­ spearian plays. He visited Spain and Italy. V e r on a. P a d u a , a nd Florence. W h i l e at the French court, Francis fell in love wi th M a r gu e r i t e of N av a rr e w h o wa s then taking steps to be di­ vorced from her h us ba nd . Q u e e n Eliza­ beth would not sanction the e n g a ge ­ ment. a n d the loss w a s bitter even to the end of his life. All efforts to p e rs u ad e the Q ue e n to acknowl edge him publicly as her son a nd heir to the t hrone failed. Unofficial records state that he w a s compelled to keep the knowledge a secret at peril of his life and to s w e a r that he would make no claim to the succession. W h i l e on

the cont inent , he wa s initiated into tY, Rosicrucian O r de r. He had also be™ imbued wit h the N e w Learning th*^ s p r e ad i ng from Greece to Italy a Cj Fr an ce . H e conceived the idea of teach ing the common people the cardinal virI tues in g r e at epics of moral passion th" D r a m a — similar in principle to the wa* we find t r u th s e mbe dde d in the m y t h j the w i s d o m of the ancients. In Eli za’ b et ha n d a y s the language of culture w a s Latin. T h e r e w a s virtually no E n g­ lish save b ar b a ro u s count r y dialects T h e cust om a n d manner s of the people wer e r u de a n d coarse. H e began the herculean task of giving Engl and a l an gu ag e, building up a vocabulary, a n d refining the ethical s ta n da r ds of the masses. H e s pe nt all the money he could make o r obtain to further his aims; so. too, did L a d y Bacon a nd his fosterbrother, A n t h o n y Bacon, fired by the s a me ideals. T h i s hidden work was k no wn to t he fraternities. W h e n Bacon died, the g r e a t scholars of the day united to acclaim him the greatest poef w h o h a d ever lived. Yet Francis Bacon never w r o t e poet r y openly over his own name, save one or two translations, any more t h a n he claimed openly to be a Prince in the H o u s e of T u d o r . T h e Q u e e n ’s intimacy with Leicester resulted in a n ot h e r child k nown to his­ tory as the E ar l of Essex. T h e two men k n e w each o t he r as brothers. T h e y ar­ r a ng e d t h a t if ever Essex should be a c k n o wl e d g e d heir. Franci s should have a free h a n d for his literary and phi­ losophic ideals. W h e n Essex was con­ d e mn e d for treason. Franci s had no fear that E s s e x wo ul d actually go to the block. E ss ex ha d the Q u e e n ’s ring in his possession. T h e Q u e e n had prom­ ised that if Essex would send her the ring, she w o u l d refuse to sign the death w a r r a n t . T h e rinq did not come. T h e ministers pr es se d Elizabeth for her sig­ nature. T h e fact is that Essex had sent the ring relying on the Q u e e n ' s promise. T h e C o u n t e s s of N o t ti ng h am kept it back. O n h e r d ea th b e d she sent for the Q u e e n a n d confessed her guilt. History records t h at the horrified a n d enraged Q u e e n sho o k the dying w o m a n on her bed, scr eami nq at her. " G o d may for­ give you, b u t 1 never ca n. ” F o r histor­ ians to declare that Essex was the Q u e e n ' s lover is absurd. All the facts

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e s t Novem ber 1942

point to this: T h a t she h a d the love of an imperious w o m a n for a w a y w a r d child, a n d t ha t false pride on bot h sides led to theix joint undoing. All this time Francis w a s k n o w n as the s tr ai gh t es t man in the H o u s e of C o m m o n s b y all the F r e eh o ld e rs of E n g la n d. A t James' first par li ament he w a s r e tu r ne d b y two constituencies, a l w a y s a r a r e honor. It w a s a signal tribute to virtue a nd ability. A t fifty-one he w a s m a d e A t t or n e y - G e n e r a l , a nd then successively, Lord Keeper, Lord Chancellor, a P e e r of the Realm. H e held the office of Lord Keeper for three years, a n d a t the ag e of sixty he w a s cr eated V i s c o u n t St. Alban. \ et within three m on th s af ter receiving this honor. E n g l a n d ’s gr ea te st Ch a nc el lo r fell — a c at as tr op h e so surprisingly dramatic that its equal can be found onl y in the terrible tr agedies of a Sha ke sp ea re . It is a tangled tale of the deceit, h y p o ­ crisy. a nd corruption r a m p a n t at the C our t. " L o r d St. A l b a n " w a s falsely accused of t aki nq bribes a n d perverting justice in the C h a n c e r y Division b y political enemies w h o w a n t e d to get rid of him. w h o coveted his position and w ho despi sed his upr ight nes s a n d his intellectual genius. Bacon w a s so taken ba ck that his health wa s broken. N e v e r ­ theless he b e g a n to pr e pa re a defense. T h e King, full of fear of ruin a n d r evo­ lution. b e g g e d him to plead guilty lest the T h r o n e be jeopardized. A t last the King c o m m a n d e d him to ent er a plea of Guilty. T h e n the Cha ncell or submitted. Bacon' s enemies, to humili­ ate him. d e m a n d e d that he pl ead guilty to each par ti cul ar charge. T h e r e w a s no w a y of escape. H e could not d r a w back. T h e t r ut h is. however, t h a t Lord St. Al ban p le ade d guilty to technical carelessness only, not to crime; c ar e­ lessness, too. w h e n he w a s n e w to the office, his registrars, his secretaries, and his clerks. A f t e r his fall, his enemies w e r e in power. Dissatisfied suitors w e r e e nc ou r­ a g e d to obtain a reversal of his j u d g ­ ments. T h e fact emerges t h a t though there w e r e m a n y at t empt s to set aside his verdicts, not one w a s reversed. T h e y s t a n d s o un d in law a n d s o u n d in fact. T h a t in itself is sufficient to acquit Fr an c is Bacon from the common verdict p assed by el eme n t ar y hi st ory books.

A ruined man socially a n d politicaJly. a nd penniless. Bacon t urned to his liter­ ar y work. W i t h i n five y e a rs he tur ned out work af ter w o r k of prose, philoso­ phy. a n d n u me r ou s secret volumes. H e compiled the S h a ke s pe a ri a n Folio and published it secretly so that it should not be tar nished b y his personal disrace. H e compl eted his personal poems, hakespeare' s S onn et s , which contain the secret of his t ru e personality. T h e s e sonnets w er e sold onl y to the Brothers of the Ma soni c a n d Rosicrucian Or de rs . H e requested the Br ot he rs not to di­ vulge the secrets of his birth, life, and death. Ben J ohnson believed in his in­ nocence. A note is e x t an t of B a c o n ’s interview with t he King in wh i ch Bacon declares that he is r e a d y to ma ke an oblation of himself for the King. T h e name S ha k es pe a re is a p e n - na m e taken from the G o d d e s s P a ll as A t h e ne , the Shaker of the S p e a r of K no wl ed g e at the Serpent of Ignor ance. T h e final e was not a d d e d to t he n a m e till the ni ne ­ teenth century. Some time ago a we ll - k n o wn literary man wrote w o r d s to this effect: " W e have the plays: w h a t does it ma tt er w h o wrote them?” It m at te r s a gr eat deal to honest men. It me ans the reest abl i sh­ ment of a m a n ’s c har act er . Mi lton a n d Addison knew’ the trut h a n d kept silence loyally, kn owi ng t h a t S t a te Secrets were involved in his birth, life a n d poli­ tical death. P o p e k n e w it w h e n he erected the S ha k e s p e a r e M o n u m e n t in Westminster Abbey. T h e A b b e y aut hor it i es k n e w the se­ cret when they a ll owed the mo nu me nt to be erected, for t he s tat ue is graced with the h e a d of Fr a nc is Bacon, the stockings are e n g ra v ed with T u d o r roses and a crowrn, a n d the lace w o r k of the ruffs of the sleeve is an exact repe­ tition of the ruff w o r n b y Q u e e n Eli za­ beth. Bet ween his feet a re the Sonnet initials. T . T . , r eferri ng to Ma s o n r y . T h e finger of the s ta t ue points to the Queen at the side. T h e place of honor in front is given to a beautiful youth, a c rowned Prince, y o u ng Fr an cis Bacon of the H i l y a rd Mi ni at ur e. O n the left side is the figure of the Q u e e n ’s second son. the Earl of E ss ex , or the Q u e e n ' s husband, the E a r l of Leicester. T h e Hilyard M i ni a t u r e of Fr a nc is Bacon as a youth of e ig ht ee n a p p ea r s in the Q u e e n ’s own p r ay e r- boo k.

[ 375 ]

A lf re d D o d d states: T h i n k you that the A b b e y authorities would have a l ­ lowed all this a p pa r en t ly meaningless foolery if they had not k nown to whom the Sha ke spe ar e M o n u m e n t w a s a c t u ­ ally being erccted — Lord St. Al ban, a Prince of the Ho u s e of T u d o r ? No t likely. . . . T h e Hi gh Dignitaries knew the truth as the St at e Secret. A n d it is k n o wn to da y in the H ighe st Quar ter s. T h e time is now ripe wh e n the inscrip­ tion on Francis Bacon's tombstone must be ma de manifest . . . "Let C o m p o u n d s Be Dissol ved. ” I close with the w o r d s of Alfred Dod d: "Let me. then, appeal to you in the sacred name of justice to help to touch the public conscience, to restore to one o f the noblest o f men his good name, so that this generation may hand to posterity the lamp of truth respecting this most lovable charact er, the pure soul of a W o r l d M a s t e r . " O u r student s will find this brief s u m ­ ma r y of the evidence of the Baconian a ut hor s hi p of the S ha ke s pe a ri a n plays helpful: 1. E dw in Reed, the English scholar, has pointed out 885 parallelisms in the Baconian books a n d the Shakespear ian plays. 2. O n l y five b a d l y written signatures are e x t a nt of Shakespear e' s. T h e d e ­ tails of S ha k e s p e a r e ’s life before he left St r at f o r d and after his retirement are unbelievably petty. T h e r e is not one sign of interest in the plays. T h e r e is not one indication of love of culture. Yet the Sha ke spe ar ia n plays are w r i t ­ ten "in the most courtly, refined, and classical English, replete with learning, full o f evidence of w i de reading, d e a l ­ ing wi th aristocratic life a n d manners, a nd instinct with p o e t ry of the very highest or der ." S h a k e s p e ar i an scholars freely a dmit that the plays show k n o w l ­ edge of the N e o - P la t on i c philosophy, are full of Ma soni c symbols, reveal a familiar knowl edge of the Bible, a m a s ­ terly k nowledge of the ancient world, a nd an e xt r a or di na ry vocabulary. W i l ­ liam H. Furness, o n e of the greatest The R o s ic r u c ia n Sh akes pear ian scholars that ever lived, said: "1 have never been able to bring D ig e st his life a n d his plays within a p l anetar y N ovem ber space of each other. " T h e plays and 2942 sonnets, howrever. harmoni ze perfectly

with the life character, attainments and learning of Sir Fr an c i s Bacon. 3. T h e o r na me nt s placed at the head of the Sonnet s in the Q u a r t o are also found in Franci s Bacon's works. Shake sp ea re 's plays, and the King James V e r ­ sion of the Bible. 4. T h e D e A u g m e n tis published at Leyden in 1645 contains a frontispiece which is a pictorial allegory. Bacon is s eat ed before a table pointing with the forefinger of one h an d to an open book T h e o t he r h an d restrains a figure clad in a skin that is struggling to reach a temple on the top of a nearby hill. Bacon is here r epr es ent ed as the author of two w o r k s — one open and acknowl­ edged: the other, enigmatical, dramatic, a n d una ckn owl ed ge d. T h e figure clad in the be a st ' s skin struggling to reach the T e m p l e of My s t e r i e s is the Muse of T ragedy. 5. T h e head o r n a me n t o f T h e T e m ­ p e s t in the G r e a t Folio a n d that of the N o r u m O rganum a r e the same, thus ext er nall y indicating the close connec­ tion b etween the t wo books: the one i n a ugur a ting the " I n ve n to r y of Thi ngs in N a t u r e . " the other the "Invent or y of H u m a n Pa ss i on s . ” 6. T h a t ciphers w e r e popular in Q u e e n Elizabeth's d a y is well-known. A t least five of the ciphers that Bacon used have been deciphered. T h es e ci­ pher s are discovered profusely scattered t h r ough the plays, sonnets, and or na­ ments. revealing his n ame and identity, also his position in the two brotherhoods. 7. T h e d an g er s of publication were so dr ea df ul that Bacon' s concealment of his identity is readily understood. "In 1530 Press C e nsor s hi p w a s established until 1694. If b y c hance anything to which h e r M a j e s t y took exception hap­ p e ne d to find its w a y into print, the u n­ h a p p y wrinter, if he w a s not broken on the rack or if he did not have his feet s m a s h e d into a pulp with boots, had his h a n d s cut off a n d the s tumps seared with a hot iron.” ( H a r o l d Bayley) If we take a firm s t a n d on the Trut h, the time must come w h e n public opinion will compel the authorities to acknowl­ e d g e all the facts in the case. T h e old tale of W i l l i a m S ha k es pe a re of St rat ­ f or d- on - Av on will fade a w a y like the legend of G e or ge W a s h i n g t o n and the c hcrrv tree.

[ 376 ]

A Philosophical View of Alchemy
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand M aster
appear ed, p u r po r ti n g to ha ve been w r i t­ ten b y alchemists, but w h os e real a u ­ thors w er e the clergy. E d u c a t e d men a n d thinking men w h o r e a d this c on ­ glomeration of n onsens e n at ur al ly be­ came di sgust ed, a n d so ha ve our scien­ tists of t o da y w h o h a v e r ea d some of these pamphl et s. T h e system in vogue by the Jesuits to discredit men w h o p o s ­ sibly woul d be c ome a menace to the church's teachings w a s a common p r a c ­ tice a t t h at time. O n t he other h and, there a r e some w h o discover in the a l ­ chemists only secret e x p o u n d e r s of truth, who, u n d e r terms of chemistry, hid their t eachi ngs from all but their own kind, a n d n o t only n ev er m a d e a grain of gold, b u t never a tt e mp te d it, nor wer e chemists a t all. M a n y al che m­ ists wer e a d v a n c e d sages, who, not c a r ­ ing to be det ected in wo rk i ng u n a u t h o r ­ ized miracles in times w h e n b ur ning at the s take w a s still in vogue, p r et e nd e d to be smelting a n d distilling in the se­ clusion of their laboratories, while, in fact, th ey w e r e onl y medi tat ing a n d contemplating for the pur pos e of ac­ quiring occult power s. T h e i r writings, w h i c h d i s c l o s e n o th in g s a v e an intent to hide or c onfuse the casual reader, are of small value wit ho ut the secret key, which could not b e u n de r st ood without a t ho r o ug h k n o wl e dg e of a s t r o ­ logy a n d the n a t u r e of the planets, a n d mystic phraseology. N o ma tt er w h a t o u r opinion m a y be about the alchemists of the Renaissance, the ind eb te dn es s to al ch emy is g re at e r than w e realize. In the first place.

HROUGHOUT the 15th a n d 16th centuries, a wave o f i n t e r e s t in A l c h em y b e c a m e very prom inent a mo n g the lear n­ ed men a n d pr e­ lates o f the day. If we realize that scientific k n o w l ­ e d g e of n a t u r e a n d n a tu r al p h e ­ nom ena w ere largely in infancy, a n d t ha t superstition e n ge nd e r ed b y the materialistic religious beliefs enveloped or controlled the r e a ­ soning faculties of the maj or it y of h u ­ man beings, it is not surprising, wh en the r um o r became c ur re nt that gold could be m a d e t hrough artificial means, a great m a n y learned men became in­ terested a n d even tried to find out e verything ab ou t the mysterious process. Science k no ws t od a y that gold can be m a d e — a t gr eat cost whi ch is prohibi­ tive. T h e alchemists, however, claimed that t h e y h a d a secret process for its manufacture. Ac ce pt in g these things as facts, and realizing the i mpor tant repercussions such knowl edg e wo ul d have upon the multitude which the st ate a n d church tried to hold in bondage, we can r e a d ­ ily u n d e r s t a n d t ha t they b e nt all their energies in an effort to discourage such practice. Printing h a d flourished for a long time, a n d it w a s used as a medium of destruction. Nons ens ic al pamphlets

[ 427 ]

alchemy contributed many nccessary words to the vocabulary of scicnce, such as c r u c i b l e , d i s t i l l a t i o n , q u i n t e s ­ s e n c e . and a f f i n i t y . In the second placc. they stumbled upon many discoveries that they did not seek. Scicncc is thus indebted to G c b i r for the first sugges­ tion of corrosive sublimate, the red oxide of mercury, nitric acid, and nitrate of silver: to R o g e r B a c o n for the tele­ scope. the magic lantern and gunpow­ der; to V a n H e l m o n t for the properties of gas; to P a r a c e l s u s for laudanum. T o him. medicine owes the idea of the clinic. As in chemistry so in other sciences, the most important discoveries were made by men who had marked taste for alchemic theories. K e p l e r was guided in his investigations by cabalistic con­ siderations. T h e search for gold and youth was only one phase of alchemy. Long before such things as animal mag­ netism. hypnotism, telepathy, ventrilo­ quism. and auto-suggestion had a name, the alchemists had discovered them. Such terms as the philosopher's stone, the elixir of youth, the transmutation of metals into gold had a symbolic and spiritual significance. This knowledge was carefully concealed because knowl­ edge is a dangerous thing in the hands of selfish men. W e , of the twentieth century, ought to realize fully the truth of this statement whe n we see ever)' sublime law of nat ure used for the de­ struction of mankind. Let me quote from Magre's book "Alchemists and Adepts." (Pages 199-200): History records many men who have been able to make gold. But this was only the first stage of the secret. T h e second gave the means of healing physical illnesses through the same agent which produced transmutation. T o reach this state, a higher intelligence and a more complete disinterestedness were necessary. T h e third state was accessible only to very few. Just as the molecules of metals are transformed under great increase of temperature, so the emotional elements in human nature undergo an increased intensity of vi­ brations w'hich transform them and The R o s i c r u c ia n make them spiritual. In this third stage, the secret of the philosopher’s stone en­ D ig est abled a man's soul to attain unity with D ecem ber the divine spirit. T h e laws of nature 1942 are alike for that which is above and

for that which is below. Na t u r e changes according to an ideal. Gold is the per­ fection of terrestrial substances, and it is to produce gold that minerals evolve. T h e human body is the model of the animal kingdom, and living forms orient themselves in the direction of their ideal type. T h e emotional substance of the soul strives, through the filter of the senses, to transform itself into spirit and return to unity with the divine. T h e movements of Na tur e are governed by a single law, which is diverse in its manifestations but uniform in its es­ sence. It was the discovery of this law that the alchemists sought. If there were many of them who discovered the mineral agent, fewer were able to find its application to the human body, and only a very few adepts knew of the essential agent, the sublime heat of the soul, which fuses the emotions, con­ sumes the prison of form and allows entry into the higher world." T h e most overwhelming proof of the truth of the mystic philosophy is that it links up every department of life and knowledge. A knowledge of funda­ mental principles compels us to study nature, and science is thus born. These principles must be lived, and so we have religion, ethics, and morality. Ever\- phase of life and literature re­ veals the same message. In the light of mysticism, philosophy, science, religion, music, architecture, literature, and art. all tell of the soul's high destiny. Each tells it through a different medium. Each tells it equally well. T o the mystic, his philosophy is his guide; his map. his compass. It is to be­ come part of his soul make-up. It is a light to guide his feet. It is to be lived until no other w a y of life is possible. His philosophy is not an intellectual exercise or an abstraction. It is food for his heart, his soul, his mind. T h e vari­ ous arts are channels from his soul to the oversoul. T h e medium is but a n ­ other design in the universal pattern on his trestle board. His philosophy, there­ fore, is equally cogently expressed in the pattern of verbal beauty of a poem, in the study of the conflict of personal­ ity and environment in the drama, in the analysis of the souls in the novels, and in the straight-forward discourse of a philosophical treatise. It is One

[428]

«

Life, O n e Divine Power. One Destiny, O n e Path. W e can find the Divine message in the vision of Isaiah, in the law codes of Moses, in the Egyptian Book of the Dead, in Plato's Dialogues, in Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, in the poems of Wo r ds wo rt h, in Browning a nd Tennyson. W e can study the les­ sons of our Order. But the result should be that we learn to see the truth every­ where, in poetry, drama, art, and phi­ losophy. And finally, the highest de­ gree of development of all, we should learn to find the truth within ourselves. O u r great goal is to be a channel of G o d ’s W i s d o m and Love and Activity in a medium heightened to the degree of genius. W e will need no guide, no book, no instruction because we will have attained the ability to be instructed by Divinity Itself. Spiritual principles remain the foun­ dation of the world no matter how blind people may be. It is a great blessing that the doubts of materialism and athe­ ism do not assail our hearts. It is a great blessing that in this incarnation we have contacted the Rosicrucian Ord er and the teachings of the Alchemists and Philosophers. It is a great blessing and privilege that we can share, no matter how small, in helping the constructive forces in the world. Such were the thoughts and aims of the medieval alchemists. Of such con­ sistency was the gold of human values after having passed through the crucible of fire of human suffering and trials. Such were the truths of the human al­ chemy that they endeavored to leave to the generations to follow. T o speak out in those times of persecution was to willfully become a martyr, and there­ fore, they left unto the printed and written words the truths they had found in their solitude. I will quote a few alchemical aphor­ isms, picked up here and there in my reading. I am sorry that I cannot give the names of the authors. Some are my own translation or selection of words. You can j udge for yourself their value to you: " T h e greatest of all facts is the fact of consciousness. Apart from conscious­ ness there is chaos. It is a general term for cognition of experience. Experience becomes clearer in relation to how we

reason about it and classify it. W e do not notice all that we do and are. No creature is completely conscious.” “ Mind-consciousness is men’s great­ est power for good or evil. A lowly creature may employ an expedient not recognized in civilized human life with­ out any evil motive. Evil is of the mind. Having mind we do not need to depend upon the instincts for choosing, but we can choose according to a temporary s tandar d or civilized expedient set up by the mind.” " D o not inquire if there is a God, or about a life beyond the grave. Of the beginning and the end no one knows anything, but this w e know of the Now: that if we be patient in the study of things present, we shall in time know things eternal. If you ask about Crea­ tion, the answer is Now, for at this moment the world comes into being; and if you ask about the Last Day. it is Now, for at this moment the world passes away. As the sun rises in one land, it sets in anot her .” "Life is change, for Change is this: that the present moment is both begin­ ning a nd end, and that the world is ever becoming new, just as it is ever grow­ ing old. Fo r were there not Death in Birth, there could be no death, and were there not Birth in Death, there could be no Birth. T h a t which is not now can never come to pass in the fu­ ture, for past and future are but an ex­ pansion of the present, while the pres­ ent is the moving image of the Eternal.” " T h e wonder of Life is this: that in every moment is the whole of Time and a perpetual recreation of the world. Recreation or Play. This is no mere chance of words, for in play the act of making is more than the thing made. So. also, Life is more than the things which ,it forms. If the forms of Life were more than Life itself, this would be Death, for in each created thing its work would come to an end. If the flower did not die, the seeds would not be scattered; if man were immortal, he would need no children to preserve his kind. Truly, if forms were immortal, Life would die. for Life is an everlast­ ing recreation. This, then, is the glory of Life: that it is forever going forward, nothing holding it. for all that is made

[ 429 ]

must pass away. In this is its freedom and its undying wo n de r .” "From this we see that if we go for­ ward. holding fast to nothing, nothing shall then hold us back from attain­ ment. And if we ever recreate what we have made, nothing shall weary us. ex­ cept it be ourselves.” "Consciousness is a 'becoming.' T h at of which we are conscious evolves only in so far as it is valuated. according as we value it or perceive its factual n a­ ture. The wise man realizes that apart from mind there is no valuation, there is chaos. T he mind builds out of ac­ cumulated experiences and the fancies derive therefrom.” "Our present existence is of the greatest importance. If we could re­ member a previous incarnation, it would be of a different person in different circumstances.” "If there is a 'universal mind,' it is only what doctors sometimes refer to as the unconscious, an impersonal concep­ tion. It is not a God but an alteration in the forces of ' N a tu re ' .” V V

Suffering is neither a curse nor a blessing, save as a particular organism reacts to it. Asceticism and sensuality are extreme reactions thereto. Flux is a fact, and the wise man realizes it. He therefore, keeps an open mind as to values.' Valuation is an arbitrary act of the social mind.” "Since all is a state of flux, 'self' is not a permanent, separative, entity. Ap ar t from the community it would have no value. But the community is a totality which shall endure longer than the person. In so far as it is great, so shall it longer endure and find an im­ portant place in the history of human endeavor.” " H e who would seek the greatest of all earthly benedictions, the knowledge of all created good, and of the effectual virtue which God has liberally implant­ ed in stones, herbs, roots, seeds, ani­ mals, plants, minerals, metals, and all things, must fling away every earthly thought, hope only for freedom of heart, and pr ay to God with the Greatest hu­ mility. T hus. the aspiration after free­ dom will soon be realized.” V
(C ontinued from P age 426)

THE MORAL ARGUM ENT OF KANT All imperatives command either hypo­ thetically or categorically. A hypotheti­ cal imperative commands a certain thing to be done, if something else which is willed is to be attained. A categorical imperative is an act which in itself is objectively necessary, without any ref­ erence to another end. An action is essentially good if the motive of the act is good, let the conse­ quences be what they may. Th is im­ perative may be called the imperative of morality. Ho w is this imperative pos­ sible? One should act in conformity with the maxim which he can will at the same Lime to be a universal law. T he imperative of duty demands that one act as if the maxim from which he acts were to become through his will a uni­ versal law of nature. Thi s is necessary for rational beings, The R o s i c r u c ia n for will is the faculty of determining to act in accordance with the idea of cer­ D ig e s t tain laws. Such a faculty can belong D ecem ber only to a rational being. 1942 Ma n in all his actions must also be

regarded as an end. T h e imperative in this connection must be: Act so to use humanity — whether in your own person or the person of anot her—as an end. never merely as a means. A free will is the same thing as a will that conforms to natural laws. Reason must, therefore, regard itself as the author of its principles of action and as independent of all external influences. Hence his practical reason is the will of a rational being and it must be r egard­ ed by itself also as free. T h e will of a rational being, in other words, can be his own will only if he acts under the idea of freedom, and, therefore, this idea must in the practical sphere be ascribed all rational beings. W i t h o u t presupposing freedom, we cannot conceive of ourselves as rational beings who are conscious of causality in respect to that action, that is. as enlowed with will. All beings endowed with reason and will must determine themselves to act under the idea of their freedom.

O ur A ctivity
A H E A R T T O H E A R T TA L K T O T H E M EM BERSHIP
By T h e G ra n d M a s te r

without jeopardizing your own advance­ ment and endangering the reputation of the Orde r. Let me offer an analogy. You know how shocked you feel when you see a physician violating the prin­ ciples o f h i s p r o f e s s i o n . You know how insistent communities are that the teach­ ers of children be more circumspect in conduct and in speech than the rest of the community. You know how people despise a church officer who is selfish, insolent or tyrannical in his social or business relationships. You know the glass-bowl existence that a minister or you who have been members for several years and who a public official must lead. He must believe firmly in the basic p ri n c i p l e s of p a t i e n t ]y a n s w e r the telephone n o mat­ the Order are undoubtedly eager to help ter how late it is or how tired he may spread the light. T h e big question be­ be. H e must welcome every visitor cor­ fore us today is, " H o w shall we act and dially no matter how many pressing speak to convince people that peace and duties call. He must donate to every happiness are to be found in entering cause no matter how small his salary upon the path? How shall we make may be or how many demands are made people realize the seriousness of our upon his purse. If you were ever rebuffed by a person purpose and the reality of our high holding an executive position, were you ideals?” W e are no longer a s e c r e t organiza­ not deeply hurt? Did you stop to con­ tion. W e are working openly. W e sider that the man might have been dis­ want to reach just as many people as tracted with innumerable requests or we possibly can. W e make no require­ cares? In all probability you did not. ment of wealth, education, or exception­ You were deeply wounded, and you felt al talents. W e take each human being that at least he might have been civil in just as he is, and make every effort to his speech and courteous in his manner. Now, as Rosicrucians, you occupy a help him raise his plane of conscious­ The R o s ic r u c i a n ness. There are, however, certain re­ similar position in the community. Since sponsibilities and obligations attached it is the dut y of the mystic to teach even D ig e s t to membership in the Rosicrucian Order. while he learns, to be an example even January It is impossible to continue careless while he is patiently struggling to over­ 1943 habits of thought, speech, and action come faults and weaknesses himself, he I T H the year 1943, the R osic rucian Orde r enters upon its fifth period or s u b - c y c l e of ex­ p r e s s i o n in t h i s j u r i s d i c t i o n , and it is our d u t y to make every effort to a d v a n c e the cause of Rosicrucianism wherever we can. Those of
[ 452 ]

must be careful of w ha t he says and does just as a teacher, m i n i s t e r , o r a public official. It is a strain, of course, to be unceasingly watchful, but if these people can adjust themselves to the exi­ gencies of their positions, w h y should t h e p r o b l e m be m o r e difficult for you? Once a desirable trait becomes habitual, the strain disappears. You know the psychological principles involved in habit formation. Begin with a t remen­ dous resolve and let no exception escape your notice. Continue until you reach the stage of mastery; then the trait be­ comes a habit or second nature. You will find it impossible to keep your m e m b e r s h i p a s e c r e t indefinitely, and you will not want to. W h e n I en­ tered the Order, I silently decided to master the lessons just as thoroughly as possible and become quite proficient myself before I would breat he a word to a stranger. I very soon found myself plunged info one situation after another where to have been silent would have been shameful, and I w a s compelled to declare myself. You must be on the alert to be help­ ful and to exert an influence for good. You must not be afraid to take the ini­ tiative in spreading knowledge. At the same time, you must be extremely care­ ful about the impression that you are making upon the people with whom you come in contact. It is necessary, to some extent, to consider public opinion or your power for good will be curtailed. Thes e little sacrifices of vour personal likes and d i s l i k e s m u s t b e cheerfully made because of your desire to be of service to the Order. In the first place, take the matter of personal appearance. N o one realizes more than I how i n t r i n s i c a l l y u n i m p o r ­ t a n t appearance is from a spiritual point of view. In an ideal world, a man will be judged solely on his merits. C h a r ­ acter and ability will be of first impor­ tance and superficial a t t r a c t i o n s will be discounted. But this is not an ideal world, and we must wo rk among people as they are. W h a t teacher would have a shred of influence among boys if he openlv ridiculed ba.sebaJ] and football? T h e day of the shabby salesman is over. T h e executive is no longer carelessly dressed or has his shirt sleeves rolled up or his tie under one ear. Ever y typist and telephone operator knows the im­

portance of being becomingly dressed, and refined and g r a c i o u s in speech and manner. These secondary matters need not dominate your life. Dressing properly can become a habit just like washing your hands or combing your hair. It need not take up your time or distract your attention from your studies and work. W e want our members to feel proud of each other, and we want our young men and young women to be at ­ tracted to each other. W e don't want people to say. " W h a t a pale, lifeless crowd your members are!” W e want them to say, " W h a t splendid people these Rosicrucians are!” If you sincerely feel that the Rosicru­ cian studies have changed your outlook on life, and if you are making every ef­ fort to cultivate the positive emotions, and if you are trying to live the life of love, then radiate these beautiful quali­ ties in your f a c e , your v oi c e , your man­ ner. and your thoughts. You know the dictum of psychology. "Act the emo­ tion, and you will feel it.” Do not keep these qualities of your real self locked in your heart or reserved for your fam­ ily and intimate friends. A woman said to a member of the Order, "You seem to live according to higher standards than most of us.” W e want people to be able to make a similar c o m m e n t a b o u t everyone who belongs to the Rosicru­ cian Order, and particularly those who have been connected with the Order for several years. Be very c a r e f u l o f what you say and do. Never indulge in gossip. T h e per­ son who precipitates the discussion is sure to remark behind your back. ” 1 never t hought a Rosicrucian would be so c r i t i c a l . " Ne ver humiliate a fellow mortal no matter how much at fault he may be. Be silent if you cannot find a helpful or constructive word appropri­ ate for the occasion. W h e n you are ready to take o f f e n s e , c o n s i d e r t h e f a c t that the same situation may present a totally different aspect to different peo­ ple. W h a t seems amusing to one seems insulting to another. In this respect, men are a p t t o wound the sensibilities of women. W h a t seems a careless re­ mark to one, may be a deep wound to another. W e ought to learn from the Chinese the art of expressing ourselves tactfully in every situation in life. W e ,

[ <53 )

personally, may be able “ to take it on the chin,” and if we are sincere about self-improvement we should. But the next person may be downhearted, dis­ couraged, and bewildered, and the one careless word we utter may be "the straw that breaks the camel's back” and c a u s e collapse. A young woman, ardent and enthus­ iastic, attracted to the Ord er because of its high ideals and noble aims, and de­ sirous to meet people whom she could respect and admire, people living ac­ cording to the high ideals of the Order, was dumbfounded when she met a group of members to find the same kind of small talk and gossip that she had suffered from in her own social circle. She was so disheartened and disillu­ sioned that she left immediately in order to return home and weep. This incident indeed saddened me. O f course, we are only humans. O f course, we are all im­ perfect. O f course, we wrant to relax occasionally and indulge in pleasantries and merriment. W e can continue inde­ finitely to look for excuses and to evade the issue and end up comfortably with the s t a t u s q u o . But wha t will be the re­ sult? T h e result will be disaster. W h y did the churches lose prestige? W h e n the lay officers and worshippers did not practice the principles that they professed to believe, thoughtful people began to feel that religion was a hollow mockery and a sham. Hypocrisy and pretense among church members caused schisms to form, and inspired men like Voltaire to attack the church fiercely all his life, turned the ignorant to atheism, and made the oppressed masses consid­ er religion an opiate to make them in­ sensitive to the abuses of the ruling class. T h e masses lost confidence in the churches because the clergy, on the whole, did n o t o p e n l y e s p o u s e thei r cause in pre-revolutionary France and Russia. Ther e is a tendency for every high ideal to be diluted in the course of materialization. T h er e is a tendency for every noble movement to become ossi­ fied, to adapt itself too completely to the demands of the world, and for its mem­ bers to lay more stress upon the form The R o s ic r u c ia n than upon the principle. T h e institution may become too involved in the neces­ D ig e s t sary fund-raising, building projects, January membership campaigns, and all the pris­ 1943 tine beauty and wonder disappear.

Thi s sad denouement must never be the fate of the American Order. W e in this cycle are in greater danger of worldly distraction and pollution than in other cycles because we are naturally more active. W e do not work secretly as was necessary in earlier cycles. W e do n o t l i m i t o u r membership so rigidly as in earlier times. As Rosicrucians openly working in the world among men. we are more exposed than earlier members were to criticism and attack. O u r position is both a privilege and a challenge. W e dare not fail. As im­ perfect as we are. we must aim at the highest. Even as Joshua and Caleb up­ held the arms of Moses upon the mountaintop so that the courage of the peo­ ple might not f a l t e r , s o m u s t e a c h of us, in our personal life, uphold the officers of the O r d e r in obedience to its supreme ideals, so that the world may be in­ spired to enroll under its banner. O u r task is a double one. W e must improve ourselves and at the same time work in the world. W e must be super­ men and superwomen. W e must study our lessons, practice our experiments, fulfill all our natural duties and obliga­ tions in life better than other people do. W e must ever scorn so base a thing as "getting a w a y with it,” to use the cur­ rent phrase. W e must live ever mindful of the fact that "the eye of God is upon us.” At the same time, we must partici­ pate just as frequently as we can in the enterprises that are important for the community. Do not give anyone occa­ sion to say, “T h e Rosicrucians do not seem to know what is going on in the world. ” Be informed. Be alert. Be wide-awake. O f course, it is difficult. Make the effort because you love the Order and want the name R o s i c r u c i a n to be regarded by all as a synonym for whatever is fine and noble and ideal. A woman said to me, “ I w a nt to strike a blow against the forces of evil and reaction. I w a nt to join a militant organization. I don't w a nt to learn any more high ideals. I wa nt to see those that I know become part of the daily actions of man." Fellow Members, such is our ideal of the Order. W e are in­ deed a militant organization. W e teach so that you may a p p l y the principles in your daily li fe. W e do not wa nt our beautiful ideals to remain mere theory and words. W e want to influence men.

[454]

W e want to influence the world. W e want to strike a strong blow for right­ eousness. and peace, and justice. W e want to help eliminate very type of prejudice and intolerance. W e are un­ alterably opposed to persecution and V V

oppression no matter what the motive may be or how specious are the ar gu­ ments advanced. W e believe in a free world of free men pledging allegiance to God alone and guided only by the Law of Love. V

Symbols That More Us
By F r a te r C h a r le s W . B ro w n

O T only is it a n at ­ ural p r e o c c u p a ­ tion, but it is also a great p l e a s u r e f o r t h e m i n d to move in symbols, a n d . a s b e s t it can. p o r t r a y the surges of the soul in f i g u r e s of its environment. This is t h e u r g e t h a t gives rise to cul­ ture. and to art, in whatever sense we may wish to em­ ploy it; this it is that beckons us into the realms of religion and philosophy: for what, pray, is the value of either a faith or a technique of thought until it takes into full account the realities about us and with which we must cope. This is the way that leads to mysticism. W e naturally symbolize the progres­ sion of a day as the progression of a lifetime, with dawn as its birth moving onward through the quickening light of adolescence to the hours of planning and endeavor, toward the beautiful frui­ tion of the sunset, thence to rest —rest and recuperation • and onward, ever — onward, to a new dawn and a new day. W e picture the s e a s o n s as the rhythmic cycle of our own beings as indeed they are. Th er e is a time to plant, and a time to cultivate, a t i m e to reap and a time to enjoy and share that for which we have labored and perchance won. Here, too, the symbolism of the great cycle flows forward to begin anew. W e seem to feel in the t hunder­ storm the great furies that engulf our emotional natures and at times nearly sweep us off our feet. W e are filled w'ith consternation: a consternation, which, if we could but look carefully enough, we might find arising within

ourselves due to our individual mode of thought, and projected by us onto the face of nature and into the hearts of our fellow mortals. An d these things, too. move on. T h e hurricane gives way to the alleviating miracle of refreshing calm that soothes and regenerates like the touch of a cooling hand on a fevered and fearful brow\ And we compose our own emotions in the strains of a great orchestration, to w'hich as we listen we respond, whether we will or no. T o the measured monotone of the dirge we mourn with the mourner. T h e lyrical lilt of the mat ­ ing song makes lovers of us all. and we happily dance over the lea. The battle hymn quickens our pulse, enthrills our nervous fibers and w e will do or die for the land of our birth. Upon listening to the great religious anthems we lift our consciousness, cleanse it and purify it and sweep onward and upward, ever onward, ever upw-ard, to the mystical music of the spheres w'here the morn­ ing stars sing together. W e delight in the fragrance and the beauty of the Rose. Fo r us who read this, perhaps more than for some others, it has a special significance. W e see it as something w i t h - i n u s as well as some­ thing with-out us; something, indeed, that is everywhere we look, be it the king’s palace or the slave mart. It is ever with us though we may not at all times give cognizance to the fact. None the less, it is as infinitely present as the magnetic good earth and the all-pervad­ ing influence of that which comes to us through the sun. W e wonder our way into its depths, open our hearts, and the Rose and we. whoever or wherever we may be. merge into the symbol of the One. attuned and vibrant with the diapasoned rhythm of the Soul.

[455]

Predestination
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
one is. or will be. is determined before birth. Such an hedonistic theory seems to us the most unreasonable and pessimistic dreamings of a human mind. It r e j e c t s E v o l u t i o n , and that consciousness in­ creases in its advance from the mineral, vegetable, animal, human states of be­ ing. It regards the humanity as mold­ ed into a form, without self-realization and soul: as a mere machine or a mech­ anistic existence and a purposeless life. T o bolster up such negative theories it is pointed out that the future can be predicted. Even if we admit that mo­ mentary flashes of future events have been perceived by sages and prophets, such inner or immaterial sight, not be­ ing constant, can never become a foun­ dation for a pre-ordained existence. It is true that the Hebrew prophets Elijah, Isaiah, Daniel, Amos, Hosea, and Jeremiah, predicted with accuracy many coming events. Also Nos t ra d a­ mus. M ot he r Shipton, the Shepherd of the Hills, and many others, have pre­ dicted with more or less clarity many events in history which indicate that the future can be conceived and foretold. W e do not deny that the future can be foretold in certain respects. T h e ex­ tensive experiments conducted at the Duke University in Durham. North Carolina, under the supervision of Dr. Joseph B. Rhine, where the sequence o f cards were t o l d b e f o r e t h e y h a d b e e n s h u f f l e d , are of great interest. Tests were made two days and ten days in advance, with the results somewhat better in the ten-dav forecast. Dr. Rhine

M O N G the many
t h e o r i e s o f life,

advanced by phi­ losophers. the idea t h a t al l life e x ­ pression on earth follows a pattern
which excludes

exceptions or var­ iations. seems the m o s t pessimistic. Predestination a d ­ vances the theory that the beginning and end of life, and human life partic­ ularly. is determined and planned b e­ fore its manifestation begins. It clings to the theory of a personal God. plan­ ning world events, national and group action, and millions upon millions of in­ dividual existences from the cradle to the grave. Unde r such reasoning, all thoughts and actions of individual man would be a fore-ordained performance which he could not avoid or alter, and in which he had no personal interest or concern. He would be a mere automa­ ton. a robot, and would be devoid of free will or choice, and would be acting a part for some one else and not for himself. All experiences from birth to death would have been laid out previ­ ously for him. W h e t h e r his life be good or bad, generous or selfish, it would be a result of a preordained plan, and not The an effort of his own. T h e incentive to R o s ic r u c ia n advance in intelligence, or to develop D ig e s t initiative, integrity, honesty, or lead a February good life, would be gone. All effort exerted would be useless, because what 1943

r H ]

says: " T h e newest experiments and previous research combine to make a strong composite case for this ancient but stiJJ revolutionary hypothesis t h a t
pe rc ep tu a l k n o w l e d g e can p e n e tr a te the f u t u r e .......... More work is needed on so unorthodox a conclusion, yet e x i s t i n g

experimental results prevent any escape from such hypothesis." Wi t hou t looking deeper i n t o t h e laws of the known and the unknown, the uni­ versal and the Cosmic, the material and the spirit, one would be inclined to ac­ cept the despondent and melancholy theory of predestination, and that the universe is a mere machine and we. only the cogs or wheels necessary for its running. It is true that life expres­ sion cannot go beyond its limitations, just as you cannot have more water than the size of the vessel you have it in, be it a glass or a bucket. But this argument takes only material and ph y­ sical things into consideration. It leaves out of the equation that inner energiz­ ing force which causes the manifesta­ tion, and therefore deal? with result in­ stead of cause. It is an undeniable fact that if we reason from a false p r e m i s e or begin­ ning. we arrive at a false conclusion, and such is the fact in this instance. From p r e h i s t o r i c t i me s , m a n has held a belief in a spiritual world contemporan­ eous with this material world, or in a force or power higher and miqhtier chan his puny self; in other words, a Godconsciousness. Thi s realization of God. or consciousness of God. could not have had any other root than those s u b j e c t i v e i n t u i t i o n s which come to the solitarv saae or saint in contemplative quietude. Though the god thus coming into belief was merely the first principle in nature, it has been invested with mundane qualities and become an ob­ ject of veneration and worship. T h e facts upon which a belief in a spiritual world, in God and Soul of man are founded, are as real as any in na ­ ture. Nothing has been better verified bv experience, or more insisted on in history than the countless phenomena commonly called s u p e r n a t u r a l . and for ^'hich no law is yet dcfinitelv known. W e refer to the apparitions of dead or living relatives or friends. W h e r e thev ^'ere likenesses of dead persons, it was

easy to suppose that, by primitive men. they should be taken for the very orig­ inals they represented. As a natural consequence, ancestor worship prevail­ ed in China, and still is a common belief. Unlike other lower organized beings whose realization is exclusively con­ fined to the physical plane, that which
constitutes m an and distinguishes him

from the animal is an integral part of the highest spiritual energy of the uni­ verse. which is everywhere present. The materials of w'hich man is constructed are the principles that flow into him from the storehouse of nature. Some call this Vital Life Force God. or Divine Consciousness, or Spirit, or Soul. It matters little what name is given to this immaterial energizing force in nature: the fact remains that it does exist and manifest in the material world through the consciousness. T h e quickening, evolving and development of conscious­ ness in matter, is the object of life. T h e consciousness in matter is limited by its vehicle, and can be perceived through­ out the natural manifestation in all departments. M a n ’s consciousness is therefore limited in direct proportion to the development of his sens-c-pcrception. God and Soul having thus established themselves in human consciousness and belief, human ingenuity stirred bv hu­ man motives, set to work upon it. and religious c o n c e p t s b e g a n t o take form. Here is the province of speculation, fab­ rication. creed, ritual, orthodoxy, a u­ thority. and priestcraft. T he method bv which the patriarch Isaac "meditating in the twilight” got his instruction from Jehovah: that by which the Hindu her­ mit attains to conscious oneness with Brahma, were and are the same, namely M e n t a l C o n c e n t r a t i o n . The subjective phenomena equally with the objective are obtainable at first hand, and in their presence man st ands as near to the s u p e r n a t u r a l — to the unknown causes of known effects — as is possible for him. All that comes after these is a structure of his own fabrication. Let us now sec what science has to say about the possibility of seeing or knowing the future. M an y of our fore­ most thinkers, philosophers, and scien­ tific men. such as Ouspenskv and Ein­ stein, explain that both the past and the

[ in

future c o - e x i s t n o w a n d a l w a y s . Th ey regard time as the fourth dimension, an element in which we arc immersed, in which everything is merely relative. W e have the habit of regarding the present as something concrete, and the only reality, whereas it must be regarded as a point or a fleeting moment between two eternities. Eternity is one condition, and what is meant is the two poles or extremities of eternity. W e may there­ fore regard the present as a succession of events, according to the rhythm or periodicity prevalent. Material life and conditions are con­ stantly changing —are becoming some­ thing else — relative to the cause in which the effect is incorporated. As the seed determines the kind and quality of the plant, so does the cause determine the effect. Therefore, sages and seers, able to concentrate and place their con­ sciousness receptive to Cosmic vibra­ tions. can perceive both cause and ef­ fect. past and future, at one and the same time, because there is only one condition — t h e E t e r n a l N o w . It natur­ ally d e p e n d s u p o n e a c h p e r s o n a l i t y ' s education, intelligence, and reasoning faculties what he conceives a thing to be to himself. W e therefore find many soothsayers, charlatans, and liars mas­ V V

querading as prophets. It is a field where no concrete evidence can be p r e ­ sented to the contrary, because it is in the field of the infinite and immaterial. W h e n we understand that God is a force or power of Eternal Life, and o u r ­ selves as parts of that life, the st at e­ ments in the Bible as well as the teach­ ings of the sages and philosophers, take on a greater meaning. W h e n we realize that this force acts through us accord­ ing to our understanding of Go d and Life, we also realize that we are cr ea­ tors of our own destiny, we are not slaves to conditions, but free agents and captains of our souls. Living be­ comes an adventure, and the highest a c ­ complishments desirable of attainment. Life becomes a friendly game of e x­ pressing and manifesting the noblest conceptions of love and truth. W e realize that we are the directors of our own lives and responsible for all our acts. W e do not hide behind excuses or negative inability, we know that what we are. or do, are results of our understanding and use of God's Eternal Life Force. W e a c c e p t o u r responsibili­ ties to make this Earth a Paradise, where brotherhood is a towering fact and where Peace and Plenty should reign forever. V

PSY CHO -PHYSIOLOG Y OF T H E EN D O C R IN E GLANDS
( C o n t i n u e d f r o m P a g e 13)

rather than an isolated one. and a time limit is also set. W e are all living souls, and, because of our development through ages past, we will each have certain groups of centers r e l a t i v e l y more active than others in the psychic body. At these points of extra activity in the psychic body, a corresponding harmony or inharmonv will be found in the glandular chain of the physical body. O u r glands are what they are because of our own activity, development and experiences, and not the converse. Ma n has the same types of glands as the lower ani­ mals. and the function in all is to main­ The R o s ic r u c ia n tain the organism in a state of oneness and individuality. W h a t gland could D ig e s t produce a substance, which when re­ February ceived into the blood stream would cause man to love his neighbor as him­ 1943

self7 Ther e are none. Thes e urges are of the higher, the universal nature of man. T h e y are the e x p r e s s i o n o f a highly evolving character. Once man has included these higher principles in his code of character and has unfolded to that point of aspiring to nobler ideals — then and then only can the qlands be of great aid to his progress. Therefore, let us not bemoan the fact that our glands hold us back in our development —but rather let us align the objective mind with the subjective, let us train our ears to listen to the voice of the soul and our objective wills to obey it. Let us direct the healing forces to normal­ ize any inharmony in the physical self, that we may be of aid and inspiration to those whom the Cosmic may direct to us.

[ 16 ]

Rosicrucian Psychology
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
Let us consider how' p s y c h o l o g y , and p a r t i c u l a r l y psycho-analysis, has brought the modern world to a concep­ tion of living that approximates the Rosicrucian teachings. O n e of the first discoveries that pioneers like Freud, Jung, and Adler made in the course of their investigations was that a great many abnormal conditons of the human being, like hysteria, hysterical blindness, hysterical deafness, and hysterical p a­ ralysis, were n e u r o t i c in o r i g i n . T o q u o t e A n d r e Tridon: "Medical literature fur­ nishes us with remarkable illustrations of the way in which people produce in themselves a condition which they ex­ pect to be produced by some external agent." T h e cause was fear, either con­ scious or unconscious, either expressed or unexpressed. An dre Tri don says: "Thinki ng constantly of some part of our body is quite sufficient to damage it." An d again: "Continued fear about any organ will damage it. because fear in itself, if experienced long enough, damages the whole organism." Sometimes the fear was an uncon­ scious one of life s i t u a t i o n s that were too difficult for the individual to sur­ mount. T h e patient unconsciously took refuge in a flight from reality. Disease for such persons, to quote Overstreet, is a refuge and a blessed deliverer. The flight from reality pattern in the think­ ing and emotional lives of large num­ bers of men and women who c a n n o t stand the strain and demands of modern life is an accepted fact among psycholo­ gists today. W h y do people take refuge in the flight from reality? In the first place,

A N Y tim es we have pointed o u t how s c i e n c e , d e­ spite its carefully g u a r d e d tech­ n i q u e s a n d cau­ tious experimenta­ tion, was compel­ led to a c c e p t the reality of psychic phenomena. T h r o u g h the re­ c e n t investigations of p h y s i c s a n d mathematics, the most rigid fields of knowledge, science has likewise been compelled to accept the reality of a fourth dimension. Ouspensky was the first among modern philosophers to real­ ize the i m p l i c a t i o n s o f t h e s e new con­ ceptions, and he worked out a system of thought that approaches the Rosicru­ cian very closely. Modern psychology, in its many interesting branches, has stimulated the study of man himself as a human being — his mental life, his emotional life, and his personality. T h e results o f fifty years of e x p e r i m e n t a t i o n in universities and hospitals have com­ pelled physicians and educators to for­ mulate a technique of life similar to what has been taught through the ages by the Rosicrucians. It is interesting to watch science re­ versing its stand upon question after q u e s t i o n . A t p r e s e n t , s c i e n c e is unbe­ The R o s ic r u c ia n lievably close to the Rosicrucian teach­ ings. T h e time should not be far dis­ D ig est tant when science, religion, and phi­ M arch losophy should join hands as Blavatsky predicted more than a generation ago. 1943

f 68 1

they arc ignorant of the basic principles of their mental and emotional life. In the second place, they have no philoso­ phy of life to help them meet the in­ evitable losses, reverses, defeats, and sorrows of life. In the third place, they lack the ability to make the necessary adjustments at each level in life. W h e n constructive outlets are denied them, suppressed desires seek substitute forms of expression. These substitute forms of expression may be dreams, visions, dis­ eased states of mind and body, and even insanity. The flight from r e a l i t y a n d e v a s i o n o f responsibility may be evidenced at every stage of life. There may be r e g r e s s i o n to t he i n f an t i l e , as when a woman seeks a father in her husband, or a man seek a mother in his wife. Ther e may be x a t i o n at each level of development ecause o f r e f u s a l or inability t o m a k e the necessary effort to advance to the next level of growth. People who can­ not make up their minds to marry are usually examples of f i x a t i o n at the a do ­ lescent stage. Couples who refuse to have children arc fixated at the next stage. Parents who cannot let their children go. and who cannot renew their interests in life through creative work or community work, are also examples of fixation. Psychologists call these unfor­ tunate individuals who get into mental and emotional tangles. contractives" because they have not learned to trans­ fer their interests from themselves to something or someone outside of them­ selves. Thoughts and emotions that do not lead to action become "ingrown" and fester. Psychology, as a result of the study thousands upon thousands of unhapPV and maladjusted people, has come to |ne conclusion that there is a definite echnigue in developing a well-balanced Personality and in achieving happiness and success in life. In the first place, it |s essentia] for the individual to know ., e tr'ck s that the mind can plav and e damage that the emotions can do. n the second place, the individual must ea ize t h a t n o r m a l living is man's Srowth from level to level in life. He ust be trained from childhood to face .I3 ar>d to overcome difficulties and ‘ must a Iso be trained from 1 nood to get along easily with peo­
[

ple and at the same time find happiness within himself through the cultivation of his talents and potentialities. He must not be at a loss when alone, and like­ wise he must not be miserable in the company of others. T he highest type of mind is the crea­ tive. Every individual through the cul­ tivation of his talents and potentialities will become creative. Creative minds working in unison will revolutionize so­ ciety. T h e individual, for his highest good, must learn to universalize both his thoughts and his emotions. Thought and emotion, wholly self-centered, can­ not be productive. Art. music, and study of science, and genuine interest in any phase of human welfare will help the in­ dividual achieve this universality, see the one in the many and find the under­ lying principles in the flux of experi­ ence. T o the developed mind, an inci­ dent is no longer an isolated phenome­ non. Such an individual sees the rela­ tionships and implications at a glance. He has the ability to adjust himself to new conditions. He may be discontent­ ed. but with a divine discontent that drives him on to achievement. He may feel anger indignation, but it is the righteous indignation that impels him to correct abuses and take a leading part in instituting reforms. He may experi­ ence sorrow, unhappiness, and even de­ spair, but it is the unhappiness of the creative mind that t r i e s e v e r to embody the vision in concrete form, and his sorrow is transformed into a mellower outlook upon life and its rare shapes of beauty and harmony. Such are the conclusions which psy­ chologists. and in particular psycho­ analysts. have reached through pains­ taking and laborious research. They have discovered the necessity for reach­ ing out from the narrow circles of self. W h e n any of .these basic urges arc denied fulfillment, the personality in some w a y becomes warped and serious disturbances arise in the life of the in­ dividual. T o summarize the teachings of modern psychology, the well-balanced, well-adjusted, happy individual is he who knows himself, fulfills himself, de­ velops his creative possibilities and uni­ versalizes both his outlook on life and his interests. He is intensely interested in both knowledge and life. A striking
]

sentence appears in "Meaning of P s y­ chology." by C. K. Ogden: "Just as we evade the personal problem, so civiliza­ tion as a whole is evading the Cosmic issue . . . but we must dare to be wise and the way to wisdom lies through knowledge of ourselves." Fellow Students, is not the resem­ blance to the teachings of our Order striking? First of all, the motto of our Order for centuries has been "Know Thyself" and " M a s t e r Thyself." W e emphasize the necessity of controlling thought and emotion, speech and act. The type of thought and emotion that we call "negative" psychologists call "contractive." In either case, control is essential if damage is not to result. T he mystical student fearlessly probes his inner thoughts and concealed motives. In order to root out evil and plant the good we must not permit a thought, a fear, a motive, an act, a word to pass from us unscrutinized. W e must reverse each negative thought. W e must trans­ mute each negative emotion. W e must forbear to utter the negative word. W e must be our own psychoanalysts. W e must consciously cultivate the thoughts and emotion that will benefit us. W e must teach ourselves to speak the words that will bear good fruit. In the lan­ guage o f t h e mystics, we must express love in word, thought, and deed. W i t h negative thought we mean any thought of failure, disappointment, or trouble; any thought or criticism, spite, jealousy, or condemnation of others, self-condemnation or self-pity; a ny thought of sick­ ness or accident, or any kind of limita­ tion or pessimistic thinking. An y thought t h a t is not positive a nd constructive in character, whether it concerns you your­

self or anyone else, is a negative thought. In the second place, we have ever stressed the life of action and service. Love and service have been the w a t c h ­ words of the Order and the royal road to advancement within the Rosicrucian Order. W e bid man to realize his sonship to God and his brother-hood to all men. W e bid him love God and man and express that love through service. W e urge him to develop all his latent abilities and potentialities, including the psychic, so that he may have the joy of self-expression and at the same time prepare himself for greater service. W e know' that the result is bound to be a w'ell-developed. balanced personality of superb physical, emotional, and mental health. W e believe firmly in the power of education to change the individual. W e believe that education is continuous and coextensive with life. W e have al­ wa ys believed in the education of adults. W e also believe that incentive and in­ spiration we give our students are far superior to any that psychology can offer. A Rosicrucian of many years' standing is bound to attain the ques­ tioning, e x p e r i m e n t a l , creative mind which is the greatest asset of any civilization. W e go far beyond the modest claims o f psychology. "Eye hath not seen nor ear hath heard the wonder yet to be re­ vealed." W e await with impatience the hour w'hen modern man will s tand at our side and join us in our st udy of the secrets of nature and the powers of the soul. T h e once yawning abyss between science and mysticism has been d ra ma ­ tically diminished. T h e once divergent points o f view come c l o s e r an d c l o s er , merging in the unity of all life.

R O SICRU CIA N LECTURES IN N E W YORK
O u r m em b e rs a n d frie n d s a r e c o rd ia lly in v ite d to a tte n d th e se rie s o f le c tu re s n o w b e in g p re se n te d in N e w Y o r k C ity . T h e s e le c tu re s w ill c o n tin u e th ro u g h th e E rst th re e S u n d a y s of M a rc h . H i e le c tu re r a n d F ie ld R e p re s e n ta tiv e o f th e O r d e r , F r a te r G ilb e rt N . H o llo w a y . Jr.. is g iv in g th ese le c tu r e s u n d e r th e d ire c tio n o f th e S u p re m e a n d G ra n d L o d g e s, a n d in c o o p e ra tio n w ith th e N e w Y o rk C h a p te r o f A M O R C . A ll these le c tu re s a re o p e n to th e p u b lic, a n d y o u a r e in v ite d to a tte n d th e m all. T h e re a re n o fe e s o r co llectio n s. T h e le c tu re s a r e h e ld in th e b allro o m of th e P y th ia n T e m p le , S e v e n tie th S tre e t E a s t of B ro a d w a y .

The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig e s t M arch 1943

T 70 ]

SANCTUM MUSINGS
THE TRIALS OF LIFE
By
T
h o r

&

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign G rand M aster
I k n o w th e d o c trin e a n d th e law. B ut m y t o n g u e cleaves to th e ro o f o f m y m outh. I c a n n o t u t t e r a w o rd . W i s e w a s the s a g e w h o said, “ In the h o u r of a m a n 's grief a p p r o a c h him not. Be silen t." It is a b a ttle t h a t m ust b e f o u g h t alo ne. It is a v ic to ry th a t th e suffering soul m u s t a c h ie v e alon e. F o r tu n a te , in­ d eed , is th e p e r s o n w h o is in possession o f a s o u n d p h ilo s o p h y of life. A s th e Bible desc rib es su ch a o ne in S t. M a t ­ thew , ch. 7: “T h e r e f o r e w h o s o e v e r h e a re th th ese s a y in g s o f m ine, a n d d o e th them , I will liken him u n to a w is e m an , w h ic h b u ilt his h o u s e u p o n a rock: A n d th e ra in d e s c e n d e d , a n d th e floods came, a n d the w in d s b lew , a n d b e a t u p o n t h a t house; a n d it fell no t: fo r it w a s fo u n d e d u p o n a rock. A n d e v e ry o n e t h a t h e a r e th th e se s a y in g s o f m ine, a n d d o e th th em not, sh all b e lik en ed u n to a foolish m an, w h ic h b u ilt his h o u s e u p o n the sa n d : A n d th e ra in d e s c e n d e d , a n d th e floods cam e, a n d th e w i n d s b le w , a n d b e a t u p o n t h a t h o u se; a n d it fell: a n d g re a t w a s the fall of it .” A p h ilo s o p h y o f life m u s t b e p a t i e n t ­ ly bu ilt u p d a y b y d a y th r o u g h re a d in g , s tu d y , a n d o b s e r v a tio n in o r d e r t h a t the soul m a y s t a n d firm in th e h o u r o f a d ­ versity . T h e first cruel b la s t m a y t h ro w y o u off y o u r feet. B u t w h e n th e b lin d ­ ing, lig h tn in g b o lt h a s p a s s e d , w h e n the d e a fe n in g t h u n d e r h a s ce ased , th e w o r d s of re a s s u ra n c e , p a t i e n t l y sto re d , rise to

H E t r a g i c asp ects of life a r e n o t to b e m inim ized. It is tru e t h a t t r a g ­ e d y m a y b e ju st a m ask o f th e lifeforce. Its p urpo se, w e k n o w , is b e ­ nevo lent. Its tears a n d p a n g s m a y be t r a n s m u t e d into bloom s a n d fruits of tr a n s c e n d e n t b e a u ty . B u t to the so u ls t h a t a r e s tru g g lin g , to h u m a n eyes t h a t c a n n o t p ierce the veil of destiny, th e t r a g i c m a s k is v e ry real. T h e tears t h a t fall a r e h o t a n d blin ding . T h e p a n g s t h a t p ie rc e th e h e a r t a r e like d a g g e r th ru s ts . I v isit a m o th e r w h o h a s j u s t lost her o n ly ch ild ; I visit a y o u n g w ife w h o h as b e c o m e a w i d o w a f te r o n ly fo u r m on th s of m a rr ia g e ; I visit a w o m a n still lo n g ­ ing d e s p e r a t e l y for h e r h u s b a n d al­ th o u g h h e left h e r y e a rs b efore. I visit a y o u n g girl w h o s e n erves a re co m p lete­ ly s h a t t e r e d . S h e can n e v e r b e a wife a n d m o th e r, a n d sh e c a n n o t reconcile h ers e lf to h e r lot. I visit a y o u n g m an w h o s e p h y s ic ia n h a s told him t h a t his c u r v a t u r e of th e sp ine can n e v e r be cor­ re c te d . I visit a m an w h o se h e a r i n g b e ­ com es p o o r e r w ith each p a s s in g year, a n d h e m u s t a d j u s t him self to a w o rld o f silence.

[ 151]

th e m ind; a n d the soul o n c e m o re can face life courageously. T h e N e c e s s ity o f a S o lid F o u n d a tio n W e a re living in a n e u r o tic age. In s ti­ tu tio n s for h a n d lin g m e n ta l cases a r e b e ­ co m ing y e a r ly m ore n u m e ro u s . C h u r c h ­ es a r e o p ening u p p s y c h o lo g y clinics. S ch o o ls find it n e c e s s a r y to a d d p s y ­ ch olo g ists to their staffs. P a r e n t s s e ­ c r e tly co n su lt p s y c h ia trists a b o u t their g r o w n - u p sons a n d d a u g h t e r s w h o a re n o t p ro p e rly a d ju s tin g them selves to p r e s e n t life s ta n d a r d s . P o p u la r b o o k s o n p s y c h o lo g y a re flooding th e m a rk e t of th e c o u n try . T h e soul o f m a n is sick. I t crie s fo r h e a lin g a n d light. It sh rin k s fro m a fu tu re clo u d ed w i t h fe ars o f w a r a n d insecurity. It c a n n o t face th e s p e c ­ t re of loneliness. M u c h can be d o n e ev e n in the h o u r o f a n g u is h . W e c a n v isit th e sick. W e c a n give com p an io n sh ip to th e elderly. W e ca n p ro v id e a t a s k fo r th e lonely. W e c a n fu rn ish fo o d a n d s h e lte r a n d c lo th in g for those in w a n t . A b o v e all, w e c a n do our d e e d s o f k in d n e s s in sin ­ c e rity a n d love so t h a t th e re cip ien t of o u r fa v o rs b e n o t hum iliated . M a n y of o u r w o e s a r e th e s a d c o n ­ s e q u e n c e s of o u r p r e d a t o r y econom ic sy s te m . O n l y a tru e B r o t h e r h o o d of M a n k in d will fo re v e r w ip e a w a y the b lo ts o f w a r a n d p o v e r ty . M a n y o f o u r difficulties a r e th e b itte r fru its of ig n o r ­ a n c e . T h e lig ht o f k n o w le d g e c a n d is ­ pell these. W h e n th e p a r e n t s o f o u r c o u n t r y d e m a n d t h a t o u r e d u c a tio n a l s y s te m b e m o re re alistic a n d t h a t o u r t e a c h e rs sh o u ld b e t r a i n e d a n d p e rm it­ ted to teach ch ild ren h o w to live a n d h o w to face life, a w h o le s h e a f o f trials a n d trib ulatio ns will d is a p p e a r. B u t th e re a r e s o r r o w s t h a t n e ith e r s o c ie ty n o r legislation ca n p re v e n t. T h e r e a re so rro w s t h a t ea ch indiv id u a l m u s t face alone. W h a t th e e x a c t cau se m a y b e w e c a n n o t u s u a lly tell. S o m e ­ tim es it m a y b e th e a c tio n of th e l a w of re trib u tio n , a n d so m etim es it m a y be e x ­ p e rie n ces n e e d e d in p r e p a r a ti o n fo r a g r e a t w o rk . W h a t e v e r th e p re c ip ita tin g cause, th e difficulty m u s t b e fa c e d a n d elim inated. B u t th e q ualities n e c e s s a ry The R osicrucian fo r th e victory m u s t b e a c q u ire d lon g b e fo re. D ig est T h e m ental ills t h a t ca n afflict th e a v ­ M ay e r a g e h u m a n b ein g a r e ap p a llin g . P ick 1943 u p a n y re cen t v olu m e on m en tal h y g ie n e

a n d t u r n th e pag e s. T h e h e a r t qu ails a t th e d is a s tr o u s co n se q u en ce s in l a t e r life of little f o r g o tte n in ciden ts o f ch ild h o o d . T h e c u re is a recogn itio n o n th e p a r t of th e p a t i e n t t h a t h e is m e n ta lly ill a n d n e e d s h elp a n d co o p e ra tio n w i t h w h a t ­ e v e r m e th o d s his ph ysician em ploys. Y o u H a v e th e P o w e r W i t h i n Y o u E v ery book that I have read em pha­ sizes th e f a c t t h a t th e c u re lies e n tire ly in th e h a n d s o f the p atien t. H e m u s t w a n t to b e h e a le d . H e m u s t re c o g n iz e a s u b c o n s c io u s d e s ire to e s c a p e life or reality. H e m u s t d esire h e a lth e a r n e s tly a b o v e all th in g s. H e m u s t e x e r t his w ill-p o w e r. H e m u s t p a tie n tly rise a b o v e s e tb a c k s a n d re la p ses. H e m u s t dev e lo p his o w n fo rtitu d e . H e m u s t s t r e n g t h e n his o w n faith. H e m u s t find his o w n re a s o n f o r living a n d s tr u g g l i n g a n d asp irin g . W h a t a m ig h ty ta s k is h erein outlined! T r u e , in d eed , is th e s t a t e m e n t o f S c rip tu re s t h a t g re a te r is h e w h o c o n q u e rs h im s e lf th a n h e w h o c o n q u e rs a c ity . I t is m y o p in io n t h a t w h e r e th e o n ly c u re is a p h i lo s o p h y o f life, t h e s o u l is r e a d y to t a k e th e first s te p s o n th e P a t h . I f y o u a r e a s t u d e n t of m ysticism , if y o u h a v e p l a c e d y o u r feet u p o n t h e p a th , y o u m u s t b e c o m e so d e e p ly r o o t e d in th e n e w life t h a t y o u can b e n d b e f o re th e b la s ts o f a d v e rs ity a n d survive. W h e n life is p ea cefu l, w h e n t h e s to rm clou ds a r e m e re ly t h re a te n in g , is the tim e to p r e p a r e y o u rse lv e s. F o r life p u r p o s e s th is t h o ro u g h g r o u n d i n g in m y stic p rin c ip le s is m o re i m p o r t a n t t h a n a n y p s y c h ic o r o ccu lt p o w e r. R e a d a n d s t u d y a n d m e d ita te until y o u r t h o u g h ts , s pee ch , a n d a c ts a r e s a t u r a t e d w i t h the m y stic spirit. L e t th e n e w life becom e s e c o n d n a t u r e . L e t re p e titio n m a k e th e b asic c o n c e p t — life e v e rlastin g , t h e life o f love, th e life of serv ic e— b e p a r t of y o u r v e r y soul. P a t i e n t ly r e v e r s e each n e g a ti v e t h o u g h t . P a t i e n t ly r e f r a i n from t h e n e g a ti v e w o r d . P a t i e n t ly control th e n e g a tiv e im pulse. E a c h d a y s a y to y o u rs e lf, “ F o r w h o m ca n I d o th e loving d e e d ? ” W h e n y o u look fo r o ne o n w h o m to p o u r y o u r love, fo r g e t e v e ry w o rld ly c o n s id e r a tio n o f race, creed , color, an d social class. D o n o t s a y , “ C h a r iW b e ­ g ins a t h o m e ,” o r “ I sh all first h elp the peo p le o f m y o w n religion a n d r a c e . ” Y o u will find in the c o u rs e o f time th a t th e n e w life h a s b ec o m e y o u r real

f 1*2]

life. Y o u c a n live n o o t h e r w a y . T h e m o odiness o f earlier d ay s, th e s to rm s of tem per, th e spells o f d ejection , th e bit­ ter re p ro a c h e s , the black d a y s o f b lan k d e s p a ir a r e n o lo n g er so fr e q u e n t o r so d e v a s ta tin g . T h e in n er c h e ck in g p ro ­ cess h a s b ec o m e au to m atic. Y o u hav e told y o u r s e lf so m a n y tim es t h a t these violen t em o tio n al sto rm s m u s t p recipi­ ta te a h o s t o f ills, y o u h a v e suffered from p r e v io u s lapses b o th p h y s ic a lly a n d m e n ta lly w i t h such sev erity t h a t y o u no lo n g e r d a r e to let y o u rs e lf go. Y o u close y o u r e y e s a n d clench y o u r fists, a n d ta k e a d e e p b r e a th a n d re fu s e to su c­ cum b. Y o u d a r e n o t let y o u r s e lf b roo d. Y o u re c o g n iz e th e first ste p s o f th a t d a n g e r o u s s t a t e o f m ind, m elan cho ly. Y o u b r e a k t h a t n u m b n e s s of sp irit th a t d e s c e n d s u p o n y o u like a paraly sis. Y o u re c o g n iz e e v e ry d a n a e r o u s m ental a n d em o tio n a l sy m p tom . K n o w le d q e of th e l a w o f c a u se a n d effect, k n o w le d q e o f th e devastatincr c o n se q u e n c e s o f lack o f m en tal a n d em otional co n tro l, k n o w l­ e d g e t h a t a n exp e rien ce n o t fa c e d p ro ­ p e r ly will s p r in g u d a g a in a n d a g a in in y o u r life un til y o u learn th e r i g h t m e th ­ o d o f o v e rc o m in g , will help steel y o u r will a n d co n tro l th e will im pulses th a t beset you. R e s t O n Y o u r D iv in e H e rita q e Y o u k n o w th a t y o u a r e a child of G o d . Y o u k n o w t h a t d e a th is n o t th e en d . Y o u k n o w t h a t all cre a tio n desires y o u r v ic t o r y a n d th e v ic to ry o f e v e ry soul. Y o u k n o w t h a t y o u a r e n o t alone. Y o u k n o w t h a t th e forces o f lig ht, life, a n d love func tion on e v e ry p la n e , b o th visible a n d invisible. T h e y e a r s p ass so s w if tly t h a t a n in c a rn a tio n a t its close see m s b u t a fleeting d ream . In th e deep sleep o f n ig h t, w e a r e c o m p letely u n c o n ­ scious of t h e p a s s a g e o f time. E v e n so m ust th e s e n s e o f time v a n is h in the p e rio d s b e t w e e n in c a rn a tio n s . W i t h a n e w i n c a r n a tio n b eg in s a n e w d a y , p e r ­ h a p s in h a p p i e r times, p e r h a p s in m ore b e a u tif u l climes. T o d a y w e ca n d o o u r bit t o w a r d t h a t b r i g h t e r to m o rro w . T r y to t a k e a m o re im p erso n al v iew of y o u r life. T r y to r e g a r d th e ev e n ts of y o u r life a s y o u w o u ld a p ic tu re on a s creen , o r a s to ry in a b ook . R e g a r d ea ch t r y in g e x p e rien ce in th e lig h t of discipline. S a y to y o urself, “ Is th e re a n e e d e d discipline t h a t this ex p e rie n c e is g iving me? O r am I b e in g given a

g lim p se of a n u n k n o w n a s p e c t of life?” If th e re is a n in te re st in m en tal h y g ien e to d ay , if th e re is s y m p a th y a n d c o m p a s ­ sion fo r th e insane, it is d u e to a man w h o him self b e c a m e insane, w a s c o n ­ fined to a n in stitu tio n fo r ten y e a rs, a n d th e n r e g a in e d his san ity . T h i s m an w r o t e th e s t o r y o f his life, “ A M i n d T h a t F o u n d Its e lf.” In a d d itio n , he d e ­ d ic a te d him self to th e c a u se of m en tal h e a lth a n d d id p io n e e r w o r k in c h a n g ­ ing th e a t t i tu d e o f th e public to w a r d th o se m e n ta lly afflicted. Be m ercilessly f r a n k w ith y o u rs e lf. Y o u n e e d n o p s y c h ia tris t or fa th e r c o n ­ fessor. R e v ie w v o u r life in e v e ry detail w ith y o u rse lf. D i d n o t y o u r suffering in cre ase y o u r u n d e r s ta n d in g o f life a n d people, v o u r s y m p a t h y a n d y o u r to le r­ an ce? I f y o u h a d a d r e a d f u l e x p e rien ce o f b e in g co m p elled to lie a b o u t y o u r ag e, o r y o u r religion, a n d to d v e y o u r h a i r in o r d e r to g e t a job o r to k e e n it. if y o u h a d th e e x p e rie n c e o f b e in g fired a n d re h ir e d a t a lo w e r w a g e , y o u w o u ld b e k e e n lv a w a r e o f th e deficiencies of o u r social a n d econom ic sy stem s. Y o u w o u ld realize t h a t a t r u e feeling of B ro th e rh o o d is a cry in g n e e d o f th e d ay . O f y o u r p e rs o n a l g riefs, y o u w o u ld m a k e a s w o r d to strik e a b l o w a g a in s t th e forces of m aterialism a n d in h u ­ m anity. I h a v e r e a d th e lives o f m a n y m vstics. T h e r e is n o t o n e w h o d id n o t suf f er in ­ te n se ly . T h e n , sh all w e b e e x e m p t from th e u n iv e rs a l h u m a n lot? T u r n th e p a g e s o f th e Bible. Is n o t su ffering w r i t t e n on e v e ry p aq e ? A b r a h a m h a d to le a v e th e la n d of h is b irth a n d his p a r e n ts . Jacob h a d to flee from h o m e a n d n e v e r a g a in s a w his b e lo v e d m o th er. T h e w ife o f his h e a rt, R ach e l, d ied w h e n B e n ia m in w a s b o rn . H e t h o u g h t his son, Jo seph, d e a d for m a n y y e a r s . Y e t Jac o b w a s a ch o s e n vessel o f th e L o rd . Jo se p h w a s h a t e d b y his b ro th e r s . H e w a s fa lsely a c c u s e d a n d la n g u is h e d in prison. M y s tic is m Is N o t a C u r e -A ll M a n y s t u d e n t s h a v e a w r o n g im p re s ­ sion o f w h a t th e fru its of m y stic s t u d y s h o u ld be. T h e y look u p o n m ysticism as a s h o r t - c u t to solvin g all p ro b le m s of h e a lth , s u p p ly , a n d h a r m o n y . T h e y c o n ­ s id e r m ateria l b le s s in g s a s th e principa l r e w a r d . It is t r u e t h a t m ysticism h elps y o u find p e a c e a n d h a p p in e s s , b u t n o t a l w a y s in a m ate ria l form. It h e lp s y o u

[ H 3 ]

a c h ie v e a n in n er p ea ce th ro u g h u n d e r ­ s t a n d i n g . It helps y o u gain fo rtitu d e to e n d u r e the buffets o f life. T h r o u g h u n d e r s t a n d i n g th e law s o f th e universe, y o u a c c e p t them a n d co o p e rate w ith th e m . C o n s e q u e n tly , y o u s h o u ld not s in k u n d e r life's b u rd e n s . Y o u sho u ld n o t b ec o m e neurotic. Y o u sho u ld n o t b e d riv e n to drink, d ru g s, o r suicide. Y o u m u s t realize th a t w h e n y o u e a t o f th e fru it o f the tree of k n o w led g e , y o u a re d riv en o u t o f th e p a r a d is e of ig no rance. I d o n o t th in k t h a t is is n e c e s s a r y for a s t u d e n t o f m ysticism to becom e h a r d o r indifferent. Jesus w a s n o t a s h a m e d to w e e p w h e n h e h e a rd t h a t L a z a ru s h a d died. H e w a s h u m a n e n o u g h to s h r i n k from the cup o f a g o n y t h a t life w a s h a n d in g him. H e felt it n e c e s s a ry to p r a y for s tre n g th . A n d G o d did not e x p e c t him to find th e s tre n g th u n a id e d . W e a r e told t h a t an a n g e l c a m e d o w n to s tr e n g t h e n him. H o w fa r a h e a d o f us Jes u s w a s a n d y e t h e suffered. S h a ll w e w h o h a v e ta k e n b u t th e first fe w fa lte r­ in g s te p s expect to learn all th e d e p th s o f t h e h u m a n h e a r t w ith a m inim um of u n h a p p y experiences? W e c a n n o t escape trial a n d trib u la ­ tions, sin a n d suffering. A s R o sicrucians, V V

w e n ee d n o t suffer like help less sheep. W e can le a rn from o u r ex p eriences. W e can utilize them to gain u n d e r s ta n d in g a n d s t r e n g t h o f c h a ra c te r. W e can re ­ g a r d th em as a s p u r to s t u d y th e law s of life a n d n a tu re . W e c a n avoid r e ­ s e n tm e n t, ill-will, a n d self-pity. A s life dea ls us b lo w u p o n blow, w e ca n s t e a d ­ fa s tly seek to sm o o th th e lives of o thers. If d is a p p o in tm e n t u p o n d is a p p o in tm e n t is o u r m a te ria l lot, w e can s te a d f a s tly devo te o u rse lv e s to a c c u m u la tin g s p ir­ itual rich e s in s te a d th ro u g h diligent s tu d y . O t h e r s m a y n o t give us th e love w e a r d e n t l y desire, b u t n o th in g can stop us from p o u r in g o u r p e n t-u p love upon th e sick a n d u n f o r tu n a te a n d th e lonely t h a t com e o u r w a y . In a sea of trouble, G o d ca n b e to us a n in n e r s a n c tu a ry . W i t h s e e m in g ly n o t a th in g to live for, w e can b u ild up lives o f usefulness, b e a u ty a n d k n o w le d g e . A l t h o u g h w e m a y live a lo n e in th e c h e a o e s t of fu r­ n ish ed ro o m s, y e t all th e C osm ic h o sts m a y sm ile u p o n us. T h e s e a r e the tre a s u re s o f th e m y stic life. T h i s is the w a y to a v o id neu ro ticism . T h i s is the w a y to s a f e g u a r d m e n ta l h e a lth . T h i s is th e m e a n in q of a tta in m e n t. T h i s is th e s e c r e t o f peace, h a r m o n y , a n d h ap p in ess. V

T h e h ig h e s t com pac t w e can m a k e w i t h o u r fellow is, let th e re be t r u t h b e tw e e n us t w o foreverm ore. It is sublim e to feel a n d s a y o f a n o th e r , I n e e d n e v e r meet, o r s p e a k or w rite to him; w e n e e d n o t re in fo rc e o u rse lv e s, o r s e n d to k e n s o f r e ­ m em b ra n ce; I re ly on him as on m y self; if h e d id n o t th u s o r th u s, I k n o w it w a s r i g h t . —-E m erson.

The Rosicrucian D igest M ay
1943

“SM A LL W O R L D ” (The following is an account by Newspaper Columnist, Frank Freeman, which ap­ peared in the morning newspaper of San Jose. It indicates how members of the Order all over the world are serving in the Armed Forces, yet are not devoid of their idealism aroused and developed by their Rosicrucian studies.) "Here's an odd one written home from New Caledonia by Lt. (Dr.) John C. Wilson of the Navy. He went up with a New Zealander in a Hudson bomber on a five-hour patrol flight. . . . 'It was a most gorgeous experience. W e flew out to sea at 4 a. m.— 250 miles straight out. It was a full moon and we were above the clouds. Up there the moon is enormous—then we could see the Southern Cross. Soon the sunrise came to the east. Sunrise in the tropics is as gorgeous as sunset with beautiful shades of gold, rose, pink, yellow, and magenta. At one time half the sky was sunrise while the other half was full moon.’ . . . Doc commented on the beauty of it all and pretty soon the New Z e a ­ lander was saying it reminded him of the teachings of the Rosicrucians . . . and great was the surprise of both, especially the pilot when he learned his passenger lived near Rosi­ crucian Park in San Jose. . . . On the trip they spotted an allied battle fleet, dropped two bombs on w-hat looked like an enemy sub. . . . ‘The wa y home was very exciting with dog fighting and diving most of the way. At one time we skimmed the surface of the sea by 5 feet at 350 m. p. h.’

r

154]

SANCTUM MUSINGS
By
T

&

T H E R O SIC R U C IA N V IE W P O IN T h o r K i i m a l e h t o , Sovereign Grand Master
raise themselves above their sphere. T h e y live in the immediate present, a n d they ar e cont ent just where t h e y are. In the first place, it must be admit ted t h a t m a n y people are not sufficiently developed either intellectually or spir­ itually for the entire course of instruc­ tion that the Rosicrucian O r d e r has to offer. In the second place, ma n y souls t h a t a r e r e a d y a re asleep. T h e y need the sp ur o f a specific situation in life to arouse them. T a k e the gr eat Voltaire, for example. H e led the pleasant, selfcentered life of a brilliant, successful y ou n g man of his d a y until he suffer­ ed personally from the abuses of the ari stocr acy a n d the church. T h e n he became t h e m i g h t i e s t c h a m p i o n of enli ghtenment t ha t F r a n c e e v e r had. H e act ual ly p r e c i p i t a t e d the Fr enc h Revolution. N o ma tt er h o w free of problems our lives m a y be for the moment, we need a guide to living. W e cannot live as unconsciously as the birds a n d the flow­ ers do. N o ma tt er how little the next i ncar nat ion m a y . i n t e r e s t us. no matt er h o w unreal it m a y seem to us, we should avoid as much as is humanl y possible p r e c i p i t a t i n g an u nf or tu na te Karma. O f course, an enlightened soul does good because he abhor s evil and delights onl y in the good. T o a less e n ­ l ight ened soul, we must appeal on the gr ou nd of self-interest. Unl ess we k now the laws of health, we a re likely to suffer from avoidable disorders. M e r e ­ ly to keep well a n d h ap p y it is neces­

N a discussion of the aim s of the Rosicrucian O rder, a young person said to me. "I c a n s e e h o w a n y b o d y w h o is s u f f e r i n g , or in sorrow, or in need, would b e n e f i t f rom the teachings of the O r d e r , but I d o not see w h a t a p e r s o n w h o is perfectly c o n t e n t e d w i t h life has to gain." It is true that we are likely to emphasize the salvaging aspects of our work, for the need of the w o r l d is so pitiful a n d immediate. In a wor ld at w ar, it is natural that we tr y to point the wa y to peace. In a generat ion of sick souls, we try to point the w a y to health. In a materialistic age, we try to reveal the beauty of the spiritual life. W h e n so many are a s t r a y in the wil der ­ ness. we feel it our d u ty to point out the W a y , the T r u t h, a n d the Life. For all the woe a n d he ar t a c he in the world, there are m a n y more still u n ­ touched. T h e y are y o u n g , in g o o d health, earning enough for their modest needs, with h a pp y t e mp e ra me nt s that enable them to enjoy each d a y that dawns, and each little pl ea sur e that comes their way. T h e y have their fami­ nes and their friends. N o unfulfilled Aspirations trouble them. Ambit i on is foreign to their nature. T h e y have no ]°nging to excel, to do gr eat deeds, to

r 227 ]

sary to k n o w s ome of the laws of life such as the O r d e r teaches. T h e great er v a lu es of life— the reali­ ties of life — these ar c to be found through the exper ience of toil a n d pain, through living with o t h e r people and being obliged to consi der their needs, through the discipline a nd education that such relations with other people involve. From the point of view of good citi­ zenship a n d national Welfare, it is d a n ­ gerous to let y o u n g people g r e w into self-centered m a t u r i ty or to let voting citizens be i gnor ant of the needs of their fellow citizens. T h e member s of a de­ mocracy must be vigilant. T h e y must be intelligent. T h e y must be publicspirited. T h e unscr upul ous are ever watchful to take a d v a n t a g e of the u n ­ wary. the uni nf or med, a n d the indiffer­ ent. T he re fo r e, no ma tt er h o w con­ tented you may be with y ou r lot in life, you must k no w h o w to keep well, and you must be interested in the welfare of your country. In a st at e of war, your contentment is in doi ng all you can for your country. T h e r e f o r e , you should be interested in giving y o u r s uppor t to ac­ tivities that will assist our count ry to establish world peace. It is impossible to go t hrough life u n ­ touched by the trials a nd tribulations that afflict all manki nd. T h e late p r o­ fessor Do wd e n, the g re a t aut hor ity on Shakespeare, divided the Sh ak e sp e ar ­ ian plays into four groups. T h e first group he called In the W o r k s h ip , the period of e xpe ri me nt at ion. T h e second group he called In the W o r l d , the p e r ­ iod of h a p p y pr ogr ess . T h e third group he called In the D e p th s , the period of disillusionment, d is appointment , losses, and tragedy. T h e fourt h group he called O n the H e ig h ts , t h e period of philo­ sophic calm a nd reconciliation to life. T h e s e n at ur al g r o u pi ng s of the S h a k e ­ spearian plays se rve for every intelli­ gent, gr owi ng soul. W e all pass t hrough these stages. W e ar e really u nf or tunat e if, until the time of inevitable losses or sorrows, o ur life h as been one of su m­ mery calm. T h e n e ce s s a ry adj ust ment s The R o s ic r u c ia n then become e xt r eme ly painful. T o s ta nd on o n e ’s o w n feet for the first D ig e s t time in middle life must be a severe e x ­ J u ly perience. T o go gr op i n g for consolation 1943 and spiritual s t r e n g t h w h e n in the

throes of a gony is equally difficult. It is true, of course, that ma ny people first begin to seek God wh e n they find them­ selves sinking in the qua gmi r e s of 1jfe It must be admi tted that m a n y people are not strong e nough to survive. T h ey lose their hold on life. T h e y suffer total collapse. T h e y are even driven to sui­ cide. It is true that a st r ong soul will survive a n d find G o d. W o u l d it not be better if he had a spiritual suppor t to help him when he w a s walking through the valley of the s h a d o w of death? M i g h t not the victims of melancholia, collapse, and suicide have been rescued? W o u l d it not be better to begin with period four, the time wh e n a philosophy of life is formulated? A l t h ou gh children prefer to play, we must train them in the habits a n d skills necess ar y for successful living. W e must teach them to read a n d writ e al­ though they prefer to look at pictures. A teacher once said to the students, " Y o u must train y ou r children in such a w a y that they, wh e n a du lt s them­ selves, should commend y ou r methods. ” W e have all met the a du lt w h o blames his par ent s or teachers with the words, " T h e y should have k n ow n better." I w a s astonished to read the v e ry same reproach from E v e Curie, t he distin­ guished d a u g ht e r of the great scientist, M a ri e Curie. Eve Curie, as no doubt you know, published a splendid life of her mother. In it she makes the state­ me nt that her mother, her father, and o lder sister h a d no interest in lifephvsics. T h e i r w a y in life w'as clear. But she herself did not k n o w w’hat she w a nt e d, and her mother did not compel her to follow a definite plan. Her mot he r h a d too much r espect for the freedom of the soul. N o w , y e ar s later, E v e regrets her m o t he r ’s scruples. She says, "I was too y o u ng t hen to know w h a t w a s best for me." If gifted people feel later in life that their p a r e nt s and teachers should have exercised more firmness with them in c hil dhood and should have foreseen future needs, how will less gifted people feel? W e k n ow that life has its problems a nd perplexities. W e k n o w that disap­ pointment, disillusionment, a n d losses a re universal experiences. W e know that a crisis of some sort occurs in the life of each human being, therefore

f 228 ]

spiritual prepar at ion of some sort is essential. If life w e n t smoothly and we did not have to meet with a n y blows, bumps, checks, kicks, cuts, retaliations, slights, sneers, ccnsures, criticisms, accusations, denunciations — if we had no opposition a n d met wit h no people with wh om it w a s har d to get along — if we had our o wn w a y a n d everyone bowe d before us, if life never b ro u gh t us a ny bodily pain, or spiritual pain, a n y regrets, a ny sorrow's, a n y humiliation, a n y r e p e n t ­ ance, if there w er e no suffering as a re­ sult of faulty ambitions and bad choices, that would be a hell. W e should be left w'ith the i m p e r f e c t i o n a n d i m m a t u r i t y and mediocrity of our natures; there w'ould be no progress, a n d the place w'here there is no progress is hell. T h e value of life is not in just being alive. It is in developing, growi ng, a n d enlarging the mind, training the emo­ tions, cultivating the appreciations, p r o ­ ducing a personality, developing a soul, making one's existence productive. lift­ ing oneself up into something of posi ­ tive value. T o accomplish such results a man must yield himself with c o ope ra ­ tive d e s i r e t o the d i s c i p l i n e s o f l i f e a n d make it his business to learn every lesson that can be learned. H a v e we not listed reasons enough w h y even the most careless a n d indolent need the message of the Rosicrucian Order? Life is like a jour ney on the high seas. W e need both the compass and the polar st ar to guide us. W e need a map even to drive across the country, or to hike t hr ough the mountains. W e need a pat t er n for making the simplest garment. W e need a recipe for the simplest dish, i f it is n e w to us. E v e r y ­ thing in life grow's according to a p a t ­ tern or is built according to a plan. Should a h u m a n life be the only h a p ­ hazard thing in the universe? T o travel through an unexplored c o u n t ry we need a compass, courage, enthusiasm, and faith. A jour ney t hrough life is like traveling t hr ough an unexpl or ed terri­ tory. T o succeed, to avoid going h op e ­ lessly astray, we must k n o w that there ls a goal, that t here is a w a y, a n d that success is possible. If we a r e a l r e a d y m e m b e r s . Jet us d e ­ termine to be faithful to the very end. *-et us bear in mind that at some time

every principle that we learn will prove helpful. Let us teach our children as ma ny of the principles as they can grasp. I f we h a v e contacts, l e t us popularize as m an y of the principles as we can in talks a n d articles. W e may not be able to put a cr oss the entire Rosi­ crucian philosophy, but we can fre­ quently p u t across one principle, one idea, one thought to serve as a seed. W e never k now wh e re a seed m a y take root a n d sprout. T h e most unexpected people prove responsive. If our lives are peaceful at the m o­ ment, w e are very fortunate. W e should be able to derive t re me ndous benefit from the instruction o f the Or der . W e can s t u d y the lessons with calm, col­ lected minds. W e can practice a n d e x ­ periment with the n eces sar y c on c en tr a­ tion. W e can build a solid foundation a n d a full b a c k g r ou nd of knowledge. W e can teach wi th ease. W e can give undivided attention to the problems of others. W e can s t u d y calmly the lives of our fellow'men a n d consider the di­ rection of world events. W h e n we do not need help, we can be helpers. W h e n life is peaceful, w e ca n ha ve time for
b e a u t y , art. a n d c r e a t iv e sel f- e x p r e s s i o n .

W e have time for friendships, for n a ­ ture. for dignified a n d noble leisure. It is then w'e can a ppr eci at e the true beaut y of the law's of God, of the impressive­ ness of the Divine Plan, of the magnifi­ cence of the universe, a n d the glory of h uma n life. If the w'onders of the universe a n d the infinite possibilities of the human race do not kindle y o u r a r d o r to climb the heights, to do. a n d dare, a n d know-, then y o u r soul is asleep. Life will prod you into a shar p a wa ke ning. H o w can a ny o n e be content wit h a squirrel-cage existence, with the same simple daily round of duties, with an occasional card part y, moving-picture or sociable for r e ­ laxation? F o r shame, children of a divine Fa th e r, a w a k e to y o u r divine p o ­ tentialities. T h e kingdom is for you, but you must make it y o u r own. T h e divine F a t h e r w a n t s you to appreciate it, to show y ou r ability to ma st er it, a n d your fitness to govern it. W e a r e like acorns. W e do not know' into w h a t kind of tow'ering oaks we a re dest ined to grow. Is it not exciting to know' just wher e our place is in the universe? All the acorn

needs is sunshine, rain, and a favorable soil. W e , in addition, must exercise initiative a n d will-power. I should think t h a t she er curiosity woul d be sufficient impetus. O u r lives can be infinitely e n ­ riched in u s e f u l n e s s , self-expression, and service. W e can rise above the storm and strife. W e can wal k unhar med over perilous paths. W e need not feel like sheep ga th er e d for the slaughter. W e need n o t feel terrified about the future of the wo r l d o r the future of mankind. W e need not feel the victims of a h e a r t ­ less fate. T h e future of the race is s e­ V V

cure. T h e p owe r t h a t cr eated us pQs_ sesscs W i s d o m a n d Love. In t h e com forting w or ds of D eu te ron om y: “ U n d e r n e a t h are t h e everlasting arms. " Love in t h e end must be victorious for it js t h e st ro ng est force in the world. The plans of G o d must triumph because God is all t h a t there is in the world. This k no wl e dg e makes for peace, security a nd s t r e n g t h . H o w can one live with­ out it? W e must all come to it some day. Let us not be driven to it b y the wh ip s of misfortune. Like eager chil­ dr en let us welcome the gifts of a loving a n d gener ous F a t he r . V

HOW

S C I E N C E IS B R O A D E N I N G O U R C O N S C I O U S N E S S
(C ontinued from P a g e 221)

which are also essential in certain of ma n' s psychic functions. T h e s e frontal lobes w e r e t h ou g ht to be the seat of me mo ry until it w a s found that monkeys wi th this p a r t of the brain r emoved still remember ed things they had been taught a n d remember ed a ne wl y learned me th­ od for acquiring food af ter only a 10 second hesitation. T h e present wor ld conflict seems de s­ tined to have a p r o f ou nd effect on the minds a nd nervous systems of t he mil­ lions o f persons involved. T h i s is not only true of the shock of battle but of m a n y thi ngs which a pp ea r to be bless­ ings. F e w medical t reatments of the pas t few years ha ve h a d such a w i d e ­ sp r ea d influence for good as the sulfa drugs; at times it almost seems as if no disease can resist them. Y et we must p a y for the good accomplished with the w r o n g decisions a n d mental confusion whi ch persist in m a n y cases af ter this treatment. T h e intimate connection b e ­ t we en mind and b o d y is being b ro u gh t out time a n d agai n b y the events of the day. T h e t r aumatic neuroses of this w a r a pp ea r to be much more severe t ha n the "shell s ho c k" of the last, and it is predicted b y Dr. S a n d or Rado, N e w Y o rk psychiatrist, that t he y will take more physical forms, appear ing as peptic ulcers a n d hear t c o m p l a i n t s .

Me di c al t r eatment is not indicated, but r a t h e r p s y c h o a n a l y t i c a n d hypnotic methods, to r e l i e v e these c o n d i t i o n s b r o u g h t o n b y di sordered nervous sys­ tems. Accor ding to t he psychosomatic a p p ro a ch , we a re n o w in a transitional stage; instead o f looking for an organic explanation for every disease, we now look for the psychological explanation. T h i s is in a g re eme nt with the Rosicru­ cian doctrine that most diseases have their origin in the psychic, r ather than the physical body. D a y b y d a y w e see science expanding our k n ow le d ge of things a s t hey are, ext e nd in g our vision of thi ngs as they o ug h t to be. It is said that mu nd an e sci­ ence is a lw ay s following behind the dis­ coveries of ar ca ne science, a n d this is doubtless true. Y e t m u n d a n e science follows the sure a nd firm path of walk­ ing slowly, carefully examini ng each step bef or e taking anot her. T h e scien­ tist is convinced of t h e validity of a lav/ or principle only af ter the most exhaus­ tive testing, a n d w h e n he believes, who shall doubt? T h o s e w h o k n o w a n d truly u n de r s t a n d nat ur e a n d her laws view with a ppr ova l the a tt emp t s of science to b ro a de n the consciousness of mankind, even as the ar ca ne schools br oa de n and lift the minds of their followers.

r 23 o i

SANCTUM MUSINGS
EM O TIO N A L C O N T R O L
By
T
hor

&
-I*

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master

F A M O U S Bud­ dhist once said: T n e v e r get a n g r y b e c a u s e it is not w or t h while, a n d I never w o r r y b e ­ cause it d o e s n o good." He had disciplined himself along t h e s e lines u n t i l he h a d a c ­ q u i r e d as firm a c o n t r o l over his rebellious t ho ug ht s as a skillful driven has over his team of spirited horses. T h e horses recognize the iron h a n d which guides them a nd have l earned to be obedient. So the thoughts, impulses, a n d passions can be forced to do w h a t the soul bids them do. T h e y can be held in check; they can be forbidden to mutiny; t hey can be made docile w h e n they k n o w they have a Master. If we could abolish a n g er and the re­ sultant mistakes, agonies, h e a r t a c h e s a nd hear t breaks this world woul d be a very different place in which to live. It is really the cause of half the ills to The which the flesh is heir. N o man is just R o s ic r u c ia n when he is ang ry . H e is simply a r u n a ­ D ig e s t w a y horse, w h o in the wild frenzy of August tempor ar y insanity, dashes himself to 1943 destruction. A n g e r is a delirious im­

pe tu os i ty which makes the hear t beat like a tri phammer a n d sets the brain in a whirl which r enders a so u n d judgment impossible. A n g e r is generally direct folly, followed b y a loss of self-respect a n d b y stinging regrets. Ha bi tu al anger creates physical disease, a n d w h e n it is sufficiently forceful, it may cause s ud­ den d eath. A n g e r may be classed as one of the stupidities of we a k human n atur e. T h e control of y o u r temper is a bs ol ut ely necessary if you ar e to be a good citizen, a loving parent, a faithful friend, or a w o r t h y st udent on the Path. If w e could also eliminate our tend­ ency to worry, we wo ul d change the whol e complexion of life . W e would be st r onger , healthier, a n d happier. W o r r y is not a r eme dy for disease but rather a cause of it. T o have that degree of a n ­ xiety which prompts us to do w ha t we can to prevent an impending evil is stimulating and invigorating. It calls out all o ur latent capacity, puts us on our mettle, quickens the pulse and some­ times develops a heroism which seems incredible. T h e man w h o has never been in an emergency a n d has never ma de himself a master of it does not k n o w how much char act er he has. and has missed one of the most glorious ex­ periences in the consciousness of the soul. A t such a time, the man actually quivers with life; his nerves thrill with

f 268 ]

a new sensation; he is in a fight with fate; winning the victory will be a precious memory forever. All that is legitimate is in accor d with Cosmic law which tells us h o w to h a m ­ mer ourselves into sh a pe wh en we are in the fiery furnace. By wo rr y, I mean that useless brooding which s a p s yo ur strength because y ou live the trouble before it comes a n d agai n live it after it has passed. You insist on maki ng a reality of it and t her eby a t tr a ct it or draw it to yourself. I have k n o w n p e r ­ sons w h o never seemed h a p p y unless they were trying to make themselves miserable, who a lw ay s w a n t e d s om e­ thing ot her than w h a t t hey h a d a n d were ever-lastingly di scont ented, b e ­ cause if the sun shone on M o n d a y , they were sure that there wo ul d be rain or an e arthquake on T u e s d a y . W o r r y for wor ry ’s sake is a poor rule to a dopt. Fear is a not her emotion, p r ob a bl y the most important, a n d often th e cause which creates ang er a n d worry. Fear, that horrible specter t ha t leers a t us from every side. Fear , the heirloom of prehistoric man. W e ha ve been b r o u g h t up to fear this a n d that, a n d finally to fear death. W e a re h a u nt e d b y fear that too soon the s a n ds of life m a y run out. F e a r has been the driving force for ma ny of us. Life ha s been a race with death — the fear of the unkn own . After all. fear is a n i magi nar y co n d i ­ tion created in the mind as a result of ignorance of the p o w er of self. It is a negative feeling of u n c e r t a i n t y of strength and power of self. W h e n w e attain full mastery of our being, with knowledge and u n d e r s t a n d i ng of our own ability and power, there can be no room for fear in our consciousness. Darkness c a n n o t exist w h e r e l i g h t shines. It is true that s h a d o w s a re c re ­ ated by light, but the man w h o k n o w s will not give a p pe ar an ce s an actuality or a reality. Therefore, the Rosicrucian O r d e r has always a dva nc ed the theor y t ha t know'Iedge of self is the f u nd a me nt al study. T h e ancient axiom, " K n o w T h y s e l f . ” is the foundation stone the Rosicrucian philosophy is built upon. A s we p r o ­ gress in s elf-knowledge a n d self-mastery, we ar e released from the b o n d a g e of fear; it becomes non-existent.

W e have s ou gh t peace of mind in religion, we have sought consolation in belief a n d faith. W e have found faith a difficult thing to acquire, because faith n eeds the foundation of knowledge. Belief is f ounded upon ignorance, upon uncertainty, hope, trust, a n d ex pe ct a­ tion that we are right. Fa it h is founded u p o n knowl edge, upon conviction. W h a t w e k n o w within ourselves we ca n have faith in. W e must learn to k n o w G o d in w ho s e image wre are born. W e must learn to k n o w the laws of G o d e st ab ­ lished in n a tur e. O n l y then can w e have faith in a loving God. W e mu s t learn t h a t life is indestructable, that we ca n ­ n o t die, a n d that this life o n earth is o n l y one of m a ny that we mu s t pass th ro u g h before we reach perfection and un it y with God. W e must realize that life is a school wherein w e g r a d u a t e in k n o wl e dg e a n d faith a nd u n d e r s t a n d ­ ing. Some of us learn slowly a n d others faster. T h e sor r ows a n d pain ar e p r o d ­ ding us on to seek happiness a n d peace. W e shall ha ve to learn that t here is no u r ge n t need for every one of us to b e ­ come millionaires or to pile up needless we alt h. T h e r e is no need for us all to wri te our names indelibly on the scroll of fame, but there is need for us to learn to possess ou r being in patience a n d to a t tu n e ourselves to the higher rh yt hm a n d song of life. T h i s wo r l d of ours holds m a n y joys that are not evident to the material senses. T h e r e is joy of contemplative living; t here is joy of coming into communion with the vari­ ous manifestations of nature; there is joy of knowing our fellowmen a nd d e ­ veloping the best that is in us; there is joy in wor king together for a common aim. T h e w'orld has ma ny beautiful spots in it if you will search for them. T h e habit of dwelling on the evils which b e ­ set us r at her t h a n on the pl e asa nt things w e m a y enjoy is almost criminal. A s weet t emper a n d a cont ented soul are treasures wo r t h working for. W i t h G o d w ithin you a n d yo ur kn o wl ed g e o f cause a n d effect, you should be able to create for yourself the c o n d i t i o n s of your h e a r t ’s desire. T h i s w'hole matt er is largely under yo ur own control. You can give y o u r ­ self a loose rein, let your passions drive you w'hither they will t hrough life with a

[ 269 ]

load whose w e i g h t you have e x a g ge r ­ ated by y ou r men t al attitude, or you can keep yourself well in h and, create a tendency to m a k e the best of har d ex­ periences, a n d s u r r o u n d yourself with high and e n c o u ra g in g th ou g h ts a n d vi­ brations so t ha t w h e n it rains you will k now that s u n s h i n e is not far off and that the rain w a s pr o b a b l y needed for plant life s omewher e. You c an no t fulfill the spiritual law or release the ble ss e dn e ss of life unless you control the que ru lou s a n d cultivate the a cqua inta nce of w h a t e v e r can make

you s tr ong in b o d y a n d cheerful of soul. Det ermi ne to be h a ppy, a nd you will be surprised at the a m o un t of hap­ piness which will come to you. Remem­ ber t ha t we at tract to ourselves those conditions that are predominent in heart a n d mind. It is not w h a t you wish or desire negatively, but w h a t you fee] within yourself, of w h a t y o u are aware, t h a t y o u can d r a w to yourself. T h e r e ­ fore, g u a r d the inner feeling. Give out love all a round you. Become a ray of s unshine to all y ou r environment. It p a ys gr eat dividends.

V

V

V

BUY

U. S.

SAVINGS

BONDS

AND

STAMP S

GRAND

COU N CILO RS OF AM ORC

A m ong o th er item s of business of each annual C onvention of the O rd e r is the election of nine G ra n d C ouncilors to represent various sections of this jurisdiction. In accordance with the C o n stitu tio n and S ta tu te s of the G ran d L odge, the G rand Councilors w ere elected at the concluding session of the C onvention and all G ran d C ouncilors serving th e 1942-43 term w ere re-elected for a n o th e r y e ar b y unanim ous vote of the C onvention. A M O R C m em bers are priv ileg ed to contact G rand C ouncilors in their districts on em ergency m atters and fo r personal contact. A ll correspondence referring to the R osicrucian teach­ ings and ad m in istratio n of the organization should, as usual, be directed to the G rand Lodge and n o t to the individual G ra n d C ouncilor. T h e nam es and addresses of the G rand C ouncilors a n d th e section of the jurisdiction w hich they represent are as follow s: N o rth e rn A tlan tic S tates: D r. J. Lew is Blass, 475 F ifth A venue, N e w Y ork C ity, N ew Y ork. South A tlantic S tates: ington, D . C. M r. W illiam V . W h ittin g to n , 4700 C onnecticut A venue, W a s h ­

S outhw estern S ta te s: M r. Jam es M . Blaydes, 4916 S an Jacinto S treet, D allas, T e x a s. M idw estern S ta te s: M r. O rla n d o H ughes, 608 K an sas A ve.. A pt. 12, T o p ek a , K ansas.

N e w E n g la n d S tates: M r. R obert W . W e n tw o rth , 132-A Russell S treet, W e s t. Peabody, M a ssac h u se tts. G reat L akes A re a: M r. H . C . Blackw ell, 1201 S. M aple A venue. B erw yn. Illinois. Pacific N o rth w e st S tates: M r. C. R. C leaver, W in slo w , W ash in g to n .

The
R o sicru cia n

E astern C a n a d a : C anada.

D r. S tan ley C lark, 185 S t. C lair A venue. W e s t, T o ro n to , O ntario, M r. J. A . C alcano. A p a rta d o 1611, C a rac as, V enezuela.

D ig e s t August 1943

South a n d C e n tra l A m erica: South A m erica.

Knowledge of Self
A d d re ss by th e Sovereign G r a n d M as te r, T h o r Kiim alehto, A n n u a l R osicrucian C o n v en tio n , 1943 PART I
SYCHOLOGY, the s t u d y of h u ­ man n a tur e, is in­ dispensable today. T h e h u m a n mind, in r e a c h i n g out into the unlimited a b y s s of e x i s t ­ ence, is trying to p e n e t r a t e the d a r k n e s s of t h e ages, a n d is s eek­ ing to a n s w e r the eternal questions, " W h a t ? " a n d " W h y ? " T h e information that this d epa rt me nt of kn o wl ed ge a f ­ fords is so wide- spr ead that the people without such information a re distinctly handi capped. T h a t human n at ur e can be studied and influenced is accepted t o d a y b y the American public. T h e market is flooded with popul ar m a g a ­ zines on the subject. Books on applied psychology are among the best sellers of the day. Books like " W a k e U p and Live," by Dor ot hea Brande. "Be Gl ad Y o u ’re Neurotic," by Dr. Lewis E. Bisch, a nd " H o w to W i n F r i e n d s and Influence People." by Dale Ca rn e gi e are as widely read as wor ks of fiction. E v e r y university has its D e p a r t m e n t of Psychol ogy, and. if it can afford it. a l aborat ory and clinic for experimentation. W h e r e a s originally psyc ho l og y was merely a branch of philosophy, t oday philosophy has slipped into s econd place and p s y c h o l o g y has b e c o m e a fullstatured subject w i t h e x t r a o r d i n a r y ramifications. O p e n a n y college catalog a n d you will be amazed a t the numb e r of courses listed in the field of psychology. It is rapidly b e c o m i n g i n d i s p e n s a b l e for practicing physicians, n u r s e s , lawyers, a n d public speakers. M o d e r n advert is­ ing has shown that psychol ogy pays. T h e W o r l d W a r revealed the tr eme n­ dous power for good a n d evil that p r o p ­ a g a n d a a nd mass pressure can exert. Ps yc hol ogy is p op ul ar because the people have discovered that a knowl­ e dge of it p ay s d ivi dends of happiness a n d successful living. W i t h a k no wl ­ e dge of hu ma n n at ur e, you are bound to be a better neighbor, a h appi er h u s ­ b a nd or wife, a n d a more successful parent or teacher. Big business has not scorned to use the principles of ps y­ chology to sell s ha vi ng soap, cigarettes, a n d drugs to the public. T h e forces of evil and reaction maintain their power by an appeal to the lowest instincts and needs. M a n y e duc ator s feel it is only common sense for the forces making for the uplift of h um an i ty to utilize this knowl edge to put across noble and al ­ truistic ideals. H u m a n Similarity T h e first step in unde rs ta nd in g h u ­ man natur e is to k n o w yourself. You a re a h uma n being. You are one with all humanity. W h e n you have learned that motives of y o u r own conduct are

[ 29} ]

It would s u r p r i s e m o s t o f us to be aware the s p r i n g s o f y o u r o w n a c t i o n s , you have taken a long step t oward u nd e r­ of h o w our forgotten c hi ldhood impres­ s tanding ot he r people. O u r f u nd a me n ­ sions have influenced o ur reactions to life a n d our relationships to people. tal w a n t s a n d ne e ds are very much the same. O u r differences are of d e g r e e H e a l t h is o f V i t a l I m p o r t a n c e rather t han of kind. It is surprising how Sel f-knowl edge begins wi th the study few intelligent a n d highly educated peo­ o f y o u r physical self. T h e health and ple u n d e r s t a n d t h e m s e l v e s . O u r m o s t vitality of the b o dy is f u n d a m e n t a l . serious errors in life are due to this lack You cannot look y o u r best, feel your of u nd er s t an di ng . Incompatibility in best or do your best w i t h o u t health and marriage, for instance, is due to the fact vitality. It is difficult to be in high spir­ that neither k n e w his o w n nature, nor its, to have an optimistic out look on life had studied the n at ur e of the other. An erroneous choice of a business or p ro ­ to be ar the inevitable irritations and a n ­ n o y a nc es of life unless the b o d y is func­ fession is d u e to a m a n ' s i g n o r a n c e o f tioning smoothly. E v e r y o n e s h o u l d his capabilities a n d potentialities. a d o p t a sensible daily r out ine for keep­ T o m a r ry w i th o ut a real knowledge ing fit. You o ug h t to k n o w the value of of yourself is to invite marital u n h a p ­ fresh air. sunshine, wa te r, exercise and piness. T o enter a tr ade or profession without a k n o w l e d g e of yourself is to diet in keeping well. Y o u o u g h t to know become a misfit in life — a s quare peg in the value of fruit juices a n d vegetable juices, particularly the r a w g r e e n vege­ a round hole; in o t he r words, to fall short of the hi ghest of which you are tables. You o u gh t to kno w, for exam­ ple, that white s u g a r is t he source of capable, to miss y o u r sphere of greatest tooth decay a n d t h at meat is the best usefulness. source of e ne rg y for b ra in workers. Some people k n o w definitely what You also o ught to k n o w the value of t hey wa nt. T h e y are people usually of fasting occasionally for cleansing the one strong be nt or interest. T h e y are b o d y t horoughl y of a cc umu l at ed poi­ very fortunate. T h e y are not confused sons. T h e r e is p lent y of r e a d y matter b y a vari ety of choices. Dr. Samuel Johnson, for example, in an age indif­ available on the subject, a g o o d deal of it free or only nominal in price. Ther e ferent to literature knew that he wa nt ed are several magazines d e vo te d to health to devote his life to writing, even though poverty might be the result. O t h e r fields a nd natural living. T h e i mportance of this kno wl ed g e is of activity, offering a bet ter means of that it removes fear from y o u r li fe. You livelihood, m a d e no appeal to him. If w e select a t y p e of w o r k because it e n ­ k no w how to handle difficulties as they ables us to live at home, or offers a arise. If you h an dl e small difficulties higher s al ar y to s t ar t with, o r offers pr op er l y and promptly, y o u avoid seri­ more security o r easier physical condi­ ous bodily di stur bances la te r in life. If tions. we a re permitting ourselves to be you u nd er st an d the mechani sm of the bo dy you will not permit constipation influenced b y s e c o n d a r y considerations. In a field not r elat ed to our special tal­ to become chronic, or an acid condition to continue for years, or use d r u g s for ent, we c an do only competent work. he ad ac hes or indigestion. T h e r e is a W e cannot offer a unique contribution to the public. W e cannot do o u t s t a n d ­ tremendous sense of f reedom in k now­ ing t ha t your b o d y is u n d e r y o u r control ing work. W h e n the task is agreeable to our inmost n at u r e , time means n ot h ­ a n d that your healt h is reliable a n d that ing. effort me a ns nothing, interest is bar r ing accidents not hi ng r eally serious easily s us tai ned a n d joy is a natural can hap pe n to you. a ccompaniment . A n important factor in he al th is emo­ tional control. A n analysis of y o u r emo­ It is an illuminating experience to see tional nature is also essential to selfourselves as o t he r s see us, a n d to look The knowledge. M a n y of us h a v e h a d the at life from a poi nt of view completely R o s ic r u c ia n experience of an at tack of indigestion a t variance wi th our own. It would D ig e s t or a vomiting spell upon h ear ing bad prove a s ur pr is e to m an y intellectual S e p t e m b e r people to realize h o w t horoughl y con­ news. W e know that too muc h excite­ ment can bring on high blood pressure ventional their controlling t ho ug h t s are. 1943
[ 294 ]

a nd insomnia. A p r ol onged fit of d e ­ pression can upset the entire system. T h e r e will be a bad taste in the mouth, no appetite, dull h eadaches , a n d vag u e aches a n d pains t hr o ug h ou t the body. Di sappointment, anxiety, a n d fear can d e ra ng e the b o d y seriously. S t u d y y ou r emotional reactions. In m a n y cases, the s y mptoms of illness a re d u e to these powerful negative emotional states. If such is the case, it is foolish to call a doctor or to take drugs. T h e doct or will consider y o u a neur ast henic a n d the drugs will ruin your system. T o quote A n d r e T r id on : " A serious illness is often the refuge from life's problems, selected by the neurotic." H o w ma ny of us do not use an ailment a s a n e x ­ cuse for either temper or laziness? H a v e you ever k nown a person w h o could not be h a p p y without complaining about
so m e ailment? P syc h o a n a ly sis has d o n e

for him. he became so deeply interested that he made physiology his specialty, a n d he later became a professor of physiology in the medical college wh er e he previously flunked. T h e glands, too. can affect the emo­ tional nature. Insufficiency in the t h y ­ roid gland secretion can make you we a k and apathetic. W h e n the gland is stim­ ulated a n d functions normally, you will feel much m o r e a l i v e a n d e n t h u s i a s t i c . A simple exercise to stimulate the t h y ­ roid gl and is to stretch the neck a few times every day. W h e t h e r your glands are functioning properly or not can only be determined b y a medical examination.
W a t c h Y o u r M e n ta l Control

valuable w o r k in tracing m a n y physical disturbances and emotional m a l a d j u s t ­ ments to irritating memories buried in the subconscious mind. Irrati onal dis­ like of certain foods a n d certain types of people m a y be due to f orgot t en e x ­ periences of an u npl easant nature. You need not be a s h a m e d of the fact that y o u are over-emotional or over ­ sensitive. A s Dr. Bisch has pointed out. these t wo qualities f requent ly indicate a real superiority that is unrecognized. T h e whol e organism cries for utilization and self-expression. Su pe ri or people cannot fit easily into the so-called n o r ­ mal o r mediocre environment. Kno wi n g that y ou are superior to the plodding, stolid people of limited ideas a n d o u t ­ look ab ou t you. y ou will ma ke no u s e­ less efforts to fit into the conventional mold. Instead, you will develop y o u r ­ self in the direction of y o u r latent talent as much a s you can. Seek y o u r true level elsewhere, a n d be co nt e n t with w h a te v er friends you can ma ke in your immediate environment. W e a k points can be t u r n e d into strong points. T h i s is called o ver -com­ pensation. Y o u ha ve h e a rd of D e m o s ­ thenes. w h o suffered from stuttering. T h r o u g h persistent practice he became the greatest orat or t ha t G r e e ce ever had. I remember r e ad in g a b o ut the medical s tu de nt w h o h a d to take a course in physiology t hree times. In his effort to master this subject, so difficult

M o s t of the people who have come to me for assistance are ill either t hrough ignorance of the physical care t h a t the body needs or t hrough emotional dis­ turbances. I realize how eas y it is to tell people not to w o r r y or to feel a n x i ­ ety or to indulge in fits of depression or "the blues.” I realize h o w difficult it is to face a crisis in one's life calmly, to meet loss with composure, and to ma in ­ tain one's self-confidence and poise a n d optimism in the face of disaster. W h e n I s ta nd before a soul shaken with great suffering. I am compelled to be silent. I feel that mere w o r d s are futile. Yet. friends, as difficult as it may be. let us consider the problem frankly. W h a t is to be gained from loss of health? W h a t is to be gained from a nervous b r e a k ­ down? H e r e is a y ou ng woman teacher, for example, w h o had a mother a n d sis­ ter to support. F o r one reason or a n ­ other she w or ri ed about them so much that finally she had a nervous b r e a k­ down. It took her a y ea r to regain her health. F o r a y e a r they had to m a na g e without her salary. H e r illness in no w a y helped the s i t u a t i o n . D i f f i c u l t i e s simply multiplied. T h a t is the s tr on ge st a rgume nt to be presented agai nst wor ry . N o matter how serious a problem m a y be. y ou r collapse will only make matters worse. Y o u need your health. Y o u need your position. It takes a long time to be restored to complete health. V e r y often you will fall into debt a s a r e s u l t . T he re for e, from the practical point of view, you must make every effort to control your self emotionally. ( C o n t i n u e d on Page 316)

[ 29 f ]

mingled feelings at this vast symbol of nature s laws — sensi ng, too, a subtle in­ fluence which b e g g a r e d wor ds of d e ­ scription. T h e fascination of M t . Shasta is not alone its physical ap pe ar a nce , that is, its sheer bulk, its majesty, or beauty. T he re is s ome thing ab ou t it that t r a n ­ scends all physical allure, something entirely different t h a n one may experi­ ence in the A n d e s o r the Alps, for ex­ ample. So me thi ng intangible radiates

from its atmosphere which inspires rever ance a n d spirituality. It is for such r eas ons that A M O R C has wr it te n the book, " T h e Lost Co n ti n en t of Lemuria " referring in detail to the M t . Shasta legends, a n d w h y it also p ro d uc e d the professional sound motion picture by the sa me name. W e w is he d to convey to all an unde rs t an di ng of the mystical tradi tions which are a ssoci at ed with this place of beaut y — this symbol of the survival of the wisdom of mankind.

K N O W L E D G E O F SELF ( C o n tin u e d fr o m P a g e 295) Resort to w h a t e v e r means will be ef­ fective in helping y o u achieve emotional control. If an affirmation will help you, use it. If a t t e n d i n g a church service or prayer will help you. then accept the comfort that religion gives. Some peo­ ple feel helped b y a tt ending a concert or taking a w e e k - e n d trip or u n b u r de n­ ing themselves to a bosom friend. A n y method will do p r o v i de d it is effective with you. M y p e r s on a l opinion is that the Rosicrucian phi lo so p h y of life should be sufficient to su st ai n y ou in a n y trial. W i t h so ma n y i ncar nati ons before us. we need not be b r o k e n he a r t ed because V V

of some unfulfilled ambition or desire H a v i n g dedicated ourselves to the Cos ­ mic. w h y should we shr ink from the tests a n d trials that p r ep a r e us for g r ea te r triumphs a n d responsibilities? A s Rosicrucians, too, we k n o w that love is the greatest r emedy in the world. It will heal every situation a n d transform every life. T h e knowl edge t ha t ps y ch ol og y gives us is essential in every sp h er e of life. In o r d e r to un d er s ta n d h u m a n nature, however, it is necessary to underst and ourselves first. W e should s t u d y our physical type and our emotional pattern. In P a r t II, we shall discuss the char­ acteristic reactions of o ur mental life. ( T o be c o ntin ue d ) V

W H O WAS NOSTRADAMUS? Michel N o s t r a d a m u s (1503-1566) w a s b or n in Provence, F ra nc e. His two g ra nd fa t he r s w e r e v e ry influential men a t court a n d very learned in occultism as well as in ac a de mi c knowledge. T h e y b o t h resolved that their onl y grandson, Michel, should h a v e the best education possible. Af t e r private tut ori ng b y his gra nd pa re nt s, y o u n g N o s t r a d a m u s was g r a d u a t e d from the Uni ve rs it y at M o n t ­ pellier as a doctor of medicine. Af te r becoming a Doctor, he t raveled over Eu r op e stu dy in g a n d obtaining ma ny r ar e volumes. H e made certain connect ions with mystical gr oups, also, dur­ ing this time. A f t e r his travels N o s t r a d a m u s married a n d settled at Solon, France, a t the a g e of 44. H e w a s so successful in his medical practice that his rivals called him a sorcerer. N o s t r a d a m u s did possess marvelous a n d mysterious knowledge but of a beneficent kind t h at he h a d gained from s tu d yi ng with cer­ tain occult groups. N o s t r a d a m u s is famous for his prophecies. H e received these revelations from gazing into a mi rr or a n d checked them in some w a y b y a calculation of the star, Ve g a. T h e s e pro ph ec ie s are in verse form a n d are known as " C e n t u r i e s . ” These verses foretold the events of the wor ld a s far di st ant as 7000 A. D. M o s t all of The R o s ic r u c ia n his prophecies a b o u t W o r l d W a r N o . 1 a n d W o r l d W a r N o . 2 ha ve come true. He also foretold m a n y events in the lives of Kings a nd Nobles. H e also foretold D ig e s t the time of his o w n transition. N o s t r a d a m u s w a s the greatest pr op he t of Europe S e p t e m b e r if not of all mo d er n times. M e t r o - G o l d w y n - M a y e r has pr oduced t wo movies de­ 1943 picting the life a n d prophecies of N o s t r a d a m u s . — Scribe.

[ 316]

Meditations on Immortality
By
S
u pr em e

S

ecretary

H ROUGHOUT M a n ' s h i s t o r y as a r a t i o n a l being p h ilo s o p h y has be en a vision while r e l i g i o n a faith. T h e vision of phi ­ l o so ph y has made possible a d e t ac h ­ ed c o n t e m p l a t i o n of h u m a n life. T h e faith o f r e l i g i o n h a s held f o r t h to h u m a n i t y the a l ­ most pathetic hope t h a t reality is not as difficult or trying as it a ppear s. T h i s faith has caused men in their hope to accept a belief t ha t b e y o n d their trials a n d troubles t her e lies a reality of better things in a wor l d to come to compensate them for the sacrifices of today. T h u s faith has been the hope of immortality for those w h o find their s tr engt h and solace in religion. Mo re t ha n me re bl i nd faith has c a us ­ ed men to look b e y o n d the restrictions of this ear thl y existence. In all things which M a n observes as he goes t hrough life, serious reflection upon life a n d e n ­ vironment has ca us e d to exist in his mind u n a n s we r ab l e problems, the solu­ tion of which point the w a y to a realm of ideas b e y o n d his immediate grasp. In this he sees t h a t the manifestation of life is not ye t d e ta c he d from the p h y s i­ cal universe, a n d f ur ther mor e, there are The R o s ic r u c ia n indications t h a t life’s continuity is not depe nd e n t on material alone. D ig e s t T h e vision of phi l os op hy has been O cto b er willing to cons ider all theories of real­ 1943 ity a n d to disint erest edl y analyze the

problem of immortality by a frank con­ sideration of its possibilities b ased upon h u m a n experience. T h i s vision is com­ p os e d of the contribution to thought by m a n y w h o have cont emplat ed M a n ’s existence. N o t alone is this confined to the gr eat philosophers b u t to the think­ ing o f each individual. O u r philosophy of life is in the end the result of our own conclusions and ideas. M y conclusions m a y not agr ee in whole o r in part with a not her 's , but they constitute my ideas a s y o u r conclusions constitute the phi­ l os ophy with which you look at life. I believe in immortality. I bas e this belief neither upon the faith of religion or up on the vision of philosophy. T h e b e ­ lief is founded in experience, in the realization of knowledge t ha t has come t h r o u g h intuitive channels a n d which to me has been convincing of the fact that life is a continuous process. Such a con­ cept cannot limit eternity b u t rather must e xpand the idea o f th e universe to include all k n o w l e d g e , wisdom, and power. Immortality c annot b e conceived in t erms of time. It is not in the past; it is not in the future. It is the eternal now. Et er ni ty does not be gi n or end; it is. C o n f i r m a t i o n of the e x p e r i e n c e s b r o u g h t through our objective senses a r e self evident in m an y respects of the fact t ha t life is a reality wh i c h lies be­ y o n d the manifestation of a physical form a nd thereby must be attributed to w h a t we conceive to be G o d . W h a t G o d is must be interpreted ultimately in terms of our own kn owl edg e and ex­ perience. Some may feel t ha t concept is b e yo n d our grasp, that there are a p ­

[ 350 ]

p ar en t inconsistencies in the universe which others may point out to d en y our theories a n d conclusions. It is b eyond our finite capabilities to cross-question the infinite because in s o d o in g w e are only making a play on w o r d s . But b e ­ yo nd wo r ds or even b e y o n d hu ma n t h o u g h t we k now that life is. a n d c o n­ clude that life is one manif est at ion of God. T ime is a conception o f o u r o b ­ jective consciousness b u t is f ur ther mor e an assurance of continuity t h a t exists in

the mind of the Cr e a t o r t ha t sets all things into being. T he r ef o re , as I now witness a n d feel the manifestation of life as it s urges t hrough m y physical being, I am convinced that this surge will continue a n d that w h a t I h a v e not learned he re will be learned, a n d my sincere aspirations will be consummated, in the cont inued process of a n eternity not b e y o n d my grasp, but a lw ay s a n d ever present.

V

V

V

K N O W L E D G E O F SELF ( C o n tin u e d from P a g e 332) ities. W e need not w a i t for the ideal educational system. W e c an s t u d y o u r ­ selves. W e can consult o u r tastes, in­ clinations, a n d aptitudes. I f o ur wor k lies in the field of our a p t i t u d e s we are indeed fortunate. If not, w e ha ve a beautiful and inspiring w a y of s pending our leisure time. W e ca n b e n d every' effort to cultivating the gift G o d gave us. Be not over anxious a b o u t finding a n outlet for your special gift. G o d needs t h a t gift as much as y ou long to exercise it. Y o u r p a rt is to p r e pa re yourself. T h e n the task will come t h a t will d e m a n d o f you everything t h a t you ha ve to give. T o conclude, t hr ough k n o wl e dg e of o ur physical powers, t hr ough s t r e n g t h ­ ening the positive emotions a n d t hr ough developing a n d e xp and ing the creative p o we r of t hought , we pr e pa r e ourselves for o ur r ight place in the world.

FOR M EM BERS O F T H E LOS ANGELES AREA
AJ] m em bers in Los A n g eles and n e ar-b y localities will be interested to know th a t the H erm es M inor Lodge h a s n o w been organized so th at N a tio n a l m em bers can p a rticip a te as m em bers of this L odge in su p p lem en tary activities to their re g u la r hom e studies. T h is m eans th at all m em bers w h o re g u la rly receive their studies directly from the G ra n d L odge can also have the ad d ito in al p rivilege of affiliating w ith the H erm es M inor L odge and participating in their general convo catio n s, receive th e re g u la r L odge initiations for each degree, and have the com bined privileges of N a tio n a l a n d L odge m em bership. All m em ­ bers in this area are c o rd ia lly inv ited to a tte n d the general convocations of th is L odge held every S unday a ftern o o n a t 3:00 P . M. M a n y interesting plan s are being form ulated for these convocations. T h e a d d ress of the L odge is: M 8 N o rth G ram ercy P lace, L os A ngeles. F o r further in fo rm atio n be present a t these co n v o catio n s or call at the office of our counselor now located in L os A ngeles. F ra te r G ilbert N . H ollow ay. Jr., th e o rg a n iz a ­ tion's lecturer and co u n selo r is m aintaining an office in dow ntow n Los A ngeles. located at 323 C om m ercial E x ch a n g e B uilding, 416 W e s t 8th S treet. It is H is office hours

are from 1:45 to 4:45 P. M . M o n d a y through F riday, a n d 5:30 to 7:30 P . M . F rid a y eve­ nings. M em bers are inv ited to call at a n y time during these hours for further in fo rm al tion regarding their m em bership o r the n e w ly established a c tiv ities in the local Lodge.

[351]

£

A N A M E R IC A N PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE
By
T
h o r

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign Grand Master
O n e of the most mystic of Ame ri c a n sects is t h at of the Q u a ke r s. T h e greatest name in Ame r ic a n litera­ ture is Ralph W a l d o Emer son; in p h i ­ losophy. Wi ll i a m James; a n d in poetry, W a l t W h i t m a n . T h e s e personalities t ower above all c o n t e m p o r a r i e s a n d successors. T h e y strike a distinctive­ ly Ame ric an note in their s p he r e of t hought . Yet Emerson, a n d W^hitman. w h o considered himself a disciple of Eme rs o n ' s, wer e life-long s t u d e n t s of t he Or ie nt al philosophies; a n d W i l l i a m James in his monument al " V a r ie ti e s o f R elig io us E x p e rie n c e" a n d in his letters reveals his intense interest in psychic p h e no me na and the u ne xp la in e d m y s ­ teries of religious experience. H i s p r a g ­ matism is in m a n y points similar to the Rosicrucian postulates. E me r so n w a s t h e foremost e x p o n e n t of the T r an s c e nd en tal i sm t h at w a s po pu la r in N e w E n g l a n d in his d ay. In the O v e r S o u l he points o u t t ha t each soul is a s egment of the universal soul a nd a channel for the divine energies. E a c h soul is linked to e v e ry o th er t hr o ug h the O v e r Soul. " L e t m a n then learn the revelation of all n a t u r e a n d all t h o ug ht in his heart; this, namely; t hat the H ighe st dwells wit h hi m. " In his most famous essay on C o m p e n s a ­ tion he explains the law of balance, the l aw of action a nd reaction mani f esti ng on every plane of life — physical, m e n ­

H E Rosicrucian phil osophy of life e m b r a c e s the s t u d y of b o t h mysticism a n d oc­ cultism. Although the m ystic p h i­ l o s op h y is a gift of t he East, it is an e s s e n t i a l l y A m e r i c a n mode of th o u g h t and out look upon life. W h a t e v e r is finest a n d best in A m e ri c a n religious and phi­ losophical thinking e m a n a t e d from the Oriental teachings. T h a t G eo rg e W a s h ­ ington w a s a M a s o n is well-known. T h a t Benj ami n F r a n k l i n , T h o m a s Jef­ ferson, a n d A l e x a n d e r Hamil ton were Rosicrucians is w el l - kn ow n. T h a t Sir Francis Bacon p l a n n e d the first Rosi­ crucian commun it y t h a t w a s established on American soil is well-known. T h e seal of the Un i te d S ta t e s is of Rosicru­ cian origin. O n e o f the g r e a t mystic classics of the wor ld is the Bible, including the Old and the N e w T e s t a m e n t s . If you re­ member y o u r e ar l y Ame r ic a n history, The the first const it uti ons d r a w n up for the R o s ic r u c ia n various colonies w e r e completely model­ D ig e s t ed on the legislation of Deuteronomy. N ovem ber T h e Pu r it a ns tried to live the life of the 1943 O l d T e s t a m e n t a s t h e y interpreted it.

[ 390]

tal, a n d spiritual. " W h a t we call retri­ bution is the universal necessity by which the whole a p p e a r s w h e re v er a p ar t a p p e a r s . ” In his e ss a y on SelfR eliance he strikes the typical American no te of i nd ependence. A m a n attains ma tu r i t y w h e n he realizes t ha t his task in life is to cultivate his o w n potentiali­ ties a n d to reply wh o ll y on his o w n in­ n at e divine power s. "Insi st on yourself; never imitate. Y o u r o w n gift y ou can pr esent every m o m e n t wit h the c umul a ­ tive force of a wh ol e life’s cultivation.” " N o t h i n g can b ri ng y o u p eace b u t y o u r ­ self. N o t h i n g c an b ri ng you peace but the t riumph o f principles.” “ T r u s t t h y ­ self; every h ea rt vibrat es to t h at iron st ri ng . ” E m e r s o n ac ce pt s the basic truth of mysticism t h a t spiritual laws a re the foundat i on of o u r universe. T h e mystic note is s o u n d e d even more clearly in his poems. Y o u r emember the we ll - k n o wn B ra h m a whi ch is really a poetic r ende ri ng of a p a s s a g e in the B h ag ava dg ita. "If t he red sl ayer think he slays O r if the slain t hink he is slain. T h e y k n ow n o t well the subtle w a ys 1 keep, a n d pass, a n d t hen t ur n again" Accor di ng to Dr . Bucke, t h a t pro­ found st udent of illumination, both Em er s on a n d W a l t W h i t m a n h a d ex­ perienced Cosmic Co nsci ousness. W a l t W h i t m a n ' s e mp ha si s o n Br othe rhood a n d Co mr a de s h ip , on the g reat nes s lat­ ent in the common man, on “ the divine a v e r a g e ” is the typical mystic doctrine of the oneness of all life a n d the divin­ ity latent in ev er y living creature. T o him ther e w a s no n e a r or far or great or small. H e identified himself with every h u ma n being, n o ma tt er h o w u n ­ developed and primitive. T h a t he was a wa r e of his illumination is evidenced in these lines: " D a r e s t thou now, O Soul, W a l k out with me t o w a r d the unknown region. W h e r e neither g r o u n d is for the feet nor a n y pa th to follow?” Similar themes a p pe a r in the essays of W i l l i a m James. E v e r y m a n h as p o w ­ ers of whi ch he is for t he most pa rt u n­ a wa re . H e is like the iceberg, twothirds of which is s u bm er g ed . H e does not use a fraction of his potential ener­

gies. It takes a crisis to reveal to him w h a t he is capabl e of achieving. His pragmati sm takes its name from his in­ sistence on demonstration. M a n y o the r Ameri can wri ters have been inspired b y mystic truths. Y o u are familiar with N a u tilu s by Ol iver W e n del Ho lme s which refers to r e i nc a rn a ­ tion. E d w i n M a r k h a m in T h e M a n with the H o e expr esses the t h o u g h t that man is responsible for his fellowman. You recall these stirring lines: " O masters, lords a nd rulers in all lands, Is this the h a nd iw or k you give to God, T h i s monst rous thing distorted a nd soulq u e nc h ed ? ” Pr of e ss o r H o c k i n g in h i s v o l u m e . T y p e s o f P h ilo s o p h y points out in the ch ap te r of Myst i cism that the greatest humani tar ians a n d reformers in the wor ld a re found in the r an ks of the mystics. T h e mystic phi losophy fur­ nishes a powerful stimulus to action, a nd its truest represent at ives have been courageous, i nd e pe nd en t l eaders a n d teachers. W h e n w e think of the typical A me r i­ can, w e think of men like Benjamin Franklin, a public-spirited citizen, inter ­ ested in every p hase of the life of the community. W e think of experimenters like Lut her B ur ba nk, i nventors like T h o m a s Edi son, immigrants like Jacob Riis, n egr oe s like Booker T . W a s h i n g ­ ton, a n d s tatesmen like A b r a h a m Li n­ coln, a man w h o rose from p ov e rt y yet remained a son of the people. W e think of the men w h o dedi cat ed their genius a nd their lives to the service of the n a ­ tion. O u r great Ame ri c ans ha ve come from every racial stock in t h e world. In the democratic tradition t here has been no emphasis on race or blood, no discrimination as to color, sect. o r creed. T h e mystic phil osophy is t rul y A m e r ­ ican. Re ma rk s ab ou t alien philosophies, quietistic a n d pessimistic in tr end, u n ­ suited to the tempo of the twenti eth c e n ­ t ur y a n d the s t re nuous d em a n ds of our age, a re mere twaddl e, revealing a b y s ­ mal ignorance. R e a d the G a t h a s of Zo ro as te r . T h e y emphasize action as the basis of the good life • good — thoughts, good wo r d s , a n d go od deeds. Read D e u t e r on o my in the O l d T e s t a ­ ment, r ea d the Psalms, r e a d the P r o ­ phets. Action is the t h e m e — r i gh te o u s­

[ 391 ]

ness and social justice are not the d e ­ based a n d spurious b r a n d that were broadcasted from Royal O ak , Michigan. Read the Sermon on the Mount . T h e divinity of the common man is stressed; the virtues of kindness a n d gentleness a nd humility are emphasi zed; not race and blood, not noble birth or wealth. T h e theme of Christianity, the theme of every true religion, the heart of mysti­ cism, is the life of love. A n d the life of love is the life of action. H o w can love be manifest if not t hr ough forgiveness, refusal to h ar b or resentment, refusal to be s w a ye d b y prejudice, refusal to p a r ­ ticipate in movement s stirring up strife a nd racial a n d religious antagonism? D e mo c r ac y may permit every a r r a n t knave to b r ay al oud his asininity, but perfect love p a y s no heed a n d makes every effort to p revent the poison from spreading. T h e genuine mystic docs not flee from life, does not seek escape from reality, does not s hun his fellowman. a n d does not shrink from assuming r e ­ sponsibility. H e who. as a result of his mystic studies, loses touch with his fellowmen or loses interest in the pursuit of wisdom has misi nterpret ed the mystic philosophy. T h e aim of mysticism is to make the h uma n being a complete and perfect man. self-directive, able to exer­ cise initiative, every faculty alert, and able to w o r k ha rmo ni o u sl y with his fellowman for the wel f ar e of society. Mysticism deplores the r ugge d individ­ ualist wh os e motive is only self-interest. Mysticism deplores the corporate state idea which strips man of his individual­ ity, which s ubor di na te s him whol ly to the ends of a warlike, p r e d at o r y state, a nd which reduces him to a robot, a cog in a soulless machine. T h e leader in mysticism is never a dictator, a brute, a bully, o r a neurotic. T h e l eader in mysticism is a s e rv a nt of the people, a man of compassi onat e under standing, an inspiration and an example to all generations. T h e s ong of hate is never a msytic song. H a b i t s like refraining from eating of meat, the drinking of The wine, and the smoking of tobacco may R o s ic r u c ia n be laudatory, but ar e not the pr imar y D ig e st qualifications of a mystic. Novem ber Let us sum up the basic truths of the 1943 Rosicrucian phi losophy of life. W e

teach the oneness of all life. W e teach the father hood of G o d and the br ot he r­ hood of man. W e teach the perfect h u ma n being, the man of balance, whose hear t a n d head a n d h a n d w o r k together. He has manl y st r en g t h and womanl y compassion. He exer ts himself to the utmost so that he m a y be the most use­ ful to his fellowman. He makes no dis­ tinction of race, creed, sect. or color. T h e sufferings of all manki nd are dear to him. H e gives w h a t he can to all. His life d e mo n st r a t e s the mystic teach­ ings. Em er s on said: " W h a t you are s pe ak s so loud t ha t I cannot he ar w ha t you s a y . ” So is it with the true mystic. His actions reveal him a n d declare him. W e preach the life of love a n d action. W e teach the mystic life. W e know it is the truly A m e ric a n W a y of life. Friends, let us be loyal to the teach­ ings of the O r d e r . M a ri e Corelli in L ife E ve rla stin g states t h a t one o f the greatests obstacles in the path of the s t ud e nt is the influence of others. Let us vow never to be s w a ye d from the following of our high ideals. T h e age may be materialistic. W e need not succumb. T h e age m a y be brutal. Let love be our guide. T h e r e is a resurgence of intense nationalism t h r ou g ho u t the world. W e can do our d u ty to the state a nd ye t rise above nationalism a n d love all mankind. W e ca n w o r k for the fel­ lowship of nations a n d a wo r l d federa­ tion of states. T h e r e a r e times wh e n to be true to t h e highest within us w e must run c ount er to the ag e in which we live. 1 do not believe t ha t Ameri ca to da y is bereft of ideals o r vision or altruism. But those w h o believe in the reality of spiritual principles must assert their conviction. A united spiritual front is the need of the hour. Let us not be re­ miss in this great task, O fellow w o r k­ ers. In the a r m y o f the Lor d let us not be the l a g ga r ds in the rear. W h e r e v e r we are, let us take the lead in asserting t he spiritual life to be the truly Ame ri­ can life. Let us provide food for the h ungr y, clothing for the naked, consola­ tion for the despairing a n d b r ok e n ­ hearted. Let us strive for peace. It is our d u t y a n d o u r privilege to d e mon­ strate to the wor ld that t here are other s t a n d a r d s , other w a y s of thinking and living, and nobler ideals.

r '92 ]

Occult Sciences of Ancient Egypt
By
T
hor

K

iim a l e h t o

,

Sovereign G rand M aster

G Y P T w a s a n im­ m en sely ( w e a l t h y c o u n t r y , a n d it m a y b e a p e r tin e n t q u e s t i o n to ask , w h e n c e c a m e this en o rm o u s w e a lth ? W e know that m ines w e r e w o r k ­ ed f o r g o l d a n d silver, t h a t trib u tes w e r e e x a c te d from subjugated na­ tions, a n d t h a t a g o o d ly sum w a s d e riv e d from th e fish­ eries. Y e t all th e s e so u rc e s could n o t p r o d u c e a tithe o f h e r y e a r l y reven ue. E n o u g h w a s s p e n t u p o n public d e c o r a ­ tion to b a n k r u p t a s ta te . E g y p t w a s y e llo w w ith gold, w h ic h b ec a m e the c a u s e for its d e stru c tio n . B esides the t h o u s a n d s o f h e r to y s, jewels, s ta tu e s a n d a r t objects o f th e solid m etal, w e le a r n th a t the s c u lp tu re s on lo fty w alls, t h e o rn a m e n ts o f a co lossus, th e d o o r ­ w a y s of temples, th e c a p s o f obelisks, p a r t s o f n u m ero u s l a r g e m o num ents, a n d even the ro o fs o f p a lac es a n d the b od ies of m um m ies w e r e c o v e re d w ith g o ld leaf. T h e sta tu e o f M in e rv a , se n t to C y re n e b y A m asis, a n d th e sph in x a t th e p y ra m id s a re instan ce s. W e r e , then , the le a r n e d priests M A K E R S o f gold? In th e reign of the E m p e r o r D iocletian, the E g y p t i a n s rebelled a g a in s t R om e, a n d fo r nine y e a rs did n o t lack m o n ey to c a r r y on the w ar. S tr u c k b y their riches,

th e E m p e r o r in s titu te d a s tric t s e a rc h th r o u g h o u t th e lan d fo r a ll w ritin g s on a lch em u . T h e s e b o o k s he o r d e r e d to b e b u r n t, n o p in g th u s to d e s t r o y th e sec re t of E g y p t ’s w e alth . It is useless to d e n y to th e s e s t r a n g e d w e llers in t h e old tem ples, a skill a n d a k n o w le d g e f a r b e y o n d o u r o w n , a n d w h ic h w e c a n o n ly w o n d e r a t a n d imi­ tate, n o t eq ual. M a g i c in its h ig h e s t s e n s e w a s p a r t o f th e d a ily life o f the E g y p t i a n princes. P la to , w e k n o w , s tu d i e d w ith these p riests. L e c k y tells u s t h a t “w h e n e v e r his p h i lo s o p h y h as b e e n in th e a s c e n d ­ a n t it h a s b ee n a c c o m p a n ie d b y a te n d ­ en c y to m a g ic .” T h i s m ag ic w a s p r a c ­ ticed b y th e priests in d iv erse w a y s, som e o f w h ic h w e ca n o n ly g u ess at. T h e y w e r e seers, c la irv o y a n ts, divin ers a n d d r e a m e r s o f d re a m s . T h e y u n d e r ­ s to o d a n d m a n ip u la te d th e s u b tlest p ro p e rtie s o f m atter. N o w o n d e r they w e r e n o t a s to n is h e d a t th e exhibitions o f M o s e s , w h o h a d le a r n e d all he k new in th e ir tem ples. In th e ir religious w o rk s , veiled as th ey a r e in sym bolism , w e d isco v er a belief in an a ll-p e rv a d in g , u n iv ersa l e ss e n c e — call it th e a s tra l ether, o r p s y c h ic force, o r ” o d , ” o r " b io g e n ” o r “a k a s ," o r w h a t y o u will — from w h ic h e m a n a te d all thin gs, a n d w h ich c o u ld be controlled a n d d ire c te d b y th o s e w h o w e re in­ in s tru c te d a n d o th e rw ise p ro p e rly quali­ fied. T h e y all believed in g ho sts, and t h a t th e living, u n d e r c e rta in conditions,

The Rosicrucian D igest D ecem ber
1943

[412]

could co m m u n ic a te w ith th e souls of the d e p a rte d . G e r a l d M a s s e y , in discu ssin g E g y p ­ tian term s, s a y s t h a t “ all t h a t is secret, s a c re d , m y stical, th e in n e rm o s t o f all m y s te ry , a p p a r e n t l y including som e r e ­ la tio n s h ip to, or co m m u nion w ith the d e a d , is e x p r e s s e d b y th e E g y p t i a n w o r d ‘S h e t ’ a n d in s p e a k in g of sec­ o n d s ig h t o r clairv o y an ce , he a s s u re s us d is tin c tly t h a t “ th e a n c ie n ts w e r e quite fam iliar w i t h this p h e n o m e n a .” N o o n e w h o im p artially ex a m in e s the m ass of e v id e n c e d e riv e d from E g y p t i a n a n d classic so urces, ca n fail to b e im­ p re s s e d w ith th e belief th a t th e E g y p ­ tia n p rie s ts w e r e p e r fe c tly fam iliar w ith all classes o f p sy ch ic p h e n o m e n a , a n d t h a t t h e y w e r e also in p o ssessio n of sec rets p e r ta in in g to th e so -c a lle d ex a c t sciences, a s w ell as of th e occult, of w h ic h w e t o d a y h a v e v e r y little k n o w l­ edge. W e k n o w o f a s u re ty t h a t m a n y o f th e ir a r ts a r e lo st— p e r h a p s b e y o n d re co v ery . W h e n shall w e e q u a l th em in m eta llu rg y ? W h e n will w e le a r n h o w to i m p a rt e la sticity to a c o p p e r blade, or to m a k e b ro n z e chisels c a p a b le of h e w in g g ra n ite ? W i l k i n s o n sa y s, “W e k n o w o f n o m e a n s o f te m p erin g c o p p e r u n d e r a n y form , o r u n ite d w ith a n y a l­ loys, fo r s u c h a p u r p o s e ” ; a n d a d d s , “ W e m u s t co n fe ss t h a t th e E g y p t i a n s a p p e a r to h a v e p o s s e s s e d ce rta in secrets fo r h a r d e n i n g o r tem p erin g b ro n z e w ith w h ic h w e a r e to ta lly u n a c q u a in te d ." A f t e r five t h o u s a n d y e a r s h a v e p a s s ­ ed, th e b rillia n c y o f th e colors u s e d b y th e E g y p t i a n a r tis t re m a in s undim m ed. A f t e r se v e n t h o u s a n d y e a r s w e w o n d e r a t th e d u r a b ility o f th e ir p a p e r, a n d th e lastin g q ualities o f th e ir w a fe r- lik e ce­ m ent. W e d is in te r th e m um m ies w h ich h a v e r e s te d u n d is tu rb e d since th e p y r a ­ m ids w e re b u i l t — a n d ex a m in e th e still p e rfe c t fe a tu re s , a n d th e lon g hair, a n d th e te e th filled w ith gold a g e s a g o b y E g y p t i a n d e n tis ts — a n d w e v iew w ith a m a z e m e n t th e b a n d a g e s a th o u s a n d y a r d s in l e n g t h in w h ic h th ese form s a re s w a t h e d — a n d th en w e a r e obliged to co n fe s s t h a t m o d e rn s u r g e r y c a n n o t eq u a l th e b a n d a g in g ; a n d m edical a r t a n d m o d e rn c h e m is try a r e m a ste rs of no m e a n s b y w h ic h a h u m a n b o d y m a y b e p r e s e r v e d fo r five t h o u s a n d y e a rs . W h e n w e h a v e u n d is p u te d evidence as to th e ir a c h ie v em en ts in th e se direc­

tion s, is it th e p a r t o f w isd o m to d e n y t h a t th e y m a y h a v e p o s s e s s e d o th e r a r ts a n d o th e r sciences w h ic h w e a r e u n a b le to equ a l o r a p p ro x im a te ? L e t m e a n s w e r th e a s se rtio n t h a t th e E g y p t i a n priests w e r e f r a u d s a n d c h a r ­ l a t a n s — d eceivers of th e people, w ily tric k s te rs, a n d th e vicious w o rs h ip p e rs o f m a n y G o d s . In th e first p lace , n o n e w e r e a d m itte d to th e p rie s th o o d s a v e s u c h a s w e r e esp ecially fitted b y th e ir p u r i t y of life a n d h olin ess of asp ira tio n . T h e o rd e a ls th ro u g h w h ic h c a n d id a te s w e r e o blig ed to p a s s w e r e v e r y severe, th e ir lives so m etim es b ein g e x p o s e d to g r e a t d a n g e r. T h e priests w e re h u m b le a n d se lf-d e n y in g a n d re m a r k a b le for sim p licity a n d a b s t i n e n c e . P lu t a r c h s p e a k s o f th em a s “ g iv in g them selves u p w h o lly to s t u d y a n d m ed itatio n , h e a r i n g a n d te a c h in g th o s e tr u t h s w h ic h r e g a r d th e d iv in e n a tu r e .” T h e y took g r e a t c a re to p re se rv e from p ro f a n a t i o n th e ir s e c re t rites, a n d e x c lu d e d all w h o w e r e c o n s id e re d unfit to p a r tic ip a te in s o lem n cerem onies. C le m e n t s a y s th e y w e r e confined to th o s e “ W h o from th e ir w o r t h , le a r n in g a n d s ta tio n w e r e d e e m e d w o r t h y of so g r e a t a priv ileg e.” N o r w a s th e re m otive, e ith e r for g ain o r re p u ta tio n . A ll th e g re a t p riests, s c h o l­ a r s a n d s a g e s cou ld be, if t h e y s o d e ­ sired , s u p p o r te d b y th e S t a t e — a m p le a c c o m m o d a tio n b e in g p r o v i d e d fo r th em w ith in the tem ple p re cin cts, w h e r e in q u ie t, e a se a n d re tire m e n t, th e y co uld p u r s u e th e ir deep re s e a rc h e s a n d s u b tle e x p e rim e n ts in s e c re t sciences. T h e y w e re w o rs h ip p e rs o f o n l y o n e G o d , w h o s e v e r y n a m e w a s so s a c r e d it w a s , a c c o rd in g to H e r o d o t u s , u n la w f u l to u tte r; a n d th e ir v a r io u s divinities b u t p erson ified som e form o f th e d iv in e a t ­ trib u te s . I n te r b le n d e d a n d i n t e r - d e p e n d e n t w e find E g y p t i a n science a n d reli­ gion. T o u n d e r s ta n d o ne w e c a n n o t r e ­ m a in ig n o r a n t of th e o th er. T o th e E g y p t i a n his religion w a s e v e ry th in g . H e r e g a r d e d his a b o d e u p o n e a r t h as b u t a s h o r t jo u rn e y u p o n th e p a t h w a y o f e te r n a l life. T o th e fu tu re w h ic h s t r e t c h e d b efo re him, h e tu r n e d w ith h o p e a n d long ing . H e d id n o t b eliev e t h a t w h e n his s h o r t life closed, p h y sical e x is te n c e w a s e n d e d . A g a in a n d a g a in , his religion ta u g h t, h e w o u ld r e tu r n to e a r t h to w o r k o u t in h ig h e r fo rm s his

[413]

spiritual salvation. This doctrine of re­ incarnation, has been generally grossly misunderstood by writers who have at­ tempted to explain it. W ith this belief was connected the doctrine of the “cycle of necessity.” Can our Egyptologists sa y w hat this cycle was, or what it sig­ nified, and can they further tell what the winged scarabi of Egypt symboliz­ ed? They cannot tell us these things any more than they can explain the sep­ tenary composition of man or his triune character, or interpret the “unpronouncable” name which Herodotus dared not disclose. T he ethics taught in the M ystery Schools of Egypt was singularly pure and exalted. They believed not only in the negative virtues but the positive also, and a moral life, “a life of holiness and beneficence, was conceived of as being a matter of solemn obligation to the Deity himself.” The highest princi­ ples alone were inculcated, and always in the heart of the Egyptian priest were treasured the words of his great exam­ ple — the noble prince and moralist —Amenhotep: ‘‘Mind thee of the day when thou too shall start for the land V V

to which one goeth to return not thence. Good for thee will have been a good life. Therefore be just and hate iniquity, for he who doeth w hat is right shall triumph.” Have modern scholars a surer guide to honor and uprightness than the old Egyptian Initiate? Have we any right to utter words of censure and condem­ nation? Ancient Egypt is gone, her priests have passed away, and buried with them in the recesses of impene­ trable tombs is much of her wisdom, her magic and her glory. Her greatness has indeed passed away. O f her religion and science there has been preserved much more than which modern science is aware. It is preserved in the archives of certain societies, and will be revealed in due time when the world is ready to receive it. Notwithstanding the fulfill­ ment of the dark prophetic words of one of her greatest priests: ‘‘O Egypt, of thy religion there will remain nothing but uncertain tales which will be believed no more by posterity,” much of the purest and best of her science, philosophy and religion will in due time be presented to the world. V

Prescribed thinking toward a W orld Peace—there is but one race and that is man; there is but one creed and that is love; there is but one freedom and that is conformity to the law .'-'A nonym ous.

O U R H E R IT A G E F R O M

H IS T O R Y

In view of the traditional beginning of this organization in E g y p t, m any members are interested in the history and thinking of the civilizations of the N ile in ancient times. T o provide a historical background for our members and those interested in ancient history, the Supply Bureau has three of the best books published in single volumes on these sub­ jects. You will enjoy adding this background of an ancient civilization to your library. O rder from the Supply Bureau one or all of the following three books by eminent authori­ ties on ancient civilization. T h e books available at the present time are: “T h e H istory of E g y p t" by James H enry Breasted, price $7.50, postpaid; "T h e D aw n of Conscious"

T he Rosicrucian
D igest D ecem ber
1943

by James H enry Breasted, price $3.00, postpaid, and the latest book of D r. G eorg Steindorff, entitled, "W hen E g y p t Ruled the E ast," price $4.00, postpaid. Dr. Steindorff is considered one of the greatest living authorities on E g y p t, and is consultant for the Rosicrucain Egyptian O riental Museum.

[ 414 ]

SANCTUM MUSINGS
T H E AGE-OLD PRO BLEM By
h e

T h o r K iim a l e h t o ,

Sovereign G ra n d M aster T h e one g reat discovery of science th a t bears upon th e solution of the . problem of h u m an destiny, is th e gen­ eral u n ifo rm an d orderly m ode of the operation of n a tu ra l forces in every d ep artm en t of N atu re. T his m ode of w orking constitutes w h a t we com pre­ hensively te rm as N a tu ra l Law s, and th ey operate on the largest or sm allest scale w ith th e sam e u n ifo rm results. W e can discover these law s o n ly by th e ir effects in the objective world. T h e y belong to th e invisible W o rld of Causes an d m anifest them selves in the visible W o rld of Effects. To u n d e r­ stand th e ir m ode of w orking on the h u m an p lan e is to be able to co-oper­ ate w ith th em fo r our ow n elevation, an d thus d eterm ine our ow n destiny. In his struggle for existence, m an, the self-conscious h ead of organic N ature, entered u p o n his career w ith dual equipm ent: a body, w hich connected him w ith th e ea rth and all the form s of life below h im ; an d a soul, w hich con­ nected h im w ith th e invisible w orld of great potential forces from w hich, in h arm o n y w ith its law s, he could draw the sustenance to g ratify his unlim ited aspiration. Therefore, he is n o t only the p roduct an d m aster of th e earth, but also th e legitim ate h e ir of th a t in ­ finite an d etern al supply, for all his w ants, w hich exists in th e invisible W orld of C ausation, and to w hich this

t h i n k i n g m an has looked upon life as the greatest problem of the ages. T h e origin and des­ tin y of m a n have been of a b s o r b i n g interest. W h e n c e ? W h at? A nd w hither? T hese questions have been th e pursuit of the best m inds of all climes, classes, an d conditions. Researches into th e archaeological an d ethnological archives th a t belong to unrecorded tim es indicate th a t prehis­ toric m an had his m en tal or religious observances and was interested, as were all succeeding generations, in problem s of h u m an existence. T h ro u g h th e rem ­ nants found in excavations w e have been able to follow th e developm ent of m a n ’s thinking throughout the ages. In his quest for knowledge, m an has ever found him self upon th e borderland of the great U niverse, th e hidden re ­ cesses of w hich m u st be penetrated, and its m ysteries unveiled, before he can hope to solve th e problem s of life. His persistent digging an d delving into every departm ent of th e visible w orld has provided us w ith a m ost w onderful The R o s ic r u c i a n treasu ry of facts, teem ing w ith valuable deductions and applications, y et we still D ig est grope in the darkness of th e U nknow n, Ju ly but not U nknow able in so fa r as hum an 1947 necessity m ay apply.

[ 234]

objective W orld of Effects is subordi­ body an d in tim e, again pass through n ate. M an is th e self-conscious l i n t m aterial b irth and activity. A ctivity betw een the two. H e began a t th e bot­ an d rest, activ ity and rest, is n a tu re ’s tom , on the m aterial plane of self-con­ law of subsistence. scious life, and by the in h e re n t force As in this objective w orld we have of his own m ental constitution an d only a resem blance or a photograph, in sp iritu al aspirations he is on the w a y to its m ateria l form s, of the re a lity th a t tn e top, ever rising, through m anifold exists in th e Invisible, so in the W orld experiences, a l i t t l e of M an every form h ig h er tow ard the goal th a t his h an d fashions of his ideal aspiration. m u st be first conceived T h e m ind of m an is tm in the hidden recesses th e interm ediary be­ of his m ind. E very tw een the soul and h u m an achievem ent of body, receiving inspi­ the past an d present, ra tio n from the invisi­ all th e w onderful in ­ ble W orld of Causes ventions of m odern an d expressing them tim es, w hich enable us in th e m aterial W orld to work w ith th e forces B y E r w in W . E . W a te rm e y e r, of Effects. of N a tu re as tireless M .A . , F . B . C . A ll th a t has ever s e r v a n t s— th e a ir­ D ir e c t o r , A M O R C T e c h n ic a l D e p t . been e v o l v e d from plane, th e railroad, • A c c o r d in g to t h e l a t e s t in v e s t i g a ­ m a tte r m ust have been tio n s c a r r i e d o u t b y P r o f e s s o r th e radio, th e tele­ A r t h u r H o lm e s , m e m b e r o f th e o riginally involved in graph, th e telephone, D e p a r t m e n t o f G e o lo g y o f th e E d i n b u r g h U n iv e r s ity , th e a g e of it, an d came from the th e steam er an d the th e e a r t h is n o w b e lie v e d to b e realm of the Invisible. in t h e n e ig h b o r h o o d o f 3350 m il­ p rin tin g press, books, lio n y e a r s ! T h is is th e source of nouses, utensil?, • P h o t o g r a p h s ta k e n fr o m a n a l t i ­ th e infinite, eternal t u d e o f a p p r o x im a te ly 500,000 f e e t c l o t h e s , t o o l s , and w ith a n a u to m a tic c a m e r a a t ­ supply for every w a n t every article of neces­ ta c h e d to a V -2 ty p e o f r o c k e t in d ic a te c le a r ly t h a t t h e s u r f a c e w hich finds expression sity, com fort and luxo f th e e a r t h i s c o n v ex . in accordance w ith u iy , w hich m inisters • A R u s s ia n s c ie n tis t h a s s u c c e e d e d in t r a n s p l a n t i n g a liv in g h e a r t n a tu ra l law. M atter, to our needs and grati­ f r o m t h e b o d y o f o n e f r o g to as it appears to the a n o th e r. T h e su ccess o f th is e x ­ fies our t a s t e s— all p e r im e n t o p e n s n e w v i s t a s in to objective v i s i o n , is have taken form in t h e f u t u r e o f s u r g e r y , n a m e ly , th e p o s s ib il ity o f r e p la c e m e n t o f o nly one form of u n i­ th e unseen m ind of d e t e r i o r a t e d v ita l o r g a n s . versal substance. All m an before th e y ap ­ • I t h a s b e e n d is c o v e re d t h a t th e b lu e c o lo r o f t h e o c e a n is c a u s e d th e g r e a t , potential peared in th e objective b y m y r i a d s o f e x tr e m e ly tin y , forces of N ature be­ d u s t l i k e p a r tic le s — in v is ib le e v e n w o r l d of existence. under o rd in a ry m ic r o s c o p e s — long to the Invisible T hus all things evolve w h ic h a r e s u s p e n d e d th r o u g h o u t t h e w a te r . W h ite s u n l i g h t is a W orld. W e see the from th e u n s e e n m i x t u r e o f t h e s e v e n c o lo r s of t h e s p e c tr u m . W h e n s u c h l i g h t e a rth bare and bleak Wrorld. s h in e s u p o n a n d p e n e t r a t e s th e in the w inter, arrayed T his great Invisible w a t e r , th e n th e s e p a r tic le s r e f le c t l i g h t , m u c h lik e a m i r r o r . In ­ in living green in the realm is th e infinite, a s m u c h a s s a l t w a t e r h a s th e p ro p e rty o f a b s o rb in g th e re d , spring, and in the i n e x h a u s t i b l e , and o ra n c re , a n d y e llo w r a y s , t h e c o lo r sum m er and autum n, eternal source of sup­ o f th e r e f le c te d l i g h t w ill b e a m i x t u r e n ( p r e e n , b lu e . I n d ig o , we g ath er the golden p ly for every h u m an a n d v io le t, w h ic h iriv es t h e o c e a n i t s c h a r a c t e r i s t i c b lu e - g r e e n c o lo r. h arv est w h i c h has w ant, an d upon w hich been evolved from the m an is perm itted to Invisible by the opera­ d r a w , in accordance tion of its potent forces. E very form of w ith n a tu ra l law and his understandlife we see around us, both vegetable ing, n o t o n ly for the sustenance and an d anim al, w ill soon re tu rn to th e in ­ com fort of th e body, but also for every­ visible world of g reat potential forces th in g th a t can be desired for the im ­ an d give place to other form s w h ich provem ent of th e m ind, for th e strength­ w ill be evolved from the sam e source of ening a n d upbu ild in g of his higher infinite, eternal supply. L ife is in ­ m oral an d sp iritu al character, an d for destructible, and the body of m a n is th e gratification of our highest and subject to the n a tu ra l law of change. holiest aspirations. T he supply is u n ­ W e m u st finally give u p the w orn-out lim ited a n d adapted to the m ost press­
[ 235 ]

%

ing needs, b u t it can be draw n upon only in accordance w ith the fu n d a­ m ental law s of h u m an progress, as il­ lustrated in th e history of th e race and expressed an d defined in the constitu­ tion of the h u m an m ind. E very im provem ent in the condition of the h u m an race has been the result of thought, stim ulated into action by environm ents. P rim eval m a n felt the need of som ething m ore th a n his naked hands w ith w hich to defend him self, an d as he thought o u t this problem of his environm ent he learn ed to use clubs an d slingstones, and la te r to m ake stone axes, bows and arrow s, spears and flint knives. H e first lived in caves, b u t as num bers increased he h ad to think again, and there resulted from his thinking th e prim itive h u t, b u ilt of stones, and cem ented w ith clay. T hus, a t every step of his progress, his necessities have set m a n to thinking, and through his thoughts he has suc­ cessfully d raw n on th e infinite supply of the U nseen and satisfied his wants. So it has ever been from ea rlv ages to th e present tim e, an d so it m u st ever continue to be. M an can save him self from th e adverse conditions of his e n ­ vironm ents and im prove his condition, physically and m orally, only b y th in k ­ ing. T he all-im portant elem ent in h u m an progress is first to cultivate the pow er to th in k —logically, candidly, and ea rn ­ estly— and th en consistently act accord­ ing to the best thought th a t is reached, regardless of custom , church, or creed. Jesus gave expression to this axiom atic tru th w h en h e said: “As a m an thinketh in his h ea rt, so is h e.” H istory and science confirm th e tru th of this af­ firm ation. A ll th a t m a n has attained to, has come as th e em bodied resu lt of his thinking; an d w hen rig h t thinking results in rig h t acting th e outcome is all-sufficient. T h e tru e concept of w h at

w e ought to be, united w ith th e m oral courage to act in obedience to o u r re­ quirem ents, w ill surely open the unseen storehouse of infinite and etern al sup­ p ly to the aspiring and earnest soul. H u m a n grow th is in the direction of our m en tal ideals— th a t w hich we really desire to be. T he m ore exalted our ideals are, th e m ore exalted w ill be the ch aracter th a t we develop. If o u r ideals are pure, we will build u p a fine per­ sonality, an d it is equally tru e th a t if o u r thoughts are low we w ill develop a vicious personality. As w e th in k , so w ill w e be. Therefore, if we would elevate ourselves, we m ust cultivate lofty and pure ideals of w h a t we desire to be. Since environm ents stim ulate our faculties into activity, it follows, as a logical sequence, th a t if we would elevate comm on h u m an ity , w e m ust labor to establish such environm ents as ten d to stim ulate into activity the higher faculties of the m ind and soul of th e o rd in ary m an. If we w ould reform an d elevate our fellow beings, we m ust w ork in h a r ­ m o n y w ith the n atu ral law s of hum an developm ent, beginning w ith th e en­ vironm ents w hich stim ulate thought an d m old character. L ofty ideals, kept before the m inds of the people, prepare th e w ay to th eir realization, ju st as soon, an d in such degree, as ethical teachers an d those w ho w ork unself­ ish ly am ong the people are bro u g h t to un d erstan d the fundam ental law s of h u m an progress. T he com ing state and com m unity w ill abolish poverty an d all its n a tu ra l consequences of disease, ig­ norance, vice and crim e, b y creating public environm ents in w hich practical righteousness will be placed directly in th e lin e of least resistance— w hich the average h u m a n n atu re is inclined to follow. T h is w'ork m ust be in au g u rated b y those individuals who rise superior to debasing influences an d w ho fully sym pathize w ith the w eak an d helpless.

F R E N C H R O S IC R U C IA N BOOK
The R o s ic r u c ia n D ig est July 1947
A F re n c h editio n of th e p o p u la r book S e lf M a s te r y a n d F ate w ith th e C ycles o f L ife is now available. I t is a com plete u n a b rid g e d tra n s la tio n , p rin te d in P a ris, c o n ta in in g a ll c h a rts a n d diag ram s. W e have a lim ite d n u m b e r i n stock for m em bers a n d friends. V e ry e x c e lle n tly p rin te d , paper-bound. P ric ed a t o n ly $1.50, postpaid. O rd e r d ire c tly fro m th e R osicrucian S u p p ly B u re au in San Jose.

[2 3 6 ]

W 1 ii- v i w

/0 -4 1 -3 2 8 A m e r i c a n C o n s c i o u s n e s s , T h e /I - 4 3 -3 9 0 A m e r i c a n P h i l o s o p h y o f L i f e , A n / X'S2 - 4 2 “_ A n c i e n t S y m b o l i s m ^ «4 4 2 2- - 1 0 9 ; - 2 : 2 - 7 5 ; A r t i s t r y o f L i v i n g , T h d * ' 3 4 ; ^ 4 2 - 1 5 2 * / ' 4 ;*( 4 13 9- 4 1 3 * > “4 3 - 1 8 8 2 1 / - 4 0 -4 5 3 B i b l e o f M a n k i n d , T h e - 57-- 2 7 4 ;s-4 1 -1 5 0 B r o t h e r h o o d s u - 5 9 -4 0 7 C h r i s t m a s S p i r i t , T‘ h e ii- 4 1 -3 7 9 C o m i n g A g e , T h e H-3 7 -3 8 7 C o m m o n M i s c o n c e p t i o n s E d u c a t i o n 7*41-217 E m o t i o n a l C o n t r o l i 4 3 - 2 GO E t e r n a l Q u e s t i o n , T h e 7-41-291 G e t t i n g A l o n g i n L i f e i'57-9 6 K o a l t h a n d R i & ’h t L i v i n g 7 - 4 2 -3 1 1 I s p c a c c P o s s i b l e ? ) -38-G.? K e e p Y o u r F e e t o n t h e G r o u n d '•* 3 6 -3 9 1 K n o w l e d g e o f S e l f 1-3-295; 1-3-330 r/ ‘ L o s t H o r i z o n , T h e / * 3 8 -4 7 3 M e m o r i e s o f t h e L o n g A g o 7 -3 9 -^ 0 3 M i s c o n c e p t i o n s /-37-44G M y s t i c ' ra y , T h e — A R e v i e w fa-39-174 N e e d o f t h e H o u r , T h e j- 4 0 -7 3 O c c u l t F o r c e s i n M u s i c , T h e r 3 8 -2 8 6 O c c u l t S c i e n c e s o f A n c i e n t 2 g (J- p4 3 -4 1 2 y t O u r A c t i v i t y r 4 3 -4 5 2 O u r D e m o c r a c y f - 3 9 -1 3 0 /^ b u r Y o u t h G r o u p s / - 3 9 -4 4 7 .O u r W o m a n h o o d ^ 4 1 -4 1 2 P h i l o s o p h i c a l V i e — o f A l c h e m y , ,1 -4 2 -4 2 7 A P l a n n i n g Y o u r L i f e JL-3 7 -2 9 P r a y e r ,--41-474 P r e d e s t i n a t i o n - 4 3 -1 4 • .iu e s t o f C o s m i c C o n s c i o u s n e s s , i - 4T1 -1 e9 2 h R e i n c a r n a t i o n x - 4 1 -2 7 R o m a n c e o f L o v e , T h e ¥ -3 9 -8 9 R o s i c r u c i a n B e h a v i o r i s m 7 -3 8 -2 3 4 R o s i c r u c i a n C i t i z e n , T h e /- 4 2 - 4 7 4 R o s i c r u c i a n p s y c h o l o g y 4 3 -6 8 R o s i c r u c i a n V i e v n o i n t , T h e 7 - 4 3 -2 2 7 S e c r e t o f N u m b e r s , T h e i-3 :-2 e S i r F r a n c i s B a c o n i r 4 2 -3 7 2 S o u l D e v e l o p m e n t *4 0 -4 5 2 3 S p i r i t u a l O u t l o o i c , T h e 4 2 -2 3 0 T r i a l s o f L i f e , T h e 5 " - 4 3 - 1 5 1 v-e M u s t S t a n d A l o n e 1-33-52 Y Jho I s A M y s t i c ? j 4 1 -5 7 Y o u t h a n d O l d A g e lo-4 2 -3 5 4

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful