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AP Gov.

Chapter 4
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1.

According to your textbook, since its Roe v. Wade decision, the Supreme Court has a. not moved an inch from its dramatic original ruling. b. reversed itself within the last few years and has now overturned the Roe decision. c. greatly extended the right of a woman to make her own decision about terminating her pregnancy. d. generally moved to allow states more room to regulate abortions (e.g., waiting periods) than was true in Roe. e. been silent on the politically divisive issue of abortion.

generally moved to allow states more room to regulate abortions (e.g., waiting periods) than was true in Roe.

5.

Cruel and unusual punishment is forbidden by the a. Sixth Amendment. b. exclusionary clause. c. self-incrimination clause. d. Fifth Amendment. e. Eighth Amendment.

Eighth Amendment.

6.

Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure are most relevant to which stage of the criminal justice system? a. Arrest made b. Interrogation held c. Evidence gathered d. Trial held e. Suspicion cast

Evidence gathered.

2.

Advertising is considered a form of ________ and, according to the decisions of the Supreme Court, is subject to greater restrictions on free speech than religious or political speech. a. commercial speech b. imaged expression c. symbolic speech d. propaganda e. paid speech

commercial speech.

7.

Freedom of religion is guaranteed by the ______ Amendment. a. Fourth b. Third c. Second d. First e. Tenth

First.

8.

Government recognition of a national or official religion is prohibited by the a. establishment clause. b. due process clause. c. free exercise clause. d. Second Amendment. e. freedom of religion.

establishment clause.

3.

Beginning with the case of ________ in 1925, the Supreme Court began to rule that the Bill of Rights applied directly to the states, as well as to the national government. a. United States v. Bill of Rights b. Engel v. Vitale c. Gitlow v. New York d. Miranda v. Arizona e. Barron v. Baltimore

Gitlow v. New York .

4.

Civil liberties are legal and constitutional protections against a. government. b. minority tyranny. c. factions. d. criminals. e. foreign invasions.

government.

overturned the convictions of Communist Party officials who had been sent to prison because of their beliefs. . Minnesota d. literary. a. free press b. a. foreign terrorism suspects held at Guantanamo Bay have constitutional rights to challenge their detention in U. courts. e. including such gauges as whether material appealed to merely a prurient interest in sex. National Security Agency domestic spying and wiretapping of international telephone calls without court-approved warrants were unconstitutional. Osborne v. upheld the federal law banning the Nazi party in the United States and prohibiting its activities. In ________.9. 11. and whether it lacked serious artistic. upheld the convictions of Communist Party officials who had been sent to prison because of their beliefs.S. even though it is an extreme sanction for the most extreme of crimes. commerce due process.S. Vitale b. political. California e. Ohio Miller v. necessary and proper c. background checks for gun buyers and qualifications on the commercial sale of firearms are unconstitutional. the Supreme Court a. Heller (2008). Federal Communications Commission v. Engel v. the Second Amendment only applies to the right of states to create militias. the state of Georgia) to be "freakish" and "random. United States.S. settled once and for all debate over whether the death penalty constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. 12. prohibitions on concealed weapons are unconstitutional. Stern c. c. 14. due process e. 10. c. the Supreme Court ruled that a. courts. In Gitlow v New York (1925). b. Both b and c are true." e. ruled that burning a draft card was not covered under free speech. guns must be stored in a fashion that prevents their theft or children from accessing them. d. the Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected to service in a militia. e. e. marks the Supreme Court's ruling that the death penalty is constitutional. overturned the federal law against burning or desecrating the American flag. Georgia (1976) is significant in that it a. the Court ruled that freedoms of speech and press were liberties protected by the ________ clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. foreign terrorism suspects held at Guantanamo Bay do not have any constitutional right to challenge their detention in U. In 2008 in Boumediene v. Near v. Miller v. the Second Amendment protects an individual right to possess a firearm unconnected to service in a militia. d. b. d. foreign terrorism suspects held at Guantanamo Bay have constitutional rights to challenge their detention in U. the Court clarified its doctrine of what was obscene. Bush. b. Both a and c are true. In Dennis v. Gregg v. The USA PATRIOT Act was unconstitutional. upheld the convictions of Communist Party officials who had been sent to prison because of their beliefs. arguing that it violated free speech. National Security Agency domestic spying and wiretapping of international telephone calls without court-approved warrants were constitutional. was the first time the Court found a state's death penalty practices (in this case. the Supreme Court ruled that a. d. c. marks the Supreme Court's ruling that the death penalty is constitutional. courts. interstate commerce d. or scientific merit. c. b. even though it is an extreme sanction for the most extreme of crimes. In District of Columbia v. California 13.

the state government could not use prior restraint to shut down an outspoken newspaper. the state government could not use prior restraint to shut down an outspoken newspaper. ruled that "partial birth abortion" should never be permitted under any circumstances. a CIA agent could not publish a personal memoir without clearing it through the agency. b. the procedures for trying prisoners at Guantanamo Bay. c. a school newspaper was not a public forum and could be regulated "in any reasonable manner" by school officials. Rumsfeld (2006) the Supreme Court ruled that a. b. ruled that the state of Connecticut could legally ban the sale of contraceptives under state police powers of the Tenth Amendment. overturned a Connecticut state sodomy law. In Hamdan v. 16. e. the procedures for trying prisoners at Guantanamo Bay. ruled that various portions of the Bill of Rights cast "penumbras" protecting a right to privacy. b. 17. In Lemon v. treat all religions equally. the Geneva Convention does not apply because the "enemy combatants" are not soldiers in a recognized army. the Supreme Court a. the Supreme Court ruled that a. Wade. d. Connecticut (1965). b. not advance religion. the president has "inherent power" to fight the war on terror as he sees fit.15. d. inhibit religion . Cuba. the Supreme Court a. overturned Roe v. All of the above are true. including a right to family planning. Therefore. overturned a woman's legal right to abortion. declared waiting periods for women seeking abortions unconstitutional. c. d. d. states were prohibited from publishing newspapers because that amounted to government censorship of the press and constituted the establishment of a government monopoly. b. ruled that various portions of the Bill of Rights cast "penumbras" protecting a right to privacy. c. e. e. states had the power to use prior restraint broadly. c. have a secular purpose. overturned a 2003 law banning "partial birth abortion" because it does not make an exception to preserve the mother's health. e. the Supreme Court established that aid to church-related schools must do all of the following EXCEPT a. Minnesota decision of 1931. Carhart (2007). c. e. were insufficient for ensuring a fair trial. In Gonzales v. were insufficient for ensuring a fair trial 18. upheld a 2003 law banning "partial birth abortion" despite the fact that it does not make an exception to preserve a mother's health. but the national government did not. Cuba. upheld a 2003 law banning "partial birth abortion" despite the fact that it does not make an exception to preserve a mother's health. held that abortion was a woman's legal right. inhibit religion. d. In its Near v. terrorists are not entitled to protection by the Bill of Rights. the president can establish judicial procedures on his own. not create excessive government entanglement with religion. including a right to family planning. Kurtzman. In Griswold v. 19.

c. states are prohibited from funding the abortions of poor women. 22. one must be provided. e. ruled that political candidates' rights to free speech required newspapers to grant them space to communicate with voters. the Supreme Court ruled that in the third trimester of pregnancy a. Casey. Wainwright 25. the Supreme Court ruled that abortion a. e. e. d. In Roe v. d. b. voided a Florida state law requiring newspapers to provide space for political candidates to reply to newspaper criticism. Arizona e. freedom of association In the 1963 case of ________. In NAACP v. the film Carnal Knowledge. and if they could not afford to hire a lawyer. the Court a. could not be banned. ruled that print media would be subject to a lower standard of constitutional review than broadcast media. United States d. c. In Miami Herald Publishing Company v. b. b. c. and could be made a crime. restrictions could be imposed by states if they did not involve "undue burdens" on the women seeking abortions . a. b. d. Tornillo (1974). c. ruled that newspapers were prohibited from printing stories that criticized political candidates. d. obscenity is not within the area of constitutionally protected free speech. freedom of religion. In Roth v. Mapp v. Wade. Vitale Gideon v. freedom of expression. and any restrictions on such a right had to be judged by a "strict scrutiny. but not the states. Alabama (1958). 23. was a fundamental right. which had critical acclaim but a sexual theme and explicit scenes. the Supreme Court ruled that forcing the NAACP to turn over its membership list to the state of Alabama was an unconstitutional violation of the NAACP's a. 21. freedom of association. d. could be completely outlawed by individual states. the possession of child pornography was not covered by any right to free speech or press. Wainwright b. National Bar Association v. states cannot ban abortion. obscenity is not within the area of constitutionally protected free speech 24. restrictions could be imposed by states if they did not involve "undue burdens" on the women seeking abortions. is prohibited from funding abortions for poor women. e. Miranda v. None of these are correct. the government cannot prohibit discrimination against women priests by churches because it would violate the free exercise of religion. the Supreme Court ruled that defendants in all felony cases had a right to counsel.20. states can ban abortion except when the mother's health is in danger. c. the federal government. must be funded by state governments when the mother cannot afford it. Gideon v." e. voided a Florida state law requiring newspapers to provide space for political candidates to reply to newspaper criticism. freedom of belief. Ohio c. or it would be a violation of the equal protection clause. upheld a Florida state law requiring newspapers to provide space for political candidates to reply to newspaper criticism. Engel v. the Supreme Court held that a. outdoor drive-ins could not be barred from showing a film that included nudity. b. funding by any level of government was unconstitutional. states cannot ban abortion unless the mother's life is in danger. United States. states can ban abortion except when the mother's health is in danger In the 1992 case of Planned Parenthood v.

Baltimore e. b. e. Ohio 28. libel. a. the police must show probable cause before making an arrest. New York Barron v. United States b. United States in 1919. the Connecticut statute barring the distribution of birth control information e. Roth v. New York Mapp v. Wainwright d. New York v. Arizona c. Sullivan (1964). Barron v. police search or seizure without an authorized warrant d. . police must inform any suspect of a series of rights. segregation c. a clear and present danger. public demonstrations in opposition to the government. c. In the case of ________. d. defendants in all felony cases have a right to counsel. illegally obtained evidence cannot be used in a trial. In the case of New York Times v. the United States b. including the constitutional right to remain silent 30. including the constitutional right to remain silent. prior restraint b. Mapp v. even if the state has to provide such legal assistance. a.26. c. the Supreme Court ruled that a. statements made about political figures are libelous only if made with malice and reckless disregard for the truth 27. government officials cannot sue newspapers for libel since this would entail prior restraint of the press. the death penalty could be imposed for the most extreme of crimes. the Pentagon papers could be legally published despite the government's desire to keep the material secret. the Supreme Court ruled that the protection against unreasonable search and seizure applied to the state and local governments. b. Engel v. c. In the case of ________. Justice Holmes declared that government can limit speech if that speech provokes a. the publication of the Pentagon papers could be legally barred as a matter of national security. Vitale case of 1962. Baltimore 29. can never be deemed libelous. thus nationalizing the exclusionary rule. United States v. Miranda v. a clear and present danger. d. statements made about political figures. e. Arizona. 31. e. d. police must inform any suspect of a series of rights. statements made about political figures are libelous only if made with malice and reckless disregard for the truth. Gitlow v. b. Gideon v. prior restraint. a. the Supreme Court ruled that a. the Supreme Court ruled that ________ was (were) unconstitutional. In the Engel v. In the case of Miranda v. Arizona c. Ohio e. In the case of Schenck v. Miranda v. not states and cities. Vitale d. however malicious. as well as the national government. the Supreme Court ruled that the Bill of Rights restrained only the national government. Obscenity. prayers done as classroom exercises in public schools prayers done as classroom exercises in public schools.

free exercise clause. b. The Bill of Rights was adopted primarily in response to a. d. e. a violation of privacy. b. cruel and unusual punishment. the horrors of the French Revolution. c. Twenty-sixth e. Sullivan Near v. Gideon v. The ________ Amendment forbids forced self-incrimination. president b. British abuses of the colonists' civil liberties. unreasonable search and seizure. Ohio e. Minnesota 38. c." a. Ohio Miranda v. First c. bounty hunting. The ________ is the final interpreter of the content and scope of Americans' civil liberties. or not to worship. Incorporation is the legal concept under which the Supreme Court has nationalized the Bill of Rights by making most of its provisions applicable to the states through the due process clause of the _________ Amendment. full faith and credit clause. Fifteenth Fourteenth. Tenth d. that what they say can be used against them. 40. must be allowed to publish without prior restraint? a. aid to church-related schools is fully constitutional and can be used for any purposes needed by the schools. the Spanish Inquisition. Miranda v. Miranda v. In the Lemon v. a. First b. a. United States d. the Supreme Court ruled that a. Yoder c. the abuses committed by the United States Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. d. an Ariel search. Arizona b. Ninth d. New York Times v. Arizona The abridgment of citizens' freedom to worship. e. b. aid to churchrelated schools must be for secular purposes only and cannot be used to advance or inhibit religion. 35. Arizona d. Mapp v. any aid of any sort to churchrelated schools is not constitutional because it violates church-state separation. Wainwright e. Second e. 39. Fifth Fifth 33. is known as a. devotional Bible reading in public schools was unconstitutional. unreasonable search and seizure. Mapp v. c. e. Wisconsin v. aid to church-related schools must be for secular purposes only and cannot be used to advance or inhibit religion. c. Near v. 34. 36. Kurtzman decision of 1971. as they please is prohibited by the a. Shays' Rebellion. 37. and of their right to have an attorney present during any questioning? a. Plucennik v. British abuses of the colonists' civil liberties. Congress e. spoken prayers in public schools were unconstitutional. Minnesota c. Fourth c. . Near v. American Civil Liberties Union d. in violation of the Fourth Amendment. Minnesota b.32. free exercise clause. Constitution Supreme Court. Obtaining evidence in a haphazard or random manner. due process clause. d. Fourteenth b. establishment clause. In what case did the Supreme Court rule that a newspaper. e. In what case did the Supreme Court rule that suspects must be told of their constitutional rights to remain silent. no matter how outrageous its opinions. Supreme Court c. d. stating that no person "shall be compelled to be a witness against himself. b. privileges and immunities clause.

b. 44. the Anti-Defamation Act of 1952. application of the Bill of Rights to the states The publication of statements known to be false that are malicious and tend to damage a person's reputation is called a. press. . b. b. d. e. c. the interpretation of the commerce clause. The great freedoms of speech. disincorporation doctrine. ***cat Theater. The Fifth Amendment forbids a. Sullivan. Fourth Amendment. The incorporation doctrine involves a. b. b. c. e. Ohio. d. New York Times v. forced self-incrimination. Tenth c. 50. First. illegal searches and seizures. restrict the powers of the state governments. Eighth b. "Congress shall make no law. 45. California. the extension of judicial review to state courts. Second. c. Osborne v. Fifth d. e. d. New York Times v. d. Miller v. e. d. libel. e. the procedures for creating a city government. the United States Supreme Court in 1796. All of these except d. b. e. Second Amendment. and Fourth Amendments. Falwell. The Bill of Rights was written and proposed by a. incorporation doctrine. due process doctrine. The language of the First Amendment. c. religion. Ohio. the government's power to regulate corporations. c. Third. d. the government establishment of a national religion. fraud. United States 48. enumerated powers doctrine. The right to assemble and the right to associate with people who share a common interest are protected by the ________ Amendment. libel. d. and assembly are contained in the a. c. Snepp. a. restrict the powers of the national government. First Amendment The principle that statements about public figures are libelous only if made with malice and reckless disregard for the truth was established in a. Ohio v. application of the Bill of Rights to the states. b. symbolic speech. e. 43. the First Congress of the United States in 1789. Texas v. e. Roth v. Second First. First Amendment. forced selfincrimination The principle that "obscenity is not within the area of constitutionally protected speech or press" was established in a. 46. d. Roth v." suggests that the Bill of Rights was written to a. the Constitutional Convention in 1787. implied powers doctrine. Sullivan 49. restrict the powers of the national government. b. incorporation doctrine 47. obscenity. c. c. slander. Johnson. Third Amendment. enlarge the powers of the national government.41. b. The legal concept through which the Supreme Court has nationalized the Bill of Rights is called the a. United States. First e. e. restrict the powers of both the national and state governments. President Thomas Jefferson in 1801. United States v. Osborne v. President George Washington in 1789. c. cruel and unusual punishment. d. 42. the First Congress of the United States in 1789. enlarge the powers of the state governments. Hustler Magazine v.

d. e. cruel and unusual punishment. Wade decision was issued in a. 1973. b. prohibited government officials from issuing gag orders to the media. extended the right to counsel to everyone accused of a felony 56. Gun ownership e. Assembly c. Baltimore (1833) maintained that the Bill of Rights intended to prevent a. d. d. e. The Supreme Court's 1991 ruling that a coerced confession introduced during a trial does not automatically taint a conviction if it is a "harmless error" is an example of the Court's recent willingness to make exceptions to the requirements of a. the due process clause and the free exercise clause. d. e. only the national government from abridging civil liberties 57. is permitted when the aid is for a nonreligious purpose. Marriage b.51. The Supreme Court's Roe v. elimination of government funding for parochial schools. d. c. 58. c. both the national and state governments from violating civil rights. the establishment clause and the free exercise clause. b. c. loosening of regulations on government aid to parochial schools 52. does not constitute an establishment of religion. c. The rights of protestors demonstrating outside abortion clinics concern which of the following freedoms? a. Miranda rights. SimmonsHarris (2002) together exemplify a(n) a. Felton (1997) and Zelman v. the free exercise clause and the necessary and proper clause. the due process clause and the establishment clause. The Supreme Court case of Gideon v. The Supreme Court decision in Barron v. e. Religious expression d. c. is permitted when the aid is for a nonreligious purpose the establishment clause and the free exercise clause. b. The Supreme Court has ruled that government aid to church-related schools a. d. habeas corpus. 1991. The Supreme Court rulings in Agnostini v. The two clauses of the First Amendment regarding religion and government are commonly referred to as a. Wainwright a. b. the states from infringing on individual rights. c. the United States government from granting titles of royalty. tightening of the limitations on government involvement in religion. 54. b. . ruled that illegally seized evidence cannot be used in court. 1979. Miranda rights 53. the exclusionary rule. loosening of regulations on government aid to parochial schools. only the national government from abridging civil liberties. gave only those accused of capital crimes the right to counsel. b. violates the establishment clause. is acceptable if the school is affiliated with a major religion but not for small. e. breaking down of the wall of separation between church and state. 1973. e. c. fringe religious sects. is acceptable for things such as field trips and teacher salaries but not for textbooks or transportation to school. cities from taking private property without due process. extended the right to counsel to everyone accused of a felony. b. opening of public schools to religious activities. e. set guidelines for police questioning of suspects. 1954. 1985. Abortion Assembly 55. the right to privacy. d. the establishment clause and the necessary and proper clause.

A majority of Americans support abortion under some circumstances. Right to counsel in felony cases b. e. A majority of Americans support abortion under some circumstances. Burning the American flag b. Twenty-four-hour waiting periods for women seeking abortions d. b. d. d.S. Parades d. Wearing an armband All of these are forms of symbolic speech 64. More Americans oppose abortion than support it. Which of the following is a form of symbolic speech? a. The Constitution does not specify the size of a jury. All of the above are true. All of these are forms of symbolic speech. Which of the following is NOT a constitutionally permissible limitation on the Second Amendment right to bear arms? a. b. A majority of Americans oppose abortion under all circumstances. Which of the following elements of the Bill of Rights was extended to the states by the Supreme Court case of Near v. Grand jury requirement c. c. but tradition has set the number at twelve. Prohibiting "partial birth abortion" without an exception to preserve the mother's health The Court has argued that all of the above are constitutional 61. Mandatory trigger locks c. criminal justice system? a. None of these is a form of symbolic speech. b. . c. Restrictions on dangerous and unusual weapons not typically used for self-defense d. c. Prohibitions on concealed weapons e. A majority of Americans have no opinion on abortion. Freedom of the press d. The Court has argued that all of the above are constitutional. e. Limits on the possession of firearms by the mentally ill and by felons b.59. Freedom of speech Freedom of the press 63. Approximately 90 percent of all cases begin and end with a guilty plea. Right to privacy e. A majority of Americans support abortion under all circumstances. Background checks for gun buyers Mandatory trigger locks 62. Which of the following restrictions on access to abortion has the Supreme Court argued is constitutional? a. All of the above are true 60. Parental consent for minors seeking abortions e. Which of the following is TRUE of American public opinion on abortion? a. Requiring doctors to present women with information concerning the risks of abortion c. Minnesota? a. Recent Supreme Court rulings ensure that judges' authority in sentencing derives from juries' verdicts. Which of the following is true of the U. e. Unanimous votes of juries are required for a criminal conviction.

c. d. The Courts have made it easier for prosecutors to exclude from juries jurors who oppose the death penalty. Which of the following statements regarding the death penalty is NOT true? a. The Supreme Court has made it easier for death row prisoners to file petitions to delay and appeal their executions. e. The European Union prohibits the death penalty in member countries. There is evidence that racism plays a role in whites' support of the death penalty.65. Most Americans support the death penalty. b. The Supreme Court has made it easier for death row prisoners to file petitions to delay and appeal their executions .