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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 138
EARNING SUPPORT
NATION PAGE 7
‘PARKER’ GETS
THE JOB DONE
WEEKEND PAGE 16
KERRY TACKLES QUESTIONS ON IRAN,SYRIA,HAGEL
Volunteers help
count San Mateo
County homeless
Data helps to secure federal
funding and design services
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
About 250 volunteers fanned out across San Mateo County
early yesterday morning to count the homeless, a federal
requirement that helps secure funding for critical services.
The data is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development and is used locally to design homeless
services provided by the county’s Human Services Agency and
local nonprofits.
A team of formerly homeless volunteers were linked up with
police, housing advocates and county officials to take the cen-
sus yesterday morning in practically every corner of the coun-
ty, from the coast to East Palo Alto, Daly City and downtown
San Mateo.
Board of Supervisors President Don Horsley and his Chief
Dragon Theatre fired up
over Redwood City move
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Dragons have always been special to
Meredith Hagedorn, representing things
that are rare, interesting and magical.
So when she thought about the type of
theater company she wanted to create,
Hagedorn didn’t have to look far for a
name and logo.
REUTERS
Gov. Jerry Brown arrives at the State of the State Address in Sacramento.
By Juliet Williams and Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown
delivered a State of the State address
Thursday that was heavy on soaring
rhetoric but largely repeated his well-
known policy priorities, ideas he hopes
will shape his legacy as he begins the
second half of his term.
Education reform, high-speed rail and
the largest upgrade to the state’s water-
delivery system in decades top an ambi-
tious — and expensive — agenda.
The Democratic governor delivered
his address just months after voters
approved his Proposition 30, which
raised sales and income taxes temporari-
ly and is expected to generate $6 billion
Brown gives pep talk
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Gov. Jerry Brown emphasized his
commitment to overhauling education to
include more local control in his annual
State of the State address but provided
few extra details of his new vision.
Earlier this month, Brown released a
budget plan that included the changes he
again highlighted yesterday. His real
push focuses on changing how schools
are funded in an attempt to simplify the
system. Called the Local Control
Funding Formula, the idea is to have a
base per pupil amount with the opportu-
nity to get more money based on the
number of students who are English lan-
guage learners and eligible for free or
reduced lunch. Districts which have
more than the per-pupil funding through
property taxes — which would be most
Commitment to, but few details on, education
Governor outlines school funding changes, impact not yet known
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Don Horsley, president of the San Mateo County Board of
Supervisors, and his Chief of Staff Chris Hunter, left, speak
with a homeless woman yesterday morning in San Carlos as
part of a census to help secure federal funding for county
provided services.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Gov. Jerry Brown announced that
“California is back” in his State of the
State address yesterday morning and
local lawmakers serving in Sacramento
agree, although they cautioned the state
must stay true to Brown’s call of exer-
cising fiscal restraint.
While Republicans also gave
Brown’s speech a general thumbs-up,
some expressed concern that the super-
majority of Democrats in the
Legislature will charge ahead with
deficit spending.
Brown’s speech centered on K-12
education reform, an upgrade to the
state’s water-delivery system and high-
speed rail.
The key topic for many lawmakers,
however, was education.
“Education was first out of the gate,”
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo
Park, said about the governor’s speech.
“Many of us feel our first call is to
improve our schools.”
Is California back?
Local lawmakers say ‘yes’ to Brown’s uplifting speech
See BROWN, Page 18
See SPEECH, Page 18
See SCHOOLS, Page 18
Meredith
Hagedorn
See COUNT, Page 20
See DRAGON, Page 20
TIGERS PIN LOSS
ON EL CAMINO
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Singer Alicia Keys
is 32.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1863
During the Civil War, President
Abraham Lincoln accepted Maj. Gen.
Ambrose E. Burnside’s resignation as
commander of the Army of the
Potomac, and replaced him with Maj.
Gen. Joseph Hooker.
“There is no such
uncertainty as a sure thing.”
— Robert Burns, Scottish poet (1759-1796)
Actress Ana Ortiz
is 42.
Actor Michael
Trevino is 28.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A flock of starlings fly over an agricultural field near the southern Israeli city of Netivot.
Friday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of
showers. Highs around 60. North winds 5 to
10 mph.
Friday night: Mostly cloudy. A slight
chance of showers. Lows in the upper 40s.
North winds around 5 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of
showers. Highs in the mid 50s. Northwest
winds 5 to 10 mph. Chance of showers 30 percent.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Lows in
the lower 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph. Chance of
showers 30 percent.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. A chance of showers. Highs in the
lower 50s.
Sunday night and Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance
of showers. Lows in the lower 40s. Highs in the lower 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No.12,in first place;Hot SHot,No.3,in third place;
and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:41.05.
(Answers tomorrow)
RIVER WEDGE STRAND ROCKET
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After seeing how much the bank’s saving
accounts earned he was INTERESTED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SOREA
WOYHD
LEYWOL
EPCOIT
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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4 3 1
7 11 16 39 54 13
Mega number
Jan. 22 Mega Millions
24 27 28 28 32
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 6 4 4
Daily Four
2 7 8
Daily three evening
In 1533, England’s King Henry VIII secretly married his sec-
ond wife, Anne Boleyn, who later gave birth to Elizabeth I.
In 1787, Shays’s Rebellion suffered a setback when debt-rid-
den farmers led by Capt. Daniel Shays failed to capture an
arsenal at Springfield, Mass.
In 1890, reporter Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane) of the New
York World completed a round-the-world journey in 72 days, 6
hours and 11 minutes. The United Mine Workers of America
was founded in Columbus, Ohio.
In 1915, Alexander Graham Bell inaugurated U.S. transconti-
nental telephone service between New York and San Francisco.
In 1936, former Gov. Al Smith, D-N.Y., delivered a radio
address in Washington, titled “Betrayal of the Democratic
Party,” in which he fiercely criticized the New Deal policies of
President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
In 1947, American gangster Al Capone died in Miami Beach,
Fla., at age 48.
In 1949, the first Emmy Awards, honoring local Los Angeles
TV programs and talent, were presented at the Hollywood
Athletic Club.
In 1961, President John F. Kennedy held the first presidential
news conference to be carried live on radio and television.
In 1971, Charles Manson and three women followers were
convicted in Los Angeles of murder and conspiracy in the 1969
slayings of seven people, including actress Sharon Tate. Idi
Amin seized power in Uganda by ousting President Milton
Obote in a military coup.
In 1981, the 52 Americans held hostage by Iran for 444 days
arrived in the United States.
In 1993, a gunman shot and killed two CIA employees outside
agency headquarters in Virginia (Pakistani national Mir Aimal
Kansi was later tried and convicted of the shootings, and exe-
cuted). Sears announced that it would no longer publish its
famous century-old catalog.
Actor Gregg Palmer is 86. The former president of Georgia,
Eduard Shevardnadze, is 85. Actor Dean Jones is 82. Country
singer Claude Gray is 81. Movie director Tobe Hooper is 70.
Actress Leigh Taylor-Young is 68. Actress Jenifer (cq) Lewis is
56. Actress Dinah Manoff is 55. Country musician Mike Burch
(River Road) is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kina is 44. Actress
China Kantner is 42. Musician Matt Odmark (Jars of Clay) is 39.
Actress Mia Kirshner is 38. Actress Christine Lakin is 34.
Flower-eating goat
cleared of vandalism
SYDNEY — Gary the flower-eating
goat’s graze with Australian police has
ended with his comedian owner getting
the last laugh in court.
A Sydney judge ruled Wednesday that
neither the goat nor his owner could be
found guilty of vandalism over an August
incident when Gary decided to snack on a
flowerbed outside a city museum.
Police at the time leveled a fine of $465
against owner Jim Dezarnaul, a comedian
known as Jimbo Bazoobi.
But man and goat got their day in court,
with Gary arriving resplendent in a color-
ful hat on Wednesday. The brown-and-
white goat didn’t testify, but he had his
own lawyer.
Owner Dezarnaul said the case serves
as a lesson to overzealous authorities,
“and that’s ‘Don’t bite off more than you
can chew.’”
Ireland won’t ease
drunken-driving law for farmers
DUBLIN — A license to drive drunk?
Some small-town politicians think it’s
just the tonic for rural Ireland.
Councilmen in Kerry, southwest
Ireland, passed a motion this week asking
the government to create a permit that
would allow isolated farmers the ability
to drink a few pints and then return home
in their car, or on their tractor, without
fear of being busted.
Its backers say the measure is needed to
combat an epidemic of boredom and
depression on farms ever since Ireland
imposed tough new blood-alcohol limits
on drivers in 2011.
But Justice Minister Alan Shatter shot
down the proposal during a speech in par-
liament Thursday as “grossly irresponsi-
ble.”
“There is no question of this govern-
ment, or indeed I don’t believe any future
government, facilitating individuals
drinking in excess of the blood alcohol
limits,” Shatter told lawmakers.
A generation ago, drunken driving was
commonplace in Ireland and even the
smallest villages or forlorn crossroads
would feature a pub. But in this century
the country has steadily improved road
safety standards, introducing mandatory
driving tests, blood and breath tests and
above all a penalty-points system that
removes licenses from dangerous drivers,
particularly drunks.
The effort has slashed road-related
deaths from more than 400 annually in
the 1990s to just 162 last year, a modern
low in this country of 4.6 million.
Kerry pub owners say their business
has plummeted right along with that
nationwide carnage — yet deny any con-
nection between the two trends. They
describe the often narrow, lightly traf-
ficked roads near their businesses as safe
for people to navigate even after three
pints (57 ounces) of beer.
Danny Healy-Rae, who owns a pub and
comes from Kerry’s most famous and
flamboyant political family, says farmers
should be allowed to drive tipsy on their
tractors because they don’t go fast
enough to kill anyone. He said those
drinking two to three pints at a pub
should be issued a permit allowing them
to drive home so long as they stay below
30 mph (50 kph).
He was one of five Kerry County
Council members who voted for the
motion Monday night. Three others voted
against, seven abstained and 12 council
members didn’t show up. Their decision
has no legal standing because the nation-
al government, not councils, sets policy
on road safety.
Healy-Rae — who like his politician
father is nationally famous for wearing a
cap everywhere and talking in rapid-fire
local dialect easy to parody but hard to
understand — said pub-loving farmers
“are living in isolated rural areas where
there’s no public transport of any kind.
They end up at home looking at the four
walls, night in and night out, because they
don’t want to take the risk of losing their
license.”
He said the older generation provided
the sociological fuel to Ireland’s tradition
of pub-based music and “craic,” Irish
slang for entertaining conversation.
“All the wisdom and all the wit and all
the culture that they had, the music and
the singing, that’s all being lost to the
younger generation,” Healy-Rae said.
8 16 22 30 33 4
Mega number
Jan. 23 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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REDWOOD CITY
Burglary. A home was burglarized on Madison
Avenue before 5:31 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 21.
Petty theft. A woman reported the theft of her
purse from Veterans Boulevard before 5:12 p.m.
on Monday, Jan. 21.
Burglary. The driver of a blue BMW reported
the window of his vehicle smashed and his lap-
top and wallet stolen on Main Street before
10:07 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 21.
DUI. The driver of a black Monte Carlo was
arrested for driving while intoxicated at El
Camino Real and Jackson Street before 7:07
p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 20.
Burglary. A vehicle was broken into and sever-
al guitars, a keyboard, cowboy hat and tools
were stolen on Whipple Avenue before 8:52
a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 20.
Police reports
In need of pest control
A man found a pipe, clothing and food in
his garage and suspected someone may be
living there on Arch Street in Redwood
City before 5:32 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The prime suspect in the 2010 shooting of
an East Palo Alto activist who still faces sen-
tencing for possessing three homemade
shanks in the county jail unsuccessfully
sought yesterday to fire the court-appointed
defense attorney responsible for having the
murder case dismissed.
Gregory Leon Elarms Sr., 60, of Pittsburg,
wanted to fire attorney Jonathan McDougall
and either be appointed a new lawyer or rep-
resent himself. After Judge Jonathan Karesh
denied Elarm’s motion to replace
McDougall, he withdrew his secondary
request to act as his own attorney.
Elarms has tried firing McDougall multi-
ple times since his assignment to the case.
The motion was denied each time.
Elarms will be back in court Wednesday
for sentencing on the jailhouse weapons
charges and faces up to four years in prison.
The weapons — a spork, a toothbrush and
two pencils strapped
together and all sharpened
to a point — were discov-
ered during cell searches
in February 2011. Elarms
pleaded no contest earlier
this month.
Prosecutors added the
felony charges in
November after Judge
Stephen Hall threw out
Elarms’ police confession and, with it, the
murder case stemming from the June 8, 2010
shooting of David Lewis. The District
Attorney’s Office asked the state Attorney
General’s Office to appeal the ruling and
used the weapons case as a way to keep
Elarms in custody in the meantime.
Elarms’ new case came as he was in cus-
tody without bail awaiting trial for Lewis’
murder in the parking garage of Hillsdale
Shopping Center in San Mateo. Elarms is
accused of following Lewis from San Mateo
Medical Center, where he was an outreach
worker, to the parking garage and shooting
him once in the torso. The men reportedly
knew each other from childhood but Elarms
believed Lewis had become his enemy.
Lewis uttered the name “Greg” before
dying but police made no arrests until con-
tacted by Elarms six months after the shoot-
ing. During the murder trial in November,
Judge Stephen Hall ruled Elarms’ police con-
fession inadmissible because San Mateo
police did not Mirandize him or respond to
his numerous requests for a lawyer.
Elarms’ prosecution was on hold for the
better part of a year while he was hospital-
ized in a state mental facility before being
found fit for trial. Upon his return to San
Mateo County last year, Elarms refused to
waive his right to a speedy trial and asked to
replace McDougall yet again.
Elarms is in custody in lieu of $500,000
bail.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Murder suspect denied request for new lawyer
Gregory Elarms
4
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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RECENT RESULTS
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rape victim
$1.00 million: Settlement for
Uninsured Motorist Claim
$405,000: Judgment for
Domestic Violence Survivor
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
• U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, will serve as the top
Democrat of the Subcommittee on
Energy Policy, Health Care and
Entitlements on the Oversight and
Government Reform Committee.
The subcommittee has oversight
jurisdiction over federal health care
policy, food and drug safety, energy policy and solvency of
federal entitlement programs. U.S. Rep. James Lankford,
R-OK, will serve as the subcommittee’s chairman.
STATE GOVERNMENT
• State Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, will introduce leg-
islation to require the California Department of Fish and
Wildlife to utilize nonlethal options when responding to
incidents like the one that led to the fatal shooting of two
mountain lion cubs by a game warden in the backyard of a
home in Half Moon Bay Dec. 1.
Hill will hold a press conference today to officially
announce the legislation. Joining Hill will be representatives
of the Mountain Lion Foundation, Felidae Conservation
Fund and Half Moon Bay Mayor Rick Kowalczyk.
The press conference is 10 a.m. at CuriOdyssey, 1651
Coyote Point Drive in San Mateo.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Bruno City Council will hold a study session
to discuss establishing a nonprofit that will manage the $70
million settlement from Pacific Gas and Electric Company.
The nonprofit will make decisions about the use of funds for
the benefit of the entire San Bruno community. The council
will not be discussing specific ideas for future use of the
funds at the study session on Feb. 5. The council meets 7
p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5 at the San Bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An East Bay taxi driver who prosecu-
tors say bought thousands of dollars of
electronic devices from stores at San
Francisco International Airport last year
using fake credit cards was sentenced
yesterday to two years in the county jail.
But under the realignment rules, Vipan
Kumar Sharma, 38, will spend one year
in jail with the second year under
mandatory supervision. He has credit of
238 days accumulated while in custody
on $500,000 bail, leaving him only a few
months left to serve for felony counts of
burglary, identity theft and credit card
fraud.
Sharma, of Hayward, went to
Brookstone and Inmotion stores every
couple of weeks to buy on average
$1,200 worth of electronic good using
credit cards in his name. About six
weeks after a card was declined at
Inmotion, he returned to try again but
was told by store personnel he could
only use cash. The store employees
pieced together a string of nine frauds
over two months and contacted the
Sheriff’s Office whose deputies arrested
him Sept. 28, 2012 when he was recog-
nized at Brookstone. He had 11 fake
credit cards on him, each in his name but
with the last four digits roughly scraped
off and imprinted with new ones.
A probation search of his home
revealed several more cards and dozens
of electronic goods like a computer and
video players still in boxes from
Brookstone, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
Cabbie gets jail for burglary, identity theft
Trio to trial for ID theft
Three people arrested by South San
Francisco police after a Los Angeles
woman contacted them to report some-
body using her husband’s credit card
without permission at a hotel in the city
will stand trial on nine felonies.
A judge dismissed two counts against
Arthur Elbert, 38, of San Francisco,
Andrea Chestnut, 28, and Amanda
Masellis, 26, of Woodland, but let the
others stand after a preliminary hearing
on the evidence.
They return to court Feb. 7 to enter a
Superior Court plea and possibly set a
trial date.
Officers arrested the three individuals
after receiving a call from the victim’s
wife in late August. South San
Francisco police responding to the
hotel room on the 200 block of
Gateway Boulevard reported finding
evidence indicating the trio were
involved in a large-scale identity theft
ring.
The evidence included numerous
birth certificates, Social Security num-
bers, credit cards and a portable credit
card reader.
Chestnut and Masellis are in custody
on $150,000 bail while Elbert is held on
$50,000.
Local brief
5
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Harry E. Young, Jr.
Harry E. Young, Jr., long time
resident of San Mateo County,
passed away on Wednesday,
January 16, 2013. He spent 25
years with the Hotel and Restaurant
Employee’s union Local 340.
His titles were President, then Secretary/Treasurer.
A memorial will be held in Elk Grove on Monday,
January 28, 2013 at the East Lawn Elk Grove Memorial
Park at 2:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, his wishes were
for donations to be made to either St. Jude’s Children
Research at stjude.org/donate or The Alheimer’s
Association at alz.org.
Obituary
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The state Attorney General’s Office is
asking a local judge to rethink housing
an insane murderer in a private psychi-
atric facility funded by taxpayers and
recommit him to a state hospital but the
man’s defense attorney says doing so
would actually be more expensive.
“The state and prosecutors have an
established policy in place that those
who are not guilty by reason of insanity
or incompetent be housed at state hospi-
tals but they have the power to place
them in private facilities,” said Vince
O’Malley, attorney for Vitin Ajani Cruz,
who is accused of a 2004 stabbing death
of a fellow vocational center client in
San Carlos.
“They are just unwilling to break their
prior habits and customs,” he said.
At O’Malley’s urging in December,
Judge Mark Forcum ordered Cruz, 38,
treated at Crestwood Behavioral Health
Center near Calistoga rather than Napa
State Hospital as preferred by prosecu-
tors. Cruz had been staying at
Crestwood the previous 14 months while
deemed incompetent for trial on murder
charges and later while prosecuted for
the stabbing death.
O’Malley calls the option a win-win
situation because his client is back in a
familiar treatment environment and the
private facility’s day rate is nearly $400
less than Napa State Hospital. O’Malley
also claims
Crestwood was able
to ready Cruz for
prosecution when
Napa could not.
However, prosecutors
counter that the pri-
vate facility is not
meant as a permanent
placement for incom-
petent or insane
patients from the criminal system.
In his initial ruling, Forcum said
Crestwood officials can transfer Cruz to
Napa if there are any issues with med-
ication or bed availability but otherwise
the state of California will fund his stay
at the private facility.
The state Attorney General’s Office
disagrees with the decision and has filed
a motion asking Forcum to set aside his
original order. A hearing is set for Feb.
22.
Although the Attorney General’s
Office is the entity pursuing the reversal,
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said
the request is in line with his office’s
original argument — that defendants
should not be housed in private facilities
at the state’s expense.
In October, Cruz pleaded no contest to
second-degree murder and the use of a
knife in the Oct. 27, 2004 stabbing of
Alfonso Ruiz at Vocational
Rehabilitation Services on Quarry Road
in San Carlos. According to prosecutors,
Cruz mistook Ruiz for another man as
they sat next to each other at the center
and suddenly lunged at him with a knife.
Ruiz was stabbed several times in the
upper torso and arm. Cruz fled but was
arrested a few blocks away from the site.
Ruiz died the following afternoon.
Cruz accepted the negotiated plea
after prosecutors agreed he was not
guilty by reason of insanity based on
doctors’ conclusions.
Cruz’s hospitalization was just the lat-
est in a long string since his arrest in
Ruiz’s death. In 2005, court-appointed
doctors found him unable to aid in his
own defense and he went back and forth
between the mental facilities and county
care until he was found competent in
2012.
Competency is a person’s ability to aid
in his or her own defense while sanity is
a person’s mental state at the time of an
alleged act.
Schizophrenia medication and other
signs of psychiatric problems were
found at Cruz’s home during a police
search after the stabbing. O’Malley has
said Cruz has a deep fear of being
stabbed because he was left with severe
stomach wounds several years before the
murder during a bus attack in San
Francisco. Cruz thought Ruiz was some-
how associated with his previous attack-
ers and possibly armed with a box cutter,
according to O’Malley.
If Cruz had been convicted of murder
and found sane, he faced up to 26 years
in prison.
Judge asked to move insane
killer from private hospital
Vitin Cruz
Man who shot friend
in face gets 38 years
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
A 25-year-old Redwood City man who shot his friend in the
face after a night of heavy drinking last February has been sen-
tenced to 38 years to life in prison.
Okalani Latu, his arms and neck covered
in tattoos, stared blankly at Judge Clifford
Cretan yesterday morning as he was sen-
tenced in San Mateo County Superior Court.
Cretan said he had “zero sympathy” for
Latu, who he said blatantly violated the
terms of his probation from a 2010 assault
by illegally acquiring a .25-caliber pistol,
consuming alcohol and shooting his friend,
who survived the attack but will suffer its
effects “for the rest of his life.”
Latu claimed the shooting was an accident, defense attorney
Randy Hey said.
At about 2:30 a.m. on Feb. 15, 2012, a resident of San Carlos
Avenue in unincorporated Redwood City was awakened by a
man covered in blood pounding on his front door, according to
prosecutors. The man had been shot.
Sheriff’s deputies responded and the victim identified the
shooter as Latu, who was found driving in the area about 45 min-
utes later and arrested.
The two friends were part of a group that had been out drink-
ing at various Redwood City bars for most of the evening, pros-
ecutors said.
After the last bar closed, Latu apparently ordered the 24-year-
old victim to get out of his car and then — without apparent
provocation — shot him in the face, District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe said.
The victim “ran off screaming for help” and Latu drove away,
Wagstaffe said.
The victim was taken to Stanford Hospital and survived, but
has suffered total loss of taste, smell and hearing in one ear. His
jaw was permanently damaged and the bullet remains lodged in
his head, Wagstaffe said.
Okalani Latu
6
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Agitation, Medications
and
Behavioral Interventions

- 7:00 pm
Join us for an educational speaking event on:





























N




Elizabeth A. Landsverk, M.D is a board certified physician with more then 21 years of experience in internal
medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care. Dr. Landsverk is the founder of ElderConsult, a Geriatric
Medicine Housecalls Program that addresses the challenging medical and social issues of older patients and
their families. Dr. Landsverk has also participated in the Scientific Council for the Alzheimer’s Association,
consults on multiple projects for the Institute on Aging and was a member of the San Francisco Elder Abuse
Forensics Center – with adult protective services, the district attorney, the police and the public guardian.
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Health &
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Saturday, January 26, 2013
9:00am to 1:00pm
Millbrae Recreation Center
477 Lincoln Circle, Millbrae
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Goody Bags for first
250 attendees
Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
On Wednesday, the South San Francisco
City Council introduced an ordinance restrict-
ing smoking in certain areas and extended a
ban on big box store and grocery use in other
areas of the city for 16 months.
South San Francisco’s downtown has been
marred by a variety of issues in recent years
like homelessness and transients which offi-
cials say have been causing problems. In
December, the council was introduced to four
ideas Mayor Pro Tem Karyl Matsumoto put
forward to curb challenges while promoting
more activity. All ideas were met with enthu-
siasm for more study and to be brought back
before the council in the future. On
Wednesday, the council got an update on the
actions and decided to introduce a smoking
ban in city-owned parks and walkways. It’s a
measure to deter people who chronically cre-
ate problems downtown from hanging around
the area.
At the same meeting, the council extended a
city-wide ban on large retail stores and gro-
cery uses east of Highway 101.
In December, the council approved a 45-day
moratorium to allow time to research if big
box stores were a fit for the community. The
ban was extended an additional 16 months
allowing the city to contract with Ascent
Environmental to conduct a study about the
change.
Conversations about big box stores started
in South San Francisco late this summer when
rumors began to circulate that Walmart was
interested in moving into the Lowe’s location
east of Highway 101. As a result, the council
conducted an analysis of the impact the open-
ing of a superstore would have on other retail
establishments in the city. While both Walmart
and Lowe’s have denied the rumors, a repre-
sentative from Lowe’s did previously submit a
letter opposing the proposal.
More recently, Costco submitted a letter
wanting to work to make changes to the ban to
allow for a new business center the company
had hoped to open in South San Francisco.
While the company isn’t sure the moratorium
would prohibit such a business, it wanted to
work with the city before moving forward,
according to the Jan. 7 from Tim Rose, execu-
tive vice president of Business Centers.
Six standing trial for Bell corruption
LOS ANGELES — A half dozen former
officials of a scandal-ridden Southern
California city heard a prosecutor paint them
as thieves Thursday. But their lawyers told
jurors in their trial that they were tireless
workers for the good of the community of
Bell.
Defense attorneys said their clients are
being wrongly blamed for the misdeeds of a
city manager who ripped off the city treasury
for millions and a city attorney who never
advised them they were giving themselves
illegally huge salaries.
Ronald Kaye, who represents former coun-
cilmember George Cole, said Robert Rizzo
kept council members in the dark about what
was going on as he systematically enriched
himself at the expense of citizens.
“When he ripped off this city and these
councilmembers, he duped them,” Kay said.
He depicted Cole as a dedicated resident of
the small blue-collar community who worked
for new schools and other benefits. If he was
paid $70,000 a year for a part-time job, he
said, “He believed that was reasonable.”
City introduces smoking
restrictions ordinance
Woman with Alzheimer’s missing
Police are asking for the public’s assistance
in locating a woman who left her home on the
1000 block of Idyllwild Avenue in unincorpo-
rated San Mateo County near Redwood City
at about 11:30 a.m. Thursday.
The woman, Margaret Woodman, 67, has
Alzheimer’s disease, did not have any money
on her when she left, does not drive a vehicle
and may be in the area of downtown Redwood
City. She has been known to frequent
Courthouse Square, according to the San
Mateo County Sheriff’s Office.
She left her home to go for a walk but has
yet to return. She is white,
with brown hair and eyes,
5 feet 6 inches and 110
pounds. She was last wear-
ing a white leather jacket
and black pants with a
flower print, according to
the Sheriff’s Office.
Anyone with any infor-
mation is asked to call the
Sheriff’s Office at 363-
4911.
Local brief
Margaret
Woodman
Around the state
STATE/NATION/WORLD 7
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
advertisement
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Sen. John
Kerry, President Barack Obama’s
nominee for secretary of state, col-
lected pledges of support Thursday
and testified at his confirmation
hearing that U.S. foreign policy
should be defined by a helping hand
as well as military strength.
The Massachusetts Democrat
discussed Iran, Syria, climate
change and a variety of issues with
members of the Foreign Relations
Committee at a hearing that
recalled an unusual American life
— son of a diplomat, Navy lieu-
tenant who volunteered for
Vietnam, anti-war protester, five-
term senator, unsuccessful nominee
for president, and Obama’s unoffi-
cial envoy.
The nearly four-hour hearing also
provided an odd juxtaposition as
Kerry, a member of the panel for 28
years and its chairman for the last
four, sat alone in the witness chair.
At one point, Sen. Bob Menendez,
D-N.J., the incoming chairman who
presided, mistakenly referred to
Kerry as “Mr. Secretary.”
The current secretary, Hillary
Rodham Clinton, introduced Kerry,
calling him “the right choice.” She
is stepping down after four years.
The committee is expected to
approve Kerry’s nomination. A full
Senate vote will take place
Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid said.
“American foreign policy is not
defined by drones and deployments
alone,” Kerry said in outlining his
views. “We cannot allow the
extraordinary good we do to save
and change lives to be eclipsed
entirely by the role we have had to
play since Sept. 11, a role that was
thrust upon us.”
Kerry spoke out strongly for
dealing with climate change, pro-
viding food and energy security and
humanitarian assistance.
Kerry tackles questions
on Iran, Syria and Hagel
Dutch, Britons, Germans
warned to leave Benghazi
LONDON — Britain, Germany,
Canada and the Netherlands urged
their citizens to immediately leave
the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi
on Thursday, warning of an immi-
nent threat against Westerners days
after a deadly hostage crisis in
neighboring Algeria.
European officials told the
Associated Press that schools were
among the potential targets.
The warnings came a day after
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton testified to
Congress about the Sept. 11 attack
on the U.S. diplomatic mission in
Benghazi that killed four
Americans, including the U.S.
ambassador to Libya. They also
came as French troops battled al-
Qaida-linked militants in the West
African nation of Mali, and fol-
lowed the deaths of at least 37 for-
eign hostages seized by Islamist
extremists in Algeria.
Syrian jets bomb
rebel areas near Damascus
BEIRUT — Syrian warplanes
bombed rebel areas near Damascus
on Thursday as President Bashar
Assad’s troops battled opposition
fighters for control of the road
linking the capital to the country’s
largest airport.
Assad’s forces are trying drive
out rebels who have established
enclaves in the suburbs. While the
government has lost control of
large swaths of territory in the
country’s north and east, including
parts of the northern city of
Aleppo, the capital remains tightly
secured.
Around the world
By Marcy Gordon and Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President
Barack Obama sent his strongest sig-
nal yet Thursday that he wants the
government to get tougher with Wall
Street, appointing a former prosecu-
tor to head the Securities and
Exchange Commission for the first
time in the
agency’s 79-year
history.
Mary Jo
White, former
U.S. attorney in
Manhattan, has
an extensive
record of prose-
cuting white-
collar crime, won convictions in the
1993 World Trade Center bombing
and the 1998 terrorist attacks on two
U.S. embassies in Africa, and put
crime boss John Gotti away.
If confirmed, she will have the job
of enforcing complicated regulations
written in response to the worst finan-
cial crisis since the Depression.
“You don’t want to mess with
Mary Jo,” the president said at the
White House with White at his side.
“As one former SEC chairman said,
Mary Jo does not intimidate easily,
and that’s important because she’s
got a big job ahead of her.”
White would take over at the SEC
from Elisse Walter, who has been
interim chairwoman since Mary
Schapiro resigned in December.
Obama picks former prosecutor to head SEC
Mary Jo White
REUTERS
U.S.Sen.John Kerry testifies during his Senate Foreign Relations Committee
confirmation hearing to be secretary of state.
LOCAL 8
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Day labor law to end
Efforts to keep day laborers off the street
and potential employers from parking illegal-
ly while hiring workers were so successful
the county was planning to repeal an ordi-
nance limiting where they seek employment
the week of Jan. 25, 2008.
Sheriff Greg Munks was set to
ask the Board of
Supervisors the next
week to add a termi-
nation date to the
existing Roadway Solicitation
Ordinance. The ordinance let
officers cite workers who trespass on clearly
marked private property or who are involved
in the illegal parking of a vehicle in a road.
The driver of the involved vehicle can also be
liable if he or she is soliciting a day laborer.
The city of San Mateo has a similar ordi-
nance and only passed it after creating its
worker resource center at Fifth and Railroad
avenues.
The board passed the ordinance in May
2005 after closing the county’s day laborer
center at 3180 Middlefield Road.
Police finish T.G.I. Friday’s
crime scene investigation
An autopsy of the murdered T.G.I. Friday’s
night manager indicates he died from blunt
type object to the head, a San Mateo police
lieutenant said the week of Jan. 25, 2008
A daytime restaurant manager arrived at
the eatery, located at 3101 S. El Camino
Real, at around 5:15 a.m. Monday and found
Hayward resident Douglas Castello, 36, dead
on the floor.
The manager immediately called police,
who arrived within minutes. Castello was
pronounced dead at the scene.
Massive mudslide buries Highway 1
Days of downpour sent a mudslide tum-
bling onto Highway 1 at Devil’s Slide the
week of Jan. 25, 2008, closing the area for
nearly six hours.
The slide occurred at approximately 3:30
p.m. Friday of that week and crews from
both Caltrans
and the tunnel
contractor were
on scene to assess the situation, said Jeff
Norris, district coordinator for the San Mateo
County Office of Emergency Service.
By 9:20 p.m., the San Mateo County alert
system delivered a message that Highway 1
was reopened.
Millbrae hotel plans on hold
The week of Jan. 25, 2008, plans to replace
Millbrae’s Clarion Hotel with three new
hotels were delayed one year with talks of
changing the proposal to include retail.
Starwood Hotels, the parent company of
Clarion, was given a one-year extension of a
permit to demolish one hotel and build three
others. Concerns arose with talks of scrap-
ping the third — and possibly second —
hotel for a retail project to make the plan fea-
sible. However, no definite retail plans or
ideas were discussed.
Higher than anticipated construction costs
and a soft housing markets were cited for
causing the delay.
From the archives highlights stories originally
printed five years ago this week. It appears in the
Friday edition of the Daily Journal.
Harry E. Young Jr.
Harry E. Young Jr., longtime resident of
San Mateo County, died Wednesday, Jan. 16,
2013.
He spent 25 years with the Hotel and
Restaurant Employee’s Union Local 340. His
titles were president, then secretary/treasurer.
A memorial will be held in Elk Grove 2 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 28, 2013 at the East Lawn Elk
Grove Memorial Park.
In lieu of flowers, his wishes were for dona-
tions to be made to either St. Jude’s Children
Research at stjude.org/donate or The
Alheimer’s Association at alz.org.
D
onald Newman, who served on
the Peninsula Health Care
District Board of Directors for
14 years, announced his resignation effec-
tive Feb. 1. The district has decided to
launch an appointment process to fill the
remaining two years on his term. Anyone
interested in the appointment should contact
the district office for more information at
www.peninsulahealthcaredistrict.org.
The Board of Supervisors will also
honor Newman with a resolution Tuesday
for his 14 years on the board.
***
The Daily Journal and Health Plan of
San Mateo are hosting the Senior
Showcase Health and Wellness Fair this
Saturday at the Millbrae Recreation
Center. Stay healthy with free health
screenings. Protect your identity with free
document shredding. Come early to receive
a goody bags and refreshments. Plus, visit
more than 40 exhibitor booths. Admission is
free and everyone is welcome. Be sure to
say hi to Daily Journal staff while you are
there!
***
Laurie Wishard has joined the Child
Care Coordinating Council for San Mateo
— otherwise known as 4Cs — as its new
executive director. The 4Cs creates child
care and preschool opportunities in San
Mateo County.
***
The San Mateo County Human
Services Agency recently received national
re-accreditation through the New York-
based Council on Accreditation on all eli-
gible services areas, including adoptions,
child protective services, foster care/kinship
care, youth independent living, children’s
receiving home, family resource centers and
workforce development services.
Public and nonprofit agencies pursue and
maintain accreditation to demonstrate the
implementation of best practice standards in
the field of human services. COA evaluated
all aspects of HSA’s programs, services,
management and administration.
***
Nearly two dozen Kaiser Permanente
staff and caregivers spent their Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. holiday in Redwood City’s
Stulsaft Park on Farmhill Boulevard,
wielding shovels and rakes, pulling weeds
and more. For Kaiser Permanente, the holi-
day is “A Day On, Not Off.” The volunteer
gardeners were from Kaiser Permanente
medical centers in Redwood City, South San
Francisco and others.
The project, in cooperation with Acterra,
included planting buckeye trees, repairing
some vandalized signs and spending quality
time with weeds and dirt.
***
San Francisco Giants fans can check out
the World Series trophy in Daly City on
Friday with a voluntary $2 donation. The
funds will go to the Junior Giants program
in Daly City. A photographer will be on
hand to take pictures for purchase but,
depending on the size of the line, fans may
also be allowed to snap photographs with
their own cameras. The trophy will be at
City Hall, 333 90th St., from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. Friday, Jan. 25. Parking around the
civic center is limited so fans are encour-
aged to carpool to take public transit. The
SamTrans Route 121 stops at Edgeworth
Avenue and 90th Street.
Side note, 49ers fans are encouraged to
wear their colors, said Vice Mayor David
Canepa.
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Obituary
OPINION 9
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Prostate cancer
screening: A personal decision
Editor,
The recent news about Gov. Jerry
Brown’s prostate cancer diagnosis
brings to light a vitally important issue
about men’s health and the potential
benefits of early detection. According
to Brown’s oncologist, his prognosis is
excellent, as it is localized and was
caught in its early stages.
Prostate cancer is the second leading
cause of cancer death in men and it
ranks fifth in all causes of death
according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. Some prostate
cancers are fast-growing and can
spread to other parts of the body,
endangering a man’s health. Others,
however, are slow-growing and may
not pose a serious threat.
This is why I have decided to be
proactive and get screened. I am partic-
ipating in Seton Medical Center’s
Know Your Stats event this Saturday,
Jan. 26 at Capuchino High School in
San Bruno, where hospital physicians
will be performing free prostate cancer
screenings. I commend Seton for offer-
ing this tremendous service to our com-
munity, providing men with the screen-
ing and other educational resources.
David Wilcox, former 49er and NFL
Hall of Famer will share his experience
with prostate cancer at the event.
Medical experts differ on the benefits
and risks of screening and treatments.
Those who recommend screening
believe that early detection and treat-
ment could save lives. Those who dis-
agree do not believe there is enough
evidence to support that view and
believe that some prostate cancer treat-
ments could cause unpleasant side
effects for no good reason.
David Canepa
Daly City
The letter writer is the vice mayor of
Daly City
Councilman Jack
Matthews’ integrity
Editor,
For the first time in donkey years I
find myself in 110 percent agreement
with Sue Lempert in her testament to
the integrity of Jack Matthews (“An
arcitect on the City Council” column in
the Jan. 21 edition of the Daily
Journal).
Having closely followed the 7-Eleven
debacle to the point of reading all the
administrative reports, absolutely no
whiff of wrongdoing on his part is evi-
dent. I have had ongoing dealings with
the councilman since his early Planning
Commission tenure and have always
found him forthright, upstanding and
respectful to his constituency. Unlike
many elected officials today, the coun-
cilman truly serves at the pleasure of
the people not only in his own city, but
gives fair representation to regional
issues that affect the Peninsula.
Although unable to cast a vote in a San
Mateo election, I am proud to know
and work with the honorable Jack
Matthews.
Pat Giorni
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
By Ron Collins
A
s a member of the San Carlos
City Council, it is my respon-
sibility to participate in deci-
sions on the merits of a project near the
San Carlos Caltrain depot known as the
San Carlos Transit Village. This mixed-
use residential and commercial project
has been planned since the late 1990s
on a portion of vacant land owned by
SamTrans and the Peninsula Corridor
Joint Powers Board along El Camino
Real in the Holly Street area in San
Carlos. The San Carlos Transit Village
proposal would result in the develop-
ment of multi-family rental housing
units, offices, retail space, underground
and street parking, new paving treat-
ments, enhanced landscaping and a
pedestrian plaza. The land has been
pre-zoned for this use for many years.
Once built, this will be the second
largest development in San Carlos’ his-
tory, so it is important that we get it
right. The process of reviewing such a
project is full of complexities, confu-
sion and uncertainty for many in our
community. As a relative newcomer to
the council, I have many questions
about the project, and I frequently
receive questions and comments from
residents. Many of the questions I have
received are about understanding the
review process and what the council
can and cannot do, and what challenges
will be addressed as we decide the
future of this part of
town. In California,
there are a number
of statutory guide-
lines that govern the
process of review
for this type of proj-
ect.
CEQA, or the
California
Environmental Quality Act, is a state
statute that requires state and local
agencies to identify the significant envi-
ronmental impacts of a project and to
avoid or mitigate those impacts, if fea-
sible. Every development project which
requires a discretionary governmental
approval will require at least some
environmental review pursuant to
CEQA, unless an exemption applies.
The EIR is a report of, as its name
implies, the impact of a particular proj-
ect on its surrounding environment.
Each public agency in California (in
our case, the city of San Carlos) that
has jurisdiction over a project must,
according to CEQA, certify that an EIR
has been prepared and has evaluated all
impacts a project will have on air, soil,
water, traffic, etc. as a result of its con-
struction. The EIR does not indicate if a
project should or should not be built. It
does not pass judgment on the cultural
or economic impact of a project, or
even if it is a good fit for the communi-
ty. In essence, the final EIR, once certi-
fied, and no matter how technically
accurate it may be, does not determine
whether a project will be built. That is
the job of the agency. In other words, it
is the job of the city of San Carlos to
decide if the project gets built.
It is also the job of the City Council,
using the EIR as a guide, to communi-
cate to the project developer what spe-
cific changes, improvements, alterations
or reductions it wants to see to approve
the actual project. These changes are
the result of many hours of input from
various entities that include city staff,
members of the public and other inter-
est groups. We value this input, as we
feel it eventually makes for a better
project, even if it takes a little longer
than might usually be expected.
Large projects, such as the Transit
Village, require a substantial review
process so that the City Council and the
community can hear from stakeholders,
review expert analysis and receive com-
ments from any interested party in ren-
dering a responsible decision that takes
into consideration how the Transit
Village project will impact our city and
its residents for years to come.
Ron Collins is a member of the San
Carlos City Council.
What it takes to build a village
Whistleblower
policy to return
A
fter a false start in November, the county seems
to be proceeding with its whistleblower guide-
lines, officially called the “internal
controls/fraud prevention initiative,” proposed by
Supervisor Dave Pine.
As you may remember, Pine’s proposal was put on hold
by Supervisor Don Horsley,
who said he wasn’t sure it was
necessary. However, the two
have worked on a subcommit-
tee together and have ham-
mered out a few details to ease
its passage when it comes back
to the board likely next month.
Originally, the cost was ball-
parked to be $262,000 to start
it up and about $70,000 a year
annually. According to Pine,
that has been scaled back and is
now up to $45,400 in one-time
costs. Essentially, the proposal
will consolidate guidelines and procedures for reporting
suspected fraud, waste and abuse into a single web-based
point, retain a vendor to provide an independent hotline
and implement continuous employee training. Two other
components that would have added cost have been
dropped from the proposal, but Pine said will likely still
be pursued by the controller’s office and funded from that
office. One is an expansion of analysis software that can
identify unusual financial activities and a one-time inde-
pendent evaluation of the controller’s internal audit divi-
sion to implement best practices.
San Mateo County has had a significant number of
fraud and embezzlement in the last two years, most
notably with the Mosquito and Vector Control District, the
Public Administrator division of the District Attorney’s
Office and the Portola Valley School District. While this
initiative will not cure all ills, it’s certainly a step in the
right direction.
“It’s an inexpensive way to encourage more whistle-
blowing, that’s a good thing,” Pine said. “There are too
many problems, too much fraud in the public sector in
San Mateo County. It’s time to tighten up the processes.”
Once this is up and running in the county, my hope is
that it is something that can be shared with smaller dis-
tricts in the county and even cities so future fraud and
embezzlement can be caught early and even prevented.
***
The Macedonia Church of God in Christ has been pro-
viding food as part of its pantry program to those in need
in North Central San Mateo for the past few years.
It’s a critical program for the neighborhood and draws
about 200 people a week when it opens its back door
every Tuesday to hand out fresh, canned and packaged
food to anyone who meets certain requirements and signs
up. It started with a few single mothers at the congrega-
tion saying that they had issues with providing their chil-
dren with enough nutrition. Second Harvest Food bank
provides most of the food, but they are able to get more
through local grocers when it is available. It has since
grown into a regular safety net for many, especially in this
time of need.
So it was particularly distressing when church officials
discovered that someone had broken into their storage
shed two Fridays ago and stole six cases of canned goods.
“It was all gone, wiped out,” said Deacon Victor
Morton.
The church did not file a police report but decided they
needed a more secure way to store the food they regularly
give away. They are looking to buy a sturdy Tuff Shed
storage unit that locks and a steel security door for the
church itself. The cost is about $800, and Morton is hop-
ing a local service organization steps up with a donation
that will cover the cost.
There are a number of service organizations in the area,
including Rotary, the Lions Club and the Elks Club that
could make a meaningful donation that would help this
church continue to provide a much-needed service to the
community.
To donate or for more information contact Morton at
(650) 704-7985 or email him at samorton@sbcglobal.net.
***
Former San Mateo mayor Claire Mack will read from
her new novel “Sister Samms and Sister Johnson, the
Neighborhood” 7 p.m. tonight at 611 S. B St. in San
Mateo. If you know Claire, you know it will be worth
checking out. If you don’t know Claire, here’s your
chance.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmays.
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,825.33 +0.33% 10-Yr Bond 1.84% +0.60%
Nasdaq3,050.39 +0.00% Oil (per barrel) 96.03
S&P 500 1,494.82 +0.00% Gold 1,686.40
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — A sharp drop in
Apple’s stock pulled the Nasdaq down
with it after the tech giant warned of
weaker sales. Other stock-market
indexes eked out slight gains.
Apple sank $63.50 to $450.50. With
iPhone sales hitting a plateau and no
new products to introduce, Apple said
sales would likely increase just 7 per-
cent in the current quarter. That’s a let-
down for a company that has regularly
posted growth rates above 50 percent.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
edged up 0.01 of a point to 1,494.82.
Earlier in the day, the S&P 500 crossed
above 1,500 for the first time since
December 2007.
The broad gauge of the stock market
has already gained 4.8 percent this year
and climbed seven days in a row.
One reason for the market’s recent rise
is that some of the biggest obstacles have
been pushed aside, said Brian Gendreau,
a market strategist at Cetera Financial
Group. On Wednesday, the House of
Representatives agreed to suspend the
federal government’s borrowing limit
until May 19, allowing the U.S. to keep
paying its bills for another four months.
“Politics is off the table for now and
Europe seems like it’s stable. So what’s
left? It’s earnings. And aside from
Apple it seems like pretty good news,”
Gendreau said.
The Dow Jones industrial average
gained 46 points to close at 13,825.33.
The Nasdaq fell 23.29 points to
3,130.38. The 12 percent drop in Apple,
which makes up 10 percent of the
index, was enough to pull the Nasdaq
lower.
Even after its recent slump, Apple still
ranks as the world’s most valuable com-
pany at $423 billion, putting it $7 billion
ahead of the runner up, Exxon Mobil.
Heading into this earnings season,
many investors wondered whether
shrinking sales would start to squeeze
Corporate America’s profits. Judging
by the results so far, few are struggling.
Of the 134 big companies in the S&P
500 that reported through Thursday
morning, 85 have beaten Wall Street’s
estimates, according to S&P Capital IQ.
Microsoft fell in after-hours trading
after reporting that its earnings slipped
4 percent in the last quarter of 2012.
Starbucks, which also reported results
after the closing bell, was little changed
as its revenue came in slightly below
forecasts.
Netflix jumped $43.60 to $146.86, a
42 percent bounce. Analysts had
expected rising costs to lead the movie
and TV show distributor to post a loss
in the last three months of 2012. But
Netflix said late Wednesday that it
turned a profit with the help of 2 mil-
lion new subscribers.
The Labor Department reported that
the number of Americans applying for
unemployment aid fell last week to the
lowest since January 2008.
Applications dropped 5,000 to 330,000.
The four-week average also hit a five-
year low.
The employment report nudged
prices for U.S. government bonds
down, sending their yields higher. The
yield on the benchmark 10-year
Treasury note inched up to 1.85 percent
from 1.83 percent late Wednesday.
Airline stocks were mostly higher.
Despite rising fuel costs, Southwest
reported better earnings than analysts
had expected, thanks partially to the
airline charging $8 more for the average
fare. The parent company of United
Airlines and Continental took a heavy
quarterly loss but announced plans to
cut around 600 jobs.
Apple tugs Nasdaq index lower
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Xerox Corp., up 17 cents at $7.75
The copier maker and business services provider said its fourth-quarter
net income fell 11 percent, but it still beat Wall Street expectations.
Nokia Corp., down 38 cents at $4.26
Struggling with competition, the mobile phone maker posted a weak
outlook and said it will not pay a 2012 dividend, to save money.
Brunswick Corp., up $2.41 at $35.22
The seller of boats and boat engines and fitness equipment maker posted
fourth-quarter results that met Wall Street expectations.
Swift Transportation Co., up $2.91 at $13.14
The truckload delivery company posted results for the fourth quarter
that topped what analysts expected.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., down $63.51 at $450.50
The maker of the iPhone and iPad reported quarterly results that point
to slowing growth after five blowout years.
Netflix Inc., up $43.60 at $146.86
The online video subscription service reported fourth-quarter results
with a gain of 2 million subscribers in the U.S.
Travelzoo Inc., up $4.67 at $23.88
The travel company’s profit shrank in its most recent quarter, as the
website hired more salespeople and spent more on marketing.
F5 Networks Inc., up $4.41 at $103.22
The information technology company said it will launch new products
over the next two quarters that will increase revenue.
Big movers
“Politics is off the table for now and Europe
seems like it’s stable. So what’s left? It’s earnings.
And aside from Apple it seems like pretty good news.”
— Brian Gendreau, a market strategist at Cetera Financial Group
By Peter Svensson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Apple needs to come
down off its perch and start making nice
with Wall Street, analysts said Thursday
as investors hammered the company’s
stock.
The sell-off put Apple a hair’s-breadth
away from losing its status as the world’s
most valuable company. At Thursday’s
close, it was worth $423 billion, just 1.6
percent more than No. 2 Exxon Mobil
Corp.
The plunge was set off Apple’s quarter-
ly earnings report late Wednesday, which
suggested the company’s nearly decade-
long growth spurt is slowing drastically.
The stock ended down $63.51 or 12
percent, at $450.50. It last traded that low
a year ago.
What can Apple do to boost its stock?
Analysts say it may not be able to win
back the investors who bought the stock
on the way up. They’ll be chasing the
next hot stock. But the company can
make itself appealing to a new crop of
investors who’ve never considered the
stock, by doing what Wall Street wants
and doling out more of its massive cash
pile in the form of more generous divi-
dends and stock buybacks.
Apple’s profits for the October-
December quarter were flat compared
with the year before. It still managed to
grow revenue 18 percent from the year
before, but the cost of starting up produc-
tion lines for multiple new products like
the iPhone 5 and iPad Mini meant that
less revenue flowed to the bottom line.
Analysts to Apple: Bend
your knee to Wall Street
REUTERS
A display for the iPhone 5 is pictured at Apple’s flagship retail store in San Francisco.
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Netflix’s
rollercoaster ride on Wall Street surged
to new heights Thursday.
The company’s stock climbed $43.60
to close at $146.86 as investors celebrat-
ed a fourth-quarter earnings report high-
lighted by accelerated growth in
Netflix’s Internet video service.
The 42 percent increase in Netflix’s
market value marked the stock’s biggest
single-day gain since Netflix went pub-
lic more than a decade ago when
investors were still shunning Internet
businesses in the wake of the dot-com
bust.
The last time that Netflix’s stock came
close to soaring like this came in
October 2002 when the shares rose near-
ly 36 percent in a single session. That
gain, though, wasn’t quite as impressive
because Netflix’s stock closed at a split-
adjusted $3.55 that day. The meager val-
uation reflected widespread doubts
about a quirky company trying to make
money renting DVDs with a monthly
subscription service that delivered the
discs through the mail.
Although it still operates its shrinking
DVD-by-mail rental service, Netflix Inc.
is now leading the way into a new era in
home and mobile entertainment. The
company’s main subscription service
now streams movies and TV shows to
any device with a high-speed connec-
tion, freeing consumers from the shack-
les of conventional television viewing.
Netflix’s early success in Internet
video enthralled Wall Street until its
CEO, Reed Hastings, irked subscribers
18 months ago by announcing the com-
pany was ending its practice of allowing
them to get DVD rental and streaming
services in a single package. Customers
who wanted to keep both options were
hit with price increases of as much as 60
percent, triggering a customer backlash
that started Netflix stock’s jarring plunge
from its peak of nearly $305 in July
2011.
Even after Netflix began to slowly
regain disaffected subscribers last year,
the company continued to lose its luster
on Wall Street.
Netflix stocks soars 41 pct after strong 4Q report
Belkin to buy Linksys router maker from Cisco
PLAYA VISTA — Belkin, a maker of smartphone cases
and computing accessories, said Thursday that it is buy-
ing the home networking business unit of Cisco, includ-
ing the Linksys router brand.
Privately held Belkin, based in Playa Vista did not dis-
close the purchase price, nor did Cisco Systems Inc. The
deal is expected to close in March.
Belkin intends to maintain the Linksys brand, as well as
honor warranties on current and future Linksys products.
The company said that after the acquisition, it will
account for about 30 percent of the U.S. retail home and
small-business networking market.
Cisco has been moving away from products it sells
directly to consumers, and it laid out a strategy last month
to become a leading supplier of information technology to
big businesses.
In 2011 it shuttered its consumer-oriented Flip video
camera business. Last year, it bought NDS Group Ltd., a
U.K. software firm that helps cable and satellite TV com-
panies deliver content to subscribers’ digital video
recorders, tablets, smartphones and other devices.
Hilton Romanski, vice president of corporate business
development for Cisco, said in a blog post Thursday that
Belkin and Cisco will continue to have a strategic rela-
tionship in dealing with service providers.
“We are confident that we have found the best buyer in
Belkin,” he said. “We look forward to witnessing Belkin’s
growth as they bring Linksys into their family.”
Belkin CEO Chet Pipkin said the company’s ultimate
goal is to be “the global leader in the connected home and
wireless networking space,” saying this acquisition was
an important step.
Cisco shares fell 5 cents in after-hours trading to $20.97
following the announcement, after closing up 40 cents,
about 2 percent, at $21.02 in the regular session.
Fund founder gets two years in prison
NEW YORK — A San Francisco hedge fund founder
has been sentenced in New York to two years in prison for
his conviction on insider trading charges.
Doug Whitman was sentenced Thursday by U.S.
District Judge Jed Rakoff. The judge also fined the
founder of Whitman Capital $250,000 and ordered him to
forfeit $935,000. Whitman was convicted of securities
fraud and conspiracy by a jury in August.
Prosecutors say he made nearly $1 million between
2006 and 2009 by receiving inside tips about the earnings
of public companies. Whitman had testified that he was
careful to avoid inside trades.
At sentencing, Whitman said he was “terribly, terribly
sorry.”
The sentence was below the four to five years that fed-
eral sentencing guidelines recommended Whitman serve.
He reports to prison May 9.
Business briefs
<< Sharks top Coyotes, page 12
• Luck excited about Pro Bowl appearance, page 13
Friday, Dec. 25, 2013
DISABLED ARE ATHLETES TOO: A NEW RULING SAYS SCHOOLS MUST ACCOMMODATE DISABLED ATHLETES >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
There were much more than just
bragging rights on the line when the
Hillsdale and Aragon girls’ soccer
teams met Thursday afternoon —
namely, a win.
Both the Knights and the Dons
came into the game looking for their
first Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division victory. Both sides had a
number of opportunities but they
will have to wait until next week as
they finished in a 1-1 tie.
“We’ve had a few of those this
season,” said Hillsdale coach Samia
Shoman. “We have the opportunities
and we don’t quite get there.”
The Dons are in the same boat.
“We’ve only lost two. We’ve
played seven (games in PAL play),”
said Aragon coach Nick Dye. “We
seem to be getting punished every
time we make a mistake.”
Truth be told, Hillsdale (0-6-1
PAL Bay, 0-10-2 overall) should
have walked away with a 2-1 win,
but a prime scoring opportunity in
the opening minutes went by the
wayside when Hillsdale misfired on
an open net. The Knights had a cou-
ple of dangerous chances in the
early parts of the game, but Aragon
goalkeeper Ashley Lenz kept
Hillsdale off the scoreboard with
some aggressive play off her goal
line in thwarting the Knights’
attacks.
Aragon (0-2-5, 0-6-6) drew first
blood off a mistake by the Hillsdale
defense. From just past the midfield
stripe, Alexa Smith sent a long ball
toward the Hillsdale goal. The
Hillsdale sweeper appeared to be in
position to clear the ball away, but it
skipped past her and Aislinn Oka
pounced on the loose ball and broke
in on goal. She went around the
goalkeeper and deposited a shot into
the empty net to give the Dons a 1-0
lead in the 15th minute.
Still no wins
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragon’s Arianna Campos, left, challenges Hillsdale’s Tayla Kelley
for the ball during a 1-1 tie in a PAL Bay Division game Thursday.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Jackie Harbaugh will
wear a neutral-colored outfit, still to be deter-
mined. Her daughter, Joani Crean, little sister to
coaching brothers John and Jim Harbaugh, plans
to sport all black at the Super Bowl to show no
allegiances whatsoever.
“I am wearing whatever fits that day,” Crean
quipped.
The entire Harbaugh family — a close-knit,
hyper-competitive crew that also includes
Indiana basketball coach Tom Crean — realizes
it has already won big. They got their Super
Bowl victory on Sunday, when each coach did
his part to ensure a family reunion in New
Orleans next week, with John’s Baltimore
Ravens facing off against Jim’s San Francisco
49ers in the first Super Bowl with sibling coach-
es on opposite sidelines.
One Harbaugh will haul home the Lombardi
Trophy from the Big Easy.
And, no, the family members haven’t decided
where to sit for the Feb. 3 NFL title game at the
Superdome — or at least they aren’t revealing it
if they have.
“We are neutral in the Super Bowl, and we are
just excited that they have brought their teams to
the pinnacle of sports,” Jackie Harbaugh said
Thursday. “The Super Bowl is the ultimate
accomplishment for them and for their teams
and for all of the extended football family and all
of the teams who have participated in this great
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Terra Nova’s Abdallah Mahmoud cinches down on El Camino’s Nick Villanueva during the 160-pound match. Mahmoud would go on to pin
his opponent, one of eight pins the Tigers recorded in a 60-18 win over the Colts.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Because each wrestling team in the
Peninsula Athletic League’s Bay and Ocean
divisions meet each opponent only one time a
season, there is no “we’ll get them next time”
mentality. Teams have one shot at each other
and when a team is in the upper echelon of the
division, it could be the difference between a
league title and being an also ran.
Two of the best teams in the Bay Division
— Terra Nova and El Camino — met in
South San Francisco Thursday night with
identical 2-0 records in league dual meets.
The winner would continue its quest for the
Bay Division crown, while the loser would all
but be eliminated from title contention.
El Camino got off to a quick start, winning
the first three matches and four of the first
five, but Terra Nova came roaring back. Not
only did the Tigers win the final nine matches
of the night, they did it in emphatic style,
recording pins in eight of them to record a
convincing 60-18 victory.
“[El Camino] has some good lightweight
wrestlers,” said Terra Nova coach Bill
Armstrong. “But we have some good upper-
weight kids.”
Armstrong said now that he has an experi-
enced, senior-laden team, the last three years
are finally starting to pay off.
“It doesn’t surprise me (to dominate),”
Armstrong said. “We’ve ingrained in them,
when you put them on their back, finish
them.”
Terra Nova (3-0 PAL Bay) followed its
coach’s advice to a “T,” finishing with pin in
the Tigers’ final seven matches competed. The
only thing that broke the streak was picking
up a forfeit at 195 pounds.
El Camino (2-1) started quickly. The Colts
earned six points when the Tigers forfeited the
first match of the night at 106 pounds. The
Diokno brothers — Marlon at 113 and
Christian at 120 — followed with a pair of
convincing wins. Marlon Diokno, one of the
top wrestlers in the Central Coast Section at
113, dominated his opponent, building up a
16-0 lead before the match was halted by a
technical fall.
Younger brother Christian Diokno also
started strong, but had to work a little harder
for his 13-5 victory. Christian Diokno found
himself in a little trouble in the second period
Tigers take down Colts
Parents won’t
play favorites
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Tim Duncan was selected
to his 14th All-Star game, Spurs teammate
Tony Parker is joining him, and the Chicago
Bulls also had two reserves chosen Thursday
for next month’s game in Houston.
Joakim Noah and Luol Deng were picked
from the Bulls, who have
stayed in the thick of the
Eastern Conference play-
off race despite the sea-
son-long absence of point
guard Derrick Rose. Noah
is one of five first-time
All-Stars for the East,
along with New York’s
Tyson Chandler, Indiana’s
Paul George, Cleveland’s
Kyrie Irving, and
Philadelphia’s Jrue Holiday.
Miami’s Chris Bosh, picked for his eighth
All-Star team, rounded out the East squad.
West forwards David Lee (Golden State),
LaMarcus Aldridge (Portland) and Zach
Randolph (Memphis) all were picked for the
second time. Houston’s James Harden was
chosen for the first time and joins former
Lee an All Star,
Curry snubbed
See ALL STARS, Page 13
David Lee
See SOCCER, Page 14
See TIGERS, Page 14
See PARENTS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Breaking new ground, the U.S. Education
Department is telling schools they must include students with
disabilities in sports programs or provide equal alternative
options. The directive, reminiscent of the Title IX expansion of
athletic opportunities for women, could bring sweeping changes
to school budgets and locker rooms for years to come.
Schools would be required to make “reasonable modifica-
tions” for students with disabilities or create parallel athletic
programs that have comparable standing as mainstream pro-
grams.
“Sports can provide invaluable lessons in discipline, selfless-
ness, passion and courage, and this guidance will help schools
ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity
to benefit from the life lessons they can learn on the playing field
or on the court,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a
statement announcing the new guidance on Friday.
Federal laws, including the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, require states to
provide a free public education to all students and bans schools
that receive federal funds from discriminating against students
with disabilities. Going further, the new directive from the
Education Department’s civil rights division explicitly tells
schools and colleges that access to interscholastic, intramural
and intercollegiate athletics is a right.
“This is a landmark moment for students with disabilities.
This will do for students with disabilities what Title IX did for
women,” said Terri Lakowski, who led a coalition pushing for
the changes for a decade. “This is a huge victory.”
Education Department officials emphasized they did not
intend to change sports’ traditions dramatically or guarantee stu-
dents with disabilities a spot on competitive teams. Instead, they
insisted schools cannot exclude students based on their disabili-
ties if they can keep up with their classmates.
“It’s not about changing the nature of the game or the athletic
activity,” said Seth Galanter, the acting assistant secretary for
civil rights at the Education Department.
It’s not clear whether the new guidelines will spark a sudden
uptick in sports participation. There was a big increase in female
participation in sports after Title IX guidance instructed schools
to treat female athletics on par with male teams. That led many
schools to cut some men’s teams, arguing that it was necessary
to be able to pay for women’s teams.
There is no deadline for schools to comply with the new dis-
abilities directive.
But activists cheered the changes.
“This is historic,” said Bev Vaughn, the executive director of
the American Association of Adapted Sports Programs, a non-
profit group that works with schools to set up sports programs
for students with disabilities. “It’s going to open up a whole new
door of opportunity to our nation’s school children with disabil-
ities.”
A Government Accountability Office study in 2010 found that
students with disabilities participated in athletics at consistently
lower rates than those without. The study also suggested the
benefits of exercise among children with disabilities may be
even important because they are at greater risk of being seden-
tary.
“We know that participation in extracurricular activities can
lead to a host of really good, positive outcomes both inside and
outside of the classroom,” said Kareem Dale, a White House
official who guides the administration’s policies for disabled
Americans.
Dale, who is blind, wrestled as a high school student in
Chicago alongside students who had full vision.
“I was able to wrestle mainly because there was a good
accommodation to allow me to have equal access and opportu-
nity,” Dale said, describing modified rules that required his com-
petitors to keep in physical contact with him during matches.
Those types of accommodations could be a model for schools
and colleges now looking to incorporate students with disabili-
ties onto sports teams. For instance, track and field officials
could use a visual cue for a deaf runner to begin a race.
Some states already offer such programs. Maryland, for
instance, passed a law in 2008 that required schools to create
equal opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in
physical education programs and play on mainstream athletic
teams. And Minnesota awards state titles for disabled student
athletes in six sports.
Increasingly, those with disabilities are finding spots on their
schools’ teams.
“I heard about some of the other people who joined their track
teams in other states. I wanted to try to do that,” said 15-year-old
Casey Followay, who competes on his Ohio high school track
team in a racing wheelchair.
Current rules require Followay to race on his own, without
competitors running alongside him. He said he hopes the
Education Department guidance will change that and he can
compete against runners.
“It’s going to give me the chance to compete against kids at
my level,” he said.
In cases where students with disabilities need more serious
changes, a separate league could be required.
Although the letter is directed to elementary and secondary
schools and the department hasn’t provided comparable guid-
ance to colleges, some of the principles in the letter will be read
closely by administrators in higher education, said Scott Lissner,
the Americans with Disabilities coordinator at Ohio State
University and president of the Association on Higher Education
and Disability.
“The logic that’s in there applies us to us as well as it does to
K-12, for the most part,” Lissner said.
While slightly different portions of civil rights law apply to
colleges and universities, “their approach in this letter was real-
ly more about the basic underlying equity and civil rights
issues” that colleges also must ensure they’re applying to pass
muster under the law.
Generally, Lissner said, as colleges review their policies, the
effects would more likely be felt in intramural and club sports
programs on campus than intercollegiate ones, Lissner said.
That’s because relatively few people can meet the standards to
compete in intercollegiate sports, and nothing in the guidance
requires a change in such standards. But the purpose of intra-
mural and club sports is broader, and colleges may have to do
more to ensure students with disabilities aren’t deprived of a
chance to compete.
Some cautioned that the first few years would bring fits and
starts.
“Is it easy? No,” said Brad Hedrick, director of disability serv-
ices at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and him-
self a hall-of-famer in the National Wheelchair Basketball
Association. “In most places, you’re beginning from an inertial
moment. But it is feasible and possible that a meaningful and
viable programming can be created.”
Sports are a civil right for disabled
Sharks 5, Coyotes 3
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Patrick Marleau scored the tiebreaking goal
with 1:53 remaining for his third straight two-goal game, help-
ing the San Jose Sharks rally from a two-goal deficit to beat the
Phoenix Coyotes 5-3 in their home opener Thursday night.
Logan Couture and Marty Havlat also scored and Joe
Thornton had three assists and an empty-net goal for the Sharks,
who have opened the season with three straight wins for the first
time since 2008-09. Antti Niemi made 32 saves.
Steve Sullivan, Antoine Vermette and Lauri Korpikoski
scored for the Coyotes, who were unable to hold onto a 3-1 lead
in the third period on the back end of a back-to-back.
Marleau started San Jose’s comeback with a goal midway
through the third and then beat Jason LaBarbera for the game-
winner. Thornton started the play with a sharp up-ice pass to Joe
Pavelski, who fed Marleau for the wrist shot.
The Coyotes seemed to take control with two goals in a span
of 2:27 of the third to take a 3-1 lead. The outburst started when
Sullivan came out of the penalty box to start a 15-second power
play that Phoenix capitalized on. Sullivan’s shot was blocked
but Vermette knocked the rebound past Niemi, who was off-bal-
ance after Shane Doan was knocked into him by a Sharks
defender.
While Niemi had little chance to stop that shot, he did a poor
job on Phoenix’s next goal when Korpikoski beat him to the
short side from a bad angle to give the Coyotes a two-goal edge.
That proved to be short-lived as Marleau took a pass from
Thornton in the slot and beat LaBarbera to make it 3-2. Havlat
then got the equalizer when he knocked in a rebound with 6:54
remaining.
After beating Calgary and Edmonton in their home openers to
begin the season, the Sharks got their long-awaited chance to
play before their own fans for the first time in more than nine
months because of the four-month NHL lockout.
Marleau on fire,
Sharks go to 3-0
SPORTS 13
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Oklahoma City teammate Russell Westbrook,
headed to his third straight All-Star game.
Duncan wasn’t chosen last year for the first
time in his career but has bounced back with a
terrific season at age 36, averaging 17.5 points,
9.8 rebounds and 2.7 blocked shots, his best
statistics since 2009-10.
The co-MVP of the 2000 All-Star game
joined a group that includes Michael Jordan for
fifth-most selections. Kobe Bryant and Kevin
Garnett, both voted to start, and Shaquille
O’Neal all were picked 15 times. Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar is the career leader as a 19-time
All-Star.
The reserves were voted by the head coaches
from each conference, who had to select two
guards, three frontcourt players and two play-
ers regardless of position. They were not
allowed to vote for players from their own
teams.
With centers Chandler and Noah, East
coaches passed on Brooklyn’s Brook Lopez,
the leading scorer for a resurgent team that is
right behind the Knicks for the Atlantic
Division lead. Perennial All-Stars Deron
Williams and Joe Johnson of the Nets also
missed out, as did Boston’s Paul Pierce.
Lee gave the Warriors their first All-Star
since Latrell Sprewell in 1997, but coach Mark
Jackson and his team hoped for more.
However, Stephen Curry wasn’t selected
despite averaging 20.9 points. He’s the league’s
eighth-leading scorer and the highest one who
won’t be in Houston for the Feb. 17 showcase.
Lee called his selection “bittersweet”
because Curry — the first person to send him a
congratulatory text — wasn’t picked.
“In our practice facility, there’s that All-Star
chart and it stops at ’97 and there hasn’t been
any since. So the whole team was really excit-
ed with the improved record this year and to get
one or both of our guys on there,” Lee said.
“I’m really excited to be the one that goes and
represents our team. I wish Steph could be a
part of it and maybe he’ll still be able to. I’m
just very, very excited. It’s been a long time for
the Bay Area fans. Not only to have an All-Star,
but to be winning games.”
Voted as East starters by fan voting along
with Garnett were Miami’s LeBron James and
Dwyane Wade, New York’s Carmelo Anthony
and Boston’s Rajon Rondo.
The West starting five is Kobe Bryant and
Dwight Howard of the Lakers, Oklahoma
City’s Kevin Durant, and Clippers teammates
Chris Paul and Blake Griffin.
The Clippers were hoping for a third All-
Star, but sixth-man Jamal Crawford wasn’t
picked.
Commissioner David Stern would choose
the replacement if any players are injured.
Randolph leads the NBA with 27 double-
doubles and becomes the first Grizzlies player
with multiple selections.
“It is truly an honor to be named by the
NBA’s coaches to the 2013 Western
Conference All-Star team,” he said in a state-
ment. “I am grateful for this opportunity and
look forward to playing with the best players in
the world.”
Continued from page 11
ALL STARS
By Michael Marot
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS — Andrew Luck is getting
down to business in Hawaii.
He attends quarterback meetings in the morn-
ing, practices in the afternoon and tries to glean
as much information as possible from some of
football’s biggest stars. For the record-setting
rookie, it’s just another football week.
“That’s Andrew being Andrew, I think that’s
the only way he knows how to roll,” Colts coach
Chuck Pagano said with a chuckle Thursday.
To Luck, the Pro Bowl is about more than just
fun in the sun.
Rookie quarterbacks rarely get the opportuni-
ty to play in Hawaii, and Luck only made it
because New England’s Tom Brady pulled out
of the game Monday with an injury. Luck, the
first alternate for the AFC, was hoping for the
call and was staying near his
alma mater, Stanford, so he
would have a shorter flight
to Honolulu.
Now that he’s in
Honolulu, Luck is working
again with Peyton Manning,
an old friend who gave him
a chance to be both a stu-
dent and a counselor at the
Manning Passing Academy.
Together, the Colts’ past and present franchise
quarterbacks, both perfectionists by trade, are
trying to take the lead in making sure the Pro
Bowl is taken seriously.
“I guess some folks weren’t happy with the
play last year, but I think guys will take it upon
themselves to keep this game going for many
years to come and play hard,” Luck said after
listening to Manning’s speech. “I think it is part
of our obligation to make sure we play hard and
this game continues.”
The hard-working Luck does have other plans
this week.
Two of his Colts’ teammates, outside line-
backer Robert Mathis and receiver Reggie
Wayne, also are expected to play for the AFC on
Sunday. Wayne has brought along the Colts’
receiving corps for the trip and Luck picked up
the tab for third-string quarterback Chandler
Harnish, the last pick in April’s draft. Backup
Drew Stanton declined to go, Luck said, because
he wanted to stay home with his newborn son.
“Obviously you’re going to have fun, you’re
in Hawaii, that’s what it’s about,” Luck told
Indianapolis reporters during a conference call
Thursday. “But anytime you’re around so many
great football players, it’s not an obligation, but
close to it, to try to get better at football.”
Indy took Luck with the first pick in April and
he delivered a season to remember.
He broke the NFL’s rookie records for
attempts, yards passing and 300-yard games,
falling just short of setting new marks in com-
pletions and touchdown passes. He broke the
franchise’s single-season record for TDs rushing
by a quarterback. He tied the league record for
game-winning drives in the fourth quarter
(seven), won a league-high nine one-possession
games and was the conductor of one of the
greatest turnarounds in league history. Indy
went from 2-14 to 11-5 and earned its first play-
off berth without Manning since 1996.
In 2013, nobody expects more than Luck,
who will be working with a new offensive coor-
dinator after Bruce Arians took the head coach-
ing job in Arizona. Fortunately, for Luck, he’ll
have a familiar face calling the plays in Pep
Hamilton, who was Stanford’s offensive coordi-
nator.
Colts’ Luck eager to make first Pro Bowl appearance
Andrew Luck
SPORTS 14
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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It was one of two shots the Dons had in the
first half. Hillsdale, on the other hand, man-
aged to fire off seven shots, with Lenz making
routine saves.
In the second half, the game really opened
up with end-to-end action. Hillsdale knotted
the game at 1 just two minutes into the second
half, a strike which mirrored the Dons’ goal.
Hillsdale midfielder Kayla Coleman, who was
slicing up the Aragon defense with her pin-
point passing, sent a through ball into space.
Amanda Diaz ran onto the ball and had a one-
on-one with Lenz. Much like she did in the
first half, Lenz came off her line and smoth-
ered the ball on Diaz’s foot. This time, how-
ever, Lenz could not hold onto the ball. Diaz
gathered the loose ball behind Lenz and, with
a defender closing, finally tapped the ball into
the empty net for the equalizer.
Dye said in an effort to jump-start his
offense, he aggressively pushed a number of
players into the offensive end, knowing full
well his team was susceptible to a counter
attack.
“You have to take a gamble. When you’re
going for the win, you have to take risks,” Dye
said. “We expect to be hit on the counter.”
The rest of the game was spent with each
team running at the other. Both teams had
their chances to make something happen, but
the slick field and wet ball did not lend itself
to precise play.
Given the way the league season has gone
for both teams, neither coach was too disap-
pointed with the draw. The tie gives Hillsdale
its first point in PAL play this season.
“We played hard. We got a point. We need-
ed it,” Shoman said. “The last few games,
we’ve managed to put one it. We’d like to get
a few more. I don’t know if the soccer gods
are against us or what. I feel like we have an
exciting second half (of the league season)
coming for us. We’ve showed good teams we
can hang with them.”
Dye can empathize with Shoman.
“I’m not disappointed. The players gave it
their all,” Dye said. “We’ve scored only four
goals (in PAL play). That’s not enough. We
need more goals.”
Continued from page 11
SOCCER
as Patrick Palomata nearly turned the tables
and had Christian Diokno on his back. But
Diokno escaped and then controlled the match
the rest of the way, earning two-point take-
downs and then allowing Palomata to escape,
just to take him down again. That win gave the
Colts a 15-0 lead after three matches.
Terra Nova got on the scoreboard with a win
at 126 when Manny Borrego, one of the top
CCS wrestlers, recorded the Tigers’ first pin.
The Colts responded with a 10-5 win from
Mark Formalejo at 132 — the Colts’ final win
of the of the night.
El Camino’s Alec Goff was having his way
with Shane McCarran at 138, tossing him
around the mat. Goff had four throws in the
first two periods, but led only 2-0. On his final
throw, however, he got a little careless and
dumped McCarran on his neck and head,
stunning McCarran. After about a minute or
so lying prone on his back, he was ready to
resume the match, but the referee disqualified
Goff for the dangerous throw and the Tigers
were right back in the match, down just 18-12.
From there, the Tigers steamrolled the
Colts. Zach Skiles won his 145-pound match
with a pin at the end of the second round in a
match he was dominating. Aaron Worthens
followed with a third-period pin at 152 before
Abdallah Mahmoud destroyed his opponent,
mercifully pinning him at the 2:53 mark at
160 pounds. Zaur Melikoff beat up his oppo-
nent at 170 pounds before finally pinning him
late in the third round, while David Melton
got in on the pin-fest with his in the second
round at 182.
The pin streak stopped at 195 where Robert
Pyne won by forfeit, but the Tigers’ big boys
— Nick Pierotti at 220 and Adam Noce at
285 — finished off the match in style with two
more pins in the first and second round,
respectively.
The win sets up the Tigers to make a run at
Half Moon Bay, the reigning Bay Division
champion. The two met in the final match of
the 2012 season with the Cougars winning the
championship. While Armstrong admits he
knows what’s looming, he and the Tigers are
not taking their eyes off the opponent imme-
diately in front of them. Thursday night, that
was El Camino. They’ll worry about Half
Moon Bay when they get there.
“We just tell them to take it one match at a
time,” Armstrong said. “We worried about El
Camino today.”
Continued from page 11
TIGERS
game. We are excited for that type of thing.”
Her sons, all of 15 months apart, have tried to
downplay this matchup from the moment it devel-
oped — each wanting to keep the focus on the
players, on the field.
The Harbaughs have been inundated with well
wishes and media requests since the moment
John’s Ravens beat New England on Sunday night
a few hours after the 49ers won at Atlanta. This
matchup provides the storyline of storylines, one
that will compete with Ravens star Ray Lewis’last
hurrah before retirement and the emergence of
second-year San Francisco quarterback Colin
Kaepernick (in a savvy move, he had pizza deliv-
ered to the overcrowded press trailer Thursday).
Fortunately for the Harbaugh folks, they’ve
been through this once before — albeit on a slight-
ly smaller stage: prime time on Thanksgiving
night 2011. John’s Ravens won 16-6 at home.
“We experienced that last year at
Thanksgiving,” Jack Harbaugh said, “the thrill of
victory and the agony of defeat.”
Jack visited each locker room after that game
and observed the “smile on John’s face,” then
headed over to see how Jim was handling it.
“It was quiet and somber, and finally I saw Jim,
all by himself, no one around him,” Jack said. “He
still had his coaching thing on, and his hands on
his head, and we realized that that is where we
were needed. . And we know we are going to
experience that next week.”
For Jackie Harbaugh, who has held things
together for decades and is known to offer up a
sports cliche or two herself, the real celebration
began last weekend.
“I felt that was a joyful moment for them, for
our whole family, our extended family and for my
father, who is 97 years old,” she said. “Great feel-
ing of joy. I am going to be neutral in the game,
and I know one is going to win and one is going to
lose, but I would really like to end in a tie. Can the
NFL do that?”
Continued from page 11
PARENTS
SPORTS 15
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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vs. Predators
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
2/2
@Edmonton
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/22
vs.Phoenix
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/24
vs.Colorado
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/26
vs.Vancouver
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/27
vs. Anaheim
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/29
vs. Edmonton
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
1/31
vs. Dallas
7:30p.m.
TNT
1/31
vs. Suns
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
2/2
vs.OKC
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/23
@Chicago
5p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/25
@Bucks
5:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/26
@Toronto
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/28
@Cleveland
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
1/29
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 26 14 .650 —
Brooklyn 26 16 .619 1
Boston 20 22 .476 7
Philadelphia 17 25 .405 10
Toronto 16 27 .372 11 1/2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 12 .692 —
Atlanta 24 18 .571 4 1/2
Orlando 14 28 .333 14 1/2
Charlotte 10 32 .238 18 1/2
Washington 9 31 .225 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 25 16 .610 —
Indiana 26 17 .605 —
Milwaukee 22 18 .550 2 1/2
Detroit 16 26 .381 9 1/2
Cleveland 11 32 .256 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 34 11 .756 —
Memphis 27 14 .659 5
Houston 22 22 .500 11 1/2
Dallas 18 24 .429 14 1/2
New Orleans 14 28 .333 18 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 33 10 .767 —
Denver 26 18 .591 7 1/2
Utah 23 19 .548 9 1/2
Portland 21 21 .500 11 1/2
Minnesota 17 22 .436 14
PacificDivision
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 32 12 .727 —
Golden State 26 15 .634 4 1/2
L.A. Lakers 17 25 .405 14
Sacramento 16 27 .372 15 1/2
Phoenix 15 28 .349 16 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Atlanta 104, Charlotte 92
Miami 123,Toronto 116, OT
Chicago 85, Detroit 82
Denver 105, Houston 95
Memphis 106, L.A. Lakers 93
Brooklyn 91, Minnesota 83
San Antonio 106, New Orleans 102
Utah 92,Washington 88
Portland 100, Indiana 80
Phoenix 106, Sacramento 96
Golden State 104, Oklahoma City 99
Thursday’sGames
Toronto 97, Orlando 95
New York 89, Boston 86
Phoenix 93, L.A. Clippers 88
Friday’sGames
Minnesota at Washington, 4 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Golden State at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Brooklyn at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Houston at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday’sGames
New York at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
NBA STANDINGS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Islanders 3 2 1 0 4 12 9
New Jersey 2 2 0 0 4 5 1
Pittsburgh 3 2 1 0 4 11 9
N.Y. Rangers 4 1 3 0 2 9 14
Philadelphia 4 1 3 0 2 5 12
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Ottawa 3 3 0 0 6 11 2
Boston 3 2 0 1 5 8 6
Buffalo 3 2 1 0 4 10 9
Montreal 3 2 1 0 4 9 4
Toronto 4 2 2 0 4 12 12
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Tampa Bay 3 2 1 0 4 13 8
Winnipeg 3 1 1 1 3 6 8
Carolina 3 1 2 0 2 8 12
Florida 4 1 3 0 2 7 12
Washington 3 0 3 0 0 6 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 4 4 0 0 8 17 10
St. Louis 4 3 1 0 6 15 6
Nashville 4 1 1 2 4 8 11
Columbus 4 1 2 1 3 7 15
Detroit 3 1 2 0 2 5 11
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 3 2 1 0 4 9 5
Edmonton 3 2 1 0 4 8 9
Minnesota 3 2 1 0 4 6 5
Vancouver 3 1 1 1 3 8 12
Calgary 3 0 2 1 1 7 12
PacificDivision
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 3 3 0 0 6 15 7
Dallas 4 2 1 1 5 8 8
Anaheim 2 2 0 0 4 12 7
Phoenix 4 1 3 0 2 15 16
Los Angeles 3 0 2 1 1 4 10
NOTE:Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 5, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3, OT
Phoenix 5, Columbus 1
Columbus at Phoenix, late
Thursday’sGames
N.Y. Islanders 7,Toronto 4
Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Rangers 1
Montreal 4,Washington 1
Carolina 6, Buffalo 3
Ottawa 3, Florida 1
St. Louis 3, Nashville 0
Chicago 3, Dallas 2, OT
Colorado 4, Columbus 0
Edmonton 2, Los Angeles 1, OT
San Jose 5, Phoenix 3
Friday’sGames
N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, 5 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
NHL STANDINGS
FRIDAY
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Sacred Heart Prep at Pinewood, 6 p.m.; San Mateo
at Burlingame, Hillsdale at Aragon, Menlo-Ather-
ton at Woodside, Mills at Capuchino, Sequoia at
Carlmont, Oceana at El Camino, Jefferson at Terra
Nova,South City at Half Moon Bay,6:15 p.m.; Menlo
School at Eastside Prep,6:30 p.m.; Notre Dame-Bel-
mont at St. Francis, 7:30 p.m.
BOYS’ SOCCER
Westmoor at Hillsdale, South City at El Camino, Ca-
puchino at Mills, Aragon at Jefferson, 3 p.m.; Priory
at Menlo School, Crystal Springs at Eastside Prep,
3:30 p.m.; San Mateo at Burlingame, Woodside at
Menlo-Atherton, Carlmont at Sequoia, Half Moon
Bay at Terra Nova, 4 p.m.
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Sacred Heart Prep at Crystal Springs, 5:30 p.m.;
Menlo School at Pinewood,7:30 p.m.;Priory at East-
side Prep, 6:30 p.m.; San Mateo at Burlingame,
Hillsdale at Aragon, Menlo-Atherton at Woodside,
Mills at Capuchino, Sequoia at Carlmont, Oceana
at El Camino, Jefferson at Terra Nova, South City at
Half Moon Bay, 7:45 p.m.
SATURDAY
BOYS’ BASKETBALL
Leadership at Crystal Springs, 4:30 p.m.; Priory at
Sacred Heart Prep, Harker at Menlo School, 6 p.m.;
St. Francis at Serra, 7:30 p.m.
GIRLS’ BASKETBALL
Leadership at Crystal Springs, 3 p.m.
BOYS’ SOCCER
Valley Christian at Serra, 2 p.m.; Menlo School at
Crystal Springs, 2:45 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep at Pri-
ory, 3:30 p.m.
GIRLS’ SOCCER
Priory at Crystal Springs, 1 p.m.; Notre Dame-Bel-
mont at Valley Christian, 2:30 p.m.; Sacred Heart
Prepat NotreDame-SJ,Mercy-Burlingameat Latino
College Prep, Summit Prep at Pinewood, 3 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—Agreed to terms with LHP
Craig Breslow on a two-year contracts. Named
PedroMartinezspecial assistant tothegeneral man-
ager.
CHICAGOWHITESOX—ClaimedRHPZachStew-
art off waivers from Pittsburgh.
National League
ARIZONADIAMONDBACKS—Traded OF Justin
Upton and 3B Chris Johnson to Atlanta for INF Mar-
tin Prado,RHP Randy Delgado,RHP Zeke Spruill,SS
NickAhmedand1BBrandonDrury.DesignatedINF
Lars Anderson for assignment.
NFL
CHICAGO BEARS —Named Pat Meyer assistant
offensive line coach.
CLEVELANDBROWNS—Named Brian Baker out-
side linebackers coach and Jon Embree tight ends
coach.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS —Named DeWayne
Walker defensive backs coach, Frank Scelfo quar-
terbacks coach and George Yarno offensive line
coach.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS—Signed DE Marcus
Benard, RB James Develin, WR Jeremy Ebert, WR
Andre Holmes, QB Mike Kafka, DL Tracy Robertson
and LB Jeff Tarpinian to reserve/future contracts.
NEWORLEANS SAINTS —Fired defensive coor-
dinator SteveSpagnuoloandsecondarycoachKen
Flajole.
NEWYORKJETS—Named Dennis Thurman de-
fensive coordinator,David Lee quarterbacks coach
and Tim McDonald defensive backs coach. Signed
WR Vidal Hazelton to a reserve/future contract.
NHL
BOSTONBRUINS —Reassigned D Colby Cohen
from Providence (AHL) to South Carolina (ECHL).
COLUMBUSBLUEJACKETS—Assigned D Patrick
Cullity from Springfield (AHL) to Idaho (ECHL).
DALLAS STARS—Agreed to terms with C Jamie
Benn on a five-year contract.
DETROIT REDWINGS —Reassigned RW Andrej
Nestrasil and RW Trevor Parkes from Grand Rapids
(AHL) to Toledo (ECHL).
NEWYORKRANGERS—Traded F Chad Kolarik to
Pittsburgh for F Benn Ferriero.Recalled F Kris New-
bury from Connecticut (AHL).
ST. LOUISBLUES—Assigned D Jeff Woywitka to
Peoria (AHL).
Major LeagueSoccer
NEW YORK RED BULLS — Promoted interim
coach Mike Petke to coach.
PHILADELPHIAUNION—Acquired M Alex Men-
doza.
TRANSACTIONS
Colorado 54, Stanford 54
BOULDER, Colo. — Andre
Roberson scored 12 points and tied
his career high with 20 rebounds,
leading Colorado to a 75-54 rout of
Stanford on Thursday night. It
marked the Buffaloes’ first win over
the Cardinal in 22 years.
Colorado (13-6, 3-4 Pac-12) had-
n’t beaten the Cardinal (11-8, 2-4)
since Dec. 23, 1990, in Boulder, los-
ing five straight in the series.
Chasson Randle had 15 points for
Stanford. The Cardinal’s leading
rebounder and third-leading scorer,
Josh Huestis, was plagued by foul
trouble and was held to six points
and six boards in 19 minutes.
Cal 62, Utah 57
SALT LAKE CITY — Allen
Crabbe scored 23 points, including
four 3-pointers, and California
defeated Utah 62-57 on Thursday
night.
Cal led by as many as 15 points
midway through the second half, but
the Utes pulled within 58-55 on Jason
Washburn’s 3-pointer with 55 sec-
onds remaining.
David Kravish missed at the other
end for the Golden Bears (11-7, 3-3
Pac-12) but poked the rebound out to
Crabbe, who was fouled and sank two
free throws with 17 seconds left.
Cal used a 13-0 run midway
through the first half to take a com-
manding lead.
USF 75, Portland 72
PORTLAND, Ore. — De’End
Parker scored 16 points and Cole
Dickerson added 15 on Thursday
night, helping San Francisco escape
with a 75-72 victory over Portland.
San Francisco (9-11, 2-5 West
Coast) won despite collecting just 17
rebounds.
The Dons made up for that discrep-
ancy in other areas, hitting 16 of 17
free-throw attempts and building a 35-
16 scoring advantage off the bench.
Dickerson hit three 3-point field
goals and had three steals. Cody
Doolin had seven assists.
College roundup
‘Parker’ gets
the job done
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Parker” plays like the bloodiest promotional video ever made for Palm
Beach tourism. Stabbings, explosions and furniture-smashing brawls occur at
some of the ritziest (and name-checked) locations within the sun-splashed, pas-
tel-soaked slab of Florida opulence. Kinda gives a whole new meaning to the
idea of The Breakers.
The city is the setting for an elaborate, $50 million jewel heist as well as some
revenge doled out with the usual machine-like efficiency by Jason Statham. As the
title character, the anti-hero of many of the novels by Richard Stark (the pseudo-
nym of the late Donald E. Westlake), Statham is stepping into a well-known per-
sona. But he’s not exactly pushing himself outside his comfort zone; he’s on auto-
pilot here, despite the obvious physical demands of the part. Parker is the kind of
thief who lives by a civilized, self-imposed code — one he expects others to adhere
to, as well. But this is the same character Statham always plays: quietly cool, dryly
British, powerfully lethal.
Director Taylor Hackford’s rather perfunctory action film is actually more com-
pelling before it even gets to Palm Beach, as Parker makes his way from Ohio to
See PARKER, Page 20
‘Somewhere’
New play full of
singing and dancing
SEE PAGE 24
WEEKEND JOURNAL 17
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING VIS-
ITS SAN FRANCISCO. Hers is one of the
most famous faces in art. Johannes Vermeer’s
masterpiece portrait of a young woman,
sometimes called the “Dutch Mona Lisa,” is
the star of Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch
Paintings from the Mauritshuis, a collection
of 35 works from The Hague’s Royal Picture
Gallery Mauritshuis. The Mauritshuis, which
houses one of the world’s most prestigious
collections of Dutch Golden Age paintings,
has not lent a large body of works from its
holdings in nearly 30 years, but an extensive
two-year museum renovation has sent these
masterworks traveling. The de Young
Museum in Golden Gate Park is the first
North American venue for the exhibit. Among
the pieces are four works by Rembrandt van
Rijn, The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, and
Vase of Flowers by the Rachel Ruysch, one of
the few female painters of the Dutch Golden
Age. The collection, taken as a whole, reflects
the culture of artistic, economic and techno-
logical innovation that allowed the
Netherlands to prosper in the 17th century.
THE GIRL IN POPULAR CULTURE.
Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring is known
to many through Tracy Chevalier’s 1999 his-
torical novel Girl with a Pearl Earring, which
inspired a 2003 film starring Scarlett
Johansson. The Girl with a Pearl Earring is
also available as a costume in LittleBigPlanet
2.
MUSEUM FACTS. The de Young
Museum is located at Hagiwara Tea Garden
Drive in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.
Museum docents speak about Girl with a
Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the
Mauritshuis on Sunday, Feb. 3 at 1 p.m.;
Tuesday, Feb. 5 at 1 p.m.; and Sunday, Feb. 24
at 2:15 p.m. For more information about
events related to the exhibit visit deyoungmu-
seum.orgMauritshuis runs through June 2.
***
THE WIEGAND GALLERY AT
NOTRE DAME DE NAMUR UNIVERSI-
TY IN BELMONT HOLDS PUBLIC
RECEPTION. The Wiegand Gallery invites
the public to a reception on Sunday, Jan. 27
from 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. to mark the opening of
Roberto Chavez Paintings and Drawings. The
Wiegand Gallery is part of the Madison Art
Center, a stone building originally built as a
carriage house on the country estate of 19th
century financier William Chapman Ralston.
Admission to the gallery is free. Hours are
Tuesday – Saturday, noon – 4 p.m. during
exhibitions. 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
508-3600.
***
FREE ART CLASSES FOR CHIL-
DREN AT STANFORD’S CANTOR ARTS
CENTER. Beginning Feb. 3, the Cantor Arts
Center at Stanford University offers free pro-
grams for families as part of the Cantor’s new
Community Initiative. On Sundays through
June, special 30-minute tours depart from the
main lobby at 12:30 p.m. Artworks included
on the tour become inspiration for drop-in art-
making activities in the museum’s Moorman
studio from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. that same day.
Experiment with art materials and new tech-
niques in studio sessions taught by profes-
sional art teachers. No prior registration is
required. Pick up a printed “Music and
Movement” Family Guide that helps families
explore the Asian galleries while making
music, dancing and sketching. Or, stop by the
lobby and check out an art pack stocked with
colored pencils and paper. Spend family time
in the galleries sketching and drawing and
take your drawings with you to start your own
gallery at home. Free and available to all fam-
ilies. Cantor Arts Center is located on the
Stanford University campus at 328 Lomita
Drive, across Palm Drive from the Bing
Concert Hall. 723-4177 and
http://museum.stanford.edu/family.
***
ELECTRIC WORKS PRESENTS
TAPESTRIES BY ANN DIENER. With
Tapestries, Ann Diener continues her investi-
gation of place and time with her faceted
interpretation of the urban landscape trans-
posed into a multi-dimensional weave of pat-
terns and space. Diener’s mixed media works
on paper focus on Los Angeles where she cur-
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Travel Editor/Writer Georgia Hesse takes notes in front of the main attraction during the press
preview of Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis, at the de Young
Museum in San Francisco through June 2.
See MUSEUM, Page 18
18
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
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rently works and lives. Feb. 15 – March 16.
Artist Reception, Friday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. - 8
p.m. 1360 Mission St. First Floor, San
Francisco. (415) 626-5496 or www.sfelectric-
works.com.
***
THE SNOWY DAY AND THE ART OF
EZRA JACK KEATS CONTINUES AT
THE CONTEMPORARY JEWISH
MUSEUM THROUGH FEB. 24. The
Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats is
the first major exhibition in the United States
to pay tribute to award-winning author and
illustrator Ezra Jack Keats (1916–1983),
whose beloved children’s books include
Whistle for Willie (1964), Peter’s Chair
(1967) and The Snowy Day (1962) — the
first modern full-color picture book to feature
an African American protagonist. At the
Contemporary Jewish Museum. 736 Mission
St. (between Third and Fourth streets), San
Francisco.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
Continued from page 17
MUSEUM
High-speed rail, Gordon said, is a conversa-
tion that is “quite a ways off.”
Whether high-speed rail ever becomes a
reality in the state, Gordon said, will depend
on federal funding.
“He continues to hold out a bold vision but
the reality is we don’t have the resources to fill
the vision,” Gordon told the Daily Journal.
Brown’s speech was a stark contrast to the
ones given the past two years, he said.
“In many respects, his speech was hopeful,”
Gordon said.
Two years ago, “pundits were writing
California’s obituary,” state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-
San Mateo, wrote in an email to the Daily
Journal.
“Now, thanks to the hard work and generos-
ity of voters who approved Proposition 30,
we’re in a position to return our state to its for-
mer glory — if we exercise fiscal discipline
and don’t repeat our mistakes,” Hill wrote in
the email.
Freshman Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-
South San Francisco, said the speech was
“quintessential” Jerry Brown.
“I think he was channeling the hopeful feel-
ing in the Assembly chamber with regard to
the prospects of an improving economic cli-
mate — yet tempered that enthusiasm with a
renewed call for fiscal discipline and wisely
building our reserve — all points I agree
with,” Mullin wrote the Daily Journal in an
email.
He also praised Brown’s call for local con-
trol, especially when it comes to educating the
state’s students.
“I generally agree with his desire to stream-
line education funding and empower local
school boards, yet the details of his proposal
will be analyzed over the spring,” Mullin
wrote in the email.
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San
Mateo, said the state is now headed in the
right direction thanks to the passage of tem-
porary tax measures in November that will put
another $6 billion annually into the state’s
budget.
“While we should not go on a spending
spree, we should begin to restore critical serv-
ices that were decimated in the past several
budgets. I am extremely pleased to see the
governor’s commitment to our public univer-
sities and his declaration that tuition hikes are
off the table,” Yee wrote in a statement.
Many Republicans in Sacramento stopped
short of giving Brown credit, however, for the
state’s economic rebound.
“California’s future can be bright and full of
promise if the government provides the foun-
dation for its prosperity and is not a barrier to
its success. Smarter regulations and a govern-
ment that lives within its means — that is the
path to a vibrant and prosperous California
and I hope the governor and legislative
Democrats follow that course,” state Sen. Ted
Gaines, R-Rocklin, wrote in a statement.
Brown’s “good news” budget plan, Gaines
wrote, “is a less painful budget than we’ve
seen in the past (but) it is only balanced due to
the $50 billion tax increase felt by every
Californian across the state.”
Continued from page 1
BROWN
a year in additional revenue.
Brown used much of his speech to congratu-
late voters and lawmakers for having an opti-
mistic vision of California. The state, he said,
“has once again confounded our critics.” He
promised an end to the deep budget deficits that
have plagued lawmakers and governors for
most of the decade.
“Against those who take pleasure, singing of
our demise, California did the impossible,” he
said.
Brown’s speech was filled with the rhetorical
gems and historical references that are hall-
marks of his addresses, from the biblical story
of Pharaoh’s dream about fat and lean cows
emerging from the river to the Spanish adven-
turers who forged north into modern-day
California. But it did not break new ground,
aside from the announcement of a trade mis-
sion to China in April.
The main topics Brown included have been
addressed previously, including in his budget
proposal earlier this month. Those include
reform of K-12 education funding, the need for
the higher education systems to hold down
costs, promotion of the $68 billion high-speed
rail system, the continued need to combat cli-
mate change and building massive twin water
tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin
Delta at a cost of $14 billion.
His speech seemed partially intended to lay out
the lasting achievements he hopes to leave after
his current tenure in the governor’s office is over.
Brown served from 1975-83, in the era before
term limits, before being elected to his latest term
in 2010. Despite the big-ticket projects Brown
sees as a priority, he urged the Legislature to rein
in its temptation to add burdensome regulations
and to practice fiscal restraint with the additional
tax money approved by voters.
“We have promises to keep,” he told a joint
session of the Legislature held in the Assembly
chamber. “And the most important is the one
we made to the voters if Proposition 30 passed:
that we would guard jealously the money tem-
porarily made available.”
Republicans reacted favorably to the gover-
nor’s live-within-our-means message to the
Legislature, where Democrats won superma-
jorities in both houses last November. That
would allow them to pass tax increases without
Republican support, if they choose.
“We have a governor who is speaking
Republican language, embracing long-held
Republican principles,” said Sen. Jim Nielsen,
R-Gerber. “He is admonishing his colleagues
here that notwithstanding their supermajority
status and the unnecessary taxes ... he is saying,
‘Don’t spend all the money.”’
Left relatively powerless, Republicans have
taken a somewhat conciliatory approach to the
governor in the first month of the new legisla-
tive session, looking for areas where they could
align with him and against legislative
Democrats, some of whom wish to expand
social programs that were cut in recent years.
Continued from page 1
SPEECH
districts in San Mateo County — can keep the
funds. However, the number of these districts,
currently known as basic aid, but will soon be
called community funded, is expected to
drastically lower under the governor’s pro-
posal.
“While it will take years for our schools to
recover what they have lost, I applaud the
governor for putting California on the path
toward restoring the financial health of our
schools. I also applaud the governor’s focus
on students with greater needs. The state is
responsible for providing tools to each of our
children for competing in the 21st century,
and the playing field is inadequate and
inequitable under our current system,” State
Superintendent Tom Torlakson wrote in a pre-
pared statement.
The ability to be upbeat and focus on
change came after voters approved
Proposition 30, a set of temporary sales and
income tax increases to raise revenue.
Brown’s budget includes $2.7 billion more for
K-12 education and community colleges, for a
total of $56.2 billion. His proposal for local
control comes from not earmarking all the
school funds. Actual numbers for how much
local districts will receive under the new
model have yet to be released making it diffi-
cult for district’s to know the impact of these
changes.
Despite the unknowns, more local control
will provide community stakeholders a
greater voice in the decision-making process
with their governing boards, said Nancy
Magee, spokeswoman for the San Mateo
County Office of Education.
Generally, education officials are excited
about the direction in which the state is mov-
ing.
“We must act now to modernize our broken
school finance system. We can no longer tol-
erate an outdated, irrational and overly com-
plex finance system that yields unacceptable
inequities and poor student outcomes,” said
Ted Lempert, president of Children Now, a
nonprofit children’s advocacy group, in a pre-
pared statement. “Giving school districts flex-
ibility and local control is critical. Student
needs are best understood at the local level so
that is where these important finance deci-
sions should be made.”
Dean E. Vogel, president of Burlingame-
based California Teachers Association, was
refreshed by the governor’s criticism of the
tendency by state and federal officials to
micromanage education.
“And he’s right that we have to move
beyond obsessing about standardized tests to
focus on well-rounded education. Putting our
schools and communities on the road to
recovery is what voters wanted when they
passed the governor’s Proposition 30 in
November,” said Vogel.
Continued from page 1
SCHOOLS
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“We are a family of dreamers,”
says the matriarch of a Puerto
Rican immigrant family in
“Somewhere,” the Matthew Lopez
drama presented by TheatreWorks.
For the Candelaria family, the
dreams revolve around show busi-
ness, but reality keeps them in a
tenement apartment in New York
City in 1959.
The steely matriarch, Inez
(Priscilla Lopez), does sewing for
neighbors and works two jobs,
including ushering at the Broadway
theater where “West Side Story” is
playing. Daughter Rebecca
(Michelle Cabinian) also ushers
and takes dance lessons. Son
Francisco (Eddie Gutierrez) takes
acting lessons.
Son Alejandro (Michael Rosen)
played a son in “The King and I” on
Broadway, but a burdensome secret
has led him to abandon his dream
and work long hours to help the
family. The long-absent family
patriarch is an entertainer in Cuba.
Two catalysts propel the plot. The
first is that choreographer Jerome
Robbins is in town to film the dance
prologue to the movie version of
“West Side Story.” Inez and Jamie
MacRea (Leo Ash Evens), a family
friend who is Robbins’ assistant,
urge Alejandro to try out.
The second is that the family
must move in 30 days because their
neighborhood is being razed to
make way for Lincoln Center for
the Performing Arts, but Inez refus-
es to go. She fears her husband
won’t know where to find them.
The end of Act 1 is fraught with
peril as the three siblings frantical-
ly pack while a wrecking ball
whacks away at their building.
While Act 1 has slow spots, Act 2
is stronger as the family is settled in
a nicer apartment in a Brooklyn
housing project a year later. By
then, Inez is ushering for “Gypsy,”
whose central character, Mama
Rose, shares many of Inez’s charac-
teristics. However, Act 2 ends anti-
climactically after an Alejandro
dance scene that might have
worked better as the ending.
Because the play has several
dance scenes well choreographed
by Greg Graham, director
Giovanna Sardelli needed skilled
actors who also dance. She found
them in this five-person ensemble,
and she guides them well.
Scenic designer Andrea Bechert
masters the challenge of changing
the set from Act 1’s cramped
brownstone apartment — complete
with fire escape and laundry hang-
ing outside — to the more spacious
yet basic apartment of Act 2.
Jeremy J. Lee’s sound design fea-
tures music and news broadcasts to
give a sense of the times.
Playwright Lopez is the nephew
of actress Lopez, who was the
spunky Diana Morales in the pre-
miere of “A Chorus Line.”
Candelaria was her mother’s maid-
en name and, in a sly aside, the
family downstairs in the play is
named Lopez.
“Somewhere” premiered at San
Diego’s Old Globe Theatre in 2011.
Besides being restaged from in-the-
round to a proscenium, it was
rewritten. Despite any changes, it
still needs more work.
Nevertheless, it’s worth seeing,
especially for the dancing and act-
ing.
It continues at the Mountain View
Center for the Performing Arts
through Feb. 10. For tickets and
information call (650) 463-1960 or
visit www.theatreworks.org.
‘Somewhere’ features a family of dreamers
TRACY MARTIN
From left,Francisco (Eddie Gutierrez),Inez (Priscilla Lopez),Alejandro (Michael Rosen),Jamie (Leo Ash Evens) and
Rebecca (Michelle Cabinian) dance in ‘Somewhere,’ playing Jan. 16 - Feb. 10 at TheatreWorks.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, JAN. 25
Free Tax Preparation. 9 a.m. to noon
and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Samaritan House,
4031 Pacific Blvd., San Mateo.
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
from Jan. 14 to April 5 at 9 a.m. to
noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Meet Nick Bruel. 4:30 p.m. 1375
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Bruel
will share the latest installment in his
Bad Kitty series, Bad Kitty School
Daze. For more information call 685-
4911.
Peninsula Arts Council’s 11th
Annual Diamond Awards Benefit
Gala and Awards Ceremony. 6 p.m.
to 10 p.m. Hiller Aviation Museum,
601 Skyway Road, San Carlos. The
Annual Diamond Awards recipients
make up San Mateo County’s Arts
Hall of Fame.The celebration includes
an hors d’oevres reception, no-host
cocktails, a silent auction,
entertainment and more. $25. $20 for
PAC members. For more information
and for tickets go to
www.peninsulaartscouncil.org.
Reel to Real Film Nights: Hugo. 7
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas. Free. Martin Scoresese’s
beautiful homage to the films of
George Melles, brought to life with a
star-studded cast including Asa
Butterfield, Jude Law, Ben Kingsley
and Sasha Baron Cohen. For more
information contact
conrad@smcl.org.
Voices of Latin Rock Autism
Awareness Benefit. 7 p.m. The Fox
Theatre, 2223 Broadway, Redwood
City. Ages 21 and over. Advanced
tickets $30. Door general admission
$35. For more information or to
purchase tickets call (415) 285-7719.
Ian Rankin Talk and Book Signing.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bay Book Company,
Strawflower Shopping Center, Suite
F, 80 N. Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon
Bay. Internationally best-selling
author, Ian Rankin, will discuss and
autograph copies of his new novel,
‘Standing in Another Man’s Grave.’
Free. For more information call 726-
3488.
‘ Depression: The Musical!’ 7:30 p.m.
Congregational Church of Belmont,
751 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Comedian and public speaker Brian
Wetzel will offer his one-man show
‘Depression: The Musical!’ Wetzel has
lived with chronic depression for
more than 20 years. He takes his
audience on a musical and comedic
romp through the strange and, yes,
sometimes funny world of mental
health. Refreshments provided.
Tickets $15. For more information call
593-4547.
Dragon Productions Presents:
‘After Ashley.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City.
Opening Night Gala after the show.
Ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor
Alicia Aguirre and the Redwood City
Council at 5:30 p.m. with free tours of
the facility until 7 p.m. The show will
run from Jan. 25 to Feb. 17. Thursdays
through Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays
at 2 p.m. Opening night $35 general
admission, $30 for seniors and $25 for
students. All other nights tickets are
$30 general, $25 for seniors and $15
for students. To purchase tickets or
for more information go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
HMS Pinafore: The Next
Generation. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive,
Stanford University, Palo Alto. The
Stanford Savoyards, a student-run
community theater troupe dedicated
to Gilbert and Sullivan, will launch
their season. $10 for students. $15 for
seniors, Stanford faculty and Stanford
staff. $20 for general admission. For
more information and for tickets go
to tickets.stanford.edu.
SATURDAY, JAN. 26
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San
Mateo Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled
eggs, pancakes, bacon, ham or
sausage and French toast will be
served. There will also be juice, coffee
or tea. $8 for adults and $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
Senior Showcase Health & Wellness
Fair. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Millbrae
Recreation Center, 477 Lincoln Circle,
Millbrae. 40 exhibitors featuring
senior resources and services of San
Mateo County. Free services include:
document shredding, goody bags,
refreshments, multiple health
screenings and giveaways. Everyone
welcome. Free admission. For more
information call 344-5200.
Memory Screenings. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Millbrae Recreation Center, 477
Lincoln Circle, Millbrae. Individuals
can take confidential memory
screenings as part of National
Memory Screening Day, an annual
initiative of the Alzheimer’s
Foundation of America. All ages are
welcome. Free. For more information
call 343-6770.
Free Document Shredding. 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Millbrae Recreation Center,
477 Lincoln Circle, Millbrae. Free.
Some Restrictions apply. For more
information call 455-1820.
National Puzzle Day Celebration
and Competition. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Jigsaw Java, 846 Main St., Redwood
City. Compete in teams of four for
$500 cash prize in the competitive
level, or compete in the less
competitive level for a $100 cash
prize. $15 per person to register for
competitive, $10 per person for less
competitive. For more information go
to www.jigsawjava.com.
Annual Peninsula Orchid Society
Show and Sale. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Community Activities Building, 1400
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. $5
general admission, $3
seniors/students/disabled and
children under 12 are free with an
adult. The schedule of speakers is as
follows: at 11 a.m. Weegie Caughlan
will speak about repotting
cymbidiums, at 1 p.m. Winny
Stockwell will speak about making
an orchid corsage, at 2 p.m. Tom
Mudge will speak about how to make
your phalaenopsis happy and at 3
p.m. Chris Mende will speak about
slipper orchids. For more information
go to www.penorchids.org.
‘Mavericks: Everest of the Seas’
Reception. Noon to 5 p.m. Coastal
Arts League Museum, 300 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay. Continues through
Feb. 24. Museum opens Thursday
through Monday during same hours.
For more information call 726-6335.
Timber Barons and Tree Huggers
at the History Museum. 1 p.m. Old
Courthouse, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Author Sheri Jansen-
Olliges will discuss her new book,
‘Timber Barons to Tree Huggers: The
Story of Middleton’s Redwood
Community.’ Free with price of
admission to museum, $5 for adults
and $3 for seniors and students. For
more information call 299-0104.
Raptor Identification Workshop. 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sea Crest School, 901
Arnold Way, Half Moon Bay. Come
learn about the coastside birds of
prey: hawks, eagles, falcons, kits and
owls. We’ll study field marks, behavior,
ecology and migratory patterns.
Learn how to tell them apart and
where to find them. Suitable for
beginning to expert birders and
families. Workshop donation $15 for
seniors, free for children. For more
information call 726-5056.
Vocal Gems of the Ragtime Era. 2
p.m. to 5 p.m. UUSM Unitarian
Church, 300 Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. This toe-tapping, syncopated
musical revue features many of the
vocal numbers that helped to define
the era and some that should have.
$25. For more information call (408)
475-1376.
Bird Walk. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Smith
Field, Wavecrest Road, Half Moon Bay.
Come learn about the coastside birds
of prey: hawks, eagles, falcons, kits
and owls. We’ll study field marks,
behavior, ecology and migratory
patterns. Learn how to tell them apart
and where to find them. Suitable for
beginning to expert birders and
families. Light refreshments will be
served. Workshop will be held rain or
shine. However, if weather is extreme,
the decision to proceed will be made
at Smith Field. Workshop donation
$15 for seniors, free for children. For
more information call 726-5056.
Dragon Productions Presents:
‘After Ashley.’ 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre,
2120 Broadway, Redwood City. The
show will run from Jan. 25 to Feb. 17.
Thursdays through Saturdays at 8
p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. General
admission $30, $25 for seniors and
$15 for students. To purchase tickets
or for more information go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
HMS Pinafore: The Next
Generation. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive,
Stanford University, Palo Alto. The
Stanford Savoyards, a student-run
community theater troupe dedicated
to Gilbert and Sullivan, will launch
their season. $10 for students. $15 for
seniors, Stanford faculty and Stanford
staff. $20 for general admission. For
more information and for tickets go
to tickets.stanford.edu.
Crestmont Conservatory of Music
Gourmet Concert Series. 8 p.m. The
Crestmont Conservatory of Music,
2575 Flores St., San Mateo. Pianist
Sandra Wright Shen will perform and
there will be a reception with
gourmet refreshments after the
performance. $15 general admission
and $10 for seniors and students 16
and under. For more information call
574-4633.
Rudy Columbini and The
Unauthorized Rolling Stones at
Club Fox. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. $18 in
advance, $20 at the door. For tickets
and more information go to
www.clubfoxrwc.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
of Staff Chris Hunter teamed up with a
formerly homeless volunteer and
Sheriff’s Deputy Scott Berberian at 6
a.m. yesterday to take a census of the
homeless in San Carlos and Belmont.
They found many encampments,
mostly under Highway 101 overpasses,
that were recently inhabited but aban-
doned yesterday due likely to rain in
recent days.
The formerly homeless volunteer,
who desired not to be identified, shared
his life story with Horsley and Hunter as
they trudged through the mud looking
for people who might still be sleeping at
the early hour.
The Navy veteran now lives in the
Maple Street Shelter in Redwood City
after living on the streets in south coun-
ty.
He disclosed he was essentially a
loner while homeless, finding shelter in
office parks or behind churches.
Berberian, with the Sheriff’s Office,
has patrolled San Carlos for about a
year now and knew some locations,
mostly along creeks, where the home-
less were known to sleep at night.
Together, the two men led Horsley
and Hunter to several locations, behind
fast-food restaurants and offices along
El Camino Real for the census.
In an encounter with a homeless
woman on the street in San Carlos, it
became clear to Horsley quickly that
her needs were beyond just finding
shelter.
She told the former sheriff that she is
being investigated by the FBI and can-
not receive services unless she declares
herself “mentally incompetent,” which
she refuses to do.
People with mental illness, Horsley
said, are often the most underserved and
the least likely to know they even quali-
fy for any services.
Part of the reason to do the census,
Horsley said, is to try to get the home-
less to take advantage of services.
Many homeless who do not seek serv-
ices end up in the county hospital or jail,
which can be more costly for taxpayers.
Another homeless man Horsley
encountered said he is currently “couch
surfing” and had a bad experience previ-
ously at a shelter.
Horsley and his team found seven
homeless people yesterday morning in
Belmont and San Carlos. They were
mostly white and middle-aged, a con-
trast to other areas in the county that
have a more diverse homeless popula-
tion.
Yesterday’s street count will be part
of a report forwarded to the U.S.
Department of Housing and Urban
Development that will also include a
facility survey, including jails, medical
facilities and shelters.
“It will also include the survey in
which we take a geographically repre-
sentative, statistically-valid sample of at
least 200 homeless individuals who live
in RVs or encampments to learn more
about their household characteristics,”
HSA spokeswoman Amanda Kim wrote
the Daily Journal in an email.
Preliminary numbers were not avail-
able for yesterday’s street count and the
final report will come out in May.
In 2011, volunteers identified 2,149
homeless people living in San Mateo
County. That number was up from 1,796
in 2009 and the greatest increase — 83
percent — was among people living in
cars, recreational vehicles and encamp-
ments.
Continued from page 1
COUNT
On Friday night, the Dragon
Productions Theatre Company will
unveil both in its new downtown
Redwood City home with a grand open-
ing celebration and debut of satirical play
“After Ashley.” Hagedorn’s dream the-
ater has existed for 13 years, mainly in
Palo Alto after a nomadic first season, but
the company and its executive artistic
director now call Redwood City home.
The new location at 2120 Broadway
nearly doubles the previous capacity
with 75 seats and space for classes,
rehearsals and rentals. The site is also
smack dab in the middle of Redwood
City’s downtown arts scene at the inter-
section with Theatre Way, right across
from the Century 20 movie theater and
kitty-corner from the Fox Theatre which
itself offers a wide variety of entertain-
ment and Broadway By the Bay shows.
Broadway By the Way, in particular,
offers a great synergy because the two
theaters offer such different types of
shows, she said. In contrast to the big
Broadway shows down the street,
Dragon Theatre favors off-the beaten
path works like the lesser-known play
“November” by David Mamet.
Yet the proximity to the Fox and movie
theater mean Dragon may draw new fans
who walk by the glass facade — a bene-
fit it didn’t have at its side street Palo
Alto location
“This location was really just perfect in
so many ways,” Hagedorn said.
Hagedorn actually looked at the build-
ing in 2010 when downtown Redwood
City had more vacancies. Fast forward to
when the company really had outgrown
its Palo Alto building and Hagedorn was
surprised to find the site still available
while everything around it filled up.
“The fates were smiling on us,” she
said.
But the company had work to do
before the curtain could rise and
launched a $400,000 fundraising cam-
paign to cover the relocation, architects
and permits. Donations have hit
$320,000 which Hagedorn concedes is
not too shabby but she said the company
really needs to span the difference.
Hagedorn said the company is grateful
not only for support through donations
but also by bodies in the 75 seats.
“People have asked if we can fill that
many and I say I don’t know because we
never have before. It will be an interest-
ing challenge for us, ramping up and
introducing our work to a whole new
community,” Hagedorn said.
Dragon will stage seven productions in
the 2013 season and may also offer late-
night entertainment like music and com-
edy in the future. Following “After
Ashley,” the second show is the play
“Les liaisons dangereuses.”
Dragon Theatre is at 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City and can be reached at
493-2006 ext. 4. To purchase show tickets
online visit www.dragonproductions.net.
The grand opening includes a ribbon-
cutting ceremony with Redwood City
Mayor Alicia Aguirre at 5:30 p.m. fol-
lowed by free tours of the facility until 7
p.m. Friday, Jan. 25.
Continued from page 1
DRAGON
Texas to New Orleans before reaching his
final destination. This is where the charac-
ter’s resourcefulness comes in handy, as he
goes from one stolen car and one cheap
motel room to the next, navigating sundry
lowlifes in between. Parker has been dou-
ble-crossed by his partners (including
Michael Chiklis and Wendell Pierce) on a
daring robbery of the Ohio State Fair.
Although these guys have serious mob con-
nections, he seeks his revenge by tailing
them to their next job: hitting the auction of
some major jewels that belonged to a late
Palm Beach society maven.
Jennifer Lopez co-stars as local real
estate agent Leslie Rodgers, who’s been
struggling financially and emotionally since
her divorce. When Parker pretends to be a
rich Texan looking for a vacation home
(complete with a big ol’ cowboy hat and an
obviously fake drawl), Leslie shows him
around and hopes for a hefty commission.
But once she starts snooping into her
intriguing new client’s background, she
learns too much and wants a piece of the
action.
Lopez gets a couple of amusing lines, and
theoretically is here to provide some comic
relief as the wide-eyed fish out of water. (An
underused Patti LuPone classes things up a
bit as her sassy Latina mama.) But playing
weak and girlish isn’t exactly Lopez’ strong
suit, and she never functions as a potential
romantic interest for Parker because it’s
been well-established that he’s in love with
Claire (Emma Booth), the daughter of his
grizzled mentor (Nick Nolte), who is well
aware of the dangers of the life he’s chosen
and sticks by him nonetheless.
Continued from page 16
PARKER
FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Disappointment is
likely if someone for whom you do a favor is unable to
adequately express his or her thanks. You’ll feel better
if you don’t expect anything.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- A burned child fears
the fre, but you’re not a kid anymore. Stop shunning a
former collaborator just because he or she erred in the
past. Be the bigger person and forgive and forget.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- You’re in a better position
career-wise than you might think. Though you might
see only dark clouds ahead, don’t retreat from doing
what you should and can do.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Because all your focus
is placed on lofty objectives, it might be diffcult for
you to see the multitudes of lesser but still proftable
opportunities. Remember, small things can add up.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Although a joint venture
in which you’re involved should be uppermost in your
mind, this isn’t likely to be the case. Diverting your
attention elsewhere could dilute your efforts.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- There is a hard way to
do things and an easy way. Even though you might
recognize the difference, for some reason you’ll make
things tougher than they need to be.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If you fnd yourself in the
position of being unable to fnalize an important project,
don’t make things worse by stewing over it. Let those
fruits ripen a bit longer on the tree.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t turn your household
into a military installation. Harsh rules and commands
won’t be nearly as effective as making polite pleas.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Remember, the mind is a
remarkable mechanism for performing wonders. All you
have to do is marshal your thinking to conquer doubt
and accomplish whatever you wish.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Because of an inability
to capitalize on a good opportunity, the biggest
problem you’ll have to contend with is accepting your
shortcomings.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- It might be wise to
analyze your desire for something material. There’s a
chance you may be seeking it for the wrong reasons.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Even though you
might be truly grateful to someone who does a favor for
you, you might be unable to express your gratitude in a
way that you feel is adequate. Nonetheless, do your best.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
1-25-13
ThURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Horned goddess
5 Rainy
8 Poetic adverb
11 Ohio city
13 Doctors’ gp.
14 Meadow
15 Brother’s daughter
16 Titled woman
18 “The Bridge on the River
--”
20 Magazine stand
21 Type of spray
23 Author -- Rand
24 Mouth, slangily
25 Fissure
27 Gymnasts’ former goals
31 DDT banner
32 Marx or Malden
33 Suggestion box opening
34 Rome’s fddler
36 Volvo rival
38 -- -Magnon man
39 Mach 2 fiers of yore
40 Paris buck
41 Little rascal
42 Happy sighs
44 Dutch cheese
46 Disgusting
49 Hardy’s dairymaid
50 Andes country
52 Snug
56 Dark brew
57 Letter after pi
58 Golfer Sam --
59 Snookered
60 Qty.
61 Toothpaste types
DOwN
1 John, in Aberdeen
2 Zoom on runners
3 Vexation
4 Argyles, e.g.
5 Dry riverbed
6 Flightless bird
7 Sticky
8 Table tub
9 Actor -- Parker
10 Chore
12 La Guardia alternative
17 Faint traces
19 Assumed names
21 Ponytail sites
22 Isolated
23 On the run (2 wds.)
24 Sudden urges
26 Mrs., in Berlin
28 Heston title role (2 wds.)
29 Actress -- Shearer
30 Grind to a halt
35 Port near Kyoto
37 Gives a leg up
43 Greek water monster
45 Depleting
46 Slangy affrmative
47 Home of the Bruins
48 Fed a line
49 Easy gait
51 Resistance unit
53 Wow!
54 Mr. Linden
55 NFL stats
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
FUTURE ShOCk®
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Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Mid Peninsula
CNAs needed
Hiring now!
Hourly & Live-ins
Drivers encouraged
Call Mon-Fri 9am – 3pm
Reliable Caregivers
415-436-0100
(650)286-0111
CLEANING -
HOUSE CLEANERS
NEEDED
Excellent pay. Company Car. Must
have valid CDL. Bilingual preferred.
Call Molly Maids, (650)837-9788.
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320, San
Mateo.
DOCKET ATTORNEY Service good civil
procedure, computer,
customer service and Bay Area courts
skills
Email only/ resume comments
panderson@aalegalservice.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
NOW HIRING Cooks, Busboys & Serv-
ers. Experience preferred, good pay
(D.O.E.). Apply in person: Neal’s Coffee
Shop, 1845 El Camino Real, Burlingame
(650) 692-4281, Neal’s Coffee Shop
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253786
The following person is doing business
as: Saka Limousine, 704 Prospect Row,
#2, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sinan
Saka, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sinan Saka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/12, 01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253788
The following person is doing business
as: R.L. Cooper Construction, 506 Cu-
pertino Way, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Robert L. Cooper, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Robert L. Cooper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/12, 01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253746
The following person is doing business
as: Helpway, 823 Shepard Way, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Agueda Al-
varado, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Agueda Alvarado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/12, 01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253671
The following person is doing business
as: Simple Sell Homes, 589 California
Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Eric Berlin, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Eric Berlin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/04/12, 01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253584
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: My Girl Friday Now, 535 S.
Norfolk St., #1, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Robin A. Pollock, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Robin Pollock /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/22/13, 02/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253585
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Sleep Management Serv-
ices, 2) Comfort Sleep Testing, 751 Lau-
rel St., #103, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Donald Bale 1626 Albemanrle
Way, Burlingame, CA 94010, and
James Neal Lancaster, 1912 Maybelle
Dr. Pleasant Hill, CA 94523. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Donald Bale /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/22/13, 02/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253689
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Italian American Social
Club of San Mateo, 100 N. B st., SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Peninsula Italian
American Social, CA. The business is
conducted by a corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 02/19/2003.
/s/ Lawrence Ratti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/22/13, 02/01/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253911
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Cleaning, 1339 Modoc
Ave., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Jose J. Camacho, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jose J. Camacho /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/22/13, 02/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253581
The following person is doing business
as: Giusto’s Specialty Foods, LLC, 344
Littlefield Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Western Grain, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 09/18/2007.
/s/ Ann Moore /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/11/13, 01/18/13, 01/22/13, 02/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254042
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Two Fle’s, 2) Fair Warning, 137
Elm St., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Curtis Dunn Fleharty, same address The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Curtis Dunn Fleharty /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253887
The following person is doing business
as: Trinitas Caritas, 1000 Atkinson Ln.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Socrates
In San Francisco, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/15/2012.
/s/ Curtis Dunn Fleharty /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253826
The following person is doing business
as: Tri-Star Financial Services, 231 El
Bonito Way, MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Zernial Alliance Corporation, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Gus Zernial /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254110
The following person is doing business
as: Dela Clothing Company, 823 Com-
modore Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ron Bender, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Ron Bender /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/22/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/24/13, 01/31/13, 02/07/13, 02/14/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253915
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Moderna Homes, 2) Moderna
Builders, 883 Santa Cruz Ave. Ste. 205,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Eco Off-
site, INC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2013.
/s/ Kathleen Liston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253769
The following person is doing business
as: JT Jewelry, 12 Lake Meadow Dr.,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Pek Lan
Teh, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 10/31/2012.
/s/ Kathleen Liston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253811
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bugler Group, LLC, 725 5th
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Bu-
gler Group, LLC, WY, Bugler Group,
LLC, WY, Bugler Group, LLC, WY Bugler
Group, LLC, WY. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Partnership.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Christopher Bugler /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254153
The following person is doing business
as: Le Tajine, 663 Laurel St., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner:Trid, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/23/2013.
/s/ Ike Aboubzou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253856
The following person is doing business
as: Bay General Contractor, 308 Sheri-
dan Dr., MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Hoang Nguyen, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Hoang Nguyen /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253874
The following person is doing business
as: 100% Pure, SFO International Airport
Terminal, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94128
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Purity Cosmetics, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/08/2004.
/s/ Ric Kostick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
23 Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254049
The following person is doing business
as: Rack & Roll BBQ Shack, 20 Wood-
side Plaza, 20 Woodside Plaza RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Old Port
Lobster Company, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Russell Deutsch /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 01/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #253721
The following person is doing business
as: Coastside Footcare Alliance, 2132
Vallemar, MOSS BEACH, CA 94038 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Preventive Diabetic Foot Care Alliance,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
11/14/2012.
/s/ Laura Roehrick /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 12/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/25/13, 02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 237366
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: La
Diva, 12 N. San Mateo Dr., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401. The fictitious business
name referred to above was filed in
County on 02/09/2010. The business
was conducted by: Ellsworth Manage-
ment Corp, LLC, CA.
/s/ Susan Dahi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 12/27/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 01/11/13,
01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/01/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 253617
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Mod-
erna Homes, 883 Santa Cruz Ave. Ste.
205, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. The ficti-
tious business name referred to above
was filed in County on 12/14/2012. The
business was conducted by: Kathleen
Liston, same address.
/s/ Kathleen Liston /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 01/10/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 01/25/13,
02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13).
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO SALE
REAL PRPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
No. 119275
In re the matter of the Estate of Edward
L. Moss, Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that subject
to conformation by this court, on Febru-
ary 13, 2013, or thereafter within the time
allowed by law, the undersigned as Ad-
ministrator of the Estate of Edward L.
Moss, deceased, will sell at private sale
to the highest and best net bidder, on the
terms and conditions hereinafter men-
tioned all right, title, and interest of the
decedent at the time of death and all
right, title, and intrest that the estate has
acquired in addition to that of the dece-
dent at the time of death, in the real
property located in the San Mateo Coun-
ty, California, as follows:
The property is commonly referred to as
114 McLellan Avenue, San Mateo, Cali-
fornia, assessor’s parcel number 040-
052-200, and is more fully described as
follows:
“Lot 28, Block 2 of tract 89, as per map
recorded in book 28, page 26 to 28 of
maps, in the office of the County Record-
er of San Mateo County”
The Property is commonly referred to as
135 Abelia Way, East Palo Alto, CA
94303
The sale is subject to current taxes, cov-
enants, conditions, restrictions, reserva-
tions, rights, rights of way, and ease-
ments of record, with any encumbrances
203 Public Notices
of record to be satisfied from the pur-
chase price.
The property is to be sold on an “as is”
basis except for title.
Bids or offers are invited for this property
and must be in writing and can be deliv-
ered to the office of Sharon A. Godbolt,
Attorney, PO Box 731621, SAN JOSE,
CA 95173-1621.
The property will be sold on the following
terms: all cash, or part cash and part
credit, the terms of such credit to be ac-
ceptable to the undersigned and to the
court, ten percent (10%) of the amount of
the bid to accompnay the offer by certi-
fied check, and the balance to be paid
thirty (30) days of confirmation of sale
by the court. Taxes, rents, operating and
maintenance expenses and premiums on
insurance acceptable to the purchaser
shall be prorated as of the date of Con-
formation of sale. Examination of title, re-
cording of conveyance, transfer taxes,
and any title insurance policy shall be at
the expense of the purchaser or purchas-
ers.
The undersigned reserves the right to re-
ject any and all bids.
Date: December 5, 2012
/s/ Administrator, Opal Okikiade /
/s/ Attorney of the Administrator Sharon
A. Godbolt /
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on January 25, February 1, 8, 2013.
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Andrew Oscar Berquist, aka Andrew
Berquist, aka Drew Berquist
Case Number 123034
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Andrew Oscar Berquist,
aka Andrew Berquist, aka Drew Berquist.
A Petition for Probate has been filed by
James Williams in the Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo. The
Petition for Probate requests that James
Williams be appointed as personal repre-
sentative to administer the estate of the
decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to the
probate. The will and any codicils are
available for examination in the file kept
by the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: March 05, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo, 400 County Cen-
ter, Redwood City, CA 94063. If you ob-
ject to the granting of the petition, you
should appear at the hearing and state
your objections or file written objections
with the court before the hearing. Your
appearance may be in person or by your
attorney. If you are a creditor or a con-
tingent creditor of the decedent, you
must file your claim with the court and
203 Public Notices
mail a copy to the personal representa-
tive appointed by the court within four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters as provided in Probate Code sec-
tion 9100. The time for filing claims will
not expire before four months from the
hearing date noticed above. You may
examine the file kept by the court. If you
are a person interested in the estate, you
may file with the court a Request for
Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing
of an inventory and appraisal of estate
assets or of any petition or account as
provided in Probate Code section 1250.
A Request for Special Notice form is
available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Donald L. Tasto, Esq.
Donald L. Tasto Attorney at Law
600 Allerton St., Ste. 202,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
(650)369-1383
Dated: January 23, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on January 25, February 1, 8, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Christmas Eve in the Broad-
way/Laguna Ave. area of Burlingame:
Diamond & emerald gold bangle brace-
let, Very sentimental. Reward Offered.
(650)347-0749
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY BASSINET - like new,
music/light/vibrates, $75., SOLD!
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BABY CARRIER CAR SEAT COMBO -
like new, $40., SOLD!
294 Baby Stuff
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR (HOT Point) runs
good $95 (650)333-4400
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
T.V. 19" Color3000, RCA, w/remote
$25 obo (650)515-2605
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
100 USED European (33) and U.S. (67)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $6.00, 650-787-
8600
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLOR PHOTO WW 2 curtis P-40 air-
craft framed 24" by 20" excellent condi-
tion $70 OBO SOLD!
298 Collectibles
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
HARD ROCK Cafe collectable guitar pin
collection $50 all (650)589-8348
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars in
action, sealed boxes, $5.00 per box,
great gift, (650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
SPORTS CARDS - 3200 lots of stars
and rookies, $40. all, (650)365-3987
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
FISHER PRICE Musical Chair. 3 activi-
ties learning sound, attached side table,
and lights up, $25., (650)349-6059
KR SKATES arm and knee pads, in box,
$15 (650)515-2605
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, (650)589-8348
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, $30,
(650)365-3987
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA DROID X2 8gb memory
clean verizon wireless ready for activa-
tion, good condition comes with charger
screen protector, $100 (213)219-8713
PR SONY SHELF SPEAKERS - 7” x 7”
x 9”, New, never used, $25. pair, SOLD!
PS3 BLACK headset $50 (650)771-0351
SONY HDTV hdmi monitor 23"
flatscreen model # klv-s23a10 loud built
in speakers $100 call (213)219-8713
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3 DRESSERS, BEDROOM SET- excel-
lent condition, $95 (650)589-8348
4 FREE dining room chair with wheels
SOLD!
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CIRCA 1940 Mahogany office desk six
locking doors 60" by 36" good condition
$50., SOLD!
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE - pedastal, 42” round,
4 chairs & a leaf, $250., (650)888-9115
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER SET - 3 pieces, wood, $50.,
(650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON BED, full size, oak. Excellent
condition. No Mattress, $50,
(650)348-5169
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVESEAT - 60” length, reupholstered
appoximately 4 yrs. ago in pink & white
toile, $75., (650)231-8009
24
Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Fair share,
maybe
5 Polite denial
11 Pro-__
14 Arch type
15 Commensurate
(with)
16 Soaked
17 Cry from a
duped investor?
19 Brother
20 “I” strain?
21 Where to find
Ducks and
Penguins: Abbr.
22 Eyes
24 Cry just before
dozing off?
28 Eschewed the
backup group
31 Mrs. Gorbachev
32 Influence
33 Took in
37 Lab medium
38 Thinking out
loud, in a way
40 Farm father
41 Anthem
fortifications
43 Cupid’s boss
44 Free
45 Dog named for
the bird it
hunted,
familiarly
46 Cry from a
superfan?
50 Hose
51 Dig in
52 John, Paul and
George, but not
Ringo: Abbr.
55 Electees
56 Cry from a
Jeddah native?
61 Iron __
62 Troubled state
63 Vronsky’s lover,
in Tolstoy
64 “Balderdash!”
65 Some aces
66 Kid
DOWN
1 Clinton’s
birthplace
2 Bug-eyed
3 Jay related to a
peacock?
4 Casbah
headgear
5 Had a little
something
6 Frère de la mère
7 Dent, say
8 Big lug
9 Travel org. since
1902
10 “Captain
Kangaroo”
character who
told knock-knock
jokes
11 Really bad
12 Haggard of
country music
13 Flight part
18 Ocean-bay
connector
23 Someone to
admire
24 Grouch
25 Sung approval?
26 Prison area
27 Bring on board
28 Injury reminder
29 ’70s Olympics
name
30 Good earth
34 Pixie dust
leaver, to Peter
35 Deco designer
36 Beloved
38 Uffizi hangings
39 Hubbub
42 Pays to play
43 Into a state of
decline
45 Ocean borders
46 Patch plant
47 Rock’s __ Boingo
48 Start
49 One may follow
a casing
52 Trig function
53 XXX, at times
54 Three-handed
game
57 Singer
DiFranco
58 Bookmarked
item nowadays
59 “Gloria in
Excelsis __”
60 British rule in
colonial India
By Kurt Krauss
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
01/25/13
01/25/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ROUND CLAW FOOTED TABLE
Six Matching Oak chairs and Leaf. $350,
Cash Only, (650)851-1045
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45
(650)592-2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new SOLD!
306 Housewares
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
GLASS SHELVES 1/2’” polished glass
clear, (3) 12x36”, SOLD!
KLASSY CHROME KITCHEN CANIS-
TERS: Set of four. (2--4"x 4"w x 4"h);
(2--4"x 4" x 9"h.). Stackable, sharp.
$20.00 SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, $60. all,
(650)365-3987
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
TABLE SAW (Sears) 10" belt drive new
1 horse power motor, SOLD!
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
11 4" recessed light kits (will e-mail pho-
to) $80 (650)365-6283
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
1941 SAN Francisco News Dec. 22 to 31
Huge fifty pound black bounded book
$80 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASSORTED CHRISTMAS TREE orna-
ments, bulbs, lights, SOLD!
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, SOLD!
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30
(650)290-1960
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EMERIL LAGASSE BOOK – unopened,
hard cover, Every Day’s a Party, Louisia-
na Celebration, ideas , recipes, great gift
$10., (650)578-9208
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOBBY TABLE for Slot cars, Race cars,
or Trains 10' by 4'. Folds in half $99
(650)341-8342
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
310 Misc. For Sale
JAPANESE SAKE SET - unused in box,
sake carafe with 2 porcelain sipping,
great gift, $10., (650)578-9208
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW CEDAR shake shingles, enough
for a Medium size dog house. $20,
(650)341-8342 San Mateo
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SNOW CHAINS never used fits multiple
tire sizes $25 SOLD!
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VARIETY OF Christmas lights 10 sets, 2
12" reef frames, 2 1/2 dozen pine cones
all for $40 (650)341-8342
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25 (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WANTED: USED. Tall, garage-type
storage cabinet with locking option,
(650)375-8044
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WICKER DOG Bed excellent condition
34" long 26"wide and 10" deep $25
(650)341-2181
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
UKULELE: MAKALA Soprano $60,
Like new, Aquila strings (low G) gig bag,
Great tone. (650)342-5004
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand $75,
(650)631-8902
312 Pets & Animals
4 MALES- all shots done, Great family
dogs/ hunters. Top Pedigree $800
(650)593-4594
KENNEL - small size, good for small
size dog or cat, 23" long 14" wide &
141/2" high, $25. FIRM (650)871-7200
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. SOLD!
25 Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BABY CLOTHES boys winter jackets
and clothes, 1 box, $20. Gina
(650)784-5004
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MEN'S FLANNEL PAJAMAS - unop-
ened, package, XL, Sierra long sleeves
and legs, dark green, plaid, great gift
$12., (650)578-9208
MEN'S SPORT JACKET. Classic 3-but-
ton. Navy blue, brass buttons, all wool.
Excellent condition. Size 40R $20.00
(650)375-8044
MENS CLASSIC BOMBER JACKET -
Genuine cow leather, tan color, $75.,
(650)888-0129
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
316 Clothes
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$100.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE BIKE - $20., SOLD!
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
HEAVY PUNCHING bag stand - made
out of steel, retail $200., used, $50.,
(650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM Like new, $250
(650)588-5746
YAKIMA ROCKETBOX 16 Rooftop
cargo box. Excellent condition. $200
(650)593-5917
319 Firewood
FIREWOOD ALL KINDS- from 4” by 4”
inches to 1” by 8”. All 12” to 24” in length.
Over 1 cord. $75, (650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE
MOVING SALE
2939 Dolores way,
Burlingame
Furniture, collectable,
sporting goods,
electronics, plants, etc.,
Sunday, Jan. 27th
11AM - 3PM
Saturday, Feb. 2nd,
11AM - 3PM
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
DOCTOR’S OFFICE SCALE - by
Health-O-Meter, great condition, RWC,
$49., (650)365-1797
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
428 R.E. Wanted to Buy
WANTED Studio or 1 Bedroom, Penin-
sula Area, All Cash, Po Box 162,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 1,800
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exh01954613aust and tires. Well taken
care of. No low ballers or trades please.
Pink in hand and ready to go to next
owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$19000. obo, (650)465-6056
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $7,400.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
CHEVY ASTRO rear door, $95., SOLD!
670 Auto Parts
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)280-9240
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
Cleaning Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction Construction Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
DON’T PAINT
– GO GREEN
Affordable, Natural,
Authentic Wall Finishes
to replace paint
888-391-2479
415-467-7009
www.sanfranciscoplaster.com
info@sanfranciscoplaster.com
• Non-toxic/Hypoallergenic
• Filters the air absorbing
carbon dioxide and odors
• Eliminates mold and fungus
• For both residential or commercial
• 80 selected colors
Please contact us
for custom color matches
Lic# 106426
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Computer
COMPUTER PROBLEMS?
Software, hardware issues,viruses,
updates, upgrades, optimization &
tune-ups. data backup & recovery,
network-troubleshooting & installation
Residential and commerical,
Most consultations free,
NO CHARGE if not fixable.
Microsoft and Cisco certified,
Call Erik (650)995-4899
$45 an hour
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
27 Friday • Jan. 25, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Friday • Jan. 25, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
oyster perpetual datejust
rolex oyster perpetual and datejust are trademarks.

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