Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan for U. S.

Army Garrison Fort Drum, New York

Revision 1

December 2012

U. S. ARMY GARRISON, DIRECTORATE OF PUBLIC WORKS, ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION (Preparing Activity) Record of Revision Revision # 1 Date 20 December 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE. ............................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 OBJECTIVES. ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 BACKGROUND. .................................................................................................................... 2 3.1 Location. ............................................................................................................................. 2 3.2 Mission................................................................................................................................ 2 3.3 Organization. ....................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 APPLICABLE REGULATONS. ........................................................................................... 2 4.1 Federal Regulations. ........................................................................................................... 2 4.1.1 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). ................................................. 2 4.1.2 Pollution Prevention Act of 1990. ............................................................................. 3 4.1.3 Federal Facilities Compliance Act. ............................................................................ 3 4.2 Executive Orders................................................................................................................. 3 4.2.1 Executive Order 13423 (Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management). ............................................................................................. 3 4.2.2 Executive Order 12856 (Federal Compliance with Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements). .................................................................................. 4 4.2.3 Executive Order 12780 (Federal Agency Recycling and Council on Federal Recycling and Procurement Policy).................................................................................... 4 4.2.4 Executive Order 13514 (Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance) 4.3 State of New York Regulations. ......................................................................................... 4 4.4 Department of Defense Regulations. .................................................................................. 5 4.4.1 Department of Defense Instruction 4715.4 (Pollution Prevention). .......................... 5 4.4.2 Qualified Recycling Program Guidance. ................................................................... 5 4.4.3 Department of Defense Memorandum, Revised Pollution Prevention and Compliance Metrics. ........................................................................................................... 5 4.5 Army Requirements and Policy. ......................................................................................... 5 4.5.1 Army Regulation 420-1 (Army Facilities Management). .......................................... 5 4.5.2 Sustainable Management of Waste in Military Construction, Renovation, and Demolition Activities. ......................................................................................................... 5 4.5.3 Guidelines for Managing Construction and Demolition Waste. ................................ 5 5.0 RESPONSIBILITIES. ............................................................................................................ 6 5.1 Garrison Commander. ......................................................................................................... 6 5.2 All Directors........................................................................................................................ 6 5.3 Director of Public Works. ................................................................................................... 6 i

5.4 Chief, Environmental Division. .......................................................................................... 7 5.5 Solid Waste Program Manager. .......................................................................................... 7 5.6 Qualified Recycling Program Manager. ............................................................................. 8 5.7 Directorate of Logistics (DOL). .......................................................................................... 9 5.8 Directorate of Contracting. ................................................................................................. 9 5.9 Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) ...................................................... 9 5.10 Public Affairs Office. ...................................................................................................... 10 5.11 All Organizations, Units, and Tenant Activities. ............................................................ 10 6.0 SOURCE REDUCTION. ..................................................................................................... 10 6.1 Green Procurement. .......................................................................................................... 10 6.2 Pollution Prevention.......................................................................................................... 11 6.3 Reuse. ................................................................................................................................ 11 6.3.1 Packaging Materials. ................................................................................................ 11 6.3.2 Waste Exchange. ...................................................................................................... 11 6.4 Best Management Practices. ............................................................................................. 12 7.0 INSTALLATION RECYCLING PROGRAM. ................................................................. 12 7.1 Program Status. ................................................................................................................. 12 7.2 Program Structure. ............................................................................................................ 12 7.3 Recycled Materials............................................................................................................ 13 7.4 Segregation, Storage, and Collection Procedures. ............................................................ 14 7.4.1 Excavated Materials. ................................................................................................ 14 7.4.2 Cardboard................................................................................................................. 15 7.4.3 Scrap Metal. ............................................................................................................. 15 7.4.4 Brass from Expended Munitions. ............................................................................ 15 7.4.5 Paper. ....................................................................................................................... 16 7.4.6 Motor Oil/Off Specification Fuel............................................................................. 16 7.4.7 Glass and Plastics..................................................................................................... 16 7.4.8 White Goods. ........................................................................................................... 16 7.4.9 Construction and Demolition Waste ........................................................................ 16 7.4.10 Other Recyclables. ................................................................................................. 17 7.4.11 Potential Recyclables. ............................................................................................ 17 7.5 Recycling Facilities........................................................................................................... 18 7.5.1 Processing Station. ................................................................................................... 18 7.5.2 Drop Off/Convenience Centers................................................................................ 18 7.6 Diversion Rates. ................................................................................................................ 18 7.7 Recycling Through the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office. ............................. 19 8.0 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND HANDLING PRACTICES. ............................ 19 8.1 Residential Waste.............................................................................................................. 20 8.2 Nonresidential Waste. ....................................................................................................... 20 8.3 Yard Waste........................................................................................................................ 20 ii

8.4 Construction and Demolition Waste. ................................................................................ 21 8.4.1 Construction and Demolition Activities at Fort Drum. ........................................... 21 8.4.2 Construction and Demolition Waste Management Program Requirements. ........... 21 8.4.3 Documentation. ........................................................................................................ 23 8.5 Special Wastes. ................................................................................................................. 23 8.5.1 Petroleum-Contaminated Rags, Soils, and Dry-Sweep. .......................................... 23 8.5.2 Universal Waste.. ..................................................................................................... 23 8.6 Solid Waste Facilities. ...................................................................................................... 23 8.6.1 Fort Drum Transfer Station...................................................................................... 24 8.6.2 Development Authority of North Country Regional Landfill. ................................ 24 9.0 PROGRAM PROMOTION AND TRAINING. ................................................................. 24 9.1 Recycling Program Promotion. ......................................................................................... 24 9.2 Public Education and Outreach. ........................................................................................ 25 9.2.1 Media Information. .................................................................................................. 25 9.2.2 Community Outreach Programs. ............................................................................. 25 9.3 Training. ............................................................................................................................ 25 9.3.1 Recycling Training................................................................................................... 25 9.3.2 Solid Waste Training. .............................................................................................. 26 9.3.3 Construction and Demolition Waste Management Training. . Error! Bookmark not defined. 10.0 RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING. ....................................................................... 26 11.0 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ACTION ITEMS..................................................... 27 12.0 TECHNICAL POINT OF CONTACT. ............................................................................ 28 APPENDICES A – References ............................................................................................................................ A-1

TABLES Table 1. Materials Recycled and Revenue Generated in FY 12. ..................................................14 Table 2. Diversion Rates for Fort Drum’s Waste Stream .............................................................19

iii

INTEGRATED SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN FORT DRUM FORT DRUM, NEW YORK

1.0 PURPOSE. The purpose of this Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan (ISWMP) is to document current solid waste management practices, to set forth goals for improvement, and to specify the approach for achieving those goals at Fort Drum. This plan meets the Army requirement to develop an ISWMP in accordance with Army Regulation 420-1. This ISWMP also reflects the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pollution prevention (P2) hierarchy that places an emphasis on source reduction and recycling to reduce the solid waste stream. The plan identifies various elements and quantities of the waste stream; identifies the current practices for reuse, recycling, and disposal of solid waste; documents the correct procedures for all aspects of solid waste management including collection, storage, segregation, transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal; identifies the solid waste responsibilities of Fort Drum personnel; and lists action items for future consideration. This ISWMP applies to all current and future Fort Drum directorates, tenants, residents, and activities. Appendix A contains references used to prepare this plan. 2.0 OBJECTIVES. The objectives of the solid waste management program at Fort Drum are described below.  Reduce the rate of solid waste generation to meet or exceed the Federal goal of diverting a minimum of 50 percent of the installation’s municipal solid waste from the offpost landfill by the end of Fiscal Year 2015.  Comply with all applicable State of New York, Federal, Department of Defense (DOD), and Army solid waste management regulations and all applicable Executive Orders (EOs) and Army guidance.  Manage solid waste in a manner protective of human health and the environment.

 Reduce, reuse or recycle elements of the solid waste stream to the maximum extent possible.

3.0 BACKGROUND. 3.1 Location. Fort Drum is located in Jefferson County in New York, approximately 70 miles north of Syracuse. It is the largest Army installation in the northeast, encompassing more than 107,000 acres of gently rolling, wooded terrain. Fort Drum supports a military and civilian population of approximately 36,000, including residents. 3.2 Mission. Fort Drum’s mission is to provide equitable, efficient, and effective management of its resources to support readiness and mission execution of combat-ready forces, while providing for the wellbeing and security of Soldiers, civilians, and family members; improving infrastructure; and preserving the environment. 3.3 Organization. Fort Drum is home to the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry). Tenant units on Fort Drum include the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, the American Red Cross, the Army Material Command, the 20th Air Support Operations Squadron (Air Force), Air Force Weather, the Fort Drum Criminal Investigation Command, the Defense Commissary Agency, the United States Naval Reserve Center, the 174th Infantry Brigade, the 95th and 520th Engineer Detachments, the 902d Military Intelligence Group, the 7th Legal Support Organization, the 725th Ordnance Company, the 27th Public Affairs Detachment, the 174th Fighter Wing Air-Ground Gunnery Range, the Medical Department Activity, and the Dental Activity. 4.0 APPLICABLE REGULATONS. 4.1 Federal Regulations. 4.1.1 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In an effort to improve solid waste disposal practices, Congress passed the Solid Waste Disposal Act in 1965. The Solid Waste Disposal Act was amended in 1976 by the RCRA, which established standards and guidelines for the management of hazardous and nonhazardous solid wastes. RCRA was promulgated to encourage waste minimization through source reduction and use of nonhazardous substances, recycling, affirmative procurement, and conversion of waste to energy. RCRA also established the legislative language governing solid and hazardous waste storage, transportation, and disposal. RCRA Section 6002 requires the Federal Government to promote standards and practices for the procurement of products made from recycled materials. RCRA regulations are contained in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 239 to 282. RCRA Subtitle C (40 CFR 260-279) contains the hazardous waste regulations, and RCRA Subtitle D (40 CFR 239-259) contains the regulations for solid waste. Some significant sections of Subtitle D are summarized below. 2

4.1.1.1 Part 243 (Guidelines for the Storage and Collection of Residential, Commercial, and Institutional Solid Waste). Part 243 establishes requirements and recommended practices for the storage, collection, and management of solid waste and for the operation of vehicles used in collection, transport, and handling of waste. 4.1.1.2 Part 246 (Source Separation for Materials Recovery Guidance). Part 246 contains recycling requirements for the recovery of paper, corrugated containers, and other consumer goods. 4.1.1.3 Part 247 (Guidelines for the Procurement of Products that Contain Recycled Material). Part 247 contains requirements regarding “buy recycled” practices that will stimulate the recovered materials market. 4.1.1.4 Part 257 (Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices). Part 257 contains guidance for determining if disposal facilities meet minimum standards to protect human health and the environment. 4.1.2 Pollution Prevention Act of 1990. The Pollution Prevention Act established a national policy to prevent or reduce waste generation through reduction, reuse, recycling, and treatment. The act established the P2 hierarchy which is the cornerstone of integrated solid waste management. 4.1.3 Federal Facilities Compliance Act. The Federal Facilities Compliance Act requires all Federal facilities to comply with substantive and procedural requirements of Federal, State of New York, and local solid and hazardous waste regulations. The act waived the immunity previously granted to Federal facilities. 4.2 Executive Orders. 4.2.1 Executive Order 13423 (Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management). EO 13423, signed in January 2007, requires Federal agencies to increase solid waste diversion, to strive to meet the national 35 percent recycling goal established by the EPA, and to maintain cost-effective waste prevention and recycling programs. EO 13423 also strengthens green procurement by requiring Federal Agencies to expand purchases of environmentally sound goods and services, including biobased products. This EO also requires Federal Agencies to follow certain guidelines when purchasing electronics and to reuse, donate, sell, or recycle 100 percent of electronic products using environmentally sound management practices. In addition, this EO requires Federal Agencies to construct or renovate buildings in compliance with the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings.

3

4.2.2 Executive Order 12856 (Federal Compliance with Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements). EO 12856, signed in August 1993, requires Federal facilities to comply with requirements of Federal, state, and local solid and hazardous waste regulations. It waived the immunity previously held by Federal facilities. 4.2.3 Executive Order 12780 (Federal Agency Recycling and Council on Federal Recycling and Procurement Policy). EO 12780, signed in October 1991, encourages Federal Agencies to exercise waste reduction, recycling, and affirmative procurement techniques. 4.2.4 Executive Order 13514 (Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance), signed in October, 2009, expands on the energy reduction and environmental performance requirements for Federal Agencies identified in Executive Order 13423 by establishing a goal of 50% diversion of non-hazardous solid waste by the end of Fiscal Year 2015. 4.3 State of New York Regulations. The State of New York’s regulations for solid waste management are promulgated by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) and contained in the New York Codes Rules and Regulations (NYCRR), Title 6, Part 360, Solid Waste Management. The State legislature established the solid waste policy when it passed the Solid Waste Management Act of 1998. The primary mandate of the Solid Waste Management Act is to reduce the amount of waste destined for landfills and incinerators in New York State. Source separation and recycling programs are fundamental components to the diminishing of the ultimate volume of solid waste requiring disposal. The New York State Returnable Container Act is regulated in Title 6 NYCRR, Part 367, Returnable Beverage Containers. This regulation is intended to provide a mechanism for economically and environmentally sound collection of empty beverage containers, to foster systems of redemption which facilitate recycling and reuse of empty beverage containers, and to minimize costs without inconveniencing consumers. The New York State Electronic Equipment Recycling and Reuse Act established the requirement for free and convenient recycling of post-consumer electronic equipment covered under this Act. This Act is intended to provide environmentally responsible disposition of electronic equipment and to bar disposal of electronic equipment in Solid Waste Landfills.

4

4.4 Department of Defense Regulations. 4.4.1 Department of Defense Instruction 4715.4 (Pollution Prevention). DOD Instruction 4715.4 establishes the DOD requirement for installation Qualified Recycling Programs (QRPs), calls for green procurement (GP), and authorizes direct sales of recyclables. 4.4.2 Qualified Recycling Program Guidance. The memorandum issued by the Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environment) supplements DOD Instruction 4715.4, paragraph 6.2.3.3 with guidance on QRPs. 4.4.3 Department of Defense Memorandum, Revised Pollution Prevention and Compliance Metrics. This memorandum supersedes the 1998 DOD Measure of Merit, which required DOD facilities to ensure the diversion rate for nonhazardous solid waste was greater than 40 percent by the end of fiscal year 2005 (FY 05). The revised metric requires DOD facilities to establish a costeffective solid waste management program that reduces solid waste generation, increases diversion rates, and optimizes cost avoidance. 4.5 Army Requirements and Policy. 4.5.1 Army Regulation 420-1, Army Facilities Management. AR 420-1 requires implementation of integrated solid waste management, development of the ISWMP, source reduction for the solid waste stream, and implementation of a QRP. 4.5.2 Sustainable Management of Waste in Military Construction, Renovation, and Demolition Activities. The memorandum issued by the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM) in 2006 requires all military construction, renovation, and demolition projects to divert a minimum of 50 percent of construction and demolition (C&D) waste by weight from landfill disposal and requires that contract specifications will include submission of a contractor’s C&D Waste Management Plan. In addition, this memorandum states that installations will achieve the silver level using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. 4.5.3 Guidelines for Managing Construction and Demolition Waste. The memorandum issued by the ACSIM in 2001 establishes guidelines for the development and implementation of programs to effectively manage wastes generated during C&D activities and requires the development of C&D waste management plans for all military C&D projects.

5

5.0 RESPONSIBILITIES. 5.1 Garrison Commander.   Provide command emphasis on solid waste reduction, materials reuse, recycling, and GP. Maintain a functional organizational structure to plan, execute, and monitor the solid waste and recycling programs. Promote participation in the installation’s recycling program. Chair the Environmental Quality Control Committee (EQCC). Ensure discussions on implementation of the ISWMP are included on the EQCC agenda.

5.2 All Directors.     Advise directorate activities of Federal, State of New York, local, and DOD requirements for managing and reducing solid wastes and recycling. Monitor directorate activities regarding compliance with solid waste management requirements. Support and emphasize the practices of waste reduction, reuse of materials, recycling, and GP. Participate in the EQCC.

5.3 Director of Public Works (DPW). In addition to the responsibilities listed in paragraph 5.2, the DPW is responsible for the following:  Program, budget, and defend resource requirements to manage the solid waste program. This includes funds for personnel, equipment, studies, operation, maintenance, treatment, storage, disposal, waste minimization measures, promotion, and training. Serve as the Commander’s expert representative for the management of solid wastes. Advise the Commander on the most cost-effective and efficient means of storing, treating, and disposing waste, and modifying equipment or procedures if needed. Recommend changes in policies or procedures to improve program management to the Commander when necessary. Ensure regular and systematic collection of solid wastes from designated pickup stations and disposal of solid wastes to provide efficient and cost-effective service in 6

accordance with the requirements of Army regulations. Periodically review number and location of dumpsters and ensure pickup schedule is adequate.   Ensure that an aggressive promotional and educational campaign for the QRP is implemented. Identify the solid waste activities that are carried out by contract, review the responsibilities, and monitor the performance of the contractor. Periodically review the number and location of dumpsters and ensure pickup schedule is adequate. Monitor installation compliance with local, State, Federal, and Army solid waste management requirements, including tenant activities.

5.4 Chief, Environmental Division.      Serve as the DPW’s expert on solid waste issues. Periodically review all applicable Federal, State, and Army requirements for managing solid wastes. Serve as the installation point of contact for questions, complaints, or other information regarding solid waste management and recycling. Ensure that the Environmental Division promotes and implements GP strategies. Participate in the EQCC or other installation forum that addresses solid waste management and recycling.

5.5 Solid Waste Program Manager.     Serve as the Environmental Division Chief’s expert on integrated solid waste management issues including waste reduction, recycling, and composting. Ensure that progress is made towards meeting solid waste reduction and recycling goals. Maintain liaison and coordinate as necessary with Federal and State solid waste regulators. Continue to maintain a recordkeeping system to track materials processed and sold. Track solid waste and recyclables quantities and submit appropriate data for the Solid Waste Annual Reporting (SWAR).

7

Ensure that all new contracts awarded, particularly C&D contracts, include recycling clauses stipulating the diversion of recyclable materials when feasible and costeffective to the Government. Additionally, ensure that C&D contracts specify that contractors submit C&D waste management plans. Include the requirement to follow Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings as specified in EO 13423, and specify that new construction achieve a LEED rating of silver or higher. Ensure that the ISWMP is updated as necessary to reflect current solid waste handling and disposal practices. Monitor installation compliance with applicable Federal, State, Army, and local regulations. Inspect the Fort Drum Solid Waste Transfer Station and the Fort Drum Land Clearing Debris Landfill on a regular basis. Seek out and propose more efficient, cost-effective methods of integrated solid waste management when applicable. Prepare and submit the Annual Report for the Fort Drum Solid Waste Transfer Station and the Fort Drum Land Clearing Debris Landfill to the NYS DEC.

 

 

5.6 Qualified Recycling Program Manager.   Oversee all operations of the Fort Drum Recycling Center, including materials collection, processing, and sale of materials processed. Work with the Mission and Installation Contracting Command (MICC) and the Solid Waste Program Manager to ensure appropriate collection and processing of recyclable materials. Ensure the Recycling Center is equipped to adequately receive, store, process, and sell recyclable materials collected on the installation. Create an active educational and promotional program for recycling practices. Work with the Public Affairs Office (PAO) to ensure the recycling program and procedures are publicized. Maintain records of all materials collected for recycling, amounts collected, and proceeds received from the sale of recyclables. Provide records to the Solid Waste Manager for inclusion in the SWAR.

 

8

Add additional recyclable materials to the QRP as markets are located and materials can be recycled in a cost-effective manner.

5.7 Directorate of Logistics (DOL). In addition to the responsibilities listed in paragraph 5.2, the DOL is responsible for the following:    Advise procurement activities on the availability of environmentally preferable products and GP requirements. Seek ways to reuse and reduce packaging and packing materials. Communicate regularly with the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) activity serving the installation to maintain current information on markets for excess or unserviceable materials and recyclable materials.

5.8 Mission and Installation Contracting Command (MICC). In addition to the responsibilities listed in paragraph 5.2, the MICC is responsible for ensuring that construction and procurement contracts meet Federal GP requirements and source reduction strategies as follows:  Require the use of environmentally preferable products where applicable, with emphasis on mandates for recovered materials, biobased products, and energy efficiency. Stipulate in contracts that paper products contain 30 percent recycled content at a minimum and that contractor documents be printed double-sided. Modify solid waste and recycling contracts as necessary to support installation solid waste management planning efforts.

 

5.9 Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO).   Maintain records concerning quantities of scrap metal and tires turned in for reuse/recycling and the proceeds for resale/recycling activities. Report the quantities of materials recycled to the Solid Waste Manager.

9

5.10 Public Affairs Office.   Publish promotional material on solid waste management issues as provided by the Solid Waste Manager or the QRP Manager. Use a variety of media to maximize the audience reached.

5.11 All Organizations, Units, and Tenant Activities.    Provide clearly marked recycling containers and establish collection points inside all buildings. Participate in and support the QRP by identifying, collecting, separating, and removing contaminants from all potential recyclable materials. Reduce the amounts of solid waste generated through procurement of products with recycled materials content and/or less or reusable packaging, buying only the amounts needed, seeking and implementing new recycling and reuse procedures, and altering operations to reduce wastes.

6.0 SOURCE REDUCTION. Source reduction, or creating less waste, is the preferred method of solid waste management. The EPA calls for source reduction as the primary tool in the waste management hierarchy. Key components of source reduction include GP, reuse of materials and waste exchanges, and management processes that create less waste. 6.1 Green Procurement. GP is the purchase of environmentally beneficial products and services in accordance with one or more of the established Federal procurement preference programs. Federal Agencies are required to establish a GP Program to meet the requirements of the EPA “Buy Recycled” Program and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) “BioPreferred” Program. In 2004, DOD issued a GP policy that reaffirmed a goal of 100 percent compliance with Federal laws and EOs requiring the procurement of green products and services. The policy was accompanied by a strategy document that outlines steps for meeting those requirements and contains metrics for measuring progress. The Army also published a GP policy in November 2006 formalizing the Army commitment to GP compliance. The Army Green Procurement Guide provides detailed instruction on implementing a GP Program at an Army installation and will be used by Fort Drum to update and implement the installation’s GP Program. Fort Drum’s most current Affirmative Procurement Plan was published in 2003. The updated GP program will include the following categories: recovered materials, environmental preferable, energy and water efficient, biobased, alternative fuels and fuel efficiency, non-ozone depleting substances, priority chemicals, Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool– 10

registered electronic products, and sustainable buildings. Further guidance can be found in the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Part 23 (reference 19), EO 13423, and the 2002 Farm Security and Rural Investment Act (FSRIA) (reference 20). 40 CFR 247 contains the Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines designated by the EPA, for which Federal purchasers must buy products containing recovered material. Title IX of the FSRIA requires Federal Agencies to show preference for biobased products as part of their GP programs. To obtain the current lists of EPA designated products, go to http://www.epa.gov/cpg/products.htm. GP has many environmental benefits, including creating markets for recycled and biobased materials, conserving resources, saving energy, saving landfill space, and reducing pollution. 6.2 Pollution Prevention. The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 established P2 as a national objective in reducing waste at the source. This is to be achieved by lessening the toxicity and/or the quantity of waste generated through such tools as material substitution, use of raw materials, procurement policies, or process changes. The Environmental Division manages the Fort Drum P2 Program and strives to reduce or eliminate the impact that any Army operation may have on the environment through reduction or elimination of wastes, more efficient use of raw materials and energy, and reduced emissions of toxic materials to the environment. The Environmental Division works with other installation activities to make environmental considerations part of their daily operations. Fort Drum maintains a separate P2 plan. Fort Drum has implemented several P2 initiatives that have helped to reduce the amount of solid waste disposed including recycling lead-acid batteries, testing and reusing lithium batteries, using green solvent for parts washers, and purchasing equipment for the recycling center including an antifreeze recycling unit, an oil filter crusher, an aerosol can puncturer, and a boiler to recycle parts washing solvent. 6.3 Reuse. Material reuse will be instituted at the lowest functional level. Reuse of materials may be either for the original intended purpose or for another related purpose. Some examples are detailed below. 6.3.1 Packaging Materials. Packaging materials are ubiquitous, make up a large portion of the waste stream, and can serve multiple uses. Buildings that routinely receive shipments of any type will designate a packaging reuse area, which can be a large box, an area of a closet, or a corner of a utility room. Styrofoam peanuts, bubble wrap, and other packaging materials will be stored for future use. Fort Drum will reuse packing materials to the maximum extent possible. In addition, personnel should strive to purchase items that use less or contain recyclable packing materials. 6.3.2 Waste Exchange. Fort Drum will consider establishing a waste exchange by electronic bulletin board. Activities generating potentially reusable items can advertise the excess materials so they may be reused by 11

other activities onpost. The Fort Drum Hazardous Material Control Point (HMCP) uses this technique to minimize chemical waste. The HMCP has a reuse room where customers can turn in items that have been unused or opened but not reached their shelf life expiration date. These products are available to other customers free of charge. 6.4 Best Management Practices. Fort Drum personnel will follow general management practices that will minimize the generation of solid waste. Examples include setting the default on printers to print double-sided, using the intranet or drive sharing to transmit nonsensitive information, using e-mail in place of written memos when possible, saving e-mail messages to files instead of printing them, conducting document reviews and providing comments electronically, sending internal mail in reusable envelopes, reusing file folders by using stick-on labels, using routing slips instead of making multiple copies, using “print view” features to reduce printing mistakes, making double-sided copies, reusing plastic and paperboard binders, and using washable coffee mugs instead of disposable cups. Best management practices will be publicized to personnel. 7.0 INSTALLATION RECYCLING PROGRAM. 7.1 Program Status. Fort Drum operates a Qualified Recycling Program (QRP) as defined in AR 420-1 and under the guidance of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management’s Qualified Recycling Program Handbook. The Army defines a QRP as a program where the installation commander has established:    Procedures for segregating and collecting specific materials intended to be recycled; Methods for maintaining fiscal accountability of funds received from the sale of recycled materials and the disbursal of these funds; and A process to review all projects funded from the proceeds of the sale of recycled materials.

7.2 Program Structure. The Fort Drum QRP is well established and is run through the DPW. The QRP Manager oversees the day to day operations of the program, which is a self-sustaining program. Fort Drum has a contract with Jefferson Rehabilitation Center to collect recyclables from the installation and to operate the Recycling Center. All activities and tenants on Fort Drum participate in the installation QRP, except for family housing. Family housing at Fort Drum has been privatized and a private contractor is responsible for providing solid waste and recycling services. The contractor provides family housing residents with containers for the collection of 12

solid waste and recyclables, collects the solid waste and recyclables curbside once a week, and transports the waste and recyclables offsite for disposal and recycling. 7.3 Recycled Materials. The Recycling Center staff collects, sorts, and prepares the materials for sale and the QRP Manager markets the materials to recyclables dealers and scrap handlers. The Fort Drum QRP handles cardboard, glass, expended brass, plastics (#1 and #2), metals (aluminum, copper, steel), mixed paper (brochures, magazines, packing paper, telephone books, etc.), white paper, newspaper, used motor oil, and appliances. Antifreeze, lead-acid batteries, tires, kitchen grease, and toner cartridges are also recycled. Table 1 shows the recyclable material type, the quantities recycled, and the revenue generated through the Fort Drum QRP in FY 12.

13

Table 1. QRP Materials Recycled and Revenue Generated in FY 12. Recyclable Material Off-Spec Fuel Cardboard Metals Expended brass Mixed paper Used motor oil White paper Cooking Oil Newspaper Plastics Glass White Goods Electronics Tons Recycled 369.28 501.74 762.04 119.59 151.20 147.50 54.45 28.06 69.65 9.28 15.76 26.21 81.09 Total Revenue $13,293 $63,099 $94,247 $493,474 $7,302 $20,213 $3,988 $847 $1,569 $0 $0 $3,012 $767

7.4 Segregation, Storage, and Collection Procedures. Each building on Fort Drum has at least one centrally located recyclables accumulation area. Recycling accumulation areas should be well marked, recycling procedures should be posted in the recycling accumulation area, and recycling collection containers should be labeled appropriately. The accumulation area, at a minimum, should have collection containers for white paper, mixed paper, and commingled containers. Some buildings choose to have a collection container for newspaper and/or separate bins for various container types (plastics, cans). There are also 83 dumpsters designated for cardboard recycling located throughout the installation. Employees are responsible for transporting their recyclables to the centrally located recycling containers and/or to the dumpsters designated for cardboard recycling. Recycling Center personnel collect the recyclables weekly and transport them to the Recycling Center for processing. 7.4.1 Excavated Materials. Several hundred thousand tons of excavated materials are diverted from the waste stream each year. Excavated material consists of rock, stone, concrete, asphalt, and common soils. Rock, stone, concrete, and asphalt are crushed and used for installation road construction and maintenance, particularly outside the cantonment area on the ranges, and borrow pit 14

rehabilitation. Common soils and dirt are used throughout the installation as grade and fill material or for borrow pit rehabilitation. 7.4.2 Cardboard. Most activities on the installation generate corrugated cardboard. Fort Drum personnel are requested to flatten cardboard boxes and place them in their building’s cardboard recycling dumpster or recyclables accumulation area. There are more than 80 dumpsters designated specifically for cardboard located throughout the installation. Recycling Center personnel use a front-end loader to collect cardboard from the dumpsters on a weekly basis. Cardboard collected in the recyclables accumulation area is also picked up weekly. The cardboard is compacted and baled at the Recycling Center. A vendor picks up the accumulated cardboard bales at the Recycling Center and transports the cardboard off the installation for recycling. Weights of the recycled cardboard are reported to the QRP Manager. The proceeds from the sale of the cardboard paper are deposited into the designated QRP account. 7.4.3 Scrap Metal. The bulk of scrap metal generated on Fort Drum is from maintenance facilities. Heavy-duty storage bins are located at maintenance facilities and other activities that generate large quantities of scrap metal. Scrap metal collection containers are collected on an on-call basis and transported to the Fort Drum Transfer Station and placed into a vendor-owned rolloff container. Scrap metal is recycled through a local vendor who reports the weight to the QRP Manager. The proceeds from the sale of the scrap metal are deposited into the designated QRP account. Activities are also required to collect aerosol cans and oil filters for recycling. Aerosol cans are collected at an activity’s satellite accumulation point. When the collection container is full, the contents are brought to the Recycling Center where the cans are punctured, depressurized, and placed in a scrap metal collection container. Oil filters are punctured, crushed, and drained prior to being placed in the scrap metal collection container. The New York State Returnable Container Law has been in effect since 1993. This bottle bill compensates individuals for turning in carbonated beverage containers to distributors. As a result, few aluminum cans are collected through the QRP. The buildings that collect aluminum cans from occupants, turn in the aluminum cans to a local distributor and retain the revenues for activity-specific use. 7.4.4 Brass from Expended Munitions. Brass from expended ammunition/munitions is recycled. Expended munitions must be free of any explosive hazard or residue and be crushed, shredded or otherwise destroyed prior to public sale. At Fort Drum, brass from expended ammunition is processed through a brass deformer machine located at the transfer station. The deformed brass is purchased by a scrap metal vendor who reports the weighed amount to the QRP Manager. The proceeds from the sale of the scrap metal are deposited into the designated QRP account. 15

7.4.5 Paper. Paper (white paper, mixed paper, newspaper) is a substantial waste stream at Fort Drum. Deskside paper collection bins are used to collect waste paper. Fort Drum personnel are responsible for transporting their deskside paper bins to their building’s recyclables accumulation point and for placing the paper in the appropriate collection containers. Recycling Center personnel collect the paper weekly and the paper is transferred to the Fort Drum Recycling Center where it is sorted as needed and baled. A vendor picks up the accumulated paper at the Recycling Center and transports the paper off the installation for recycling. Weights of the recycled paper are reported to the QRP Manager. The proceeds from the sale of the paper are deposited into the designated QRP account. 7.4.6 Motor Oil/Off-Specification Fuel. Activities that generate used motor oil and/or off-specification fuel collect and store the waste in their satellite accumulation area and notify the Environmental Division when their collection drums are full. The Environmental Division collects the used oil, samples it to ensure that it is nonhazardous, and transports it to one of two 10,000-gallon bulk storage tanks located on the installation. A vendor picks up the used oil and off-specification fuel and transports it off the installation for recycling. The volume of the recycled oil is reported to the QRP Manager. The proceeds from the sale of used motor soil are deposited into the designated QRP accounts. 7.4.7 Glass and Plastics. Glass and plastic containers are collected for recycling on Fort Drum, although they do not provide any financial return. Green, brown, and clear glass containers are accepted. Only #1 polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and #3 – 7 high density polyethylene (HDPE) plastics are accepted. Collection containers for commingled glass and plastic beverage containers are located in each building’s recyclables accumulation area. The glass and plastic containers are collected from the storage containers on a weekly basis and transported to the Recycling Center by Recycling Center personnel. These materials are transported off the installation for recycling and the weight of the recycled glass and plastic recycled is reported to the QRP Manager. 7.4.8 White Goods. Since family housing has been privatized, Fort Drum does not generate many waste white goods. White goods that need to be disposed of should be transported to the transfer station and recycled as scrap metal. Any refrigerants should be removed from the appliance prior to transport to the transfer station. 7.4.9 Construction and Demolition Waste. With the exception of excavated materials, C&D contractors are required to remove all C&D debris off of the installation. In addition, C&D contractors are required to develop and submit 16

C&D Waste Management plans and are also required to report the quantities of waste disposed or diverted to the Solid Waste Manager. 7.4.10 Other Recyclables. Fort Drum recycles several other materials that are not recycled through the QRP. These materials include antifreeze, parts washing solvent, lead-acid batteries, tires, toner cartridges. Quantities recycled are reported to the Solid Waste Manager and are included in the installation diversion rate. 7.4.10.1 Used Antifreeze. Activities that generated used antifreeze collect and store it in their satellite accumulation point. The DPW collects and recycles the antifreeze onsite. Recycled antifreeze is available for issue at the HMCP. 7.4.10.2 Parts Washing Solvent. The Environmental Division operates a parts washing solvent recycling operation. Parts washing fluid is recycled on an as-needed basis and redistributed free of charge. 7.4.10.3 Lead-Acid Batteries. Activities that generate lead-acid batteries exchange old ones for new ones. 7.4.10.4 Tires. Tires are turned in through the DRMO and are either recycled or reused. 7.4.10.5 Toner Cartridges. The Self Service Supply Center accepts toner cartridges for recycling. 7.4.10.6 Shipping Pallets. Fort Drum collects wooden shipping pallets for transfer to a recycler. Current market conditions for wooden pallets have made this a cost item for the Qualified Recycling Program, however, disposal costs and the landfill diversion benefit have justified this method. 7.4.10.7 Post-consumer Electronic Waste. Fort Drum maintains a NYS registered collection site for receiving and preparing E-Waste for shipment to a permitted recycler. This site is located at Fort Drum’s Solid Waste Transfer Station. 7.4.11 Potential Recyclables. Fort Drum continues to generate a large quantity of wood waste. In FY 2012, approximately 14%, or 890 tons, of the non-C&D waste disposed was wood waste product. The majority of the wood is shipping crates and dunnage. Due to Fort Drum’s geographical location, recycling options are limited. Fort Drum has investigated wood recycling opportunities in the past and has been unable to find a viable solution, although negotiations with a local biomass facility are ongoing for the transfer of this waste stream as a renewable energy source. 17

7.5 Recycling Facilities. 7.5.1 Processing Station. Recycling Center personnel collect recyclables from Fort Drum buildings and transport the recyclables to the Fort Drum Recycling Center for sorting, processing, and sale. The Recycling Center, Temporary Building #1142, is located off 1st Street. Recycling Center personnel hand sort materials as needed and bale cardboard and paper. Contamination of recyclable materials with waste is not a significant issue at Fort Drum. Sorted and baled recyclables are stored until there is an adequate quantity of materials for sale. Plastic and glass are recycled as cost avoidance materials and do not generate revenue for the QRP. 7.5.2 Drop Off/Convenience Centers. Fort Drum has a drop off/convenience center located adjacent to the Recycling Center. There are collection containers for the following materials: junk mail and magazines, newspaper, packing paper, cardboard, colored glass, clear glass, metals, plastics, and wood pallets. Employees and retirees are allowed to drop their recyclables off at the Fort Drum convenience center. The convenience center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 7.6 Diversion Rates. The diversion rate, expressed as a percentage, is the rate at which nonhazardous solid waste is diverted from entering a disposal facility. The diversion rate equals: (R/(R+L))*100, where R = amount (in tons) of nonhazardous waste diverted and L = amount (in tons) of solid waste disposed Table 2 shows the diversion rates for non-C&D waste, C&D waste, and all waste combined for FY 10, FY 11, and FY 12. The overall diversion rate is consistently greater than 75 percent due to the large quantities of C&D materials that are recycled or reused. The non-C&D diversion rate does not meet Installation Management Command’s FY 12 goal of 46 percent.

18

Table 2. Diversion Rates for Fort Drum’s Waste Stream. Waste Type Disposal/Diversion Data Waste Disposed (tons) Non-C&D Waste Waste Diverted (tons) Diversion Rate1 Waste Disposed (tons) C&D Waste Waste Diverted (tons)2 Diversion Rate1 Waste Disposed (tons) Total Waste Waste Diverted (tons)2 Diversion Rate1
1 2

FY 10 6092.61 3065.95 33.48% 2528.63 11022.39 81.34% 8621.24 14088.34 62.04%

FY 11 6391.19 2701.13 29.71% 995.21 3835.63 79.40% 7386.40 6536.76 46.95%

FY 12 6437.28 2696.19 29.52% 6955.86 34,290.34 83.14% 13,393.14 36,986.53 73.42%

Tonnage of materials diverted/ (Tonnage of materials diverted + Tonnage of materials disposed) x 100 Excavated materials are reused on the installation and counted towards the diversion rate

7.7 Recycling Through the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office. The Fort Drum DRMO is small and only serves as a scrap yard that accepts tires and scrap metal, both of which are recycled through the DLA. Used and out-dated computers are scheduled for turn-in by the Directorate of Information Management (DOIM) for evaluation. DOIM collects the hardware and schedules it for evaluation. Computers that are unserviceable are sent for recycling to DRMO-Mechanicsburg. DLA reports these recycle tonnages directly to Fort Drum’s Solid Waste Program Manager quarterly for inclusion in Fort Drum’s Solid Waste and Recycle (SWAR) reports. 8.0 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AND HANDLING PRACTICES. Solid waste, as defined in RCRA, is any garbage, refuse, sludge, or other discarded material resulting from industrial, commercial, institutional, and residential activity. Discarded materials include those disposed, abandoned, recycled, or inherently waste-like. Hazardous wastes are solid wastes that meet specific RCRA criteria involving hazardous characteristics or the presence of listed constituents and are not addressed in this ISWMP. Solid waste at Fort Drum is categorized and managed based on the type of operation generating the waste. A discussion of the general waste categories is presented in the following paragraphs. 19

8.1 Residential Waste. Family housing at Fort Drum has been privatized and solid waste management is handled by the contractor that manages and operates the Fort Drum Mountain Community Homes Project. A private contractor collects the wastes and recyclables generated by family housing residents once a week. Because family housing has been privatized, solid waste and recycling rates are not reported in the SWAR, in accordance with Army guidance. 8.2 Nonresidential Waste. Nonresidential solid waste includes waste generated from the various commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings located on Fort Drum. These include administrative buildings, multiple vehicle and aircraft maintenance facilities, barracks, health and dental clinics, Army lodging facilities, various dining facilities, a bowling alley and snack bars, fitness centers, a retail exchange, gas stations, and daycare facilities. SWAR records from FY 10 through FY 12 show that Fort Drum facilities and operations generate, on average, about 9,100 tons of municipal solid waste per year. Waste generation fluctuates as the military population expands or contracts due to deployment operations. The DPW is responsible for solid waste collection on the installation. There are more than 700 dumpsters on Fort Drum. Four waste collection vehicles are used to collect the waste and transport it to the Fort Drum Transfer Station, which is located outside of the North Gate. The frequency of solid waste collection varies. On average, waste from barracks and dining facilities is collected daily and waste from all other buildings is collected three times a week. A contractor transports the waste from the Fort Drum Transfer Station to the Development Authority of North Country (DANC) Regional Landfill for disposal. 8.3 Yard Waste. Fort Drum has a land clearing debris landfill in Training Area 5 adjacent to the Wheeler-Sack Airfield. The Roads and Grounds crew uses this landfill to dispose of land clearing debris (trees, branches, dirt, and hard fill). According to NYCRR 360-7.1.(b).(ii) a landfill for the disposal of trees, stumps, yard waste and wood chips generated from these materials is exempt from permit or regulation when origin and disposal of such waste occur on properties under the same ownership or control. In order to comply with New York regulations, Fort Drum will ensure that waste, other than land clearing debris, is not placed in this area. Fort Drum will ensure that such illegal dumping does not occur by posting signs that indicate what types of waste can and cannot be disposed. The Solid Waste Manager conducts regular inspections to ensure that control measures are working and waste is not dumped illegally. Any illegally dumped waste will be removed immediately and disposed of properly. Fort Drum will consider chipping yard waste and using it for trail maintenance or another beneficial reuse. Since family housing has been privatized, its yard waste is handled separately. A private contractor provides landscaping services for the cantonment area of Fort Drum. Yard waste generated by contracted landscapers is disposed of offpost.

20

8.4 Construction and Demolition Waste. C&D waste accounts for a large percentage of the waste stream at Army installations. According to Army-wide SWAR data, 60 percent of the Army’s nonhazardous solid waste stream consisted of C&D debris. Typical wastes from C&D activities includes lumber, reinforcing steel and other metals, piping and wiring, concrete, brick, plaster, wall board, roofing material, insulation, plumbing fixtures, doors, windows, and asphalt. C&D wastes are generated through maintenance, renovation, construction, and demolition activities at Fort Drum. 8.4.1 Construction and Demolition Activities at Fort Drum. Construction sites are a common sight at Fort Drum. The installation has been growing in size and will continue to grow in the future years, which will result in a multitude of demolition and army military construction projects well into the future. These projects will increase the generation of C&D wastes. C&D projects at Fort Drum are executed by private contractors or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Private contractors and the USACE are required to remove and dispose of all C&D debris at approved offpost facilities. In accordance with Army regulations, Fort Drum inserts a specification into new C&D contracts that requires contractors to provide weight tickets for the quantities of C&D waste disposed of and the quantities of waste diverted from the waste stream. Fort Drum has also developed Construction and Demolition Debris Disposal and Recycling Guidelines. 8.4.2 Construction and Demolition Waste Management Program Requirements. The Army has established the requirement for a 50 percent minimum diversion rate by weight of C&D waste from landfill disposal. Achieving a 50 percent diversion rate and reusing existing materials are two of the construction and renovation project checklist items for which credits can be earned to achieve the appropriate LEED rating required by the Army. A well executed C&D waste management program will help to ensure that Fort Drum continues to reach its diversion goal. 8.4.2.1 Bid Specifications. All military construction, renovation, and demolition activities will include C&D waste management performance requirements in the solicitation requirements. Contract bid specifications shall either reference the current Unified Facilities Guide Specifications (UFGS), or provide language as appropriate to the program’s solicitation document format by editing these UFGS provisions to the specific project.  UFGS Division 01, Section 01 57 20.00 10, Environmental Protection; requires contractors to develop and provide recycling and solid waste minimization plan and nonhazardous solid waste diversion reports as part of the project’s Environmental Protection Plan. UFGS Division 01, Section 01 74 19, Construction and Demolition Waste Management; requires contractors to submit a C&D Waste Management Plan for Government approval 21

within 15 days after contract award and prior to initiating site clearance activities, and identifies what information must be provided in the waste management plan and the records maintained.  UFGS Division 2, Section 02 41 00, Demolition and Deconstruction; requires contractors to include in the demolition/deconstruction plan procedures for separation and disposition of salvageable and nonsalvageable wastes during the project.

These specifications and other guides may be downloaded from the Construction Criteria Base section of the Whole Buildings Design Guide Web site: http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/browse_org.php?o=70. This Web site provides general contract performance requirements and depend on project planners and managers to specify further project and site-specific requirements. 8.4.2.2 Waste Management Plan. The Fort Drum DPW shall ensure that all C&D contractors submit a Waste Management Plan as required by the Army and to fulfill the requirements of UFGS 017419. The contractor should reference the Whole Building Design Guide for the development of construction waste management plans. The purpose of the waste management plan is to minimize the generation of C&D waste and ensure the maximum quantity of potential C&D waste (including material generated during site clearing, existing structure demolition, and new construction activities) is salvaged for resale or reuse, returned, or recycled. The waste management plan should include the elements described in the following paragraphs.  Responsible Persons. The waste management plan shall designate personnel on the contractor’s staff responsible for C&D waste prevention and management. The plan should clearly identify ownership of property between Government and contractor. Waste Characterization. The waste management plan shall characterize the waste to be generated during the project including types and quantities. The characterization should address generation and disposition of site waste materials, building materials, packaging, packing material, wastes from construction equipment, wastes from site offices, and wastes from site workers. Waste Disposal Location. The waste management plan shall provide the name of the designated landfill(s) or incinerator, tipping fee, and projected disposal costs for all waste in the landfill or incinerator. Recycling Strategy. The waste management plan shall provide a description of specific approaches to be used in recycling or reuse of various materials generated, including, as appropriate, designation of areas and equipment used for processing, sorting, and temporary storage of C&D materials; identification of local and regional reuse programs, including nonprofit organizations such as schools, local housing agencies, public arts programs, and service organizations (such as Habitat for Humanity) that accept used 22

materials; a list of specific waste materials to be salvaged for resale, salvaged for reuse, and recycled; the recycling facility to be used, and copies of all applicable permits and/or registrations; and identification of materials that cannot be recycled or reused with justification for each. For all disposed materials, including anticipated hazardous wastes, the plan must include names of haulers, disposal sites, and applicable permits and registrations.  Plan Review. The DPW staff responsible for solid waste management and recycling shall review the C&D waste management plan for installation-managed projects and participate in the review and approval of waste management plans for projects performed on the installation by others. The contracting office shall review the waste management plan to ensure compliance with all applicable FARs. 8.4.3 Documentation. For each construction project requiring a C&D waste management plan, the DPW shall document and monitor implementation of the approved plan. In addition, the DPW will ensure C&D activities and materials are monitored and quantified by the contractor for incorporation of the data into the installation’s C&D diversion rate calculation within the SWAR. 8.5 Special Wastes. 8.5.1 Petroleum-Contaminated Rags, Soils, and Dry-Sweep. Petroleum-contaminated products should not be placed in dumpsters. Activities that generate petroleum-contaminated products will turn them in to Building P-2019. Petroleum-contaminated products are tested and, depending on the contaminant levels, either brought to the transfer station for disposal or turned in as hazardous waste. 8.5.2 Universal Waste. Fort Drum collects batteries (except lead acid) and fluorescent light bulbs through its universal waste program. Universal waste is turned in through the Fort Drum Hazardous Waste Program. Batteries are disposed of properly and fluorescent light fixtures are crushed and recycled by a contractor. The quantity of universal waste recycled is not currently being applied towards the installation diversion rate. The tonnage of light fixtures recycled will be reported to the Solid Waste Manager for inclusion in the installation diversion rate. 8.6 Solid Waste Facilities. The DPW collects and transports Fort Drum’s waste to the Fort Drum Transfer Station where the waste is deposited and compacted. Fort Drum has a contract with Feher Rubbish Removal, Inc. to transport the compacted waste to the DANC Regional Landfill. On average, Feher transports three loads of waste per day to the landfill. 23

8.6.1 Fort Drum Transfer Station. The Fort Drum Transfer Station is located off of Iraqi Freedom Drive immediately outside of the North Gate . The transfer station is an enclosed building with a concrete tipping floor. The DPW trash trucks deposit the waste on the tipping floor, transfer station personnel pull large recyclables items (cardboard boxes, appliances, other large pieces of metal) from the waste, and a machine operator transfers the waste into a compactor. The compacted waste is loaded onto one of Feher’s trucks and the waste is transported to the DANC Regional Landfill. The transfer station property is enclosed with a fence. Within the fenced area is another small building where the brass from expended ammunition is deformed and stored for resale. There are several rolloff containers onsite for pallets and other wood waste, metals, and tires. Military units deliver bulk items (pallets, tarps, metals) to the transfer station for disposal. Extra dumpsters for Fort Drum are also stored on the transfer station property. 8.6.2 Development Authority of North Country Regional Landfill. The DANC Regional Landfill is located about 20 miles south-southwest of Fort Drum in Rodman, New York off Route 177. The tipping fee charged for Fort Drum waste is $41.00 per ton. The landfill has an active permit (Permit #23S13) issued by the NYS DEC. The landfill is permitted to receive 346,320 tons of waste per year, but it is not currently at capacity. Waste from Fort Drum accounts for approximately 2 percent of the total waste received at the landfill. The DANC Regional Landfill has recently expanded and has an expected lifetime of more than 20 years. 9.0 PROGRAM PROMOTION AND TRAINING. 9.1 Recycling Program Promotion. The recycling program requires aggressive promotion to ensure its continued success since it depends on the participation of every worker and visitor to the facility. Visual reminders to recycle, as well as signs on every waste and recyclables container stating the acceptable items that can be placed there, are crucial to the compliance with recycling procedures. The Fort Drum QRP Manager will ensure that recycling accumulation areas have the necessary signage. Fort Drum provides welcome packets, which include information regarding the recycling program, to new employees. Fort Drum will provide comprehensive information regarding the recycling program and green procurement on the Intranet. Promotional materials will remind installation personnel that the installation must pay for items discarded in the dumpster, but receives money for the sale of recyclables. In addition to any economic benefit derived from recycling at Fort Drum, the benefits that should be extolled are environmental (reducing the waste stream, saving natural resources), regulatory (complying with waste reduction and recycling goals), and sociological (being good neighbors).

24

9.2 Public Education and Outreach. Public education is an integral part of a solid waste management program and particularly a recycling program. Waste generating operations affect installation personnel and the surrounding communities. Legislation such as the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act has reinforced the need to keep the Army’s neighbors informed of its activities and has heightened the public sector’s awareness and interest. 9.2.1 Media Information. Fort Drum uses two methods to release information concerning Solid Waste and Recycling on and off of the installation, which include a weekly newspaper, The Mountaineer and commandwide public service announcements via the Intranet. The DPW submits a minimum of two solid waste and recycling related articles to The Mountaineer on an annual basis. Events such as elimination of a waste stream, attainment of waste reduction goals, or positive progress in the recycling program are examples of noteworthy items. Additionally, the DPW updates its Web site with the most current information regarding solid waste disposal and recycling. 9.2.2 Community Outreach Programs. The DPW currently has an employee who is responsible for environmental outreach to the installation and surrounding community. Fort Drum will consider enhancing the outreach program using the following methods. Fort Drum personnel will consider participating in functions at local schools such as science fairs, school presentations, recycling drives, and mentoring programs to raise environmental awareness. Fort Drum may want to invite local elementary schools to visit the transfer station and recycling center for educational field trips. To the extent feasible, Fort Drum will support and attend community-sponsored events such as neighborhood cleanups. Fort Drum will continue to support the Army’s annual Earth Day/Arbor Day event. 9.3 Training. Proper and relevant training is integral to the success and safety of solid waste management operations and recycling programs. Training programs may be in the form of formal training courses, correspondence courses, hands-on applications, subscriptions to appropriate professional journals, or attendance at seminars and conferences. The following are examples of training that may be beneficial to Fort Drum personnel. 9.3.1 Recycling Training. Providing training opportunities to the QRP Manager will help keep him informed of new technologies and opportunities to recycle or otherwise reduce wastes. Recommended sources include the Air Force Institute of Technology, which sponsors the course WENV 160 Qualified Recycling Program Management. This course is approved training by the Interservice Education 25

Review Board for all DOD components. The National Recycling Coalition annual conference is another source of education. 9.3.2 Solid Waste Training. Solid waste management alternatives, new technologies, and P2 initiatives are constantly evolving. Recommended sources for current information are the Solid Waste Association of North America annual conference (WasteCon), the Joint Services Environmental Management Conference, the National P2 Round Table, and the FedCenter Web site. 10.0 RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING.

Fort Drum will comply with the following fundamental recordkeeping and reporting requirements:   Track and report the installation’s diversion rate and cost avoidance in accordance with EO 13423. Maintain accounting and control system for the QRP in accordance with DoD Instruction 4715.4, that-- Provides detailed management and audit information; - Tracks recycled material quantity; - Calculates sales and handling costs for recycled material; and - Tracks expenditures made for appropriate projects and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation programs. Retain records of operation and overhead costs, including records for equipment, maintenance, program operations, labor, training, and publicity. Retain the distribution of proceeds records. Report the nonhazardous solid waste diversion rate and economic status (cost avoidance) of the integrated solid waste management program in the SWAR annually. Track and report in SWAR the C&D waste generated, disposed of, and diverted from landfilling. Contractors shall provide C&D waste disposal and diversion rates, or other approved quantifiable data, to the Solid Waste Manager as required by contract. Submit the Annual Report for the Fort Drum Solid Waste Transfer Station to the NYS DEC. The report tracks the quantity of waste handled by the transfer station on a monthly basis.

   

26

Submit the Annual Report for Fort Drum’s Land Clearing Debris Landfill to the NYSDEC. The report tracks the quantity of waste deposited on a monthly basis. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ACTION ITEMS.

11.0

The following action items will help ensure that Fort Drum continues to operate its solid waste disposal and recycling activities in a manner protective of human health and the environment and maintain compliance with applicable regulations. Use economic analyses to investigate the cost effectiveness of items requiring funding. 11.1 Ensure personnel involved in solid waste management are familiar with the ISWMP and are implementing the plan. 11.2 To remain in compliance with New York State law, ensure that municipal solid waste is not disposed of in the land clearing debris disposal site. Post signs that indicate what type of waste can and cannot be placed in a land clearing debris disposal site. Perform regular inspections to ensure control measures are working and municipal waste is not placed in a land clearing debris disposal site. Promptly recover and properly dispose of any illegally dumped waste. If illegal dumping continues to occur, it may be necessary to control access to the site. 11.3 Continue to investigate recycling and reuse options for pallets and other wood waste. Wood waste comprises about 14 percent of the waste disposed at Fort Drum and pallets account for a majority of the wood waste. 11.4 Ensure all possible recycled/reused materials (antifreeze, lead acid batteries, tires, universal waste) are included in recycling data and diversion rate calculations. 11.5 Ensure program emphasis and oversight of C&D project wastes to maximize diversion rate. 11.6 Include C&D waste management performance requirements in the solicitation requirements for all military construction, renovation, and demolition contract projects. 11.7 Ensure that C&D contractors submit C&D Waste Management Plans and report quantities of waste diverted and disposed and provide C&D generation, disposal, and diversion data to the Solid Waste Manager for inclusion in the SWAR. 11.8 Continue to promote deconstruction rather than demolition of buildings. 11.9 Continue to pursue innovative ways to reuse and recycle C&D waste generated during routine operations and maintenance activities. . 11.10 Fort Drum will consider chipping land clearing debris and using it for trail maintenance or another beneficial reuse. 27

11.11 Increase recycling awareness and implement additional outreach techniques to maximize recycling participation. Update solid waste, recycling, and GP information on the Fort Drum Intranet and in The Mountaineer. Ensure that recycling accumulation areas have appropriate signage. 11.12 Fort Drum will consider enhancing the outreach program using the following methods. Fort Drum personnel will consider participating in functions at local schools such as science fairs, school presentations, recycling drives, and mentoring programs to raise environmental awareness. Fort Drum may want to invite local elementary schools to visit the transfer station and recycling center for educational field trips. To the extent feasible, Fort Drum will support and attend community-sponsored events such as neighborhood cleanups. Fort Drum will continue to support the Army’s annual Earth Day/Arbor Day event. 11.13 Update the Fort Drum Affirmative Procurement Plan in accordance with the U.S. Army Green Procurement Guide. 11.14 Mandate duplex copying for all internal documents and ensure contracts specify that written documents be submitted in double-sided print on paper with a minimum of 30 percent post-consumer recovered material as required in FAR Part 4. 11.15 Setup a waste exchange by electronic bulletin board. Activities or personnel generating potentially reusable items can advertise the excess materials for reuse by other activities or personnel. 11.16 Review the ISWMP annually. The annual review will include an evaluation of the overall effectiveness of the solid waste management program. Consideration should be given to factors such as: workforce changes, new or renewed solid waste contracts, changes in regulatory requirements, new technology, and recyclable market prices. 12.0 TECHNICAL POINT OF CONTACT. This Plan has been reviewed and revised by the Fort Drum Solid Waste Program Manager, currently staffed at the Directorate of Public Works, Environmental Division. The Solid Waste Program Manager may be contacted at (315) 772-6121.

28

APPENDIX A REFERENCES 1. Army Regulation 420-1, Army Facilities Management, 12 February 2008. 2. Public Law 94-580, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, 21 October 1976. 3. Public Law 101-508, Pollution Prevention Act of 1990, 5 November 1990. 4. Public Law 102-386, Federal Facilities Compliance Act, 6 October 1992. 5. Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, January 24, 2007. 6. Executive Order 12856, Federal Compliance with Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements, August 3, 1993. 7. Executive Order 12780, Federal Agency Recycling and Council on Federal Recycling and Procurement Policy, October 31, 1991. 8. Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, October 8, 2009 9. Title 6, New York Codes Rules and Regulations, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities. 10. Title 6, New York Codes Rules and Regulations, Part 367: Returnable Beverage Containers. 11. The New York State Electronic Equipment Recycling and Reuse Act 12. Department of Defense Instruction 4715.4, Pollution Prevention, 18 June 1996. 13. Memorandum, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environment), 22 April 2003, subject: Qualified Recycling Program Guidance. 14. Memorandum, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Environment, Safety, and Environmental Health), 12 October 2004, subject: Revised Pollution Prevention and Compliance Metrics. 15. Memorandum, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, 6 February 2006, subject: Sustainable Management of Waste in Military Construction, Renovation, and Demolition Activities. A-1

16. Memorandum, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, 31 August 2001, subject: Management of Construction and Demolition (C&D) Waste. 17. Memorandum, Under Secretary of Defense, 27 August 2004, subject: Establishment of the DOD Green Procurement Program. 18. Green Procurement Guide, Version 1, Prepared by the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Prepared for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Policy and Procurement) and the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army (Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health), August 2006. 19. Fort Drum Affirmative Procurement Plan, Prepared by Fort Drum Public Works Environmental Division and Directorate of Contracting, June 2003. 20. Federal Acquisition Regulations, Part 23 - Environment, Energy and Water Efficiency, Renewable Energy Technologies, Occupations Safety, and a Drug-Free Workplace. 21. Fort Drum Solid Waste Annual Reporting System Data, Fiscal Year 2010. 22. Fort Drum Solid Waste Annual Reporting System Data, Fiscal Year 2011. 23. Fort Drum Solid Waste Annual Reporting System Data, Fiscal Year 2012. 24. Memorandum, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army, 27 April 2007, subject: Sustainable Design and Development Policy Update – Life Cycle Costs.

A-2

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful