Uniting ARCCAW members across Alberta Fall 2012

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Alberta Millwright
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366 days of MAX makes 2012 the year of extended run time.
DEWALT2012.com is your home for information about new products,
promotions and more. Register now for your chance
to enter daily prizes, monthly contests and VIP Experiences.
Entry into the DEWALT 2012 VIP Experience Contests requires a custom PIN Code. PIN codes are available at DEWALT 2012 events,
on board featured DEWALT tools and at supporting DEWALT retailers and distributors. No purchase necessary.
To learn how to obtain a non-purchase PIN code, please visit www.dewalt2012.com for full details.
©2012 Stanley Black & Decker "ALL PETTY MARKS USED UNDER LICENSE FROM RPAC RACING, LLC."
You Could WIN The DEWALT 2012 V.I.P. Experience #4
The DEWALT Racing Experience for you and 3 Friends in Florida in February 2013.
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HARDHAT FALL 2012
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Executive Secretary Treasurer’s REPORT
The Importance
of Volunteering
Martyn A. Piper
s fall is quickly upon us, we are step-
ping out of another summer and
approaching the cold of winter. In the
not too distant future the holiday season will
be upon us, and looking ahead to the future I
would like to take this opportunity to stress
the importance of volunteerism in our union.
Members are likely familiar with the union
executive and staff who work and volunteer
some of their free time on the membership’s
behalf, but some members do not realize the
large number of other members who volunteer
their time. Members who volunteer do so with
the goal of making our union, our workplaces
and our communities better places. Here are
just some examples of activities in which time
is committed by our union’s members through
volunteer activities.
In our work sites and camps, we have vol-
unteers selling tickets for cheque pools. These
members do this on their own time. The
money raised goes to the Building Trades of
Alberta Charitable Foundation. Our member
volunteers have been donating their time to
these activities for over 10 years, thereby con-
tributing to the over $5 million directed by
the Charitable Foundation to charitable orga-
nizations. These charities include diabetes
research, support for military families, STARS
Air Ambulance, Special Olympics Alberta, the
Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital Foundation,
E
4
C School Lunch Program and a host of other
charitable organizations.
Members of our union also donate their
time to organizations such as Habitat for
Humanity, the Calgary Stampede Barbecue,
motorcycle rides
for charity and the
Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation.
In addition to vol-
unteering time and effort to assist with community organizations,
members of our union take the time to volunteer in activities within our
union community. Whenever our union puts on events or participates
in activities, it is our members’ spirit of volunteering that makes these
events happen and is crucial to their success. This includes a long list of
members who work on the locals’ picnics, kids’ Christmas parties, pin
presentations, retiree clubs, attend and help out at meetings and par-
ticipate on committees (such as the Women’s Committee). Even some-
thing as simple as putting chairs away at the end of meetings is crucial.
Recently, the Alberta Carpenters Training Centre hosted our union’s
Canadian Skills Competition in Edmonton. The event was well-
attended with competitors from across the country. The ability to make
such an event a success depends on the commitment of the members
who volunteer. There were, again, a significant number of volunteers
from our locals, and the competition was a huge success.
I wanted to take this opportunity to mention some of these things
and stress the importance of the strong core of members who volunteer
in our union. This is also another opportunity the union provides our
members. Volunteers find there is a sense of personal achievement in
helping others. Volunteering can help develop leadership skills. Most
importantly, volunteering enables our members to strengthen the fel-
lowship and camaraderie within the community that is our union,
thereby strengthening our union.
With that, I would like to offer a big “thank you” to all of our mem-
bers who volunteer. Keep up the good work. If you have not been volun-
teering in the past, please think about the many different ways that you
may be able to help either within the union or within the community at
large. If you can’t think of something, just contact a union representa-
tive and we will find a way for you to help contribute.
I’ll finish with a quote from Booker T. Washington: “If you want to
lift yourself up, lift up someone else.”
A
HH_Fall12_p04-05.indd 4 10/4/12 12:32:14 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 5
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8
Edmonton 780-471-3200
Fort McMurray 780-743-1442
Calgary 403-283-0747
Carpenters Training Centre 780-455-6532
Carpenters Health and Welfare 780-477-9131
Carpenters Pension 780-477-9131
Industrial Workers 403-283-0747
Millwright Local 1460 780-430-1460
Local Union 1325 and 2103 Dispatch 1-888-944-0818
PUBLISHED FOR:
Alberta Regional Council of
Carpenters & Allied Workers
15210 – 123 Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5V 0A3
Tel: (780) 474-8599 / Fax: (780) 474-8910
www.albertacarpenters.com
PUBLISHED BY:
Venture Publishing Inc.
10259 – 105 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1E3
Toll-free: 1-866-227-4276
Phone: (780) 990-0839
Fax: (780) 425-4921
www.venturepublishing.ca
PUBLISHER
Ruth Kelly
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Joyce Byrne
ARCCAW EDITOR
Martyn A. Piper
EDITOR
Kim Tannas
ART DIRECTOR
Charles Burke
ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR
Andrea deBoer
ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR
Colin Spence
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR
Betty-Lou Smith
PRODUCTION TECHNICIAN
Brent Felzien
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Gisele Aparicio-Hull, Bobbi-Sue Menard,
Lisa Ricciotti, Robin Schroffel, Matt Smith
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
AND ILLUSTRATORS
Buffy Goodman,
3TEN Photo - Eugene Uhuad
VICE-PRESIDENT, SALES
Anita McGillis
ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
David Frazier
SALES ASSISTANT
Karen Crane, Jenn Rush
Contents©2012byARCCAWInc.
Nopartof thispublicationshouldbereproduced
withoutwrittenpermission.
Important Phone Numbers
ON THE COVER:
Alberta millwright contestant Tyler Shipton
placed first in his trade category at the
UBC’s Annual National Apprenticeship
Competition on August 25.
7
Fall 12
Contents
12
28
FEATURES
10 fit@work
Is being a tradesperson similar to being
a professional athlete?
By Matt Smith
12 Spirit of Competition
Edmonton hosts the 20th annual appren-
ticeship contest
By Lisa Ricciotti
18 A Brief View of Our Union
Listings of Regional Council executive
boards, delegates and committees
21 Frameworks of Respect
Drytec Interiors is a young company
with a bright future
By Gisele Aparicio-Hull
DEPARTMENTS
4 Note From the Executive
Secretary Treasurer
By Martyn Piper
6 Site Lines
Made for the movies; Teeing up for
charity; Local 1325 summer picnic;
Cabinetmaker Mike Srejic puts his skills
on display; Family fun day at Calaway
Park; Stampede picnic
24 Geared Up
Tools to help you work better
27 KidZone
Going to extremes
24 Local 1460 Millwrights Report
By Bob Hugh
25 Training and
Apprenticeship Report
By Len Bryden
28 Meet the Instructor
29 Meet the Apprentice
30 Training & Events; In Memoriam
HH_Fall12_p04-05.indd 5 10/9/12 2:17:02 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012
Golf Tournament
Scores for Charity
A total of 160 union members, service
providersandvendorsbroughttheirbest
swingtotheLegendsGolfandCountry
Clubforthe12thannualBarrieReganGolf
TournamentonFriday,July20.
“Overallitwasasuccess,”saysMartyn
Piper,executivesecretarytreasurerof
ARRCAW.“It’sagreatnetworkingaffair.
It’safundaybutmoreimportantlyweare
raisingmoneyforagoodcause.”
Closeto$12,000wasraisedthis
yearfortheJuvenileDiabetesResearch
Foundation,alongtimecharityofchoice
forthetournament,insupportofleading
researcheffortsmadeattheUniversity
ofAlberta.“Anycontributionisgoodbut
that’sasizableamount,”saysPiper.
Teamsoffourhitthelinkswiththe
lowestgrossingscoretakingthisyear’s
winnertitle.Asidefrombraggingrights,
thewinningteammembersgettheir
namesetchedonthetrophythat’s
passedonfromyeartoyear.
AbigthanksgoesouttoLinda
Helmecziandthemanyvolunteersfor
givingtheirtimetomaketheeventa
success.
THis yeAR’s winneRs:
WinningTeam:ChrisCrouter,JakeBaker,DaleGuggenmos,DenisTadic
LongestDrive(Ladies):ChristineBaurenschmidt
LongestDrive(Men):MikeCarew
LongestPutt(Ladies):AmandaBetker
LongestPutt(Men):DaleHarvey
ClosesttothePin:PatSmith
A hot, 26 C day with food, music and entertainment was the
perfectsettingfortheannualLocal1325summerpicnicheldon
August12.
“Ourvolunteerssteppeduptotheplate,”saystrusteeLeonard
Lopatynski,whoorganizedtheeventalongsiderecordingsecretary
MoeRahime.“Everythingisdonestrictlyonavolunteerbasis,and
withoutourexecutivesupportandourvolunteers,thispicnic
wouldn’thappen.”
Closeto200unionandfamilymembersfeastedonabarbecue
spread,cooledthemselvesoffwithicecreamandwereentertained
bytwomusicalacts.Kidshadavarietyofactivitiestochoosefrom,
includingbouncycastles,airbaseball,airbowlingandbasketball.
“Itgivesachanceforpeoplewhoworkonjobsitesanddon’tget
toseeeachothertomingleandseeeveryone’sadditionstotheir
families,”saysLopatynski.
Site Lines
News in Brief
A roundup of news and events
from around the region
BY Gisele ApARiCio-Hull
summer eats and Family Fun
HH_Fall12_p06-09.indd 6 10/4/12 12:35:04 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 7
Jeremy Kozina (left) Ed MacKinnon (right) at a staging area near Elbow
Falls, pre-material mobilization; wire basket and pallet of stair treads were
pre-slung in netting at Aluma’s Calgary yard The falls at the end of day one
Chopper flying in a bundle of three
meter standards, weighing 1,800
pounds. A pilot-controlled sling
release is located just above the load
JeremyKozina(left)andEdMacKinnon
atElbowFallsattheendofthefirstday
ofthetwo-daystairtowererection
Guess the Tool
Can you guess the name of
this antique tool?
ANSWER ON PAGE 8
Helicopters, movie stars, explosions…
not a typical day for three union members
who found themselves working on the set
of this summer’s action blockbuster The
Bourne Legacy.
The three-man crew from union
company Aluma Systems were a part of
movie-making magic in preparation for two
Hollywood Connection
of the film’s pivotal scenes shot in Kananaskis
Country, including the opening scene where main
character Aaron Cross, played by Jeremy Renner,
jumps out of freezing water at Elbow Falls.
“They only had one opportunity to do that
shot,” explains Rob Wetherell, construction
superintendent for Aluma Systems, Calgary
Division, who led the team.
“The scene was shot at an inaccessible side of
the Elbow River, so we built stair-tower access on
the McLean Creek side so they could bring the
crew in and down that stair tower.”
“It would have been unfeasible to bring them
all in by helicopter to try and get that shot done
in one day.”
Journeyman scaffolder Ed Mackinnon
and third-year apprentice Jeremy Kozina
accompanied Wetherell for Aluma’s first feature
film project. The stair tower at Elbow Falls
was built in January of 2012, and the team also
constructed a short stage close to Fortress
Mountain for a cabin explosion scene two
months prior. It was built on the hillside behind
the cabin as a location where the film crew could
blow snow in order to increase the amount of
snow for the shot.
Although Wetherell ranks the complexity
of both scaffolds as fairly simple, he says the
unique circumstances behind the job made this
experience stand out for him. On a few different
occasions he accompanied the film’s head of
photography to scope locations in a low-flying
helicopter through the Rocky Mountains, and the
team was also flown to the job site by helicopter,
along with all their materials.
“It’s a different game with movies than it is with
construction,” he says. “That was pretty neat.”
And in the scaffolding trade where he
describes the opportunity to see your work as
“rare,” this is one project the team can revisit
time and time again.
“This is something that is actually
documented where we can say ‘I did this for this
part of this movie,’ ” says Wetherell. “Even in the
trailer, both of those scenes are in it so I was able
to show my wife. It was neat that way for sure.”
HH_Fall12_p06-09.indd 7 10/4/12 12:35:41 PM
8 HARDHAT FALL 2012
Site Lines News in Brief
A roundup of news and events
from around the region
Answer to
“Guess the Tool”
This tool is called called a bell hanger’s gimlet,
which can be used to bore small holes.
(From Page 7)
And he’s more than happy to pass on his knowledge to his fellow
tradespeople, including Provencher, who says even after his own many
decades of experience, “I learn something from Mike every single time I’m
around him.” Srejic’s son, Petar, also benefited from this knowledge. He
took after his father to become a cabinetmaker and studied as one of his
apprentices.
Srejic is eager to share the tricks of the trade that continues to give
him a rewarding and fulfilling career. The challenge of taking raw material
and a few lines drawn on paper to create something extraordinary gives
him so much pleasure, that he’s in an enviable position where his job feels
like anything but work.
“I don’t see my work as a difficult task. I see my work as something that
I like doing,” he says. “To me, a wood workshop is my playground and I
never get tired of it.”
Among his extensive portfolio of
projects, Mike Srejic tends to favour
“the most complicated ones.” Why?
Because even after more than 40 years
as a professional cabinetmaker, his love
for the craft still centres around putting
his skills to the test to deliver a flawless,
finished product.
“I’m one of those 40-plus year
apprentices,” he jokes. “I’m always trying
for perfection, I find pleasure in that. I’m not saying I’m near
perfect but I’m trying to get as close as possible.”
Despite his modesty, products of Srejic’s craftsmanship are
admired and displayed throughout ARRCAW’s offices and training
centres in the form of shelves, podiums, countertops and cabinets.
ARRCAW project manager Bob Provencher, who hired Srejic in
2010, is proud and feels lucky to have him as part of his team.
“He’s a pretty humble man, but if you’ve ever seen his work,
it’s absolutely stunning,” he says. “His work is world class and
that’s not exaggerating.”
The foundation of Srejic’s training began in his home country
of Serbia, and in 1971 he came to Canada and began practising
in the trade. He owes some of his well-honed skills to work
experiences with some of the best craftsmen in the world and, of
course, good old-fashioned hard work.
“Like in any other trade, the learning never stops,” he says.
“Even today, I’m still learning by practising.”
World-Class
Workmanship
Record Numbers at
Stampede Breakfast
The Local 2103 Calgary office parking lot was open to the community
for a taste of the Old West in celebration of the Calgary Stampede.
This year’s Stampede Breakfast on July 14th was “the best year ever”
with close to 1,000 breakfasts served. “The country music was the crowd-
drawer. People would come to the sidewalk and look in and we’d invite
them in,” says organizer Stephen Brazil, Local 2103 executive trustee.
“This shows the presence of the carpenters’ union in Calgary, but
the main benefit is giving back to the community. We want to be a part
of this community, so here’s our way of saying thank you.”
Brazil jokes at one point that the whole 9-1-1 response team was in
attendance, with EMS staff, firefighters and police coming in to feast on
the traditional western breakfast of pancakes, sausages and beans.
Mike Srejic
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at 1-877-250-5079 no later than Novem
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HH_Fall12_p06-09.indd 8 10/4/12 12:36:24 PM
Thrills and Frills at
Calaway Park
In the midst of laughter and screams heard from the top of the
roller-coaster, Local 2103 members and their families came together in
camaraderie at the Calaway Park Family Fun Day.
Close to 100 union and family members came to the park on
August 11 to enjoy a full day of rides and a lunch provided by the union.
Organizer Stephen Brazil, Local 2103 executive trustee, says with
everyone working so hard throughout the year, it’s important to give
back to the families a day reserved for nothing but fun.
“It’s just that little aspect of bringing the family together and closer
at least one day of the year,” he says. “It’s about getting out, having fun,
forgetting work and enjoying the family spirit.”
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To pre-register, em
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rights.1460.com
or
call Jeannelle at 780-430-1460, ext 2164, or toll-free
at 1-877-250-5079 no later than Novem
ber 23, 2012
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HH_Fall12_p06-09.indd 9 10/4/12 12:36:34 PM
eing a professional athlete is an
exciting career that comes with great
amounts of respect and recognition
but over the long term it can place a large
amount of stress on the physical and emo-
tional well-being of the individual. This
can come in the form of brutal injuries or
simple chronic wear and tear, but can also
extend to the sacrifice and pressure it puts
on home life while being on the road for
weeks at a time.
Specific challenges for professional ath-
letes can result from large amounts of travel
throughout the year, staying in hotel rooms
when they’re on the road, and of course
the demands of performing their sport. An
athlete’s in-season schedule can be a very
intense experience and many look forward
By MATT SMITH
demanding on the body and mind over longer
periods of time.
The focus of this article is not to simply say
work less, eat better and get in the gym once in
a while. It’s meant
to bring a slightly
different perspec-
tive to why it might
be a good idea to
be more conscious
of how our jobs
affect our physi-
cal and mental
health. Being aware of some of the basic simi-
larities between athletes and tradespeople can
help emphasize the reasons for keeping your
body healthy and properly fuelled and also the
potential problems of being in a career where
to recovering and preparing for the next year
when it’s all over.
Does this not describe another group of peo-
ple very closely? We could easily replace the
word athlete with
tradesperson and
it would still very
much make sense.
Minus the seven
figure salaries,
there are many sim-
ilarities between
the two.
One major difference between the two, how-
ever, is that tradespeople have no off-season and
therefore neglecting some basic training and
proper eating habits to reduce potential risks
can really take its toll. This can be extremely
Performance on the job is
important but staying healthy and
injury-free should have greater
focus since without this well-oiled
machine we call a body, how can
we perform in the first place?
B
How similar is a trade to being in a professional sport?
Trade ATHleTeS
10 HARDHAT FALL 2012
HH_Fall12_p10-11.indd 10 10/9/12 12:41:36 PM
Matt Smith, CSEP-CPT, NASM-CES
By Randy Stefanizyn, Manager, Labour Relations,
Syncrude Canada Ltd.
it’s common to be working long hours or away
from home over long periods of time.
Here are some of the commonalities
between tradespeople and professional
athletes:
Their bodies are their livelihood.
Performance on the job is important but
staying healthy and injury-free should have
greater focus since without this well-oiled
machine we call a body, how can we perform
in the first place? Unfortunately, a body in
risk of being injured is a liability many don’t
think about until it’s too late. Taking simple
measures of addressing any major tight mus-
cle groups with a basic stretching program
or increasing a little bit of our strength and
endurance can be a great place to start in mak-
ing sure performance stays tip top. Even if we
never get hurt, it’s sometimes nice when get-
ting out of bed in the morning isn’t the biggest
challenge of the day.
Hectic work schedules.
Putting aside the fact that a consistent
weekly schedule is not something a tradesper-
son usually signs up for, athletes and workers
alike will usually find themselves away from
home large portions of the year and/or work-
ing long shifts whether or not they are feel-
ing up to the challenge. Professional athletes
often have their season extended into playoffs
while tradespeople often are called on to work
extra shifts: are you prepared for the extra
time spent away from families and friends?
Living arrangements and travel.
Both the trades and professional sports
involve a lot of travelling and commuting to
work, which can be taxing both mentally and
physically. The effect of being crammed into
a hotel room or camp for weeks on end where
proper nutrition can be difficult to come by is
something that we might not feel right away,
but over years and years it can become more
evident. Some of the risks involved might
include having low energy and being mentally
fatigued – and these are effects that can trans-
fer over to our work performance.
In the end, there are not many differences
between tradespeople and athletes, and in
both occupations it’s important to follow basic
principles of eating better, staying fit and
training for our specific job. These principles
can be effective in troubleshooting the effects
of a demanding lifestyle and will ultimately
help get us home safe and feeling good.
In addition, becoming more aware of poten-
tial physical and sometimes emotional risks
involved with being a tradesperson or athlete
can direct us toward finding solutions to them
as they arise. Remember, an ignorant mind is
a mind moulded by circumstance. Being con-
scious is much safer than waiting for something
to happen or wondering why it happened.
If you’d like more information on what was
presented in this article or have any questions
about training and assessments, please contact
Matthew by emailing matt@smithtrained.
com. Working with all types of trades and ath-
letes, Matthew is a Certified Personal Trainer
and Corrective Exercise Specialist through
the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology,
National Strength and Conditioning Association
and National Academy of Sports Medicine.
HH_Fall12_p10-11.indd 11 10/4/12 1:03:24 PM
12 HARDHAT FALL 2012
en Bryden sounds like he’s just run the 100-metre dash. He barely picks up my call
before voice mail can kick in, but he doesn’t have time for chit-chat. Bryden is busy. As the
director of training and apprenticeship for the Alberta Carpenters Training Centre,
he’s trying to be six places at once, pulling together 1,001 last-minute details for the
National Apprenticeship Competition, now just days away. This year it’s in Edmonton and he’s
determined everything will run as smoothly as a well-oiled machine.
Expectations are high since 2012 marks the 20th anniversary of the high-powered
competition that attracts the top final-year apprentices and brand-new journeypersons from
across Canada in the carpentry, drywall and millwright trades. There’s also some serious
hometown pride at stake. It’s a big honour to host the hands-on competition, along with its two
lead-up days of written exams, events and meetings and it’s been 10 long years since Edmonton
had the privilege.
“The last time in Edmonton was 2002 and it was held in a parking lot at West Edmonton Mall,”
says Bryden. “It was great. This time, we’re aiming for awesome.”
Bryden must have some pull with the weather gods. Earlier in the week, the city experi-
enced a prairie version of a tropical monsoon, with endless rain, heat and high winds. Then two
days ago, a freak hailstorm pounded the city. But today, August 25, there’s nothing but clear skies
and cooler temperatures. Perfect working weather for the nine-hour competition ahead for 25
apprentices, roughly one per province for each of the three trades.
I follow the whine of power saws and nail guns, descending to Louise McKinney Park. Could
organizers have picked a more picturesque setting? Towering above is the castle-like grandeur
of the historic Fairmont Hotel Macdonald, temporarily home for contestants and competition
guests, while below lies the natural beauty of the North Saskatchewan River and Edmonton’s
river valley.
Today there’s a new addition to the park, a
humungous white tent that could fit a small
circus. It’s popped up overnight – 220 feet long
and 60 feet wide – just off the walking paths
where early morning risers jog, adjacent to the
park’s traditional Chinese Garden. Usually the
large stone lion statues in the garden look fierce
and formidable, but today they’re overshadowed
by the impressive tent. My first impression can
be summed up in one word – awesome! Len
Bryden must be proud.
Under the big top, contestants are already
hard at it – carpenters on the left, drywallers on
the right and the millwrights across the back.
The previous evening featured fun and frolic
aboard the Edmonton Queen paddlewheel
riverboat, including a dinner cruise and
entertainment, but today is strictly business.
Competitors have their game faces on and
have already put in an hour’s work when I
enter the tent.
Unlike the carpentry and the drywalling
areas where each provincial representative has a
separate workstation and an individual project
to complete, the millwrights rotate between
L
Edmonton shines as host city to the 20th anniversary of the national
apprenticeship contest ByLisA RiccioTTi
HH_Fall12_p12-15.indd 12 10/4/12 1:13:10 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 13
workstations to complete three distinct
tasks – alignment, bearing and measuring and
mechanical fitting. What exactly millwrights
do has always been mysterious to me, so I head
for their area first, hoping for enlightenment.
I see nine intense-looking competitors. All
are hunched over various pieces of machinery,
totally focused on their tasks. In their craft,
millimetres matter. Carpenters may measure
twice and cut once, but the millwrights seem
to measure and adjust, then measure and
adjust repeatedly.
I drift away, drawn to the drama
of watching sheets of plywood and
drywall transformed into a finished
product. None of the carpenters and
drywallers had a clue what they’d
be working on until the competition
began, but now all is revealed.
Blueprints are posted at each station and savvy
spectators can watch projects take shape and
gauge who’s getting it right, who’s having
problems and who seems to be ahead.
The drywallers are creating a mini-structure
that’s art deco-ish in design, a challenging
puzzle of streamlined symmetrical angles and
geometric curves. The carpenters’ task? Well,
they’re busy building doghouses, but aren’t your
typical backyard variety. These will be posh
pooch palaces – deluxe canine quarters with
a peaked shingled roof, shuttered windows,
insulation and a subdivided interior. Once
completed, they’ll be donated to the Edmonton
Humane Society, which will auction them off to
raise funds for the city’s homeless pets.
It’s still very early in the timed competition,
but already it’s apparent that some apprentices
work faster than others. Does that mean they
are the current frontrunners? “It’s not a race,”
explains Jim Archer, a millwright trainer with
Local 1460 who’s wearing a white judge’s
hard hat today. “We’re evaluating their work
continuously, not just the final product. And
some of the fastest have made mistakes already!
Points are given for completion time, but the
quality of work and their overall work and safety
practices are just as important. Often you can’t
tell who’s won until we add up the final score
sheets.”
The apprentices have now been working
for almost three hours straight. Although
spectators are wearing jackets and sweaters,
things are heating up for the competitors. Their
T-shirts are beginning to show evidence of
sweat, and some safety goggles are beginning to
steam up. The clock is on and so’s the pressure.
A buzzer sounds – break time!
I approach a small cluster of apprentices
and ask if they can talk. No problem, I’m told, as
long as I don’t give them any tips. Not the remot-
est chance of that, I think to myself. Instead the
current topic of discussion is last night’s river-
boat cruise. The onboard entertainment includ-
ed a hypnotist who found many cooperative
subjects willing to go under with often hilari-
ous results. I ask if any of them were hypno-
tized to ease pre-competition jitters? No, they
laugh, but maybe they should have.
“I was so tense during that first hour
that I had to walk away to calm down,”
admits Bradley Small, a drywaller from
Newfoundland. “But then you settle in
and focus on what you have to do.” Some
apprentices have already experienced a
competition, qualifying for the national event
by winning at the provincial level. Others,
generally from smaller provinces, were
selected because they had the highest scores
on their written apprentice exams, and this
competition is their first.
Regardless, most feel like they’ve
conquered their nerves and are in the zone
now. Surprisingly, most also agree that there’s
no temptation to look around to see how
other competitors are tackling their project.
“I’m here for fun and to do my best for my
province,” says Bradley. “I’ll do it my way;
there’s no time to worry about the other guys.
Besides, I was too busy with all those radius
lengths and curves, something I haven’t run
into on the job for a while!”
As the competition resumes, I decide
to keep things interesting by choosing a
favourite from each trade to cheer on. Of
course it’s natural to root for Alberta, so for
the millwrights I go with Local 1460’s Tyler
Shipton. From the drywallers, I
lean toward Bradley Small since
he’s trying so hard and has a great
attitude.
Among the carpenters, I’m
tempted to pick Tim Allen from
B.C., based on his name alone, or
local favourite Kyle Hoodendoom.
But a twist of fate makes the decision for me.
Manitoba’s Justin Laroche was doing well
with his doghouse, keeping up with pace-
setter Brian Gauthier from Ontario, when
he misfires his nail gun and puts one into his
hand.
That’s gotta hurt, but Justin wants to yank
it out and carry on. Of course the safety guys
think otherwise; he must go to emergency at
the nearest hospital. “I’ll be back!” he vows,
knowing that one slip has just ruined his
chances of victory. He’s the new underdog of
doghouse builders, but Justin’s still acting like
a champ. He’s got my vote!
Lunch! The competitors devour loaded
plates and the media descend with cameras
and recorders. The doghouse angle is a big
“Working against the clock means making
decisions fast. It means this isn’t my best
work – but I did my best.”
Bradley Small, drywall competitor, Newfoundland
and Labrador
HH_Fall12_p12-15.indd 13 10/4/12 1:13:13 PM
14 HARDHAT FALL 2012
000HH-SocialClub-FP.indd 1 10/4/12 10:56:37 AM
hit, as the Humane Society brings in some
hounds that are up for adoption to test them
out. Then it’s back to the tools, for the final
stretch.
The two drywallers from Ontario
continue to lead the way, with one contestant
finishing about an hour and a half early. The
millwrights keep on milling, while most of
the carpenters are now tackling the challenge
of rafters and roofing. Justin is back in the
game, hand bandaged, but still well ahead of
many other doghouse builders. It now looks
like not all the doghouses will be completed,
but a judge reassures me that they’ll all go
back to the Alberta Carpenters Training
Centre, to be finished or in some cases
fixed, and all will go to the Humane Society.
The crowd passes the time swapping
stories. With instructors and union reps
from different training centres and locals
across Canada, there’s lots of information to
share. Too soon for some of the contestants,
it’s all over. “Working against the clock
means making decisions fast,” says Bradley.
“It means this isn’t my best work – but I did
my best.”
Who won? The contestants will remain in
suspense until the evening award banquet at
the Hotel Macdonald, after the judges have
thoroughly checked their work and tallied up
scores. My best guess is one of the Ontario
drywallers, and either B.C. or Ontario for
the carpenters. For the millwrights … who
knows? For me, they remain as mysterious
as ever, although their dedication and
meticulous work has earned my respect.
DRYWALL
1. Darcy Mitchell
Ontario
2.Christian Berger
Ontario
3.Matthew Smith
NovaScotia
And the Winners Are…
Overall,Ontariodominated,butAlbertatookhomeapieceofthehardwarewithanimpressive
winfromTylerShiptonforthemillwrights.“Ineverdidwellinschool,”saidanemotionalShipton
attheceremony.“BeingamillwrightisthefirstthingI’vebeengoodat.Winningthismeansso
muchtome.”
CARPENTRY
1. Brian Gauthier
Ontario
2. Tim Allen
BritishColumbia
3.Nolan Weimer
Saskatchewan
MILLWRIGHT
1. Tyler Shipton
Alberta
2.Gilbert Bedard
Saskatchewan
3.Michael Champagne
Ontario
HH_Fall12_p12-15.indd 14 10/4/12 1:13:40 PM
000HH-SocialClub-FP.indd 1 10/9/12 9:36:58 AM
HH_Fall12_p12-15.indd 15 10/9/12 12:44:47 PM
Always Wear Safety Goggles. Copyright
®
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.
TRADITION. PRODUCTIVITY. INNOVATION.
These words are everything you know Stanley Tools represents.
This is the kind of variety, quality and innovation professional
contractors and do-it-yourselfers alike have come to expect
from Stanley, and those characteristics are clearly thought of
for every tool we offer. We work continually to design products
with real-world benefits that will see you through to the end of
job after job. Whether you are doing your first home project
or completing a full room renovation, Stanley has the tools
you need for the job.
STANLEY. TOOLS THAT GET THE JOB DONE RIGHT.
www.stanleyhandtools.ca
000HH-StanleyTools-DPS.indd 1 9/26/12 12:22:13 PM HH_Fall12_p16-17.indd 16 10/4/12 1:06:51 PM
Always Wear Safety Goggles. Copyright
®
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.
TRADITION. PRODUCTIVITY. INNOVATION.
These words are everything you know Stanley Tools represents.
This is the kind of variety, quality and innovation professional
contractors and do-it-yourselfers alike have come to expect
from Stanley, and those characteristics are clearly thought of
for every tool we offer. We work continually to design products
with real-world benefits that will see you through to the end of
job after job. Whether you are doing your first home project
or completing a full room renovation, Stanley has the tools
you need for the job.
STANLEY. TOOLS THAT GET THE JOB DONE RIGHT.
www.stanleyhandtools.ca
000HH-StanleyTools-DPS.indd 1 9/26/12 12:22:13 PM HH_Fall12_p16-17.indd 17 10/4/12 1:06:52 PM
18 HARDHAT FALL 2012
Crystal Bowen 1325
Len Bryden 1325
Greg Budd 1325
Rob Carlson 1325
Bob Cook 1325
Mike Dunlop 1325
Randy Dwernychuk 1325
Dave Dwyer 1325
Chester Fergusson 1325
Todd Gartner 1325
Doug Germaine 1325
Bob Hardy 1325
Doug Hogan 1325
Gord Hrycun 1325
Dave Hunter 1325
Terry James 1325
Devin Jean-Louis 1325
Ralph Jewitt 1325
Len Lopatynski 1325
George Pekarchik 1325
Martyn Piper 1325
Wilf Pipke 1325
Bob Provencher 1325
Moe Rahime 1325
Steve Rossignol 1325
Derrick Schulte 1325
Grover Sewell 1325
Martin Smith 1325
Greg Smith 1325
Brandi Thorne 1325
Dave Todd 1325
Searle Turton 1325
Perry Walsh 1325
Greg White 1325
Richard Winkenweder 1325
Tom Debeljak 1460
Hank Ell 1460
Gord Evers 1460
Bob Hugh 1460
Dave Knight 1460
Mike Lahti 1460
Ted Remenda 1460
Stephen Brazil 2103
Hughie Bruce 2103
Mike Cooper 2103
Randy Eirich 2103
Gary Loroff 2103
Joe Maloney 2103
April Parsons 2103
Bruce Payne 2103
Tim Virtanen 2103
Sean Watkinson 2103
Shane Whitmore 2103
Paul Zarbatany 2103
Joe Budac 2010
Clint Kittle 2010
Ed Lonsdale 2010
Philip Banh 2010
Vince Pariseau 2010
Bob Sawatzky 2010
Bill Weireter 2010
A BRief View Of OuR uniOn
Local Union Membership elects Executive
Board (accountable to membership)

Membership considers and passes
motions governing the Local Union at
monthly meetings
Local Union Executive Board responsibil-
ities include, but are not limited to:

Oversight and management of Local
Union affairs

Maintain and disclose to membership
detailed and accurate financial records

Hold regular monthly meetings

Record and maintain minutes

President appoints committees

Executive Board appoints Trust Fund
Trustees

Execute duly passed motions

Fully accountable to the general
membership
Local Union elects delegates to the
Regional Council
*Number of delegates based on local
membership
Delegates elect Regional Council Executive
Board and Executive Secretary Treasurer

Delegates consider and pass motions
governing the Regional Council at
quarterly meetings
Regional Council Executive Board respon-
sibilities include, but are not limited to:

Oversight of Regional Council affairs

Authorize staff recruitment and final
selection

Hold quarterly meetings

Maintain and disclose to delegates detailed
and accurate financial records

Fully accountable to the delegate body
of the Regional Council
Executive Secretary Treasurer (EST)
*EST is essentially the Chief Executive Officer
of the Regional Council, with the accompany-
ing responsibilities and the required author-
ity to execute those responsibilities. The EST
is accountable to the Executive Board of the
Regional Council and to the delegate body of
the Regional Council.
Responsibilities include, but are not
limited to:

The general management of financial
and business affairs

Record and maintain minutes

Management of contract disputes

Grievance procedures

Recruit and hire all staff
- Final approval by Executive
Committee
* All paid staff employed by Regional
Council – Local Unions do not employ
any paid staff

Appoints committees

Appoint professionals and consultants as
required (lawyers, accountants, etc.)

Develop relationships with partner
organizations

Develop relationships with government
representatives and elected officials

Representative to the UBC General
Executive Board

Report to the Regional Council Executive
Board

Report to Regional Council Delegate
Body

Ensure the management and execution
of duly passed motions by the Delegate
Body

The foregoing information
represents a limited description of the
governance of Local Unions and the
Regional Council. Publications contain-
ing the UBC Constitution and Alberta
Regional Council Trade Rules and Bylaws
should be consulted for further
information.
DELEGATES (elected 2012)
HH_Fall12_p18-19.indd 18 10/4/12 1:20:25 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 19
EXECUTIVE BOARDS
ALBERTA REGIONAL COUNCIL
EXECUTIVE BOARD
Bob Hugh,President
Greg Budd, Vice-President
Martyn Piper, ExecutiveSecretaryTreasurer
Bob Arnestad, Trustee
Gord Evers, Trustee
Paul Zarbatany, Trustee
Bill Weireter, Warden
Shane Whitmore, Conductor
Gary Loroff, ExecutiveCommitteeMember
Moe Rahime, ExecutiveCommitteeMember
Robert Provencher, ExecutiveCommittee
Member/FinanceChair
LOCAL UNION 1460 MILLWRIGHTS
David Knight, President
Neal Hugh, Vice-President
Stan Howell, RecordingSecretary
Bob Hugh, FinancialSecretary
Ken Walker, Treasurer
Philip (Wei) Yun, Conductor
Tom Debeljak, Warden
Hans Kruger, Trustee
Kyle Middleton,Trustee
Grant Ireland, Trustee
UBC Organization Chart
UBC International
General Executive Board
LOCAL UNION 2010 EXECUTIVE
William Weireter, President
Robert Sawatzky, Vice-President
Vince Pariseau, RecordingSecretary
Bhajan (Ben) Kang, FinancialSecretary
Renato Danzo, Treasurer
Edwin Lonsdale, Trustee
Clint Kittle, Trustee
Joseph Budac, Trustee
Fabian Cherewko, Conductor
Chris Robinson, Warden
LOCAL UNION 1325 EXECUTIVE
Mike Dunlop, President
Brandi Thorne, Vice-President
Moe Rahime, Recording Secretary
Al Minaker, Treasurer
Rob Carlson, Financial Secretary
Doug Germaine, Conductor
Dave Hunter, Warden
Leonard Lopatynski, Trustee
John Northcott, Trustee
Perry Walsh, Trustee
LOCAL UNION 2103 EXECUTIVE
Paul Zarbatany, President
Bruce Payne, Vice-President
Mathew McLeod, Recording Secretary
Mike Cooper, Treasurer
Gary Loroff, Financial Secretary
Stephen Brazil, Trustee
Merritt Broughton, Trustee
Joseph D. Wagner, Trustee
Tim Virtanen, Warden
Hughie Bruce, Conductor
Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers
Central
District
Southern
District
Eastern
District
Western
District
Mid-Western
District
Canadian
District
Local Union 1325
Edmonton
Construction
Local Union 2103
Calgary
Construction
Local Union 2010
Province-Wide
Industrial Shops
Local Union 1460
Province-Wide
Millwrights
Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Delegate Body
Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Executive Board
Alberta Regional Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers Executive Committee
HH_Fall12_p18-19.indd 19 10/4/12 1:21:13 PM
Members or probationary apprentices:
if you do not notify the Millwright
Training Centre that you are unable to
attend a course you are registered in, you
will be billed a “no show” fee of $100.
No show fees for any other courses sched-
uled outside the Millwright Training Cen-
tre will be the full cost of the course.
NAIT hoisting and rigging course is
subject to a $450 no show fee.
Scaffold Training
Industrial Technical Training (ITT) $100
Level One Scafolding $100
Level Two Scafolding $100
Level Three Scafolding $100
Scafold Journeyman Upgrade $100
carpenTry Training
AIT Period One Carpentry $700
AIT Period Two Carpentry $700
enhancemenT Training
1st Aid/ CPR $135
Blueprint Reading $250
CSTS $50
H2S Alive $135
Hoisting & Rigging $250
Insulating Concrete Forms $200
OSSA Confned Space $150
OSSA Fall Protection $150
No Show FeeS
If you register for any of the following courses through the Alberta Carpenters
Training Centre and fail to attend and not notify the Alberta Carpenters Training
Centre, you will be charged the following NO SHOW Fees.
*any other Enhancement Training will be the full cost of the course
alberTa carpenTerS Training cenTre
millwrighT Training cenTre
IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ATTEND A COURSE THAT YOU
HAVE REGISTERED FOR AND YOU NEED TO CANCEL,
CALL AND LEAVE A MESSAGE AT 780-455-6532 eXT. 4226.
HH_Fall12_p20-23.indd 20 10/4/12 1:53:42 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 21
ictor Pereira’s ultimate goal
is to make everyone his company
touches – from customers to employ-
ees – happy. The way to accomplish that is to
show respect, he says. It’s a key to success that
Pereira, the president and owner of Drytec
Interiors, owes to his Portugese family back-
ground.
“My parents always told me to respect your
boss and the person who’s in charge and to
respect everybody,” he says.
Drytec Interiors has been in the interior
systems business since May 2011, providing
design-assist and construction services for
several clients across Alberta, including Bird
Construction, PCL and the Alberta Regional
Council of Carpenters and Allied Workers.
That usually involves providing all of the
interior package for a building, including sup-
port framework, drywall, acoustical ceilings,
insulation and piping. At not even two years
old, the company has been busy from day one
and has been on a steady incline ever since.
Starting up the business is a risk that has paid
off for the husband and soon-to-be father of
three.
“It’s hard to start, and you have to put your
time into something that you don’t know is
going to work,” says Pereira, who by the end
of the year will need to hire more than 40
employees. “But it has been pretty good. I’ve
been busy through the last year and a half.
I have a lot of projects coming and it’s better
than I was expecting, way better than I was
expecting.”
If you ask Drytec client Bob Provencher,
project manager at ARRCAW, this is far from
a coincidence. Provencher, who has seen
With its focus on quality and customer service,
Drytec Interiors has a promising future ahead
V
By GISELE APARICIO-HULL
Frameworks
of RESPECT
NEW SHOP BUILDING: Carpenters
Local 1325inEdmonton
HH_Fall12_p20-23.indd 21 10/4/12 1:53:57 PM
22 HARDHAT FALL 2012
Drytec’s development from its infancy, says Pereira’s success is well-
earned, thanks to his combination of diligent craftsmanship, hon-
esty and excellent work ethic.
“The number one thing clients are looking for today is the ability
to communicate with their contractor, that everything is going to be
made right,” says Provencher. “And Vic brings that to the table. He’s
not a guy who collects his money and he’s gone. If you have a prob-
lem, you call Vic and he’s going to come back and make sure you’re
taken care of. And that’s big in
today’s world.”
Pereira’s passion for the
craft began 18 years ago after
discovering the creativity and
discipline involved in becom-
ing an interior systems mechanic. “There’s a lot of imagination, you
can be creative and I like perfection. I like the way you can mould
drywall and you can do a lot of stuff with it that you can’t do with
other stuff, like steel.”
As a union member and tradesperson, Pereira helped construct
ARRCAW’s head office in Edmonton. Provencher later approached
him to complete renovation and repair work on the building, and
once that was successfully completed, presented him with the
opportunity to bid as an interior systems contractor to help develop
a 10,000-square-foot storage and shop facility on the same campus.
The timing couldn’t have been better, as Pereira had already been
thinking about starting his own company. As a tradesperson, he had
some ideas on improving quality control and the customer service
experience. He also wanted to be more influential in the projects
he was involved with. When Provencher approached him, Pereira
remembers asking himself, “Why not start my own company and see
what I have to offer?”
What Pereira offers Drytec and everyone who does business with the
company is a foundation built on hard work, innovation and treating
everyone with respect. “Even the workers that I have, I try to offer the
most that I can to them, so that they can feel comfortable and feel happy
to go to work the next morning; that’s what I like to do.”
And Pereira recognizes happy workers are more likely to foster the
company’s commitment to con-
sistently delivering good, qual-
ity work, no matter the size of the
project.
“It doesn’t matter if it’s a $1,000
job or $5-million job, I care for all
the jobs and I respect them the same,” he explains. “My thing is to make
the client happy and give them a good final product. That’s the way you
get the next job.”
Provencher describes Drytec under Pereira’s leadership as a success
story of a tradesman developing into a contractor, something the union
would like to see more of its members do.
Although it’s hard work, Pereira recommends this path for the right
person. His words of advice: “If they have that dream, if they have the
background and if they’re comfortable to open a company, they should
go ahead and do it and don’t look back, because it’s a great opportunity.”
With contracts signed into the end of next year, Pereira is cautious but
optimistic about Drytec’s future. “It’s hard to predict three or four years
ahead. It changes fast sometimes but for the next year I’ll be pretty busy,”
he says.
“And I hope it will last for a long, long time.”
“If you have a problem, you call Vic and he’s
going to come back and make sure you’re
taken care of. And that’s big in today’s world,”
says Bob Provencher.
OPERATING ENGINEERS BUILDING:
Local 955 in Fort McMurray
HH_Fall12_p20-23.indd 22 10/4/12 1:54:09 PM
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LOCAL 1325 CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS PARTY
HH_Fall12_p20-23.indd 23 10/4/12 1:54:16 PM
24 HARDHAT FALL 2012
Geared Up
AUTOMATED ADJUSTMENT
Since its spring 2012 launch, the Auto-Adjust Toggle
Clamp from Bessey Tools has become the go-to tool for
carpenters, woodworkers and metal workers looking for an
easy setup clamp that will effortlessly match whatever piece
of material is being worked on. The auto-adjustment feature
handles variations in workpiece thickness of one inch while
maintaining clamp pressure.
The Auto-Adjust Toggle Clamp is available in three styles:
horizontal low to handle workpiece height up to 1
9
⁄16 inches;
horizontal high auto-adjusts to variations up to 2
3
⁄8 inches;
and the inline model, which auto-adjusts to width variations
of up to 1
3
⁄16inch.
Clamping force can be adjusted within a range of 25 to 550
pounds of pressure with the turn of an integrated screw.
The swivel foot has a non-marring plastic cap and the toggle
will automatically adjust to different heights of wood while
maintaining a steady pressure. The clamp has up to 700
pounds of holding capacity. It’s easy to install with one-time
setup, optimized to use a
1
⁄4 inch (M6) fastener.
The Bessey Auto-Adjust Toggle Clamps sell for
approximately $22 each and are available at retailers
across Alberta. Visit www.besseytools.com for more
information.
SINGLE UNIT, MULTIPLE POINTS
Bosch has introduced a new laser level designed
for multi-point projects in a single unit, rather than
working with two or more levels on a job. The new
GCL 25 five point self-levelling alignment laser with
cross-line is designed for tradespeople and craftsmen
in need of a versatile tool for daily use .
It has one-button operation that allows for quick
Tools to help you work faster and smarter
switches between the multiple self-levelling modes and the
slope mode. The five laser points are visible up to 100 feet
away and offer accuracy of a quarter inch for points and an
eighth of an inch for cross lines with laser visibility up to 33
feet. The GCL 25 starts with the basics, including self-levelling,
plumb up and down, horizontal levelling, alignment, right
angle setting and laser cross line.
Additional features have been designed to speed up the
process for multi-point jobs.
The GCL 25 can transfer
points to the ceiling or
lighting installations using
plumb points, square
for room partitions or
walls using the five-point
mode and lay out frame
tracks.
The GCL 25 will be
available at online and in-store
retailers this fall. Visit www.
boschtools.com for more information.
MEASURING UP
The new Stanley FatMax 25 foot magnetic tape measure
(model FMHT33865, metric model FMHT33866) has an
impressive 11 feet of blade standout combined with an
effective and accurate magnetic end. Designed to be tough,
the magnet is a powerful rare earth magnet with a holding
force of up to four pounds. The end of the blade is coated with
BladeArmor on the first three inches to deliver durability of
the hook end and the blade is coated with Mylar polyester film
for long life. “We are proud to be introducing a new magnetic
tape measure that is accurate and provides both long reach
and a power magnet, making it the perfect choice for pros in a
host of different trades,” says Scott Moore, vice-president of
marketing, Stanley Black & Decker.”
The Stanley FatMax 25 sells for
approximately $27.99 and is available
at retailers across Alberta. Visit
www.stanleytools.com for more
information.
HH_Fall12_p24-25.indd 24 10/4/12 1:55:21 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 25
pring and summer of 2012 have certainly proven to
be the busiest the Alberta Carpenters Training Centre has
seen. Last year we were facing an unprecedented number of
members looking for spots in our scaffold training program. We then
created enough classes for the 2012-2013 schedule province-wide to
address this backlog. We continue to run hundreds through our in-
ternationally recognized scaffold training program every few months
in this province, and we continue to develop, review and improve our
training delivery on an ongoing basis.
We focus on quality control. We focus on professionalism. We
focus on excellence for our members and contractors. That’s what
separates us from the competition that wants our jobs and our
contracts, the same competitors and contractors that are hell-bent on
lowering our wages and benefits to increase overall corporate profits.
Research the wages and benefits of a carpenter and/or scaffold erector
in any part of the southern United “right to work” States. You will soon
see what I am talking about. The minute we lose our focus, our resolve
and our unity is when we go to work creating wealth for others and see
our take-home pay and benefits cut by as much as half. Don’t think it
can’t happen because it already has, and there is a large group of people
that wants it to happen here in Alberta, if not all across Canada.
On the topic of scaffolding, I am writing this article from what
can seem like a second office or home at times – our International
Training Centre in Las Vegas, where I am currently working on
curriculum review and redevelopment of our International Scaffold
Training Manual, to be used throughout North America. Instructors
George Pekarchik and Randy Dwernychuk and I have been tasked
with this important project, representing Canada and our scaffold
industry’s needs. We have been asked in years previous to assist
with development of scaffold training programs on all levels for the
International, hard work that ACTC staff members Randy, George
and myself take on gladly and treat very seriously.
Why does the International Brotherhood of Carpenters continue to
request our assistance in development of training manuals and actual
scaffold training programs to spread all over North America, from
coast to coast to northern coast? Because we have proven what we do
works, year after year. Our contractors know it, and the International
knows it, and it drives our competition absolutely crazy. It should make
our Alberta members, as well as our contractors, other UBC training
centres teaching scaffolding and all of our scaffold instructors across
Canada very proud to know we have the recognition we deserve in this
field. We are carpenters with a major in scaffolding. I have heard that
more than once in our International dealings.
This August we had the pleasure to host the Canadian National
Apprenticeship contest in Edmonton. Congratulations to all
Busy Times for ACTC
REPORT Training and Apprenticeship
S
26 apprentice/new JM
Carpenters/Drywall/
Millwright competitors from
across Canada that attended,
and thanks to all the ACTC
and millwright staff, many
volunteers, and generous
sponsors for helping to
make this a well-attended
and well-run event. The
carpenter apprentices built
custom deluxe doghouses
(an actual miniature house,
fully insulated with rafters,
shingles and siding and an
attached solar panel to power
a small porch light as an added
bonus!) Definitely some of
the nicest custom doghouses
most have ever seen! We will
be delivering 12 completed
projects to the Edmonton Humane Society for them to help raise funds
for their organization. If you are interested in purchasing one, contact the
Edmonton Humane Society after October 8 to ask how you can get one for
your pampered pet. Great job by the drywallers and millwrights as well!
Be sure to read the article in this issue for more information regarding the
NAC2012, and check out millwright Bob Hugh’s article as he speaks more
about the national contest.
Watch for changes to our required work experience hours for the scaffold
program coming in 2013, more great training sessions for the remainder of
2012 and into 2013 for Hoisting and Rigging, Forklift, Telescoping Rough
Terrain Forklift, Aerial Work Platform, Commercial Door Hardware, all
of our ongoing safety training classes, First and Second Period Carpentry
Apprenticeship classes, and more. Contact us or visit our website at
www.abcarptc.ab.ca for more information and to register for training.
After such a busy 2012 so far, we would like to think that things would
slow down for a bit into the fall for the ACTC. Not the case. After a busy
spring, busier summer and a quick holiday to catch my breath, I will be right
back at it. As usual, I want to remind all apprentices and members that all
training is valuable, and we at the ACTC are here to answer your questions
and help you succeed within our organization. Stick together, support one
another in good times and bad, and stay strong.
Now we all need to keep working at our respective jobs and keep this
Carpenters Union strong, productive and proud. That takes all of us. The
staff at ACTC and myself are going to do our part. Will you?
Len Bryden,
Director of Training and Apprenticeship
Alberta Carpenters Training Centre
HH_Fall12_p24-25.indd 25 10/4/12 1:55:26 PM
26 HARDHAT FALL 2012
ore than 200 delegates and 26 of the country’s
finest UBC millwright, carpenter and drywall
apprentices recently converged on Edmonton
for the National Apprenticeship Competition.
Nobody left unimpressed. Believe me!
And no one was prouder at the competition’s end than the
Alberta Millwright Training Centre staff, because one of our own,
Tyler Shipton, placed first in the millwright competition.
The Canada-wide National Apprenticeship Competition is held
in conjunction with an annual two-day National Apprenticeship
and Training Advisory Committee (NATAC) meeting of trainers
from every province. Tom Debelajk and I represented the Alberta
Millwright Training Trust Fund at these meetings.
To me, the effort that goes into this competition proves UBC’s
commitment to excellence in tradesmanship and to ensuring that
the next generation is motivated to uphold professional standards
that have been proudly passed down for hundreds of years.
The August 25 competition required months of planning,
dozens of volunteers and a large investment of time and materials.
It was held in a 220-foot long, 60-foot wide tent at Louise McKin-
ney Park in Edmonton’s river valley.
Competitors were given plans (carpenters and drywallers) or
task assignments (millwrights) at 8:00 a.m. and worked feverishly
to finish by the 4:00 p.m. deadline. Judges from Alberta and several
other provinces monitored their performance, from planning the
job to final execution.
The challenges of staging this competition were formidable.
Once the tent was erected, we needed to supply it with generated
power (and a complete backup system) and supplies like water,
tables and chairs, and services ranging from security, porta-potties
and chartered buses to food caterers and more.
Volunteers at the Alberta Carpenters Training Centre teamed
up to pre-build 26 individual platforms for the competitors to work
on, and to acquire endless lifts of plywood, lumber, drywall and
other supplies they’d require for their projects.
Myshak Sales & Rentals donated the use of two 40-foot
highboys to transport our props and tools, the work platforms
and project materials to and from the competition site. KBIM,
our largest millwright-only employer, picked up the costs for
the tractor and the operators’ wages. Companies like DeWalt
donated an incredible amount of value by providing tools for the
competitors and as prizes. And the City of Edmonton generously
allowed us the use of the park, free of charge!
I was proud to serve on the organizing com-
mittee along with committee chairman Len
Bryden of the Alberta Carpenters Training
Centre. We would not have succeeded without
the help of the highly organized duo of Kim
Belbin of the ACTC and our own Lisa Wilson.
My thanks go to the many ACTC staff,
carpenter and millwright members who vol-
unteered so many hours of hard work to pull
the competition together, and to Dave Knight,
Grant Ireland and Jim Archer who, along with
Lloyd Horley, our Saskatchewan brother, judged
the millwright competition.
Congratulations, Tyler Shipton!
First Place for
Local 1460 Apprentice
REPORT Local 1460 Millwrights
Bob Hugh, Senior Business
Representative - Millwrights
M
HH_Fall12_p26-27.indd 26 10/4/12 1:56:20 PM
HARDHAT FALL 2012 27
KidZone
Eating bugs. Riding motorcycles through mud. Whitewater rafting. People love
to take things to extremes, and construction is no different. All around the world, you can
see extreme building projects that took years to plan and that cost millions, sometimes even
billions, of dollars to build.
One example is the world’s biggest dam. It’s in China and crosses the Yangtze River. It’s called
the Three Gorges Dam, and it’s 2,335 metres long and 181 metres high. That’s the length of 233
football fields, and it’s made of enough steel to build 63 Eiffel Towers!
In Europe, one of the coolest construction projects ever was the CERN Large Hadron
Collidor. It’s a giant scientific instrument built 100 metres underground so that scientists can
study the tiniest particles on Earth. It’s shaped like a circle and is 27 kilometres around, crossing
the border between France and Switzerland. If you were driving the normal speed limit in your
neighbourhood, it would take about half an hour to get around it.
Ancient Extremes
Extreme construction projects are nothing
new. Hundreds, and even thousands of
years ago, people were building big and
beautiful things. Below, we share some of
the most extreme construction projects of
their time. All of them have stood the test of
time: with a little travelling, you can still see
all of them today.
THE PYRAMIDS OF GIZA
Where: Egypt
When: About 2560 B.C.E.
What: Giant stone pyramids
rising out of the desert.
CAPPADOCIA
Where: Turkey
When: About 300 A.D.
What: Underground cities that included
churches, temples, stables and homes.
By ROBIN SCHROFFEL
Word Scramble
Try to unscramble these words. (Hint: all of them are
mentioned somewhere on this page.)
Extreme Construction
ANGKOR WAT
Where: Cambodia
When: Circa 1100 B.C.E.
What: A large, beautiful religious
temple surrounded by a moat.
RKGNAO TAW
CHUMA CHCPIU
RAEGT LLAW FO HCNAI
PACPDOAICA
RHEET OGSREG AMD
Find your way
through the building maze.
Start on the ground floor.
THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA
Where: China
When: About 220 B.C.E.
What: A giant protective wall stretching
21,196 kilometres long across the country.
MACHU PICCHU
Where: Peru
When: About 1460 A.D.
What: A fortified city on top of a
mountain, built by the Inca people.
HH_Fall12_p26-27.indd 27 10/4/12 1:56:30 PM
or centuries, the trades have worked in muchthe same way:
experienced journeymen pass down to apprentices the knowledge
and skills they’ve accumulated over many years. That sense of
tradition is what keeps millwright instructor Jim Archer, a veteran
who’s practised the trade for more than 50 years, teaching students even
through his semi-retirement.
“It’s good to pass that onto somebody that’s young and coming up, and
hopefully when they get older they’ll be able to pass it on also,” he says.
“That’s how we keep a skilled workforce.”
Archer first entered the mechanical trade in his native England at 16,
completing a five-year apprenticeship before an advertisement for work
at an Alberta coal mine caught his eye. In 1969, he headed across the
pond and signed on at the mine as a mechanical
engineer. After a short time, Archer left the
coal biz and joined Local 1460, doing general
construction work within the millwright
trade at oil refineries, gas plants and the like.
Eventually, he took a job at the Northern
Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)
teaching millwright apprentices. Between NAIT
and later, a position at SAIT, Archer spent about
15 years instructing before going back to the job
site. Soon, he began training union members
at the Provincial Millwright Training Centre in
Edmonton.
The author of one manual for millwrights,
IPT’s Industrial Hydraulics Training Manual,
and co-author of another on rotating
equipment, Archer’s thorough grounding in the
principles and practices of the trade combined
with his passion for new technologies makes
him an inspiring instructor. His enthusiasm
– Archer professes love for all the courses
he teaches, from rigging to steam turbines
to alignment – doesn’t hurt, either. The
training centre keeps up to date with the latest
equipment, including high-tech laser alignment
products, and Archer relishes the opportunity
to put that equipment to use. “I enjoy
change,”
he says.
Advancements in technology provide a
compelling reason for union members to take
Archer’s courses. In fact, most of his students
are journeymen upgrading, keeping their
F
Labour of Love
By ROBIN SCHROFFEL
Meet the Instructor
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JIM ARCHER
skills fresh and learning to use the newest equipment. Alignment, in
particular, is one course that journeymen can always benefit from.
“Alignment is one of these things that if you don’t continually do it,
you tend to lose your skills and forget a little bit,” Archer says. “[Laser
alignment] could even be something they haven’t done at all – some of
them might have done the old style using dial indicators.”
Archer’s courses aren’t run on a full-time basis, which suits him just
fine: it allows him to spend more time at his home base in Cochrane,
coming up to Edmonton for just a few weeks at a time. He really doesn’t
need the work: for the lifelong tradesman, it’s a labour of love.
“I do the instructing more to help everybody out and pass on whatever
skills I can.”
28 HARDHAT FALL 2012
HH_Fall12_p28-29.indd 28 10/4/12 1:57:53 PM
Meet the Apprentice
yler Shipton is the first to admit he was a bit of a
slacker in high school. In fact, he says he barely scraped
through with his diploma. But as a fourth-year millwright
apprentice, he’s completely turned things around. For the past
three years, Shipton has been recognized as the top apprentice
in his class and in August, he topped that honour by winning
first prize for millwrights in the 2012 National Apprenticeship
Awards, beating out eight other representatives from across the
country.
The award means a lot to Shipton, who confides that he
wasn’t expecting to win. He recalls looking over to his table
of family and friends during the ceremony as they shook their
heads, thinking he wasn’t going to win, and says he almost cried
when the judges called his name. “I felt the weight of the world
lift off my shoulders. I wanted to prove to myself that I could
be the best in something,” he says. “This is like the Grammy of
millwrighting.” To prepare for the competition, which lasted
two days and included both a written component and practical
exams like alignment, a bearing scrape and a bearing installation,
Shipton worked closely with Dave Knight, president of Local
1460, to brush up on his skills.
While Shipton’s technical abilities were advanced enough to
win the apprenticeship competition, he says that it’s the people
skills he’s picked up through the union that have proven the
most valuable to him. “The biggest thing I’ve learned is being
part of a team and learning how to work with other people,” he
says. “How to speak to people, how to get them to do the things
you want them to do and how to take direction.”
The importance of keeping a positive attitude on the job site
has also made a lasting impression on Shipton. No matter how
much money you’re making, if morale is low then it could be the
worst job in the world, he explains. But even a crummy job can be
improved by creating a positive atmosphere. “If it’s -50 C outside
but you have a good crew, the day goes by better and everyone
works safer.”
It’s an attitude that will help Shipton when he transitions
to a journeyman next year. The rite of passage is one he
takes extremely seriously. “One day, we all have to become
journeymen. I want to make sure that, when the time comes,
I’m not going to be letting anyone down, that I’ll be proficient
in what I do and that I will be able to lead one day,” he says. But
T
Shipton is conscious of how much work that entails. “I still have a lot
to learn.”
Describing himself as a perfectionist with a serious work ethic,
Shipton credits his success to developing a routine, knowing where his
focus needs to be and learning how to study. “I can’t be out with my
buddies all the time. There has to be a balance in there,” he says. “It’s
absolutely worth the sacrifice.”
By ROBIN SCHROFFEL
Winning
Attitude
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TYLER SHIPTON
HARDHAT FALL 2012 29
HH_Fall12_p28-29.indd 29 10/4/12 1:58:14 PM
Alberta Carpenters Training Centre
We’ve trained North America’s
best scaffolders for 15 years.
The Alberta Carpenters Training
Centre has delivered its 3-year
Scaffolder Apprenticeship and Carpenter JM Upgrade
Scaffold Programs, as well as dozens of other safety and
skill training programs, to thousands of students in three
training centres – Edmonton, Ft. McMurray & Calgary –
since 1994.
Our new $23 million centre includes two state-of-
the-art scaffold shops, including one purpose-built to
accommodate suspended scaffolding.
ACTC-trained scaffolders work on some of the world’s
largest mega-projects. Many of the scaffolds they design
and build are unique, highly-complicated, and critical to
both human safety and worker productivity.
www.abcarptc.ab.ca
000.ABCarpTraining_1-2H_nBL.indd 1 1/13/10 3:43:38 PM
In Memoriam
Training + Events
UPCOMING
ARCCAW notes with sorrow the
passing of the following members.
Aerial Work Platform:
Nov. 14 to 15, 2012; Nov. 28 to 29, 2012
Standard First Aid and CPR:
Nov. 17 to 18, 2012
Industrial Technical Training:
Feb. 19 to March 3, 2013
Forklift Training Course:
Nov. 12 to 13, 2012; Nov. 26 to 27, 2012
Blueprint Reading: Dec. 17 to 21
Commercial Door Hardware Installation:
Feb. 11 to 15, 2013 (Calgary); May 27 to May 31, 2013
Scaffolding Level 2:
April 8 to 26, 2013;
June 24 to July 12, 2013 (Fort McMurray)
Period 2 Carpentry: March 11 to May 3, 2013
MILLWRIGHTS TRAINING CENTRE
Visit www.albertamillwrights.com for a current
listing of training courses available
MEETINGS
First Wednesday of each month:
Local 1325 meeting
Third Thursday of each month:
Local 2103 meeting
Fourth Tuesday of each month:
Local 1460 meeting
TRAINING
Alberta Carpenters Training Centre
The following is a sampling of training courses that
are open for registration at the time of publication
of this edition of Hard Hat. For full listings or
more information on training courses, visit www.
abcarptc.ab.ca or phone the Edmonton offi ce:
780-455-6532 or toll-free 1-877-455-6532.
All courses are at the Edmonton location, unless
otherwise indicated.
H2S Alive: (Enform Certified):
Nov. 4, 18, 25, 2012
OSSA Fall Protection: Nov. 3, 6, 9, 2012
OSSA Confined Space: Nov. 10, 16, 24, 2012
LOCAL 1325
James Bibaud
August 2011,
Age 83
David Bourke
July 2012,
Age 58
Dennis Gudmundson
July 2012,
Age 61
Local 2010
Eugene Gendron
August 2012,
Age 63
Local 1460
Joseph Colnar
April 2012,
Age 64
Confidential personal assistance and self-development services for employees and their dependents
Your Construction Employee & Family Assistance Program
From time to time we all face difficult or stressful events in our lives.
Most of the time we handle these personal challenges fairly well.
Other times, our personal issues can become significant enough
that they begin to interfere with our effectiveness, happiness or
safety, both at work and at home.
CEFAP is a plan designed to provide confidential counselling,
educational and self-development services to people employed in
the unionized construction and plant maintenance industries to help
manage
these issues. While CEFAP can be used for crisis intervention, the
ideal time to use the plan is before problems get out of hand.
Who Sponsors CEFAP?
CEFAP is endorsed by the Building Trades of Alberta and Unionized
Contractors. Funding for the program is provided by unionized
employers, and various local Union Health & Welfare Trust Plans.
Who is Eligible for Services?
CEFAP services are provided to employees and their eligible family
members according to the participation of sponsoring organizations
and employers as well as plan eligibility rules.
How Are Services Accessed?
By contacting Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) you will be
assisted in setting up an appointment at a time and office location
convenient to you. Education and self-development services can be
accessed through the Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) website.
Is CEFAP Confidential?
Yes, CEFAP is a confidential service. Human Solutions™ (Wilson
Banwell) counsellors are required by law to maintain the strictest
confidentiality. One who inquires about or receives services will only
be identified with that person’s written approval.
Language and Aboriginal Options
Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) provides multi-language
options in all offices. For aboriginal workers, options for receiving
assistance from approved Healers, Elders and aboriginal treatment
facilities are also available.
Alcohol and Drug Issues
Alcohol and Drug counselling services provided by Human
Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) meet all of the requirements of the
Canadian Model for Providing a Safe Workplace-Alcohol and
Drug Guidelines and Work Rule. Counselling and return to work
assessments are conducted by professionals with specialized
training in dealing with alcohol and/or drug use issues.
A unique feature of CEFAP is the provision for coverage of some
or all of the fees charged by approved residential facilities, to
assist an eligible employee and each eligible family member. This
provision is administered by Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) in
a confidential manner.
Emergency Services are available 24 Hours a day, 7 days
a week through the Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell)
Toll-Free Numbers
CEFAP covers counselling, education and self-development services in addition to assessment
and referral when required, for a full spectrum of personal issues including, but not limited to:
What Does CEFAP Offer?
• separation /divorce/custody
• financial and legal difficulties
• alcohol and drug dependency
• gambling and other addictions
• smoking cessation
• eating disorders
• difficulties with children
• anger management
• sexual harassment and abuse
• bereavement
• child/elder care resources
• retirement planning
• dietician services
• physical fitness assessment
• single parenting
• sleep difficulties
• health & wellness companion
For Immediate Response
North America Wide:
English 1-800-663-1142
French 1-866-398-9505
Hearing 1-888-384-1152
International Access:
(Call collect) 604-689-1717
Internet Services Available at:
www.humansolutions.ca
www.wilsonbanwell.com
E-Learning Courses
Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) provides access to the latest in leading
edge learning with self-paced, confidential and interactive online courses.
All online visits are treated just like counselling sessions, ensuring privacy
and confidentiality.
000HH-CEFAP-FP.indd 1 10/2/12 4:25:54 PM HH_Fall12_p30-32.indd 30 10/4/12 1:59:13 PM
Confidential personal assistance and self-development services for employees and their dependents
Your Construction Employee & Family Assistance Program
From time to time we all face difficult or stressful events in our lives.
Most of the time we handle these personal challenges fairly well.
Other times, our personal issues can become significant enough
that they begin to interfere with our effectiveness, happiness or
safety, both at work and at home.
CEFAP is a plan designed to provide confidential counselling,
educational and self-development services to people employed in
the unionized construction and plant maintenance industries to help
manage
these issues. While CEFAP can be used for crisis intervention, the
ideal time to use the plan is before problems get out of hand.
Who Sponsors CEFAP?
CEFAP is endorsed by the Building Trades of Alberta and Unionized
Contractors. Funding for the program is provided by unionized
employers, and various local Union Health & Welfare Trust Plans.
Who is Eligible for Services?
CEFAP services are provided to employees and their eligible family
members according to the participation of sponsoring organizations
and employers as well as plan eligibility rules.
How Are Services Accessed?
By contacting Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) you will be
assisted in setting up an appointment at a time and office location
convenient to you. Education and self-development services can be
accessed through the Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) website.
Is CEFAP Confidential?
Yes, CEFAP is a confidential service. Human Solutions™ (Wilson
Banwell) counsellors are required by law to maintain the strictest
confidentiality. One who inquires about or receives services will only
be identified with that person’s written approval.
Language and Aboriginal Options
Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) provides multi-language
options in all offices. For aboriginal workers, options for receiving
assistance from approved Healers, Elders and aboriginal treatment
facilities are also available.
Alcohol and Drug Issues
Alcohol and Drug counselling services provided by Human
Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) meet all of the requirements of the
Canadian Model for Providing a Safe Workplace-Alcohol and
Drug Guidelines and Work Rule. Counselling and return to work
assessments are conducted by professionals with specialized
training in dealing with alcohol and/or drug use issues.
A unique feature of CEFAP is the provision for coverage of some
or all of the fees charged by approved residential facilities, to
assist an eligible employee and each eligible family member. This
provision is administered by Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) in
a confidential manner.
Emergency Services are available 24 Hours a day, 7 days
a week through the Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell)
Toll-Free Numbers
CEFAP covers counselling, education and self-development services in addition to assessment
and referral when required, for a full spectrum of personal issues including, but not limited to:
What Does CEFAP Offer?
• separation /divorce/custody
• financial and legal difficulties
• alcohol and drug dependency
• gambling and other addictions
• smoking cessation
• eating disorders
• difficulties with children
• anger management
• sexual harassment and abuse
• bereavement
• child/elder care resources
• retirement planning
• dietician services
• physical fitness assessment
• single parenting
• sleep difficulties
• health & wellness companion
For Immediate Response
North America Wide:
English 1-800-663-1142
French 1-866-398-9505
Hearing 1-888-384-1152
International Access:
(Call collect) 604-689-1717
Internet Services Available at:
www.humansolutions.ca
www.wilsonbanwell.com
E-Learning Courses
Human Solutions™ (Wilson Banwell) provides access to the latest in leading
edge learning with self-paced, confidential and interactive online courses.
All online visits are treated just like counselling sessions, ensuring privacy
and confidentiality.
000HH-CEFAP-FP.indd 1 10/2/12 4:25:54 PM HH_Fall12_p30-32.indd 31 10/4/12 1:59:15 PM
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