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Saturday 01-26-13 u One dollar

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Adam Shiverdecker arranges the separate pieces of his artwork “Unmanned,” while installing it on Wednesday at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College. Mr. Shiverdecker is one of the artists selected for Denatured Nature, the 69th Scripps College Ceramic Annual, which opens today at the gallery.

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The city’s talk with Golden State is postponed due to scheduling conflicts.

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In this edition
Board of Supervisors give more time to protest Clean Water, Clean Beaches tax Story on page 3 Claremont Mom & Pop: Saca’s Mediterranean Cuisine
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CHS fights it out, but the match ends in a 100-minute, scoreless game We’re online and on Facebook. Friend us. Visit claremont-courier.com.

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Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

Claremont invaders False sense of safety, lock up Security gone
—Angela Rhodes Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

READERS’ COMMENTS
Excuse the lawyers
Dear Editor: I am overwhelmed by the 2 goliaths: The city and the for-profit water company. I am not sure either party is coming forth with the true agenda and exhuming what the citizens really need. I am especially concerned about the millions of dollars of legal fees that will be incurred. In the past, the city attorney has used the mega-law firm that they are associated with, claiming that there is not the potential for conflict of interest. I have had to swallow a lot of bull manure in my life, but this is real hard to swallow. If we lose, we will also have to pay the water company legal fees. Will the megalaw firm pay for that? I doubt it. I think it is time to form a blue-ribbon committee of people from the community and selected city staff, leaving out the city attorney, initially. This committee would determine what the citizens really need and then negotiate with the water company to see if a compromise could be achieved without taking on this tremendous burden. I was a victim of the mega-law firm’s ruthless and nasty processes in eminent domain. I gather some solace in knowing the water company will also have ruthless and nasty legal policies. It is time to bring in fresh ideas and think out of the box. This community has a wealth of talent to complete this project.
Dave Lannom Claremont

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Monday, January 28 County Area Agency on Aging Public Hearings, 1 to 3 p.m. Joslyn Senior Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave. Tree Committee Council Chamber, 6 p.m. United States would be the safest country in the world as Americans own 310,000,000 guns. But, alas, we are the least safe of advanced countries. It is time to ignore the NRA which is, after all, now essentially a lobby for the gun manufacturers.
David Levering Claremont More READERSʼ COMMENTS on page 7

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

The gun lobby
Dear Editor: Kudos to Gar Byrum and Merrill Ring for their thoughtful comments on the issue of gun control (COURIER, January 23). It is difficult to quarrel with their arguments: that neither the Second Amendment nor the history of legislation involving firearms in this country present any significant argument against the common-sense gun control recommended by the President and incorporated in Senator Feinstein’s bill. We hear a lot from supporters of the NRA about guns and self- or family-protection. But if gun ownership were any guarantee of protection or safety, the

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Sports Reporter Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy

Production
Ad Design/Classified Pages Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
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Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
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Intern Open

The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published twice weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 07

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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Unable to agree, city and Golden State postpone talk

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he first water negotiation meeting scheduled to take place between Golden State Water Company and the city of Claremont has been canceled.

After about a month of pause in the water discussion, City Manager Tony Ramos announced the city’s intent to meet water company officials at the city council meeting Tuesday night. Golden State Water officials confirmed on Wednesday that a meeting was scheduled to take place between city and water company representatives in the form of a conference call Friday, January 25. Legal counsel would be present for both sides. No sooner was the meeting announced than it was called off due to scheduling problems, according to both groups. The 2 groups have yet to meet following the city’s first formal offer for purchase of its water system. In November, Claremont attorneys presented Golden State with a $54 million offer for purchase of the city’s water system and assets. While the water company has made repeated statements that Claremont’s water system is not for sale, officials say they are open to dialog and ways to work together moving forward. The city maintains its focus on water system ownership, whether through negotiations or by acquisition. The privately-owned water company approached the CPUC in July 2011 to request a rate increase of more than 24 percent to take effect in 2013 with additional, smaller increases to be added in 2014 and 2015. The appeal was followed by a series of protests from the water company’s customers, many here in Claremont, upset about yet another set of rate increases. After several public hearings held in November 2011 and negotiations the following spring, the CPUC has been charged with deliberating the final rate. While a decision was anticipated by the end of 2012 in order for the rates to take effect as requested on January 1, 2013, the CPUC has yet to render any decision on the final rate. As the city awaits a decision from Sacramento on the water rates, Claremont officials made their own visit the state capitol on separate city business. Mr. Ramos

and several city council members attended the League of California Cities’ first policy committee meetings for 2013. Mayor Pro Tem Opanyi Nasiali sits on the employee relations policy committee, Councilmember Sam Pedroza serves on the transportation, communication and public works committee, Councilmember Joe Lyons on community and economic development and Mr. Ramos on the public safety committee.   “League support and opposition to legislation is a means of influencing our state decision-makers and ensuring our local government is representing us at a state level,” Mr. Ramos said. “We want to thank our councilmembers for serving on these policies. It is an extra added duty beyond what you do as councilmembers but that is how we get our voice to be heard representing the residents of Claremont.” In other council news Back on the home front, Claremont continues to move forward on city policy and goals. Among these is continuing to allocate funds to community efforts like the Safe Routes to School program. On Tuesday, the council approved the allocation of $450,000 in Caltrans grant funds and $51,500 in local Measure R funds to support the program’s continued efforts. Implemented in spring 2011, Safe Routes provides education, training and incentives for students to promote the safe use of public walkways for walking or biking to school. The half-million in funds will be used to make bike and pedestrian improvements on public right of ways near Danbury, Vista de Valle and Sycamore elementary schools as well as El Roble Intermediate. Councilmember Joe Lyons added his voice to the council’s unanimous support of the city’s continued work with the Safe Routes to School program and overall city sustainability efforts. “This is a good example of how we advance our city’s interests...and acquire funding from the federal and state levels that are available for our residents’ needs,” Mr. Lyons said. “This is a kind of home rule that I think we do well in Claremont, and I think other cities would do well to model after us.”

The council continued to drive city interests forward on Tuesday night by adding its approval to the latest budget for the city’s Community Development Block Grant program (CDBG), supporting city and countywide programs and projects dedicated to helping lowincome individuals. This year, the city will award $137,204 to participants in CDBG, a federal block grant program that receives grant funding from Los Angeles County on a yearly basis in order to continue its operations. $60,000 of that grant money will be used for housing rehabilitation, $20,580 for senior case management and $56,624 for job creation and business incentive. Mayor Larry Schroeder expressed his pleasure in the city’s continued funding for the job creation and business incentive program, which offers loan forgiveness to new or expanding businesses in exchange for hiring a fulltime employee. “We get double credit here. We are not only helping low-income residents, but we are also helping economic development,” he said. City manager gets merit bonus, payout The council also awarded a one-time merit bonus to City Manager Tony Ramos to the tune of $10,048.50 and a payout of 2 weeks paid vacation at $7,729.66 for a total of $17,778.16 in addition to his regular salary. Council members directed city counsel to prepare a resolution approving merit awards for the city manager, promoted to his current title in November 2011, after conducting an employee evaluation earlier this month. City accomplishments under his leadership include the Foothill Boulevard relinquishment, the establishment of Courier Place, development at Auto Center Drive and the parking lot expansion at the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park. “During the process of evaluation, [the council is] appraised of the long list of accomplishments that our city manager has overseen,” Mr. Lyons said, adding, “It also gives me the opportunity to compliment the staff also that makes his job and his accomplishments certainly the stellar accomplishments that they are.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

City believes initiative is not part of clean water solution

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he Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has granted an extension for those who want to protest the proposed countywide Clean Water, Clean Beaches tax initiative. If approved, the measure would charge residents an annual fee to help pay for water quality projects.

The city of Claremont, the Claremont Unified School District and the Pomona Valley Protective Association (PVPA) joined with numerous other municipalities, school districts and organizations across the county to add their voice in opposition against the Clean Water, Clean Beaches tax, which would cost the city an estimated $102,703 a year. The Clean Water fee is expected to cost the average single-family homeowner in Claremont $54 a year of what city officials believe will add up to $1,539,658 annually for residents. Only

40 percent of those funds will be returned to the city for use in its water treatment, Brian Desatnik, director of community development, noted earlier this month. “The measure provides an inadequate amount of funding to deal with the full compliance issue for the city,” he told the council on January 8. “We believe that if there is going to be an approach to local funding, we should have more control over the entire funding source generated locally and that it should deal with the entirety of the issue and not just a small portion. “It’s just not a solution to the problem,” he continued. Those who wish to protest the parcel tax will be allowed 60 more days to do so. As of January 15, only 95,000 people had protested the fee. More than 50 percent of LA County’s 9.8 million residents are needed to stop the tax from going to a vote. More than 200 individuals spoke earlier this month at a hearing of the LA County Board of Supervisors, which gathered to take a vote on whether or not to send the proposed tax to a countywide vote. Supervisors tabled the

vote after weighing the concerns of the public. Many LA County residents said they were upset with the timing of the proposed measure, sent in a nondescript letter that many noted looked like junk mail during the bustling holiday season. In addition, many were upset about the confusing verbiage of that letter. Supervisors directed staff to make changes to the measure to include a sunset date, a list of projects and a credit for property owners already collecting storm water before making a decision. “I think the supervisors did the appropriate thing and have extended [the decision] out and will revisit this in the next couple of months,” said City Manager Tony Ramos. In addition to emails, letters of protest can also be mailed to the executive officer of the board of supervisors at PO Box 866006, Los Angeles, CA 90068. For more information on Clean Water, Clean Beaches, visit www.lacountycleanwater.org.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Lindblad to join Pomona College
Bertil Lindblad, director of the UNAIDS New York Office, will join Pomona College as senior adviser for international initiatives this March, bringing with him more than 30 years of experience in large and complex global organizations focused on international cooperation and development. In the newly created position, Mr. Lindblad will work with the college’s leadership to coordinate and expand Pomona’s global connections and international activities. Among his duties will be working with faculty to establish relationships with international organizations, including non-governmental organizations, United Nations agencies and think tanks; expanding international options for students; and facilitating campus visits by international professionals, artists and scholars. Mr. Lindblad, a 1978 graduate of Pomona College, assumed his current post as director of the UNAIDS New York Office in 2008, after serving 4 years as UNAIDS regional director for Eastern Europe and Central Asia, based in Moscow.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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Claremonters gather to recognize the success of CHERP

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laremont residents and administrators took a night off on Thursday for a special house party.

About 400 Claremonters and local dignitaries gathered at Taylor Hall to recognize Claremont’s Community Home Energy Retrofit Project (CHERP) reaching its goal of retrofitting 130 homes. Claremont leads Los Angeles County as the city with the most home energy retrofits. As the city embarks on its new goal of retrofitting 1300 homes, 10 percent of the estimated 11,000 single-family homes in Claremont, program volunteers took a timeout to bask in their accomplishments. “Claremont is really a unique place, and it’s the right size and has the right attitude in its community to really make things happen,” said Freeman Allen of Sustainable Claremont. “It makes me think of the inauguration, when Alex Haley was saying, ‘Find the good and praise it.’ That’s what I see happening.” Originally named the Claremont Home Energy Retrofit Project, CHERP began in 2010 as a collaboration of residents working with community organizations, contractors and cities to cut back on fossil fuels and encourage sustainable building practices. Through CHERP, co-founder Devon Hartman and volunteers built an organization to work with homeowners in making home performance improvements to their residences. Mr. Hartman didn’t take much convincing to get behind the concept of home retrofit that was taught to him in a building science class about 6 years ago. “After working in the field of architecture and construction for 30 years, I was learning things I had always wanted to know about,” Mr. Hartman said. “[Home Energy Retrofit] is the best thing for construction and architecture since the circular saw.” The most rewarding part for Mr. Hartman was seeing how many others felt the same. Though anticipating that the program would start off slow, Mr. Hartman found himself quickly inundated with re-

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Claremont Mayor Larry Schroeder welcomes the crowd of over 400 at Taylor Hall in Claremont.

sponses, to his delight. “I dreamed that it would be this way,” Mr. Hart joked. “Once people take the time to educate themselves about what’s possible [with a home retrofit], it’s not surprising that they latch on to the idea.” Two years later, the Claremont community continues to latch on to CHERP, renamed the Community Home Energy Retrofit program in hopes of reaching out to other cities throughout southern California. To date, CHERP has brought more than $2 million dollars in jobs and about 2 dozen employees into the city, according to Mr. Allen. “This is a model for what other communities can

do,” Mr. Allen said. “This is a great tool in fighting global warming and making homes more comfortable. It’s just a win-win situation all around.” Those interested in a home energy retrofit may receive rebates, grants or financing. CHERP experts and volunteers are willing to help. For more information, visit the CHERP website at www.claremontenergy.org or contact Chris Veirs, senior planner/sustainability coordinator, at 399-5486 or by email at cveirs@ci.claremont.ca. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, January 18 Hendrix Drive is the latest street targeted by the recent sweep of house burglaries in Claremont. Burglars entered a detached garage in the 600 block of Hendrix Drive between 6 p.m. on Thursday, January 17 and 6:30 a.m. the next day by forcing open the garage door. They made off with a hand drill and saw valued at $300. There are no suspects. **** A woman’s pleasant cup of coffee turned sour when she encountered an unpleasant sight outside of Village West’s Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, where she was enjoying her evening brew. A man, clad in black and wearing a bike helmet and sitting outside the window where the woman sat, pulled up his shorts to expose his genitals to her for about 20 seconds, according to Lieutenant Shelly Vander Veen. The man disappeared before the woman could call police, but a report was taken. The man is described as about 50 years old, Caucasian, approximately 6 feet 2 inches tall and 165 pounds. Saturday, January 19 A car thief hit the jackpot in an incident that occurred at Bonita Avenue and

POLICE BLOTTER

Alcohol shopping spree lasts only so long for minors
Two minors with a serious appetite for alcohol made off with multiple bottles of the hard stuff over a 3-day burglary binge at Claremont’s local Stater Bros. market, located at 1055 W. Foothill Blvd. One minor conducted most of the crime, acting alone in 2 of the burglaries, performed on January 15 and 16. On day 3, January 17, he brought along a male accomplice. It turns out luck only lasts so long. Police arrived at a residence off Mountain Avenue the following day after a parent called to inform officers that minors were in a bedroom of the residence, drinking alderneath the fingertips of their owners, working unaware on their computers at the Starbucks on Yale Avenue in the Claremont Village. Two men simultaneously stole the laptops and ran off into a dark-colored sedan waiting on Second Street, driven by another male. The 2 thieves are described as black males in their early 20s, both about 5 feet 9 inches tall and 170 pounds. A similar incident was reported at a Starbucks in Chino the same day, but a connection is unknown. cohol and smoking marijuana. Police found the male accomplice in the room accompanied by the fruits of his burglaries: lots and lots of alcohol. The 17year-old was taken to Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall in Downey. The original crook is still outstanding. The fate of Brian Smith, 23, of Pomona, was similar to that of the 17year-old. He chose the wrong time and the wrong market, that same Stater Bros., to steal alcohol from, attempting to make off with a fifth of spiced rum on Tuesday, January 22. He was caught and charged with burglary.

Taylor Drive Saturday afternoon. The thief smashed the front passenger window of a parked Audi and stole a $3000 laptop, 2 iPhones valued at $700, a leather jacket and a purse with credit cards and checks. There are no suspects. Sunday, January 20 Police are searching for a vandal with either terrible aim or a thirst for vengeance, responsible for smashing the rear window of a car in the 500 block of Cedar Crest Avenue. The object used in the crime: a 12-pound metal ball used for shot put. Monday, January 21 A morning meal at a Burger King off Towne Avenue was interrupted for 34year-old Sim Nay of Victorville when Claremont police carted him off to jail. Though the man may have paid for his meal fair-and-square, the same could not be said of his car, which was reported stolen out of Rialto, according to Lt. Vander Veen. Mr. Nay was arrested for unlawfully taking the car from his ex. **** Two $1400 laptops were stolen in a bizarre coffeehouse theft Monday night. Both laptops were torn away from un-

Wednesday, January 23 A night out ended in jail time for 26year-old Claremont resident Thomas Line, arrested for felony vandalism. Mr. Line went on a vandalism spree in the Village West parking structure, denting and knocking off the side mirrors of 7 different cars, according to Lt. Vander Veen. While the cost of the damage is unknown, police do know that Mr. Line had been drinking previous to the incidents.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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Scripps Ceramics Annual showcases fresh faces, new approaches

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o those unfamiliar with the world of contemporary clay artists, the word ceramics may evoke the image of pots, vessels and tiles and nothing more.

The Scripps Ceramics Annual, which opens on Saturday, January 26, by contrast, highlights the endless forms ceramics can take. Themed Denatured Nature, the 69th installment of the prestigious exhibition showcases everyday objects that have been altered or re-envisioned in a way that imbues them with a compelling strangeness. “The shared fundamental root of the artists is their push to compromise, to revoke the inherent quality of the familiar and render it inscrutable,” notes guest curator Virginia Scotchie, head of ceramics at the University of South Carolina, in her curator’s statement. The objects thusly transmuted range from Frieda Dean’s “Moss” works resembling the organic filigree of lichen to Priscilla Hollingsworth’s oversized pieces hailing from a surreal game, which—if the accompanying schematic drawings are any indication—seems to take place on a microcosmic level within a living body. They include Kate Roberts’ hoop-skirted dresses, which evoke the fashion and rigidly assigned gender roles of the antebellum South, and Adam Shiverdecker’s “Unmanned,” a 17-foot sculpture of a drone plane that appears to have been unearthed whole like some deadly mechanical dinosaur. The idea that clay is a limited material is belied by John McMillan’s bio-morphous forms like “One Drop,” which dangles with a solid plasticity, looking like it would spring back at the touch. Even Rebecca Manson’s Vascellum, a series of dainty teacups and teapots, have been crafted so as to appear found, then broken and then remade. On Wednesday, Mr. Shiverdecker and Ms. Roberts could be seen meticulously piecing together their installations in preparation for the show’s opening. Kirk Delman, collection manager for the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, was also on hand to provide any needed assistance. Because there is always a different curator, the Scripps Ceramics Annual has a different feel each year. This installment is particularly interesting, according to Mr. Delman. “I like the variety of ways these artists have used the material,” he said. “Half the artists are quite young emerging artists. They’re approaching it in a very fresh way—the variation of scale and the introduction of other materials, like the ribbons on Kate’s dresses and the drawings accompanying Priscilla’s game pieces.”
“Postpone,” by artist Jonathan McMillan, left, and Mr. McMillianʼs “Emptied” are on display at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College. The the 69th Scripps College Ceramic Annual, called Denatured Nature, was guest curated by Virginia Scotchie.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Kate Roberts and her father Tom, left, install her artwork on Wednesday at Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College. The 69th Scripps College Ceramic Annual is the longest-running yearly show for contemporary ceramics. Below: Ms. Roberts works on an installation. Her father flew out from New York to help install her 2 artworks selected for the Scripps show.

Ms. Roberts’ satin and lace ribbons, many of them antique, have been used to string together the dozens of panels making up the skirts for her “Melanie” and “Scarlet.” In order to create the panels, she used porcelain slip, piped in much the same way you would decorate a cake. The designs on the scarlet dress, which hangs airily from a repurposed lamp stand, were inspired by 18th and 19th century fabric and include flowers and birds.

The birds, Ms. Roberts shared, underscore the cagelike qualities of the hoop skirts and corsets popular in the mid-19th century as well as the confinement created by the proscribed expectations of women that still prevail. Ms. Roberts conceived of the dresses for her thesis show at Alfred University in Western New York, where she earned a BFA with a concentration in ceramics. She is originally from South Carolina, which influenced her decision to portray iconic imagery from the South. Ms. Roberts, 24, plans to go to graduate school soon in preparation for a career teaching as well as creating art. While she is at the beginning of her career, she said that being chosen to participate in the Ceramics Annual is a heartening development for her and the other younger artists involved. “It’s exciting for us. It gives us more hope and guides us along,” she said. “It makes us think we might be going along the right path.” Given the size of the Williamson Gallery, only a finite number of ceramic artists can be highlighted each year, Mr. Delman notes. This show features works by 10 artists. Nonetheless, the Ceramics Annual offers visitors the opportunity to “see what artists are doing with the material and watch, within a small scale, the evolution of what’s happening in the world of ceramics.” “Ceramics is always vital,” Mr. Delman said. “Artists are always developing and evolving new uses and new ways to express themselves.” The 69th Scripps Ceramics Annual will kick off this Saturday, January 26, with a lecture by curator Virginia Scotchie from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Scripps College Humanities Auditorium. An opening reception, featuring live music and light refreshments, will follow that same evening, from 7 to 9 p.m., in the Williams Gallery. Both events are free and open to the public. The show will be on view through April 3. For more information, visit rcwg.scrippscollege.edu.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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Travel with a twist
by Jan Wheatcroft

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have a collection of over 10 travel journals that I created while traveling since 2000. They are filled with photos, drawings, descriptions and information about everything I have done while on a trip. I was leafing through them the other day to find some information about a museum I had enjoyed in Delhi, India to pass on to someone on her way to India. I was drawn in to re-living many of the experiences I had enjoyed and forgotten.

Since I am not traveling at the moment but am working to create a body of art work for an exhibit in March of this year, I thought I might share some of the interesting tidbits I came upon. BEAR ENCOUNTER.....I was in Istanbul, Turkey spending the day with a Turkish student I had worked with at Pitzer College one summer. We were walking along the Bosphorus after having visited the beautiful Dolmabahce Palace where I had been so impressed by the long, heavy silk curtains covering huge windows. On the road, we met a man holding a chain attached to a bear. The bear was standing on his 2 hind feet. His fur was matted and full of dirty bits. He was thin and looked sad and hungry. He just stood there looking dejected. My student friend Tuba told me that the man was a Gypsy and was using the bear to get money from tourists. I took out my camera to take a photo of the mistreatment of this bear, feeling so sorry for the situation. After I had snapped a few photos, the man stuck out his hand and said something that I could not understand, but he obviously wanted money for the photo op. I refused to pay him anything as the bear was obviously so mistreated and miserable and should not have been chained and kept in this state. His only interest was in my paying him. I pocketed my camera and we turned and left after I told him how I felt. A few seconds later I heard him shouting and running after us, the chain clanking away and the bear awkwardly being dragged along. We ran, the man ran, the bear ran....we ran faster and he yelled louder. It was a scary moment being chased by an angry man and a sick and hungry bear down the streets in Istanbul, but we did outrun him and got lost in the crowd ahead of us. I think that it was quite as special an experience for my Turkish friend as it was for me.

THE THRILL OF FLYING ALONG A WINDING ISLAND ROAD ON A GREEK MOTORBIKE.....I lived for many years on the Greek island of Samos. Tourism was just beginning and English-written signs were needed to announce the opening of motorbike rentals for tourists. After teaching private English lessons, I would get to work on wooden slabs painting “Nikos Rent a Bike” or “Yorgos Motorbike Rental” and then add on a happy biker with a backpack as a finishing touch. Then came the restaurant signs decorated with plates of food, and a few hotel and gift shop signs as well. Soon, I decided it was time I learned to ride a motorbike. Friends came to visit and we went to rent motorbikes. Bikes are bikes, with or without motors. They still have only 2 wheels and they still tip over. I had not mastered the art of bicycle riding, so I was a bit afraid of what might happen to me on this bigger, faster mechanical monster. But I was desperate to learn and experience the sense of freedom on the road. Yorgos fitted us out with bikes, showed us how to start them and waved us off. We rode off up the road to the village above ours, me clutching the handles in fear but enjoying the feeling of speed or what felt like speed to me at that moment. We wound around the mountain roads until we came to the village and needed to stop. I took my hands off the handles to slow down but had no memory of how to stop the bike, so I slowly rode into the nearest wall and came to a standstill. A handle bashed into my chest and left me with a large blackand-blue mark for many days afterwards. But I had arrived, and I had survived and I found that I loved it. That began my love affair with motorbikes in Greece. I did learn to stop and I rented and rode bikes all over the islands, just for fun, to go outside of our village, to hit the beach for lunch or just to feel the wind blowing in my face as I “raced” through the hills from village to village with a scarf tied on my head.

We would often stop at a small cafe for a Greek coffee under the shade of a large plane tree with its leaves casting shadows over our heads. The hills were covered in pine and olive trees and herbs that gave off a sharp, pungent smell in the heat and the cicadas buzzed with a noisy intensity that never stopped. I once bought a very small, light motorbike and rode like a queen around the island for a year on it. Over the years, I visited other islands and rented many different bikes. Each island seemed to have different varieties of bikes for rent and slowly over time the bikes actually grew in size. Soon I was riding a Vespa on Chios. Once on Paros Island, I got a rather large bike with a girlfriend and my son and his friend and we rode off, me following my friend on a small dirt track near the sea. Soon the track disappeared and I was bumping along on rocks while she had disappeared completely. Then I hit something and flipped over on top of my backpack while the bike flipped over on top of me. I lay there trying to figure out how I was going to get up and get the bike off of me when I heard the dripping of gas, I stopped thinking about it and just shoved the bike up and off. As I stood up my son rode by, looked at my now-dirty backpack, and said, “Fell off your bike again, Mom?” Two years ago, I went back for a visit to Samos and was so excited about the chance to rent a motorbike and explore all the places I had enjoyed as well as feel the wind in my face and the feeling of power in my hands. Imagine my disappointment when Nikos told me there were no motorbikes to rent, only motorcycles and that all renters had to have motorcycling licenses in order to rent them. I felt a true pain in my heart, as this was all I had thought about for weeks. We took a car instead, which was dull and boring compared to that dreamed motorbike ride and went up the winding roads into the hills. The hills were no longer covered in trees as before. Mostly, they were empty and many showed bad scars left from fires. It was ugly and the new building construction didn’t help either. It made my memories become more important, and I missed the feeling of youth and passion that the motorbike had brought me. It was over. I will always remember the years that I lived on that island and the magic of learning to sit on a bike and let it carry me up and down mountains and into the wildest life I had ever known. All of this on a small motorized bike and some dusty, tree-covered hills full of pines and olives and me, the captain of my ship, sailing into forever.

Guess what? One of the cute guys said I had a Mona Lisa smile!

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

7

Local control is the answer

Dear Editor: For over a year, we have heard about Golden State Water Company (GSWC) and the high rates they charge for water in Claremont. In 2011, this for-profit water company applied to the California Public Utilities Commission (PUC) for a rate increase, seeking 25.54 percent more from Claremont ratepayers, for 2013 and beyond. In GSWC’s 2011 rate request application, the water company stated that reduced water usage was a primary reason for the rate increase. GSWC has figured out a way to increase our water bill, when we actually use less water. On top of that, we see that the parent company (AWR) posted 2012 third-quarter profits of $15.1 million. Not once in this recession have they cut back expenses, posted a loss or shown any sign of an economic slowdown. Indeed, they have increased staff 31 percent, posted record results (in-

READERS’ COMMENTS
creasing operating income by 55 percent in 4 years), all with a 21 percent decrease in the amount of water delivered. They delivered less water and made more money doing it. The California PUC has a Division of Ratepayer Advocates (DRA). The DRA has 137 state employees who are charged with obtaining the “lowest possible rate for service consistent with reliable and safe service levels.” Just last week, the DRA released their 2012 Annual Report touting that they saved the average customer $6 a month over what water companies were proposing to charge ratepayers. Really, DRA? You pat yourself on the back for saving ratepayers $6 monthly, when the water bills in Claremont have virtually doubled since May 2011 after GSWC went from a 2-month to a 1month billing cycle. In August 2012, we were told that the DRA negotiated a proposed settlement agreement with GSWC, whereby Claremont ratepayers would only—and I use the word “only” to highlight the absurdity—see a 15.1 percent increase in 2013. All we have been looking for in this David vs. Goliath fight is a fair and reasonable price for water. Look at our surrounding cities and you’ll see they are paying half, or even less, for their water. On average, our water rates have increased 11 percent per year for the last 7 years. Who is looking out for the Claremont ratepayer? The DRA’s Annual Report goes on to explain how they forced one for-profit company to accept a rate of return of 9.99 percent versus 10.02 percent. No one in Claremont should be tricked Contact Claremont Place Senior Living at 447-5259 for more information, or visit www.claremontplace.com.

into thinking that a fair settlement was reached with the California PUC—it wasn’t. Until we have local control of the water company/provider, we are forced to rely on 137 DRA employees. To date, the DRA has failed ratepayers, earning them a letter grade of “F.” The DRA failures are something that should have been included in their Annual Report. The report can be viewed at www.dra.ca.gov.
Hal Hargrave Randy Scott Claremont Against Outrageous Water Rates
READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission for the Wednesday edition is Monday at 3 p.m.; the deadline for the Saturday edition is Thursday at 3 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Claremont Place asks local teens to apply for ʻSenior to Seniorʼ scholarships
Claremont Place encourages collegebound graduating seniors to apply for a Claremont Place “Senior to Senior” Legacy Scholarship. The senior living community will award $1000 scholarships to 5 students from Claremont and San Antonio High Schools. Applications are due on Monday, February 4 at 5 p.m. Applicants must have a verified 3.0 GPA and have applied for Fall 2013 admission to a college or university with the intention of obtaining a degree. Each applicant should prepare a 1- to 2-page essay explaining their reason for pursuing higher education and a personal ac-

OUR TOWN
count of how a senior has affected their life, including specific examples of intergenerational experiences. Qualified applicants will be invited to an oral interview with Claremont Place’s Resident Scholarship Committee the week of February 11. The presentation of the scholarships will be held Thursday, February 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Claremont Place. By offering “Senior to Senior” Legacy Scholarships, the residents of Claremont Place—an independent, assisted and memory care community—are able to fulfill their mission to encourage, support, educate and develop this generation as they move into adulthood.

ʻAmerican Meatʼ documentary screening at Pitzer College
Pitzer College will host a screening of the documentary film American Meat: A Leave it Better Story on Wednesday, January 30 at 4:15 p.m. at the Broad Center. The documentary on animal farms and meat works to shed light on both sides of livestock: the violent life of animal farms and the sustainable alternative where the

animals live good lives and eat mostly grass out in the fields. Livestock are responsible for 18 percent of the earthheating gases. A panel discussion will occur after the screening and will include producer Graham Meriwether from New York; Pitzer College professors Muriel Poston, Melinda Herrold-Menzies, Evaggelos Vallianatos; California State UniversityPomona professor Dan Yuhasz and Dean Freudenberger from Pilgrim Place as well as 2 sustainable small family farmers from Ontario, Dave and Heather Fikel. The Broad Center at Pitzer College, is located at 1050 Mills Ave.

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

8

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Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

Brenda Busuttil
Brenda Denise Busuttil, a longtime Claremont resident, died on Sunday, January 20, 2013 of a weak heart after a long, courageous battle against cancer. She was 57. Ms. Busuttil was born on April 1, 1955 to Andrew and Janet Anziano in El Monte, California. She lived in El Monte for many years before moving to San Bernardino. After graduating from Cajon High School in San Bernardino, she attended San Bernardino Valley Community College, taking classes in business and accounting. Ms. Busuttil was a single parent to her son, John, for many years, juggling parenthood with a career performing bookkeeping and inventory for a large construction company. She was offered her own store in Orange County, but she declined because the hours were long and she wanted to be with her son. In March of 1983, she met the love of her life, Robert Busuttil, and they were married on May 14, 1983 in Carmel after a whirlwind courtship. They made their home in Claremont for many years before moving to La Verne. Ms. Busuttil had a vast interest in collectables, jewelry and antiques, with a

9

OBITUARIES
she was my dance partner—all the glory was hers.” Ms. Busuttil had an abundant love for her children and grandchildren and will be dearly missed by all, according to family. “My wife, friend, companion, my world and the air I breathe rests in Jesus’ arms,” her husband said. “My heart is broken but I must let you go until we meet again.” Ms. Busuttil is survived by her husband of 30 years, Robert Busuttil; by her sons, John and Jason; by her daughter, Marie; by her daughter-in-law, Cynthia, and by her beloved grandson Connor. She also leaves her sisters, Pamela, Sherri and Judy; her brothers, David and Joseph; her mother, Janet Anziano; and numerous relatives and dear friends, especially Debie and David Mueller.

Loving mother, grandmother, wife
keen eye for the unique and precious. In 1985, she opened her own business in Claremont, the Tic Toc Doll Shop. Originally located in the Village, the shop moved to a spot on the second floor of the Old School House. Along with fine furniture, clocks and dolls, the shop featured coin-operated machines stocked with food for the ducks in the Old School House’s fish pond. Eventually, Ms. Busuttil closed the store to spend more time with her family, which had grown to include another son, Jason, and a daughter, Marie. She transitioned to the role of homemaker and home-school teacher and considered raising her children her most important avocation. Ms. Busuttil enjoyed camping, fishing and weekend travel to unknown destinations for the sheer pleasure of the drive. She also loved heading to local casinos for shows and entertainment. She particularly enjoyed going to nightclubs to watch her son, Johnny Main, perform as lead guitarist for the noted blues/rootsrock band The 44s. In the spring of 2012, The 44s partnered with musicians like Kid Ramos and the legendary Los Lobos (“La Bamba”)

to perform a benefit concert for Ms. Busuttil. She was deeply touched when this array of accomplished musicians dedicated songs to her. “She became a princess for the local musicians, just loved for her warmth and charm,” Mr. Busuttil recalled. “For me,

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

10

Myron Chapman
Physician, activist, poet
Myron Grover Chapman, a longtime Claremont resident and physician, died on January 18, 2013 at Mt. San Antonio Gardens, where he had lived for the past 7 years. He was 87. Dr. Chapman was born on November 23, 1925 in Methuen, Massachusetts to Grover and Eva Chapman. His father was a Methodist minister, and his family moved often to serve different parishes in the northeast and Midwest. In his senior year of high school, Dr. Chapman’s family moved to Florida but he stayed by himself in Ashtabula, Ohio. He lived at the parsonage on weekends and at the YMCA during the week, working at the front desk at night to pay the rent, in order to finish the school year there. He graduated as valedictorian of his high school class in 1943, and then went on to undergraduate and medical school at the University of Chicago. Dr. Chapman’s college education was interrupted when, as he put it, he was “selected” to join the US Army and sent to Newfoundland during World War II. After the war, Dr. Chapman returned to the University of Chicago and in 1948, he met a student nurse, Lois Matz, at a square dance there. They were married in 1949, and Dr. Chapman received his MD in 1951. The family, then including children Jennifer and Carol, moved to Los Angeles for Dr. Chapman’s residency in internal medicine in 1952. Two more children, Laura and Mark, were born in Los Angeles, and the family settled in Claremont in 1958. Dr. Chapman had a private practice in Claremont for 4 years and then was the director of Student Health Services at the Claremont Colleges for 18 years, during which time he oversaw a significant expansion and development of the services offered. He later worked as staff physician at Casa Colina Hospital for 8 years, including a year as chief of staff. Dr. Chapman’s passionate interests in peace and social justice were expressed as early as his high school valedictory address, in which he spoke of the ending of all war and of “the battle to keep democracy vital and progressive—the unsung and perpetual battle to make living decent and human dignity universal.” He lived these beliefs through his volunteer involvement in many groups and events. His philosophy was, “You can’t have a democracy without people participating.” And participate he did. Dr. Chapman was actively involved with the Claremont Friends Meeting (Quaker), and he was a longtime member and co-chair of the Peace and Social Justice Committee there. Other members of that committee describe him as principled and dedicated in his research, thinking and actions. He was also a strong supporter of the Friends Committee on National Legislation and brought their “War Is Not the Answer” campaign to Claremont, buying signs with his own money when necessary. Dr. Chapman was also passionate about health education and the environment, and he brought his characteristic dedication and commitment to those issues. At Mt. San Antonio Gardens, he coordinated a popular series of health education lectures, bringing in expert speakers on medical issues of concern to the residents. He also served many years on the Environmental Quality Board for the city of Claremont. Recently, in response to a growing be-

OBITUARIES
as a child, as well as later camping in the deserts of Utah, collecting driftwood and shells on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, contemplating the lakes of New England and experiencing awe in the Sierras and the Alps. Photography was also a special interest, starting with well-loved black-andwhite pictures of his children and evolving through slides of family trips and then professional-level scenic prints. At the Gardens, he was also known as a wonderful ballroom dance partner who was light on his feet and a delight to watch, with a special grace and style of his own. Dr. Chapman is survived by his friend and companion, Elayne Logan, by his daughters and their partners, Jennifer Chapman and Roger Smith of Austin, Texas, Carol Chapman and Joe Cadora of Richmond, California and Laura and Glenn Morrison of Champaign, Illinois, and by his son, Mark Chapman of Santa Cruz, California. Their mother, Lois Chapman, died in 1972. Also surviving are Dr. Chapman’s granddaughter, Leslie Morrison, his sister, Margaret Smith, sisters-in-law Glenn Chapman and Gloria Underhill, friend and former wife Karen Chapman Lenz, stepson Jason Shupe and many special friends. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made in Dr. Chapman’s memory to the Chesapeake Climate Action Network (www.chesapeakeclimate.org). He was very proud of the work his granddaughter, Leslie, has been doing with that organization. Services will be held on Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 2 p.m. at the Claremont Friends Meeting House, 727 W. Harrison Ave. in Claremont.

lief that climate change was becoming the most important issue of our time, he helped form the Future of the Earth group at the Gardens and worked tirelessly to inform others and inspire them to action on that problem. He treasured the people he met and worked with in all of his activities, and they respected and appreciated him for his generosity in helping others. Dr. Chapman lived a full and extraordinary life in other areas as well. He expressed some of his most important thoughts and deepest feelings through his poetry, which he shared in lively discussions at the Joslyn Center poetry class he attended for many years and at the Live Poets Society at the Gardens. He loved being out in nature and enjoyed summer visits to his grandparents’ farm in Indiana

Elhai named to deanʼs list at Weinberger to discuss journal- Marquette University Dylan Claremont has been named the ism at Democratic Club meeting dean’s listElhai offall 2012 semester at MarquettetoUnifor the
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its versity in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Ms. Elhai, who is the monthly members’ meeting on Monday, January 28 at 7 p.m. in Porter Hall at Pilgrim Place. The speaker for the evening will be Peter Weinberger, publisher of the Claremont COURIER, who will discuss “What role should news media play in reporting news, and is watchdog journalism dead?” A

OUR TOWN

business meeting for members will follow the talk.

daughter of Claremont High School Theatre Director Krista Elhai, is pursuing a bachelor’s in theatre arts.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

11

Lady Wolfpack unable to convert scoring opportunities
On Wednesday night, Claremont girls soccer Krista Krugler crossed into the 6-yard box, punchplayed 100 scoreless minutes against the Ayala ing the ball away from danger. Tracey acknowlBulldogs. “There you have it—you have to finish edged the Bulldogs’ fighting spirit, “Ayala’s a good your chances,” said Coach Tim Tracy. After domside and they gained momentum when we began inating possession in regulation and having a numto lose focus during the game.” ber of clear-cut opportunities, the Wolfpack played On 54 minutes, Claremont broke down the right out 2 goalless extra periods and the match finished when Claire Damon sent Renken for a cross into 0-0. the box. Settles gathered and laid the ball off to Claremont came out in a midfield-heavy forChua, who shot low and into the goalkeeper mation, looking to continue their quick passing Abeyta’s arms. Abeyta finally made a mistake 8 game. Indeed, the strategy looked to have paid divminutes later when she dropped another searching idends early on. Right winger Megan Renken won ball from Holmes right into the path of Merin Arft, a corner after only 3 minutes, and Madison Stark but Ayala’s Jones was there to mop up. The game headed the out swinging cross against the crosswhistle blew, and now they would have 2 extra bar. time periods. At 21 minutes, Claremont broke through on Extra time proved to be the same war of attrigoal again. Hannah Chua flicked on a long ball tion seen during regulation. In the 92nd minute of from center half Ari Holmes, releasing left midplay, Chua created another good chance for Arft fielder Merin Arft. The ball was just too far, and who rounded the keeper, but ran out of space for a Ayala goalkeeper Katlyn Abeyta came out to shot. With 3 minutes left in extra time, Claremont smother. Abeyta would prove to be a thorn in the gave up a free kick just outside the area. Ayala’s side of Wolfpack strikers as the game wore on. Samantha Orodpour lined up and shot the ball over The Wolfpack were winning most 50/50 balls the crossbar, calming Wolfpack nerves. as well as almost every header, but were unable to The referee then blew for the end of the match, create any more clear scoring chances in the half. amid hopeful shouts from the fans for a penalty COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff shootout. Alas, the game would end all square. In fact, after Claremont’s bright start to the game, Members of the Claremont and Ayala high school girls varsity socAyala managed to claw back some of the posses- cer teams attempt to head the ball after a Claremont corner kick on Tracey said, “I am happy that we maintained sion time 10 minutes from halftime. Bulldog cen- Wednesday in Claremont. Visit our online gallery for more photos focus. With the draw and Chino Hills’ loss to South tral players Morgan Brown and Maya Jones held from the girls matchup, www.claremont-courier.com. Hills, we are now tied for first place in Sierra.” Claremont attackers at bay and launched a couple Claremont will travel to South Hills, who just flank, and found forward Ryley Settles with a through beat the best team in the division. The Wolfpack have anof counter-attacks of their own. Just 2 minutes after the restart, Claremont won another pass. Again the chance evaded the Wolfpack, as Settles other 2 away games following that one. Check online corner. Haley Arft struck her cross low and into the dan- crossed just over the head of onrushing teammates. and in our next edition for more scores. —Chris Oakley Again, Ayala began to turn the tide. Goalkeeper ger area for Stark, who skewed her shot just wide of the sports@claremont-courier.com post. Renken continued to make headway down the right Amanda Garvin was called into action when Ayala’s

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

12

Saca’s keeps it fresh and healthy 6 days a week

F

or Fred and Nadia Saca, the Mediterranean diet is not a trend. It’s a way of life, and the source of a thriving family business.

Since 1992, Saca’s Mediterranean Cuisine has provided Claremonters with fresh and healthy meals, using Ms. Saca’s traditional family recipes. The menu hasn’t changed much since Saca’s first opened its doors: crisp falafel, creamy hummus and baba ghanouj, tangy tabouleh, savory shawerma and stickysweet baklava. It’s the kind of food that Mr. Saca, who moved to Houston, Texas from Lebanon in 1955 at age 10, grew up eating, and which his wife has prepared for their family since the couple was married in 1975. They didn’t always plan to take Ms. Saca’s skill in the kitchen public. After moving to California in the 1970s, Mr. Saca worked for 30 years in the savings and loan industry, first at Security Pacific and then at Union Federal. Meanwhile, Ms. Saca tended to their growing family of 3 boys, who went through Chaparral Elementary, El Roble Intermediate and Claremont High School. When the savings and loan industry began to dry up in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Sacas found themselves at a crossroads. They decided to open up a restaurant, and the rest is a piece of Claremont history. At first the restaurant was located at Indian Hill Boulevard and Arrow Highway in the Peppertree Square shopping center. Their business grew, little by little, until 1998, when they moved to their current Second Street location. Once headquartered in the Claremont Village, their business tripled almost immediately, according to Mr. Saca. The restaurant business is a 6-day a week affair for these local entrepreneurs. In fact, it is only in recent years that Saca’s has been closed on Sundays. That’s a lot of time for a couple to spend together. What keeps their relationship, and their business, going smoothly is a clear delineation of duties.

Mom & Pop

Claremont

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Fred Saca, owner of Sacaʼs Mediterranean Cuisine, opened the restaurant with his wife Nadia in 1992 at Peppertree Square the corner of Arrow Highway and Indian Hill Boulevard. They moved to their current location on Second Street in the Village in 1998.

Mr. Saca does the purchasing, the accounting and the bookkeeping. Ms. Saca supervises all of the cooking, assisted by a staff of 8. Her busy kitchen features lamb, chicken and beef sizzling on spits, each marinated with its own blend of water and spices, while whole chickens brown on a rotisserie. Saca’s offers takeout catering and so there are often large party platters to prepare, each carefully arranged and garnished. Sandwiches are arguably the most popular item on the Saca’s menu. Pita bread is stuffed with falafel—a perfectly toasted patty made of ground chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans—or strips of shaved shawerma meat, layered on top of a bed of lettuce, tomatoes and onions. Tahini, a gourmet sesame sauce, adds additional flavor while a spear of homemade pickled turnip, tinted a fetching red with beet juice, adds a finishing touch.
CLAREMONT MOM & POP continues on the next page

The pita-wrapped lamb shawerma sandwich is typical of the food served at Sacaʼ. The recipes are the creations of owner Nadia Saca.

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

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CLAREMONT MOM & POP continued from the previous page

It’s a selection that suits health-conscious Claremont. The Sacas dress their salads with olive oil and cook with transfat-free and cholesterol-free canola oil. A number of items are even vegan, including the falafel, dolma (grape leaves stuffed with rice and herbs), tabouleh (a flavorful salad of chopped parsley, tomatoes, onions and cracked wheat), and the hummus and baba ghanouj spreads, which are made of pureed chickpeas and eggplant, respectively. “Mediterranean food is extremely healthy, especially our way of cooking here. We do everything from scratch, and we don’t use any preservatives,” Mr. Saca noted. A number of people eat at Sacas every day they are open, some of them even twice, knowing the habit won’t supersize them, Mr. Saca said. While most diners are less zealous, the success of the family business is due to their large number of regular customers. John Sweeney, who lives in Yucaipa but teaches at the Claremont School of Theology, is among these. He comes in about once a week, lured by the falafel, lamb and feta-laden Greek salad, saying, “It’s good food at a good price.” The Sacas are committed to keeping their low prices, which haven’t changed in 4 years, despite the fact that their own food costs seem to continually escalate. They stay afloat thanks to low overhead

and a loyal clientele. It helps, too, that Claremont is becoming known as a culinary destination. Mr. Saca doesn’t view the increasing number of eateries in town as competition but instead as a boon. “More restaurants are coming in, and it’s bringing more people.” Like the proprietors of most familyowned businesses, the Sacas spend an inordinate amount of time at their restaurant. They don’t get much time for outside pursuits. They do, however, eat out about once a week, at a variety of restaurants. Sundays are a special time, when Mr. and Ms. Saca head to church at Our Lady of the Assumption. If they’re lucky, they also get to see their 2 small grandchildren, who are reportedly big fans of their grandmother’s hummus. Despite the long hours, the Sacas enjoy their work, which allows them to meet new friends and to make people happy in a primal way…by feeding them. “My philosophy is to lead a good life,” Mr. Saca said. “Be honest and straight with people, and talk to people. Take advice from the old and the young, and then make your own decision.” Having made the decision to open a family business, the Sacas plan to keep serving up Mediterranean goodness “as long as God gives us good health,” Mr. Saca said.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

David Hernandez prepares a lamb shawerma sandwich for a customer recently at Sacaʼs Mediterranean Cuisine in the Claremont Village. The favorite dishes at the Second Street eatery include the falafel platter and the chicken shawerma.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

14

Dream Crushers takes top honors at sectional tournament
The girls under 14 AYSO soccer team Dream Crushers represented Claremont in the area tournament, and took home the first-place trophy. Coached by Joseph Armendarez, the team won its semifinal match down one player, and then beat Chino in the final down another player because of injury. Oksana Sosnovsky’s goal and Ryanna Curtis’ strong goalkeeping preserved a 1-0 win for the Dream Crushers and a bid to the sectional tournament. Sosnovsky finished the season with almost 20 goals, left winger Genesis Ruiz stood out in attack with 8 playoff goals after coming back from injury and Sarah Armendarez provided quality service down the right flank. Utility midfielder Summer Sargent supported the Crushers’ adventurous 3-striker formation. Alyssa Hermelin spent most of the season shutting down the opposition’s best attacker as a man marker. Breakout defensive players Kayla Clebenger and Lauren Csik each matured into veteran fullbacks having only played at most one season prior to this one. “We took a number of inexperienced players; I am

proud to say they developed quality through this year. Winning this tournament is great but it comes second to seeing young people develop,” Coach Armendarez said. The team will feature in Riverside’s Sectional Tournament on the weekend of February 23.

CMS women spread the joy of playing basketball
Just after the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps women’s basketball team finished practice last Wednesday, they went on to visit students at Vista Del Valle Elementary School in the afternoon. The students participate in the After School Community Education and Safety (ASES) program, and played various basketball-related games with members of the Athenas. Ranging from kindergarten to sixth grade, the students also worked on their homework under the women’s tutelage. “Meeting with real student athletes makes a big difference in what the students want in life and the choices that they make going forward,” ASES instructor Ian Tompkins said.

Photo courtesy of Laura Hermelin Alyssa Hermelin, left, and Oksana Sosnovsky attempt to get by the Chino goalkeeper on Sunday during the AYSO girls 14 and under area championship game in Ontario.

Claremont COURIER/Saturday, January 26, 2013

15

Betty Slaboda
Betty Slaboda, better known to generations of Claremont High School Marching Band and Show Team members as “Grandma Betty,” died on Tuesday, January 15, 2013. She was 98. Ms. Slaboda was born on June 21, 1914 in Trenton, New Jersey to Anna and Joseph Kissak, the fourth child in a family of 5 sisters and one brother. Her parents were ethnic Slovakians who, upon coming to the United States from the Carpathian Mountains near Hungary, changed their surname from its original Kecha to sound more American. Ms. Slaboda’s birth name, “Lizzie,” was also Americanized when her older sisters began calling her Elizabeth. Over the years, she adopted the name Betty. As a girl growing up on a farm in the outskirts of Trenton, she loved making corn-husk dolls and swimming in a nearby stream. The Kissaks attended the local Byzantine Catholic Church and Ms. Slaboda attended a Catholic elementary school, graduating from 8th grade. It was an unusual achievement in a time when immigrant children were expected to work to help their families, rarely attending school past third grade. Though surrounded by friends and relatives who spoke only the Slavish language, she grew up very proud to be an American. At the age of 17, Ms. Slaboda, a true “flapper girl” who worked in a factory making silk stockings, met and married 24-year-old Michael Slaboda. Mr. Slaboda also hailed from an immigrant Slovakian family, who lived and owned a business in Trenton. A trumpet player who performed in local Big Bands, Mr. Slaboda had the added distinction of being one of the only guys in town with a convertible. Before long, they welcomed their first child, Raymond. Ms. Slaboda’s oldest sister Velma, who had moved to California after her marriage, urged the couple to move out west. Leaving friends and relatives behind, they settled in Lincoln Heights, where they had fun raising Ray in the warm southern California sunshine. Their second child, Michele, was

OBITUARIES
dancing, the Polish sausage sandwiches and the annual New Year’s Eve parties where colorful balloons dropped at midnight. No matter how late the festivities lasted, she never missed going to Colorado Boulevard and viewing the Rose Parade to see the beautiful flowers and ring in another year. After their children were married, the Slabodas took a cruise to Hawaii, where Ms. Slaboda fell completely in love with everything, from the flowers to the Hawaiian dancers. The cruise gave her the thirst to travel, so she and her husband took 2 trips around the world and a few more to Hawaii. Her obsession with dolls began, and she collected a doll from every city and country they visited. The only thing Ms. Slaboda liked more than traveling was traveling with family. She was able to take granddaughter Roberta cruising on the Q E 2 ship, travel with her grandson John to Alaska and vacation with her son Ray in Australia. She traveled with her daughter Michele to Hawaii numerous times as well as to Spain, Ireland, Scotland, Russia, France, Holland and Thousand Islands, New York. In between trips, Ms. Slaboda would head to Trenton, New Jersey for a visit with her sisters and relatives. All that traveling inspired her to become a photographer and she became known for taking pictures and recording videos—of everything and everyone— everywhere she went. When Mr. Slaboda died in 1980, Ms. Slaboda moved to Upland. Her daughter, Michele, was a longtime coach for the Claremont High School dance, drill and cheer squads. Being so close to Claremont, it was then that she became the famous “Grandma Betty,” the darling of the CHS Marching Band and Show Team. During those years, Grandma Betty never missed any of their events, riding on the bus and sitting with the boosters in the stands. She was sad when her daughter and Dr. Gary Iida, the band director, decided to retire in 1999. No one could have missed those kids and the glamour, glitter and travel excitement more than her, according to family. Ms. Slaboda’s 8 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and 9 great-greatgrandchildren will always remember her as a person who was kind, energetic and generous with her time, affection and finances. Grandma Betty took them to theme parks, zoos and an array of events. Her grandson, Robert, was on his way to a theatrical musical singing career and she attended every play he was in, always taking a front-row seat. She lived alone and independently for 30 years, going for the goal of living to the age of 100, and never had any major illness or surgeries. Just a few days before she died, Ms. Slaboda’s grandson Kenny talked to her about her age and living to be almost 99. He told her she was so blessed to live such a long life and remarked that she must have seen and done so many things. All she said was, “Oh, honey, it all went so fast.” “Grandma Betty was one in a million, for sure, and we will treasure the lifetime of memories she made with all of us,” her daughter Michele said. Ms. Slaboda is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, Ray and Barb Slaboda; by her daughter, Michele Allen; by her grandchildren, Debi Slaboda Fisher, Cyndee Slaboda Wildeboer, Roberta Allen Schuller, John Allen, Kenneth Allen, Robert Allen II and Michele Allen Peterson; by her great-grandchildren, Chris Ramey, Lisa Totten, Shannon Houlemard, Heather Grana, Lindsey Wood, Dylan Slaboda, Cameron Slaboda, Geoffrey Schuller, Melanie Schuller, Bradley Schuller, Riley Schuller, Taylor Allen, Broder Allen, Kenneth Lee Allen, Louis Allen, Lanie Allen, Robert Allen III, Samuel Allen, Grace Peterson and Nicholas Peterson; and by her great-great-grandchildren, Daija Ramey, Ryland Totten, Logan Houlemard, Megan Houlemard, Kaitlyn Houlemard, Peyton Houlemard, Holland Wood, Even Grana and Ella Grana.

Loving matriarch, CHS booster, world traveler

born in Los Angeles. If Ms. Slaboda enjoyed California, she adored Hollywood—the stars with their glamour, Shirley Temple with her curls and Elizabeth Taylor with her furs. Anyone famous became her idol, a propensity she never outgrew. Over the years, Ms. Slaboda collected dolls fashioned after Princess Diana, the Queen of England, Jacqueline Kennedy and the latest royal bride and groom, Kate and William. Ms. Slaboda lived her life around her children, giving Ray accordion lessons and putting Michele in movie and modeling work, baton twirling and dance of every kind. She spent much of her time sewing and embroidering all of her daughter’s clothes and costumes, from casual wear to formal gowns. During this time, Ms. Slaboda also took classes in oil painting, learning to hand-tint black and white pictures with color tones. She also wrote a song that was recorded, and many of the poems she wrote under the name PITTI PAT were published. Along with her children’s activities, Ms. Slaboda enjoyed watching her husband build his machine shop business and went to see him play trumpet every Saturday night at the Polka Palace with the Melody Men. She delighted in the

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High School midfielder Ben Santia heads the ball over the reach of South Hills High Schoolʼs Alan Garcia during their Sierra League match Wednesday night in Covina. The Pack spent most of the game one goal behind the Huskies but tied the game in the second half, forcing an overtime period. When the game resumed, CHS quickly scored and held on to the lead to win 3-2.

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Pack gets physical
After yellow cards and a scolding for coaching staff, the boys varsity soccer team takes the win, 3-2, over South Hills.

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Council takes next steps to resolve parking at the Wilderness Park
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Next stop for our Claremont Mom & Pop series...

In this edition
Exploring the influence of a conservative think tank
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Pigale Optical Parlor
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Showcasing international talent at the Whitehead Film Festival

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LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TSG No.: 120244094 TS No.: 2068.00296 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED June 08, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 11,2013, Sage Point Lender Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT drawn on a state or national bank, cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED TN BELOW MENTIONED DEED OF TRUST Executed by: EVERETTE W HUGHES JR. AND, JOYCE HUGHES HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded on June 16, 2006, as Instrument No. 06 1328351, of Official Records, in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, California Date of Sale: February 11, 2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: In the Vineyard Ballroom in the Doubletree Hotel Los AngelesNorwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1274 W BASLINE RD, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN# 8302-015-029 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Sale is $604,721.72. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell, The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to the return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site www.aaction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 2068.00296. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: January 7, 2013 Sage Point Lender Services, LLC 34 Executive Park, Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 949-2659940 Lorena De La Torre FOR TRUSTEE'S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL (800) 280-2832 or visit www.auction.com SAGE POINT LENDER SERVICES, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. A-4349042 01/12/2013, 01/19/2013, 01/26/2013

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Trustee Sale No. 24950CA Title Order No. 120294210 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 04-19-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 0211-2013 at 9:00 AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 04-27-2006, Book , Page , Instrument 06 0926682 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: CAU VAN GIANG AND DENISE HO as Trustor, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without convenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Legal Description: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST Amount of unpaid balance and other charges:$573,971.27 The street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 19071 GOLD LANE , WALNUT, CA 91789 APN Number: 8734-050-004 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the property itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com , using the file number assigned to this case 24950CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 01-17-2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 5864500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1015737 1/19, 1/26, 02/02/2013
Trustee Sale No.: 20120168301077 Title Order No.: D012-600594 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 2/19/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 02/26/2008 as Instrument No. 20080326590 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: FABIOLA HOLGUIN, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 2/11/2013 TIME OF SALE: 09:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles - Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 23834 DECORAH RD, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 APN#: 8703-003-045 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $234,823.68. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120168301077. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM, LLC ONE MAUCHLY IRVINE, CA 92618 800-280-2832 www.auction.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 1/14/2013 P1015015 1/19, 1/26, 02/02/2013 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: KS016759 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: TWANEIL D. HARRIS Filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: a. TWANEIL DURON HARRIS to Proposed name: a. WILLIE BERNARD HARRIS, III. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 01, 2013 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept.: O Room: Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 /s/ Peter J. Meeka, Dated: January 10, 2013 Judge of the Superior Court Petitioner: Twaneil D. Harris 701 Lander Cir., Claremont, CA 91711 Tel.: 909-232-3839 PUBLISH: 01/19/13, 01/26/13, 02/02/13, 02/09/13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Saturday, January 26, 2013
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 007194 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Luscious Nails & Spa, 446 Auto Center Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Francesco R. Galuppo, 6976 Julian Ln., Fontana, CA 92336. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Francesco R. Galuppo This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of LosAngeles County on 01/11/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 19, 26, February 2 and 9, 2013 Trustee Sale No.: 20120169805466 Title Order No.: 120323906 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/11/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 06/13/2008 as Instrument No. 20081055220 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: CHARLES R HOLT, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 2/11/2013 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: DOUBLETREE HOTEL LOS ANGELES - NORWALK, 13111 SYCAMORE DRIVE, NORWALK, CA 90650. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3024 NORTH MOUNTAIN AVENUE , CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN#: 8670-018-012 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $393,057.86. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-2802832 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20120169805466. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AUCTION.COM, LLC 2 ONE MAUCHLY IRVINE, CA 92618 800-280-2832 www.auction.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 1/14/2013 P1014952 1/19, 1/26, 02/02/2013

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 014414 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as BAM LANDSCAPE, 581 Black Hills Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Andrew Bentson, 581 Black Hills Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Blake McCallion, 1959 Sixth St., La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/16/2013. /s/ Andrew Bentson This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 26, February 2, 9 and 16, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 011201 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as SUCH-A-DEAL, 2479 San Fernando Ct., Claremont, CA 91711. Jerome Feingold, 2479 San Fernando Ct., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in August, 1984. /s/ Jerome Feingold This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 26, February 2, 9 and 16, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLES O. ODOM, Deceased CASE NO. KP 015100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES O. ODOM A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHARLES W. ODOM in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHARLES W. ODOM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 21, 2013, at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. A located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Pomona South IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Christopher T. Coffin SBN#60826 Attorney At Law 2208 Calle Margarita San Dimas, CA 91773 Phone# 909-592-0305 Publish: January 26, 30 and February 2, 2013 CLAREMONT COURIER

ORDINANCE NO. 2013-02 AN ORDINANCE GRANTING TO SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS COMPANY, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, THE FRANCHISE TO CONSTRUCT, MAINTAIN AND USE PIPES AND APPURTENANCES FOR TRANSMITTING AND DISTRIBUTING GAS FOR ANY AND ALL PURPOSES IN, ALONG, ACROSS, UPON, AND UNDER THE PUBLIC STREETS AND PLACES WITHIN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA DOES ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: DEFINITIONS. SECTION 1. Whenever in this ordinance the words or phrases hereinafter in this section defined are used, they shall have the respective meaning assigned to them in the following definitions (unless, in the given instance, the context wherein they are used shall clearly import a different meaning). (a) The word “grantee” shall mean Southern California Gas Company, and its lawful successors or assigns; (b) The word “city” shall mean the City of Claremont, a municipal corporation of the State of California, in its present incorporated form or in any later reorganized, consolidated, enlarged or reincorporated form; (c) The word “streets” shall mean the public streets, ways, alleys, rights-ofway, and places as the same now or may hereafter exist within said city, including state highways, now or hereafter established within said city, and freeways hereafter established within said city; (d) The word “franchise” shall mean and include any authorization granted hereunder in terms of a franchise, privilege, permit, license or otherwise to construct, maintain and use pipes and appurtenances for transmitting and distributing gas for all purposes under, along, across or upon the public streets, ways, alleys and places in the City, and shall include and be in lieu of any existing or future City requirement to obtain a license or permit for the privilege of transacting and carrying on a business within the City, but shall not include or be in lieu of any existing or future City requirement to obtain a Permit as specified in Section 4(d) herein; (e) The phrase “pipes and appurtenances” shall mean pipes, pipelines, mains, services, traps, vents, cables, conduits, vaults, manholes, meters, appliances, attachments, appurtenances, associated communications infrastructure and any other property located or to be located in upon, along, across, or under the streets of the city, and used or useful in the transmitting and/or distributing of gas; (f) The word “Engineer” shall mean the City Engineer of the City; (g) The word “gas” shall mean natural or manufactured gas, or a mixture of natural and manufactured gas; (h) The phrase “construct, maintain, and use” shall mean to construct, erect, install, lay, operate, maintain, use, repair, remove, or replace; and (i) The phrase “gross annual receipts” shall mean all gross operating receipts received by Grantee from the sale of gas to Grantee’s customers within its service territory less uncollectible amounts and less any refunds or rebates made by Grantee to such customers pursuant to California Public Utilities Commission orders or decisions. PURPOSE. SECTION 2. That the right, privilege and franchise, subject to each and all of the terms and conditions contained in this ordinance, specifically the obligation to obtain Permits and pay the Permits Payment, and pursuant to the provisions of Division 3, Chapter 2 of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California, known as the Franchise Act of 1937 (the “Franchise Act”), be and the same is hereby granted to Grantee to construct, maintain and use pipes and appurtenances for transmitting and distributing gas for any and all purposes, under, along, across or upon the streets of the City. TERM. SECTION 3. The term of said franchise shall commence on the date this ordinance becomes effective and shall continue in full force and effect for a period of Thirty (30) years from and after the effective date of this ordinance, or until such time as the same shall, with the consent of the Public Utilities Commission of the State of California, be voluntarily surrendered or abandoned by the Grantee, or until the state or some municipal or public corporation thereunto duly authorized by law shall purchase by voluntary agreement or shall condemn and take under the power of eminent domain, all property actually used and use-

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
ful in the exercise of said franchise and situate in the territorial limits of the state, municipal, or public corporation purchasing or condemning such property, or until said franchise shall be forfeited or terminated for non-compliance with its terms by the Grantee. SECTION 4. CONSIDERATION. (a) The Grantee of said franchise shall, during the term thereof, pay to the City at the times hereinafter specified, in lawful money of the United States, a sum annually which shall be equivalent to two percent (2%) of the gross annual receipts of said Grantee arising from the use, operation or possession of said franchise; provided, however, that such payment shall in no event be less than one percent (1%) of the gross annual receipts of Grantee derived from the sale of gas within the limits of said City under this franchise. In the event that the Franchise Act is changed to provide an increase to the consideration payable to City pursuant to Section 4 herein, and City provides notice to Grantee and adopts such increase with all other associated changes of the Franchise Act in a manner consistent with its local ordinances and state law, then Grantee shall calculate the subsequent franchise fee payment using the revised consideration amount commencing as of the next calendar month after the effective date of City’s enactment and thereafter. (b) The Grantee shall file with the Clerk of said city, within three (3) months after the expiration of the calendar year, or fractional calendar year, following the date of the granting hereof, and within three (3) months after the expiration of each and every calendar year thereafter, a duly verified statement showing in detail the total gross annual receipts of such Grantee during the preceding calendar year, or such fractional calendar year, from the sale of gas within said City. Such Grantee shall pay to said city within fifteen (15) days after the time for filing such statement, in lawful money of the United States, the aforesaid percentage of its gross annual receipts for such calendar year, or such fractional calendar year, covered by such statement. (c) In the event the Grantee fails to make payments for this franchise on or before the dates due as herein provided, Grantee shall pay as additional consideration a sum of money equal to one percent (1%) of the amount due for each month or fraction thereof in which the payment has not been made. (d) Grantee agrees to obtain all permits, licenses, and authorizations required by the City (“Permits”) prior to commencing any work subject to the franchise granted by this ordinance. Permits may include, but are not limited to any permit, license or authorization required in connection with operations in, upon, above, beneath, or across City streets, including, by way of example, but not limitation, encroachment, trench cut, excavation, inspections, and similar permits and authorizations. (e) Notwithstanding the Southern California Gas Company v. City of Alhambra decision (2011 WL 4389655 (C.D.Cal.)), in addition to the franchise fee payment calculated as set forth in section 4(a) above, and in lieu of paying a separate fee for each Permit required by Grantee (“Fees”), Grantee shall make a single annual payment of Fourteen Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($14,500), as payment in full for any and all Fees for Permits required for that year (“Permits Payment”) which may have been, or are, assessed on Grantee by the City for that year (but not including any property taxes which shall be payable by Grantee). By accepting the franchise granted by this ordinance pursuant to Public Utilities Code §6235, Grantee agrees and acknowledges that the Permits Payment is deemed to be a reasonable and accurate estimate of the City’s annual cost to issue the Permits and otherwise satisfies the requirements of the Mitigation Fee Act (California Government Code §§ 66000 et seq.). (f) The first Permits Payment shall be due and payable upon the next scheduled franchise payment due by Grantee after the effective date of this ordinance (in the event the first payment does not cover an entire calendar year the first payment shall be a pro-rata amount) and annually thereafter on the date that the franchise fee payment in Section 4(a) is due. Commencing on or after January 1, 2013, the Permits Payment to be paid by Grantee pursuant to this subsection shall be changed by the percentage change in the amount of fees that the City charges for Permits issued to third parties, provided such change is adopted in compliance with the Mitigation Fee Act (California Government Code §§ 66000 et seq.), or the percentage change in the “All Items” Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (1982-84 equals 100) published by the United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (“CPI”), whichever percentage change is less. Any change in the Permits Payment shall be made to the subsequent year’s payment. (g) Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Permits Payment shall not be changed for Grantee pursuant to subsection (f) unless and until the Fees for Permits imposed by the City on third parties are changed. In addition to any other notices provided pursuant to the requirements of the Mitigation Fee Act, the City shall provide Grantee with written notice at least thirty (30) days in advance of any increase in the Permits Payment taking effect with regard to Grantee, including the amount and calculation of the adjustment. Nothing herein shall be construed to permit or authorize Grantee, or to grant to Grantee the right, to occupy any other property of City to which access or use is not specifically granted by this ordinance. The Permits Payment shall not apply to any permits, licenses or authorizations required to permit or authorize Grantee to occupy any other property of City to which access or use is not specifically granted by this ordinance, including, without limitation, permits and licenses for placing devices on or in poles, conduits, or other structures or facilities owned by City. SECTION 5. OTHER FRANCHISES. This grant is made in lieu of all other franchises owned by the Grantee, or by any successor of the Grantee to any rights under this franchise, for transmitting and distributing gas within the limits of the City, as said limits now or may hereafter exist, and the acceptance of the franchise hereby granted shall operate as an abandonment of all such franchises within the limits of this City, as such limits now or may hereafter exist, in lieu of which this franchise is granted. SECTION 6. OBLIGATIONS OF GRANTEE. (a) All facilities or equipment of Grantee shall be constructed, installed and maintained in accordance with and in conformity with all of the ordinances, rules and regulations heretofore, or hereafter adopted by the legislative body of this City in the exercise of its police powers and not in conflict with the paramount authority of the State of California, and, as to state highways, subject to the provisions of the general laws relating to the location and maintenance of such facilities. (b) If any portion of any street shall be damaged by reason of defects in any of the pipes and appurtenances maintained or constructed under this grant, or by reason of any other cause arising from the operation or existence of any pipes and appurtenances constructed or maintained under this grant, Grantee shall, at its own cost and expense, immediately repair any such damage and restore such portion of such damaged street to as good condition as existed before such defect or other cause of damage occurred. (c) The Grantee shall pay to the City, on demand, the cost of all repairs to public property made necessary by any operations of the Grantee under this franchise. (d) Except for such losses or damages caused by the negligence or willful misconduct of City and any officers and employees, Grantee of the franchise granted hereby shall indemnify, save, and hold harmless, City and any officers and employees thereof against and from all damages, judgments, decrees, costs and expenditures which city, or such officer or employee, may suffer, or which may be recovered from, or obtainable against City, or such officer or employee, for, or by reason of, or growing out of or resulting from the exercising by Grantee of any or all of the rights or privileges granted hereby, or by reason of any act or acts of Grantee or its servants or agents in exercising the franchise granted hereby, and Grantee shall defend any suit that may be instituted against City, or any officer or employee thereof, by reason of or growing out of or resulting from the exercise by Grantee of any or all of the rights or privileges granted hereby, or by reason of any act or acts of Grantee, or its servants or agents, in exercising the franchise granted hereby. LOCATE, SECTION 7. REMOVE OR RELOCATE FACILITIES. (a) City’s Engineer shall have the power to give Grantee such directions for the location of any pipes and appurtenances as may be reasonably necessary to avoid sewers, water pipes, conduits or other structures lawfully in or under the streets; and before the work of construction any new pipes and appurtenances is commenced, the Grantee shall file with said Engineer plans showing the location thereof, which shall be subject to the approval of said Engineer (such approval not to be unreasonably withheld); and the location of such construction shall be subject to the inspection of said Engineer and done to his reasonable satisfaction. All street coverings or openings of traps, vaults, and manholes shall at all

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Saturday, January 26, 2013
times be kept flush with the surface of the streets; provided, however, that vents for underground traps, vaults and manholes may extend above the surface of the streets when said vents are located in parkways, between the curb and the property line. (b) Where it is necessary to lay any underground pipes through, under or across any portion of a paved or macadamized street, the same, where practicable and economically reasonable may be done by a tunnel or bore, so as not to disturb the foundation of such paved or macadamized street. All work shall be done under a permit to be granted by the Engineer upon application therefore. (c) City reserves the right for itself to lay, construct, erect, install, use, operate, repair, replace, remove, relocate or maintain below surface or above surface improvements of any type or description in, upon, along, across, under or over the streets of the City. City further reserves the right to lawfully change the grade, alignment or width of any street. If the necessary exercise of the aforementioned reserve rights conflicts with any pipes and appurtenances of Grantee constructed, maintained, and used pursuant to the provisions of the franchise granted hereby, whether previously constructed, maintained and used or not, Grantee shall, without cost or expense to City within ninety (90) days after written notice from the City Manager, or his designated representative, and request so to do, begin the physical field construction of changing the location of all facilities or equipment so conflicting. Grantee shall proceed promptly to complete such required work. (d) Irrespective of any other provision of this ordinance, Grantee’s right to construct, maintain, and use, or remove pipes and appurtenances thereto shall be subject at all times to the rights of the City, in the exercise of its police power, to require the removal or relocation of said pipes and appurtenances thereto at the sole cost and expense of Grantee, except (1) as the law may otherwise provide or, (2) except where Grantee’s right to possession is pursuant to instruments evidencing rights-of-way, easements, or other interests in real property, or (3) except where the removal or relocation is made at the request of the City on behalf of or for the benefit of any private developer or other third party. SECTION 8. TRANSFER OR SALE OF FRANCHISE. Grantee of the franchise granted hereby shall file with the legislative body of the City within thirty (30) days after any sale, transfer, assignment or lease of this franchise, or any part thereof, or of any of the rights or privileges granted thereby, written evidence of the same, certified thereto by the Grantee or its duly authorized officers. FORFEITURE. SECTION 9. This franchise is granted upon each and every condition herein contained, and shall ever be strictly construed against Grantee. Nothing shall pass by the franchise granted hereby to Grantee unless it be granted in plain and unambiguous terms. Each of said conditions is a material and essential condition to the granting of the franchise. If Grantee shall fail, neglect or refuse to comply with any of the conditions of the franchise granted hereby, and if such failure, neglect or refusal shall continue for more than thirty (30) days after written demand by the City Manager for compliance therewith, then City, by the City Council, in addition to all rights and remedies allowed by law, thereupon may terminate the rights, privilege, and franchise granted in and by this ordinance, and all the rights, privileges and the franchise of Grantee granted hereby shall thereupon be at an end. Thereupon and immediately, Grantee shall surrender all rights and privileges in and to the franchise granted hereby. No provision herein made for the purpose of securing the enforcement of the terms and conditions of the franchise granted hereby shall be deemed an exclusive remedy or to afford the exclusive procedure for the enforcement of said terms and conditions, but the remedies and procedure outlined herein or provided, including forfeiture, shall be deemed to be cumulative. SECTION 10. ACQUISITION AND VALUATION. The franchise granted hereunder shall not in any way or to any extent impair or affect the right of the City to acquire the property of the Grantee hereof either by purchase of or through the exercise of the right of eminent domain, and nothing herein contained shall be construed to contract away or to modify or to abridge, either for a term or in perpetuity, the City’s right of eminent domain with respect to the Grantee; nor shall this franchise ever be given any value before any court or other public authority in any proceeding of any character in excess of the cost to the Grantee of the necessary

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publication and any other sum paid by it to the City therefor at the time of the acquisition thereof. SECTION 11. AUDIT OF RECORDS The City Treasurer, or any certified public accountant, or qualified person designated by the City, at any reasonable time during business hours, may make an examination at the Grantee’s office of its books, accounts, and records, germane to and for the purpose of verifying the data set forth in the statement required by Section 4(b). SECTION 12. PUBLICATION COSTS. The Grantee of said franchise shall pay to the City a sum of money sufficient to reimburse it for all publication expenses incurred by it in connection with the granting thereof, such payment to be made within thirty (30) days after the City shall have furnished such Grantee with a written statement of such expenses. SECTION 13. EFFECTIVE DATE. The franchise granted hereby shall not become effective until written acceptance thereof shall have been filed by the Grantee with the City Clerk. When so filed, such acceptance shall constitute a continuing agreement of the Grantee that if and when the City shall thereafter annex or consolidate with additional territory, any and all franchise rights and privileges owned by the Grantee therein shall likewise be deemed to be abandoned within the limits of the additional territory. SECTION 14. WRITTEN ACCEPTANCE. After the publication of this ordinance, the Grantee shall file with the City Clerk a written acceptance of the franchise hereby granted, and an agreement to comply with the terms and conditions hereof. PUBLICATION. SECTION 15. The mayor shall sign this ordinance and the city clerk shall attest and certify to the passage and adoption of it, and within fifteen (15) days, publish in the Claremont Courier, a semiweekly newspaper of general circulation, printed, published, and circulated in the City of Claremont and thirty (30) days thereafter it shall take effect and be in force. PASSED, APPROVED, AND ADOPTED this 22nd day of January, 2013.

_____________________________ Mayor, City of Claremont ATTEST:

______________________________ City Clerk, City of Claremont APPROVED AS TO FORM:

__________________________ Best Best & Krieger LLP City Attorney STATE OF CALIFORNIA ) COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES ) ss. CITY OF CLAREMONT ) I, Lynne E. Fryman, City Clerk of the City of Claremont, County of Los Angeles, State of California, hereby certify that the foregoing Ordinance No. 201302 was introduced for first reading at a regular meeting of the City Council on the 8th day of January, 2013. That thereafter, said Ordinance was passed and adopted at a regular meeting of the City Council on the 22nd day of January, 2013, by the following vote: AYES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NASIALI, PEDROZA, CALAYCAY, LYONS, SCHROEDER NOES: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE ABSTAINED: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE ABSENT: COUNCILMEMBERS: NONE

________________________________ City Clerk Publish: January 26, 2013

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Claremont COURIER Classifieds

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CLASSIFIEDS
rentals............18 employment....18 services..........19 real estate.......22
RENTALS
Apartments for Rent
THREE bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and a pool. $1600 monthly. Barbara, 624-9958.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ADMINISTRATIVE Assistant for fast paced office. Flexible/part-time. Bring resume and complete application, 419 Yale Ave. CDL-A route delivery drivers. MBM Foodservice, Ontario, CA. $65,000 yearly with benefits. One year TT experience. Apply online www.mbmcareers.com. DRIVERS: Team drivers needed. 51 CPM split. Long haul. CDL-A with one year OTR and hazmat endorsement. Willingness to attain tanker endorsement within 30 days. 888-705-3217, or apply online at www.nctrans.com. (Cal-SCAN) APPLY now, 13 drivers needed. Top 5 percent pay and benefits. Credential, fuel, and referral bonus available. Need CDL Class A driving experience. 1-877-258-8782. www.ad-drivers.com. (CalSCAN) DRIVERS: Daily or weekly pay. One cent increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. 3 cent quarterly bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569. www.DriverKnight.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: No experience? Class A driver training. We train and employ! Central Refrigerated. 877-369-7091. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. (Cal-SCAN).

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For a brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Travel
$449 Cabo San Lucas all inclusive special. Stay 6 days in a luxury beach front resort with unlimited meals and drinks for $449! 888-481-9660. www.luxurycabohotel.com.

EMPLOYMENT
Development Director/Grant Writer
Shoes That Fit, the nationʼs largest nonprofit provider of new shoes for children in need, seeks a Development Director/Grant Writer (DD) for its development program. Primary responsibilities include foundation proposals and reports, annual fundraising campaigns, donor cultivation and communication plans. Must be a team player and possess strong written and analytical skills. For further information, please visit our website at www.shoesthatfit.org to view a complete job description. Resumes with cover letters may be submitted to: Shoes That Fit, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Suite 204A, Claremont, CA 91711. Closing date: Friday, February 15, 2013

Want to Buy
WANTED: Diabetic test strips. Cash paid. Unopened, unexpired boxes only. All brands considered. Help others, don’t throw away boxes. For more information call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628. A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. Kensoldenoddities.com. La Verne.

AUTOS
Autos Wanted
DONATE your car. Fast free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

Condo for Rent
TWO bedroom condo at The Brooks of Claremont, corner of Sycamore and San Jose. Beautiful gated grounds with pool, spa! Asking $1550 monthly. Call agent, 562862-9246. CLAREMONT Club prime location! Two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage. $1900 monthly, includes refrigerator, washer, dryer. No pets, smoking. 239-1868.

BULLETINS
Education
ATTEND college 100 percent online. Medical, business, criminal justice and hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computers available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888210-5162, www.CenturaOnline.com. (Cal-SCAN) MUSIC lessons for all ages! Find a music teacher! TakeLessons offers affordable, safe, guaranteed music lessons with teachers in your area. Our prescreened teachers specialize in singing, guitar, piano, drums, violin and more. Call 1-866-974-5910! (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINES are hiring. Train for a hands-on aviation maintenance career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 877-804-5293. (CalSCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
MEDICAL alert for seniors. 24/7 monitoring. Free equipment. Free shipping. Nationwide service. $29.95 monthly. Call Medical Guardian today, 866-944-5935. (Cal-SCAN) DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-9042372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene, an all natural testosterone supplement. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
HIGH speed internet everywhere by Satellite! Speeds up to 12 mbps! 200 times faster than dial up. Starting at $49.95 a month. Call now and go fast! 888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN) START now! Open a red hot dollar, dollar plus, mailbox, discount party, discount clothing, teen store, fitness center from $51,900 worldwide! www.DRSS25.com. 1-800518-3064. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet and digital phone. Packages start at $89.99 a month (for 12 months). Options from all major service providers. Call Aceller today to learn more! Call 1-888-897-7650. (CalSCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month. Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone and TV and get a free prepaid Visa card (select plans)! Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (CalSCAN) MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections- fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888-865-0271. (CalSCAN)

Financial
EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow. Safe and effective. Call now for your free DVD. Call now, 888-6983165. (Cal-SCAN) GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN)

House for Rent
CLAREMONT: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large fenced yard and A/C. Yankton Ave. $1950 monthly. 399-3331. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin at 714-402-0034. THREE bedrooms and 2 3/4 bathrooms. Includes water, sewer, trash and gardener. $2000 monthly. WSPM 6215941. THREE bedroom, 2 bathD room pool home in northern TE N Claremont. Fenced yard, RE hardwood floors. $2250 monthly. 482-1002.

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it for free. Call now, 1-888-8663166. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
“MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card size ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure, 916-2886019 or elizabeth@cnpa.com. (Cal-SCAN) THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! Combo: California daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Garage Sales
MOVING sale. Sunday, January 27, rain or shine. Household, furniture, books. Starts 8 a.m. 1027 Emory Drive, Claremont.

Events
RITCHIE Bros. unreserved public auction, 8 a.m., Friday, February 12, in Tipton, CA. Farm and construction equipment, trucks, trailers and more. No minimum bids. Financing available. Full details at www.rdauction.com or 559-752-3343. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get free CPAP replacement supplies at no cost, plus free home delivery! Prevents red skin, sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN) CANADA drug center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent off all your medication needs. Call today, 1-866-723-7089, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (CalSCAN)

For Sale
ProFlowers. Enjoy 60 percent off Tender Hugs and Kisses with chocolates for your valentine! Site price: $49.99, you pay just $19.99. Plus take 20 percent off other gifts over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/secret or call 888717-7251. (Cal-SCAN) SHARI’S Berries. Delight all of your valentines with our freshly dipped strawberries, decadent truffles and handcrafted sweets! Save 20 percent on qualifying gifts over $29! Visit www.berries.com/enticing or call 1-888-721-8829. (Cal-SCAN)

ANIMALS
Found Pet
BROWN male Chihuahua wearing a collar. Found January 12 on Harvard and Seventh St. 951-505-1950. FOUND: 4 small dogs, 3 white and one black. Only able to catch 3 of the 4. Found in Live Oak Canyon on Sunday, January 13, at 11:30 p.m. 398-4801.

Triplex for Rent
CLAREMONT: Single story triplex. One bedroom, one bathroom with garage. Washer and dryer hookups. Water, trash and gardener included. No pets, smoking. $995 monthly. 624-3756.

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Saturday 01-26-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

19

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128. PRIVATE duty care provider with 6 years experience, specializing in elderly care. Current CPR, TB test. For a free assessment contact: Wendi Griffin, 909-4372298. Bond#71294838.

Contractor
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

Electrician

Gardening

Handyman

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

Aikido

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook! WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616. REMODELS, additions, restoration projects. Claremont Construction Company A locally owned, full-service building contractor. We also do repairs and small jobs. Ask about our handyman services. Please call for a free estimate. Darrell, 909-626-0028. Fully insured. 20 year Claremont resident. Lic.751929

Carpet Service
Programs for adults and for children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875. ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583. EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

ALL your home remodeling and repair needs. Quality work for unbeatable pricing. 909-912-5983.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

AC/Heating

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606 Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Hayden’s Services Inc.

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162.

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Childcare
AFFORDABLE childcare. Families with multiple children welcome. Large Claremont home. Miss Carmen, 909621-3108 or 909-367-3560.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com. Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-241-7671, 909-9498230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360. Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691 SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

909-621-5388

SERVICES
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Saturday 01-26-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

20

Landscaping

Painting
COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plumbing
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tutoring
AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Landscaping
GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Upholstery

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-9821604.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Learn Japanese

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Patio & Decks
TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

Lic.839835 BEAVERS PLUMBING Drain work starting at $50, repairs and remodels. Water heater special, 40 gallon installed for $835. Free estimates! Senior discount always. 909-626-0028 Lic.711770

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Tile

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNYS Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275.

Pet Sitting
PET SITTER/DOG WALKER
Reliable, friendly, knowledgeable. Local references available.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995 STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

AMANDA, 818-219-3268
CLAREMONT Village Pet & House Sitting Service. Sabbatical special! Lisa and Brenda, claremontpets@hotmail.com or 909-518-0600.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Pilates

Yoga

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515. DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Remodeling
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

909.621.4761
Saturday 01-26-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

21

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626
LANDSCAPING SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786

909.621.4761
Saturday 01-26-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

22

REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
Sunday, January 27
1-4 p.m. 785 W. 9th St, Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 2303 N. San Benito Ct., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty. 1-3 p.m. 2206 Vallejo Way, Upland. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!
624 Pomello Drive, Claremont
www.624pomellodr.com. Enjoy the comfort of subtle elegance in this custom built, single story, north Claremont home. Featuring 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms in over 4000 sq. ft. Spectacular park-like grounds, dozens of trees, beautiful salt water pool/spa and magnificent mountain views. Updated kitchen with French style custom cabinets and Italian tile. $1,145,000. (P624)

COMING SOON!

HISTORIC UPLAND HOME
Fabulous home built in 1918. Old world charm updated with new wiring, copper plumbing, insulation, drywall, central heat/AC, roof and more. Mountain and city views. Sparkling pool and spa. Four car, 1050 sq. ft. garage. Situated on an expansive corner lot. $589,000 (T645)

Claremont Village - 3 Bedrooms - $2300 LaVerne - Upstairs 2 Bedroom Condo, Gated Community - $1300

FOR LEASE

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most widely read real estate section in the area.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds, 621-4761 Ask for Jessica!

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Saturday, January 26, 2013

23

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

Mason handled 2 transactions for us this year and we were very pleased to have worked with him. His knowledge of the area was great, which was important to us, and he was always available to answer our questions. A big plus these days—he answered phone calls promptly and was available by email as well. Both transactions went extremely well and we would recommended him to anyone interested in buying or selling a home in this area.

—Rick & Diana T.
To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing...

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

Open House Sunday 1-4 p.m.
IMMACULATE OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE HOME 785 W. 9th Street, Claremont - $575,000 Custom built in 1955. Among the many renovations is a spacious, updated kitchen with center island and a large sunlit kitchen table area, a bathroom with a jetted tub and another bathroom with a Premier walk-in tub. Lush flower gardens. Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

NEW LISTING! Open House Sunday 1-4 p.m.
2303 N. San Benito Court, Claremont - $625,000 Absolutely stunning north Claremont pool home. This picturesque property exudes outstanding curb appeal on its sweeping corner lot within a tranquil north Claremont cul-de-sac. This turnkey home is ready for the next owners to move right in. Mason Prophet www.masonprophet.com - 909.447.7708

Open House Sunday 1-3 p.m.
NORTH UPLAND CUL-DE-SAC 2206 Vallejo Way, Upland - $684,900. Sprawling single story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and a totally remodeled interior. Wood and stone flooring, granite counters, 3025 sq. ft. and a 3 car garage. Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com - 909.670.0322

GREAT NORTH LA VERNE LOCATION IN THE FOOTHILLS - $475,000.
Single story, turnkey. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and approximately 1500 sq. ft. 3 car garage. New interior paint, new flooring and newer dual pane windows. BJ Nichka www.bjnichka.com - 909.625.6754

CLAREMONT VILLAGE NEW ENGLAND STYLE - $695,000
Custom built circa 1900, this home enjoys beautiful fine woodwork, built-ins, high ceilings and refinished white oak hardwood floors. Spacious yard with lap pool. Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

PROMINENT & LEGENDARY ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIC CLAREMONT VILLAGE ESTATE
One of the finest and grandest homes in Claremont. Presiding on 3 prime city lots on over 2/3 acre, this magnificent Italian Renaissance style home has embellishments plus extensive recent upgrades inside and out. Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

Juliet Camacho 909.447.8258

Susan Emerson 909.447.7710

Jeannette Ewing 909.670.0322

Geoff Hamill 909.621.0500

Rose Ishman 909.624.1617

Bernadette Kendall 909.670.1717

Cheryl Knight 909.447.7715

Betty Leier 909.262.8630

Chris Macaulay 909.227.0162

B.J. Nichka 909.625.6754

Heather Petty 909.447.7716

Mason Prophet 909.447.7708

Madhu Sengupta 909.260.5560

Rob & Amy Titus 909.450.7415

Eurydice Turk 909.447.8258

Ryan Zimmerman 909.447.7707

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