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Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Handbook

Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Handbook

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this manual is to answer your questions and explain the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering (BSBMED) Degree at Georgia Tech. This does not replace the General Catalog, but should be used as a guide to answer questions specific to our undergraduate program. You are welcome to suggest improvements in the format or content which would make this more useful.

B. The Undergraduate Staff

The Undergraduate Academic Office is in Suite 1109 of the UA Whitaker Building. The Undergraduate Academic Advisor, Paul Fincannon, helps with scheduling, academic goals, or other concerns regarding academics. The Director of Student, Alumni and Industrial Relations, Sally Gerrish, helps with career information and guidance, including organization of medical or graduate school applications. Kim Paige helps with scheduling issues, web and publishing questions, retention issues, and recruitment programs. Here is their contact information:

Paul Fincannon

Ph: 404­894­9061

Sally Gerrish

Ph:

404­894­7063

Kim Paige

Ph:

404­385­5042

II. USEFUL INFORMATION

A. Coulter Department Educational Objectives

The faculty of The Wallace H. Coulter Department will strive to continuously improve our undergraduate program in Biomedical Engineering. To this end, the faculty worked with the department’s Undergraduate Program Committee to develop the following educational objectives:

Students will obtain a strong foundation in science and engineering fundamentals that is centered around the interface of engineering and the life sciences a strong foundation in mathematics and computation to support biomedical engineering analysis, modeling, and design a broad education necessary for professional practice in biomedical engineering, including an understanding of ethical, social, and professional responsibility the ability to use modern science and engineering techniques, skills, and computational tools to support biomedical engineering analysis, modeling, and design

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Students will develop the ability to identify, formulate and solve open­ended biomedical engineering problems by integrating and applying basic principles of mathematics, life and engineering sciences design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret experimental data function and communicate effectively, both individually and within multi­ disciplinary teams become self­directed life­long learners

Students will obtain advanced knowledge in one of four areas within the field biomechanics

cellular and tissue engineering neuroscience/engineering biomedical imaging

B. Student Life

The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering is committed to maintaining a good quality of life for its students. We urge students to familiarize themselves with and to follow the Georgia Tech policies that are found in the catalog at http://www.catalog.gatech.edu/general/life/, the Student Life section of the Georgia Tech catalog. There you will find information on the following subjects, among others:

Diversity Issues and Programs

Student Organizations

Student Health Center

* Eligibility for Treatment

* Special Health Considerations

* Health & Accident Insurance

Parental Notification Policy

C. Honor Code

Assistance for Persons with Disabilities Nontraditional Student Services Notification of Student Rights under FERPA Policy on Sexual Harassment

Student Alcohol Policy

Intellectual Property Policy

Academic Honor Code

Honesty is expected of all students and practitioners of biomedical engineering. The Georgia Tech Academic Honor Code was developed by students and faculty to remind everyone of the importance of honesty in their professional lives. It also serves to increase awareness on the part of both students and faculty of the rules regarding academic honesty and the process to be followed when these rules are broken. The complete Georgia Tech Academic Honor Code can be found on the web at http://www.honor.gatech.edu/. Students are advised to review the code and bring any questions that they may have to the attention of their instructors.

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Please see Appendix A for rules governing student conduct.

D. Web Site

The Department’s home page is http://www.bme.gatech.edu. From here you can access school publications, the BSBMED suggested Plan of Study, the academic advising website, the prerequisite chart, the list of ethics and technical elective class, information about student groups and faculty, and other useful information. A search engine is also available at the site.

III. THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

A. Academic Advising Information

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is committed to the academic, personal and professional development of its students. If you are a new student to the Department, this information will help you get off to a good start. Academic advising is an important process for planning your career at Georgia Tech. Our goal is to help you to be well informed and empower you to fully understand the curriculum and academic process. The BME Undergraduate Academic Office will have primary responsibility for your advisement through your four years of study.

Below are some helpful tips to help you plan for your academic advising meeting. Begin by familiarizing yourself with the following materials:

Georgia Tech General Catalog Undergraduate Handbook (this document) Registration Information Class schedule information on OSCAR

After reviewing this material, prepare:

A draft of your proposed class schedule

A list of your personal notes and questions

Tip 1: Before your advising meeting, make sure you have compared your proposed course schedule with the course schedule. Be sure and check prerequisites and concurrent classes for each course. These can be found on our website at http://www.bme.gatech.edu/downloads/prereq_chart.pdf. Many of your questions can be answered by browsing through the appropriate sections of this Handbook.

Other important information:

Undergraduate Academic Office Location: UA Whitaker Bldg., Rm. 1109

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Academic Advisor: Paul Fincannon Phone: 404.894.9061 E­mail: paul.fincannon@bme.gatch.edu Advising Office Hours: M­F 9am – 12noon / 1:30pm – 4:30pm Walk­ins accepted every day, but preferential treatment goes to students with appointments.

Important Academic Calendar Dates to note (from OSCAR, and from the Office of the Registar’s website: http://www.registrar.gatech.edu):

Early and Late Registration Periods Last day to drop a class with “W” Grade Substitution (freshmen only) Semester Midterm

Tip 2: Schedule a meeting early in the semester with your advisor to develop a plan for several semesters, especially if you are a co­op student. Registration periods are high volume times, and scheduling a meeting early will help to avoid a wait. The best way to schedule a meeting is by using the online scheduling system at http://www.advising.gatech.edu/scheduler/. Registering for the correct courses is an important ingredient for academic success.

Georgia Tech has a number of resources available to students in need of special attention. Here are a few of the more important campus resources:

Student Services can help with:

¸ Time management

¸ Study skills development

¸ Test anxiety

¸ Career counseling

¸ Interpersonal skills development

Career Planning Center can help with:

¸ Internship Opportunities

¸ Resume Development

¸ Job Placement

Cooperative Program can help with:

¸ Co­op Placement

¸ Internship Opportunities

Professors can help with:

¸ Research opportunities

¸ Advice about career options in BME

Tip 3: At the beginning of each semester, based upon your class schedule, develop a detailed time management schedule. Include study time, leisure time, work and campus

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organization time etc. As the semester progresses, make the necessary adjustments to your time management schedule.

Tip 4: At the beginning of the school year, list several goals (academic, social etc.) you want to accomplish for the year and your strategy for accomplishing them.

We are always interested in feedback from students to continually seek to improve academic advising services, so we welcome your comments and suggestions.

B. General Information

Biomedical Engineering includes a variety of engineering concerns. As an undergraduate, you will obtain advanced knowledge in one of six areas within the field:

In addition, the curriculum emphasizes the mathematical and scientific bases for engineering study as well as course work in the humanities and social sciences.

The program is designed to meet the educational goals of the majority of biomedical engineering students. It includes a variety of required courses and a moderate number of elective hours that allow a student to tailor a program to his or her own interest. With the approval of the Biomedical Engineering faculty and the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies, a student may modify the basic required program in order to pursue well­conceived educational objectives.

C. The Curricula

With the approval of your school or specialization, you may graduate under any catalog in use during your stay at Georgia Tech. Your Undergraduate Advisor can answer any questions you may have about discrepancies found in the catalogs. You must complete the requirements of one catalog program (sometimes with approved substitutions) since a mixed program is not acceptable.

The current program of study for a degree in Biomedical Engineering and the credit hour requirements in the various subject areas are found at http://www.bme.gatech.edu/downloads/prereq_chart.pdf. It is the responsibility of students to check the prerequisites before registering for any course. The on­line student registration system allows you to display course catalog descriptions, including

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prerequisites, while you are registering. This system will check prerequisites only allowing you to register for courses you are prepared to take.

D. Course Offerings

The Department attempts to offer each of its required courses twice a year. These courses are listed below.

1300

2300

3110

3400

3600

4600

2210

3100

3300

3510

3610

4601

The Department of Biomedical Engineering also requires the equivalent of nine hours of technical elective courses. These courses are listed at the following website:

http://www.acad.bme.gatech.edu/undergraduate/bs_deg_telect.php, along with when they are scheduled to be taught. When planning your schedule, it is important that you keep alternatives in mind since often times a course may be filled, or there may be time conflicts, or the class may be cancelled if the enrollment is too low. However, the Department tries to offer a course when there is sufficient demand, even if the class has not been planned for that semester.

E. Academic Requirements

Constitution and History Examinations Georgia law requires that before receiving an undergraduate degree in this state, all students must demonstrate competence in United States history or constitutional government. You may satisfy this requirement by passing two examinations administered by the Department of Social Sciences or by successfully completing HIST 2111, HIST 2112, POL 1101, PUBP 3000 or INTA 1200.

Regents’ Test To obtain an undergraduate degree, each student in the University System of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in reading and composition in English by passing the Regents’ Test. Students are eligible to take the test after they have earned ten hours of course credit. (Any student who has earned 45 credit hours and has yet to pass the Regents’ Test must schedule remedial English (Engl 0012 and/or 0015) in addition to regular course work.) For non­native speakers of English, alternative tests are available through the Department of Modern Languages.

GPA Requirement To receive a BSBMED degree from Georgia Tech, you must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 at the time of graduation. Also, the GPA of the BMED courses on the BSBMED degree petition must be at least 2.0. For this calculation, only the best grade earned in each course is included.

Classes Requiring a “C”

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A grade of “C” or better is required in (a) BMED 1300 and 2210, (b) BIOL 1510, (c)

MATH 1501 and 1502 (d) PHYS 2211 and 2212, (e) CHEM 1310 and 1315 (or 2311/2312), (f) CS 1371, (g) COE 2001. A student who does not receive a grade of “C” or better in one of these courses must repeat the course and satisfy this requirement prior to enrolling in follow­on courses. Note that an average of “C” or better is required for all BMED core curriculum courses, and MATH 1501, 1502, 2401 and 2403. There is

no “C” requirement for BMED technical elective courses, BMED 2400 or CEE/MATH /ISyE 3770, CHEM 3511, ECE 2025, MSE 2001, or any of the general education requirements.

Grade Substitution Policy (freshmen only) First­time freshman students who receive a grade of D or F in a course within their first two terms in residence are eligible to repeat the course and have the original grade excluded from the computation of academic average. Grade substitution may be used only once per course, with a maximum of two courses total. The course must be repeated at Georgia Tech within the student's first four terms in residence. The original course and grade will continue to appear on the student's transcript, with a notation that the course was repeated and that the original grade is not included in computation of the academic average. Credit for the course will be counted only once.

A course is not eligible for grade substitution if the student was found responsible for

any academic misconduct in that course.

F. Academic Regulations

Incompletes

If you receive an incomplete in a course, you must satisfactorily complete the course

work and arrange for the incomplete to be removed from your record by the end of the next semester for which you are registered. Otherwise, the grade will automatically be changed to an F. Clear the incomplete with your original professor. Do not register again for the course.

Numerous “W’s” on a transcript can be an indication of poor planning, ineffective time management, or lack of ability to complete assigned tasks. While a random withdraw or two should not hurt, prospective employers and graduate schools will not look favorably upon a record with a pattern of frequent withdrawals. As a practical matter, withdrawal from a course may also jeopardize a student’s ability to complete the Program of Study on schedule.

Pass/Fail Grading Option In the Biomedical Engineering curricula, the only courses that may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis are humanities and social science classes. All non­humanities and social science courses required for the degree must be taken for a letter grade. Note:

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Although LCC classes are humanities, the LCC department does not allow their classes to be taken pass/fail.

Repeating Courses Courses that are passed with a grade of "C" or better normally may not be repeated. Students who wish to repeat such a course must first obtain approval in writing from their major department. Approval, in writing, of the department in which the course is offered is also required. If a student wants to retake a class in which they received a “D” or “F”, the class must be taken at Georgia Tech. It cannot be taken at another institution. The new grade does not substitute for the prior grade, with the exception of the Grade Substitution Policy for first­time freshmen.

Academic Standing The minimum grade point average for good academic standing is 1.70 for freshmen, 1.80 for sophomores, 1.95 for juniors, and 2.0 for seniors. Any student who has an overall scholastic average below the minimum requirement or whose average for a given semester falls below the minimum requirement will be placed on academic warning and will be limited to a maximum schedule load of sixteen credit hours. A student on warning whose average for any semester falls below the minimum requirement for good standing will be placed on academic probation and will be limited to a maximum schedule load of fourteen credit hours. A student on probation whose average in any semester falls below the minimum requirements will be dropped for unsatisfactory scholarship. A student whose average for any semester is below 1.0 may be placed on academic probation or dropped regardless of their previous record.

IV. PROCEDURES

A. Registration

Carefully planned registration can greatly simplify a student's life. General registration information can be found at the registrar’s website, http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/. Class schedules, transfer equivalencies and registration information is located on OSCAR.

Problems

Restricted or Graduate Courses:

Students may take a graduate level course with the permission of the department teaching the course, and a minimum GPA of 2.7. The student must have the department of instruction enter a permit on their account, and then the student should contact the Registrar’s Office to request a LEVEL permit. The Registrar’s Office can be contacted in room 104 of the Tech Tower, or by email at comments@registrar.gatech.edu. The email should include the student’s full name, gtID#, and the course and CRN for which they are trying to register. Once the Registrar’s Office has issued the LEVEL permit, they will instruct the student to

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register for the course. For information about using the credit toward a degree, please see the Graduate Course Option section of the catalog.

Overloads of Closed Sections:

To register for a section of a course that has closed, you should go to the school or department offering the course and request an on­line permit/overload. For BMED courses, come to the BMED Undergraduate Academic Office (Rm 1109), during the last week of Phase I or II registration. Check the advisor list for a permit or overload on­line and follow the directions. If the department is not listed on the on­line system, then contact them directly via the departmental contact list on the website.

Registration Holds:

If your Time Ticket indicates a hold on registration, check the OSCAR for an interpretation of the hold and instructions for its clearance. Holds can only be cleared by the office which issued the hold.

Course Meeting Places

Each school and department posts a list of meeting places for the classes it offers. For BMED classes, times and meeting places will be listed on the OSCAR web site https://oscar.gatech.edu/. Check OSCAR before first attending classes, since meeting places may be subject to change without notice.

Cross Registration

Students who would like to take courses not offered at Georgia Tech can do so at any of the colleges or universities comprising the Atlanta Regional Consortium for Higher Education (ARCHE). All registration activities are performed at Georgia Tech and all fees are paid at Georgia Tech. Applications for cross registration and a listing of participating schools are available in the Student Records Office, Room 104 of the Tech Tower (Administration Building). Deadlines for application are printed in the Official School Calendar , http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/students/calendar.php. For more info on cross registration, go to http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/registration/cross.php.

B. Degree Petitions

In order to graduate, students must petition for a degree. Degree Petitions are available in the BMED Undergraduate Academic Office, and online at http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/docs/pdf/UGRAD_PETITION_FOR_DEGREE.pdf. This petition must be completed the semester preceding the semester of graduation and must be submitted by that semester’s drop day, or by the deadline provided by the academic advisor. Students are strongly encouraged to turn in degree petitions early, so that the petition can be reviewed by the academic advisor in time to resolve any deficiencies in their program during the Drop/Add period of their final semester.

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If you do not graduate in the semester for which you filed, then submit a reactivation petition when ready to graduate. They must be submitted to the advisor by the drop date of the semester preceding graduation.

Please see your Undergraduate Advisor to complete the check­sheet and Degree Petition. Co­op and minor students should obtain the appropriate signatures. The advisor will turn the petition with the CAPP and the degree petition checklist in to the Degree Certification Office for final review.

To Graduate with Academic Distinction a student must have earned at least 70 semester credit hours (excluding remedial course work) at Georgia Tech to graduate with highest honor, with high honor, or with honor. For graduation with highest honor, the minimum scholastic average shall be 3.55. For graduation with high honor, the minimum scholastic average shall be 3.35. For graduation with honor, the minimum scholastic average shall be 3.15.

C. Transfer Credit

Course work taken at another accredited institution may be considered for transfer credit if (a) it was passed with a grade of C or better and (b) it is not a substitute for a course previously failed at Georgia Tech. Transfer credit is granted by one of two means. For most lower division courses, the Admissions Office or the Registrar, upon review of a transcript, will automatically give credit for courses taken at other institutions. The transfer equivalency information can be found on the registrar’s website at https://oscar.gatech.edu/pls/bprod/wwtraneq.P_TranEq_Ltr. Otherwise the student must convince an instructor in the appropriate department at Tech that the non­ resident course is equivalent to a course here. If you are seeking transfer credit by such means, bring all relevant materials (syllabi, textbook, catalog description, copies of exams, homework, etc.) to the instructor of the similar Georgia Tech course, and ask that a Non­Resident Credit Form be completed and submitted to the Registrar. You should check at a later date to make sure the form did indeed reach the Registrar.

Transfer credit appears as the initial entry on a student's transcript. Where credit is granted for a course, which has content identical to a Georgia Tech course, the Tech course number will be listed. If the credit is for a course, which does not exactly match

a Tech course in content or hours, the listing will be in a generic form, such as Math

3xxx.

D. Readmissions

A student who for any reason has remained out of school for two semesters or more must apply for readmission. To apply, a completed Application for Readmission must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the posted deadlines. The deadlines and information are posted on the registrar’s website at http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/students/readmission.php. It is the responsibility of the student to allow sufficient time for the readmission process to be completed. In cases which require an interview, the Institute deadlines may be too late. Please note

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that the Department of Biomedical Engineering can only recommend a course of action; the final decision is made by the Institute's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.

Voluntary Withdrawal after Completion of Semester

Students who are on good standing or warning status may apply for readmission in any subsequent semester and expect positive action by the Registrar's Office.

Students who are on probation must arrange for an interview with the Undergraduate Advisor to discuss their application for readmission. A positive recommendation will normally be given if there is a clear indication that the problems which led to the student's poor standing have been, or are being, rectified.

Voluntary Withdrawal with all "W" Grades

Students who withdraw during a semester and receive all "W" grades will not be allowed to re­enter the semester following withdrawal. In addition, the application for readmission must be accompanied by a letter explaining how the problems that led to the withdrawal have been resolved. As in the previous case, those students on probation at the time of withdrawal must schedule an interview with the Undergraduate Advisor.

Dropped for Unsatisfactory Scholarship

Students who have been dropped for unsatisfactory scholarship must apply for readmission. This includes the readmission application, a petition to the faculty, and inclusion of an academic contract that has been arranged with the BME academic advisor. Students who have been dropped must sit out at least two semesters before returning to the BME department. Students who have been dropped once are not guaranteed readmission, but if they have addressed their problems, most are readmitted by the Institute Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Students who have been dropped twice will not be allowed to return to the Institute, except in extreme circumstances.

Students who are readmitted into BMED after being dropped for unsatisfactory scholarship must demonstrate the potential for greatly improved, successful performance. Some students may be asked to complete up to two semesters of work at another accredited institution. An additional semester of absence may also be required to allow time for evaluation of the student's qualifications for readmission. Students should work closely with the undergraduate academic advisor to follow the proper procedure for readmission.

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If the Department recommends readmission, the student will be asked to sign a contract that will include a program of study and a minimum grade point average that will assure a GPA of 2.0 at the end of the period covered by the contract. (Contracts typically run for three semesters, but may be extended if the student takes fewer than 12 hours per semester.) Failure to meet any part of the contract will result in the student's dismissal from the Institute with the understanding that no attempt will be made to seek further readmission to the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Section VIII, B.6 of the Student Rules and Regulations states: "A student who is dropped a second time for unsatisfactory scholarship will not be readmitted to the Institute”.

E. Special Problems Courses

A student may use a maximum of six hours of special problems research credit (BMED 2698, 2699, 4698, or 4699) for free elective credit. This credit is for projects that involve individual study in a specialized area under the direction of a member of the Biomedical Engineering Faculty. Students are also allowed to use credit earned in BMED 2699 and/or 4699 for up to six hours of technical elective credit. Students are also encouraged to propose a project and to ask a faculty member to help direct it. The Undergraduate Advisor can help students make contact with faculty who have projects.

Once a project is defined and a professor has agreed to serve as the advisor, it is your responsibility to obtain the signature of the advisor. The student then signs the form, accepting responsibility for completing the project for the agreed number of credit hours. This completed form, including all the required signatures, must be returned to the BMED Undergraduate Academic Office before the student may register for the course. Each special problem must culminate in a written final report that is to be submitted to the professor for grading and forwarded to the Undergraduate Academic Office at the end of the semester.

F. Exam Policy

The Department of Biomedical Engineering follows the guidelines on quizzes and final exams set forth by the Academic Senate of the Institute. These guidelines are given below.

Students should receive some performance evaluation prior to the end of the 5 th week of the term.

Quizzes and tests may not be given during the week preceding final exams. All quizzes and tests must be graded and returned on or before the last day of class preceding final exam week.

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Each regularly scheduled lecture course shall have a final exam, and it shall be administered at the time specified in the official final exam schedule as distributed by the Registrar.

A request for a change in the final exam period for a class must have the approval of the instructor and unanimous approval of the class as determined by secret ballot. The request must be submitted to the Associate Chair of Undergraduate Programs for his approval at least a week before the beginning of final exams.

In the event a student has two examinations scheduled for the same period, it is the obligation of the instructor of the lower numbered course to resolve the conflict by giving a final exam to that student at a mutually satisfactory alternate time.

In the event a student is scheduled to take three exams in the same day, it is the obligation of the instructor of the class scheduled for the middle exam period to give a final exam to that student at a mutually satisfactory alternate time.

G. Petitions to the Faculty

Students may ask for relief from any of the Institute's rules and regulations by petition to the Institute Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. The necessary form, called a Petition to the Faculty, is available in the BMED Undergraduate Academic Office, and online at http://www.registrar.gatech.edu/students/formlanding/pettofac.php. A petitioner should complete the form, obtain the recommendation and signature of the Undergraduate Advisor and submit the petition to the Registrar. Petitions are generally granted when the student has been unjustly served by the regulations or when relief is requested from the consequences of a mistake over which the student had no control. Do not expect the faculty to protect you from the consequences of your own carelessness.

V. SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

A. Second Undergraduate Degree

Students are not allowed to pursue second degrees in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

B. Cooperative Education Program, the Undergraduate Professional Internship

(UPI) and the Work Abroad Program

Students who maintain the necessary high academic scholarship may participate in the Cooperative Education Program and receive the degree Bachelor of Science in

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Biomedical Engineering, Cooperative Plan. Cooperative Education, or "Co­op," is a unique partnership among employers, students and the university whereby students work in paid, planned and supervised work experiences in business, industry, education, and government on an alternating semester basis while earning academic credit. Students will work for a minimum of three semesters. Established in 1912, Georgia Tech's program is currently the largest totally optional program in the United States, with about 3,000 students participating. Students interested in more information, or in applying for admission to the cooperative plan should contact the Division of Professional Practice in the Savant Building, or by phone at 404­894­3320, or visit their site at http://www.profpractice.gatech.edu/.

The Undergraduate Professional Internship (UPI) Program was established at Georgia Tech in Fall 2002. Undergraduate Professional Internships provide practical work experience, in a professional setting, related to the students field of study. Internships are a partnership among students, employers and Georgia Institute of Technology. Internships are single­semester, paid, major­related work experiences designed to help students understand the "real world" applications of their academic studies. Opportunities are available during summer, fall, or spring semesters. Involvement is a commitment of full­time employment for a minimum of 18 weeks during the spring and fall semesters and 12 weeks during the summer term. Students interested in more information about the UPI program should contact the Division of Professional Practice in the Savant Building, or by phone at 404­894­3320. Web information is available at http://www.gtip.gatech.edu/.

The Work Abroad Program includes co­op, internship, graduate, and undergraduate work experiences – the qualifier being international. These international work experiences are designed for the ultimate experience to include practical training, cross­ cultural exposure and learning, and acquisition of the softer skills that will set you apart from others. The Work Abroad program is part of the International Plan, a Georgia Tech initiative that was launched in 2005 to offer a challenging academic program that develops global competence within the context of a student’s major. Opportunities are available during summer, fall, or spring semesters. Students interested in more information about the UPI program should contact the Division of Professional Practice in the Savant Building, or by phone at 404­894­3320. Web information is available at http://www.workabroad.gatech.edu/.

While on work terms, students in the Professional Practice programs may receive academic advice by telephoning the BME Undergraduate Advisor at 404­894­9061. It is important for cooperative students to check periodically with the BMED Undergraduate Academic Office to make sure they are aware of revisions in BMED course schedules or curriculum.

C. Academic Support Services

The Office of Success Programs offers free one to one tutoring to all Georgia Tech Students. Tutoring is offered in over 50 courses, with emphasis on

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introductory classes. Tutors in Math, Physics, Chemistry, ECE, CEE and other courses are available to meet one on one for an hour with a student. Tutoring is available Monday through Friday ­ 9am to 5pm (the last session commences at 5 pm). For information, call 404­894­1945, or visit the web at http://successprograms.gatech.edu/php/tutoring/.

The Freshman Experience Learning Assistance Program provides free tutoring Sunday through Thursday for three to four hours each night in calculus, chemistry, and physics directly in the residence halls. The program is unique because it provides tutoring where students live, which means getting the answers you need in a more personal atmosphere. For more info, go to http://www.freshmanexperience.gatech.edu/learning/.

OMED (Office of Minority Educational Development) offers free study sessions for any Georgia Tech student. Tutoring is available in math, science and many engineering courses. Study sessions are located in 208 Chapin, with tutors available Sundays through Thursdays from 5.30 until 7.30 PM For more information, call 404.894.3959 or visit their website at http://www.omed.gatech.edu/

Tutor­Vision provides call­in tutoring airing live on gtcn20. Student tutors are available for assistance with Calculus, Chemistry, and Physics. You can get answers to your questions and help working through problems, without leaving

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Phys 2211/2212 students are invited to make use of the Physics/OMED help sessions held in Howey N­209. Sessions are held every Monday through

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The School of Mathematics offers free tutorial help in the Math Lab for the following courses: 1113, 1501, 1502, 1522, 1711, 1712, 2401, and 2605. The Math Lab is staffed by graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants. The

Math Lab is located in room 257 of the Skiles Building. The hours are Monday

through Thursday 11­5.

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The College of Computing lists available teaching assistants and times on their

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For Pre­Health advising, contact Jennifer Kimble, M.Ed., the Director of Pre­ Health Advising. She works with Tech students interested in health related careers. For students who are pre­health, please sign up for Jennifer's pre­

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health@lists.gatech.edu at https://lists.gatech.edu/sympa/ to keep up with the latest pre­health issues and workshops. Jennifer can be contacted by phone at 404.385.2475 or by email at jennifer.kimble@carnegie.gatech.edu. You can make an appointment with her at www.advising.gatech.edu.

If you need preparation for the Regents’ Examination, the School of Literature, Communication and Culture offers courses (English 0012 and 0015) and a workshop to improve reading and writing skills. Freshman English courses also include a unit on the examination.

Students having academic and/or personal problems may also seek assistance from the Georgia Tech Counseling Center. Each semester, the center offers workshops to help Tech students succeed academically, professionally, and personally. Typical programs include life and career exploration, study skills and time management, intercultural studies, stress and anxiety reduction, assertiveness training, and depression and motivational problems. For informations, call 404­894­2575, or access the website at http://www.counseling.gatech.edu/.

Students are also invited to make use of Career Services, which offers resources in Career Counseling, Externships and Interships, a Georgia Tech Majors Fair, Career Seminars, Resume help, mock interviews and more. You can get more information by calling 404­874­2550, or on the web at http://www.career.gatech.edu/.

D. Honor Societies

Alpha Eta Mu Beta

Alpha Eta Mu Beta (AEMB) is the Biomedical Engineering Honor Society at Georgia Tech. According to the constitution, AEMB membership is extended to top fifth of the junior class (60+ hours of credit) and top third of the senior class (90+ hours of credit) in Biomedical Engineering, who have completed at least six semester credit hours of BMED courses.

Gamma Beta Phi

The Gamma Beta Phi Society is an honor and service organization for students in colleges and universities in the United States. Membership at Georgia Tech is by invitation to students with a GPA of 3.3 or above. Founded February 15, 1965 at Georgia Tech, Gamma Beta Phi seeks:

To recognize and encourage excellence in education To promote the development of leadership ability and character in its members

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To foster, disseminate, and improve education through appropriate service projects

Tau Beta Pi

Highest Engineering Honor ­ Engineering students who show superior scholarship and leadership, as well as integrity and breadth of interest, both inside and outside of engineering, are recognized by Tau Beta Pi. The top eighth of the junior class and the top fifth of the senior class are eligible for membership. Current advisor is Dr. Jane Ammons, Associate Dean of Engineering for Faculty Affairs (IE).

VI. FACULTY

Your interaction with faculty, both in and out of the classroom will be an important part of your education. Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities for meeting with the faculty, just as the faculty is encouraged to include students to the maximum extent possible in research and other mutual learning experiences. There follows a list of the faculty in the Biomedical Engineering program, their campus addresses and extensions, and areas of interest. You will find faculty listings on the BME website at http://www.bme.gatech.edu/facultystaff/faculty.php.

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APPENDIX A Rules Governing Student Conduct

In addition to the honor pledge, students should be aware of the rules for student conduct found in the Georgia Tech General Catalog. Of particular relevance are those rules that apply to academic misconduct. The following excerpt is taken from the Student Conduct Code found in the Rules and Regulations section of the Georgia Tech General Catalog, and can also be found at http://www.catalog.gatech.edu/rules/19c.php, the General Catalog online.

Prohibited Academic Misconduct

Academic misconduct is any act that does or could improperly distort student grades or other student academic records. Such acts include but need not be limited to the following:

1. Possessing, using, or exchanging improperly acquired written or verbal information in the preparation of any essay, laboratory report, examination, or other assignment included in an academic course;

2. Substitution for, or unauthorized collaboration with, a student in the commission of academic requirements;

3. Submission of material that is wholly or substantially identical to that created or published by another person or persons, without adequate credit notations indicating the authorship (plagiarism);

4. False claims of performance for work that has been submitted by the claimant;

5. Alteration or insertion of any academic grade or rating so as to obtain unearned academic credit;

6. Deliberate falsification of a written or verbal statement of fact to a member of the faculty so as to obtain unearned academic credit;

7. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any Institute document relating to the academic status of the student.

Judicial Process for Academic Violations

A report of academic dishonesty may be initiated by any member of the Georgia Tech community. Most acts are reported by faculty members, although a substantial number are reported by students.

Once a report has been made, the allegation is investigated to determine if there is sufficient reason to proceed. An intake interview is then scheduled with a member of the

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Office of Student Integrity staff. At this interview, the accused student is shown the evidence supporting the allegation, and asked for their perspective on the incident. Other persons who may have information relative to the incident may be identified so that additional information can be collected before a judicial conference occurs. The adjudication process is reviewed with the student and potential outcomes discussed. Once all pertinent information has been received, a judicial conference is scheduled. This conference will normally be held with a designated staff member in the Office of Student Integrity. At this conference, the student is shown the evidence, and the allegations are discussed.

The judicial process may again be reviewed and possible outcomes communicated. The student has an opportunity to give any perspectives of their own, or share additional information not covered in the intake interview.

At this point in the process, the hearing officer may feel all pertinent information is available, and may proceed with a judicial hearing. A judicial hearing may take place at the same meeting as the judicial conference, or it may take several conferences before the hearing officer is prepared to move to a judicial hearing. At the judicial hearing, specific formal charges are shared with the student. Sanctions that would be given by the hearing officer are identified. The student then has an opportunity to choose the administrative process and accept the decision and sanctions of the hearing officer, or may choose to request a hearing before the Honor Committee. Students who feel they are not responsible for the conduct alleged, or who believe the sanctions are not in keeping with the severity of the behavior, or who feel they are not learning from the judicial process experience, are encouraged to seek a hearing before the Honor Committee.

Outcomes from either the administrative hearing process or the Honor Committee hearing, include a finding of responsibility with sanctions, or exoneration. Sanctions can include reprimand, warning, disciplinary probation, reduced grades on portions of an assignment or entire assignments, reduced grade in a course, an assigned grade of "F" for a course, suspension, expulsion, and other sanctions specifically related to the behaviors involved .

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the Honor Committee.

More information can be found at the website for the Dean of Students, http://www.deanofstudents.gatech.edu/integrity/process/academic_integrity.html, and at the General Catalog site at http://www.catalog.gatech.edu/rules/1.php.

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APPENDIX B Degree Requirements

Students may satisfy the requirements for the B.S. BME degree by meeting all the requirements listed in any one of the catalog years in effect during the period of their enrollment in the Institute or during their last two years (prior to their enrollment at Georgia Tech) in the program at one of the RETP schools. The suggested schedule for the current degree requirements is listed in the following table

FIRST YEAR ­ FALL

MATH 1501 CALCULUS I CHEM 1310 GENERAL CHEMISTRY BIOL 1510 BIOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES ENGL 1101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I INTRO TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 16

HRS FIRST YEAR ­ SPRING

4

4

4

3

1

HRS

MATH 1502 CALCULUS II CHEM 1315 SURVEY OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PHYS 2211 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I BMED 1300 PROBLEMS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING I ENGL 1102 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 17

4

3

4

3

3

SECOND YEAR ­ FALL

MATH 2401 CALCULUS III CHEM 3511 SURVEY OF BIOCHEMISTRY PHYS 2212 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II CS 1371 COMPUTING FOR ENGINEERS HIST 2111 or 2112 or POL 1101 or PUBP 3000 or INTA 1200 TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 17

HRS SECOND YEAR ­ SPRING

4

3

4

3

3

HRS

MATH 2403 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS BMED 2210 CONSERVATION PRINCIPALS IN BME COE 2001 STATICS ECE 2025 INTRODUCTION TO SIGNAL PROCESSING BMED 2300 PROBLEMS IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING II TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 17

4

4

2

4

3

THIRD YEAR ­ FALL BMED 3100 SYSTEMS PHYSIOLOGY I BMED 3400 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMECHANICS BMED 3300 BIOTRANSPORT HUMANITIES ELECTIVE(S)*

HRS

3

4

4

3

THIRD YEAR ­ SPRING BMED 3510 BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS AND MODELING BMED 3600 PHYSIOLOGY OR CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR SYSTEMS HUMANITIES ELECTIVE(S)*

HRS

4

3

3

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BMED 2400 or CEE / MATH / ISYE

BMED 3110 QUANTITATIVE

3770 STATISTICS &

3

ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS LAB

2

APPLICATIONS

I

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 17

LCC 3401 TECHNICAL

2

COMMUNICATION PRACTICES WELLNESS

2

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 16

FOURTH YEAR ­ FALL MSE 2001 PRIN & APPL ENGINEERING MATERIALS BMED 4600 SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT I BME TECHNICAL ELECTIVE(S) BMED 3610 QUANTITATIVE

ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS LAB

II

FREE ELECTIVE(S)

HRS FOURTH YEAR ­ SPRING

HRS

3

2

6

2

2

BMED 4601 SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT II BME TECHNICAL ELECTIVE(S) ECON 2100 or 2105 or 2106 HUMANITIES / SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVE(S)* FREE ELECTIVE(S) TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 17

3

3

3

6

2

TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS = 16

Total program hours = 130 semester hours plus Wellness (2 hours)

*Students must include an ethics course, selected from an approved list, as one of their social science or humanities electives.

BME Technical Electives

Nine hours of biomedical engineering technical elective courses are required. These may be selected from the following list of courses.

BMED 4400 Neuroengineering Fundamentals BMED 4500 Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory BMED 4477 Biological Networks and Genomics BMED 4750 Diagnostic Imaging Physics BMED 4751 Introduction to Biomaterials BMED 4752 Introductory Neuroscience BMED 4757 Biofluid Mechanics BMED 4758 Biosolid Mechanics BMED 4765 Drug Design, Develop & Delivery BMED 4783 Introduction to Medical Image Processing BMED 4784 Electrophysiology

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Ethics Requirement

Students must include an approved ethics course, selected from the following list, as one of their social science (SS) or humanities (H) electives

LCC 3318 Biomedicine and Culture (H) PST 3105 Ethical Theories (H) PST 3109 Ethics and Technical Professions (H) PST 3127 Science, Technology, and Human Values (H) PST 4176 Environmental Ethics (H) HTS 2084 Technology and Society (SS) HTS 3032 Modern European Intellectual History (SS) INTA 2030 Ethics in International Affairs (SS) PUBL 3600 Sustainability, Technology, and Policy (SS)

Additional Requirements for Pre­Med Students

Students who intend to go to medical school must plan their program of study carefully to satisfy the admission requirements of the medical schools they plan to apply to. Medical schools vary somewhat in terms of their admission requirements. However, students who successfully complete the following will meet the coursework admission requirements of the vast majority of medical schools:

One year of college level or AP calculus (MATH 1501/1502) One year of general college chemistry with lab (CHEM 1310/1311/1312) One year of organic chemistry with one semester of lab (CHEM 2311/2312/2380) One year of college biology with lab (BIOL 1510/1520 OR BIOL 1510 & BMED

3160/3161)

One year of general physics with lab (PHYS 2211/2212) * CHEM 1311/1312/2312/2380 will have to be taken in addition to the requirements of the biomedical engineering undergraduate program. CHEM 2311 will be accepted as a substitute for CHEM 1315. BIOL 1510 & BMED 3160/3161 satisfy the requirements for college biology with lab.

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APPENDIX C Prerequisite Chart for the B.S. BME Degree Program

Course Title Prerequisite

BMED 1300

Problems in BME I BIOL 15101 AND BMED 1000

BMED 2210

Conservation Principles in BME BMED 13002 AND CHEM 1310 AND PHYS 22112

BMED 2300

Problems in BME II BMED 13002 AND COE 20011

BMED 2400

Intro to Bioengineering Statistics MATH 15012 AND CS 1371

BMED 3100

Systems Physiology BIOL 15102

BMED 3110

Quantitative Engr Physiology Lab I BMED 3400 AND ECE 2025 AND BMED 31001

BMED 3300

AND (BMED 2400 OR CEE/ISYE/MATH 3770)1 Biotransport BMED 22102

BMED 3400

Intro to Biomechanics (MATH 24031 OR MATH 24131) AND COE 20012

BMED 3510

Biomedical Systems and Modeling ECE 2025 AND PHYS 2212 AND MATH 2403

BMED 3600

AND BMED 3100 Physio of Cellular and Molecular Sys BIOL 15102 AND (CHEM 3511 OR 4511)

BMED 3610

Quantitative Engr Physiology Lab II BMED 2300 AND 3300 AND 3110 AND 36001

BMED 4400

Neuroengineering Fundamentals BMED 3110 AND 4752

BMED 4500

Cell & Tissue Engineering Lab BMED 3610 AND 3300 AND 3400

BMED 4600

Senior Design Project I BMED 36101

BMED 4601

Senior Design Project II BMED 4600

BMED 4477

Biological Networks and Genomics ECE 2025 AND BMED 3600 AND

BMED 4750

(CEE/ISYE/MATH 3770 OR BMED 2400) Diagnostic Imaging Physics BMED 3110

BMED 4751

Introduction to Biomaterials MSE 2001

BMED 4752

Introductory Neuroscience BMED 3600 OR BIOL 3340

BMED 4757

Biofluid Mechanics BMED 3300

BMED 4758

Biosolid Mechanics BMED 3400

BMED 4765

Drug Design, Develop & Delivery CHEM 3511 OR 4511

BMED 4783

Intro Medical Image Processing ECE 2025 AND (CEE/ISYE/MATH 3770 OR

BMED2400)

BMED 4784

Engineering Electrophysiology ECE 3040 OR BMED 3510

CHEM 1315

Survey of Organic Chemistry CHEM 1310

CHEM 3511

Survey of Biochemistry CHEM 1315 OR CHEM 2312

COE 2001 Statics MATH 1502 AND PHYS 2211

ECE 2025

Intro to Signal Processing MATH 1502 AND CS 13712

ECE 3710

Circuits & Electronics PHYS 2212

ECE 3741

Instrumentation & Electron Lab ECE 3710

MATH 1502

Calculus II MATH 1501

MATH 2401

Calculus III MATH 1502

MATH 2403

Differential Equations MATH 1502

ISYE 3770 Statistics & Applications MATH 2401

MSE 2001 Prin & Appl Engineering Materials CHEM 1310

PHYS 2211

Intro Physics I MATH 15021

PHYS 2212

Intro Physics II PHYS 2211

1Prerequisite w/concurrency 2Minimum grade of C required

Last updated December 12, 2007

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APPENDIX D Schedule of BMED Course Offerings 2006­2007 Academic Year Note: Summer courses are offered in BME, but each year is different.

BMED

     

Course

Title

Fall

Spring

 

Introduction to Biomedical

   

1000

Engineering

X

1300

Problems in BME I

X

X

2210

Conservation Principles in BME

X

X

2300

Problems in BME II

X

X

2400

Intro to Bioengineering Statistics

X

X

3100

Systems Physiology I

X

X

3110

Quantitative Eng. Physiology Lab I

X

X

3300

Biotransport

X

X

3400

Introduction to Biomechanics

X

X

3510

Biomedical Systems & Modeling

X

X

 

Physio of Cellular & Molecular

   

3600

Systems

X

X

3610

Quantitative Eng. Physiology Lab II

X

X

4400

Neuroengineering Fundamentals

 

X

4500

Cell & Tissue Engineering Lab

X

 

4600

Senior Design I

X

X

4601

Senior Design II

X

X

4477

Biological Networks and Genomics

 

X

4750

Diagnostic Imaging Physics

 

X

4751

Introduction to Biomaterials

X

X

4752

Introductory Neuroscience

X

 

4757

Biofluid Mechanics

X

 

4758

Biosolid Mechanics

 

X

 

Drug Design, Development &

   

4765

Delivery

X

4783

Intro to Medical Image Processing

X

 

4784

Engineering Electrophysiology

X