Smart,  Affordable   and  Fair  
Why  Texas  Should  Expand  Medicaid  to   Low-­‐Income  Adults  
  A  report  by  Billy  Hamilton  Consulting   prepared  for     Texas  Impact   and   Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas,  Inc.  of  South   Texas     January  2013                                                        

                               
   

       

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults    

Table  of  Contents  
 
Executive  Summary ............................................................................................................................. 2   Background.......................................................................................................................................... 4   Impact  on  Existing  Local  Health  Care  Spending..................................................................................... 4   Impact  on  Children .............................................................................................................................. 7   Summary  of  Total  Funding,  Economic  and  Tax  Impacts ........................................................................ 7   Current  and  Future  Health  Insurance  Income-­‐Eligibility  Standards  and  Federal  Match  Rates.............. 12   Methodology  Summary ..................................................................................................................... 14   Funding  Estimates.............................................................................................................................. 16   Local  Benefits .................................................................................................................................... 19   State  Benefits .................................................................................................................................... 21   Benefits  to  Children ........................................................................................................................... 22   Benefits  to  Adults .............................................................................................................................. 22   Benefits  to  Employers ........................................................................................................................ 25   Findings  in  Other  States ..................................................................................................................... 26   Objections  to  Medicaid  Expansion ..................................................................................................... 28   In  Conclusion ..................................................................................................................................... 29   Appendices ............................................................................................................................................   Appendix  A:  Appendix  Notes.......................................................................................................... 31   Appendix  B:  Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Local  Health  Care  Spending—State  &  Regional  Data36   Appendix  C:  Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Local  Health  Care  Spending—Countywide  Data...... 58   Appendix  D:  Regional  Healthcare  Partnership  (RHP)  Regions—Map  &  County  List ......................... 66   Appendix  E:  Methodology  &  Sources.............................................................................................. 69                                1      

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults    

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair   Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults  
 
Executive  Summary     Texas  is  at  a  crossroads.  The  2013  Texas  Legislature  must  decide  whether  to  accept  $100  billion  in   federal  funding  over  10  years  to  provide  additional  Medicaid  health  care  coverage  under  the  Affordable   Care  Act  (ACA)  for  our  state’s  neediest  citizens.  Texas  already  spends  the  state  match  necessary  for  the   expansion  on  purely  state-­‐funded  health  programs  for  low-­‐income  adults  and  local  funding  for  charity   care.  Rejecting  these  funds  would  mean  unnecessarily  rejecting  an  opportunity  to  greatly  expand  the   number  of  insured  Texans,  improve  efficiency  in  state  health  programs,  provide  relief  to  local  taxpayers   and  increase  the  financial  stability  of  the  health  care  infrastructure  on  which  all  Texans  depend.   Texas  ranks  first  among  states  in  its  share  of  uninsured  residents,  at  23.8  percent  in  2011  —  more  than  6   million  people  —  compared  with  a  national  average  of  15.7  percent.  Unsurprisingly,  many  of  Texas’   uninsured  adults  have  little  income,  and  the  cost  of  their  health  care  is  borne  by  state  and  local   taxpayers  and  health  care  providers.     The  ACA  directs  states  to  offer  Medicaid  coverage  to  adults  below  138  percent  of  the  FPL  —  $15,401  for   single  adults  and  $31,809  for  a  family  of  four  in  2012.  Except  for  administrative  costs  that  are  matched   at  50  percent,  the  federal  government  would  bear  nearly  all  the  cost  of  Medicaid  for  these  newly  eligible   adults—100  percent  for  the  first  three  years,  declining  to  90  percent  by  2020  and  beyond.   A  recent  Supreme  Court  decision,  however,  allows  states  to  opt  out  of  the  expansion.  Eighteen  states   and  the  District  of  Columbia  already  have  expanded  or  decided  to  expand  Medicaid;  five  are  leaning   towards  expansion;  12  are  undecided;  five  are  leaning  towards  rejecting  it;  and  10  governors,  including   Texas’,  have  said  their  states  will  not  expand  Medicaid,  although  it  is  ultimately  a  legislative  decision.1   Criticism  that  Texas  cannot  afford  an  expansion  ignores  the  fact  that  Texas  state  and  local  governments   and  hospitals  already  spend  enough  on  adult  health  care  to  more  than  cover  the  $15  billion  in  state   match  necessary  for  the  ten-­‐year  period.  In  addition,  the  expansion  would  generate  new  state  revenue   that  the  state  could  use  for  match.  Other  states  have  had  similar  findings  that  have  caused  governors   who  initially  opposed  the  expansion,  such  as  Arizona’s  governor,  Jan  Brewer,  to  change  their  minds.   Specifically,  Texas  could  use  some  of  the  state  funds  currently  spent  on  the  following  programs:   • • • • • • community  and  mental  health  care,   women’s  health  care,  including  the  breast  and  cervical  cancer  program,     the  kidney  health  care  program,  HIV  Medication  assistance  and  STD  program,   inpatient  hospital  care  for  incarcerated  individuals,     state  supplementation  of  the  County  Indigent  Health  Care  (CIHC)  program,  and   medically  needy  adults  that  currently  qualify  for  Medicaid  at  the  higher  state  match  rate.  

Counties  and  hospital  districts  also  spend  $2.5  billion  in  local  tax  dollars  for  indigent  care,  inpatient   hospital  care  for  jailed  individuals  and  charity  care,  most  of  which  the  expansion  would  cover.  Finally,   local  hospitals  shoulder  an  additional  conservative  estimate  of  $1.8  billion  in  unreimbursed  charity   costs,  some  of  which  funds  individuals  that  Medicaid  would  cover  under  an  expansion.                                                                                                                            
1

 The  Advisory  Board  Company,  “Where  Each  State  Stands  on  ACA’s  Medicaid  Expansion,”  January  15,   http://www.advisory.com/Daily-­‐Briefing/2012/11/09/MedicaidMap.  

   

               2  

   

  generating  an  estimated  231.   providing  the  means    to  fund  the  currently  Medicaid-­‐eligible  but  unenrolled  children  anticipated   to  enroll  due  to  the  ACA.  adults.   It  also  estimates  new  revenue  generated  by  activity  springing  from  Medicaid  expansion.                    3       .  However.400  premature  deaths  each  year.  unemployed  adults.  Finally.  the   government  not  only  funds  but  also  operates  hospitals.   eliminating  inefficiency  among  the  state’s  various  health  programs  for  low-­‐income  adults.     Opting  out  will  also  create  a  disadvantage  for  low-­‐income  Texans  in  the  reformed  health  insurance   market.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     The  stimulus  from  the  additional  federal  funds  from  2014  through  2017  would  also  generate  an   estimated  $1.  as  well  as  $2.7  billion  in  state  match  required   for  the  expansion  for  2014-­‐2017.8  billion  in  new  state  tax  revenue.  and  the  state  would  lose  the  benefits  in  jobs  and  investment  that   increased  federal  spending  would  spread  through  the  economy.   significantly  reducing  the  current  $1.9  billion  during  fiscal  2014-­‐17.000  additional  jobs  in  Texas  by  2016.  hires  health  care  providers  and  controls  every   aspect  of  health  care.  and  compares  them  to   the  unreimbursed  costs  local  governments  and  hospitals  currently  incur.8  billion  in  new  revenue  from  the  state’s  insurance  premium  tax  that  the   Comptroller  estimated  would  result  from  the  ACA  implementation  during  a  six-­‐year  period  from  2014-­‐ 2019.  and     ensuring  consistency  in  the  state’s  policy  of  savings  through  managed  care.5  billion  in  local  revenue.  patients  and  their  health  care  providers  make   health  care  decisions.  employers.   boosting  Texas  economic  output  by  $67.”  is  incorrect.  so  these  individuals   will  not  be  able  to  participate  in  the  ACA  Health  Benefit  Exchange  and  premium  subsidies.  It  profiles  the  benefits  of   expansion  to  children.   Fears  that  the  federal  government  will  reduce  matching  rates  in  the  future  are  unlikely  to  become   reality  given  that  members  of  Congress  represent  states.  In  a  socialist  system.  hospitals  and  the  overall   economy  and  discusses  the  consequences  of  opting  out  for  low-­‐income  adults.  Expanding  Medicaid  would  also   generate  a  portion  of  the  $1.  Experience  in  other  states  indicates  that  failing  to   expand  Medicaid  would  result  in  an  estimated  8.     This  study  provides  a  statewide.Smart.  The  state  accepts  federal  funds  for  many  other  similarly  funded  programs.  offsetting  half  of  the  $3.  assuming  moderate  enrollment  levels.  The  ACA  assumes  that  Medicaid  will  cover  people  below  100  percent  FPL.   Criticism  that  Medicaid  is  “broken”  and  putting  more  people  into  the  program  would  be  “like  putting   more  people  on  the  Titanic”  is  actually  the  opposite.  assuming  moderate  enrollment  levels.  regional  and  county-­‐level  overview  of  the  costs  local  governments  and   hospitals  now  face  for  charity  health  care.   Expanding  Medicaid  to  adults  would  also  benefit  Texas  by:   • • • • • • • • providing  health  care  coverage  to  about  a  million  adults  aged  18  to  64  who  are  below  138   percent  of  FPL.  and  highlights   existing  state  funding  that  could  fulfill  the  state’s  matching  requirements.   reducing  Texas’  uninsured  population  by  25  percent.   Texans  would  receive  no  benefit  from  rejecting  the  Medicaid  expansion.  it  reports  on   findings  from  other  states  and  addresses  arguments  against  the  expansion  in  more  detail.  even  without  an  expansion  to  adults.  Medicaid  does  not  do  these  things.  It  would  have  no  impact   whatsoever  on  our  federal  tax  burden.   Criticism  that  expanding  Medicaid  would  be  expanding  “socialism.  employees.8  billion  in  annual  hospital  charity  care  costs.  leaving  them   with  few  options  but  to  continue  using  expensive  hospital  emergency  rooms  for  routine  care.  Texas  could  build  in  an  automatic   “trigger”  to  reduce  Medicaid  optional  populations  and  services  should  such  action  occur.  It  estimates  the  federal  funding  a  Medicaid  expansion  would   bring  under  different  enrollment  scenarios  as  well  as  the  required  state  match.

2     The  federal  Affordable  Care  Act  (ACA)  provides  for  an  extension  of  Medicaid  coverage  to  adults  aged  18   through  64  whose  incomes  are  below  138  percent  of  the  federal  poverty  level.  August  1.pdf.  Ph.  http://governor.  Census  Bureau.  at  23.  Current  Population  Survey.7  percent.809  for  a  family  of  four.                      4       .  Texas:   Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas.  assuming  a  phased-­‐in.  the  state’s  match  would                                                                                                                             2  Texas  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission.5  million  with  a  moderate   enrollment  effort.org/images/stories/advocacy_and_public_policy/Estimates%20of%20the%20Impact%20of%20t he%20ACA%20on%20Texas%20Counties_FINAL%20REPORT%20APRIL%202012.  the  Legislature.  still  higher  than   the  national  average.   leaving  cities.  Extending  Medicaid  coverage  to  low-­‐income  adults  would  eliminate  many  of  these  costs.pdf.D.   http://www.”   http://www.  “Letter  to  Kathleen  Sebelius.  16  and  18.tx.hhsc.2  percent.   3  Texas  Office  of  the  Governor.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Background   Texas  has  an  extraordinary  opportunity  to  expand  health  care  coverage  that  would  benefit  more  than  2   million  of  its  citizens  with  a  maximum  enrollment  effort  and  about  1.)  This  poverty  level  equates  to   $15.  Inc.     Texas  would  receive  $7.6  billion  in  federal  funds  to  expand  Medicaid  for  adults  in  2016.  or  FPL  (actually  133   percent  with  a  5  percent  modified  adjusted  gross  income  disregard.4   Impact  on  Existing  Local  Health  Care  Spending   Due  largely  to  Texas’  high  rate  of  uninsured  individuals.  2012  Annual  Social  and  Economic  Supplement.  16.    12.  (San  Antonio.htm.us/files/press-­‐office/O-­‐SebeliusKathleen201207090024.  Ph.”  Austin.  Department  of  Health  and  Human   Services..  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties  in  Texas.   moderate  enrollment  level.  Texas  will  have  to  find  additional  state   match  for  these  children  without  the  benefit  of  the  additional  state  funds  that  an  expansion  would  free   up  and  without  the  new  revenues  that  the  additional  federal  funding  would  generate.  and  Steve   Murdock.S.  the  lowest  county  rate  was  17.  U.census.8  percent  in  2011  —  more  than  6   million  people  —  compared  with  a  national  average  of  15.  and  Michael  E.tx.  p.  Uninsured  rates  rose  as  high  as  28   percent  in  some  rural  Texas  counties  in  2010.  pp.   Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  by  State  for  All  People:  2011.”  July  9.  Cline.  and  associated   Excel  spreadsheet.   Texas  ranks  first  among  states  in  its  share  of  uninsured  residents.  counties.  the   federal  government  would  provide  100  percent  of  funding  for  the  expansion.  however.  In  2016.     Additionally.state.state.  will  make  the  final  decision.D.7  billion  in  federal  funds  for  adults  during  the  2014-­‐2015  biennium.  2012.     A  June  2012  Supreme  Court  decision  made  this  expansion  optional  for  states.   http://www.  2012.pdf.  Without  expanding  Medicaid  to  adults.  Texas.  April  2012).mhm.  it  may  join  later  but  would  miss  receiving  an   estimated  $7.  many  children  are  likely  to  enroll  without  a  Medicaid  expansion  once  the  ACA  insurance   mandate  is  implemented.415  for  a  single  adult  and  $31.  and  associated  Excel   spreadsheet.gov/hhes/www/cpstables/032012/health/toc.   4  U.  hospital  districts  and  hospitals  with  additional  resources  to  meet  other  pressing   needs.  “Table  HI06.  Governor  Perry  has  stated   that  Texas  will  not  participate.  “Presentation  to  the  Senate  Health  &  Human  Services  and  Senate   State  Affairs  Committees  on  the  Affordable  Care  Act.  with  the  state  responsible  for  only  about  $15  billion  under  a  moderate  enrollment  scenario.3  If  the  state  opts  out  this  session.Smart.  probably  during   the  2013  session.us/news/presentations/2012/080112-­‐Senate-­‐HHS-­‐ACA-­‐Presentation.  Secretary.S.  The  federal  government  would  pay  about  $100  billion  toward  this  expansion  over  10   years.  local  governments  and  the  private  sector  must   spend  billions  to  provide  uncoordinated  and  often  inefficient  health  care  services  for  specific   populations.

    Taxpayers.  then.  2012.us/chs/hosp/hosp5/).   which  is  now  required  throughout  Texas.  Uncompensated  care  for  the  uninsured  costs  hospitals   an  estimated  $40  billion  per  year.  hospital  charity  costs  reached  an  additional  conservative  estimate  of  $1.8  million  for  Parkland   Memorial  Hospital  in  Dallas.6     American  hospital  emergency  rooms  absorb  $4.  and  $101.  local   unreimbursed  health  care  costs.  using  far  more  expensive  emergency  room  care  only  when  necessary.  would  equal  about  6.  mostly  met  by  hospital  district  taxes.  2010.  the  data  used  in  this  report   understates  unreimbursed  costs  to  hospitals  but  also  provides  the  most  conservative  estimate  available  for  county   and  regional  actual  unreimbursed  costs  to  hospitals  for  charity  care  that  is  not  government-­‐sponsored.  Charity   care  charges  include  those  for  uninsured  patients  with  incomes  below  certain  FPL  percentages.  the  state  match  would   increase  to  $694  million.  as                                                                                                                             5  Hospitals  in  Texas  accrued  $17.Smart.4  million   for  Memorial  Hermann  Hospital  in  Houston.  Table  1  compares  2010  RHP  regional  charity  costs.  and  Community  Benefits  Provided  by  Nonprofit  Hospitals  in  Texas  -­‐  2010.6  billion  in  federal  funds  for  the  adult  expansion.  In  2010.8  billion  in  bad  debt  (see  Texas  Department  of  State  Health  Services.7  percent  of  the   amount  local  jurisdictions  and  hospitals  are  already  spending  on  low-­‐income  care.  according  to   a  2010  national  study  by  the  Rand  Corporation.  “Texas  Fact  Sheet:  Acute  Care   Hospitals.  rather  than  charges.   6  Texas  Department  of  State  Health  Services.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     be  primarily  limited  to  50  percent  of  administrative  costs.  Texas  would  again  receive  $7.  the  federal   match  rate  would  decline  to  95  percent.  unreimbursed  charity  care  costs   totaled  $58  million  for  Scott  &  White  Memorial  Hospital  in  Bell  County.  These  costs  also   are  passed  on  to  the  insured  through  higher  premiums.  while  in  2010   (most  recent  data).  Medicaid  coverage  would  provide  a  more   economical  and  sensible  approach  to  health  care  for  the  uninsured.  As  such.  The  state’s  share  for  the  adult  expansion  in  2017  thus  would  amount  to  about   16  percent  of  what  local  jurisdictions  currently  spend  on  low-­‐income  care.rand.  that  hospitals  incur  for   uninsured  patients  that  meet  their  poverty  guidelines.  “Some  Hospital  Emergency  Department  Visits  Could  Be  Handled  by  Alternative  Care  Settings.   Unreimbursed  charity  costs  represent  a  major  burden  to  Texas  hospitals.   In  2017.state.  many  of  which  provide  services   to  a  disproportionate  share  of  indigent  and  low-­‐income  adults.  The  estimate  also  does  not  include  an  additional  $255.  totaled  $2.  many  people  have  no  choice  but  to  turn  to   emergency  rooms.5  billion.  Charity  charges  also  include  unreimbursed  costs  from  government-­‐sponsored  health  programs   such  as  Medicaid  and  Medicare.  since  these  cross  county  boundaries.  Texas.  Under  Medicaid  managed  care.”   September  7.)   7  Rand  Corporation.3  billion  in  uncompensated  care  charges  in  2010.4  million  in  charity  costs   reported  by  hospital  systems.html.  It   also  uses  data  from  DSHS  that  estimate  the  unreimbursed  actual  costs.  http://www.  depending  upon   hospital  policies.  These  data  exclude  charity  costs  of  270  for-­‐profit  hospitals   that  are  not  designated  as  Medicaid  Disproportionate  Share  Hospitals  and  are  not  required  to  report  and  exempts   108  other  hospitals  under  the  law.  In  2011.2  million  for  University  Medical  Center  at  El  Paso.  “Report  on  Charity  Care  Costs.5  billion  in  charity   care  and  $7.org/news/press/2010/09/07.  Government-­‐Sponsored  Indigent   Health  Care  (GSIH).  and  hospitals  often  must  use   contributions  and  grants  to  cover  them  instead  of  improving  their  facilities  and  services.  local  governments  and  hospitals  pay  for  these  costs.  available  at  http://www.  Charity  charges  included  in  uncompensated  care  estimates  are  also  unadjusted  for   allowances  and  discounts  typically  provided  by  insurance  companies.”  Austin.  or  about  $293  million  (Table  1).  This  study  excludes  bad  debt  and   unreimbursed  costs  from  government-­‐sponsored  programs  in  estimates  of  unreimbursed  costs  for  charity  care.4  billion  in  non-­‐emergency  care  each  year.  covered  individuals  would  have  access  to  a  primary-­‐care   physician  and  preventive  care.”  (Internal  Excel   spreadsheet.   Texas  has  20  new  Regional  Healthcare  Partnerships  (RHPs)  designed  to  coordinate  health  care   regionally.  including  $9.  $82.8  billion.dshs.                      5       .tx.7  Without  health  insurance.  January  24.  $70.  making  it  more  efficient  and  effective.  while  due  to  increased  caseloads.5   The  state  match  due  for  the  adult  expansion  in  2016.

 such  as  undocumented  immigrants.  2016  and  2017                          6       .Smart.  while  Appendix  D  provides  a  map  and  list  of  counties  included  in  the  RHPs.  to  the  federal  funds  Texas   would  receive  in  2016  and  2017  for  adults  aged  18  through  64  below  138  percent  FPL.  they  would  have  a  substantial  impact.     (See  Appendix  B  for  more  detail  on  the  state  and  each  region.  since  not  all  individuals.  Appendix  A  includes  explanatory   notes  for  the  appendices.   Appendix  E  explains  the  methodology  and  lists  the  sources  used  for  these  estimates.  including  an  explanation  and  breakout  of   three  enrollment  scenarios.  Although  federal  funds  for  the  expansion  would  not  offset  all  of  the   regions’  charity  costs.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     well  as  2011  unreimbursed  health  care  costs  to  hospital  districts  and  counties.  would  be  eligible  for   Medicaid  or  subsidized  insurance  under  the  ACA.  and  Appendix  C  for  county-­‐level  data.)   Table  1     Current  Local  Low-­‐Income  Health  Care  Costs  by  Regional  Health  Partnership  Region     Versus  Costs  Covered  Under  Medicaid  Expansion.  assuming  a   moderate  enrollment  scenario.

 April  2012).  We  also  calculate  the  state  and  federal  cost  of   covering  these  children.  for  a  total  of  $27.     The  expansion  to  adults  would  generate  enough  new  state  revenue  and  offset  enough  existing  state  and   local  expenditures  to  cover  both  adults  and  children.46   billion  for  children.   http://www.28  billion  for  adults  and  $2.                                                                                                                               8  Michael  E.000  Texas  children  are  eligible  for  but  are  not  enrolled  in  Medicaid  and  CHIP.  extending  Medicaid  to  low-­‐income  adults   would  likely  increase  the  number  of  children  in  Medicaid  and  the  Children’s  Health  Insurance  Program   (CHIP).  and  the  Legislature  will  have  to  identify  other  sources  of  funding  them  without  the  benefit  of   the  new  state  revenues  and  state  and  local  spending  offsets  that  an  expansion  to  adults  would  bring.  assuming  moderate  enrollment  levels.  and  an  “Enhanced”  scenario  based  on   extremely  high  enrollment  levels.pdf.  rather  than  the   more-­‐generous  match  for  newly  eligible  adults.  (San  Antonio.96  billion  for  adults  and  $4.  only  because  the   Legislature  has  neither  budgeted  for  full  enrollment  in  children’s  Medicaid  and  CHIP  nor  directed  state   agencies  to  pursue  full  enrollment.42  billion  with  state  matching  funds  of  $833  million.  and  Steve  Murdock.   In  2014.org/images/stories/advocacy_and_public_policy/Estimates%20of%20the%20Impact%20of%20t he%20ACA%20on%20Texas%20Counties_FINAL%20REPORT%20APRIL%202012..46  billion.74  billion—an  overall  effective  state  match  rate  of  13.                      7       .  This  probable  influx  of  new  children.  In  2015.  Ph.  economic  and  tax  impacts  for  the  Medicaid  expansion  under  three   scenarios  depending  upon  enrollment  levels:  a  “Limited”  scenario  based  on  minimal  enrollment.  then.  About   two-­‐thirds  of  the  state  match  required  from  2014  through  2017  is  due  to  additional  children  who  would   likely  enroll.  State  match  would  be  $1.  Inc.6  percent.  Economic  and  Tax  Impacts   This  study  provides  detailed  funding.50   billion  for  children.   The  three  enrollment  scenarios  in  this  report  include  estimates  of  the  number  of  currently  eligible  but   unenrolled  children  expected  to  enter  Medicaid  or  CHIP.D..  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties   in  Texas.  many  of  these  children  are  likely  to  enroll   anyway.  This  is  true.  who  in  theory  should  already  be  enrolled.  who  would  enroll  their  children  during  the  process  of   completing  their  own  enrollments.  It  is  unlikely  that  local  governments   or  hospitals  are  expending  charity  dollars  on  eligible  but  unenrolled  children.  Chart  1  identifies  estimated  federal  and  state  funding  requirements  under  a  Medicaid   expansion  for  adults  and  eligible  but  unenrolled  children.  however.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Impact  on  Children   Although  the  new  ACA  Medicaid  option  applies  to  adults.   federal  funds  would  total  $6.Smart.     Costs  for  children  who  enroll  in  Medicaid  and  CHIP  as  a  result  of  their  parents’  new  eligibility  would  be   subject  to  the  existing  state-­‐federal  match  rate  for  children  already  in  the  program.  would   represent  an  additional  new  cost  to  state  general  revenue.  however.  assuming  a  50  percent  phase-­‐in  and  an  eight-­‐month  year.  federal  funds  would  total  $2.71   billion  with  state  matching  requirements  of  $352  million.   Total  federal  spending  from  2014  through  2017  would  amount  to  $22.  Cline.  these  funds  will  not  be  available  unless   Texas  expands  Medicaid  to  adults.  a   “Moderate”  scenario  based  on  higher  enrollment  levels.  for  a  total  of  $3.  Texas:  Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas.  Ph.     Summary  of  Total  Funding.  assuming  a  75  percent  phase-­‐in.D.     Funding.  Without  an  expansion.  As  many  as  878.  they  should  —  and  have   every  reason  to  —  enroll  such  children  in  Medicaid  or  CHIP.8   Many  newly  eligible  adults  would  be  parents.mhm.

100  in  fiscal  2016  and  229.  federal  funds  would  total  $9.8  billion  in   fiscal  2017  as  the  expansion  phases  in.   Chart  1   Federal  and  State  Funding  of  Texas  Medicaid  Expansion   Adults  and  Eligible  But  Unenrolled  Children.   Moderate  Scenario.     Total  Medicaid  expansion-­‐related  wage  and  salary  jobs  will  gradually  increase  as  the  expansion  phases   in—from  71.  231.   As  more  federal  funds  enter  the  state  economy.  Moderate  Enrollment  Scenario   2014-­‐2017         Economic.12  billion  with  state  matching   funds  of  $1.47  for  hospitals  and  for  physicians.  Tax  and  Jobs  Impact.S.500  in  fiscal  2014  to  166.5  billion  in  additional  federal  funds  from  the  expansion  will  boost  Texas  economic  output  by  $67.000  in  fiscal  2015.9   billion  during  fiscal  2014-­‐17  as  the  direct  and  indirect  impacts  of  this  new  spending  re-­‐circulate  through   the  state’s  economy.  Table  2  illustrates  that  under  the  moderate  enrollment  scenario.  statewide  employment  and  wage  rates  will  also  grow.  the  first  full  year  of  implementation.  when  the  federal  match  rate  declines  from  100  percent  to  95  percent.   federal  funds  would  amount  to  $9.                        8       .  the  injection  of   $27.8  billion  increase  in  state  economically-­‐responsive  taxes  from  injecting  new   federal  Medicaid  funds  in  the  Texas  economy  will  offset  nearly  half  of  the  $3.9  This  economic  impact  increases  from  $6.  In  2017.  the  $1.  dentists   and  other  health  care  practitioners.  under  the  moderate   enrollment  scenario.7  billion  in  state  matching   funds  required  to  fund  the  ACA  Medicaid  expansion  from  fiscal  2014  through  fiscal  2017.7  billion  in  fiscal  2014  to  $22.06  billion.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     In  2016.  as  well  as  job  creation.49  billion.22  billion  with  a  state  match  of  $1.  Expanding  Medicaid  would  have  a  substantial  impact  on  the  Texas   economy  and  state  and  local  tax  revenues.Smart.    Overall.  RIMS  II  input-­‐output  multiplier  of  2.200  in  fiscal                                                                                                                             9  This  estimate  is  based  on  a  U.

 increased  state  economic  output  will  boost  state  and  local  tax  revenues  in  sales.    Thus.7  cents.7  percent  in   fiscal  2017.  motor  vehicle  and  other  economically-­‐responsive  taxes.  franchise.  before  falling  to  39.         Overall.   mixed  beverage  and  hotel  occupancy  taxes.  for  the  entire  medical  expansion.6  cents  and   local  economically-­‐responsive  taxes  by  3.    This  is  the  key  factor  driving  the  boost  to  the  state  economy  due  to   the  expansion  of  the  state’s  Medicaid  program  during  this  period.   11  For  this  estimate  state  economically-­‐responsive  taxes  include  sales.7  billion  state  match  to  fund  the  expansion  during  fiscal  2014-­‐2017.2  percent  fiscal  2016.  these  additional  workers  will  earn  an  average  of  $50.  join  the  program.  the  ratio  of    total  state  and  local  economically-­‐responsive  relative  to  state  gross  state  product  has   remained  remarkably  stable  during  this  period.  the  magnitude  of  the   state  revenue  offset  will  generally  fall  over  time  as  more  children  funded  at  the  baseline  Texas  Medicaid   match  rate  of  59.  the  $67.                                                                                                                             10  These  estimates  are  based  on  historical  BEA  data  on  Texas  wages  and  employment  and  a  RIMS  II  health  and   hospital  services  jobs  multiplier  2.Smart.  under  the   moderate  scenario.9  billion  gain  in  state  economic  output   from  the  ACA  Medicaid  expansion  will  add  $1.10   Because  of  the  nearly  100  percent  federal  match  for  the  Medicaid  expansion  to  adults.  the  $1.818.12    Thus.   franchise.  Medicaid  generated  state  revenues  will  increase  from  49.       In  turn.8  billion  to  the  state  treasury  and  $2.                        9       .  utility.  the  same  as  the  statewide   average  for  all  industries.11      Based  on  data  for  2000-­‐2012.33.  utility.  sales.8  billion  increase  in  state  revenues  from  this  expansion  will  offset  47.  each   $1  increase  in  Texas  gross  state  product  boosts  state  economically-­‐responsive  taxes  by  2.  insurance.  property.34  in   matching  federal  funds  to  the  state.  every  $1  in  state   money  spent  for  the  adult  and  child  expansion  during  fiscal  2014-­‐2017  will  draw  an  additional  $7.    Overall.  mixed  beverage  and  hotel  occupancy  taxes.  However.  during  this  period.     12  Although  the  structure  of  the  Texas  economy  and  state  and  local  taxes  have  changed  significantly  during  this   period.2  percent  of  the   $3.5  percent  of  state   matching  funds  in  fiscal  2014  and  fiscal  2015  to  55.  Local  economically-­‐responsive  taxes  include  school  and  other   property.3  percent.  motor  vehicle.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     2017.5  billion  to  local   government  revenues  from  fiscal  2014  through  fiscal  2017.

Smart.  the  injection  of  $16.    Under  the  limited  enrollment  scenario.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Table  2   Annual  Multiplier  Impacts  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  the  Texas  Economy  and  State  and  Local  Taxes.   Fiscal  2014  to  2017   Moderate  Enrollment  Scenario   (amounts  in  millions  of  dollars)         Limited  and  Enhanced  Scenarios.2  billion  in  federal  funds  to                      10         .  Table  3  illustrates  that  changes  in  assumptions  for  various  enrollment   scenarios  result  in  significant  ranges  of  economic  and  tax  impacts  of  the  Medicaid  expansion  on  the   state  economy.

berkeley.  under  their  base   expansion  scenario.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     the  program  would  increase  state  economic  output  by  $40.  with  an   estimated  $17.8  percent.  Greg   Watson.    See  Laurel  Lucia.”  January  2013.  state  economically-­‐responsive  tax  revenues  would  range  from  $1   billion  in  the  limited  expansion  to  $2.  economically-­‐responsive  state  tax  collections   would  offset  56.5  billion  in  the  limited  expansion  to  $3.           However.1  billion   in  federal  funds  under  the  enhanced  enrollment  program  would  boost  the  state  economy  by  $94.  Roby.  the  state  tax  offset  would  be  43.  “Med-­‐Cal  Expansion  under  the  Affordable  Care  Act:  Significant  Increase   in  Coverage  with  a  Minimal  Cost  to  the  State.Smart.75   dollars  in  federal  funds  for  every  $1  in  state  spending.                      11       .  would  offset  60.8  percent.    However.  as  noted  above.  more  Californians  would  be  covered  by   Medicaid.2   billion.5  billion  in  the  enhanced  expansion.81  dollars  in  federal  funds  drawn  down  for  every  $1  spent  on  the   expanded  program.  Under  the  limited  child  enrollment  scenario.  Ken  Jacobs.     According  to  the  UCLA  Center  for  Health-­‐Policy  Research  and  the  UC  Berkley  Labor  Center.  with  the  enhanced  child   enrollment  scenario.  under  their  enhanced  scenario.edu/healthcare/medi-­‐ cal_expansion13.5  billion  in  the   enhanced  expansion.  while  local  economically-­‐ responsive  tax  revenues  would  range  from  $1.pdf.  the  offset  would  be  40.  state  revenue  gains  from  a  Medicaid  expansion  similar  to  that  proposed  for  Texas.  however.    However.  the  overall  impact  on  state  finances  would  depend  on  the  number  of  adults   versus  children  who  enroll  in  the  program.4  billion  in  additional  federal  funds.4  percent  of  the  state  match  during  fiscal  2014-­‐ 2019.3  percent  of  the  state  match  for  the  program.  Mirada  Dietz.  where  more  lower-­‐match  federal  funds  for  children  are  drawn   into  Medicaid.  with  $6.  while  the  injection  of  $38.  drawing  an  estimated  $25.    In  this  scenario.  and  Dylan  H.1  billion.13                                                                                                                                 13  This  estimate  is  generally  in  line  with  a  recent  study  of  the  ACA  Medicaid  expansion  on  California  state  finances.  http://laborcenter.  with  $8.  Under  the  two  scenarios.1  billion  in  federal  funds  during  the  period.

                       12       .  competitive  health  insurance  through  the  ACA  Health  Benefit   Exchange.Smart.  Individuals  with  incomes  between  100  percent  and  400  percent  FPL  will  be  able  to  purchase   federally  subsidized  private  health  insurance  through  the  exchange  (Chart  2).  the  aged  or  disabled  up  to  74  percent  FPL  and  pregnant  women  up  to  185   percent  FPL  (Chart  2).  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Table  3   Total  Multiplier  Impacts  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  the  Texas  Economy  and  State  and  Local  Taxes.  The  ACA  requires  those  with  incomes  above  133  percent  of  FPL  to  purchase  insurance  or  pay   a  fine.  all  individuals  above  100  percent   of  FPL  will  be  able  to  purchase  private.  Medicaid  and  CHIP  cover  children  under  the  age  of  18  with  family  incomes  below   200  percent  of  FPL.     Once  the  ACA’s  insurance  provisions  become  effective  in  January  2014.   Fiscal  2014-­‐2017   Alternative  Enrollment  Scenarios   (amounts  in  millions  of  dollars)         Current  and  Future  Health  Insurance  Income-­‐Eligibility  Standards  and  Federal  Match  Rates   Texas  Medicaid  currently  covers  relatively  few  adults  other  than  long-­‐term  care  patients—  parents  with   incomes  up  to  14  percent  FPL.

 “Letter  to  Governors.  meaning  that  for  every  dollar  spent  on  the  program.  After  that.  limiting  the  expansion  to  those  below  100  percent  of  FPL  is  not  an  option.  2012.  will  be  unable  to  participate  in  the  exchange  because  the   ACA  assumes  Medicaid  coverage  for  this  group.  This   match  rate  is  far  higher  than  that  in  the  current  Medicaid  program.  and  will  remain  at  that  level  under  current  law.  CHIP  covers  children  with  family  incomes  between  133  percent  and  200  percent  of  FPL.14     Chart  2   Eligibility  for  Health  Insurance  Programs  Under  the  Affordable  Care  Act    and  Existing  CHIP  and  Medicaid         As  noted  above.     Under  the  ACA.  The  U.  Department  of  Health  and  Human  Services  has   determined  that  states  must  expand  coverage  to  133  percent  of  FPL  to  receive  the  full  federal  match   rate  under  the  expansion.S.                      13       .cms.  the  federal  government  is  providing  states  with  a  huge   incentive  to  provide  affordable  health  care  for  their  citizens  at  a  comparatively  modest  cost.  the  federal  government  pays  59.3   cents  and  Texas  pays  40.pdf.gov/resources/files/gov-­‐letter-­‐faqs-­‐12-­‐10-­‐2012.  federal  funding  will  decline  to   95  percent  in  2017  and  to  90  percent  by  2020.Smart.   The  state’s  CHIP  federal  match  rate  is  currently  71.  In  effect.  Under  the  ACA.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Individuals  below  100  percent  FPL.  however.3  percent.S.7  cents.  Secretary  of  Health  and  Human  Services.  the  CHIP  federal                                                                                                                             14  U.   http://cciio.  the  federal  government  will  fund  the  adult  expansion  without  requiring  a  state  match   (other  than  for  administrative  costs)  from  2014  through  2016.  This  match  will  continue  to  apply  to  newly  enrolled  children  since  they   are  already  eligible.51  percent.”  December  10.  which  generally  provides  about  six   dollars  for  every  four  the  state  spends.   The  state’s  regular  Federal  Medical  Assistance  Percentage  (FMAP)  match  rate  for  Medicaid  is  currently   59.

 but  funding  beyond  that  is  uncertain.D.  opting  out  of  the  expansion  could  leave  Texas’  hospitals  holding  the  bag..     The  ACA  also  affects  funding  to  states  for  Medicaid  and  Medicare  Disproportionate  Share  Hospital  (DSH)   programs  that  assist  hospitals  serving  a  disproportionate  number  of  Medicaid  and  low-­‐income  patients   with  uncompensated  care  costs.D.  hospital  districts  and  hospitals   throughout  Texas.S.tx.  The   estimates  do  not  extend  beyond  2014  through  2017  since  HHSC  limited  its  estimates  to  those  years.                      14       .hhsc.”   from  Texas  Medicaid  and  CHIP  in  Perspective  (Austin.1  billion  in  cuts  to  nationwide  Medicaid  DSH  payments  from  2014   to  2020.  124  Stat.  The  study  controlled  for   undocumented  immigrants  and  others  who  are  ineligible  for  Medicaid.  Our  estimates  also  rely   on  funding  and  other  data  from  the  Texas  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission  (HHSC).pdf.  Because  the  ACA  assumed  full  participation  by  the  states  in  the   Medicaid  expansion.  We  show  that  local  entities  already  spend  billions  of  dollars  on  care  for  individuals   who.Smart.D.  it  included  $18.  Texas:  Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas.  Department  of  Health  and  Human  Services  has  not  yet  stated  how  it  plans  to  apply   the  cuts.  providing  a  low-­‐to-­‐high  range  based  on  2010  data.   http://www.  and  Steve  Murdock.S.  would  be  eligible  for  Medicaid  under  an  expansion.   Ph.  90  percent   (Moderate)  and  98  percent  (Enhanced).        Texas  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission.  85  percent  under  a  “Moderate”  scenario  and  98  percent  under  an  “Enhanced”  scenario.  Cline.  losing  some  federal   DSH  funding  without  gaining  Medicaid  assistance  from  the  expansion.     Caseload  and  funding  estimates  are  based  partly  on  data  from  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable   Care  Act  on  Counties  in  Texas.D.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     contribution  will  increase  by  23  percentage  points.state.  Ph.  although   Congress  must  renew  funding  for  CHIP  in  2015  for  this  to  go  into  effect.3  million  uninsured  adults  aged  18  to  64  below  138  percent  of  FPL  in  2010.  and  commissioned  by  Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas.16   Methodology  Summary   This  study  provides  caseload  and  funding  estimates  for  2014  through  2017  and  compares  them  to  actual   costs  for  low-­‐income  health  care  reported  by  local  governments.org/images/stories/advocacy_and_public_policy/Estimates%20of%20the%20Impact%20of%20t he%20ACA%20on%20Texas%20Counties_FINAL%20REPORT%20APRIL%202012.  Ph..  Inc.  Texas  hospitals  received  about   $940  million  in  federal  DSH  funds  in  2011.C.  The  state  will  be  able  to   continue  CHIP  funding  for  children  aged  6-­‐18  between  100  percent  and  133  percent  FPL  who  will  move   from  CHIP  to  Medicaid  in  2014.  (San  Antonio.pdf.  from  the  current  76  percent  rate  to  82  percent  (Limited).  in  many  cases.  Ph.  how  many  of  the  uninsured  will  enroll  in  the  program  given  the   opportunity  and  the  enrollment  efforts  of  the  state  and  other  organizations.  April  2012).us/medicaid/reports/PB8/PDF/Appendix-­‐F.   17  Michael  E.  Inc.  In  that  year.15     Although  the  U.  §  1396r-­‐4(f)(7)(A)).  Cline.  Texas   had  1.  “Appendix  F:  Medicaid  Expenditure  History  (FFYs  1987-­‐2011.     Table  4  below  breaks  out  the  three  scenarios.  and  Steve  Murdock.  and  a  five-­‐year  waiver  insures  that  Texas  will  receive  DSH   funds  at  current  levels  through  2017.  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties   in  Texas.  January  2011).  Texas.   http://www.  The   estimates  also  assume  a  response  that  increases  the  insured  rate  for  eligible  children  below  200  percent   FPL  under  the  three  scenarios.   The  scenarios  assume  a  response  that  increases  the  insured  rate  for  eligible  adults  aged  18-­‐64  below   138  percent  FPL  from  the  current  rate  of  48  percent  to  71  percent  under  a  “Limited”  enrollment   scenario.  at  1054  (codified  at  42  U.  from  2016  through  September  2019.mhm.  an  analysis  conducted  by  Michael  E.17     Cline  and  Murdock  analyzed  three  scenarios  that  depend  on  the  eligible  population’s  response  to  the   expansion  —  in  other  words.  Medicaid                                                                                                                             15 16  HCERA  §  1203(a)(2).

 512.2  percent  annual  caseload  increase.  HHSC  caseload  estimates  are  similar  to  Cline  and  Murdock’s  Moderate  scenario  estimates   after  escalation.  The   analysis  includes  a  data  adjustment  to  remove  individuals.  who  are   not  eligible  for  Medicaid.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     expansion  would  have  insured  an  estimated  581.  County-­‐level  data  have  margins  of  error  reflective  of  the  Census  data   employed  in  these  estimates.865  under  an  Enhanced  scenario.264.   Table  4     Assumptions  for  Limited.  the  growth  rate  HHSC  used  in  its   estimates.  935.447  under  a  Limited  enrollment  scenario.  less-­‐populous  counties  tend  to  have  higher  margins  of  error  than  more-­‐ populous  counties.Smart.509  under  the  Limited  enrollment  scenario.  such  as  undocumented  immigrants.371   under  a  Moderate  scenario  and  1.187  under  the  Moderate   scenario  and  804.  Moderate  and  Enhanced  Scenarios       This  study  estimates  Medicaid  caseloads  for  2014  through  2017  for  these  groups  by  adjusting  the  2010   Cline  and  Murdock  data  for  a  1.  Medicaid  expansion  to  adults  should  result  in  many  of  these  children  enrolling  along  with  their   parents  —  an  estimated  219.  These  children  are  currently  eligible  for  Medicaid  or  CHIP  but  not  enrolled.   This  methodology  apportions  the  Cline  and  Murdock  statewide  totals  to  counties  based  on  their  share  of   adults  aged  18  to  64  below  138  percent  of  FPL  and  children  under  age  18  below  200  percent  of  FPL.  As  already   noted.     Texas  also  had  an  estimated  878.                      15       .015  under  an  Enhanced  scenario.034  children  under  age  18  and  below  200  percent  FPL  who  were   uninsured  in  2010.

 readers  can  make  their  own  judgments  and  adjustments  to  the  estimates  to   account  for  any  shifting  from  the  insured  population  to  Medicaid.”   http://factfinder2.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     We  then  combined  the  Cline  and  Murdock  caseload  data  with  HHSC’s  federal  and  state  costs  per   enrollee  for  these  population  groups  from  2014  through  2017  to  estimate  funding  for  each  year.   Appendix  E  provides  a  more  detailed  discussion  of  the  methodology  summarized  in  this  section  and  the   sources  used  in  developing  it.6  billion.xhtml?refresh=t.)   Funding  Estimates   Under  the  Moderate  scenario.S.  a  75  percent  phase-­‐in  for  2015  and  a  full  phase-­‐in  for  2016.2  billion  for  the  Limited  scenario  to  $38.  the  first  full  year  of  implementation  and  2017   when  the  federal  match  rate  declines  from  100  percent  to  95  percent.  from  2014  through  2017  the  federal  government  would  pay  Texas  a  total   of  $27.1  billion  for  the  Enhanced  scenario.                                                                                                                             18  U.  Census  Bureau.  moderate  or  high  levels  of  enrollment.18  (Some  portion  of  those  who  provide   their  own  insurance  may  be  between  18  and  26  years  old  and  covered  on  their  parents’  policies.9  billion  to  $5.  as  well  as  the  data  necessary  to   adjust  the  estimates.  The  study  presents  actual  data  for  these   expenses  and  compares  them  on  a  statewide  and  regional  basis  to  the  federal  funding  the  state  and   regions  would  receive  under  the  expansion  for  2016.                      16       .   (Appendix  A  contains  notes  and  cautions  to  consider  when  using  the  data  in  Appendices  B  and  C.000  provide  for  their  own  insurance.  Employers  insure  about  675.   This  methodology  does  not  take  into  account  currently  insured  adults  that  may  move  to  Medicaid  due   to  the  expansion.  Federal   funds  would  range  from  $16.000  in  total.  the  Medicaid  expansion  can  reduce  the  burden  on  Texas  local   governments  and  hospitals  that  provide  unreimbursed  care.   Beyond  its  benefits  to  individual  Texans.  HHSC   estimates  of  costs  per  enrollee  include  administrative  costs  and  provider  rate  increases  required  by  law.   Appendix  D  provides  a  map  and  lists  the  counties  included  in  Regional  Healthcare  Partnership  regions.  2011  American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.Smart.  about  869.     Appendix  B  provides  detailed  statewide  and  regional  data  and  Appendix  C  provides  county-­‐level  data.     County-­‐level  data  also  break  out  indigent  and  jail  inmate  health  care  as  well  as  hospital  charity  costs.  respectively  (Table  5).gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.  Federal   and  state  funding  for  2017  reflect  the  reduction  to  95  percent  for  the  federal  Medicaid  match  rate.  for  an  effective  federal  match  rate  of  88  percent.000  adults  below  138  percent  FPL  in  Texas  and  another   194.7  billion  to  insure  adults  aged  18  through  64  below  138  percent   of  FPL  and  children  below  200  percent  FPL.   but  not  the  CHIP  federal  match  rate  increase  beginning  in  2016  since  Congress  must  renew  CHIP  funding   in  2015.census.  “B27016:  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  And  Type  By  Ratio  Of  Income  To  Poverty  Level   In  The  Past  12  Months  By  Age.   State  matching  costs  would  range  from  $1.)   Studies  conducted  in  other  states  have  found  it  difficult  to  estimate  with  confidence  what  portion  of  the   currently  insured  would  shift  to  Medicaid  with  an  expansion.  Since  this  study  provides  a  wide  range  of   estimates  depending  on  low.5  billion  for  a  state  match  of  $3.  The  estimates  adjust  the  Cline  and  Murdock  caseload  data  to  account  for  a  50  percent  phase-­‐in   for  2014  (and  an  eight-­‐month  year).

7  percent  effective  federal  match  rate  after  administrative  costs.  the  state’s  share.7  billion  for  the   Limited  scenario  to  $10.   For  2017.  the  federal  government  would  pay  Texas   $7.  when  the  federal  match  rate  declines  to  95  percent.8  million.  Federal  funds  would  range  from  an  estimated  $4.1   million  to  $395.6  billion  to   insure  the  adult  group  under  the  Moderate  enrollment  scenario.  Federal                      17       .  then.  the  first  year  of  full  implementation.   would  total  about  $293  million.Smart.  the  federal  government  would  pay  Texas  $7.3  billion  for  the  Enhanced  scenario.  The  state  match  would  range  from  $182.6  million  under  the  Moderate   enrollment  scenario  —  a  91.  for  an  effective  federal  match  rate  of   96.  for  a  state  match  of  about  $693.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Table  5     Fiscal  and  Enrollment  Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Texas  Adults  and  Children     In  2016.6  billion  for  the  adult  group  only.3  percent  after  including  a  50  percent  state  match  for  administrative  costs.

3  billion  for  the  Enhanced  scenario.Smart.   with  the  state  match  ranging  from  $431.                      18       .  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     funds  could  range  from  $4.   Table  6     Fiscal  and  Enrollment  Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Adults  Below  138  percent  of  FPL         In  2016.7  billion  for  the  Limited  scenario  to  $10.3  million  under  the   Moderate  enrollment  scenario  —  a  66.5  billion  to  insure  the  additional  children.3  million  (Table  6).1  million  to  $937.  the  federal  government  would  pay   Texas  $1.  for  a  state  match  of  about  $769.1  percent  effective  federal  match  rate  after  administrative  costs.  the  first  year  in  which  HHSC  projects  full  implementation.

6  million  to  $1.  hospital  districts  and  local  hospitals  submit  to  the  state.7  million  to  $1.  totaled  $2.4  billion  for   the  Enhanced  scenario.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Federal  funds  would  range  from  an  estimated  $643.  Federal   funds  would  range  from  $681.  while  the  state  match  would  range  from  $342.5  billion  for  the  Enhanced   scenario.  respectively  (Table  7).2  billion.4  million  under  the  Moderate   enrollment  scenario  —  a  66.2  million  for  the  Limited  scenario  to  $2.  with  a  state  match  of  about  $799.5                      19       .   Table  7     Fiscal  and  Enrollment  Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Children  Below  200  percent  of  FPL       Local  Benefits   Local  savings  from  the  expansion  would  offset  much  if  not  all  of  the  state  match  in  2016  and  2017.1  million  for  the  Limited  scenario  to  $2.5  percent  federal  effective  match  rate  after  administrative  costs.  counties.   unreimbursed  local  health  care  spending  in  Texas  that  local  property  taxes  largely  support.  the  federal  government  would  pay  Texas   $1.  when  the  federal  match  rate  declines  to  95  percent.3  billion.Smart.  The  state  match  would  range  from  $329.   According  to  reports  that  cities.   In  2017.6  billion  for  the  children’s  group  only.

 such  as  undocumented  immigrants.     If  necessary.  since  not  everyone  currently  receiving  charity   care.  Although  the  impact  of  the  Medicaid  expansion  and  ACA  subsidized   insurance  would  not  entirely  offset  total  local  expenses.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     billion  in  2011.  would  be  eligible  for  these  programs  and  since  some  services   may  not  be  covered.8  billion  in  conservatively  estimated   unreimbursed  health  care  costs  for  charity  care  in  2010.4  billion  in   unreimbursed  expenses  (Table  8).  much  of  it  would.   Table  8   Low-­‐Income  Health  Costs  Reported  by  Cities.  Local  governments  and  hospitals  would  still  realize  a  net  gain   over  current  costs  from  the  federal  funds  the  match  would  generate.   The  math  is  simple  —  federal  funding  for  the  adult  expansion  far  exceeds  current  local  expenses  for   unreimbursed  health  care  costs.  for  an  estimated  total  of  $4.  In  addition.  Counties.Smart.  Hospital  Districts  and  Hospitals     Versus  Federal  Funds  Available  Under  Medicaid  Expansion                            20       .  the  state  could  use  some  portion  of  these  savings  to  fund  the  required  match  through  an   intergovernmental  transfer  arrangement.  Texas  hospitals  reported  at  least  $1.

20     The  federal  government  contributes  nothing  toward  this  purpose  now.   the  state  would  spend  nothing  on  in-­‐patient  hospital  care  for  eligible  inmates  from  2014  through  2016.  mental  and   behavioral  health  services  and.   state  and  local  governments  benefit  from  increased  tax  collections.tdcj.   and  a  maximum  of  just  10  percent  of  these  costs  by  2020.   22  Texas  Comptroller  of  Public  Accounts.us/budget/lar/default.  As  employees  spend  their  wages  on  taxable  items.  the  state  would  be  able  to  use  the   high  federal  match  rate  for  newly  eligible  individuals  not  covered  by  Medicare.  http://www.  Strategy  Request.   August  16.   21  Texas  Department  of  State  Health  Services.  and  the  increased  economic  activity   in  turn  creates  other  jobs.txt.   20  Texas  Department  of  Criminal  Justice.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     We  estimate  that  the  Medicaid  expansion  would  generate  more  than  231.state.  5-­‐6.us/specialrpt/healthFed/hr3590Cost.Smart.   http://www.pdf.window.pdf.  the  kidney   health  care  program  and  the  HIV  Medication  assistance  and  STD  program.dshs.  http://www.state.1  percent  to  4.  309.8  percentage  point  reduction  in  the  state’s  current  unemployment  rate—from  6.  much  of  which  would  be   unnecessary  under  a  Medicaid  expansion.state.shtm.  many  of  them  in  health  care.  31.  Furthermore."  (October  2012).  FY  2014-­‐2015  Legislative  Appropriations  Request  (Austin.  The  Comptroller  estimates  the   increased  insurance  premium  tax  revenue  due  to  ACA  implementation  and  the  Medicaid  expansion  at   $1.   State  Benefits   In  numerous  programs.  Diagnosis:  Cost–  An  Initial  Look  at  the  Federal  Health  Care  Legislation’s   Impact  on  Texas.3  billion  from  2015  through  2019.  the  state  pays  100  percent  for  adult  health  care  that  Medicaid  would  cover   under  an  expansion.  Under  an  expansion.  soon.  women’s  health  care  delivered  to  low-­‐income  individuals  who  are   not  eligible  for  Medicaid.000  jobs  in  2016.  but  with  a  Medicaid  expansion.   The  state  also  spends  unmatched  general  revenue  for  community  primary  care  services.5  million  in   state  appropriations  for  hospital  inpatient  and  clinical  care  for  its  inmates  for  2014.  the  state   supplements  funding  for  the  County  Indigent  Health  Care  (CIHC)  program.  the  expansion   would  generate  an  additional  $1.  equivalent   to  a  1.bls.  Other  programs  include  the  breast  and  cervical  cancer  program.  January  1976  to  date.  Similarly.  The  state  also  pays  the  regular  state  match  for  medically   needy  adults  that  currently  qualify  for  Medicaid.  seasonally  adjusted.3   percent.  assuming   moderate  enrollment—enough  to  offset  nearly  half  of  the  required  state  match  from  2014  through   2017.”  available  at  http://www.  2012).21     The  Comptroller’s  office  estimates  that  larger  caseloads  from  a  Medicaid  expansion  would  net  increased   revenues  from  the  insurance  premium  tax  due  to  the  large  number  of  persons  who  will  buy  health   insurance  under  the  exchange.22     In  addition  to  these  savings  and  new  revenue  that  could  offset  the  required  state  match.   Texas.tx.8  billion  in  new  tax  revenue  from  2014  through  2017.  Legislative  Appropriations  Request  for  Fiscal  Years  2014  and  2015  (Austin.                                                                                                                             19  Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics.  the  Texas  Department  of  Criminal  Justice  requested  $186.  “3A.tx.  would  provide  substantial  benefits  and  increased   economic  security  to  families  and  local  communities.us/documents/finance/LAR_FY2014-­‐15.  or  an  average  of  $250  million  a  year.  p.  Texas.  2012).  the  expansion  would  cover  eligible   adults  in  state  mental  institutions  and  juvenile  facilities  that  need  non-­‐psychiatric  hospital  in-­‐patient   care.  p.  For  example.19  These  jobs.  August  30.  "States  and  selected  areas:  Employment  status  of  the  civilian  noninstitutional   population.  as  well  as  those  covered  in  the  expansion.  p.gov/lau/ststdsadata.                      21       .tx.

 which  identifies  and  addresses   health  problems  early.S.5  percent.  Census  Bureau.   25  Janet  Currie  and  Jonathan  Gruber.  in  2011  Texas  had  about  900.5  million  uninsured  children  with  family   incomes  below  200  percent  FPL.2  percent  of  all  Texas  children  are   uninsured.  “Characteristics  of  Uninsured  Low-­‐Income  Adults.1  percent  rate.  104:1263-­‐1296).Smart.000  of  the  nation’s  3.700  Texas  children  every  year  after  full   implementation.  health  insurance  and  out-­‐of-­‐pocket  health  care   expenses.pdf.  “S2702:  SELECTED  CHARACTERISTICS  OF  THE  UNINSURED  IN  THE  UNITED  STATES:  2011   American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.   26  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.edu/~jcurrie/publications/saving_babies.2  million  adults  who  would  be  covered  under  the  expansion                                                                                                                             23  U.  http://www.”                      22       .S.  “Saving  Babies:  the  Efficacy  and  Cost  of  Recent  Expansions  of  Medicaid   Eligibility  for  Pregnant  Women.000  or  16.pdf.  a  higher  labor  force  participation  rate  than  the  total   population’s.  “The  Impact  of  Children’s  Public  Health  Insurance  Expansions  on   Educational  Outcomes.  2011  American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.25   Benefits  to  Adults   Our  children  also  need  healthy  parents  to  provide  for  their  care.xhtml?refresh=t.  About  13.  Census  Bureau.  making  a  Medicaid  expansion  imperative.   “Health  Insurance  Eligibility.kff.7  percent  share.lafollette.9  percent  of  uninsured  adults  in  Texas  work.   111:431-­‐466).”  Journal  of  Political  Economics  (1996.  about  1.princeton.  Numerous  studies  have  tied  Medicaid  and  CHIP   coverage  to  improved  educational  outcomes.   http://www.1  percent  and  infant  mortality  by  8.  Assuming  the  lower  5.   The  Kaiser  Family  Foundation  estimates  that  about  41  percent  of  adults  covered  under  the  expansion   would  be  parents.  but  lack  health  insurance.   27  U.  the  expansion   under  the  Moderate  scenario  would  save  the  lives  of  2.7  percent  of  the  nation’s  5   million  uninsured  children.   Children  represent  the  state’s  economic  future.   24  National  Bureau  of  Economic  Research.  August  2012.  January  2009.  the  disparity  between  Texas  and  other  states  will  grow.   the  national  average  will  increase  significantly  since  most  states  will  expand  Medicaid.edu/courses/pa882/CurrieGruber.  The  program  saves  the  state  money  over  time  as  it  prevents  children  from   becoming  ill.  which  means   that.23     Bringing  Texas  up  to  the  national  average  would  require  the  state  to  insure  an  additional  393.org/uninsured/upload/8350.000   children.  less  than  the  550.   Studies  conducted  in  the  1980s  found  that  expanding  Medicaid  to  children  reduced  child  mortality  by   5.pdf.”  Table  1.24     Medicaid  provides  an  important  preventive  program  for  low-­‐income  children  called  Early  Periodic   Screening.  “B27016:  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  And  Type  By  Ratio  Of  Income  To  Poverty  Level   In  The  Past  12  Months  By  Age.  and  Janet  Currie  and  Jonathan  Gruber.27  According  to  Kaiser.  According  to  the  Census  Bureau.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Benefits  to  Children   According  to  the  Census  Bureau.5  percent.  Many  low-­‐income  individuals  and   families  simply  cannot  afford  basic  living  expenses.  It  makes  sense  in  both  human  and  economic  terms  for   low-­‐income  children  to  enroll  in  Medicaid  or  CHIP  now  and  receive  regular  developmental  and   preventive  checkups  through  EPSDT.”   http://factfinder2.  compared  to  a  national  average  of  7.wisc.  or  Texas  Health  Steps.  again  a  16.  and  regular  medical  and  dental  checkups  and  care  are   critical  for  them  to  maintain  their  educational  progress.”  by  Phillip  B.census.  or  as  ill  as  they  would  otherwise.  Utilization  of  Medical  Care  and  Child  Health.  without  the  expansion.  Levine  and  Diane  Whitmore  Schanzenbach.   59.26  Many  of  them  work.  After  2014.  Diagnosis  and  Treatment  (EPSDT).  and  nearly  600.   http://www.000  expected  to  enroll  in  Medicaid  under  a  Moderate  scenario.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.”  Quarterly  Journal  of  Economics  (1996.

    These  wages  are  generally  insufficient  to  cover  basic  living  and  working  expenses  as  well  as  health   insurance.  No.statehealthfacts.415   20.S.30  Expenses  exclude  health  care  costs  listed  at  the  bottom  of   the  table.  versus  92.  as  well  as  debt  payments.879   26.  Health  care  costs  are  averages  and  can  vary  substantially  among   families.bls.statehealthfacts.   by  Firm  Size.  Vol.gov/cex/csxstnd.  “Characteristics  of  Uninsured  Low-­‐Income  Adults.3  percent  of  the  132.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     in  Texas  are  working.  January  26.org/comparemaptable.668   Source:  Federal  Register.  The  health  insurance  premium  used  in  this  example  is  the  average  Texas  employer-­‐based   $11.000  and  $19.kff.   Table  9     2012  Federal  Poverty  Guidelines       Persons  in  Family/Household   Poverty  Guideline   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8     The  Medicaid  expansion  would  cover  a  person  employed  in  a  full-­‐time.809   37.970   34.”   http://www.  2012.kff.  about  60  percent  of  them  in  agriculture  or  service  industries  that  tend  toward   smaller  firms  and  are  less  likely  to  offer  insurance  to  employees.  Consumer  Expenditure  Survey.htm#2011.  and  illustrates  the  inability  of   people  in  this  situation  to  afford  insurance.090   23.”  http://www.080  per  year.”  Table  3.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           http://factfinder2.   30  U.  and  “Number  of   Private  Sector  Establishments.census.org/comparemaptable.29  And  besides  working  for   low  wages  in  firms  that  do  not  offer  health  insurance.  which  equates  to  $15.334  Texas  private  firms  with  fewer  than  50  employees  insured  their   employees  in  2011.jsp?ind=971&cat=3&sub=46&yr=200&typ=1&rgnhl=49.  minimum-­‐wage  job  paying  $7.274   42.739   48.050   27.890   138%  FPL   $15.   28  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.  many  low-­‐income  individuals  find  work  only  on  a   part-­‐time  or  seasonal  basis.  just  below  the  138  percent  FPL  cutoff.203   53.  17.org/uninsured/upload/8350.  resulting  in  poverty-­‐level  incomes.999.  Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics.  pp.  2011.010   30.  It  also  would  cover   a  single  parent  earning  $10  per  hour  (annual  wages  of  $20.170   15.  2011.”  http://www.jsp?ind=176&cat=3.109  larger  private  firms.4  percent  of  the  320.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1YR_S2702&prodTyp e=table.  Table  10  compiles  data  from  the  2011  Consumer  Expenditure  Survey  for  a  family  of  two  with   one  earner.   29  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.  one  child  and  an  income  between  $15.  77.930   38.                      23       .gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.  4034-­‐4035.  “Table  2:  Income  Before  Taxes:  Average   Annual  Expenditures  and  Characteristics.25   per  hour.     Table  9  lists  the  nation’s  current  federal  poverty  guidelines  by  family  or  household  size  and  calculates   incomes  at  138  percent  of  FPL.Smart.  2011.800).pdf.  August  2012.344   31.kff.130   19.  “Percent  of  Private  Sector  Establishments  That  Offer  Health  Insurance  to  Employees.   http://www.  by  Firm  Size.28     Only  28.

615.31  This  family  would  be  ineligible  for  food   stamps.  2011.   Table  10   Typical  Household  Budget  for  Two  at  138  Percent  of  the  Federal  Poverty  Level       The  high  cost  of  health  insurance  affects  both  employers  and  workers.  but  high  premiums  as  well  as  out-­‐ of-­‐pocket  medical  expenses  make  it  impossible  for  most  low-­‐income  workers  to  afford  health  care.org/?page=charts&id=1&sn=6&p=1.  1-­‐2.jsp?sub=67&rgn=45&cat=5.  “Employer  Health  Benefits  2012  Survey.  “Texas:  Employer-­‐Based  Health  Premiums.Smart.  a  30  percent   increase  since  2007.                      24       .  according  to  a  recent  study  by  the  Kaiser  Family  Foundation  and  the  Health   Research  and  Educational  Trust.  with  employers  paying  the  balance.32  Employees  paid  an  average  of  $951  for  single  coverage  and  $4.745.statehealthfacts.  At  an  average  cost  of  $4.664  for  single  coverage                                                                                                                             31  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.”  Table:  Average  Employee-­‐Plus-­‐One   Premium  per  Enrolled  Employee  For  Employer-­‐Based  Health  Insurance.   http://www.316  for   family  coverage.   32  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.kff.  The   2012  average  cost  of  single  coverage  was  $5.   http://ehbs.org/profileind.”  pp.  and  family  coverage  was  $15.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     premium  for  an  employee  and  one  additional  dependent.

S.  and  Benjamin  D.36  In  a  Kaiser  Family   Foundation  survey.  creating  a  burden  to  their  employer  and  fellow  employees.  “Expanding  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults  Leads  to  Improved  Health.33     Although  the  ACA  provides  subsidized  health  insurance  for  individuals  above  100  percent  of  FPL.  Frequent  or  prolonged   absences  for  common  untreated  conditions  such  as  asthma.  Epstein.harvard.  an  industry  that  pays  well  and  provides  good  job  security  and  benefits.org/doi/full/10.   Finally.  the  Most  Important  Reason  for  Not  Offering.   http://ehbs.”  Exhibit  2.  2012).org/?page=charts&id=1&sn=12&ch=2691.  7.  and  Participation.14:  Among  Small  Firms  (3-­‐ 199  Workers)  Not  Offering  Health  Benefits.xhtml?refresh=t.34   Covering  most  of  these  adults  through  Medicaid  would  mean  a  healthier  workforce  and  would  reduce   absenteeism.  It  also  would  increase  income   for  families  with  children.org/?page=charts&id=1&sn=3&ch=2732.                      25       .  the  first  year  of  full  implementation.  heart  disease.  Census  Bureau.840  deaths  prevented  each  year  for  every  500.kff.   And.1056/NEJMsa1202099#t=articleTop.Smart.http://ehbs.000  persons  newly   insured.census.4  million  uninsured  Texas  adults  aged  18  to  64  who  are  below  100  percent  of  FPL  will  not  be  eligible.   2012.1  percent  drop  in  the  death  rate  for   adults  under  age  65.kff.  The  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health  recently  compared  three  states  (New  York.hsph.kff.100  jobs  in  2016.  48  percent  of  small  employers  indicated  that  the  cost  of  insurance  was  too  high  for   them  to  offer  it  to  employees.   rising  to  231.  when  their  uninsured  employees  become  sick.nejm.  “2012  Employer  Health  Benefits  Annual  Survey.  “Mortality  and  Access   to  Care  After  State  Medicaid  Expansions.429  for  family  coverage  per  employee.org/?page=charts&id=1&sn=7&ch=2735.  we  estimate  that  the  Medicaid  expansion  would  generate  nearly  71.  “B27016:  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  And  Type  By  Ratio  Of  Income  To  Poverty  Level   In  The  Past  12  Months  By  Age.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.”  Section  3:  Employee  Coverage.S.  http://www.  including  health                                                                                                                             33  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.  job  loss  and  unemployment  insurance  costs  to  employers.  In  Texas.  it  would  save  lives.  they  are  more  likely  to  be  absent   from  work  longer.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     and  $11.   35  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.  http://ehbs.   34  U.  2011  American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.”  July  25.  Fewer   Deaths.  workers  in  firms  with  fewer  than  25  workers  have  insurance.  Expanding  Medicaid   to  adults  aged  18  through  64  who  are  making  marginal  wages  or  working  in  part-­‐time  or  seasonal   positions  is  an  effective  way  to  assist  small  businesses  and  their  employees  alike.  diabetes.  “Employer  Health  Benefits  2012  Annual  Survey.37   On  the  other  hand.  thus  reducing  stress  and  providing  more  opportunities.edu/news/press-­‐releases/2012-­‐releases/medicaid-­‐expansion-­‐ lower-­‐mortality.   Arizona  and  Maine)  that  expanded  Medicaid  to  childless  adults  aged  20  to  64  between  2000  and  2005   with  neighboring  states  that  did  not  (New  Hampshire.  “Employer  Health  Benefits  2012  Survey.700  lives  saved  per  year  under  the  Moderate   enrollment  scenario  once  fully  implemented.  Many  of  these  jobs  would  be  in   health  care.  it  is  unsurprising  that  most  small  employers  find  it   difficult  to  provide  insurance.   36  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.  hiring  and  training  new  employees.500  jobs  in  Texas  in  2014.html.     Benefits  to  Employers   Only  36  percent  of  U.  about   1.”   http://factfinder2.35  This  translates  into  one  life  saved  per  year  in  the  five-­‐year  follow-­‐up  period  for  every  176   newly  insured.  that  would  amount  to  about  5.  Nevada  and  New  Mexico).  but  a  6.   Eligibility.  2012.  allergies  and  flu  can   lead  to  terminations  and  the  costs  of  recruiting.  They   found  not  only  a  higher  insured  rate  in  the  expansion  states.”  p.   http://www.  Sommers.”  New  England  Journal  of  Medicine  (September  13.  Katherine  Baicker  and  Arnold  M.  Pennsylvania.  or  about  2.   37  Kaiser  Family  Foundation.

 Wal-­‐Mart  quit   providing  health  insurance  to  associates  working  fewer  than  24  hours  per  week  in  2012.000  Texans  who  were  unemployed  then)  would  benefit  substantially  from  the  additional  jobs.com/sites/rickungar/2012/12/09/walmart-­‐bails-­‐on-­‐obamacare-­‐sticks-­‐ taxpayers-­‐with-­‐employee-­‐healthcare-­‐costs/.  Department  of  Labor.   45  U.  Employment  and  Training  Division.   42  U.forbes.“States  and  Selected  Areas:  Employment  Status  of  the  Civilian  Noninstitutional   Population.gov/unemploy/page8/2012/122912.  initially  in  opposition.com/our-­‐story/locations#/united-­‐states/texas.txt.  the  Texas  economy  (and  some  of  the   771.  Department  of  Labor.1  percent.38     Given  its  December  2012  unemployment  rate  of  6.  moreover.   2012.  about  half  of  Wal-­‐ Mart  employees  nationwide  earn  less  than  $10  per  hour.do.494  on  an  annual  basis.33.  Sticks  Taxpayers  With  Employee  Healthcare  Costs.tx.  has  recently  announced  that  she  will   support  it  as  long  as  Arizona  includes  an  automatic  trigger  reducing  Medicaid  optional  coverage  should                                                                                                                             38  These  estimates  are  based  on  historical  BEA  data  on  Texas  wages  and  employment  and  a  RIMS  II  health  and   hospital  services  jobs  multiplier  2.  many  of  these  individuals  could  receive  the   health  care  they  need  as  they  seek  employment.  the  number  of  uninsured  in  Texas  will   grow  as  it  shrinks  in  states  that  acted.  “Unemployment  Benefits  Estimator.http://www.gov/unemploy/claimssum.  and  wages  would  average  $50.  Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics.   40  U.S.ows.   Findings  in  Other  States   Recent  studies  in  other  states  have  also  found  that  states  can  finance  their  share  of  the  expansion  using   funds  already  spent  on  state  and  locally  funded  health  care  for  adults  and  new  revenues  generated  from   the  expansion.  2012).  2012.asp.doleta.us/UBS/changeLocale.000  in  December  2012.43   per  week.  http://www.  By  Selection  Of  The  State(a).   Many  low-­‐income  workers.  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  and  Type  of  Coverage  by  State  and  Age  for   All  People:  2011.40   Those  individuals  receive  from  $62  to  $440  per  week  (before  income  tax  withholding  deductions)  for  a   maximum  of  26  weeks  without  an  extension.”  http://www.818  during  the  2014-­‐2017  period—the  same  as  the  statewide   average  for  all  industries.41  in  December  2012.     Some  governors  that  previously  expressed  opposition  to  the  expansion  have  changed  their  minds.gov/hhes/www/cpstables/032012/health/toc.000  Texas  employees.  “Monthly  Program  and  Financial  Data.S.walmart.twc.  Report  Period  Between  01/01/2012  And  12/31/2012.  leaving  Texas  still  at  the  bottom  and  digging  a  deeper  hole.  unemployment  insurance  covered  only  about  158.  “  Weekly  Claims  Page  8.  Census  Bureau.42  That  equates  to  $17.  January  1976  to  Date.ows.  After  further  study  and  considering  revised  trends.39  Of   the  state’s  unemployed.  are  underemployed.  and  recently   announced  plans  to  quit  providing  insurance  to  new  employees  working  fewer  than  30  hours  per  week   beginning  in  2014.   43  Rick  Ungar.bls.  and  Wal-­‐ Mart  and  other  companies  implement  their  intended  policies.  In   particular.  they  received  an  average  of  $336.  much   less  health  insurance.”  December22.  “Our  Locations.”  http://www.Smart.   44  Wal-­‐Mart.”  Forbes   (December  9.   39  U.  With  a  Medicaid  expansion.  Wal-­‐Mart  currently  has  150.                      26       .43  Most  of  these  workers  earn  near-­‐minimum  wage  and  would  be  eligible  for   Medicaid  in  states  that  expand.  hardly  enough  for  basic  living  expenses.census.  “Table  HI06.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     insurance.state.  several  states  besides  Texas  have  also   substantially  reduced  their  estimates  of  the  state  funds  required  for  the  expansion.  “Wal-­‐Mart  Bails  on  ObamaCare.”   https://services.  Arizona’s  governor.html.”   January  20.  Jan  Brewer.htm.gov/lau/ststdsadata.  Employment  and  Training  Division.S.”  http://corporate.S.  Seasonally  Adjusted.   41  Texas  Workforce  Commission.doleta.  http://www.  Summary   Data  For  State  Programs.do?language=en&country=US&page=/benefitsEstimator.  however.44     Texas  already  has  the  highest  rate  of  uninsured  for  adults  aged  18  to  64  of  any  state  —  31  percent   compared  to  a  national  average  of  21  percent  in  2011.  Part-­‐time  earners  employed  by  businesses   small  and  large  may  find  themselves  losing  insurance  in  2014  if  they  had  it  before.45  If  Texas  does  not  expand  Medicaid.

html.  and  Dylan  H.  including  reduced  criminal  justice  costs  due  to  better   access  to  substance  abuse  treatment.066  billion  over  10   years  from  2013-­‐14  to  2022-­‐23.49   Ohio.  A  recent  study  by  the  University  of  California  at  Berkeley  and  the  University  of  California  at   Los  Angeles  on  the  California  expansion  found  that  increased  state  tax  revenues  and  savings  would   largely  offset  additional  spending.   http://laborcenter.  The  study  estimated  that  the  state   would  receive  net  savings  of  about  $1  billion  on:   • • • Better  match  rate  for  medically  needy  adults  of  $709  million   Breast  and  Cervical  Cancer  Program  costs  of  $48  million   Inpatient  prison  health  care  costs  of  $273  million     In  addition.5  billion  for  state  match.2  percent  of  the  state  match  necessary  for  the  expansion.  Inc.pdf.50                                                                                                                             46  Angela  Gonzalez.4  billion.  “New  Mexico  to  join  Medicaid  expansion  program.  p.  a  concern  expressed  by  several  state   governors.  Estimates  just  published  by  Ohio  State  University  compare  the  state’s  match  requirements  with   the  net  savings  the  state  would  receive  from  moving  adults  from  state-­‐funded  programs  to  Medicaid   over  a  nine-­‐year  period  from  2014  through  2019.  Susana  Martinez..berkeley.  2013.  general  revenue  ($857  million)  from  increased  economic  activity  and  increased  drug   rebates  to  the  state  from  pharmaceutical  companies  ($218  million).  children  who   are  currently  eligible  but  not  enrolled  ($3.  It  also  found  that  savings  in  other  areas  of  the  budget.com/phoenix/news/2013/01/14/brewer-­‐to-­‐expand-­‐arizona-­‐medicaid.012  billion)  and  the  cost  of  shifting.  January  2013.  Ken  Jacobs.47   California.”  p.  Florida  has  recently  reduced  its  estimate  of  state  costs  from  $26  billion  to  $5.   49  Social  Services  Estimating  Conference.  the  study  pointed  out  that  there  would  also  be  savings  on  non-­‐Medicaid  substance  abuse   treatment.  “Estimates  Related  to  Federal  Affordable  Care  Act:  Title  XIX  (Medicaid)   FINAL  Per  email  from  House  received  on  December  20.bizjournals.  Greg  Watson.     The  study  also  found  net  increases  in  state  revenue  from  taxes  of  $2.  Medi-­‐Cal  Expansion  under  the   Affordable  Care  Act:  Significant  Increase  in  Coverage  with  Minimal  Cost  to  the  State.  Roby.  Ohio  State  University  and  Health  Policy  Institute  of  Ohio.   http://www.767  billion).  mental  health  services  and  state  prisons  due  to  the  expansion  “would  likely  be   more  than  enough  to  offset  the  $46  to  $381  million  in  annual  state  General  Fund  spending  for  the  newly   eligible  population  through  2019.   50  Regional  Economic  Models.  January  9.287  billion).   The  study  identified  other  areas  of  savings  as  well.pdf.  pregnant  women  and  other  state  health  care  programs  for  uninsured  adults.   47  Dennis  Domrzalski.”  Albuquerque  Business  First.  including  costs  for  newly  eligible  adults  ($1.46  After  reviewing  a  new  study  that  identified  sufficient  existing  revenue  sources.   48  Laurel  Lucia.   http://ahca.  of  which  about  $30  billion  is  for   newly  eligible  adults.  also  announced  her  support  for  the  expansion.  New   Mexico’s  governor.”  Phoenix  Business  Journal.  UC  Berkeley  Center  for  Labor   Research  and  Education  and  UCLA  Center  for  Health  Policy  Research.myflorida.  concluding  that  savings  in  these  programs  would   provide  41.  5.  January  14.”  of   currently  insured  individuals  to  Medicaid  ($0.  2012.  25.bizjournals.  family  planning.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     the  federal  government  reduce  its  match  rate  in  the  future.  The  study  estimates  that  the  state   will  need  about  $2.”48   Florida.  Miranda  Dietz.  Urban  Institute.  “Brewer  to  expand  Arizona  Medicaid  program.Smart.                      27       .  The  state  now  estimates  that  the  expansion   would  generate  $37  billion  in  federal  funds  over  the  ten-­‐year  period.  including  other   state  health  programs.  which  would  leave  a  net  state  fiscal  gain  of  $1.   2013.898  million  on:  managed  care  plans   ($1.html.  called  “crowd  out.823  billion).  http://www.com/albuquerque/news/2013/01/09/new-­‐mexico-­‐to-­‐join-­‐medicaid-­‐expansion.edu/healthcare/medi-­‐cal_expansion13.com/medicaid/pdffiles/Estimates_as_requested_by_House_Staff.

  Perry  tells  Sebelius  to  “Relay  This  Message  to  the  President:  Texas  Rejects  Expansion  of  Medicaid.  2010.  http://voices.Smart.  http://governor.health.  and  specifically  Great  Britain.  and     the  added  cost  burden  of  expansion.  Perry:  Texas  Will  Not  Expand  Medicaid  or  Implement  Health  Benefit   Exchange.   low-­‐income  citizens  who  cannot  afford  private  health  insurance.state.  And   Considerations  For  Decision-­‐Makers.  2012.  despite  extremely  favorable  federal  matching  rates.  The  department  found  that  “participating  in  the  optional   expansion  of  the  Medicaid  program  would  result  in  a  projected  cost  savings  for  the  State  General   Fund  throughout  the  first  6  years  of  the  ACA  implementation  (fiscal  years  2014-­‐2020).dallasnews.us/files/press-­‐office/O-­‐SebeliusKathleen201207090024.html/.aspx.  Texas  participates   in  many  similar  federal  programs  that  require  state  matching  funds.  to  provide  them  with  more  “flexibility”  in  meeting  their  citizens’  health  care  needs.  “Gov.53   Socialized  medicine:  Medicaid  is  not  socialized  medicine.  13-­‐24.”  The  Washington  Post  (June  9.  hires  health  care  providers  and  controls  every  aspect  of  health  care.”  July  9.  2009).  among  others.   54  Ezra  Klein.us/news/press-­‐release/17408/.   http://trailblazersblog.  “Letter  to  The  Honorable  Kathleen  Sebelius.  and  Robert  Wilonsky.com/ezra-­‐ klein/2009/06/health_reform_for_beginners_th_1.  “Health  Reform  for  Beginners:  The  Difference  Between  Socialized  Medicine.  2013.  2012.  The  Wyoming  Department  of  Health  issued  a  report  in  November  2012  that  also  looked  for   offsets  to  pay  for  the  Medicaid  expansion.   53  Texas  Office  of  the  Governor.  Offsets.  is  a  system  under  which  the  government  not  only  funds  but  also   operates  hospitals.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Wyoming.pdf.gripelements.  revised.tx.   51  Wyoming  Department  of  Health.  patients  and  their  health  care  providers  make  health  care  decisions.52   the  federal  government  should  abandon  Medicaid  and  move  to  a  system  of  block  grants  to   states.com/2012/07/gov-­‐perry-­‐tells-­‐sebelius-­‐to-­‐relay-­‐this-­‐message-­‐to-­‐the-­‐president-­‐ texas-­‐rejects-­‐expansion-­‐of-­‐medicaid.  historic   preservation  and  homeland  security  programs.  with  each  state  receiving  a  fixed  amount  to   establish  its  own  state-­‐specific  program  that  might  or  might  not  include  all  the  features  of  the  current                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           “Expanding  Medicaid  in  Ohio:  preliminary  analysis  of  likely  effects.  States  receive  federal  matching  funds   and  administer  the  program  under  federal  rules  that  limit  eligibility  to  certain  groups  and  services  and   that  provide  states  with  flexibility  within  certain  eligibility  and  service  requirements.   and  What  We'll  Be  Getting.washingtonpost.com/pdf/publications/oh_medicaid_expansi on_study_1_15_2013_final_numbered.  Medicaid  in  no   way  meets  the  definition  of  “socialized  medicine.  including  transportation.  Medicaid  does   not  do  these  things.  Socialized  medicine  as  practiced  in  Western   Europe.html.   http://governor.wyo.pdf.”  pp.   http://a5e8c023c8899218225edfa4b02e4d9734e01a28.  15.”  July  9.   Block  grants:  Some  Texas  lawmakers  suggest  that  Medicaid  is  a  “one-­‐size-­‐fits-­‐all”  program  that  fails  to   meet  the  state’s  unique  demographic  and  industry  needs.”  July  9.”51   Objections  to  Medicaid  Expansion   The  ACA  and  the  Medicaid  expansion  have  raised  concerns  in  Texas  and  some  other  states  about  its   long-­‐term  costs  for  state  and  local  budgets.  is  too   much  for  a  program  that  has  already  overburdened  the  state  financially.  Objections  to  expansion  in  Texas   primarily  revolve  around  three  arguments:   • • • Medicaid  is  “socialized  medicine”  like  that  practiced  in  western  Europe  and  expanding  it  would   spread  it  further.”  November  2012.  “Gov.state.   52  Texas  Office  of  the  Governor.  as  well  as  other  concerns.tx.  p.  “The  Optional  Expansion  Of  Medicaid  In  Wyoming:  Costs.  Single-­‐Payer  Health  Care.  available  at   http://www.                      28       .gov/default.”54   Medicaid  is  a  federal  insurance  program  that  matches  state  funding  to  provide  health  care  to  eligible.  They  are  petitioning  the  federal  government   to  convert  federal  Medicaid  funding  to  a  block  grant.  January  18.

 The  jobs  created  will  support  hundreds  of  thousands  of  people  and   boost  the  economy.pdf.”  Quarterly  Journal  of  Economics  (1996.”  New  England  Journal  of  Medicine  (September  13.  Experience  in  other  states  indicates  that  the  death  rate  would  fall  by   6.  our  findings  suggest  precisely  the   opposite.  New  revenue  from  insurance  premium  taxes  and  economic  growth   from  the  infusion  of  $100  billion  in  federal  funds  would  provide  additional  revenue  sources.  however.  These.55     Such  studies  led  one  author  from  the  Harvard  study.org/doi/full/10.  and  “Health  Insurance  Eligibility.”  Journal  of  Political  Economics  (1996.     Concerns  that  the  federal  government  will  not  be  able  to  maintain  high  match  rates  in  the  future  are   unlikely  to  become  reality  given  that  Congressional  representatives  and  senators  represent  their  states.  far  exceed  the  amount  Texas  would  be  required   to  contribute  to  expand  Medicaid.  opting  out  of  the  expansion  will  not  reduce  Texans’  federal  tax  burden.  Previous  studies  also  have  found  reductions  of  5.”  July  25.   Furthermore.  http://www.pdf.html.  this  argument  should  not   affect  the  decision  to  extend  Medicaid  coverage  under  the  ACA.   To  ensure  against  this  event.  Utilization  of   Medical  Care  and  Child  Health.hsph.  111:431-­‐466).  so  maximizing  federal  funding  now   would  better  position  Texas  in  the  event  of  any  future  conversion  to  block  grants.princeton.  Texas  could  build  in  an  automatic  “trigger.edu/~jcurrie/publications/saving_babies.edu/news/press-­‐releases/2012-­‐releases/medicaid-­‐expansion-­‐ lower-­‐mortality.  Even  for  lawmakers  who  favor  a  block-­‐grant  approach.  or  28.  Epstein.  preventing  premature  deaths  of  5.  “Saving  Babies:  the  Efficacy  and  Cost  of  Recent  Expansions  of  Medicaid   Eligibility  for  Pregnant  Women.                        29       .   Cost  burdens:  As  noted  above.  nor  will  expanding   Medicaid  increase  it.harvard.”  such  as  Arizona  is   doing.  state  and  local  governments  currently  fund  all  of  our  expenditures  for   indigent  care  and  in-­‐patient  hospital  costs  for  eligible  incarcerated  individuals.  Katherine  Baicker  and  Arnold  M.  to  conclude:     Sometimes  the  political  rhetoric  is  at  odds  with  the  evidence.  to  reduce  Medicaid  optional  populations  and  services  should  Congress  reduce  the  match  rate  in   the  future.  Epstein.lafollette.  “Expanding  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults  Leads  to  Improved  Health.   http://www.500  Texans  over  five   years.  2012.  and  Benjamin  D.  however.1056/NEJMsa1202099#t=articleTop.   56  Harvard  School  of  Public  Health.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     program.   Governor  Rick  Perry  has  described  extending  Medicaid  to  low-­‐income  adults  as  “adding  more   passengers  to  the  Titanic.  combined  with  hospital  charity  costs.wisc.nejm.  2012).   http://www.  while  the  state  supplies   100  percent  of  funding  for  some  adults  served  in  state  health  care  programs  that  would  be  eligible  for   Medicaid.  The  additional  tax  revenue  will  benefit  state  and  local  governments  and  important                                                                                                                             55  Janet  Currie  and  Jonathan  Gruber.  “Mortality  and  Access   to  Care  After  State  Medicaid  Expansions.  104:1263-­‐1296).  In  fact.  Fewer   Deaths.1  percent  in  the  child  mortality  rate  and  8.Smart.edu/courses/pa882/CurrieGruber.”  It  would  be  closer  to  the  case  to  say  that  failing  to  cover  adults  will  doom   them  like  those  hapless  travelers.5   percent  in  the  infant  mortality  rate  attributable  to  Medicaid  coverage.  Sommers.56     In  Conclusion   Extending  Medicaid  to  low-­‐income  adults  will  save  tens  of  thousands  of  lives  and  improve  millions  more   over  the  next  decade  and  beyond.1  percent  for  adults  under  age  65  if  the  state  expands  Medicaid.700   Texas  adults  in  each  of  the  five  years  following  the  implementation  year.   http://www.  lawmakers  who  favor  a   Medicaid  block  grant  in  particular  should  support  extending  Medicaid  to  low-­‐income  adults:  the   government  typically  bases  block  grants  on  historical  funding  levels.   such  as  claims  that  Medicaid  is  a  ‘broken  program’  or  worse   than  no  insurance  at  all.  Arnold  M.

  The  decision  to  expand  Medicaid  —  or  not  —  will  affect  the  lives  of  millions  of  Texans  for  years  into  the   future  and  is  arguably  one  of  the  most  important  decisions  that  the  Legislature  has  had  to  make  in   decades.  Texas  will  still  have  to  find  additional  state  match  for  many  of   the  eligible  but  unenrolled  children  identified  in  this  report  —  but  without  the  benefit  of  the  additional   state  funds  that  an  expansion  would  free  up  and  without  the  new  revenues  that  the  additional  federal   funding  would  generate.  the  right  decision  is  obvious.  Expanding  Medicaid   would  move  thousands  of  people  into  managed  care  from  these  programs  and  significantly  reduce  the   use  of  expensive  emergency  room  treatment  for  routine  care.     State  and  local  government  and  the  state’s  hospitals  collectively  spend  far  more  on  piecemeal  health   care  for  low-­‐income  Texans  than  the  state’s  expected  match  for  the  expansion.Smart.  infrastructure  and  public  safety.   Without  expanding  Medicaid  to  adults.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     public  purposes  such  as  education.                        30       .  If  politics  are  set  aside.  Businesses  will  benefit  from   healthier  employees  and  lower  employer  insurance  costs.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults         Appendix  A     Statewide.  Regional  &  County  Appendix  Notes                        31       .

  A  county  may  have  multiple  hospital  districts..  cities  and  hospital   districts  in  2011.  since  new  state  match  may  not  be  available.  Preparing  for  Tomorrow:  A  Look  at   State  Medicaid  Program  Spending.  D.C.  83.  the  first  full  year  of  implementation.  since  most  are  below  138  percent  of   poverty.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Appendix  Notes   Appendix  B   This  appendix  contains  statewide  and  regional  summaries  of  caseload  and  funding  estimates  involving   three  enrollment  scenarios  (Limited.S.   Appendix  C   This  appendix  provides  county-­‐level  data  on  actual  unreimbursed  expenditures  for  indigent  and  jail   inmate  health  care  and  total  unreimbursed  health  care  costs  made  by  counties.  and  a  1997  U.  a  public  hospital  within  or  without  the  boundaries  of  a   hospital  district  and  a  County  Indigent  Health  Care  (CIHC)  program  in  a  portion  of  the  county  that  is  not                                                                                                                             57  The  Kaiser  Commission  on  Medicaid  and  the  Uninsured.     The  comparison  uses  federal  funding  estimates  for  2016.  The  Medicaid   expansion  will  cover  most  inpatient  costs  for  these  inmates.  Counties  will  continue  to  be  responsible  for  these  expenses  after   expansion.   Jail  inmates  account  for  a  significant  amount  of  county  unreimbursed  health  care  costs.  Texas  has  finally  begun  to   take  advantage  of  this  ruling.57   The  methodology  allocates  county  shares  of  unreimbursed  health  care  costs  for  a  hospital  district   located  in  two  or  more  counties  to  each  affected  county  according  to  its  share  of  the  district’s  tax  levy.org/medicaid/upload/8380.pdf.  The  summaries  compare  2016  federal  funding  for  the  adult  portion  of  the  expansion  with   2011  local  unreimbursed  health  care  costs  and  2010  actual  hospital  charity  costs.  October  2012).  Enrollment  and  Policy  Trends—Result  from  a  50-­‐State  Medicaid  Budget  Survey   for  State  Fiscal  Years  2012  and  2013  (Washington.   http://www.  since  additional  funding  for  children  will  not  offset  local   costs.                      32       .  Moderate  and  Enhanced)  for  Medicaid  expansion  from  2014   through  2017.  Department  of  Health  and  Human  Services  ruling  makes  otherwise  eligible   inmates  who  spend  more  than  24  hours  in  a  hospital  eligible  for  Medicaid.     The  summaries  also  provide  estimates  for  2017  to  illustrate  the  effect  of  the  change  in  federal  match   from  100  to  95  percent.  It  uses   only  federal  funding  for  the  comparison.  and  in  January  2013  will  begin  Medicaid  enrollment  of  inmates  under  age   19  and  pregnant  women  when  they  become  patients  of  a  medical  institution.     The  regions  used  in  this  analysis  are  the  20  new  Regional  Healthcare  Partnership  (RHP)  regions.  to  provide  a  comprehensive  overview  of  potential  funding.  and  uses  funding   for  the  adult  portion  of  the  expansion  only.  Medicaid  expansion  funds  also  may  not  cover  certain  local  administrative  or  other  health   care  costs  reported  to  DSHS.   Appendix  D  provides  a  listing  of  the  counties  in  these  regions.  p.  Medicaid  funding  does  not  cover   undocumented  individuals  or  individuals  that  exceed  certain  poverty  levels  or  need  services  not  covered   by  Medicaid.  It   further  includes  2016  federal  funding  estimates  for  the  adult  portion  of  the  Medicaid  expansion.  as  they  are  already  eligible.  The  summaries  include  funding  estimates  for  children  as  well  as  children  and   adults  combined.  Medicaid  Today.   The  appendix  includes  unreimbursed  costs  for  health  care  reported  to  the  Texas  Department  of  State   Health  Services  for  the  annual  interest  distribution  from  the  tobacco  settlement.Smart.kff.  Some  unreimbursed   health  care  costs  may  not  be  eligible  for  Medicaid  expansion  funding.  It  also  provides  the  total  unreimbursed  charity  costs  hospitals  incurred  in  2010.

    The  data  in  this  analysis.  behavioral  health.  Reports  to  DSHS  ensure  against  duplication  of  expenses  reported  by  counties  and  hospital   districts  and  so  provide  the  best  representation  of  local  unreimbursed  tax-­‐supported  health  care  costs.   The  Medicaid  expansion  would  offset  some  but  not  all  expenditures  for  indigent  health  care  since   undocumented  immigrants  are  ineligible.  Charity  costs  also   exclude  bad  debt  from  insured  or  partially  insured  persons  as  well  as  a  wide  range  of  other   uncompensated  care.  In   addition.  exclude  charity  costs  of  270  for-­‐profit  hospitals  that  are  not  designated  as   Medicaid  Disproportionate  Share  Hospitals  and  are  not  required  to  report  and  exempts  108  other   hospitals  from  reporting  requirements  due  to:  1=  Hospital  in  county  with  less  than  50.000  population   and  having  whole  county  Health  Professional  Shortage  Area  designation  (78).  some  unreimbursed  costs  for  individuals  above  138%  FPL  who  receive  subsidized  insurance   under  ACA  may  shift  to  bad  debt  if  coinsurance.Smart.  the  costs  shown  are  for  the   county  in  which  the  hospital  is  located.  or  certain  services  or  other  costs  not  covered  by  Medicaid  or  insurance.  such  as  contractual  allowances  made  with  third-­‐party  payors.  Some  hospital   districts  are  countywide  while  others  serve  multiple  counties.  such  as   undocumented  immigrants.  3  =  State  acute  care  and  state  psychiatric  hospitals  (15).  copayments  and  deductibles  are  not  paid.  Also.     Hospital  charity  costs.  for  financially  eligible  patients.  since  Medicaid  and   Medicare  generate  most  of  them  and  a  Medicaid  expansion  would  not  alleviate  them.  the  methodology  assigns  tax  levies  to  the  respective  counties  from  which  they  originate.  the  Medicaid  expansion  would  offset  some  but  not   all  expenditures  for  jail  inmates.                      33       .  local  governments  and  hospitals  will  continue  to  have  unreimbursed   costs  due  to  individuals  who  are  ineligible  for  Medicaid  or  subsidized  insurance  under  ACA.  Some  hospital  districts  do  not  have  a  public   hospital  but  have  arranged  with  one  or  more  hospitals  within  the  district  to  provide  care.  For  hospital  districts  serving  multiple   counties.  specifically  the  portion  applying  to  hospital  in-­‐patient  care  for   otherwise  eligible  inmates.  not  gross  charges.  Tax  levies  apply  only  on  a  county  or  hospital  district  basis.   Charity  costs  exclude  unreimbursed  costs  for  government-­‐sponsored  health  care.  2  =  Shriners  and  Scottish   Rite  hospitals  (3).  Unreimbursed   costs  exclude  $255.  The  Medicaid  expansion  and  ACA  subsidized   insurance  would  offset  most  but  not  all  of  these  costs.  recent  opening  or  not  operational  (12).   usually  those  with  incomes  up  to  200  percent  of  FPL.  determined  to   be  exempt.  health  education  and  awareness  and  other   expenses.  then.  medical  transportation.  consequently.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     in  a  hospital  district  or  the  service  area  of  a  public  hospital.  may  be  from  multiple  counties.  but   several  counties  may  contribute  funds  to  a  single  hospital  district.  Some  public  hospitals  serve  countywide   while  others  serve  an  area  within  the  county.  not  required  to  report  due  to  closure.   Local  Unreimbursed  Health  Care  Costs   These  costs  cover  a  wide  variety  of  costs  including  those  for  health  care  for  indigent  individuals  and  jail   inmates.     Hospital  Charity  Costs   Charity  costs  represent  the  portion  of  overall  uncompensated  care  costs  that  hospitals  must  absorb.    Although  total  federal  funding  for  adults  below  138%  FPL  is  greater  than  local  unreimbursed  health  care   and  hospital  charity  care  costs.  since  undocumented  immigrants  are  not  eligible.  unreimbursed  health  care  expenditures  reported  to  DSHS   for  the  annual  interest  distribution  from  the  tobacco  settlement  reflect  the  county  shares  of  tax  levies   for  the  hospital  district  in  question.4  million  in  hospital  system  costs  unallocated  to  counties.   for  hospital  districts  serving  multiple  counties.  Similarly.  Charity  costs   include  only  estimates  of  actual  operating  expenses.  and  4  =  Other.

  HHSC  estimates  an  annual  average  increase  factor  for  health  care  costs  of  4  percent  per  year.3  percent  and  for  CHIP  is  71.  to  estimate   unreimbursed  health  care  costs  and  hospital  charity  costs  for  2016.  although  they  vary  somewhat  due  to   different  caseload  assumptions.  2019.   2018.  as  well  as  provide   health  care  to  uninsured  children.  respectively.  and  not  on  a  county  basis.  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties  in  Texas.D.  Ph.Smart.  conducted  by  Michael   E.   These  estimates  do  not  take  into  account  currently  insured  adults  that  may  move  to  Medicaid  as  a  result   of  the  expansion.   The  analysis  does  not  compare  Medicaid  funding  for  the  eligible  but  not  enrolled  population  to   unreimbursed  health  care  costs  or  hospital  charity  costs  in  this  study.  will  provide  economic  stimulus  to  counties.  Cline.   Combining  caseloads  with  HHSC  estimates  of  the  costs  per  adult  and  child  enrollee  by  year  and  by   federal/state  share  resulted  in  total  federal.  and  commissioned  by  Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South   Texas.  HHSC’s  estimates  fall  within  the  Limited  to  Enhanced  scenarios  and  fit  most   closely  to  the  Moderate  enrollment  scenario  presented  here.  These  funds.   The  scenarios  were  escalated  over  time  based  on  HHSC  estimates  of  annual  caseload  increases  and   allocated  to  counties  based  on  their  share  of  the  state’s  population  of  adults  aged  18  through  64  below   138  percent  of  FPL  and  children  under  18  years  below  200  percent  of  FPL.  Ph.   Federal  match  rates  for  the  adult  expansion  population  are  2014-­‐2016.17  percent.  Inc.D.  however.   HHSC  estimates  a  phase-­‐in  of  50  percent  implemented  in  2014  (an  eight-­‐month  year)  and  75  percent   implementation  in  2015  with  full  implementation  in  2016.  since   hospitals  may  serve  individuals  from  neighboring  counties.  95  percent.  and  2020  and  beyond.  93  percent.   The  analysis  also  compares  projected  Medicaid  funding  to  the  combined  unreimbursed  health  care  costs   and  hospital  charity  costs  only  on  a  regional  and  statewide  basis.  100  percent.  Federal  match  rates  remain  the   same  as  under  current  law  for  children  who  are  eligible  now  but  not  enrolled.  if  known.  94  percent.  Employers  insure  about  675.  the  increased  caseloads  would  more  than  offset   the  difference  at  the  state  level.  This  study  provides  for  low.  for  a  more  direct  comparison  with   the  2016  and  2017  funding  estimates.  States  will  be  able  to  use  CHIP  for   the  Medicaid  expansion  so  children  moving  from  CHIP  to  Medicaid  will  continue  to  be  funded  at  CHIP   rates.  Statewide  estimates  of  future  costs   and  enrollment  for  these  populations  vary.  smaller  counties  tend  to  have  higher  margins  of  error  than  larger  counties.  state  and  all  funds  estimates  by  year.  and  Steve  Murdock.  such  as  undocumented  immigrants.  moderate  and  high  enrollment   scenarios  (identified  as  “Limited.  90  percent.  Even  though  the  federal  match  rate  will   decline  from  100  percent  in  2016  to  95  percent  in  2017.   The  funding  estimates  presented  here  may  differ  from  other  previously  published  estimates  because  of   different  methodologies.  while  the  local  level  may  have  more  variation.  except  that  the  federal   rate  for  CHIP  will  go  up  by  23  percentage  points  for  2016  through  September  2019.000  adults  below  138  percent  FPL  in  Texas  and  another                      34       .  2017.  Counties   and  regions  may  use  this  factor  or  a  more  specific  local  or  regional  factor.”  “Moderate”  and  “Enhanced”)  based  on  2010  data  from  a  statewide   analysis.  The  current  federal   match  rate  for  Medicaid  is  59.  primarily  involving  enrollment  rate  assumptions  for  adults  and  children.  The  data  do  not   include  populations  that  would  not  be  eligible  for  Medicaid.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Funding  Estimates   Medicaid  expansion  funding  estimates  depend  upon  the  cost  per  enrollee  and  the  actual  number  of   eligible  adults  and  children  who  enroll  because  of  the  expansion.  since  these  children  are  currently   Medicaid-­‐eligible.  County-­‐level  caseload   data  have  margins  of  error  that  largely  track  with  the  Census  margins  of  error  for  counties  and  vary  from   county  to  county.

58  (Some  portion  of  those  who  provide   their  own  insurance  may  be  between  18  and  26  years  old  and  covered  on  their  parents’  policies.  as  well  as  the  data  necessary  to   adjust  the  estimates.  “B27016:  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  And  Type  By  Ratio  Of  Income  To  Poverty  Level   In  The  Past  12  Months  By  Age.000  in  total.000  provide  for  their  own  insurance.S.  moderate  or  high  levels  of  enrollment.  Since  this  study  provides  a  wide  range  of   estimates  depending  on  low.”   http://factfinder2.census.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     194.  readers  can  make  their  own  judgments  and  adjustments  to  the  estimates  to   account  for  any  shifting  from  the  insured  population  to  Medicaid.                      35       .  2011  American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.  Census  Bureau.)   Studies  conducted  in  other  states  have  found  it  difficult  to  estimate  with  confidence  what  portion  of  the   currently  insured  would  shift  to  Medicaid  with  an  expansion.xhtml?refresh=t.                                                                                                                             58  U.Smart.  about  869.

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults    

   
Appendix  B     Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Local  Spending   for  Health  Care     Statewide  &  Regional  Data  

     

   

               36  

   

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults    

   

               37  

   

Smart,  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults    

 
                   38      

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        39       .Smart.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        40       .

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                          41       .

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                          42       .

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        43       .

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        44       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        45       .Smart.

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        46       .Smart.

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        47       .Smart.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        48       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        49       .Smart.

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        50       .Smart.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        51       .

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        52       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        53       .Smart.

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        54       .Smart.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        55       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                        56       .Smart.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                          57       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults         Appendix  C     Impact  of  Medicaid  Expansion  on     Local  Health  Care  Spending       Countywide  Data                        58       .Smart.

244      $                        744.417      $                      451.821      $                  7.056      $                                          -­‐          $                9.030      $  2.313.927      $                            5.425.163.709      $                      500.933      $                    929.471      $            69.036.575      $                                          -­‐          $                4.692.258.639      $                  9.996      $                      481.256      $          113.687.247.393.969.757      $            17.277      $                                          -­‐          $                2.292      $                              6.319.568      $              11.014.721.870      $                3.664.119      $            29.872.796.544.924      $                    803.733      $10.207      $              8.658.006      $            11.079      $            10.672      $                1.203      $                1.909.868      $                            7.857      $                    180.262.914      $            19.658.573.968      $                3.101.182      $                1.499      $            71.936.203.291      $              26.402      $                          23.337.851      $        136.473      $                4.145.547.255      $                6.937      $                    903.114.136.673.901.868      $                8.829.945      $                    609.657      $                8.291.985.067      $                          50.050      $                  4.099      $                3.376.631      $                    302.561      $                1.552      $                      168.170      $                        20.664      $              4.357      $                1.583      $                1.376      $                                          -­‐          $                1.829.154.307.624.068.542.122.374.911.434      $              93.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults         Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures       Statewide  Total     Anderson   Andrews   Angelina   Aransas   Archer   Armstrong   Atascosa   Austin   Bailey   Bandera   Bastrop   Baylor   Bee   Bell   Bexar   Blanco   Borden   Bosque   Bowie   Brazoria   Brazos   Brewster   Briscoe   Brooks   Brown   Burleson   Burnet   Caldwell   Calhoun   Callahan   Cameron   Camp   Carson   Cass   Castro   Chambers   County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario                  $      258.877      $            84.680      $              18.272      $                                          -­‐          $                6.096.490.458      $            80.320.250.403      $                      577.460      $                2.290.241      $                5.892      $            12.434      $                                          -­‐          $                3.703.727.594      $                                          -­‐          $            12.444      $                      207.051      $            16.306      $                  5.102      $                      103.635      $                1.812      $                6.006.462      $                                          -­‐          $                      129.471.135.439.573      $                      392.508.366      $                      826.262      $                      584.764      $              1.182.637.714.763      $                    260.650.835.586      $            14.371      $                1.351.716.485.615.191      $                  9.128      $                7.659.414      $        573.108.540      $        286.305      $                  8.481.277      $                    450.248.974      $                  8.456      $                2.846      $                        280.502      $          254.037.034      $                        16.104.331      $                    125.110      $                2.145.359      $            52.216.126.970      $              40.219      $                3.084      $              2.151                        59       .325.632.701      $                    768.436      $            10.202      $                      207.884      $  7.774.726.141.670      $            42.756      $                            4.335.099      $                5.622.605.793.691      $              23.262.930.928.786      $                  4.977      $                      467.086      $                                          -­‐          $                      342.538      $                        11.031      $                                          -­‐          $                1.608.149.419      $                1.677      $                  4.894.056      $                3.794      $            27.149      $                2.185      $                                          -­‐          $                1.975      $                        10.664.944      $                  2.899      $                  8.104      $                1.901      $                      528.414      $                3.828      $                                      -­‐          $                      524.276      $                3.466      $                2.209.347.684      $                1.739.177      $                      440.368      $                                          -­‐          $                      363.453      $            15.867      $                2.176      $                                          -­‐          $                9.270.847                  $                    163.489      $                                          -­‐          $            21.503      $                        31.271      $                    491.782      $                  3.124      $              14.368.327      $              57.399      $        188.151      $                3.501      $                      756.647      $                  1.378      $                        789.934      $                      586.302      $        117.039.852.548.825      $                      362.678      $                      709.201      $        356.665      $                      551.845      $                      129.258.659.407      $                4.265      $          175.799.340.511      $                                          -­‐          $                2.458.186.873      $                    180.864.862      $                                          -­‐          $                4.939      $              19.927.686.733.973      $              1.431.951.681.696      $                                          -­‐          $                5.290      $            18.571.230      $                                          -­‐          $            10.546      $              1.356      $                1.661.755      $                7.515      $            35.797      $            29.628.413.824      $            29.836.388      $                4.219      $              2.010.667.086.475.154.862      $  4.728.000      $            18.194.023      $                    884.213.468.909.217.221.363      $                    133.134.Smart.651      $                                          -­‐          $                4.851      $            43.401.921      $              2.037.112.169      $                        38.057      $                  6.434.540      $            26.297.841.556      $                  5.059.401      $                4.929      $                          13.131      $              5.814.547.564      $                                          -­‐          $                2.164.688      $  1.577      $                1.242      $        130.638.123      $                4.911      $              16.046      $                  3.452.290      $            13.992.172.910      $            17.699.673.984      $          775.766      $                    215.121      $                8.235      $                6.247      $                4.390      $                7.504      $                    170.209      $              47.969      $                2.218.202      $              20.063.922      $              39.636      $                      587.

235.339.580      $                  1.122      $                4.403      $            25.421      $                      542.858      $                6.381.947.669      $                                          -­‐          $                          84.996      $            73.767      $                2.123.825.420      $                3.011.098      $                3.594      $            10.492      $          412.141      $                      831.453      $                  1.136.052.740      $                  6.177.096      $                      666.515      $          178.019      $              2.179      $                4.847      $                      661.797      $                1.889.721      $        131.540      $                                          -­‐          $                1.823.657      $              6.355.207.928      $              17.163.134.711.261.946.855.874      $                1.085      $            12.941      $                2.198.284      $            20.979      $                  1.251      $                2.190.084      $                1.411      $              10.040.588.414.782      $              11.065      $              11.861.512      $                      705.576      $                2.426      $                    120.873      $            20.960.652      $                3.965      $              27.291      $                      318.904.271.113.512      $                        21.873      $                1.534.988      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      388.836.620.736      $        112.919.431      $                5.141      $              10.451      $                1.034      $            23.006      $                  2.861.593      $                1.959      $              37.312.366.792      $              31.230      $                      389.791      $                  1.085.476      $                        62.358      $                                      -­‐          $                      530.263.019.489.904      $                        32.632.217      $                2.387.955.855.759      $                      815.153.580.879      $                5.018      $                        692.191.948      $                4.644.247      $                      855.072.109      $            27.527.034      $                2.997      $                      877.986      $                1.246.327.323      $                1.819      $          10.081      $                5.065      $                8.173      $                3.666      $            13.916      $                  2.930      $                      875.777      $            14.691.343      $                      258.349.310.120      $                    174.545.740      $                1.615.417.708      $                4.508.116      $                1.505      $                    189.848      $                8.859      $                3.661      $              2.916      $                      991.235      $                  3.385      $                      226.284      $                3.222      $              55.200      $                    384.604      $                    202.374      $              11.958      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                        10.936      $        380.140.829      $                    296.639      $                  3.506      $              14.183.590.436.384      $                5.493      $                2.911.066.365      $                7.092      $                1.951.179      $                    261.687      $                    379.678      $        611.836      $                3.962.968.594      $                1.036.225.181.398      $                1.989      $                1.668.108      $                  7.136.880      $                      969.569      $                      745.464.727.774      $              5.319      $                  1.167      $                1.202     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                7.947      $                                          -­‐          $                      190.066.255.891.382      $                  3.172      $              4.011      $                    215.996      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                7.302      $                      105.529      $            34.801      $                          40.649      $                8.512      $          826.Smart.451      $                2.563      $          152.147      $                  8.901      $                      938.120      $                        35.080      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $        240.647      $                8.202.250      $                3.920      $                  1.533.927      $                1.234.331      $                  1.608      $                      516.544.742      $                      952.804.135.411      $                3.386.622      $                2.430      $                        20.998      $            11.993      $                  2.317      $            14.623.016.630.450      $                4.134.384      $        304.375      $                2.806      $        189.102.126.431      $                  8.286      $                  2.879.258      $                8.921.762.192      $                  6.997      $                            8.153.643.957      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      398.562.554      $                                          -­‐          $            85.186      $                          39.713      $                1.097      $            81.355.449.226     Cherokee   Childress   Clay   Cochran   Coke   Coleman   Collin   Collingsworth   Colorado   Comal   Comanche   Concho   Cooke   Coryell   Cottle   Crane   Crockett   Crosby   Culberson   Dallam   Dallas   Dawson   Deaf  Smith   Delta   Denton   DeWitt   Dickens   Dimmit   Donley   Duval   Eastland   Ector   Edwards   El  Paso   Ellis   Erath   Falls   Fannin   Fayette   Fisher   Floyd                      60       .142      $                2.039.863      $            41.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                    264.048      $                1.042      $            17.067      $                                      -­‐          $                            4.853.660.494.366.548.507      $                      750.533.613      $                6.900.232.990      $                        42.797.074      $                1.730.175      $                1.791.674.957      $                        25.818.105.738.753      $                            2.482      $                  1.256      $        449.322.641.509.113.331      $                      512.108.085      $                1.673      $                      716.735      $                                      -­‐          $                                  980      $                        92.311      $                      838.159      $                                      -­‐          $                    755.224      $                      602.568.867      $                      616.492      $                2.075.539      $            70.243      $                7.778      $                1.893.790.282.084      $                      310.801      $                      335.928.683      $                1.275.869      2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $            12.474.984.111.225      $                      101.133.208      $                      402.915.560      $                1.069.575      $                                      -­‐          $                        41.064      $                1.570.188      $                1.625      $                  3.803      $                6.487      $                9.267      $                            7.677      $                  4.302.587      $              27.941      $                  4.605      $                4.141.569.270.608      $                      332.972.722      $                                      -­‐          $                    134.188      $              19.682.140      $                      241.791.898.420.

742      $                      675.542.488      $            17.970.434.090      $                    247.812      $                    226.893      $            87.817.607      $                  2.567      $            10.781.589.536      $                2.945      $                      973.613      $                1.517      $            13.899      $                1.753      $                            5.698.367      $              20.225      $                  3.588      $            32.362.847      $                  4.156.681      $                1.394.523.222      $                3.059.009      $            21.028      $        141.997.168      $                      442.247      $                2.032      $                    320.475      $            15.818      $            18.743.062.904.849      $            15.576      $                9.253      $                      551.317      $                      342.708      $              11.012      $                7.456.965      $              49.933      $                      608.073      $              38.128      $                  2.169      $                            2.375      $                    738.419      $                1.614.807.966.441.535      $              14.593      $                3.962.795.857.707.935      $                      818.273.441.415.449      $                    708.458      $                5.069      $                1.271      $            72.784.206.849      $            63.442      $                        37.056      $                1.618.657.281      $                        45.549      $                      533.147.267.559      $                9.107.358      $                  1.602.696.920      $                8.931      $            34.914      $                                      -­‐          $                            5.556.377      $                  3.982      $                6.337      $              45.753.181.316.345.225      $              38.719.581      $                5.853      $            33.869      $                    114.579      $            36.826.128.336      $                      456.528.758.642.965      $              16.501      $                2.924     Foard   Fort  Bend   Franklin   Freestone   Frio   Gaines   Galveston   Garza   Gillespie   Glasscock   Goliad   Gonzales   Gray   Grayson   Gregg   Grimes   Guadalupe   Hale   Hall   Hamilton   Hansford   Hardeman   Hardin   Harris   Harrison   Hartley   Haskell   Hays   Hemphill   Henderson   Hidalgo   Hill   Hockley   Hood   Hopkins   Houston   Howard   Hudspeth   Hunt   Hutchinson   Irion                      61       .244      $                        744.126.702.543      $  1.813.032.141.667      $              15.869      $              71.532     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                                          -­‐          $            17.057.844.148      $    1.156.653      $            20.445      $                          58.151      $                1.220      $                    133.526      $              20.525      $                                          -­‐          $                2.427      $                                          -­‐          $                          23.011.737.777.523      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                2.478      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      642.059      $                      326.302      $                    225.561.968      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $                      265.723      $            11.358      $            52.109      $              2.255      $                9.388      $          191.630.255      $                1.523      $                8.342      $                3.778.256      $                1.436      $                3.575      $                1.503      $                1.099      $            10.341.779      $            15.571      $                  2.726.355.337.860.017      $                                      -­‐          $                    718.921.594      $                4.441.858.241      $                          58.538.939      $                2.459      $                      887.316.821      $                8.527.257      $                2.719      $                      305.304      $                1.810      $                4.017.371.710.580.104      $              10.525.631      $                3.862      $            28.866      $              12.127      $              10.336      $                1.561      $          73.188      $                      543.549.301      $            21.158      $        190.497      $                2.631      $            39.003.711.521.123      $                    797.677.328.500      $              21.398      $              86.279      $                8.327.314      $              22.361      $            16.769      $                                          -­‐          $                      330.685.241      $              47.711      $                6.700      $          10.239.575.277      $                                          -­‐          $                1.777      $                1.619      $              1.783      $                        20.592      $                6.801.792      $              17.935      $                        26.577      $            39.031      $                      636.760.859      $        306.517      $              11.114.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                                      -­‐          $              6.034.761.647      $                  1.327.181.822      $                1.187      $                  8.424.750.620.652      $            15.453.926      $                5.994      $                8.668      $              53.042.880      $              11.600.199      $                3.Smart.537      $                8.173      $                1.616.241.275      $                      945.475.370      $                          10.058.744      $                8.151      $        645.951      $                1.109      $                7.442      $                1.965      $                      245.811      $                  1.766      $                2.845.775      $              2.948.224      $                5.454.513.067      $                      767.354      $                      247.665      $                      427.240.325      $        588.062.290      $                      418.995      $            12.139.616      $                      696.323.227      $            22.515      $                4.467      $                      805.249.667      $                5.012.999.791.986      $              10.855.116      $                                          -­‐          $                      355.569.929.885.280.383      $            12.929.743.172      $                1.792.200      $                9.787.634      $                                      -­‐          $                    309.471      $                4.715      $                2.865      $                    124.850      $                  3.741      $                        578.277      $            17.998.512.095.863      $            28.851.672      $                1.299      $                    265.805      $                    120.889      $                7.599.486      $            24.747      $              3.694.339      $                      709.724.802      $                        598.067      $                    356.366      $                4.927      $                6.171      $          413.647.811      $                9.623      $                                      -­‐          $                        45.498      $                      275.847.032      $                1.381      $                2.116.227.800      $                                      -­‐          $              2.038.717.665.733.330      $                1.217      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      108.157      $                    317.783.792.849      $                  4.403.931      $                                          -­‐          $        331.421.178.671.978      $                    152.966      $            16.879.772      $                                      -­‐          $                    271.997.751.145      $                      239.654      $                1.815.450.301.293.273.649.266.314.203      $                      850.001      $                1.427.975.198      $                7.

608      $                    211.109      $                9.472.301.403      $                1.072.955.862      $              13.407      $                6.729.074      $                2.799      $                      579.848      $                3.648      $                                      -­‐          $                    106.061      $                      763.765      $                1.771      $                                          -­‐          $                      255.158      $                6.336      $                  1.583      $                        48.094      $                      296.491.217.089.584      $              21.982.191      $                      508.119.093.390.440.595.368      $                  4.906.201.856      $                4.635      $            12.587.427.932      $                          28.505      $                          56.641.762      $                        41.168.181      $            10.189      $                2.870      $                      231.772.661      $                            7.947.067.203      $                1.687      $                                      -­‐          $              1.259      $                1.210.744      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      106.623.395.671.369      $                  8.322      $                3.151.758.423      $                6.969      $                          75.889.701      $            12.130.368.584.942      $            22.614      $                7.422      $                  2.184      $        140.627      $                      175.689      $                      390.599.378.759.188      $                              8.391      $                    270.469      $                    341.161      $            14.013      $                                          -­‐          $                          54.042      $            15.851      $                            61.079      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                          88.661      $                  4.726      $                      558.504.626.547      $                1.240      $                1.537      $                      951.625      $                  8.032      $              26.104.704      $                    165.878      $                        49.776      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                4.818      $              1.077.055.803      $                  5.946      $                9.632.414      $                5.906.586.876      $                1.320      $              1.295      $                                          -­‐          $            17.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                        17.483.874      $                5.315      $                  8.438      $              22.632      $                      640.945      $                            1.472      $                  2.518      $                        99.300      $                9.404      $            66.340      $                3.575.947      $                        142.704      $                      132.736      $              30.054      $                    472.913      $                      841.217.748.639      $                3.699.461.205.510      $            26.827      $                                          -­‐          $            40.876      $              22.087      $            14.145      $              19.519      $        107.487      $                8.533.605      $            19.924     Jack   Jackson   Jasper   Jeff  Davis   Jefferson   Jim  Hogg   Jim  Wells   Johnson   Jones   Karnes   Kaufman   Kendall   Kenedy   Kent   Kerr   Kimble   King   Kinney   Kleberg   Knox   La  Salle   Lamar   Lamb   Lampasas   Lavaca   Lee   Leon   Liberty   Limestone   Lipscomb   Live  Oak   Llano   Loving   Lubbock   Lynn   Madison   Marion   Martin   Mason   Matagorda   Maverick                      62       .089.747.882.033      $                2.800      $              36.368      $                    209.268.765      $                      309.802.606.201.890      $                2.031      $                1.341      $                1.675      $                                          -­‐          $                5.625      $                2.290      $                4.062      $                      899.203      $                      839.066.877.223      $            10.687.989.773      $                                      -­‐          $                    376.691      $                1.272      $                1.533      $                      450.014      $                        313.706      $                4.863      $                      851.269      $          145.590      $                    566.373      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                        93.115.992      $                    535.676      $                      953.076      $                9.271.352.354.564      $                      213.440.998      $                8.055.507      $                  9.857.174      $                3.962      $                6.757.222      $                        45.465      $                    777.621.598.867      $                      864.997      $                    115.087      $            87.301      $                3.194      $                4.615.429.652      $                3.605.722      $                7.210      $                  7.165.223      $                        289.674.803      $            19.430      $                1.256      $                5.136      $                      537.856      $                4.975.759      $                1.027      $                  1.317      $                9.530.669      $                                          -­‐          $                      880.907.947      $                      144.088      $              26.882      $                  1.176.958.827.303      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      885.333.602      $                        35.116      $                      967.059      $          189.346      $                    320.401.331      $                  6.209.770      $                1.Smart.677.056.526      $                1.872      $                6.298.228      $            16.507      $                        80.619.062      $                        12.470      $                3.768.401.495.816      $              10.446      $                    310.053      $                2.767      $                      788.934      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      548.889      $                          45.651      $                  2.682.460.878.010      $                        27.310.852      $                          92.923      $              13.428      $                      790.478      $                  7.794      $                1.567.413.188.391      $            15.286.105.474      $                      724.388.385.096      $                          65.263.838.942      $                  6.903      2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $                2.243.715.574      $                  2.944.788      $                3.061.482      $                  7.429      $                1.606.000      $                                      -­‐          $                        65.882.557      $                      209.035.749      $                2.488.801.038      $                    107.071.366      $                7.972      $                6.521.940      $            13.506.672      $            11.939.233      $                1.030      $                2.949.049      $            16.713.717.432.335      $              9.777.111.247.158      $                4.732      $              19.952      $                3.745      $                4.213.697.667      $                  1.281.754.546      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                7.490      $              21.409.532      $              15.313.466      $                  3.293      $                1.192     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $            20.967      $            11.471      $                            4.174      $                        31.240      $                      105.944      $            16.

036      $                                      -­‐          $                        14.269.441      $                7.588.646.089      $                      675.893      $                3.064.922      $                4.417      $                        366.356      $              25.203      $              23.782.648.226      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                    590.354.133      $            92.692      $                3.738.717.720      $                  4.600      $                        398.103      $            18.039.863      $                        57.282      $                      115.230.771.826      $                      680.953      $            17.897      $                      190.963      $                      904.127      $                5.340.261.555      $                  5.798.244      $                2.087.252.051.110      $                  6.269      $            17.783      $                      372.600      $                      172.344.524      $            11.405      $              62.935.497      $              1.648.810.457      $                2.227      $                    631.024      $                9.175.373.742      $                2.657      $                  7.337      $                1.701.063.360.395.184.124      $                5.598      $            34.924.934      $                    165.252.296.787.853      $            22.627      $                  1.565      $                  3.967      $                      509.538      $                      127.975      $                2.673      $                2.185      $                3.929      $                                      -­‐          $                    420.917      $                                      -­‐          $                    131.921.629      $                1.274.750.879      $                7.966.555.747.816      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $                1.748      $                1.582      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                5.366     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                      179.379.494.512      $                  5.368      $                1.525      $                        59.514      $                2.979.831      $                8.047      $                9.065      $            40.269      $                7.433.275      $                    452.723      $              12.867.700      $                          92.921      $                  1.177.533      $            15.251      $            41.281.704      $              10.010.854      $              55.937.354      $                1.455.834.329.807.447      $            28.790      $              13.017.832      $                      624.126      $                6.835.389.469.487.173.578.369      $                5.440      $            24.201      $                6.894.003      $                3.096.912      $                5.817      $                2.301      $              24.697      $                          16.634      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                3.035      $                1.625      $            15.037      $                5.120.074      $                    110.006.395.054      $              33.960.482.833      $                                      -­‐          $                        97.224.152      $                6.250      $                      753.838.511.840      $            14.092      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      368.883.775      $          125.598.939.038.022.457      $                    481.373      $            25.458.339      $                2.827.557.619      $            11.353      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $            50.425      $                  8.568      $                      865.392      $                1.004      $                4.603      $                      295.050      $                      170.332      $                1.336.699.950      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $            48.086.537      $                      468.923.379      $                            2.407      $                                      -­‐          $                    164.733      $                    396.210.168      $                  4.342      $            18.351.335      $                                          -­‐          $                1.288      $            28.958.433      $                        37.504      $                4.890      $          137.848      $            35.344      $            10.775      $                1.122      $            25.050      $                1.746      $                      550.249.704      $              10.914.753.595.574      $            10.373.202      $              1.067      $              12.968      $                3.023      $                            3.034      $                5.105.170      $                  8.426      $                5.783.529.923      $                      168.396.946.310      $            31.956.283.391.155      $                1.823      $                2.030      $            63.156      $                      268.Smart.997.107      $                      587.079      $                3.582.018      $              15.559.635.956.776      $                    273.899.977.333      $              39.723.597      $            57.781      $                7.592      $                            2.437      $                9.770      $                  4.060      $            87.545.620.804.327.004.557      $                3.523      $                    134.588      $                    591.550.439      $        101.747.615      $            11.620      $              1.972      $                2.154.877      $        140.454.147.990      $                  1.850      $                2.751.504      $                  7.316      $                      525.924.693      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                    485.642.528      $                    510.795      $                          80.415      $                3.062      $                3.980.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                                      -­‐          $              5.990      $                        480.781      $          189.104      $                3.780.318.175      $                        24.977      $                      271.616.819      $                      813.865      $                4.396      $                        810.411.618      $                      274.438      $                      686.669.880.407.735.411      $                2.272.350.813.113      $              25.721      $            18.856      $            14.953      $            11.353      $                        89.271.785      $                5.332.004      $                  5.899     McCulloch   McLennan   McMullen   Medina   Menard   Midland   Milam   Mills   Mitchell   Montague   Montgomery   Moore   Morris   Motley   Nacogdoches   Navarro   Newton   Nolan   Nueces   Ochiltree   Oldham   Orange   Palo  Pinto   Panola   Parker   Parmer   Pecos   Polk   Potter   Presidio   Rains   Randall   Reagan   Real   Red  River   Reeves   Refugio   Roberts   Robertson   Rockwall   Runnels                      63       .521.516      $                      220.099.265      $                  1.495      $                  6.181      $                      348.855.498      $                1.872      $                      355.664      $                1.797.102      $                1.099.656      $              54.114.921      $                  9.916      $                      183.284.198      $            46.976      $                5.283.417.172      $              12.693      $                      599.397      $                4.956.585      $                                      -­‐          $                        29.094      $                8.

454      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $            79.665.684      $                1.538      $                1.232.628      $                3.054.502      $                  6.470.089.045      $                                          -­‐          $            17.453.237      $                      525.858.464.448.718      $              13.985.253.004      $                6.902     Rusk   Sabine   San  Augustine   San  Jacinto   San  Patricio   San  Saba   Schleicher   Scurry   Shackelford   Shelby   Sherman   Smith   Somervell   Starr   Stephens   Sterling   Stonewall   Sutton   Swisher   Tarrant   Taylor   Terrell   Terry   Throckmorton   Titus   Tom  Green   Travis   Trinity   Tyler   Upshur   Upton   Uvalde   Val  Verde   Van  Zandt   Victoria   Walker   Waller   Ward   Washington   Webb   Wharton                      64       .285      $                2.695      $                  1.573      $              57.735      $                  7.855.121.543      $                        569.012.480      $                8.561      $                1.735.888      $                  4.746      $            18.542.337.182      $              13.598      $                7.489      $                  4.127.826.291      $                    324.168      $                3.079      $                    742.230      $                4.596      $                5.677.490.374.130.616      $                      299.368      $            14.419.307.692      $                3.235      $                1.600      $            32.737      $                3.820      $                      316.150      $                      247.298.950      $              40.478      $            38.433.440      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                    716.041      $            10.463      $                2.010.166.741.880      $                1.639.582      $                1.693.458      $            54.664      $                2.374      $                2.672      $                  3.590.265.532.979.042      $                7.209.032.768      $              24.343.809      $                  3.018.110.169      $            13.892.864      $                      889.716      $                      460.031.801.686.455      $                5.628      $                    344.129      $                                          -­‐          $                5.745.069.432.456.350      $                      655.778      $                        15.201.438      $              15.855.150.117      $            18.758      $            51.443.980      $            23.864      $                3.136.771.837      $            23.962      $                                      -­‐          $                    275.488      $                        537.880.924      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                          17.698      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      575.684.298      $            87.576      $            11.231      $            10.870      $              48.701      $        429.277.226.185      $                    199.991      $                2.741      $          372.002.013      $                1.996.208      $                      447.465      $              70.192      $        268.598.322      $                  7.101      $              13.080     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                4.291      $            10.565      $                      831.490      $                1.962      $            12.887      $                        622.864      $                  4.579.238      $                  9.614      $            10.245      $                    366.945      $              19.162.832.534.180      $                2.832      $                1.923      $            42.406      $                    200.497      $                4.697.604      $            15.151.291.646      $              31.662.298.775.560.332.218.231      $                      387.435.351      $                2.462      $                      421.457.485      $                            2.086      $            16.280.690      $                6.865      $        171.569      $              33.956      $                9.804      $                2.194      $                1.393      $                  4.836      $                      397.815      $                                      -­‐          $                    333.620.538.245      $                4.715      $                      645.020.053      $                        13.664.682      $                3.076      $                6.453.165      $                        651.612      $                                      -­‐          $                    337.302.297.505      $                1.784.486.363      $            22.041.794      $                      775.099.746.152.166      $                      514.598.424.596      $                4.218      $                    686.131.758      $                  1.484      $                1.618      $                5.575.015.472      $                2.283.381      $                      481.101.287      $                3.560.282      $                1.660.290      $                  1.641.400.968.935.147      $                8.323      $          15.178.359.328      $                      317.754.300      $              16.209      $                4.730      $              11.487      $                    285.805      $                  2.172      $                2.120.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                    418.593      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                      167.624      $              31.703      $                      867.011      $                5.884.912.990      $                      262.885      $                2.068      $                3.336      $            15.018      $            15.174.055.278.164      $          580.095      $                1.360      $                                      -­‐          $              3.555      $                      668.134.250.729      $                2.Smart.200.377      $            61.844      $                        81.457      $                3.765      $            26.577      $                      383.050.469.681.896      $        267.170.818      $              32.685.939      $              22.939.732      $            11.944      $                  1.765      $            24.212      $              83.370      $                6.025      $                8.852.391      $                      819.899      $                1.503      $                6.876      $                1.379      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $              2.146      $                1.775.024.217.164.265.171.623      $            29.284      $            11.433.662      $              18.821      $                      807.579      $            14.798      $                1.615      $                4.217.284      $                                      -­‐          $                            2.247.351.787      $                    110.643      $              2.760      $        150.879      $            25.662.797      $                        58.540.731.175.412      $                3.254.203.165.881      $            36.746.624.075.629.862      $                1.845      $                2.423      $        275.148      $                      286.915      $                    610.858      $                      346.159      $                      990.812.298.692.529.197.291      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                2.297      $          118.332      $                    721.671      2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $            14.486      $                                      -­‐          $                                      -­‐          $                            4.538      $        113.560      $                    147.500      $                1.925.637      $                    438.471      $        156.689.666      $                      225.

195      $            14.099.581      $                3.756.237      $                2.589      $              23.147      $                  7.235.202      $                2.531      $            35.534      $                3.943      $                5.704      $                1.Smart.747.828.226.932.656      $                4.381      $            52.127.132      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                4.684      $            63.812      $                3.909      $                8.868.443.061      $                      582.103      $                2.571      $                  4.105.026.434.385.405.717.227      $                3.810.905      $                1.253.774      $                      385.099.449.837.286.929      $                3.217.470      $              28.540.854.366.499      $                1.750.499      $                5.349      $                        36.769      $                                          -­‐          $                2.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Impact  of  the  Medicaid  Expansion  on  Counties    2011  Total    2011  County   Hospital   Indigent   District  or   Health  Care  &   City/County   Unreimbursed   Unreimbursed   Jail  Health   Health  Care   Care  Costs     Expenditures      $                                      -­‐          $              3.764.232.310      $          137.119.145.980      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          $                1.766.433      $                3.273.041.894.165      $              16.406      $                4.545      $                1.747     Wheeler   Wichita   Wilbarger   Willacy   Williamson   Wilson   Winkler   Wise   Wood   Yoakum   Young   Zapata   Zavala                        65       .779.654      $                      422.640      $                6.987      $                3.761     County    2010  Total   Hospital   Charity  Care   Costs      $                          54.753      $              19.684      $                2.616      $                7.956      $            13.722.233.689      $                  4.237      $            32.407      $            20.087.717      $                                      -­‐          $                    159.405      $                  7.582.913.450.813.130.392      $                  2.850.097      $              1.341.199.295      $                4.224      $            12.832      $                    190.002      $                                          -­‐          $                                          -­‐          2016  Adult    2016  Adult    2016  Adult   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Federal  Funds   Limited   Moderate   Enhanced   Scenario     Scenario     Scenario      $                1.784.727      $                  9.488      $        101.862      $            10.778      $                6.048.011.697.278      $                      287.293      $                    638.930.018      $                        81.281      $                    128.650      $              3.472      $                    116.196.811      $                  8.445      $            17.381      $            11.515      $              71.847.265.572.331      $                    209.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults         Appendix  D     Regional  Healthcare  Partnership  (RHP)  Regions   Map  &  County  List                      66       .

 Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                              67       .Smart.

 Karnes   11.  Lavaca   14.  Crane   4.  McMullen   15.  Roberts   42.  Brewster   3.  Gaines   19.  Terry   46.  Parker   7.  Jasper   6.  Frio   8.  Goliad   7.  King   30.  Burleson   3.  Grayson   3.  Wichita   11.  Floyd   18.  Hardin   5.  Armstrong   2.  Fisher   6.  Hood   4.  Swisher   45.  Mills   8.  Atascosa   2.  Terrell   17.  Hunt   16.  Presidio   13.  Washington   RHP  18   1.  Wharton   RHP  4   1.  Marion   18.  Parmer   39.  Brown   2.  Shelby   16.  Eastland   5.  Caldwell   3.  Dimmit   6.  Navarro   6.  Hardeman   7.  Dallam   13.  Crosby   12.  Duval   6.  Andrews   2.  Franklin   9.  Concho   4.  Reeves   14.  Smith   24.  Real   17.  Deaf  Smith   15.  Coke   2.  Willacy   RHP  6   1.  Coleman   3.  Callahan   3.  Kimble   7.  Schleicher   14.  Hudspeth   RHP  16   1.  Trinity   26.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults       Regional  Healthcare  Partnership  (RHP)  Regions   RHP  1   1.  Starr   4.  Titus   25.  Knox   9.  Rockwall   RHP  19   1.  Hamilton   5.  Archer   2.  Somervell   8.  Williamson   RHP  9   1.  Red  River   22.  Nueces   16.  Gonzales   8.  Motley   36.  Kinney   13.  McCulloch   9.  Cass   5.  Jim  Wells   10.  Calhoun   3.  Van  Zandt   28.  Lee   6.  Brazoria   3.  Milam   7.  Wilbarger   12.  Rains   21.  Cherokee   6.  Madison   6.  Harrison   12.  Fayette   4.  Donley   17.  Yoakum   RHP  13   1.  Mitchell   10.  Freestone   10.  Erath   3.  Clay   4.  Jackson   9.  Panola   20.  Cooke   5.  Sutton   16.  Gray   21.  Jefferson   7.  Refugio   17.  Colorado   5.Smart.  Bastrop   2.  Jim  Hogg   2.  Lipscomb   32.  Borden   4.  Palo  Pinto   12.  Childress   8.  Llano   6.  Kendall   11.  Baylor   3.  Victoria   RHP  5   1.  Brooks   4.  Lynn   34.  Val  Verde   19.  Randall   41.  Tyler   RHP  3   1.  Comal   5.  Pecos   11.  Newton   10.  Coryell   3.  Nacogdoches   9.  San  Patricio   18.  Travis   RHP  8   1.  Garza   20.  Hopkins   14.  Young   RHP  20   1.  Taylor   RHP  12   1.  Hockley   27.  Falls   4.  Hale   22.  Sabine   13.  San  Saba   9.  Wise   RHP  11   1.  Houston   15.  Runnels   13.  Howard   8.  Montgomery   7.  Lamb   31.  Grimes   4.  Oldham   38.  Winkler   RHP  15   1.  Sterling   15.  Henderson   13.  Wilson   20.  Waller   9.  Edwards   7.  Hidalgo   3.  Austin   2.  Castro   7.  Ector   6.  Moore   35.  Collin   2.  Zapata                          68       .  Jack   8.  Bee   3.  Upton   15.  Live  Oak   15.  Hartley   25.  Kerr   12.  McLennan   RHP  17   1.  San  Augustine   14.  Walker   9.  Robertson   8.  Carson   6.  Ellis   2.  Morris   19.  Orange   11.  Bailey   3.  Cochran   9.  Bexar   4.  Hemphill   26.  Lampasas   5.  Hill   6.  Angelina   2.  Hall   23.  DeWitt   5.  Zavala   RHP  7   1.  Wheeler   47.  Potter   40.  Stonewall   15.  Galveston   4.  Ward   16.  Loving   10.  Limestone   7.  Kenedy   12.  Foard   6.  Harris   7.  Fort  Bend   6.  Lamar   17.  Chambers   4.  Camp   4.  Irion   6.  Wood   RHP  2   1.  Jones   8.  Stephens   14.  Montague   9.  Aransas   2.  Jeff  Davis   9.  Delta   7.  San  Jacinto   15.  Menard   10.  Gregg   11.  Comanche   4.  Bell   2.  Mason   8.  Cottle   11.  Kaufman   RHP  10   1.  Scurry   43.  Fannin   8.  Tom  Green   RHP  14   1.  Dallas   2.  Haskell   7.  Martin   11.  Denton   3.  Ochiltree   37.  Leon   5.  Bowie   3.  Burnet   4.  Anderson   2.  Dawson   14.  La  Salle   14.  Liberty   8.  Midland   12.  Upshur   27.  Webb   4.  Polk   12.  Shackelford   13.  Glasscock   7.  Johnson   5.  Blanco   3.  Brazos   2.  Dickens   16.  Bandera   3.  Nolan   11.  Hays   5.  Kleberg   13.  El  Paso   2.  Culberson   5.  Sherman   44.  Hutchinson   28.  Tarrant   9.  Medina   16.  Guadalupe   10.  Kent   29.  Briscoe   5.  Matagorda   8.  Throckmorton   10.  Cameron   2.  Rusk   23.  Crockett   5.  Collingsworth   10.  Uvalde   18.  Reagan   12.  Hansford   24.  Bosque   2.  Maverick   3.  Gillespie   9.  Lubbock   33.

Smart.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults         Appendix  E     Methodology  &  Sources                      69       .

 “Limited.  85  percent   and  98  percent.       Our  study  limits  its  estimates  to  the  first  four  years  of  the  expansion.  The  Medicaid  expansion.”  “Moderate.”  result  in  estimated  statewide  insured  rates  after  the  expansion  of  71  percent.  Ph.1  billion  in  federal  funds  for  a  state  match  of   $15.  which   provides  three  scenarios  for  a  number  of  demographic  groups.   Using  estimates  by  Cline  and  Murdock  that  controlled  for  ineligible  individuals.  based  primarily   on  an  April  2012  study  conducted  by  Michael  E.  estimates  of  future  costs  and  enrollment  for  these  populations  can  vary  substantially.  This  study  uses  an   effective  rate  of  138  percent  of  FPL  since  the  ACA  provides  coverage  for  adults  up  to  133  percent  FPL   plus  a  5  percent  modified  adjusted  gross  income  disregard.Smart.D.6  billion  for  the  10-­‐year  period  of  2014  through  2023.  Medicaid  expansion  funds  to  counties  would  depend  on  the   cost  per  enrollee  and  the  actual  number  of  adults  and  children  who  enroll  because  of  the  expansion.  Inc.     This  analysis  provides  for  “Limited.  although  not  enrolled.  The  adult  group  would  be  new  to  Medicaid.  Their  study  employed  2010  data  to  estimate  ACA  impacts.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Methodology   The  methodology  used  in  this  analysis  provides  statewide.  The   analysis  assumes  that  newly  enrolling  parents  would  also  enroll  any  children  they  have  who  are   currently  eligible  but  not  enrolled.  The  analysis  assumes  a   phase-­‐in  for  the  Medicaid  expansion  based  on  HHSC’s  estimate  of  50  percent  in  2014.  but  the  child  group  is  currently   eligible  for  Medicaid  or  the  Children’s  Health  Insurance  Program  (CHIP).  Ph.  adjusted  to   account  for  an  eight-­‐month  year.  for  children  under  age  18  and  below  200  percent  of  FPL.  including   estimates  of  the  rates  of  annual  caseload  growth  and  health  care  cost  increases  as  well  as  costs  per   adult  and  child  enrollee  for  each  year  of  the  expansion.   Our  analysis  escalates  the  state  and  county  estimates  from  2010  to  2014  through  2017  using  HHSC’s   caseload  increase  factor  for  the  Medicaid  expansion  of  1.   90  percent  and  98  percent.”  and  “Enhanced”  caseload  estimates.  75  percent  in  2015.  since  HHSC  limited  its  most  recent   published  estimates  to  this  period  due  to  uncertainties  affecting  caseloads.  and  82  percent.”  “Moderate”   or  “Enhanced.  Margins  of  error  vary  by  county  and  tend  to  be  higher  for   smaller  counties.  for  adults  aged  18  through  64  below  138  percent  of  FPL.2  percent  per  year.  respectively.  regional  and  county-­‐level  federal.  Estimates  of  the   Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties  in  Texas  and  commissioned  by  Methodist  Healthcare   Ministries  of  South  Texas.   Consequently.  These  scenarios.  since  the  data  originate  from  Census  data.   Our  analysis  uses  the  statewide  numbers  from  these  scenarios  to  approximate  the  populations  affected   by  the  Medicaid  expansion.  Cline.  and  100  percent  in  2016  and  2017.  respectively.  The  expansion  applies  to  adults  aged   18-­‐64  with  incomes  below  138  percent  of  the  federal  poverty  level  (FPL)  and  children  under  age  18   below  200  percent  of  the  FPL  who  are  eligible  for  but  not  enrolled  in  the  Medicaid  program  or  the   Children’s  Health  Insurance  Program  (CHIP).  the  methodology   allocated  the  estimated  statewide  caseloads  for  adults  and  children  in  the  three  scenarios  to  the   counties  based  on  their  shares  of  each  group.    and  Steve  Murdock.D.  similar  error  rates  apply.  costs  and  potential  variances   in  implementation.  would  continue  beyond  2017.   Caseload  Estimates   Our  statewide  caseload  estimates  rely  primarily  on  data  from  the  Cline  and  Murdock  study.  Our  analysis   supplements  their  findings  with  data  from  the  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission  (HHSC).  with  federal   matching  funds  declining  from  100  percent  for  2014  through  2016  to  90  percent  for  2020  and  beyond..  however.  state  and   total  caseload  and  funding  estimates  by  year  from  2014  through  2017  for  the  optional  state  Medicaid   expansion  available  under  the  federal  Affordable  Care  Act  (ACA).                      70       .   HHSC  has  estimated  that  the  state  would  receive  $100.

 such  as  nurse   practitioners.                                                                                                                               59  U.  These  estimates  amount  to   $595  million  from  2013  through  2017.  state  and  all-­‐funds  estimates  for  adults  and  children  and  dividing  them  by   HHSC’s  statewide  caseload  estimates  for  each  group  by  year  from  2014  through  2017.  They  also  include  the  rate  increases  for  physician  extenders.000  in  total.     These  estimates  translate  to  enrollment  rates  for  the  insured  in  these  groups  of  44  percent.7  cents.  also  called  an  “uptake  rate.  readers  can  make  their  own  judgments  and  adjustments  to  the  estimates  to   account  for  any  shifting  from  the  insured  population  to  Medicaid.)   Studies  conducted  in  other  states  have  found  it  difficult  to  estimate  with  confidence  what  portion  of  the   currently  insured  would  shift  to  Medicaid  with  an  expansion.  Since  this  study  provides  a  wide  range  of   estimates  depending  on  low.  the  federal  government  pays  59.  Although   the  difference  in  effective  enrollment  rates  results  in  a  slightly  different  mix  of  adults  and  children  than   the  HHSC  caseload  estimates.  Should  Texas  opt  to  add  full  provider  rate  increases.   These  estimates  do  not  take  into  account  currently  insured  adults  that  may  move  to  Medicaid  as  a  result   of  the  expansion.  90  percent  and  98  percent  for   children.  93  percent  for  2019.  94  percent  for  2018.  respectively.  the  HHSC  total  caseload  estimates  are  approximate  to  the  Moderate   scenario  estimates  used  in  our  analysis.  although  the  initial  mandatory  increases  in  2014  are  continued.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.  as  well  as  the  data  necessary  to   adjust  the  estimates.000  provide  for  their  own  insurance.  85  percent  and  98  percent  for  adults.  respectively.  Census  Bureau.  insured  rate  for  these  groups  after  expansion  of   71  percent.  state  and  total  funding  for  adults  and  children  by  year.xhtml?refresh=t.   The  HHSC  cost  per  enrollee  includes  a  4  percent  annual  cost  increase  factor  and  administrative  costs   federally  matched  at  50  percent.census.  The  estimates  include  the  increase  of  the  primary  care  provider  rates   to  the  Medicare  rates  required  by  the  ACA.  for  federal  fiscal  2013.Smart.3  cents  and   Texas  pays  40.     Funding  Estimates   The  methodology  for  the  funding  estimates  derives  a  cost  per  enrollee  for  adults  and  children  by  using   HHSC’s  statewide  federal.  Additional  optional  provider  increases  beyond  2014  are  not   included.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     HHSC  assumed  an  enrollment  rate.000  adults  below  138  percent  FPL  in  Texas  and  another   194.  matched  at  the  regular  Federal  Matching  Assistance  Program  (FMAP)  rate  unless   supervised  by  a  primary-­‐care  physician.  covered  at  a  100  percent  federal  matching  rate  for  2013-­‐ 2014  under  ACA  provisions.30   percent.  so  that  for  every  dollar  spent  on  the  program.  As  an  example.   Federal  and  state  funding  estimates  assume  the  appropriate  FMAP  matching  rates  for  each  population   group.  58  percent  and  92  percent  for  children.  and  90  percent  for  2020  and  future  years.  and  82  percent.  Texas’  FMAP  is  59.  The  ACA  provides  for  the  adult  expansion  population  FMAP  to  be  100  percent  for  2014-­‐2016.   The  federal  government  will  continue  to  calculate  FMAP  rates  for  children  who  are  currently  eligible  but   not  enrolled  as  they  have  in  the  past.  about  869.  71  percent   and  96  percent  for  adults  and  25  percent.”   http://factfinder2.  moderate  or  high  levels  of  enrollment.  Moderate  and  Enhanced  scenarios   estimated  by  Cline  and  Murdock  assume  a  statewide.  The  Limited.  funding   estimates  in  this  study  would  increase  accordingly.  The  methodology   multiplies  the  cost  per  enrollee  by  the  caseload  estimates  explained  in  the  section  above  to  estimate   federal.59  (Some  portion  of  those  who  provide   their  own  insurance  may  be  between  18  and  26  years  old  and  covered  on  their  parents’  policies.                      71       .”  for  the  uninsured  in  these  groups  of  75   percent  for  adults  and  50  percent  for  children.  Employers  insure  about  675.S.  “B27016:  Health  Insurance  Coverage  Status  And  Type  By  Ratio  Of  Income  To  Poverty  Level   In  The  Past  12  Months  By  Age.  2011  American  Community  Survey  1-­‐Year  Estimates.  95   percent  for  2017.

 Consequently.  Under  Texas  law.  would  cover  some  portion  of  health  care  costs  for   prison  and  jail  inmates  that  the  state  and  local  governments  now  cover  at  100  percent.  however.  (Beginning  in   January  2013.)  If  Texas  maintains  the  present   FMAP  in  those  years.  For  counties  that   share  a  hospital  district.  Texas  will  enroll  inmates  under  age  19  and  pregnant  women  in  Medicaid  when   hospitalized  in  a  medical  institution  under  the  rule.    For  2016  and  2017.  the   Medicaid  expansion  will  not  eliminate  charity  costs  for  hospitals  entirely  even  if  expansion  funds  exceed   total  charity  costs.  as  well  as  the   later  start  date  and  phase-­‐in  assumed  in  the  estimates  used  in  this  study.  (Some  children  will  move  from  CHIP  to   Medicaid.  the  CHIP  FMAP  would  increase  to  94.  Counties  may  extend  coverage  to  50  percent  of  FPL  and  still  receive  state  assistance  if   their  total  costs  exceed  8  percent  of  their  previous  year’s  tax  general  revenue  tax  levy.  as  Medicaid  coverage  will  increase  to  138  percent  of  the  FPL.  the  analysis  allocates  each  county’s  share  of  the  district’s  costs  according  to  its   share  of  tax  levies  for  the  district.  this  study  also  provides  data  for  two  sources  of  local  spending  on  indigent   and  charity  health  care.                      72       .     The  county-­‐level  data  also  provide  a  breakdown  of  costs  to  show  the  portion  of  the  total  spent  on   indigent  health  care.   unduplicated  cost  locally  for  unreimbursed  charity  care  supported  primarily  through  local  taxes.   the  Medicaid  expansion  would  cover  a  significant  portion  of  total  charity  costs.  These  data  provide  the  total.  the  county-­‐level  breakdown  shows  the  portion  of  the  total  spent  on  jail  inmate  health  care.  The  methodology  assumes  that  CHIP  funding  for   children  that  must  move  from  CHIP  to  Medicaid  will  continue  at  the  CHIP  match  rate.  then.  The  ACA  and  Medicaid  expansion  would  not.  The  Medicaid  expansion   would  cover  charity  costs  for  adults  aged  18  through  64  below  138  percent  of  poverty.  such  as  undocumented  persons.  or  services  not  covered  by  Medicaid.  Under  a  Medicaid  rule  established  in  1997.  cities  and  hospital  districts  annually  in  order  to  receive   interest  from  the  state’s  Tobacco  Settlement  Permanent  Trust  Accounts.  consequently.   Unreimbursed  Local  Health  Care  Spending   For  comparative  purposes.  the  rate  will  “bump”  by  23   percentage  points  under  the  ACA  for  children  remaining  in  CHIP.  In  addition.  which  is  most  of  them.  HHSC  estimates  do   not  include  the  bump  except  in  the  10-­‐year  estimate  since  Congress  must  renew  CHIP  funding  in  2015.  counties  must  provide  health  care  to  indigent  persons  up  to  21   percent  of  FPL.  cover  costs  for  ineligible   adults.)   Another  source  used  in  comparisons  is  a  DSHS  report  of  unreimbursed  charity  costs  submitted  by   certain  hospitals.  A  Medicaid  expansion.     Hospitals  generally  provide  charity  care  from  21  percent  to  200  percent  FPL.7  percent  for  2014  through  2017.   since  that  is  largely  Medicaid-­‐related  and  Medicaid  expansion  funding  would  not  affect  them.   The  mix  of  Medicaid  and  CHIP  for  children  below  200  percent  of  poverty  results  in  an  effective  federal   match  rate  of  64.51  percent.  calculated  by  reducing  the  Medicaid  FMAP  state  share  by  30   percent.  Texas’  rate  is  currently  71.  Questions  have  arisen  concerning  whether  certain  features  of  the   expansion  are  also  optional.   Currently.Smart.  such  as  eligibility  determination  changes  to  the  calculation  of  modified   adjusted  gross  income  and  the  application  of  maintenance-­‐of-­‐effort  (MOE)  requirements.  for  instance.  One  is  a  Department  of  State  Health  Services  (DSHS)  report  of  unreimbursed   health  care  expenditures  submitted  by  counties.  The  data  do  not  include  unreimbursed  costs  for  government-­‐sponsored  health  care.     In  addition.  which  will  also  help  to   reduce  charity  costs.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     CHIP  has  an  “enhanced”  matching  rate.  an   institutionalized  inmate  is  eligible  for  Medicaid  for  hospital  inpatient  care  if  otherwise  eligible  except  for   his  or  her  incarceration.  local  and  state  governments  pay  for  all  health  care  of  institutionalized  persons  who  are  not   otherwise  covered.  subsidized   insurance  will  be  available  for  adults  between  100  percent  and  400  percent  FPL.   The  Supreme  Court  ruling  that  made  the  Medicaid  expansion  under  the  ACA  optional  for  states  means   that  some  variables  could  change.51  percent.

us/taxinfo/proptax/taxrates/.html.dshs.  while  others  serve  a  smaller  area   within  the  county.state.”  http://www.  then.  so  this  study  has  included   them  for  informational  purposes.     Texas  Comptroller  of  Public  Accounts.tx.  The  data  included  in  this  analysis  include  only   unreimbursed  indigent  health  care  costs.  hospital  charity  costs  attach  to  the  county  in  which  the  hospital  resides.    Counties  also  may  administer  CIHC  programs   in  areas  outside  a  hospital  district  or  public  hospital  service  area.  may  be  from  multiple  counties.   although  hospitals  may  assist  people  in  multiple  counties.     Methodology  Sources   Texas  Comptroller  of  Public  Accounts.”   http://www.  or  a  public  hospital  without  a  countywide  service  area.  and  unpublished  Excel  spreadsheet   providing  a  breakdown  of  expenditure  types.  Some  hospital  districts  are  countywide  while  others   serve  multiple  counties.  “Tax  Rates  and  Levies  by  County.  and  most  do.   Potential  Medicaid  funding  for  children  under  age  18  below  200  percent  of  FPL  who  are  currently   eligible  but  not  enrolled  is  not  compared  to  unreimbursed  health  care  costs  or  hospital  charity  charges   in  this  study  as  the  expansion  would  have  no  effect  on  these  costs.Smart.  These  funds.state.  and  use  the  counties’  shares  of  these   levies  to  apportion  unreimbursed  health  care  expenditures.   County  Health  Care  Administration  &  Funding   A  county  may  have  multiple  hospital  districts.aspx.  will  offer  economic   stimulus  to  counties  and  provide  health  care  to  currently  uninsured  children.     Texas  Department  of  State  Health  Services  and  Texas  Comptroller  of  Public  Accounts.  generally  funded  from  property  taxes  and   sometimes  supplemented  with  local  sales  taxes  or  other  funding  such  as  grants  or  the  annual   distribution  of  interest  from  the  tobacco  settlement  fund.  “SPD  Sales  and  Use  Tax  Comparison  Summary  -­‐  November  2012.  since  the  charity  costs   attach  to  the  hospital.us/tobaccosettlement/pay2012.”  2011  and  2010.     Hospital  districts  can  levy  property  taxes  for  their  support.window.  Some  public  hospitals  serve  countywide.  These  children  are  currently  eligible   and  providers  would  enroll  them  now  if  presented  for  care.  users  should  take  care  in   comparing  anticipated  Medicaid  expansion  funding  to  unreimbursed  hospital  charity  costs  on  a  county   basis.  for  the  purposes  of  this  study  the  costs  shown  are  for  the  county  in  which  the   hospital  is  located.   This  study  presents  regional  data  using  the  state’s  20  Regional  Healthcare  Planning  regions.  Counties  whose  expenditures  for  their   CIHC  programs  exceed  8  percent  of  their  previous  year’s  general  revenue  tax  levy  can  receive   reimbursement  for  that  portion  from  the  state.tx.state.  This  analysis  only  provides  comparisons  on  a  regional  and  statewide  basis  to  minimize  this   problem.window.                        73       .  Excel  spreadsheet.  and  may  have  public  hospitals  outside  the  boundaries  of  a   hospital  district.  Some  hospital  districts  do  not  have  a  public  hospital  but  arrange  with  one  or  more   other  hospitals  within  the  district  to  provide  care.us/taxinfo/allocsum/specdist.  including  jail  health  care  expenses.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     For  the  purposes  of  this  report.tx.   operate  County  Indigent  Health  Care  (CIHC)  programs.  however.   http://www.  “Unreimbursed  Health  Care   Expenditures.  Consequently.  We  apply  tax  levies  to  the   originating  counties  whenever  a  district  straddles  more  than  one.   Counties  without  a  countywide  hospital  district.  Hospital  charity  costs.

 Government-­‐Sponsored  Indigent  Health   Care  (GSIH).state.  Ph.     Texas  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission.  Texas:  Methodist  Healthcare  Ministries  of  South  Texas.hhsc.D.  Ph.tx.pdf.  Estimates  of  the  Impact  of  the  Affordable  Care  Act  on  Counties  in   Texas  (San  Antonio.  and  Steve  Murdock.  Cline.”  (Internal  Excel   spreadsheet.org/images/stories/advocacy_and_public_policy/Estimates%20of%20the%20Impact%20of%20t he%20ACA%20on%20Texas%20Counties_FINAL%20REPORT%20APRIL%202012.”   http://www.”  (Map).hhsc.  and  unpublished  Excel   spreadsheet  of  insured  and  uninsured  by  county.Smart.pdf.  “Presentation  to  the  Senate  Health  &  Human  Services  and  Senate   State  Affairs  Committees  on  the  Affordable  Care  Act.   August  2012.us/news/presentations/2012/080112-­‐Senate-­‐HHS-­‐ACA-­‐Presentation..   http://www.  age  and  FPL.D.  Inc.  and   unpublished  Excel  spreadsheet  with  Medicaid  expansion  caseload  and  funding  estimates  by  year.tx.us/1115-­‐docs/Regions-­‐Map-­‐Aug12.mhm.  “Texas  Healthcare  Regional  Partnership  (RHP)  Regions.  “Report  on  Charity  Care  Costs.pdf.state.     Michael  E.  http://www.  April  2012).  and  Community  Benefits  Provided  by  Nonprofit  Hospitals  in  Texas  -­‐  2010.)     Texas  Health  and  Human  Services  Commission.                          74       .  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults     Texas  Department  of  State  Health  Services.

org                      75       .Smart.texasimpact.org     Texas  Impact  •  200  East  30th  Street  •  Austin.  visit   www.  Texas  78705  •  512-­‐472-­‐3903  •  info@texasimpact.  Affordable  and  Fair:  Why  Texas  Should  Extend  Medicaid  to  Low-­‐Income  Adults                                                                     For  more  information  and  to  download  a  copy  of  the  full  report.