2 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) June 5, 2007 Tuesday Idaho Edition

FOUR MORE MEN ALLEGE ABUSE AT BOYS' RANCH; Two men name Weitensteiner as perpetrator at Morning Star;
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 521 words Four more men sued Morning Star Boys' Ranch on Monday, including two men who allege that the ranch's revered director sexually abused them in the 1970s and '80s. Two of the plaintiffs - 50-year-old Raymond Nelson and 38-year-old Robert Gariepy - allege that the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner sexually abused them at the Catholic boys' home south of Spokane. In previous legal filings, four other men have accused Weitensteiner of sexual abuse, according to Spokane County Superior Court documents. Reached late Monday, a Morning Star spokeswoman said Weitensteiner was not available for comment. "Neither Morning Star nor our legal counsel have reviewed these new claims, so we can't comment on them," said Jenn Kantz. In previous statements, Weitensteiner has strenuously denied previous allegations of sexual abuse. Morning Star said the priest passed a polygraph test. "His denials have to be viewed with increasing skepticism given the mounting number of men who have come forward and explicitly described the sex abuse they suffered at his hands," said Timothy Kosnoff, a Seattle attorney representing the plaintiffs. Weitensteiner, a 74-year-old Catholic priest, retired from Morning Star in 2006 amid allegations of sexual and physical abuse. The well-known boys' home opened in 1956 and has served 1,300 boys - many of whom had been involved in Washington state's juvenile justice and child welfare system. Gariepy has a lengthy criminal history, including convictions for burglary, drug offenses and vehicle prowling, according to newspaper archives. Nelson also has a criminal record, Kosnoff acknowledged. "You have accounts that are so detailed and cross-corroborating," Kosnoff said. "The grooming patterns, the information they know ? it just could not have been made up." Thirteen former residents have sued Morning Star in three separate lawsuits, and the cases have been slowly winding through the civil courts. Last month, in a critical decision, a Spokane Superior Court judge ordered the ranch to release more than 1,000 personal files of former residents to the plaintiffs' attorneys. The allegations came as a shock to supporters of Weitensteiner, a decorated Boy Scouts leader, who began working at Morning Star as a counselor in 1957. He later left to join the priesthood and returned to become Morning Star's director in 1966. In 2005, after the first allegations surfaced in court documents, Weitensteiner said he had "never been

sexually inappropriate with any child at any time." Earlier that year, The Spokesman-Review reported that Morning Star had repeatedly allowed the physical and sexual abuse of boys in its care, citing records from the Department of Social and Health Services, court documents and interviews with former counselors and residents. In Monday's filing, part of an ongoing lawsuit against Morning Star, two other men - Curtis Stump, 42, and Glenn Anderson, 41 - alleged they were abused at the boys' home. Both men allege that former Morning Star counselor James Clarke sexually abused them. Clarke has previously been accused of molesting another resident who sued the ranch in 2005. LOAD-DATE: June 8, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

3 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) June 5, 2007 Tuesday Metro Edition

FOUR MORE MEN ALLEGE ABUSE AT BOYS' RANCH; Two men name Weitensteiner as perpetrator at Morning Star;
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 563 words Four more men sued Morning Star Boys' Ranch on Monday, including two men who allege that the ranch's revered director sexually abused them in the 1970s and '80s. Two of the plaintiffs - 50-year-old Raymond Nelson and 38-year-old Robert Gariepy - allege that the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner sexually abused them at the Catholic boys' home south of Spokane. In previous legal filings, four other men have accused Weitensteiner of sexual abuse, according to Spokane County Superior Court documents. Reached late Monday, a Monday Star spokeswoman said Weitensteiner was not available for comment. "Neither Morning Star nor our legal counsel have reviewed these new claims, so we can't comment on them," said Jenn Kantz, Morning Star's spokeswoman. In previous statements, Weitensteiner has strenuously denied previous allegations of sexual abuse. Morning Star said the priest passed a polygraph test.

"His denials have to be viewed with increasing skepticism given the mounting number of men who have come forward and explicitly described the sex abuse they suffered at his hands," said Timothy Kosnoff, a Seattle attorney representing the plaintiffs. Gariepy has a lengthy criminal history, including convictions for burglary, drug offenses and vehicle prowling, according to newspaper archives. Nelson also has a criminal record, Kosnoff acknowledged. "You have accounts that are so detailed and cross-corroborating," Kosnoff said. "The grooming patterns, the information they know ? it just could not have been made up." Thirteen former residents have sued Morning Star in three separate lawsuits, and the cases have been slowly winding through the civil courts. Last month, in a critical decision, a Spokane Superior Court judge ordered the ranch to release more than 1,000 personal files of former residents to the plaintiffs' attorneys. The allegations came as a shock to supporters of Weitensteiner, a decorated Boy Scout leader, who began working at Morning Star as a counselor in 1957. He later left to join the priesthood and returned to become Morning Star's director in 1966. In 2005, after the first allegations surfaced in court documents, Weitensteiner said he had "never been sexually inappropriate with any child at any time." Earlier that year, the Spokesman-Review reported that Morning Star had repeatedly allowed the physical and sexual abuse of boys in its care, citing records from the Department of Social and Health Services, court documents and interviews with former counselors and residents. In Monday's filing, part of an ongoing lawsuit against Morning Star, two other men - Curtis Stump, 42, and Glenn Anderson, 41 - alleged they were abused at the boys' home. Both men allege that former Morning Star counselor James Clarke sexually abused them. Clarke has previously been accused of molesting another resident, who sued the ranch in 2005. SIDEBAR: AT A GLANCE *The Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner, a 74-year-old Catholic priest, retired from Morning Star Boys' Ranch in 2006 amid allegations of sexual and physical abuse. He is accused of sex abuse by two of the alleged victims named in Monday's lawsuit. The other two men say former Morning Star counselor James Clarke sexually abused them. *The Morning Star Boys' Ranch opened in 1956 and has served 1,300 boys, many of whom had been involved in Washington state's juvenile justice and child welfare system. LOAD-DATE: June 8, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

4 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA)

June 5, 2007 Tuesday Idaho Edition

FOUR MORE MEN ALLEGE ABUSE AT BOYS' RANCH; Two men name Weitensteiner as perpetrator at Morning Star;
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 607 words Four more men sued Morning Star Boys' Ranch on Monday, including two men who allege that the ranch's revered director sexually abused them in the 1970s and '80s. Two of the plaintiffs - 50-year-old Raymond Nelson and 38-year-old Robert Gariepy - allege that the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner sexually abused them at the Catholic boys' home south of Spokane. In previous legal filings, four other men have accused Weitensteiner of sexual abuse, according to Spokane County Superior Court documents. Reached late Monday, a Morning Star spokeswoman said Weitensteiner was not available for comment. "Neither Morning Star nor our legal counsel have reviewed these new claims, so we can't comment on them," said Jenn Kantz. In previous statements, Weitensteiner has strenuously denied previous allegations of sexual abuse. Morning Star said the priest passed a polygraph test. "His denials have to be viewed with increasing skepticism given the mounting number of men who have come forward and explicitly described the sex abuse they suffered at his hands," said Timothy Kosnoff, a Seattle attorney representing the plaintiffs. Weitensteiner, a 74-year-old Catholic priest, retired from Morning Star in 2006 amid allegations of sexual and physical abuse. The well-known boys' home opened in 1956 and has served 1,300 boys - many of whom had been involved in Washington state's juvenile justice and child welfare system. Gariepy has a lengthy criminal history, including convictions for burglary, drug offenses and vehicle prowling, according to newspaper archives. Nelson also has a criminal record, Kosnoff acknowledged. "You have accounts that are so detailed and cross-corroborating," Kosnoff said. "The grooming patterns, the information they know ? it just could not have been made up." Thirteen former residents have sued Morning Star in three separate lawsuits, and the cases have been slowly winding through the civil courts. Last month, in a critical decision, a Spokane Superior Court judge ordered the ranch to release more than 1,000 personal files of former residents to the plaintiffs' attorneys. The allegations came as a shock to supporters of Weitensteiner, a decorated Boy Scouts leader, who began working at Morning Star as a counselor in 1957. He later left to join the priesthood and returned to become Morning Star's director in 1966. In 2005, after the first allegations surfaced in court documents, Weitensteiner said he had "never been sexually inappropriate with any child at any time." Earlier that year, The Spokesman-Review reported that Morning Star had repeatedly allowed the physical and sexual abuse of boys in its care, citing records from the Department of Social and Health Services, court documents and interviews with former counselors and residents. In Monday's filing, part of an ongoing lawsuit against Morning Star, two other men - Curtis Stump, 42, and Glenn Anderson, 41 - alleged they were abused at the boys' home. Both men allege that former Morning Star counselor James Clarke sexually abused them.

Clarke has previously been accused of molesting another resident who sued the ranch in 2005. SIDEBAR: AT A GLANCE *The Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner, a 74-year-old Catholic priest, retired from Morning Star Boys' Ranch in 2006 amid allegations of sexual and physical abuse. He is accused of sex abuse by two of the alleged victims named in Monday's lawsuit. The other two men say former Morning Star counselor James Clarke sexually abused them. *The Morning Star Boys' Ranch opened in 1956 and has served 1,300 boys, many of whom had been involved in Washington state's juvenile justice and child welfare system. LOAD-DATE: June 8, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

6 of 265 DOCUMENTS London Free Press (Ontario) June 1, 2007 Friday FINAL EDITION

Church adopts sex abuse policy; The Roman Catholic diocese is responding to Charles Sylvestre's victims.
BYLINE: BY JANE SIMS, SUN MEDIA SECTION: CITY & REGION; Pg. B4 LENGTH: 316 words It appears the Roman Catholic diocese of London is listening to Rev. Charles Sylvestre's victims. This week, letters were sent to the women abused as children by the disgraced priest announcing the church will adopt some of their ideas in a new, long-awaited sexual abuse policy. The suggestions came from a meeting of survivors in Chatham last month. Sylvestre, 84, died in prison last January just three months into his three-year sentence for 47 counts of indecent assault on girls in his parishes over four decades. The draft policy is still not complete, after the diocese was advised the scope had been limited to child sexual abuse and not all sexual misconduct.

In Rev. John Sharp's letter to the victims, he said there's also a stronger shift towards prevention. The letter from Sharp, head of the diocese's sexual abuse committee, says two key suggestions from the victims will be adopted: - A protocol for receiving complaints "that is sensitive to needs of the complainant." The first contact would not be a priest, but a trained person, perhaps a survivor of sexual abuse, who would continue to communicate with the complainant. - The "Two Deep Rule," requiring a priest to have another adult with him when meeting a child alone in confession or elsewhere. Sharp says "your feedback has helped us broaden our scope in developing a policy" to prevent sexual misconduct in the church. Chatham-Kent Crown Attorney Paul Bailey, who prosecuted Sylvestre, said the "two-deep rule" is "unprecedented." "It's an excellent strategy," he said, used by many child-centred organizations such as minor hockey and the scouting movement. "I'm really hoping other members of the Canadian Catholic Conference of Bishops will see this and use it as a template for its own actions." Diocese spokesperson Ron Pickersgill said it's hoped the draft sexual abuse policy and code of conduct will be out by the end of June. LOAD-DATE: June 1, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Sun Media Corporation All Rights Reserved

10 of 265 DOCUMENTS Daily Miner and News (Kenora, Ontario) May 12, 2007 Saturday FINAL EDITION

Victims testify at sex abuse trial
BYLINE: BY DAN GAUTHIER, THE ENTERPRISE SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 432 words The testimony of five more alleged sexual abuse victims of Ralph Rowe were scheduled to be heard this

week and into next week as his trial in Kenora Superior Court continues. The first of the five First Nation men completed his testimony Wednesday detailing years of sexual abuse he suffered as a boy at the hands of the former Anglican minister in the 1970s. Rowe, 67, already convicted of similar offences in 1994, is now facing 12 charges - six counts of sexual assault and six counts of indecent assault - from five complainants. On May 7, the first day of the trial proceedings, Rowe pled guilty to 20 charges - 10 counts of sexual assault and 10 counts of indecent assault - during the same time period involving 20 other victims from the northern First Nation communities of Muskrat Dam, Wunnumin Lake and Big Trout Lake. The Crown withdrew 24 of the charges that involved the same 20 victims, bringing the number of charges down to 12. Justice Erwin Stach ruled Tuesday that he would not sentence Rowe for his 20 guilty pleas until the conclusion of the trial. Witness recalls camping trip The first witness for Crown testified that he grew up in Weagamow (Round) Lake in Northern Ontario where Rowe used to fly in on a weekly basis to act as the Anglican minister and organized games and camping trips through the Boy Scouts. The man, now in his 40s, spoke of first becoming involved in Cub Scouts, and first being exposed to Rowe, as an 11-year-old boy in the 1970s. He said he and many boys would sleep over at the Anglican mission house in the community when Rowe came to town. He said there were various bunk beds throughout the house as well as Rowe's bed where he slept with Rowe on many occasions and endured years of sexual abuse from the age of 11 until he was 15. He confirmed for Sinding that his first public admission of the sexual abuse by Rowe came about 10 years after the fact, to a psychiatrist at a Thunder Bay hospital following a suicide attempt. In 1994, Rowe was convicted of 27 counts of indecent assault and one count of common assault involving the sexual abuse of 16 aboriginal boys between 1976 and 1982 in the same communities. He was sentenced to six years in jail, of which he served four and a half years. Because of a plea agreement made at the time, Rowe will not be sentenced to additional jail time for his 20 new convictions, only concurrent time on his previous jail sentence. Justice Stach, however, ruled following a pretrial hearing last summer, that Rowe could receive additional jail time for more serious offences than those he was convicted of in 1994. LOAD-DATE: May 13, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Lake of the Woods Enterprise GRAPHIC: photo by Neil MacKinnon, The Enterprise Nic Camire, 13, sets up for a feeble grind at the KMTS Skatepark Tuesday. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Sun Media Corporation All Rights Reserved

11 of 265 DOCUMENTS Lancashire Evening Post May 9, 2007

Paedophile scout leader jailed
LENGTH: 367 words A scout leader and a Lancashire County Council IT specialist who downloaded images of child sex abuse has been jailed. Neil Hooson claimed he viewed the images purely for "research purposes", but a judge at Preston Crown Court told him he had to go to prison as the children depicted being sexually abused were so young. Hooson, 35, of Watering Pool Lane, Lostock Hall, pleaded guilty to 22 offences of possessing obscene photographs of children - some 292 images, of which 13 were 'level five', the most serious. Joanne Shepherd, prosecuting, said police investigating paedophilia chatrooms seized Hooson's computer from his then-home in Walton Avenue, Penwortham. On it they found images he had viewed and tried to delete of babies being abused. The court heard Hooson had been a scout leader in Bamber Bridge, and an IT technician with the county council for five years, and defence counsel Mr Christopher Hudson called him to the witness box to give evidence. Hooson told the court that, after an incident when he was a boy, an image he saw led him to seek information on the type of people who accessed such sites. He said he had not paid any fee and added: "I thought I had deleted them. It was purely for research, there was never any sexual gratification involved." Mr Hudson said Hooson was at present suspended from work and anticipated being sacked. His involvement with the scout movement has now ended. Mr Hudson said there was never any question, after police investigations, of inappropriate behaviour during his involvement with the scouts, and asked the judge to suspend any prison term. But Judge Andrew Gilbart QC said he could not suspend the five-month prison term because of the seriousness of the case, and he also passed orders disqualifying Hooson from working with children and from owning equipment capable of downloading images apart from computers used for work. Hooson's name is on the sex offenders register for seven years. A Scout Association spokesman said: "He has betrayed the trust placed in him by parents, by other volunteers and by the Scout Movement." A spokesman for the county council said: "Police have confirmed that the images were only found on his computer at home." LOAD-DATE: May 10, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2007 Johnston Press Plc All Rights Reserved

12 of 265 DOCUMENTS Morning Call (Allentown, Pennsylvania) May 9, 2007 Wednesday FIFTH EDITION

Historical group sued over child sex abuse b; Valley man, former member, is in prison for 1999-2003 acts.
BYLINE: By Daniel Patrick Sheehan Of The Morning Call SECTION: NATIONAL; Pg. A1 LENGTH: 614 words The parents of six children who were sexually assaulted by a Lehigh County member of the Society for Creative Anachronism are suing the medieval history group, saying its safeguards against such crimes were woefully inadequate. Benjamin Schragger, 45, was sentenced to 311/4 to 621/2 years in state prison in 2005 after pleading guilty but mentally ill to assaults on nine boys and two girls who ranged in age from 6 to 16. The attacks happened between 1999 and 2003, mostly at the Weisenberg Township home where Schragger lived with his parents and, in the guise of "Lord Ben the Steward," taught the children how to make armor and weapons for mock combat. According to court testimony, Schragger massaged naked children and fondled a 15-year-old boy who said Schragger watched as he, his 9-year-old sister and a 13-year-old female cousin performed sex acts on each other. Two civil suits filed Monday in U.S. District Court on behalf of the two girls and four of the boys claim the California nonprofit society failed to enforce basic safeguards, such as requiring the presence of at least two unrelated adults at events involving children. The suits demand unspecified damages for each victim on counts of negligence, negligent infliction of emotional distress, negligent misrepresentation, negligent failure to rescue and violation of the Pennsylvania Child Protective Services Law. "It's quite clear, it seems to us, that there was an absence of appropriate policies and procedure, and we want to prevent children from being in that circumstance," said Alison Soloff, a partner at Soloff & Zervanos law firm in Philadelphia. "We're not saying the organization needs to cease from existing," attorney Jeffrey Fritz added. "There are a lot of people who are part of it and take a lot from the experience. But they need to employ common sense measures." In a statement, the society said it would "take all appropriate actions available to defend itself against the allegations."

Society officers and employees had no knowledge of the misconduct and had never received any complaints about Schragger, the statement says. At the time of his arrest, Schragger was suspended from the society and, after his plea agreement, his membership was revoked permanently. The society said officers and employees "make reasonable attempts to ensure the safety of children who are involved in activities. Steps have been and continue to be taken to protect youth participants." In a Tuesday morning conference call with the attorneys and media, the mother of one of the victims said she had allowed her son to attend events after being assured by other society members that Schragger, the so-called "dean of pages," was harmless. She discovered the truth on her son's eighth birthday, when he described the activities at the house. Now 11, the boy continues to receive therapy. "All things considered, I think he's doing OK," the woman said. "He's not involved in Scouting or anything like that. He's not allowed to be alone with others." Tammy Lerner of Bryn Mawr, Montgomery County, state director of the Foundation to Abolish Child Sex Abuse, said the lawsuit "may help bring people forward who were living in silence" about abuse. "In my experience, when you have one or two or 10 kids, there's many, many others," she said. The society, which began in Berkeley, Calif., in 1966, claims 30,000 members around the world. It sponsors festivals and other events that can draw thousands of participants. Its co-founder was writer Walter Breen, who published a book advocating man-boy sexual relationships and died in prison in 1993 while serving a sentence for child molestation. daniel.sheehan@mcall.com 610-820-6598 LOAD-DATE: May 10, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: PHOTO by UNKNOWN Benjamin Schragger pleaded guilty but mentally ill DOCUMENT-TYPE: LOCAL PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 The Morning Call, Inc. All Rights Reserved

17 of 265 DOCUMENTS

The Kansas City Star April 30, 2007 Monday

In brief
SECTION: A; Pg. 4 LENGTH: 268 words Charity investigated NEW YORK | The attorney general's office is investigating a charity set up by New York's Fraternal Order of Police for its handling of more than $15 million raised after the Sept. 11 attacks. Investigators want to know why the union has not distributed $7 million of the contributions to its WTC Police Disaster Relief Fund, the New York Daily News reported. Georgia wildfire WAYCROSS, Ga. | Firefighters have managed to contain about 70 percent of the largest wildfire in Georgia history, which has charred 100 square miles. Winds and drought conditions with no rain in the forecast mean the fire will continue to rage for at least another week, said Georgia Forestry Commission spokeswoman Susan Reisch. Assault charges DIXON, Ill. | A former regional Boy Scout official has been charged with sexually assaulting a 16-year-old Scout at least four times since July. Charles Bickerstaff, 56, of Dixon, was charged with four counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse and four counts of criminal sexual assault, Lee County Correctional Officer Larry Schremp said Sunday. Investigators discovered journals in Bickerstaff's house that detailed facts supporting the boy's account, Lee County Detective Sgt. David Glessner said. Sex abuse case DALLAS | A Texas Youth Commission administrator charged with sexually abusing teenage inmates got continuing support from a supervisor despite recurring allegations, the Dallas Morning News reported. Lydia Barnard, a former director, did not fire or demote Ray Brookins over five years amid multiple abuse warnings, according to agency records. | From wire services LOAD-DATE: April 30, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 The Kansas City Star All Rights Reserved

18 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) April 20, 2007 Friday Idaho Edition

Child safety elusive; Our View: Despite increased oversight, children vulnerable;
SECTION: B; Pg. 4 LENGTH: 533 words It seems impossible - with all the awareness about child sex abuse in recent years, with all the background checking going on, with all the parents alert now to any sign of weirdness - that children and teens can still be vulnerable to sex abuse when they participate in activities outside the home. But consider these two stories from Thursday's newspaper: *William Smylie, a Washington state contract worker hired to take foster children on outings, asked Jacob Rogers, a level 3 sex offender, to accompany him on those outings. Rogers, 19, was arrested Tuesday for allegedly molesting two of those foster boys. *An Ohio principal was charged with a misdemeanor after paying 14-year-old students $15 each to let him kiss their feet. Sexual predators will find ways to be near children, no matter how stringent the safeguards. So it's up to parents and other adults to be alert at all times when children join Scouts or church and community groups or any organization that takes children outside the moms' and dads' purview. That said, there is some good news. The high-profile cases of sex abuse allowed people to exit from naiveté about the type of people who abuse children. In the 1970s, when former priest Patrick O'Donnell damaged dozens of young lives, most people still believed that pedophiles looked creepy, and not charismatic like O'Donnell. So parents handed over their children, often without question, because it wasn't in our collective consciousness that charming adults would be capable of such gross injustices against our children. Society has awakened. Organizations that serve children have strict rules now regarding adult-child contact. Staffers and volunteers receive training in appropriate touch and behavior. And parents who raise suspicions are taken seriously. These safeguards are good, but they came at a price. Displays of natural affection between adults and children are discouraged. Men, especially, can feel awkward about interacting in any way with children they don't know well. Children as young as 3 and 4 receive instruction in good-touch-bad-touch. It's a new world. Safer? That requires constant vigilance. If a principal can kiss the bare feet of his 14-year-old students and a level 3 sex offender can somehow go on outings with foster children, we're not there yet. SIDEBAR: ASK QUESTIONS When your child joins an organization, ask: Have staffers and volunteers had adequate background checks? Have staffers and volunteers had training in sex abuse prevention? Are two or more adults with the children during field trips and overnight activities? Are parents invited to drop in on activities?

Parents should also: Do some background checking on staffers and volunteers through Internet search engines, such as Google. Raise concerns about any activities or behaviors that seem inappropriate. Volunteer as chaperones for field trips and overnight excursions. Make sure their children has good information about personal safety. To evaluate your child's personal safety knowledge, go to Lutheran Community Services SAFeT Response Center Web site at lcsnw.org/spokane/SAFeT.html TYPE: Editorial, Commentary, Column, Series: Our View, Our kids: Our business LOAD-DATE: April 24, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

19 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News April 20, 2007 Friday

EDITORIAL: Child safety elusive: Despite increased oversight, children vulnerable
BYLINE: The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: COMMENTARY LENGTH: 439 words Apr. 20--It seems impossible -- with all the awareness about child sex abuse in recent years, with all the background checking going on, with all the parents alert now to any sign of weirdness -- that children and teens can still be vulnerable to sex abuse when they participate in activities outside the home. But consider these two stories from Thursday's newspaper: --William Smylie, a Washington state contract worker hired to take foster children on outings, asked Jacob Rogers, a level 3 sex offender, to accompany him on those outings. Rogers, 19, was arrested Tuesday for allegedly molesting two of those foster boys. --An Ohio principal was charged with a misdemeanor after paying 14-year-old students $15 each to let

him kiss their feet. Sexual predators will find ways to be near children, no matter how stringent the safeguards. So it's up to parents and other adults to be alert at all times when children join Scouts or church and community groups or any organization that takes children outside the moms' and dads' purview. That said, there is some good news. The high-profile cases of sex abuse allowed people to exit from naivete about the type of people who abuse children. In the 1970s, when former priest Patrick O'Donnell damaged dozens of young lives, most people still believed that pedophiles looked creepy, and not charismatic like O'Donnell. So parents handed over their children, often without question, because it wasn't in our collective consciousness that charming adults would be capable of such gross injustices against our children. Society has awakened. Organizations that serve children have strict rules now regarding adult-child contact. Staffers and volunteers receive training in appropriate touch and behavior. And parents who raise suspicions are taken seriously. These safeguards are good, but they came at a price. Displays of natural affection between adults and children are discouraged. Men, especially, can feel awkward about interacting in any way with children they don't know well. Children as young as 3 and 4 receive instruction in good-touch-bad-touch. It's a new world. Safer? That requires constant vigilance. If a principal can kiss the bare feet of his 14-year-old students and a level 3 sex offender can somehow go on outings with foster children, we're not there yet. Copyright (c) 2007, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: April 21, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20070420-SR-0420-EDITORIAL-Child-safety-elusive PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2007 Spokesman-Review

20 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) April 19, 2007 Thursday Idaho Edition

DEFINING MIRACLES DOWNWARD;
BYLINE: Doug Clark

SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 515 words It's positively pathetic what passes for a miracle these days. At least by Shaun Cross' definition, anyway. Cross is an attorney for the Catholic Diocese of Spokane. On Wednesday, in a top-of-the-front-page story, the lawyer appeared ecstatic that every clergy sex-abuse victim involved in the diocese's bankruptcy and all of its Catholic parishes voted to accept a $48 million bankruptcy settlement. Cross dubbed the unanimity "a miracle." Well, praise the Lord and pass the collection plate. Sorry, Shaun. Call me old-school, but I have a more traditional view when it comes to the subject of divine intervention. Walking on water? Miracle! Lazarus raised from the dead? Miracle! Water to wine? Feeding the multitude? Parting the Red Sea? Miracle! Miracle! Miracle! Al Sharpton and Don Imus sharing a cabin on a Carnival cruise this summer? Yep. That would definitely qualify as a modern miracle. But Cross is talking about the acceptance of a glacial-paced bankruptcy settlement that, if approved, will financially resolve the most shameful chapter in the Catholic Diocese of Spokane's history. This is really about perverted priests, child molesters and sexual deviates who robbed some of our youth of their innocence. So call the settlement vote a hard-won compromise, if you will. Call it a grudging meeting of the minds. A miracle? Not on your burning bush. Am I being too hard on Cross? Maybe this is just a lawyer's transparent and misguided effort at spin control. I realize that nearly 250 votes were cast in favor of the deal. The voters included sex-abuse victims, parishes and church service providers. And considering the factions involved and the acrimonious nature of the case, the unanimous vote does come as a bit of a surprise. The vote, according to the story, "may bolster the expected confirmation of the settlement and related bankruptcy plan by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Patricia Williams next week." Despite all the progress, Steve Barber isn't exactly doing somersaults of joy. Barber, allegedly molested by Patrick O'Donnell, a now-defrocked priest, was one of 161 people with abuse claims who were eligible to vote. I believe in a less miraculous and more believable scenario: that victims went along with the proposed

settlement more as a way to get on with their lives and put the years of frustration and legal wrangling behind them. "Basically we were asked to accept the only thing they would give us," Barber told Spokesman-Review reporter John Stucke. My heart goes out to those who were preyed on by these two-legged monsters. The emotional scars and psychological damage must be ghastly to bear. I had a great childhood. I had loving parents. My Scout leader was a fine fellow. I was never molested by a minister. I was never groped by a schoolteacher. In other words, I have no clue when it comes to trying to comprehend the terrible travails of what Barber and the others say they went through. But I do know this: No legal settlement, no amount of cash can begin to undo their sufferings. If it could, well, now, Mr. Cross, that really would be a miracle. LOAD-DATE: April 21, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Doug Clark is a columnist for The Spokesman-Review. He can be reached at (509) 459-5432 or dougc@spokesman.com. DOCUMENT-TYPE: Column, Commentary PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

21 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) April 19, 2007 Thursday Metro Edition

DEFINING MIRACLES DOWNWARD;
BYLINE: Doug Clark SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 515 words It's positively pathetic what passes for a miracle these days.

At least by Shaun Cross' definition, anyway. Cross is an attorney for the Catholic Diocese of Spokane. On Wednesday, in a top-of-the-front-page story, the lawyer appeared ecstatic that every clergy sex-abuse victim involved in the diocese's bankruptcy and all of its Catholic parishes voted to accept a $48 million bankruptcy settlement. Cross dubbed the unanimity "a miracle." Well, praise the Lord and pass the collection plate. Sorry, Shaun. Call me old-school, but I have a more traditional view when it comes to the subject of divine intervention. Walking on water? Miracle! Lazarus raised from the dead? Miracle! Water to wine? Feeding the multitude? Parting the Red Sea? Miracle! Miracle! Miracle! Al Sharpton and Don Imus sharing a cabin on a Carnival cruise this summer? Yep. That would definitely qualify as a modern miracle. But Cross is talking about the acceptance of a glacial-paced bankruptcy settlement that, if approved, will financially resolve the most shameful chapter in the Catholic Diocese of Spokane's history. This is really about perverted priests, child molesters and sexual deviates who robbed some of our youth of their innocence. So call the settlement vote a hard-won compromise, if you will. Call it a grudging meeting of the minds. A miracle? Not on your burning bush. Am I being too hard on Cross? Maybe this is just a lawyer's transparent and misguided effort at spin control. I realize that nearly 250 votes were cast in favor of the deal. The voters included sex-abuse victims, parishes and church service providers. And considering the factions involved and the acrimonious nature of the case, the unanimous vote does come as a bit of a surprise. The vote, according to the story, "may bolster the expected confirmation of the settlement and related bankruptcy plan by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Patricia Williams next week." Despite all the progress, Steve Barber isn't exactly doing somersaults of joy. Barber, allegedly molested by Patrick O'Donnell, a now-defrocked priest, was one of 161 people with abuse claims who were eligible to vote. I believe in a less miraculous and more believable scenario: that victims went along with the proposed settlement more as a way to get on with their lives and put the years of frustration and legal wrangling behind them. "Basically we were asked to accept the only thing they would give us," Barber told Spokesman-Review reporter John Stucke. My heart goes out to those who were preyed on by these two-legged monsters. The emotional scars and psychological damage must be ghastly to bear.

I had a great childhood. I had loving parents. My Scout leader was a fine fellow. I was never molested by a minister. I was never groped by a schoolteacher. In other words, I have no clue when it comes to trying to comprehend the terrible travails of what Barber and the others say they went through. But I do know this: No legal settlement, no amount of cash can begin to undo their sufferings. If it could, well, now, Mr. Cross, that really would be a miracle. LOAD-DATE: April 21, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Doug Clark is a columnist for The Spokesman-Review. He can be reached at (509) 459-5432 or dougc@spokesman.com. DOCUMENT-TYPE: Column, Commentary PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

22 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) April 18, 2007 Wednesday Idaho Edition

A Chilling effect; Child abuse cases are forcing clergy, Scout leaders and other volunteers to put more distance between themselves and the young people they're trying to help;
BYLINE: Virginia de Leon and Sara Leaming Staff writers SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1162 words Changing times and a growing awareness of child abuse have led to greater distrust of adults who work with children, prompting stricter rules in churches, Boy Scouts and other organizations. That means less one-on-one contact between children and adult mentors, so relationships that could steer at-risk kids away from trouble take longer to build.

"Our trust has been eroded," said the Rev. Chuck Wilkes, associate pastor of Spokane Valley Nazarene Church. No longer is it acceptable for an adult to initiate contact with a child, he said. Children, from an early age, are taught to be wary of people they don't know. "It's an unraveling of the community contract, which says we are responsible for the children," said Wilkes. It's affected even our willingness to commit simple acts of compassion. Wilkes recalls being in his car and seeing a boy shivering in the cold, walking in a snowstorm. He considered pulling over and offering the boy a ride home. "But I drove on by," he said, his voice tinged with sadness. The boy would have been too scared to get in the car. And Wilkes, a stranger, would have automatically been suspect for stopping to talk. "And that little first-grader paid the cost - he walked home without a coat on and he had nothing to do with this," Wilkes said. Today, would-be volunteers at various organizations undergo heavy scrutiny, including criminal background checks and interviews with references. They must undergo training and comply with strict codes of conduct. Here's how some organizations have dealt with the changes: * Mentors paired with youth through Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Inland Northwest can meet one-onone with children. But mentors who have second thoughts about those meetings are provided with another option. About 60 percent of the matches made through the national organization involve "site-based" programs, where an adult mentor meets with a child in a school or high-visibility site, said Darin Christensen, CEO of the Inland Northwest office. "Sometimes that kind of mentoring isn't quite as effective," Christensen said. "I guess the positive thing is that it allows that person who is concerned to still be involved in a way that feels comfortable." * The Boy Scouts of America also has new rules for how Scout leaders interact with boys. "We don't allow one-on-one contact with youth and adults in this day and age," said Tim McCandless, executive director of the Inland Northwest chapter. "If there is a campout, there must be at least two adults present." The Inland Northwest chapter of the Scouts - which has about 5,000 volunteers and serves about 13,000 boys in Idaho and Washington - also requires boys to receive training on how to recognize an abusive adult. Scouts must complete a Youth Protection Program to learn the signs of abuse before earning their first badge. The program also is taught to parents of Scouts, McCandless said. "If they find themselves in an abusive situation, we know they have the skills to recognize that it's wrong; they can recognize an adult who may have malicious intent," he said. Like schools and other volunteer programs for youth, all Boy Scout volunteers and staff must undergo extensive background checks. The cost typically is paid by the organization. * At the Boys and Girls Club of Spokane County, an after-school program, "we definitely do not let anyone in the building unless they went through our extensive background program; they do this before they have any contacts with kids," said Ryan Davenport, executive director of the chapter. But background checks don't always catch those who might harm children. Most abusers don't have a criminal background and are in positions of trust in a child's life. * As a result of the sex abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, the Diocese of Spokane has adopted policies to ensure the protection of children and vulnerable adults. Many of the regulations - which include outside audits, extensive training and a code of conduct that explicitly defines inappropriate behavior to include wrestling, piggy-back rides and massages - are also being

emphasized by other churches in the area, particularly in Spokane Valley. About a year ago, Wilkes and Ian Robertson, pastors of Spokane Valley Nazarene Church, decided they needed to offer support to their Catholic brothers and sisters and learn from past mistakes. "It's been so traumatic," said Robertson, reflecting on the experience of the diocese. "What can we learn from this? How can we bring healing to the whole community?" The victims of abuse, after all, aren't the only ones who have been affected, said Wilkes. The crisis also has hurt the victims' families, clergy, church members and society as a whole. The legal system, however, isn't always set up for healing, said Wilkes, an attorney who practiced law for nearly 30 years. "The legal system is about retributive justice, not restorative," he said. He and others believe it's up to the faith community to bring about that healing and restore trust, the essential element that "holds us together as a community." "The sexual abuse problems are bigger than the Catholic Church," said Robertson, who meets regularly with Catholic Bishop William Skylstad of Spokane. "It's time for us, as the entire faith community, to work on a combined solution." In recent months, the roughly 33 pastors who belong to the Spokane Valley Ministerial Association have been discussing an initiative known as "Healing to Our Community." Based on lessons learned from the diocese and using its "Safe Net for Children and Youth" as a template, members of the ministerial association are establishing an official code of conduct and policies to prevent abuse. Part of their efforts includes an informational brochure with local resources and a list of common signs and symptoms that could indicate sexual abuse. On the cover of the brochure is a photograph of two little boys and the words: "Please listen to me, please believe me." Wilkes, Robertson and others hope the work pastors are doing in Spokane Valley can become a model for healing in other places. "We have to reweave that tapestry of trust," Wilkes said. SIDEBAR: AGENCIES BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE INLAND NORTHWEST 222 W. Mission, Suite 210 Spokane, WA 99201 Phone: (509) 328-8310 Hours: M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Description: Matches boys ages 7-13 and girls ages 6-14 from single-parent homes or children who have an incarcerated parent with trained volunteers committed to being positive role models. BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA 411 W. Boy Scout Way Spokane, WA 99201 Phone: (509) 325-4562 Hours: M-F, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Description: A program that teaches citizenship, personal fitness and leadership. BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF SPOKANE COUNTY

544 E. Providence Spokane, WA 99207 Phone: 489-0741 Hours: M-F, 3-8 p.m. Description: Offers activities in education, athletics, fine arts, crafts and social recreation for ages 6-18. TYPE: Series: Our kids: Our business LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

23 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News April 18, 2007 Wednesday

A Chilling effect
BYLINE: Virginia De Leon and Sara Leaming, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 1080 words Apr. 18--Changing times and a growing awareness of child abuse have led to greater distrust of adults who work with children, prompting stricter rules in churches, Boy Scouts and other organizations. That means less one-on-one contact between children and adult mentors, so relationships that could steer at-risk kids away from trouble take longer to build. "Our trust has been eroded," said the Rev. Chuck Wilkes, associate pastor of Spokane Valley Nazarene Church. No longer is it acceptable for an adult to initiate contact with a child, he said. Children, from an early age, are taught to be wary of people they don't know. "It's an unraveling of the community contract, which says we are responsible for the children," said Wilkes. It's affected even our willingness to commit simple acts of compassion. Wilkes recalls being in his car and seeing a boy shivering in the cold, walking in a snowstorm. He con-

sidered pulling over and offering the boy a ride home. "But I drove on by," he said, his voice tinged with sadness. The boy would have been too scared to get in the car. And Wilkes, a stranger, would have automatically been suspect for stopping to talk. "And that little first-grader paid the cost -- he walked home without a coat on and he had nothing to do with this," Wilkes said. Today, would-be volunteers at various organizations undergo heavy scrutiny, including criminal background checks and interviews with references. They must undergo training and comply with strict codes of conduct. Here's how some organizations have dealt with the changes: -- Mentors paired with youth through Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Inland Northwest can meet one-onone with children. But mentors who have second thoughts about those meetings are provided with another option. About 60 percent of the matches made through the national organization involve "site-based" programs, where an adult mentor meets with a child in a school or high-visibility site, said Darin Christensen, CEO of the Inland Northwest office. "Sometimes that kind of mentoring isn't quite as effective," Christensen said. "I guess the positive thing is that it allows that person who is concerned to still be involved in a way that feels comfortable." -- The Boy Scouts of America also has new rules for how Scout leaders interact with boys. "We don't allow one-on-one contact with youth and adults in this day and age," said Tim McCandless, executive director of the Inland Northwest chapter. "If there is a campout, there must be at least two adults present." The Inland Northwest chapter of the Scouts -- which has about 5,000 volunteers and serves about 13,000 boys in Idaho and Washington -- also requires boys to receive training on how to recognize an abusive adult. Scouts must complete a Youth Protection Program to learn the signs of abuse before earning their first badge. The program also is taught to parents of Scouts, McCandless said. "If they find themselves in an abusive situation, we know they have the skills to recognize that it's wrong; they can recognize an adult who may have malicious intent," he said. Like schools and other volunteer programs for youth, all Boy Scout volunteers and staff must undergo extensive background checks. The cost typically is paid by the organization. -- At the Boys and Girls Club of Spokane County, an after-school program, "we definitely do not let anyone in the building unless they went through our extensive background program; they do this before they have any contacts with kids," said Ryan Davenport, executive director of the chapter. But background checks don't always catch those who might harm children. Most abusers don't have a criminal background and are in positions of trust in a child's life. -- As a result of the sex abuse scandal in the Roman Catholic Church, the Diocese of Spokane has adopted policies to ensure the protection of children and vulnerable adults. Many of the regulations -- which include outside audits, extensive training and a code of conduct that explicitly defines inappropriate behavior to include wrestling, piggy-back rides and massages -- are also being emphasized by other churches in the area, particularly in Spokane Valley. About a year ago, Wilkes and Ian Robertson, pastors of Spokane Valley Nazarene Church, decided they needed to offer support to their Catholic brothers and sisters and learn from past mistakes. "It's been so traumatic," said Robertson, reflecting on the experience of the diocese. "What can we learn from this? How can we bring healing to the whole community?" The victims of abuse, after all, aren't the only ones who have been affected, said Wilkes. The crisis also has hurt the victims' families, clergy, church members and society as a whole. The legal system, however, isn't always set up for healing, said Wilkes, an attorney who practiced law for

nearly 30 years. "The legal system is about retributive justice, not restorative," he said. He and others believe it's up to the faith community to bring about that healing and restore trust, the essential element that "holds us together as a community." "The sexual abuse problems are bigger than the Catholic Church," said Robertson, who meets regularly with Catholic Bishop William Skylstad of Spokane. "It's time for us, as the entire faith community, to work on a combined solution." In recent months, the roughly 33 pastors who belong to the Spokane Valley Ministerial Association have been discussing an initiative known as "Healing to Our Community." Based on lessons learned from the diocese and using its "Safe Net for Children and Youth" as a template, members of the ministerial association are establishing an official code of conduct and policies to prevent abuse. Part of their efforts includes an informational brochure with local resources and a list of common signs and symptoms that could indicate sexual abuse. On the cover of the brochure is a photograph of two little boys and the words: "Please listen to me, please believe me." Wilkes, Robertson and others hope the work pastors are doing in Spokane Valley can become a model for healing in other places. "We have to reweave that tapestry of trust," Wilkes said. Copyright (c) 2007, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: April 18, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20070418-SR-0418-A-Chilling-effect PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2007 Spokesman-Review

24 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) April 16, 2007 Monday Sunrise Edition

Obituaries
BYLINE: The Oregonian

SECTION: Obituaries; Pg. E03 LENGTH: 3296 words Louis Joseph Adams Louis Joseph Adams died April 7, 2007, at age 75. Mr. Adams was born Dec. 16, 1931, in Chicago. He served in the Air Force for 25 years, including in the Korean and Vietnam wars. He moved to Gresham in the early 1970s and worked for Boeing of Portland. He married Doris Swann. Survivors include his wife; daughters, Pam Thomas and Debbie Adams; son, Joe; brothers, Mike and George; sister, Anni Jones; nine grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Service held. Remembrances to Adventist Health Hospice. Arrangements by Gresham Funeral Chapel. Kathryn W. Baird A service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 21, 2007, in First Christian Church in St. Helens for Kathryn W. Baird, who died April 11, 2007, at age 63. Kathryn Wong was born March 12, 1944, in Portland. She graduated from Cleveland High School and worked for Northwest Regional Education Research before becoming a homemaker and working in child care. She lived in Scappoose for 38 years. In 1969, she married Thomas. Survivors include her husband; sons, Thomas Jr., Jason and Joe; brothers, Ron Wong, Duane Wong and Jim Wong; and four grandchildren. Remembrances to M.A.D.D. Arrangements by Columbia. William Bayley William Bayley died April 12, 2007, of a lung infection at age 84. Mr. Bayley was born Dec. 7, 1922, in Crookston, Minn. He served in the Navy during World War II and graduated from the University of North Dakota. He moved to Sandy in 1951 and later lived in Portland. He was a salesman for the FMC Corp. In 1951, he married Bonita Hills. Survivors include his wife; son, Ray; daughter, Carol Nelson; sister, Lois Sexton; brother, Lovell; and two grandchildren. Remembrances to the American Cancer Society. Arrangements by Omega. Douglas Lee Behrend Douglas Lee Behrend died March 30, 2007, of a stroke at age 65. Mr. Behrend was born Feb. 3, 1942, in Portland. He moved in 1969 to Beaverton and was an engineer for Tektronix. In 1963, he marriedMarlene Wallace. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Teresa Norman; sister, Caryl; and two grandchildren. Remembrances to the National Kidney Foundation. Arrangements by Springer and Son. Alton C. Billings Alton C. Billings died April 7, 2007, of cancer at age 85. Mr. Billings was born April 14, 1921, in Myrtle Point. During World War II, he served in the Army in Europe and received a Purple Heart. He moved to Milwaukie in 1945, and was a canner for M. & S. Canning for more than 20 years, and retired as a dispatcher for Silver Eagle Trucking. He moved to Powers about 1985, and was its mayor before returning to Clackamas in 1993. He moved to Oregon City in November. In 1943, he married Yvonne Sherk; she died in 1995. Survivors include his daughters, Cheryl Cutter and Kina Minto; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grand-

children. Remembrances to Willamette Falls Hospice. Arrangements by Portland Memorial. Ruth Agnes Blackburn Ruth Agnes Blackburn died April 10, 2007, at age 98. Ruth Agnes Hennagin was born July 28, 1908, in Portland. She graduated from St. Mary's Academy, and was a homemaker in Eugene and Roseburg before returning to Portland in 1942. In 1936, she married Laurence E.; he died in 2005. Survivors include her son, Gary L. Remembrances to the Oregon Humane Society. Arrangements by Mt. Scott. Charles Burch Charles Burch died April 1, 2007, at age 70. Mr. Burch was born May 5, 1936, in Baton Rouge, La. He served in the Air Force for 25 years, including in the Vietnam War. He moved to Vancouver in the early 1980s. He was a window clerk for the U.S. Postal Service in Portland. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Cherie; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Neptune. Freda Chartier Freda Chartier died March 24, 2007, at age 97. Freda Reif was born Nov. 3, 1909, in Wasserburg am Inn, Germany. A homemaker, she immigrated to Skamania, Wash., in 1955, and moved to Portland in 1980. In 1955, she married Philip; he died in 1967. Survivors include her niece, Maria Beranek; grandniece, Gabrielle Unscheid; and grandnephew, Christoph Weiss. Remembrances to Friends of the Columbia Gorge. Arrrangements by Holman's. Horace M. Davis Horace M. "Dave" Davis died April 7, 2007, from complications of diabetes at age 84. Mr. Davis was born Sept. 16, 1922, in Cortland, Ohio. He graduated from Forest Grove High School in 1941, moved to Hillsboro in 1945, then moved back to Forest Grove in 1992. During World War II, he served in the Army in the 104th infantry. He was the owner and operator of Well Drilling Company. In 1951, he married Mae Trussell. Survivors include his wife; sons, David and Dan; daughter, Rhonda; brother, Robert; sister, Marian Olnhausen; eight grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. Remembrances to Casey Eye Institute. Arrangements by Westside Cremation & Burial. Aloys J. Dugi Aloys J. Dugi died April 3, 2007, at age 82. Mr. Dugi was born June 1, 1924, in Falls City, Texas. During World War II, he served in the Marine Corps, and later was in the Army Air Corps and Air Force, for more than 20 years of service. He was a licensed practical nurse at the veterans hospital in Roseburg and moved to Portland in 1982. He married Helen Pepper; she died in 1987. In 1991, he married Jean McCool; she died in 2001. Survivors include his daughters, Joanna Dugi, Kathleen Lowe, Janice Gauthier and Donna Dugi; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Lincoln Memorial.

Mary Ferrante A funeral will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 17, 2007, in Ascension Catholic Church in Portland for Mary Ferrante, who died April 12 of a stroke at age 84. Mary Milne was born Sept. 30, 1922, in Portland, where she lived all her life. She graduated from Commerce High School and was a claims supervisor for John Hancock. In 1945, she married Ron. Survivors include her husband; daughters, Mary Davis and Gabrielle Ferrante; and two grandchildren. Remembrances to the Alzheimer's Association. Arrangements by Lincoln Memorial. Joeann Carol Gould A memorial service will be at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, April 28, 2007, in the Nazarene Holiness Campground in Vancouver for Joeann Carol Gould, who died March 30 at age 63. Joeann Carol Hanson was born Oct. 23, 1943, in St. Helens, and raised in Wapato, Wash. She graduated from Clark College and was a musician and singer, including for several churches. She served as secretary of the board of her last church. She moved to Sherwood in 1993. In 1966, she married Harvey Lewis; they divorced. She married Johnny Woods in 1984; he died in 1989. In 2004, she married John Gould. Survivors include her husband; daughter, Stephanie Woods; son, Stephen Lewis; brother, Edgar Hanson; and two grandchildren. Remembrances to Camas, Wash., Church of the Nazarene. Arrangements by Springer & Son. Donald D. Graber A memorial service will be at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, April 19, 2007, in Columbia View Wesleyan Church in Gresham for Donald D. Graber, who died April 11 at age 80. Mr. Graber was born June 8, 1926, in Portland. He graduated from Milwaukie High School and served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. He was franchise manager for a Kings Table restaurant and owner of Papa Don's restaurant, both in Gresham. He later was a financial planner for Waddell & Reed. He served on the board of trustees for Western Evangelical Seminary for about 20 years. He had lived in Boring since 1971. In 1949, he married Charlotte L. Dresser. Survivors include his wife; daughters, Susan Doran, Peggy Brown, Barbara Peterson, Donna Degler, Charlotte Hottmann and Janet Wakefield; sons, David, Tim and Dan; 25 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Remembrances to the Arthritis Foundation. Arrangements by Peake. James E. Hafer A funeral will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 18, 2007, in Holy Cross Catholic Church in Portland for James E. Hafer, who died April 13 at age 84. Mr. Hafer was born Feb. 11, 1923, in Stanfield. He served in the Army Air Corps (later Air Force) for 25 years, including during World War II. He also was a sander for Nicolai Door Co. In 1947, he married Elizabeth Granfield. Survivors include his wife; sons, Steven, Timothy, Michael and Patrick; daughters, Mary Williams, Ann Brownlee and Catherine Rost; 18 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Remembrances to Holy Cross School. Arrangements by Caldwell's, Hennessey, Goetsch & McGee. Bruce Haverstick Bruce Haverstick died April 7, 2007, at age 92. Mr. Haverstick was born Sept. 28, 1914, in Bellingham, Wash., and moved to Hillsboro as a child. He graduated from Hillsboro High School. A machinist, he owned Haverstick Manufacturing for more than 35 years. He moved to Aloha in 2005. In 1941, he married Amelia Miller.

Survivors include his wife and brother, Lee. Arrangements by Donelson Sewell and Mathews. Howard R. 'Randy' Hedrick Jr. A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 20, 2007, in St. Luke Lutheran Church in Portland for Howard R. "Randy" Hedrick Jr., who died April 3 at age 59. Mr. Hedrick was born June 3, 1947, in Astoria, and moved to Portland at age 11. He graduated from Beaverton High School. He was a senior project draftsman and methods analyst for ESI for 15 years and later a document control manager for Laerdal for 13 years. Survivors include his parents, Doris and Howard Sr.; sister, Lori; and brother, Jeff. Remembrances to the Fish Camp Fund at Camp Angelos, Corbett. Arrangements by American Burial. Lee Ora Houdek Lee Ora Houdek died April 8, 2007, of lung cancer at age 66. Lee Ora Scheel was born July 11, 1940, in Lyndon, Kan. A homemaker, she moved to Milwaukie in 1973, and graduated from the Museum Art School. She then lived in Honolulu for more than 20 years before returning to Portland in 2005. In 1962, she married Don; they divorced. Survivors include her son, Scott E.; and brothers, Larry Scheel and Alan Scheel. Remembrances to the American Cancer Society. Arrangements by Omega. Byron Dean Jennings Byron Dean Jennings died April 2, 2007, of cancer at age 47. Mr. Jennings was born June 18, 1959, in Medford, moved in 1967 to Portland and in 1972 to Oregon City. He graduated from Oregon City High School. He was a lumber salesman and lived in Gresham since 1997. In 1980, he married Jeri Lynn Garoutte. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Amy L. Olsen; son, James D.; parents, Lyndel D. and Tommie M.; sister, Cindy L. Zeppenfeld; and three grandchildren. Service later. Remembrances to Legacy Medical Services at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. Arrangements by Hillside. Ronald Harlen Johnson Ronald Harlen Johnson died April 6, 2007, at age 48. Mr. Johnson was born March 27, 1959, in Klamath Falls, and moved to Portland as an infant. He was a self-employed mechanic. Survivors include his mother, Esther, and sister, Melissa Faber. Arrangements by American Burial & Cremation. Mildred Orrell Kerchner Mildred Orrell Kerchner died March 31, 2007, at age 92. Mildred Griffiths was born June 16, 1914, in Kansas City, Mo., and raised in Southern California. She was a senior bookkeeper for Sears Roebuck, where she worked for 35 years. She moved to Portland eight years ago. Her husband Harold died in 1975. Survivors include her daughter, Donna Roberts; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Neptune. Glen Dwight Konkle A gathering will be from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 21, 2007, in the family home for Glen Dwight

Konkle, who died April 3of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at age 75. Mr. Konkle was born July 9, 1931, in Hubbard. He graduated from Parkrose High School, where he was a state champion wrestler. He served in the Navy in the Korean War. He worked for Goodyear Industrial Rubber & Supply and was a volunteer purchasing/inventory control specialist for small businesses. In 1951, he married Betty Jones. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Tracy Miller; sons, Kevin and Dana; brother, Wayne; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Omega. Robert Emerson Leach A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Friday, April 20, 2007, in Christ the Vine Lutheran Church in Clackamas for Robert Emerson Leach, who died April 12 at age 68. Mr. Leach was born April 17, 1938, in Halliday, N.D., and moved to Portland in 1942. He graduated from Franklin High School and served in the Coast Guard Reserve. He was a central office technician for Qwest for 31 years. He was a charter member of the church. In 1965, he married Lucille Taylor. Survivors include his wife; sons, Larry and Eric; and sister, Christine. Remembrances to the Huntington's Disease Society of America in New York City. Arrangements by Bateman Carroll. Judith Ann LeFever A gathering will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 21, 2007, in the Heathman Lodge in Vancouver for Judith Ann LeFever, who died April 2 of ovarian cancer at age 57. Judith Belcher was born Feb. 4, 1950, in Fruita, Colo. She graduated from Roosevelt High School and lived in Battle Ground, Wash., since about 2002. She worked for Borders Books. In 2003, she married Mike. Survivors include her husband; son, Kyler Jorden; and four grandchildren. Remembrances to the American Cancer Society. Arrangements by Evergreen Staples. John Daniel MacDonald A memorial service will be at 10 a.m. Monday, April 23, 2007, in the Providence Milwaukie Hospital chapel for John Daniel MacDonald, who died April 11 at age 72. Mr. MacDonald was born April 7, 1935, in Boston, where he lived for 48 years. He also lived in Los Angeles for 14 years and was in Milwaukie for the past 10 years. He had worked for Polaroid and more recently volunteered at Providence Milwaukie Hospital. He married Audrey Fitzgerald. Survivors include his wife; son, Richard; daughters, Marie MacDonald, Kathleen Farrell, Gini Nichols and Carolyn Fowler; stepdaughter, Karen Bennett; sister, Alice Breen; brother, Robert; 13 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Remembrances to the Providence Milwaukie Foundation. Arrangements by Peake. Archie Leo Maddalena Archie Leo Maddalena died April 6, 2007, at age 82. Mr. Maddalena was born June 28, 1924, in Reno. He served in the Navy in the Pacific during World War II. He was a store manager for Rodda Paint who moved to Hillsboro 12 years ago. In 1946, he married Jessie Hurley. Survivors include his daughters, Lee Reed and Kim Maddalena; son, Lynn; five grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Remembrances to Hospice of Washington County. Arrangements by Springer and Son. Colleen Virginia Meyer

A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 21, 2007, in Gateway Little Chapel of the Chimes for Colleen Virginia Meyer, who died April 10 at age 81. Colleen Edelman was born Nov. 24, 1925, in Portland, where she lived all her life. She was a clerk for the Super Yarn Mart, a Girl Scout leader and a volunteer for Providence Hospital. In 1942, she married Jack R.; he died in 1988. Survivors include her daughters, Jackie Altman and Kathy McCreary; sons, Jim, Phil, Mark and Dave; sisters, Arlene Wicklund and Edna Hall; brother, Bill Brandt; 15 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Remembrances to the Alzheimer's Association. MaryJo Neuhof A gathering will be from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, April 21, 2007, in the Portland home of her sister-inlaw, Rose Casciato, for MaryJo Neuhof, who died April 14 of lung disease at age 62. MaryJo Delgard was born April 17, 1944, in Portland. She graduated from Madison High School and was a secretary for Clackamas County. In the mid-1970s, she married Henry. Survivors include her husband; daughter, Gina Kroft; and three grandchildren. Arrangements by Gateway Little Chapel of the Chimes. Warren R. Osborn A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Thursday, April 19, 2007, in Omega Funeral & Cremation Service for Warren R. Osborn, who died April 10 at age 89. Mr. Osborn was born Sept. 28, 1917, in Lawrence, Kan. He served in the Army during World War II in the South Pacific and received the Bronze Star. He moved to Portland in the late 1940s and was a machinist who worked for several companies, including Iron Fireman, Electronic Specialties and Boeing. He also operated a charter boat business. In 1964, he married Joyce Kellington. Survivors include his wife; son, Montie Osborne; stepdaughter, Jerri Blodgett; stepsons, Dwight Gruber, Kent McIntosh and Mike McIntosh; brothers, Gene Osborne and Bruce Osborne; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Remembrances to charity. Viola Robison A memorial service will be at 2:30 p.m. Friday, April 20, 2007, in the Provincial House chapel of Mary's Woods in Lake Oswego for Viola Robison, who died April 1 at age 95. Viola Day was born July 31, 1911, in Westford, Mass. She graduated from Syracuse University in New York and was a homemaker in Westfield, N.J., before moving to Lake Oswego in 1989. In 1931, she married Samuel C.; he died in 1996. Survivors include her son, Cliff; and one grandchild. Remembrances to Lake Grove Presbyterian Church in Lake Oswego. Arrangements by Young's. Harrison Lee Sandidge Harrison Lee Sandidge died April 10, 2007, of a stroke at age 54. Mr. Sandidge was born April 16, 1952, in Ganado, Ariz. He served in the Navy and moved in 1975 to Portland, where he was a truck driver for Cascade Columbia Distribution. Survivors include his son, Brandon Allard; mother, Lola Snively; sister, Marge Pariseau; and brother, Paul. Remembrances to the Anatomical Research Fund in care of OHSU Foundation. Arrangements by Cornerstone.

Georgia Marie Shelley Georgia Marie "Jo" Shelley died April 9, 2007, of cancer at age 80. Georgia Marie Fiala was born July 27, 1926, in Salem, Neb., and moved to Lebanon in 1937. She was a secretary for the U.S. Postal Service in Seattle and Portland. She moved to Milwaukie in 1979. In 1958, she married Arnie; he died in 1986. Survivors include her sisters, Helen Borigo, Ethel Smith and Alice Ammon; brothers, Richard Fiala, Harold Fiala and Glenn Fiala. Arrangements by Holman Hankins Bowker & Waud. Barbara A. Ward-Ziegler A memorial service will be at 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 18, 2007, in Riverview Abbey Funeral Home for Barbara A. Ward-Ziegler, who died April 8 of lung disease at age 69. Barbara A. Bowen was born Dec. 23, 1937, in London. She received a master's degree from Portland State University and was a social worker for Multnomah County Children's Services Division. She helped to develop a sex abuse treatment program for the county. In 1988, she married Walter L. Ziegler; he died in 2002. Survivors include her friends. Remembrances to Dove Lewis Animal Hospital. George W. Wilson Sr. A memorial service will be at 1 p.m. Sunday, April 22, 2007, in River View Cemetery chapel for George W. Wilson Sr., who died April 4 at age 83. Mr. Wilson was born July 18, 1923, in Hartselle, Ala. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II in Europe. He then lived in Spokane, where he operated a real estate company with his wife for about 40 years. In 2000, he moved to Palm Desert, Calif., and then in June of last year he came to Portland. In 1944, he married Mary Palmer. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Patti; sons, George Jr. and Steve; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Remembrances to charity. Arrangements by River View Cemetery Funeral Home. Jorge Mario Zamora A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Monday, April 16, 2007, in Meridian United Church of Christ in Wilsonville for Jorge Mario Zamora, who died April 12 of cancer at age 61. Mr. Zamora was born June 14, 1945, in San Jose, Costa Rica. He graduated from Escuela Agricola Panamericana in Honduras, as well as the University of Florida and Portland State University. He was a systems administrator for Georgia-Pacific who lived in Lake Oswego for 31 years. In 1969, he married Joanne Bennett. Survivors include his wife; sons, Jorge D. and Alex J.; daughter, Ana R.; mother, Maria Bolanos; sister, Flor Isabel Wagner; brother, Edgar; and three grandchildren. Remembrances to Portland Rescue Mission. LOAD-DATE: April 18, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2007 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

29 of 265 DOCUMENTS Bristol Herald Courier (Virginia) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News April 3, 2007 Tuesday

Children's Advocacy Center coping with growing case load
BYLINE: Bristol Herald Courier, Va. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 569 words Apr. 3--In most cases, growth isn't a bad thing. But for one Sullivan County agency, it just might be. "We're bursting at the seams," Joette Street, executive director of the Children's Advocacy Center of Sullivan County, said Monday. The agency's mission is to fight child sexual and physical abuse and coordinate and provide services to children and families in crisis. Monday marked the kickoff of Child Abuse Prevention Month. Street, who took the helm of the CAC in February, said she asked the staff what they needed to keep up with the growing case load. In part, the answer was more space and more full-time therapists. Unfortunately, Street said, that means more children need treatment. In fact, the load for the 2006-07 year has so far increased by 35 percent over the previous year, with 928 cases of child sexual abuse and severe physical abuse reviewed by the Child Protective Investigative Team. In addition to more employees and office space, agency officials want to include fifth-graders in the prevention programs. As for why there are more cases, Carey Lewis, program coordinator, said the hope is it's awareness. "We like to think that more people are reporting the abuse, not that it's happening more," she said. Assistant District Attorney Barry Staubus said the proclamation of child abuse month is important, but "what happens behind the doors of the Children's Advocacy Center is ... really a world of children who are victims of various kinds of serious abuse. The advocacy center, for many of these kids, provides a safe haven from a chaotic world." In addition to therapy for victims, the center provides a place for investigators to meet and discuss cases, a secure location for victims who have to undergo physical examinations and a place for prosecutors to prepare child victims for court.

Across the state line, the Children's Advocacy Center of Washington County also has its share of cases involving child sex abuse, according to Marcia Hicklin, community education and prevention coordinator. "Every two days, we have a new case," she said. To represent the 165 children served in the county and Bristol Virginia, pinwheels were "planted" Monday in the garden at the center. By the end of the year, Executive Director Kathi Roark said the center had already served 104 children for the fiscal year, which began July 1. "The most important thing people can do is be a strong supportive adult in the life of children, whether it is their own child, someone they know from their church or in a scout troop. Having the presence of one caring adult really makes the difference," she said. A child who has been abused is more likely to seek help if he or she has a close relationship with an adult, she added. If local residents want to help, those at both centers said they can use volunteers, and each also accepts donations. Volunteers likely would not work directly with children, but provide services such as office work or maintenance. For more information about the Children's Advocacy Center of Sullivan County, call (423) 279-1222. For the CAC of Washington County, call (276) 645-5867. Copyright (c) 2007, Bristol Herald Courier, Va. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: April 3, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20070403-BC-0403-Children-s-Advocacy-Center-coping-with-growing-case-load PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: BC Copyright 2007 Bristol Herald Courier

30 of 265 DOCUMENTS Herald News (Passaic County, NJ) April 2, 2007 Monday All Editions

Child's murder spurred action; Mandatory sentencing adopted as result

BYLINE: By DEENA YELLIN and GIOVANNA FABIANO, Special to the Herald News, North Jersey Media Group SECTION: OUR TOWNS; Pg. B03 LENGTH: 324 words Rasheed Muhammad will spend the rest of his life behind bars, thanks to Joan's Law. Muhammad was sentenced to life in prison without parole in 1998 for the rape and murder of an 8-yearold Newark girl. If his sentence had come just a few years earlier, there's a chance Muhammad could have been released someday. Instead, he remains in New Jersey State Prison in Trenton, with no chance of getting out. "He's one person that I know is in jail directly because of Joan's Law," said Bergen County Assistant Prosecutor Cathy Foddai, who tried the case in Essex County. Tuesday is the 10-year anniversary of Joan's Law in New Jersey, which is named after Joan D'Alessandro, a 7-year-old Hillsdale girl who was raped and murdered by a neighbor in 1973 when she went to his home to deliver Girl Scout Cookies. Joan's Law mandates life terms without parole for child molesters who kill children under the age of 14. The better-known Megan's Law is a notification law which requires sex offenders to become registered and places them in different categories based on the severity of the crimes, Foddai said. Joan's family has spent the past 34 years trying to draw something positive from the tragedy. Her mother, Rosemarie D'Alessandro, fought for laws to keep criminals who prey on children in prison. "People who murder and molest children should not ever receive parole," she said recently, reflecting on the upcoming 10th anniversary of Joan's Law. She campaigned for three years to get the law passed. It became national when President Clinton signed it in October 1998. What's next A garage sale to benefit the Joan D'Alessandro Foundation will be held on May 19 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and May 20 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 45 Florence St. in Hillsdale. Proceeds will go toward providing an excursion for the poor and homeless youth of the Father English Center in Paterson and Youth Haven in Passaic. To donate goods, contact the foundation at del2@email.com LOAD-DATE: April 3, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 North Jersey Media Group Inc., All Rights Reserved

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The Sunday Star-Times (Auckland, New Zealand) March 25, 2007 Sunday

CRIME 'Average Kiwis' use child porn
BYLINE: HILL RUTH SECTION: NEWS; NATIONAL; Pg. 5 LENGTH: 488 words Typical user is Pakeha and in his early 30s THE TYPICAL man trading internet child pornography is an Auckland Pakeha, aged in his early 30s, according to new research from Internal Affairs. He is most likely a student or working in the IT industry. In other words, such traders appear to be average Kiwi blokes. Based on information collected by censorship inspectors, the Internal Affairs department's censorship compliance unit has built profiles of 215 traders in internet child pornography, including their social, demographic and behavioural characteristics. It is hoped profiling will give investigators an insight into offenders and why they offend - and help stop them. The unit's head, Steve O'Brien, said since the first child porn trader was convicted in 1997, the "average" offender had changed significantly. "We used to be predominantly dealing with people in their late teens or early 20s, but this may have been because the technology was so new. "Now the internet is part of everyday life for many people, we see the age range creeping up." Last month the unit charged a man in his 60s. The most recent update, in February, included profiles of 215 offenders, of whom all but one were male. Just over half (52%) lived in the main urban areas of Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. About 75% (162) were New Zealand European, while only 1% (three people) identified as Maori. More than half (63%) were aged between 10 and 34, the average age range being 30-34. Students remained the largest occupational group among offenders (23%) and workers in the information technology sector represented 17% of the total. Most (55%) had no prior criminal convictions, although 13% had sexual convictions, 9% involving someone under 16. Alarmingly, about 75% had contact with children through their family life, occupations or volunteer work. These included two soccer coaches, a primary school headmaster, a school bus driver, the driver of an ice cream van, a teacher's aide who was involved in the Boy Scouts and taught martial arts to children, a holiday camp labourer and a CYFS caregiver. O'Brien said although only 1% of those prosecuted had a previous censorship conviction, there were some who had been prosecuted two or even three times, which showed the "addictive nature" of pornography. "Most of the time, they put their hands up straight away and say `fair cop' or `I've been waiting for you to

come'. "In some cases, they aren't even trying to hide." O'Brien said although few images found over the years were of New Zealand children, research showed a correlation between offenders who collected and distributed child sex abuse images and other offending against children. "Possessing child sex abuse images is a warning about an offender's sexual attitudes to children. "Our actions are not about pictures on a computer - they're about preventing child abuse." INSIDE THE MIND OF AN INTERNET PORN ADDICT / Focus C1 LOAD-DATE: March 26, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Independent News Auckland Ltd. All Rights Reserved

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Newsday (New York) March 11, 2007 Sunday HUNTINGTON EDITION

NOTEBOOK; Students perform at music fest
BYLINE: MARY ELLEN PEREIRA SECTION: LI LIFE; Pg. G20 LENGTH: 1015 words Student musicians and vocalists from across Long Island were invited to perform with the 2007 Music Educators National Conference All-Eastern Honor Ensembles. This weekend, March 8-11, about 650 talented high school students from Maine to Washington, D.C., were to gather at the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts in Hartford. Ensembles include a concert band, symphony orchestra, mixed chorus and jazz ensemble. The local high school students are: Bellport: Michael Celentano; Commack: Ji Wook Kim, Jason Martz

and Christopher Toomey; Deer Park: Anthony Chrones; Dix Hills (Half Hollow Hills East): Thomas Grosskurth; East Hampton: Asalia Goldberg; East Islip: Keriann Shalvoy; East Meadow: Nicole Cirillo, Katherine Ferretti, Michael Lombardi and Steven Miller; Eastport-South Manor: Stephanie Barnes; Elwood-John Glenn: Hana Abrams and Stephanie Hyon; Farmingdale: Michael McCoy; Farmingville (Sachem East): Robert Cinnante Jr., Brian Nekoloff, Sarah Parsloe and Rachel Roger; Great Neck South: Benjamin Cohen, William A. Shine; Hewlett: Benjamin Pesenti; Lake Ronkonkoma (Sachem North): John-Patrick Mauro and Justin Moniz; Lynbrook: Ashley Carver; Manhasset: Megan McCarney, Jordan Roher and Timothy Tan; Massapequa: Michelle Femminella, Gregory Kappleman and Julianne Prisco; Mattituck: Ian Grinere; Merrick (Calhoun): Tyler Lee; Middle Island (Longwood): Christopher Gerig and Samuel Ortiz; Miller Place: Laura Hopwood; Mount Sinai: Toni Ann Galluccio and Andrew Shapiro; New Hyde Park (Herricks): Allison Schachter; North Babylon: Kara Edwards and Meggan Kent; Northport: Anna Avino, Michael Gordon and Marc Schwartz; Oyster Bay: Benjamin Cohen and Philip Ha; Patchogue-Medford: Edan Krolewicz, Erik Schmalenberger and Kathryn Wrede; Plainview-Old Bethpage (Kennedy): Scott Davis; Port Washington (Schreiber): Matthew Greenblatt; Sayville: Katherine Buono; Setauket (Ward Melville): Hillary Lin; Shoreham-Wading River: Alyssa Jutting; Southold: Emily Hudson; Syosset: Andrew Lelin, Erin Steigerwald and Minkee Sung; Westhampton Beach: Spencer Hood; West Islip: Lisa Corey. CONNETQUOT Career speakers Through the Student Support Center at Ronkonkoma Middle School, the Boy Scouts of America arrange for professionals to speak with students about careers. Recently the students met with Joseph Celano from FedEx, Judith Lespinasse from the Legal Aid Society, and Trinette Zizzo from the U.S. Army. DEER PARK 50th anniversary May Moore Primary School in Deer Park celebrated its 50th anniversary in November with a variety of activities. Dressed in 1950s attire, students and faculty took hula-hoop lessons, danced at a sock hop and enjoyed root beer floats. The highlight was opening a time capsule buried in 1956 containing letters from students about life back then. HALF HOLLOW HILLS Global warming Students at West Hollow Middle School in Melville created and starred in a film about pollution and the effects of global warming. They raised $500 for SurfRiders, a nonprofit environmental organization dedicated to protecting oceans, waves and beaches. HUNTINGTON Young artists Artwork created by six Huntington High School students in the Heckscher Museum's docent program was recently displayed in the art gallery at the Huntington Public Library. Works included photographs, an oil painting, mixed media and computer graphics. The docent program affords students the opportunity to work with museum educators and volunteers as they expand their knowledge of art. The student docents are Scott DeMotta, Kean Ferin, Grace Kelly, Samantha LoBue, Dana Silverberg and Emika Wada. ISLIP Special award Students in the EXCEL program at Islip Middle School participated in the Future City competition, sponsored by National Engineers Week. The team including eighth-graders John Cronau and Nikko Santiago and seventh-grader Mark Schuessler, earned the Best Infrastructure Layout award for their computer-model

city, Neo Geo. SACHEM The Constitution Rep. Tim Bishop (D-Southampton) spoke at Sachem High School East in Farmingville about the U.S. Constitution. A question-and-answer period focused on such topics as Iraq, global warming, immigration and the Patriot Act. SAYVILLE Math in the oven Second-graders in Jessica O'Rourke's class at Cherry Avenue Elementary School in Sayville blended a handful of math with a touch of science and learned to bake. The interdisciplinary lesson involved measuring, mixing, kneading and using a thermometer. With help from parent volunteer Tina Philbin, the children baked German stollen and challah bread. SMITHTOWN Sex-abuse seminar Parents for Megan's Law and Sen. John Flanagan (R-East Northport) presented "Apple of My Eye, " a sex-abuse seminar, for parents at St. James Elementary School. The program offered tips and safety rules children should be taught on the traps used by sexual predators, how to detect inappropriate actions and the physical and behavioral signs of sexual abuse. HIGHER EDUCATION Museum president Barry M. Stern, director of the Hillwood Art Museum at Long Island University, C.W. Post campus, was elected president of the Long Island Museum Association. Stern has been an adjunct professor in arts management at Post since 1984 and assumed leadership of Hillwood 10 years later. Under his leadership, the museum has been awarded many grants. Its permanent collection includes African art, contemporary photography and Hellenistic, Etruscan and Roman artifacts. ISLANDWIDE Sunday science series The Long Island Science Center offers science workshops for children on Sundays. On March 11, "Music and Sound," learn about sound waves and make an instrument; March 18, "Kites," experiment with different shapes and materials; March 25, "Fetch Day," based on the PBS show; April 1-4, "Vacation Week Animation," create moving pictures; April 15, "Arbor Day," learn about trees and make a leaf rubbing; and April 22, "Earth Day," create alternative energy. The Long Island Science Center, a nonprofit organization, is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 11 W. Main St., Riverhead; $5 for children; $2 for adults. Call 631-208-8000 or visit liscience center.org. LOAD-DATE: March 11, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Newsday, Inc.

37 of 265 DOCUMENTS THE SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER March 10, 2007 Saturday

DEFROCKED SEATTLE PRIEST ACCUSED OF ABUSE IN LAWSUIT CLERGYMAN SUSPECTED OF MOLESTING OTHERS
BYLINE: LEVI PULKKINEN P-I reporter SECTION: NEWS; Pg. B1 LENGTH: 511 words A former parishioner is suing the Seattle Catholic Archdiocese for allegedly allowing a Maple Leaf-neighborhood priest to sexually abuse him. In documents filed Friday in King County Superior Court, the alleged victim claimed that the Rev. James Knelleken molested him numerous times 50 years ago. The alleged victim was 13 at the time. "I've lived with this for 50 years, and it's just killing me," said the alleged victim, identified in court documents only as J.P. He declined to give his name during an interview with the Seattle P-I. His attorney, Mary Fleck, was present during the phone interview and confirmed his identity. Knelleken was removed from the ministry in 1988 and later defrocked because of suspicions that he was sexually abusing children in the church, said archdiocese spokesman Greg Magnoni. "I would offer our regret that this occurred," Magnoni said Friday on hearing of the lawsuit. "We'll work with the victim to the best of our ability to reach a settlement in this case." Knelleken, who died in 2003, allegedly started "grooming" J.P. after meeting the boy at a Catholic youth group dance at St. Catherine of Siena Church. In the months that followed, Knelleken then had sexual relations with J.P., according to court documents. "He was telling me that just because he was a priest he was still a human being, and he still had feelings for people," J.P. said. "In the fifth month or so, I just started feeling bad. I just got a feeling that it was wrong." J.P. said he cut off ties with Knelleken, over the priest's objections. After the abuse was over, J.P. withdrew. He said he gave up a paper route and his Cub Scout troop. He started joyriding, making little kinds of trouble. In his entire adult life, he said, a day hasn't passed when he didn't think of the abuse. "I think about this 20, 30, 40 times a day," the Chelan County resident said. "It's my last thought at night and my first thought in the morning." Knelleken died at 76, after serving as pastor at churches in Bremerton, Raymond and Seaview, according to an obituary. Knelleken was among 49 Western Washington priests included in a 2004 archdiocese investigation into decades-old allegations of sex abuse, Magnoni said. Investigators didn't offer any judgment on Knelleken's case or 35 others in which the suspected priest had died, resigned or moved away. Nine priests were eventually sanctioned or defrocked by the Vatican.

As of last year, the archdiocese had settled more than 200 sexual-abuse claims and paid out more than $20 million in damages, Magnoni said. In his lawsuit, J.P. argues that the archdiocese helped conceal Knelleken's alleged pedophilia and failed to warn parishioners about the priest. No specific financial claim for damages has been made. J.P. said what he wants most is an apology from the church. Magnoni said that's something Seattle Archbishop Alex Brunett is willing to extend. "Our archbishop has reached out to victims," he said. "And I'm sure he will in this case." P-I reporter Levi Pulkkinen can be reached at 206-448-8348 or levipulkkinen@seattlepi.com. LOAD-DATE: March 12, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Photo, A former Seattle man accuses the Rev. James Knelleken of abusing him 50 years ago. Knelleken died in 2003. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Seattle Post-Intelligencer

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Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas) March 7, 2007 Wednesday

Ranger says that priest was predator
BYLINE: DARREN BARBEE, STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 780 words The Rev. Thomas Teczar, 65, is on trial in Eastland charged with aggravated sexual assault. EASTLAND -- The Rev. Thomas Teczar was a child predator who used others to help him "lay the groundwork" to find his victims, a Texas Ranger testified Tuesday in the aggravated sexual assault trial of the former Fort Worth Diocese priest.

Teczar, 65, is accused of abusing an 11-year-old boy in the 1990s in Ranger. He pleaded not guilty to charges Tuesday. He waived a trial by jury, meaning that state District Judge Steven Herod will decide his guilt or innocence. Teczar left Eastland County 14 years ago while police investigated child abuse accusations against his friends Daniel Hawley and DeWilliam Bixler. Both men are now serving long prison terms after their convictions in the 1990s for sexually abusing as many as nine children. Allegations against Teczar came in 2002 after one of the men's victims told Texas Ranger David Hullum that the priest, about 38 years his senior, also abused him. The man is not being identified because of the nature of the case. Teczar is believed to be one of the few Fort Worth Roman Catholic Diocese priests to face criminal sex abuse charges. Hullum testified that the man was embarrassed and unable to look him in the eye as he described his accusations of abuse by Teczar. Hullum told the court that Teczar encouraged the use of alcohol, drugs and pornography and used Hawley as a "protective layer" between himself and potential victims. "He used Daniel Hawley as a facilitator, as a forward scout to kind of lay the groundwork," Hullum testified. In 1993 as police were investigating Hawley, former Eastland County Sheriff Ronnie White interviewed the priest, White testified on Tuesday. Teczar told the sheriff that he was aware of nude photographs Hawley had taken of several boys and that he had warned Hawley to destroy them, White testified. Teczar was subpoenaed in 1993 to appear before a grand jury but refused to answer questions, White said. The next day White said he was told that Teczar left town. Asked by Eastland County District Attorney Russ Thomason whether he believed Teczar was involved in the molestation that resulted in jail sentences for Hawley and Bixler, White answered, "I feel like he was fully involved in it." But White said his investigation was hampered at the time because officials at the Fort Worth Diocese did not return several messages he left seeking information about the priest. Diocese officials have said they were unaware of White's inquiries. White was also a witness in a civil lawsuit against the diocese. In 2005, the diocese settled for $4.15 million a lawsuit with two Teczar accusers, one of whom filed the criminal complaint in Eastland. White also testified that he believed that Teczar knew about the abuse but failed to report it to law enforcement. In 2005 Teczar told the Star-Telegram, "I didn't know I had an obligation to do that." Prosecutors on Tuesday first called the priest's brother, Edward Teczar, who lives in Tarrant County, and questioned him about his brother's history in the priesthood. Edward Teczar said his brother is not capable of committing such a crime. "I know my brother," Edward Teczar said. "I know he's been falsely accused of something he would never do. Ever." Other witnesses Tuesday painted a far different picture of the priest. Andrew Grumbles of Arlington told the court he was about 16 or 17 when he delivered marijuana to Teczar or Hawley on several occasions at St. Rita's Catholic Church in Ranger. Grumbles told the court that the priest offered him Southern Comfort whiskey and showed him pornographic magazines. Grumbles also testified that he had seen the pictures of several of Hawley's and Bixler's victims. But questioned by Teczar's attorney, Edwin Youngblood of Fort Worth, Grumbles told the court he had

identified the boys from their faces. Earlier, White, the former sheriff, testified that the pictures apparently did not show the boys' faces, to conceal their identities. David Lewcon, co-founder of the New England chapter of Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, testified that Teczar began abusing him when he was 16 or 17 and Teczar was a priest at his church in Massachusetts. Lewcon later sought out Teczar's accuser in Ranger and offered him assistance. But Youngblood raised questions about Lewcon's motivation for testifying, saying that hate and rage had compelled him. "Is there no forgiveness?" Youngblood asked. "He's forgiven," Lewcon answered. "What he did, is not." Testimony will continue today in Eastland's 91st State District Court. Eastland is about 90 miles west of Fort Worth. Darren Barbee, 817-390-7126 dbarbee@star-telegram.com LOAD-DATE: March 7, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Fort Worth Star-Telegram All Rights Reserved

39 of 265 DOCUMENTS Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News March 7, 2007 Wednesday

Ranger says that priest was predator
BYLINE: Darren Barbee, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Texas SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 820 words Mar. 7--EASTLAND -- The Rev. Thomas Teczar was a child predator who used others to help him "lay the groundwork" to find his victims, a Texas Ranger testified Tuesday in the aggravated sexual assault trial of the former Fort Worth Diocese priest. Teczar, 65, is accused of abusing an 11-year-old boy in the 1990s in Ranger. He pleaded not guilty to

charges Tuesday. He waived a trial by jury, meaning that state District Judge Steven Herod will decide his guilt or innocence. Teczar left Eastland County 14 years ago while police investigated child abuse accusations against his friends Daniel Hawley and DeWilliam Bixler. Both men are now serving long prison terms after their convictions in the 1990s for sexually abusing as many as nine children. Allegations against Teczar came in 2002 after one of the men's victims told Texas Ranger David Hullum that the priest, about 38 years his senior, also abused him. The man is not being identified because of the nature of the case. Teczar is believed to be one of the few Fort Worth Roman Catholic Diocese priests to face criminal sex abuse charges. Hullum testified that the man was embarrassed and unable to look him in the eye as he described his accusations of abuse by Teczar. Hullum told the court that Teczar encouraged the use of alcohol, drugs and pornography and used Hawley as a "protective layer" between himself and potential victims. "He used Daniel Hawley as a facilitator, as a forward scout to kind of lay the groundwork," Hullum testified. In 1993 as police were investigating Hawley, former Eastland County Sheriff Ronnie White interviewed the priest, White testified on Tuesday. Teczar told the sheriff that he was aware of nude photographs Hawley had taken of several boys and that he had warned Hawley to destroy them, White testified. Teczar was subpoenaed in 1993 to appear before a grand jury but refused to answer questions, White said. The next day White said he was told that Teczar left town. Asked by Eastland County District Attorney Russ Thomason whether he believed Teczar was involved in the molestation that resulted in jail sentences for Hawley and Bixler, White answered, "I feel like he was fully involved in it." But White said his investigation was hampered at the time because officials at the Fort Worth Diocese did not return several messages he left seeking information about the priest. Diocese officials have said they were unaware of White's inquiries. White was also a witness in a civil lawsuit against the diocese. In 2005, the diocese settled for $4.15 million a lawsuit with two Teczar accusers, one of whom filed the criminal complaint in Eastland. White also testified that he believed that Teczar knew about the abuse but failed to report it to law enforcement. In 2005 Teczar told the Star-Telegram, "I didn't know I had an obligation to do that." Prosecutors on Tuesday first called the priest's brother, Edward Teczar, who lives in Tarrant County, and questioned him about his brother's history in the priesthood. Edward Teczar said his brother is not capable of committing such a crime. "I know my brother," Edward Teczar said. "I know he's been falsely accused of something he would never do. Ever." Other witnesses Tuesday painted a far different picture of the priest. Andrew Grumbles of Arlington told the court he was about 16 or 17 when he delivered marijuana to Teczar or Hawley on several occasions at St. Rita's Catholic Church in Ranger. Grumbles told the court that the priest offered him Southern Comfort whiskey and showed him pornographic magazines. Grumbles also testified that he had seen the pictures of several of Hawley's and Bixler's victims. But questioned by Teczar's attorney, Edwin Youngblood of Fort Worth, Grumbles told the court he had identified the boys from their faces.

Earlier, White, the former sheriff, testified that the pictures apparently did not show the boys' faces, to conceal their identities. David Lewcon, co-founder of the New England chapter of Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, testified that Teczar began abusing him when he was 16 or 17 and Teczar was a priest at his church in Massachusetts. Lewcon later sought out Teczar's accuser in Ranger and offered him assistance. But Youngblood raised questions about Lewcon's motivation for testifying, saying that hate and rage had compelled him. "Is there no forgiveness?" Youngblood asked. "He's forgiven," Lewcon answered. "What he did, is not." Testimony will continue today in Eastland's 91st State District Court. Eastland is about 90 miles west of Fort Worth. -----Darren Barbee, 817-390-7126 dbarbee@star-telegram.com Copyright (c) 2007, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Texas Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: March 7, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20070307-FT-0307-Ranger-says-that-priest-was-predator PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: FT Copyright 2007 Fort Worth Star-Telegram

41 of 265 DOCUMENTS Idaho Falls Post Register (Idaho) February 27, 2007 Tuesday Main Edition House approves sexual abuse billThe bill extending the time period for victims of sex abuse to sue their attackers now heads to the Senate. BYLINE: By PHIL DAVIDSON, SECTION: THE WESTPg. A7 LENGTH: 369 words

BOISE - Sixty members of Idaho's House of Representatives approved legislation Monday that gives sexual abuse victims additional time to sue their attackers. House Bill 125 now heads to the Senate. It would allow sexual abuse victims to sue their predators as many as five years after a victim ""discovered"" he or she was molested. Existing law prevents victims from suing their predators after their 23rd birthdays. The 60-7 vote brings Idaho closer to matching the laws of its neighbors, all of which allow victims to sue at least three years after they discovered they were molested. One of the measure's supporters, Rep. Mack Shirley, R-Rexburg, testified Monday that the legislation is needed because abuse victims will come forward when they're ready, and for some, that means well into adulthood. Several eastern Idaho lawmakers were concerned about a section of the legislation dealing with the liability for employers of child molesters. Businesses and organizations could be sued, but only if they are grossly negligent. Democratic Rep. James Ruchti, a Pocatello lawyer who's a co-sponsor of the bill, said an example of this would be an employer who knowingly hires a child molester. ""It's not just as simple as saying an abuser is an employee of a certain company, therefore we're suing,"" he said. The driving force behind the legislation is Pocatello native Paul Steed, whose sons have filed a lawsuit against the Grand Teton Council of the Boy Scouts of America. Steeds' sons were victims of former Camp Little Lemhi director and now-convicted child molester Brad Stowell. The Grand Teton Council is also named as a defendant in a pair of civil suits relating to sexual abuse. In closing, Ruchti told lawmakers that the proposal was not ""boondoggle"" legislation that would benefit attorneys and result in more lawsuits. ""This is a piece to provide redress for children who've been abused,"" he said. Who voted against it? Eastern Idaho lawmakers who voted against the measure to give victims of sexual abuse more time to sue their attackers include Rep. Dell Raybould, R-Rexburg; Rep. Dennis Lake, R-Blackfoot; Rep. Lenore Barrett, R-Challis; Rep. Tom Loertscher, R-Bone; and Rep. Jim Marriott, R-Blackfoot. LOAD-DATE: February 27, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright2007The Post Register All Rights Reserved

42 of 265 DOCUMENTS Idaho Falls Post Register (Idaho) February 16, 2007 Friday Main Edition

Sex-abuse bills move forward- The bills extend the time victims have to sue their assailants and how long prosecutors have to charge those who withhold reports. BYLINE: By PHIL DAVIDSON, SECTION: A SECTIONPg. A1 LENGTH: 527 words BOISE - Paul Steed's most persuasive argument before the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday might have been the analogy he drew between victims of sexual abuse and children who come home with a broken leg. There are costs associated with healing a child's leg, Steed told the committee. The same can be said for minors who are sexually abused. ""In a figurative way, they're bleeding all over the place,"" he said. The Pocatello native was pushing two bills that received unanimous approval in the House Judiciary, Rules and Administration Committee. One would allow sexual-abuse victims to sue their predators up to five years after victims ""discover"" they were molested. Existing law prevents victims from suing their molesters after their 23rd birthday. The other bill would give prosecutors up to four years to criminally charge someone who's made aware of but fails to report sexual abuse within 24 hours. Prosecutors currently have only one year to charge those who neglect to report, which is a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. Last year, Steed was instrumental in getting lawmakers to enact legislation that erased the criminal statute of limitations for children who are sexually abused. His crusade this legislative session would increase the access that abuse victims have to recover counseling and other costs borne by their attacks. Rep. James Ruchti, a Pocatello Democrat sponsoring the bill, told the committee the proposed legislation requires that the clock to sue an attacker starts at the last occurrence of abuse. In other words, a predator who molested a victim from the time the child was 10 to the time the child was 16 could not argue that the discovery clause begins at age 10. Experts say many victims repress memories of their abuse and aren't able to gather the courage to come forward until well into adulthood. Steed, who has a master's degree in psychology, said he tried to pick an age limit in which victims could no longer sue. But because each case is different, any age selected would be arbitrary. If the discovery proposal becomes law, Idaho would be on par with its neighboring states - all of which allow victims to sue at least three years after they discovered they were molested. Though Steed has said these proposals weren't specifically targeting the Boy Scouts of America, much of Thursday's testimony focused on that organization. Steed's sons were victims of convicted child molester Brad Stowell while they were junior staffers at a Boy Scouts camp in 1997. Stowell admitted to molesting at least 24 boys at the Scout camp, but the parents of these children weren't made aware of what happened until a year after the fact in some cases, even though Scouting attorneys learned what happened. Now that the bills have cleared committee, they'll be sent to the House floor for a full vote. Rep. Mack Shirley, a Rexburg Republican and co-sponsor, said he thinks his chamber will overwhelmingly approve the

measures. If that happens, they'll move to the Senate, where support is being gathered. Senate President Bob Geddes, R-Soda Springs, was once wary of the discovery proposal but said he now approves of the idea. LOAD-DATE: February 16, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright2007The Post Register All Rights Reserved

46 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) February 10, 2007 Saturday Idaho Edition

Ex-Scoutmaster faces more abuse charges; He was convicted of molestation in 2003
BYLINE: John Craig Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 2 LENGTH: 592 words A former Spokane Valley Scoutmaster who was convicted of grooming a 14-year-old Boy Scout for sex in 2003 is to be arraigned Tuesday on a charge that he had similarly abused another boy a year earlier. Ralph E. "Ray" Willcox Jr., 58, was arrested Monday on a first-degree child molestation charge filed Jan. 30. Court documents say Willcox molested a boy in the summer of 2002, when the boy was 9. That was a year before Willcox molested a 14-year-old boy and pleaded guilty to communication with a minor for immoral purposes in 2003. Willcox got a one-year suspended jail sentence and two years of probation in the 2003 case. The 9-year-old who allegedly was molested in 2002 didn't agree to talk to a sheriff's detective until last month at age 14. In both cases, according to court documents, Willcox frequently invited the boys into his Otis Orchards home on Garry Road, where he touched them and encouraged them to reciprocate. The boy Willcox abused in 2003 said he and Willcox sat in the same chair while Willcox tickled him, fondled him and talked about sperm, according to court documents. That boy told his parents, and his father confronted Willcox. Court documents say the father successfully demanded that Willcox resign from a position "which allowed him access to children."

The records don't say what that position was, but Inland Northwest Boy Scout Director Tim McCandless said the father also contacted Scouting officials, and Willcox was immediately removed as Scoutmaster of Troop 413. McCandless said his records indicated the molestation occurred in a hotel room during a trip unrelated to Scouting. Boy Scout records don't show how long Willcox was a Scoutmaster, but court records say the 2003 victim had known Willcox for three or four years. In addition to forcing Willcox out of the Boy Scouts, the boy's father persuaded Willcox to seek Christian counseling. Court documents say leaders of the Catholic Diocese of Spokane reported Willcox's admissions to the Sheriff's Office when he requested sex-offender counseling. "When it was reported to me, I immediately reported it to the police," the Rev. Steve Dublinski, vicar general of the diocese, said in an interview Friday. "Reporting child abuse is part of our normal operation." Dublinski said Willcox was a parishioner but had no other role in the diocese. However, Boy Scout Troop 413 is sponsored by the Catholic Knights of Columbus and draws most of its members from two Spokane Valley parishes: St. Joseph's and St. Mary's. McCandless was unable to determine whether the alleged victim in the newly filed charge was a Scout. The boy told Detective David Skogen that Willcox encouraged him to go naked in Willcox's basement while Willcox wore a bathrobe with nothing underneath in the summer of 2002. The boy said Willcox exposed himself and fondled him on several occasions, according to court documents. Willcox told the boy not to tell his parents about the nude encounters, and he didn't until last month, Skogen said in a court affidavit. Skogen said the boy's mother had been suspicious of Willcox since the summer of 2003, when Skogen contacted her while investigating the case in which Willcox molested the older boy. Skogen said Willcox's wife at the time now says she also was suspicious of the attention Willcox paid to the younger boy in the summer of 2002. The ex-wife will testify that she questioned Willcox about the younger boy in 2003 when he was charged with abusing the older boy, and Willcox admitted abusing the younger boy, according to Skogen. LOAD-DATE: February 14, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

47 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) February 10, 2007 Saturday Metro Edition

Ex-Scoutmaster faces more abuse charges;

He was convicted of molestation in 2003
BYLINE: John Craig Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 2 LENGTH: 592 words A former Spokane Valley Scoutmaster who was convicted of grooming a 14-year-old Boy Scout for sex in 2003 is to be arraigned Tuesday on a charge that he had similarly abused another boy a year earlier. Ralph E. "Ray" Willcox Jr., 58, was arrested Monday on a first-degree child molestation charge filed Jan. 30. Court documents say Willcox molested a boy in the summer of 2002, when the boy was 9. That was a year before Willcox molested a 14-year-old boy and pleaded guilty to communication with a minor for immoral purposes in 2003. Willcox got a one-year suspended jail sentence and two years of probation in the 2003 case. The 9-year-old who allegedly was molested in 2002 didn't agree to talk to a sheriff's detective until last month at age 14. In both cases, according to court documents, Willcox frequently invited the boys into his Otis Orchards home on Garry Road, where he touched them and encouraged them to reciprocate. The boy Willcox abused in 2003 said he and Willcox sat in the same chair while Willcox tickled him, fondled him and talked about sperm, according to court documents. That boy told his parents, and his father confronted Willcox. Court documents say the father successfully demanded that Willcox resign from a position "which allowed him access to children." The records don't say what that position was, but Inland Northwest Boy Scout Director Tim McCandless said the father also contacted Scouting officials, and Willcox was immediately removed as Scoutmaster of Troop 413. McCandless said his records indicated the molestation occurred in a hotel room during a trip unrelated to Scouting. Boy Scout records don't show how long Willcox was a Scoutmaster, but court records say the 2003 victim had known Willcox for three or four years. In addition to forcing Willcox out of the Boy Scouts, the boy's father persuaded Willcox to seek Christian counseling. Court documents say leaders of the Catholic Diocese of Spokane reported Willcox's admissions to the Sheriff's Office when he requested sex-offender counseling. "When it was reported to me, I immediately reported it to the police," the Rev. Steve Dublinski, vicar general of the diocese, said in an interview Friday. "Reporting child abuse is part of our normal operation." Dublinski said Willcox was a parishioner but had no other role in the diocese. However, Boy Scout Troop 413 is sponsored by the Catholic Knights of Columbus and draws most of its members from two Spokane Valley parishes: St. Joseph's and St. Mary's. McCandless was unable to determine whether the alleged victim in the newly filed charge was a Scout. The boy told Detective David Skogen that Willcox encouraged him to go naked in Willcox's basement while Willcox wore a bathrobe with nothing underneath in the summer of 2002. The boy said Willcox exposed himself and fondled him on several occasions, according to court documents. Willcox told the boy not to tell his parents about the nude encounters, and he didn't until last month, Skogen said in a court affidavit. Skogen said the boy's mother had been suspicious of Willcox since the summer of 2003, when Skogen contacted her while investigating the case in which Willcox molested the older boy. Skogen said Willcox's wife at the time now says she also was suspicious of the attention Willcox paid to

the younger boy in the summer of 2002. The ex-wife will testify that she questioned Willcox about the younger boy in 2003 when he was charged with abusing the older boy, and Willcox admitted abusing the younger boy, according to Skogen. LOAD-DATE: February 14, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

48 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) January 23, 2007 Tuesday Sunrise Edition

2 men sue Mormons, Scouts over abuse
BYLINE: PETER ZUCKERMAN, The Oregonian SECTION: Local News; Pg. B01 LENGTH: 697 words SUMMARY: $6.5 million | The brothers claim a Scout and church leader molested them from 1983 to 1985 Two brothers filed a $6.5 million lawsuit Monday against the Mormon church and the Boy Scouts of America for alleged sexual abuse in the 1980s by a Portland church teacher and Scout leader. The lawsuit, filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court, contends that Timur Van Dykes, 50, of Portland used positions of trust to molest the boys, who were not identified, in the years 1983 to 1985. During those years Dykes served as a leader of Boy Scout Troop 719, which was supervised by the Cherry Park Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Dykes, also known as Vandykes, has been convicted of at least 23 sexual crimes against boys since 1985, when he was indicted by a Multnomah County grand jury and later convicted of sexual abuse and sexual penetration with a foreign object. One of his earliest victims, also a Portland-area Boy Scout, led a troubled life after being molested and committed suicide in April 1995, the boy's mother told The Oregonian after her son's death. Dykes served time in the Oregon State Penitentiary and now lives in Southwest Portland, where he is listed by the state as a sexual predator of infant males and boys 7 to 15. Through his parole officer, Dykes declined to be interviewed. Dykes' crimes have resulted in at least three lawsuits against the Scouts and the Church of Jesus Christ

of Latter-day Saints. Boy Scout officials, who learned about the case Monday, said Dykes was registered for scouting from 1981 to 1984. They declined to comment on specifics of the lawsuit. Confidential Boy Scout files obtained by The Oregonian indicate that Dykes resigned in 1985 and was banned from the organization in 1987, two years after Dykes was first charged with molesting boys and at least three months after the Scouts concluded that he molested five boys from two families. People generally aren't put on the Boy Scouts national blacklist until allegations against them have been substantiated, Boy Scout officials said, and authorities probably suspended Dykes immediately after he was investigated. The suit filed Monday claimed that in the years 1983 to 1985 Dykes molested one of the boys once but committed multiple offenses against the other, including fondling and oral sex. The lawsuit says that although the offenses were committed years ago, the victims did not realize until 2005 and 2006 that the abuse resulted in continuing damage and injuries. Kelly Clark, a Portland-based attorney who filed the lawsuit on behalf of the brothers, said that a quicker and more forthright response from the Boy Scouts and Mormon church could have helped the victims recover. "The last 20 years of these men's psychological suffering did not have to happen," said Clark, who has handled more than 100 claims of child sexual abuse against the Catholic Church. "Had the church but followed the law --reported allegations of child abuse involving this very same individual to law enforcement in the 1980s as they were required to do --we believe these men could have begun the healing process 20 years ago," Clark said. In a statement, church attorney Steve English of Portland said: "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints condemns child abuse and does not tolerate such actions by anyone affiliated with our faith. . . . The Church adamantly denies allegations of responsibility in this case and will defend itself vigorously." The church excommunicated Dykes more than 20 years ago, English said. Sex abuse in the Scouts was "very prevalent" before 1988, when the Boy Scouts overhauled their child abuse prevention, said Don R. Cornell, Boy Scouts field services director. Cornell said that Oregon's Cascade Pacific Council, which has 16,000 adult volunteers, bans five to 10 leaders a year for reasons that include child abuse and ignoring Boy Scout policies. The abuse described in the lawsuit wouldn't happen today, he added. Two years ago, he said, the Boy Scouts of America began doing background checks on people who register to volunteer. ILLUSTRATION: Dykes Listed as sexual predator Peter Zuckerman: 503-294-5919; peterzuckerman@news.oregonian. LOAD-DATE: January 24, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

52 of 265 DOCUMENTS Buffalo News (New York) January 15, 2007 Monday NIAGARA EDITION

NIAGARA POLICE & COURTS
SECTION: LOCAL; Pg. B3 LENGTH: 235 words >Home is destroyed by fire in Lockport TOWN OF LOCKPORT -- Fire investigators are trying to determine what triggered a Saturday morning blaze in a Crosby Road home that had just been gutted by fire less than a week ago. The two-story, single-family residence at 6662 Crosby Road has been vacant since a Jan. 8 fire. A neighbor noticed smoke coming from the home around 1:30 a.m. Saturday and crews found the home fully engulfed upon their arrival. Damage to the building was estimated at $50,000. ---->Items valued at $600 taken in car break-ins NIAGARA FALLS -- Thieves broke into two cars in the Whirlpool Street parking lot of the Aquarium of Niagara overnight Friday, taking a crate of Girl Scout cookies and several others items. Among the items taken were $600 in beauty products, including scissors, trimmers and clippers, and hunting equipment and toys, police said. ---->Probe of sex abuse claims focuses on grandfather NIAGARA FALLS -- City police have launched an investigation into allegations of sexual abuse against multiple female family members by the victims' grandfather. A cousin of one of the victims contacted police Sunday to report the latest incident, According to reports, the victims have been reluctant to come forward and have received money from the suspect to remain quiet. The informant told police that as many as six family members may have been abused by the suspect, a city resident. LOAD-DATE: January 15, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Briefs PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 The Buffalo News All Rights Reserved

53 of 265 DOCUMENTS St. John's Telegram (Newfoundland) January 14, 2007 Sunday

Fred Hutton
BYLINE: Rosie Gillingham SECTION: DIGEST; Pg. B2 LENGTH: 1463 words There are a couple of things that remind Fred Hutton of how much things have changed during his years in television. One is watching old film footage of stories he's covered for NTV news. The other is seeing himself in that footage. "I had a full head of hair and a little mustache,' he says with a laugh. "Now, I've got neither.' What he does have are plenty of colourful stories and fond memories of his experiences as news reporter and co-host of the NTV Evening News Hour. "Hey, I flew with the Snowbirds upside down - with a camera strapped to my head - and didn't throw up,' he said with a chuckle. "That was pretty cool.' In his 17 years at NTV, he has interviewed everyone from prime ministers and premiers to everyday people with compelling stories to tell. Hutton has covered many of the major stories in this province, including first oil from Hibernia, the Mount Cashel sex-abuse scandal, the Voisey's Bay discovery, the 1997 Matthew celebrations from Bristol, England and Bonavista, Brian Tobin's bid for the federal Liberal leadership and the closure of the northern cod fishery. "It's really kind of strange looking back at it,' he said of those stories, including the announcement of the cod moratorium. "You realize it was part of history and I was in that room when (former federal fisheries minister) John Crosbie made the announcement while on the other side, angry fishermen were trying to beat their way into the door. "I mean, I was 25 years old!' Hutton got his first taste of broadcasting back in the late 1980s, when he volunteered for CHMR radio at Memorial University, where he was studying political science. "One day, my dad said to me, 'You've been spending an awful lot of time at the radio station. Why don't you do that as a career?' I thought it was a good idea,' said Hutton, who then moved to Vancouver, where he graduated from the British Columbia Institute of Technology's broadcast communications program. In 1989, he returned and worked for CBC-TV for a summer as resource producer, where his love for television was born. A year later, he started a work term at NTV and ended up staying.

"I was there two days and they put me on the air,' the St. John's native said. He recalls his first assignment with laughter. "We still talk about it in the newsroom. It was a fire at A&W on Kenmount Road. They sent myself and cameraman Dan Lake there. It was his first shoot as well,' he said. "Fire trucks were there and smoke was coming out the side of the building. We pulled up, looked at each other and said, 'What do we do now?' "Anyway, the rest is history.' Hutton has seen plenty of changes in the industry over the years, and said he's glad to see NTV broadcasting across the province, and to other parts of the world, thanks to satellite. "It's not always rocket science, but people like what we're doing. It's stories about Newfoundland and Labrador, and what we do every day is basically hold up a mirror to the province,' said Hutton, who has an 11-year-old son and a nine-year-old daughter. "And the cool thing about the news business is that you have a front-row seat to whatever events are unfolding.' Hutton anchors both the lunch-time and 6 p.m. news and is also assistant news director to Jim Furlong, which means he doesn't get out in the field these days as much as he once did. "There are a lot of people going in a lot of different directions every day,' Hutton said, "and you've kind of got to co-ordinate that and be able to put it all together in a news program.' He said he especially enjoys his airtime with co-host Lynn Burry. "We are friends on and off the air and we have a good time,' he said. "What you see on the air is basically what we're like off the air. We always try to have a good laugh.' He believes that's why his years at NTV have flown. "I know it sounds corny, but it's because I love what I do,' he said. "Sure, there are lots of days you'd prefer to be playing golf, but I've never said, 'Oh God, I've got to go to work today.' "That's because I like what I do and I like the people I work with. It's a great job.' What is your full name? Frederick Charles Hutton. Where and when were you born? The Grace Hospital, St. John's, in June 1966. Where is home today? Portugal Cove. What is your greatest indulgence? Definitely golf. No question. It's never too early and never too late for golf. Final answer. What was one act of rebellion you committed as a youth? I grew my hair pretty long when I was a teenager. Now I wish I could just grow my hair. Period. It doesn't necessarily have to be long. What do you like to cook? I like cooking stew, chicken fried rice, cod, and my kids love my chocolate chip pancakes. I've got it down to a science, thanks to the just-add-water mix. What is your greatest regret?

One regret is that I quit playing the piano in Grade 7 or 8. But I'm fulfilling that dream again. My daughter and I are taking lessons. Hey, it's never too late. What are five CDs in your music collection? Van Morrison, Mark Knopfler from Dire Straits, John Prine, the Chieftains and the Masterless Men. Who would play you in a movie about your life? I would play myself. I've always wanted to star in a movie, but ended up in news. Who better to play me than me? And besides, who would want to play me? What was the most vivid dream you've ever had? This is an easy one. I've had this dream a long time and I keep having it. I can fly. I fly over the city. I never get to land and never get to take off. I just fly. I know I have it at least once a year and I never know why. Maybe someone can explain it to me. Where is your favourite vacation spot? Orlando, Fla. I'm going to be there in less than two weeks playing golf with 11 friends and they're going to be handing over their money to me at the end of our tournament. I can't wait to take their money. This is our second year going down and we just have a great time. What are you reading at the moment? "The Seven Laws of the Golf Swing" (by Nick Bradley). It was a gift from a friend, who is going on the trip with us, but it hasn't worked for me. He's trying to screw up my game by making me think more. What is your personal motto? I have a bunch. One is be prepared - from my days as a scout. Another one is don't wish away my time. Anyone who is a parent should understand that one. Do you have any hidden talents? If I do have any hidden talents, they're so well hidden, I can't even find them. I've tried for 40 years. I'm sure they're in there somewhere. What bugs you? Gossip. When people have it and they don't tell me! I hate being left out of the loop. What do you like to do to relax? I usually just listen to music or go for a walk before work. Most days, I'll take the dog and go on a trail behind my house. Who inspires you? My children and my family. What is your most treasured possession? I've got a ring that was given to me by my mother. It was actually her father's ring. He died when she was very young, but she held on to it. I'm named after my mother's father. So, when I was a teenager, she gave it to me. I actually lost it for a while once, playing softball in a friend's yard. We spent about an hour looking for it in the grass. We finally found it, but after that, I stopped wearing it and kept it as a keepsake. Just after Christmas, my son asked me about it. I told him the story and he said he hoped to have it one day. I told him he would, but not for a very long time. Who would you least like to be stuck in an elevator with? It depends on how long we'll be there and whether or not there's food. Ah, I'm going to take the stairs and avoid it. I'm trying to lose a bit of weight anyway. Who is one person, living or deceased, you'd love to have lunch with?

I'm going to have to say two people - my mother's parents. My grandfather died before I was born and my grandmother died just after I was born. I never got to meet them. My mother has a picture of her dad. When she first showed it to me, I was shocked because I looked so much like him. At first, I actually thought it was a picture of me. If you were premier of the province, what's one thing you'd try to do? I'd try to bring people back to the province who moved away. I have a lot of friends who have moved. I could have gone somewhere else to work. but I always wanted to live in Newfoundland to work and raise a family. I love Newfoundland. What would you do if you won the lottery? Pay off some bills, build a new house, help family and friends, travel, golf. How many pages is this article, anyway? Oh, one other thing I'd do is buy Lynn Burry a Porsche Boxster. She wants a red one. It's an ongoing joke with us. I actually gave her a dinky like it once and she got a grand charge out of it. She has it displayed in her living room. I told her one day I'd get her the real thing. rgillingham@thetelegram.com LOAD-DATE: January 14, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Fred Hutton has been a news reporter and anchor at NTV for 17 years, and says it is easy to go to work, "because I love what I do." - Submitted photo PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 St. John's Telegram, a division of Transcontinental Media Group Inc. All Rights Reserved

55 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) January 7, 2007 Sunday Idaho Edition

A time for healing; Our view: Priest abuse scandal; holds lessons for entire community
SECTION: B; Pg. 8 LENGTH: 542 words The stories told by adult survivors of childhood sex abuse help educate listeners to the true nature of abuse. Victims explain how predators are often charismatic and subtle in their manipulations. Victims understand how pedophiles groom children and often zoom in on the boys and girls who lack involved and caring

adults in their lives. When the priest sex-abuse scandals in the Spokane Catholic Diocese erupted several years ago, some of the victims began to tell their stories to the media. They grew up in a church that protected its leaders and their secrets, a church that hushed children when they tried to explain the horror happening to them. The victims also grew up in a culture that denied, and often still denies, the incidence of sex abuse in families and communities. The damage followed the young victims into adulthood, where some developed problems that society ended up paying for - addiction, domestic violence and mental illness. As announced this week, a $48 million settlement will end the Catholic Diocese of Spokane's bankruptcy, if approved by a bankruptcy judge. The settlement calls for the diocese's parishes to contribute $10 million, and it calls for important non-monetary obligations, too. For instance, victims will be allowed to speak publicly in the parishes where they were abused, and this will further educate Catholics who have so far been unable - or unwilling - to hear these stories. But the sex-abuse scandal, and the two years of the diocese's bankruptcy, has affected non-Catholics here, too. The Catholic influence has long been part of Spokane's culture and history. Well-established institutions, such as Gonzaga University and Sacred Heart Medical Center, were founded by pioneering priests and nuns. During the Catholic boom time of the '50s and '60s, Catholic children "networked" in Spokane's oncelarge parochial schools and this gave them the resources and connections to become community leaders and successful business owners. Abuse victims and their families, as well as parishioners - whose churches, schools and pocketbooks will feel the impact of the $48 million - are neighbors to us all. The bankruptcy threw the entire community into the national spotlight in a negative way. It coaxed to the surface some of Spokane's darkest secrets and exposed other institutions, such as the Boy Scouts, because some of the abusing priests served as Scout leaders. The scandal awakened many to the fact that predators reside not just in church communities, but in schools, neighborhoods and families. The abuse victims' stories illustrate what happens to children when adults don't listen and believe. The diocese's expensive bankruptcy illustrates what happens to institutions that fail their most vulnerable members. The hope attached to the settlement is that the lessons, and the healing, will truly begin now and lead to a future of increased justice and safety for our children. The Spokane Catholic Diocese encompasses 24,356 miles in 13 counties: Adams, Asotin, Columbia, Ferry, Franklin, Garfield, Lincoln, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens, Walla Walla and Whitman. There are approximately 97,000 Catholics and 82 parishes in the diocese. TYPE: Column, Commentary, Editorial: Our View LOAD-DATE: January 10, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2007 Spokane Spokesman-Review

56 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News January 7, 2007 Sunday

EDITORIAL: : A time for healing: Priest abuse scandal holds lessons for entire community
BYLINE: The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: COMMENTARY LENGTH: 542 words Jan. 7--The stories told by adult survivors of childhood sex abuse help educate listeners to the true nature of abuse. Victims explain how predators are often charismatic and subtle in their manipulations. Victims understand how pedophiles groom children and often zoom in on the boys and girls who lack involved and caring adults in their lives. When the priest sex-abuse scandals in the Spokane Catholic Diocese erupted several years ago, some of the victims began to tell their stories to the media. They grew up in a church that protected its leaders and their secrets, a church that hushed children when they tried to explain the horror happening to them. The victims also grew up in a culture that denied, and often still denies, the incidence of sex abuse in families and communities. The damage followed the young victims into adulthood, where some developed problems that society ended up paying for -- addiction, domestic violence and mental illness. As announced this week, a $48 million settlement will end the Catholic Diocese of Spokane's bankruptcy, if approved by a bankruptcy judge. The settlement calls for the diocese's parishes to contribute $10 million, and it calls for important non-monetary obligations, too. For instance, victims will be allowed to speak publicly in the parishes where they were abused, and this will further educate Catholics who have so far been unable -- or unwilling -- to hear these stories. But the sex-abuse scandal, and the two years of the diocese's bankruptcy, has affected non-Catholics here, too. The Catholic influence has long been part of Spokane's culture and history. Well-established institutions, such as Gonzaga University and Sacred Heart Medical Center, were founded by pioneering priests and nuns. During the Catholic boom time of the '50s and '60s, Catholic children "networked" in Spokane's oncelarge parochial schools and this gave them the resources and connections to become community leaders and successful business owners. Abuse victims and their families, as well as parishioners -- whose churches, schools and pocketbooks will feel the impact of the $48 million -- are neighbors to us all. The bankruptcy threw the entire community into the national spotlight in a negative way. It coaxed to the surface some of Spokane's darkest secrets and exposed other institutions, such as the Boy Scouts, because some of the abusing priests served as Scout leaders. The scandal awakened many to the fact that predators reside not just in church communities, but in schools, neighborhoods and families. The abuse victims' stories illustrate what happens to children when adults don't listen and believe. The diocese's expensive bankruptcy illustrates what happens to institutions that fail their most vulnerable members.

The hope attached to the settlement is that the lessons, and the healing, will truly begin now and lead to a future of increased justice and safety for our children. Copyright (c) 2007, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: January 7, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20070107-SR-0107-EDITORIAL-A-time-for-healing PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2007 Spokesman-Review

57 of 265 DOCUMENTS Chicago Daily Herald December 29, 2006 Friday D1 Edition; D2 Edition; D4 Edition; D5 Edition; D6 Edition

Top Newsmakers of 2006
SECTION: NEIGHBOR; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 3935 words Imagine you are asked to draw a single face to represent 2006 in DuPage County. Well, you say, it should reflect the incredible kindness of those who help neighbors in need, who put themselves on the line for others, who are willing to make unfathomable sacrifices to benefit us all. Still, be careful how strong you carve those lines, you say, because the same face also must show the greed of some and the evil of others. There should be a sense of joy and accomplishment around the eyes, of course, but they should show sadness and pain, too. Should the mouth be curved in a smile for those who have won success and acceptance? In a frown for those who have come under fire and sometimes tilted at windmills? And what of the forehead? Wrinkled with age and worry? Smooth with the promise of youth and hope? Imagine you are asked to draw a single face to represent 2006 in DuPage County. It can't be done, you say. For all of our similarities, it is often our differences that define us.

Here then, are just some of our Faces of 2006. Maureen Hayden Addison's Maureen Hayden, a 27-year member of Wood Dale's Veterans of Foreign Wars Tioga Post 2149, was sworn in as the new statewide president of the Ladies Auxiliary group on June 25. Hayden, who was 18 when she joined the auxiliary in 1979 after years in the Junior Girls Unit, is Post 2149's first woman to rise all the way to the top of the state's ranks. Reid Colliander The Wheaton youngster didn't allow treatments for a brain tumor to slow his spirit. Buoyed with help from a loyal team of buddies, he organized a series of events to help fund pediatric brain tumor research, raising more than $2,000 with Reid's Lemon-Aid Stand. Richard Gaines Professional dancer Richard Gaines, who broke into the business in Michael Jackson's "Thriller" video, choreographed a routine based on that dance for the marching band at Glenbard East High School. In just two days, he taught the band how to dance Thriller- style in formation and on the football field. Irene Bahr The Wheaton attorney was installed president this year of the Illinois State Bar Association. Her ascension marks the third time in the state bar's 130-year history that a woman made it to the top spot. George Bakalis The strict but compassionate circuit judge stood out again for being fair, independent and well-versed in the law. He is presiding over several high-profile cases, including that involving convicted killer Brian Dugan for the 1983 murder of 10-year-old Jeanine Nicarico of Naperville. Mike Cass Illinois Martial Arts Hall of Fame welcomed Lombard resident Mike Cass. He began his martial arts training in 1975 and is a seventh-degree black belt. Glennette Tilley Turner The well-known authority on the underground railroad became Wheaton's Citizen of the Year for 2006. She also published a new book, "An Apple for Harriet Tubman." Jeannette Pawula This Bloomingdale resident and former Rolling Meadows High School teacher made it to the final six on "The Bachelor: Rome" with Prince Lorenzo Borghese before she was sent home. Henry Hyde After decades in power, the renowned Wood Dale Republican is calling it quits. Hyde was first sworn into office in 1975. The iconic U.S. representative and chairman of the International Relations Committee leaves a colorful legacy including quarterbacking the impeachment of President Clinton, and supporting an assault weapons ban. Michael J. Fox The Hollywood actor came to Wheaton in October to help out 6th District congressional candidate Tammy Duckworth's campaign and advocate on behalf of embryonic stem cell research. Fox, who suffers from Parkinson's disease, said embryonic stem cell research is a nonpartisan issue and urged the government to fund it. John McCain The Arizona senator popped into Addison in late October, stumping for 6th District Congressional Republican candidate Peter Roskam. The Vietnam War hero remained coy about his presidential aspirations.

Patrick Collins The Lisle native and Benet Academy grad led the team of U.S. attorneys who took on Illinois powerbroker George Ryan and won. The former governor was convicted in April of corruption charges. J. Peter Sartain The Joliet Diocese's new spiritual leader was welcomed in a June ceremony amid much pomp and circumstance. The bishop told his enthusiastic congregation that "The task for us is to give ourselves to God." Sartain was born in Memphis and last served as bishop of Little Rock, Ark. Jesse Alcozer The Elmhurst resident suffered back-to-back blows in late 2005 when his son, Christopher, died in the Iraq war and his rental house burned down. To make matters worse, protesters picketed Christopher's funeral. Lt. Gov. Pat Quinn helped organize a press conference for the Alcozer family in early January, appealing to the public for assistance to help them get back on their feet after the fire. Thomas Kim As the pastor of Roselle United Methodist Church, he shaved his head to match 7-year-old church member Logan Davenport of Hanover Park. Kim promised the haircut if his congregation helped raise $1,000 to help Logan's family purchase a trained dog that will help with the boy's autism and Down's syndrome therapy. Jeff and Tyanna Cannata The Wayne Township couple were the lead plaintiffs in a class- action lawsuit involving 80 families with polluted wells. The lawsuit filed in April alleges vinyl chloride seeped from the former Mallard Lake landfill nearby and into the aquifer. Grant Eckhoff The county board member lost the GOP primary to newcomer Jerry "JR" McBride only to edge out a long list of hopefuls and be placed on the fall ballot to fill a vacancy created by the death of former county board member John Noel. Then the 47-year-old Wheaton attorney completed the political comeback by defeating Democratic challenger Richard Dunn during the general election. Jeff Redick One of the newly elected DuPage County Board members, Redick, a political newcomer, upset longtime District 2 representative Irene Stone during the Republican primary. The 37-year-old attorney from Elmhurst then bested Democrat Elizabeth "Liz" Chaplin during November's general election. Peter Roskam The Republican attorney from Wheaton gathered a grassroots following that pushed him over the top in the tightly fought 6th Congressional District race. Roskam's hard work and polished presence allowed him to hold fast against a Democratic tide, providing one of the few GOP bright spots on election night. The state senator will be sworn in Jan. 4, replacing his hero, outgoing U.S. Rep. Henry Hyde. Tammy Duckworth The wounded Iraq war helicopter pilot won many hearts in the 6th Congressional District but not enough to buck a longstanding Republican trend. Democrat Duckworth, who lost both legs in a grenade attack, received 49 percent of the votes to state Sen. Peter Roskam's 51 percent. She'll still be in the public eye, however. In November, Gov. Rod Blagojevich appointed the Hoffman Estates resident as his new director of the Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs. Laura Martindale When the Roselle woman graduated from Lake Park High School last June, she asked for books in lieu of gifts. She received approximately 120 and then donated all of them to not-for-profit Metropolitan Family Services in Wheaton.

William Maio The former DuPage County board member had his name immortalized in his hometown of Itasca. Maio's ex-colleagues on the county board in August agreed to rename a stretch of Prospect Avenue as the Honorary William J. Maio, Jr. Highway. The public recognition for the 61-year-old came nearly a year since he resigned his elected post to become a county employee. He works in the circuit court clerk's office as its chief compliance officer. Michael Connelly He successfully made the transition from Lisle Village Board to the county board by narrowly winning a four-way District 5 race in the GOP primary. But with Joe Wozniak coming in second place to Connelly by only 69 votes, Wozniak demanded and was granted a recount. It didn't change the outcome of the election. Michael Swanson Jr. Michael Swanson Jr. of Lombard earned his Eagle Scout award in January from the Boy Scouts of America. For the service requirement, Swanson created a reflection garden at the Fountain of Life Church in Lombard. Swanson also served as Assistant Scoutmaster of Troop 202. Irene Stone After losing the Republican primary to a political newcomer, longtime county board member Irene Stone shocked the GOP faithful by endorsing Democrat Elizabeth "Liz" Chaplin for her former District 2 seat. However, it didn't help Chaplin enough to overcome Jeff Redick during the general election. Stone officially retired on Dec. 1 from the county board seat she held since 1986. Ashlee Simpson Fans wondered if she'd make good on her promise to milk a cow at the annual DuPage County Fair last July. She didn't deliver, but put on a solid show. Jesse McCartney After high fan demand, the pop prince performed for the second consecutive year at the 2006 DuPage County Fair. Although his show did not sell out, fair organizers are not ruling out booking him again in 2007. John Madormo This North Central College professor sold a script for his film, "Coach Dracula," last fall to Dog & Rooster Productions in Studio City, Calif. Though no release date is set, pre-production was scheduled to start last November. Gary Sinise The star of "CSI: New York" traveled to Wheaton last summer and played in the pouring rain with his Lt. Dan Band at Cantigny Park. The show raised money for the not-for-profit Operation Support Our Troops Illinois, Inc. Hailey Zito At age 3, she was named the overall winner of New Star Discovery's Most Beautiful Baby regional contest last March at Stratford Square Mall in Bloomingdale. The event was held in 35 cities across the country. Joseph Imesch Despite turmoil over his handling of sex abuse allegations, the Joliet Diocese bishop left content with his management during the past 26 years. He announced his retirement in May while introducing his successor, Bishop James Peter Sartain, who had overseen the much quieter Little Rock, Ark. diocese. Cory Viger The Bloomingdale resident won $1,500 on Friday the 13th last October after entering a drawing held by Stark Realty at Bloomingdale's annual Septemberfest. He won just in time to repair his home's deteriorating roof.

Joe Birkett The DuPage County state's attorney celebrated a milestone with his 25-anniversary as a prosecutor. He lost a bid for lieutenant governor on a ticket with running mate Judy Baar Topinka, but won points with his party for answering their call to help. Midway into his third term, he may announce next summer if he'll seek a fourth term in 2008. Melanie McCarthy Shannon Derrick After her daughter's new iPod Nano was stolen June 6, Aurora mother Melanie McCarthy sued the family of the girl who had borrowed it to get them to pay up. The highly publicized dispute - which nearly landed on the Judge Judy TV show- was settled out of court Nov. 9 when the other side donated a used iPod. Mark Prior Though it was far short of a perfect game, a Will County judge gave this Cubs pitcher a win in a May 4 ruling in a lawsuit related to a chaotic autograph-signing event in Naperville that left a few kids in tears. The judge ordered Prior to pay back nearly half of his earnings to Just Ducky Too for unsigned merchandise, but he sided with the pitcher that he wasn't a poor sport and never agreed to all that the store hyped. Bob Adams Dirk Enger As co-directors of the Midwest Shelter for Homeless Veterans, Adams and Enger spent many months finding an appropriate location for a shelter that would serve a large portion of the homeless population. They testified at both the national and state level for funding needed to open the shelter, and convinced the necessary people that their goal was worthy. The shelter is set to open by the end of 2006. Ralph Russo This Bartlett man inspired thousands during the August PGA tournament in Medinah for his courage fighting Lou Gehrig's disease while working tirelessly as the event's marketing director. Bob Thomas A Kane County jury awarded this Illinois Supreme Court chief justice $7 million in a Nov. 14 verdict in his libel trial against the Kane County Chronicle and former columnist Bill Page. Thomas also is a Wheaton attorney. Judge Perry Thompson The DuPage County judge's July 25 ruling in an Addison murder trial so infuriated prosecutors, they began replacing him in more than 40 percent of the felony cases assigned to his courtroom. A Jan. 2 hearing is set to determine if they overstepped their authority. Ann Riebock New Glen Ellyn Elementary District 41 superintendent Ann Riebock submitted a $37,325 bill to the district to cover her moving costs, including her Realtor's commission. Riebock subsequently withdrew her request after it was made public and returned the reimbursement. Kristen Bowen Bowen, 14, of Villa Park, was struck and killed by a train in February trying to cut over the railroad tracks instead of walking at a crossing. Since Kristen's death, her father, Ray Zukowski of Lombard, has mounted a regional railroad safety campaign that's led to increased awareness of the issue and a commitment by two villages to build safety fences along nearby Union Pacific rails. Erin Pelz Zahir Wahali Michelle Jacobs Three Glenbard North High School students went to the U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., last summer after their essays on the privatization of space travel were selected from entries submitted across the nation. Erin Pelz, Zahir Wahali and Michelle Jacobs won all-expense paid trips to spend a week at the facility. Jason McDermott

Jason McDermott, a convicted felon with ties to Villa Park Village President Joyce Stupegia, was arrested during a traffic stop in late August after showing state police an ID that said he was the deputy mayor of Villa Park. No such position exists. What does exist is McDermott's history of latching onto politicians, impersonating them and trying to take their money. And, according to many witnesses, McDermott ran Stupegia's campaign under a fake name and later pretended to be her son, Sean. Michael Fortner Fortner spent his last year as West Chicago mayor by shepherding several major companies into the DuPage Technology Park and overseeing the last stages of thorium removal from the city. In November, voters made his bid for 95th District representative successful. Fortner resigned Dec. 4. A special election in April will determine who will replace him. Michael A. Wolfe The DuPage County criminal prosecution chief put serial killer Paul Runge on death row after a six-week trial. Wolfe received a national award for his dedication and integrity. In addition, the career prosecutor secured lengthy prison terms for a violent Warrenville home invasion. He also is handling the prosecutions of two heartbreaking crimes: Brian Dugan for the 1983 Jeanine Nicarico murder and Neil Lofquist, who is accused of killing his daughter in Clarendon Hills. Tony Reyes Reyes, president of the West Chicago Community High School District 94 school board, attempted to reduce a $1.4 million deficit this year with daring decisions. Under heavy fire from the community and teachers' union, Reyes' board moved to fire staff and increase class sizes to reduce expenses. In all, 13 teachers, six assistant coach positions, and one nurse were fired. Ann Banfield Baylie Owen Glenbard East High School teacher Ann Banfield helps raise money for research into pseudomotor cerebri, a rare brain disease that affects her and friend Baylie Owen. Owen started a Web site where she could sell beaded bracelets she makes to fund research. Lori Most Some 13 years after she was killed by a train while taking a shortcut home from school, the Wheaton Park District and other units of local government built a pedestrian bridge over the tracks to make sure it would never happen again. The bridge will bear Most's name. Brad Ogilvie Brad Ogilvie founded the Mosaic Initiative in Wheaton with Cathy Hetrick, director of the group. Their goal is to promote measures and practices that prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. They held the first World AIDS Day prayer breakfast Dec. 1 in Wheaton. Tim Hetzner As president of Lutheran Church Charities in Addison, Tim Hetzner oversees an agency dedicated to assisting those in need. He is the videotaped presenter of Cover to Cover Bible Study, available across the U.S. at churches and via the Internet from September to May. He includes video that he taped while in Israel in August 2006. Ruth La Sure Barb Retelny La Sure, of West Chicago, and Retelny, of Glen Ellyn, traveled to Uganda to learn about the needs of the people and report back to churches here. Alice Teisan The Wheaton resident helped provide bicycles for Hurricane Katrina victims as executive director of His Wheels International. Olive Fleming Liefeld

The Lindenhurst woman joined others from Wheaton College in January for a preview of "End of the Spear," a full-length movie about her first husband, Pete Fleming, who was murdered while serving as a missionary in Ecuador 50 years ago. Three of the five slain missionaries, Jim Elliott, Nate Saint and Ed McCully, attended Wheaton College. Alexa Scimeca The 14-year-old Addison girl placed first in the ladies division of the 2006 Morges Cup, a figure skating competition in Switzerland. Harry Paney Harry Paney, an 80-year-old Itasca resident, spent more than a hundred hours taking photographs of every Itasca police department employee. The photographs were later turned into the department's new 2006 Cop Cards. Aiham Alsammarae The Oak Brook man was named electricity minister in the interim Iraqi government, but was imprisoned when he was accused of "financial mismanagement." His family says he was imprisoned for urging the Iraqi government to find peace with minority groups in the country. John Pohl Michael Campbell Wood Dale police officers Pohl and Campbell received one of the department's highest honors on June. They were honored with the Wood Dale Police Department Lifesaving Award for their role in an April 23 house fire. Both officers responded at about 5:45 a.m., seconds before Wood Dale firefighters, to a house fire at 185 Forest Glen Road. Homeowner Christine Fintikis, her two adult daughters and the family dog had climbed out a second-story window and onto the roof. Pohl and Campbell rescued an elderly grandmother from the basement. Tim Grasso Hanover Park resident Tim Grasso, owner of the Pizza Cottage in Roselle, lowered his cholesterol 14 points, from 207 to 193, in just a month by adding three-quarters of a cup of oatmeal to his daily food consumption. He took the "Quaker Oatmeal Smart Heart Challenge" and became one of less than a dozen challenge-takers nationwide who were contacted by Quaker Oats after hearing their success stories. He taped a commercial for the company. Dr. Doug Johnson The neurosurgeon on staff at Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield and a Marine reservist who volunteered to go to Iraq convinced the hospital to donate $25,000 worth of medical supplies to the Iraqi people. Yvonne Petit The Carol Stream woman organized a second annual 5k run in honor of her teenage son, who drowned last year in a retention pond after an underage drinking party. She's organized a local group to keep teens away from alcohol. Denise Hibbard Hibbard, a junior at Lake Park High School in Roselle, became Roselle's 2006 Rose Queen in May. The 16-year-old from Roselle started flying airplanes in her early teens. She has been to Civil Air Patrol boot camp and plans to attend the University of Illinois and major in Aviation Human Factors. Robert Krilich Sr. Krilich was released from prison after serving nine years for a federal racketeering and bribery conviction. The courts found in 1995 that he rigged a hole-in-one contest at Krilich's Country Lakes Golf Course in Naperville to deliver $40,000 to then-Oakbrook Terrace Mayor Richard Sarallo's son. The money was a bribe to help secure $135 million in tax-exempt loans to finance the never- completed Royce Renaissance development.

John Geils Bensenville Village President John Geils racked up nearly $80,000 in legal bills for the libel lawsuit he filed against his mayoral opponent, John Wassinger, the day before the April 2005 election. Some of those bills were paid by the village itself until legal experts advised Bensenville officials that using public funds might not hold up in court if challenged. Kathie Pierce The former special education teacher and the Bensenville high school's current principal accepted an offer by the Fenton High School District 100 school board to replace superintendent Alf Logan at the end of the school year. Chris Kaucnik-Syphens She opened Heidi's Brooklyn Deli this summer. It's Winfield's first new town center business in decades, in the village's first town center building development in decades. Rob Federighi Lights, Camera, Fraction, a math game show featuring Addison Trail students, was created by Rob Federighi, an Addison Trail graduate, as a pilot show. The Jeopardy-style show featured former students Jae Tae Lee, Greg Formosa and Katie Pope. Lee won. No word yet if the show aired on either the Discovery Channel, Learning Channel or the Game Show Network. Allie Pleiter The Villa Park mom released her seventh book, a Christian chick- lit novel called "My So-Called Love Life." Mike Wenz Jake Lindhorst The two DuPage County men were cited in the 2007 Guinness Book of World Records for visiting 30 Major League ballparks in 29 days. Casey and Fran Gaik After claiming harassment by police and village officials, the Gaiks won a $2 million lawsuit settlement with the village of Oak Brook after filing the suit in 2005. Named as defendants were Sgt. Randy Mucha, former village prosecutor Joan Mullins, the police department and the village. Now the Gaiks, who even told their story to Geraldo Rivera on Geraldo-at-Large, are trying to move out of town. Kristina Pszotka In January, Pszotka, of Glen Ellyn, didn't mind getting her hands clammy and dirty as she became the Technology Center of DuPage's first female to compete in the Chi-Town Teardown Pit-Crew Competition in Chicago. The school, located in Addison, had four other students place nineth in the competition. Pszotka has dreams of becoming a mechanic. Jerrod Goebel The Carol Stream firefighter returned to work this spring nearly a year after a Memorial Day crash that killed his wife and left him in a coma. Kerin Motsinger The Park View Elementary School teacher was speechless after she learned she won the $25,000 Milken National Educator Award at the Glen Ellyn school. One hundred teachers nationwide receive the award. Motsinger was one of two in Illinois. Rebekah Stathakis Stathakis, an Addison resident, wished upon a star as she headed to Florida along with dozens of others to vie for the Disney Teacher of the Year Award. Forty-four teachers nationwide were nominated for the award. Stathakis, a Spanish teacher at Butler Junior High School in Oak Brook won $10,000 in cash and

$5,000 for the school. Robert Mullany Mullany, 37, an 11-year veteran of the Glendale Heights Police Department, was diagnosed with stomach cancer in January and passed away in July. He is survived by his wife, Stephanie, and six children ages 3 to 14. Gary Schira Bloomingdale Police Chief Gary Schira retired after 26 years and took the top cop job in Batavia. Veteran commander Tim Goergen was tapped to replace Schira in May. Bruce Malkin The West Chicago police commander led the DuPage County major crimes task force through its busiest year while investigating murder and mayhem. LOAD-DATE: January 4, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Photo of each newsmaker included. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Paddock Publications, Inc.

58 of 265 DOCUMENTS Detroit Free Press (Michigan) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News December 22, 2006 Friday

ANATOMY OF A CONVICTION: In a teacher's child-sex case, legal and child psychology experts question what the prosecution did and the defense didn't. The next call is the judge's.
BYLINE: L.L. Brasier, John Wisely and Suzette Hackney, Detroit Free Press SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 2031 words Dec. 22--As an Oakland County judge ponders the fate of a kindergarten teacher found guilty of molesting two boys, legal experts and child behavior specialists say the case raises serious questions about the process that led to his conviction. The debate over what happened or didn't happen in Classroom 101 at Key Elementary in Oak Park has

only intensified since a jury convicted James Perry in September of snatching two boys -- ages 4 and 5 -from a lunch line, dragging them into the classroom and forcing them to perform oral sex. Oakland County Circuit Judge Denise Langford Morris is considering a request to grant Perry, 32, a new trial or toss out his conviction since new witnesses recently came forward. Experts interviewed by the Free Press cited several concerns. Among them: --The case rested primarily on the children's accounts, which were not consistent during the investigation and trial. Prosecutors contended that children seldom lie about sexual assaults, but several leading experts on child behavior said extensive research in the last two decades has shown that small children can easily be led to fabricate stories, even unintentionally. Perry's defense lawyer did not call any experts to tell that to jurors. --A legal expert said the boys' mothers may have testified beyond the limits of what the law allows as they recounted what their children told them. That kind of testimony is known as hearsay evidence and has limits on what jurors may hear. --A former FBI profiler who specializes in child-sex cases said Perry doesn't match the profile of a pedophile who snatches and assaults children he doesn't know. No experts testified at Perry's trial about the characteristics of sexual predators. It is impossible to know whether such evidence would have changed the jury's verdict. Prosecutors and police stand by the conviction, saying the boys' core testimony about being forced to perform oral sex on the teacher was consistent and found credible by the 12 jurors. "This guy's a freak," Oakland County Prosecutor David Gorcyca said in a November interview with a Free Press editor, noting that Perry had a collection of photographs of children and youth-oriented videos. The photos and videos were never introduced at trial, and Perry contends they were innocent. The Perry case has been marked by unusual turns from the outset. Prosecutors initially declined to charge him in October 2005, citing lack of evidence, before reopening the case more than three months later. Then last month, two months after Perry's conviction, the trial judge took the unusual step of delaying sentencing to reconsider the jury's verdict after witnesses at the school -never interviewed by police -- disputed the prosecutors' account. The judge is considering defense motions claiming Perry, who is jailed in Oakland County, was denied a fair trial because his original attorney, Ray Correll, performed poorly and because the attorney allowed him to wear an electronic tether visible to jurors. The device might have implied guilt to jurors, Perry's appellate lawyers say. Langford Morris is expected to rule in January. Perry faces up to life in prison. Children's testimony Perry's march through the legal system began with the events of Oct. 12, 2005. Two hours after arriving for his first day of school, a 5-year-old would insist that Perry pulled him from a supervised lunch line and forced him to perform oral sex in a vacant room. Later the child alleged a 4-year-old was assaulted as well. The 4-year-old initially denied being attacked. Over the next several months, during the investigation and at trial, the children's statements proved inconsistent on several issues, including whether they were together or alone when they said they were attacked. The seven-day trial was built almost entirely around the testimony of the children and their mothers. Experts in child sex-abuse cases say this is common because the assaults are "crimes of privacy," and corroborating evidence is often difficult to establish unless there are signs of physical trauma, which were not present in this case. Dr. Melvin Guyer, a legal expert and professor in the University of Michigan's department of psychiatry, said that although child witnesses are often truthful, their testimony must be handled with care, particularly when there is evidence that parents or other adults may have repeatedly interrogated the children. "The allegations here are as bizarre as those in the 1980s day-care cases," he said, referring to prosecu-

tions of preschool workers -- most notably at the McMartin Preschool in California -- that were discredited when it was found that repetitive, leading questions may have caused the children to invent accounts.Young witnesses are not inherently untrustworthy. Researchers have found that children as young as 3 can accurately recount experiences. But Guyer said even graphic sexual descriptions by children don't guarantee that an attack occurred. Studies indicate that children, especially those younger than 6, can embrace false scenarios under repeated, leading questioning, he said. One study by Central Michigan University, published in 2001 and involving 114 children, found that up to 40% of children under age 8 will add false details, including about unpleasant physical contact, to recollections if they're coached or questioned repeatedly. The hearsay exception Because there is often little to corroborate a child's account in criminal cases, prosecutors often seek testimony from the parents or other adults in whom a child confided. Courts usually restrict hearsay testimony, which includes secondhand accounts, but often make an exception in cases involving young witnesses, who may have limited memories or find it difficult to describe their abuse in court. But this exception is limited: In Michigan, the child must be under 10 and his or her statements to the adult must have been made spontaneously and, in most cases, shortly after the reported incident. "That's because after a while, it loses its trustworthiness," said Lawrence Dubin, a professor at the University of Detroit Mercy Law School and an expert on rules of evidence. At Perry's trial, both mothers testified not only to what their children said in the immediate aftermath of the alleged assaults, but also about what the boys said weeks and months later. Both acknowledged repeatedly questioning the boys at length, including on one occasion questioning them together months after the allegations were made. Experts say children's memories can be easily contaminated under continual questioning. "After that, it becomes a lot harder to tell what's false and what's not," said Dr. Kamala London, a professor and researcher of children's testimony at the University of Toledo, who has served as an expert witness in numerous trials. "Kids, especially young ones, come to believe the event took place, and will even begin to supply details." Gorcyca remains steadfast that the boys' accounts were believable, as the verdict reflected. The rape shield law Yale Kamisar, a law professor at the University of Michigan whose books are staples in law schools nationally, said another key trial issue was how the rape shield law was used. The law was created so rape victims would not have to fear having their sex lives gratuitously used against them in court, Kamisar said. At Perry's trial, the law may have been misapplied, Kamisar said, when the jury was prevented from hearing testimony about whether the 5-year-old boy had been exposed to sexual contact previously. The judge ruled that jurors could not see a portion of a transcript in which the child told sexual-abuse counselors -- who interviewed him on behalf of police -- that he was previously molested by a "kid named Naz." Jurors also never learned that the boy's mother had reportedly confided to a teacher that she was angry after hearing her son say he was "tea-bagged." The word is slang for forced oral sex. The teacher, Lynn Duncan, said the mother also suggested that something similar happened to the boy while they lived in Chicago. The mother declined to comment on the boy's past.

Kamisar said of the shield law's use in the Perry case: "I don't think those who drafted this law could have begun to contemplate it being used any way like this. Technically ... this law may apply. But the people who drafted this never had anything this oddball in mind." Lawyers who specialize in sexual assault cases said it is important to call experts who can explain the limitations of children's testimony, which didn't happen in Perry's case. "These are very difficult cases to try," said Southfield attorney Gail Benson, whose practice centers on defending sexual assault suspects. "You really need a specialist." Perry's trial lawyer, Correll, disagreed. A profiler's view Kenneth Lanning, a retired FBI behavioral analyst who spent much of his 33-year career at the bureau studying people who prey on children, said pedophiles generally fall into categories, and those who turn to teaching, coaching or other activities that bring them close to children usually befriend victims over time to gain their trust. In this case, the 5-year-old boy was attending his first class at Key Elementary. He and the 4-year-old had never been in Perry's class. While acknowledging there are exceptions, Lanning, who is not involved in the Perry case, said the idea that a veteran teacher would suddenly abduct two boys he didn't know was inconsistent with how most pedophiles operate. "Generally, people who go into teaching, or coaching, or scouting because they are looking for their victims there will groom the children for a period of time, and develop a relationship," he said, adding: "It seems here they are saying a 'groomer' suddenly became a 'snatcher.' That's not consistent with the patterns we know. It appears that what you have being put forth in this case is the urban legend of what people think of when it comes to child molesters: some creepy guy leaping out of a dark corner." Lanning said he was troubled that some witnesses -- such as teachers in or near the room where the boys said they were attacked -- were not questioned by police before trial. Oak Park Public Safety Director John McNeilance said his department was at a disadvantage because prosecutors initially declined to pursue the case and it remained closed for four months before Gorcyca's office charged Perry. "We lost the momentum in the investigation," McNeilance said. He conceded, however, that detectives should have interviewed witnesses assigned to the special-education room where prosecutors said the attacks took place, "well before the trial." Some of those school employees have told the Free Press, and Perry's new defense team, that the room was occupied throughout the school day and the assaults could not have happened as described. Erik Dolan, the detective in charge, relied on a statement by the school principal that special-ed children were assigned a different room for lunch, meaning the room could have been empty. Dolan has since sought to interview the new witnesses. Correll wept when the verdict was announced Sept. 20 after the jury deliberated five hours. "I was devastated," he said. "The facts in this case are incontrovertible -- two small children say they are pulled from a supervised lunch line, taken into a room that happens to be full of people, and sexually assaulted, all in eight minutes. It couldn't have happened." Gorcyca, who has criticized Free Press coverage of the case and refused to talk to reporters in recent weeks, said in October: "Somebody is trying to escape responsibility for poor performance in his own work. It's not our job to do his defense." Contact L.L. BRASIER at 248-858-2262 or brasier@freepress.com, JOHN WISELY at 248-351-3696 or jwisely@freepress.com, and

SUZETTE HACKNEY at 313-222-6614 or shackney@freepress.com. Copyright (c) 2006, Detroit Free Press Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: January 1, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20061222-DE-1222-ANATOMY-OF-A-CONVICTION-In-a-teacher-s-child-sex-case-legal-and-childpsychology-experts-question-what-the-prosecution-did-and-the-defense-didn-t-The-next-call-is-the-judge-s PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: DE Copyright 2006 Detroit Free Press

59 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Irish Times December 1, 2006 Friday

FG opposes lowering age of sexual consent
BYLINE: Mark Hennessy, Political Correspondent SECTION: FRONT PAGE; Pg. 11 LENGTH: 457 words Fine Gael has strongly opposed a key finding of an Oireachtas child protection inquiry, which has recommended that the age of sexual consent be cut from 17 to 16 years. The all-party Committee on Child Protection, chaired by Fianna Fáil TD Peter Power, also recommends that a constitutional referendum be held to stop adults claiming they did not know the age of a person under 16 with whom they had sex. People in authority over children, such as teachers and scout leaders, should face life imprisonment if they have sex with one of their charges aged under 18, the committee also says. Cutting the age of consent by a year was difficult, Mr Power acknowledged, though research indicated that most people believed 16 was already the legally permissible threshold. Calling for a "very vigorous" sex education programme, Labour TD Brendan Howlin emphasised "that the age of consent is not the age of acceptability. It is whether or not it is criminal". However, Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny, speaking in Cork last night, said a reduced age of consent would send "a wrong signal to our children about values and standards.

"This decision is out of touch with the values and aspirations of the vast majority of parents in Ireland," he said. "Parents who want to live up to their responsibilities to nurture and protect their children." Fine Gael Cork South West TD, Jim O'Keeffe, who represented the party on the committee, said he "wasn't convinced by the case made" for the new 16-year threshold. Mr Power said the Supreme Court ruling in May that a man should be allowed to argue he did not know that a girl with whom he had sex was only 13 "had undermined the child protection system that had worked for 70 years and that had not given rise to a miscarriage of justice for 70 years". Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform Michael McDowell and the Minister of State for Children, Brian Lenihan, were ex-officio members of the committee, which began work after the summer. Cautioning against the prospect of a speedy referendum, Mr McDowell said he would bring the committee's conclusions to the Cabinet as a matter of priority. The committee also recommends that people found guilty of raping or attempting to rape a child under 16 should face a maximum sentence of life imprisonment, while first offenders should get no automatic reduction in sentence. Mandatory sentences should not be introduced, it says, though they could be considered for authority figures found to have abused their relationship with under-18s. Vetting rules should be tightened so that full details about an individual's past - including if they had been charged but not convicted of sex abuse offences - can be gathered and passed on to schools before they recruit staff. LOAD-DATE: December 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Irish Times All Rights Reserved

61 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) November 25, 2006 Saturday Sunrise Edition

Local News - briefly
BYLINE: Gosia Wozniacka, Bill Stewart, Maya Blackman, Elizabeth Suh, The Oregonian SECTION: Local News; Pg. B02 LENGTH: 625 words Sandy

1 adult, 3 youths arrested, accused of slashing tires Three youths and one adult were arrested Thursday on accusations of slashing vehicle tires in Sandy. Residents reported the tires of 14 vehicles, including a Sandy police patrol car, were punctured with a knife or similar instrument this week. Total damage exceeded $1,500, according to the Sandy Police Department. Sandy police arrested the three youths, ages 13 to 16, and one adult, 20-year-old Richard A. Cruikshank of Sandy, after a witness saw four people slashing tires and called police. The slashings took place in the neighborhoods surrounding Meinig Park. The four were charged with criminal mischief. Cruikshank was lodged at the Clackamas County Jail but released on bail. -- Gosia Wozniacka Vancouver Residents lock suspect in garage, call police A 21-year-old Vancouver man was detained by several relatives of alleged victims, then arrested by police Friday on accusations of indecent exposure involving two girls. Vancouver police found Kevin Bauersfeld locked alone in a garage in the Fourth Plain Village neighborhood. Sgt. Craig Lanwehr said the girls, both younger than 10, apparently were acquaintances of Bauersfeld. There was no indication the girls had been assaulted, but at least one incident occurred in the past two weeks. Lanwehr said the investigation was in its early stages and he had no further details. -- Bill Stewart Tigard Police seek information on sex abuse suspect Tigard police are asking people to call if they know of children inappropriately touched by William Volz, a longtime youth program volunteer and former foster parent recently arrested on allegations of sexually abusing a young relative. Police arrested Volz, 41, of Tigard, on Wednesday after a recent report of inappropriately touching a then-10-year-old boy in 2001, said Jim Wolf, the Tigard Police Department's public information officer. The initial investigation has not revealed any other possible cases of child sex abuse. However, Wolf said, police are concerned about the possibility, noting Volz's extensive contact with children. From 2000 to 2004, Wolf said, Volz was a volunteer coach with the Tigard Youth Football Association. In 2003, he was a volunteer coach for basketball at St. Anthony School in Tigard. Since 2003, he has been a Cub Scouts pack leader in the Tigard area. Volz was a foster parent through the Oregon Youth Authority, but Wolf didn't have specific times. Anyone with information is asked to call Detective Kevin Dresser at 503-718-2576. -- Maya Blackmun Portland

Group's trailer stolen from Christmas tree lot John Jefferies and his students in Teen Challenge opened up their Christmas tree lot Friday as planned, but with little more than trees and rope. The group's trailer with signs and supplies had been stolen overnight from outside the Kmart at 12350 N.E. Sandy Blvd., said Jefferies, the Portland substance-abuse ministry's executive director. The trailer cost between $4,000 and $5,000 and was crucial to the ministry's everyday activities, he said, including street outreach and donation pickups. Jefferies said he didn't know how the program would work without it, but he and his students still will run their modest tree lot at the Kmart's parking lot daily for the next month. Proceeds will go toward the ministry's operating expenses, he said. Jefferies expressed hope the thief would have a change of heart and return the trailer. "My students are more than willing to forgive," he said. The trailer is white with the "Teen Challenge" name and logo --a blue, star-shaped figure --on its sides and back. It is Wells Cargo brand with license plate U242811, and it hitches to the back of vehicles. -- Elizabeth Suh ILLUSTRATION: Cruikshank Arrested after witness calls police LOAD-DATE: November 28, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

66 of 265 DOCUMENTS

The San Luis Obispo Tribune (California) November 15, 2006 Wednesday

One man's fatal mistake is Boy Scouts' life lesson; As a Navy commander, Scott Waddle took responsibility for a submarine accident that killed nine people in 2001
BYLINE: Larissa Van Beurden-Doust, ldoust@thetribunenews.com

LENGTH: 861 words Two nights after Scott Waddle learned that nine people -- including four teenagers -- died because of his actions, he briefly considered using a ceremonial dagger in his home to stab his 13-year-old daughter, his wife and then himself. That would have been the easy way out. Instead, Waddle dealt head-on with the international fallout that occurred after the nuclear submarine he was in charge of surfaced into a Japanese fishing boat near Hawaii on Feb. 9, 2001. The now-retired Navy commander recalled that night while in San Luis Obispo on Tuesday to speak at an annual dinner for the Boy Scouts of America Los Padres Council. By telling the story of that day and the choices he made afterward, Waddle hopes others will learn that failure is not final. Setbacks will be made, and there will be a price to pay, he said, but it's better to be upfront and completely honest when a mistake is made. A deadly error In early 2001, three months before his 20th anniversary with the Navy, Waddle was captain of the USS Greeneville, stationed in Pearl Harbor. That fateful day, several civilians were onboard. Waddle ordered that the submarine perform a maneuver that brings it to the surface rapidly. But the crew did not do a thorough job making sure there was no ship above. "Complacency had kind of set into the crew," Waddle said. "The team that day, myself included, we erred." The massive submarine hit the Ehime Maru, a fishing and high school training vessel operated by a Japanese school. The submarine's massive rudders tore through the boat. It sank within 10 minutes. At first, Waddle heard someone say that all those on the boat had been saved. He didn't realize that meant just those who had made it into life rafts. In the end, nine people died. Four were 17 years old. Eight of the bodies were recovered; Waddle still remembers the name of the one who was never found. "There was a time when I thought, 'There's no way I could have screwed up; there's no way I could have made a mistake. We're too good,' " Waddle said. "It became evident that, yeah, I did make mistakes as captain." Waddle chose not to hide from the incident. He had dark periods. The murder/suicide thought came after his wife, Jill, said she had kissed their daughter, Ashley, goodnight -- something he realized four other families couldn't do. But sitting in his front yard that night, after he decided not to kill them all, looking into the dark waters of Pearl Harbor, Waddle said, he prayed and heard a voice say that he needed to do what's right. One boy at his daughter's school told her that her dad was a murderer. People posted messages online calling Waddle a killer and even Satan. Editorial cartoons showed that he let the 140 members of his crew party instead of work. Newly elected President George W. Bush had to apologize to Japan. Relations between the countries were strained. A military court of inquiry decided not to court-martial Waddle. It found there was no criminal intent. He was instead allowed to retire with full pension and an honorable discharge. The one thing Waddle said he would do differently is apologize in person to the Japanese families soon-

er. The Navy had asked him to keep quiet, he said. "I know the families suffered a lot," he said. "I honor those who lost their lives, and there isn't a day that I don't reflect on it." A lesson in accountability Though the incident has faded from the minds of most Americans, Waddle chooses to travel the country as a paid speaker. He hopes it can serve as a lesson for other leaders. "The tendency it seems today is for parents to cover up for their kids, make excuses," Waddle said. "Few people are held accountable." People who make excuses and try to hide their mistakes are rampant in America's business and political world, Waddle said, citing examples: Former Rep. Mark Foley blamed alcohol and childhood sex abuse after a sex scandal involving congressional pages surfaced; Kenneth Lay of Enron and Bernard Ebbers of WorldCom denied wrongdoings but were convicted. "There are choices that we have in our life," Waddle said. "You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that." Take it from him Advice from Scott Waddle: o Failure is not final. You can have setbacks. Let it be a defining time in your life and nothing more than that. Learn from it, but keep your character, integrity intact. Tell the truth. The American public is very forgiving when you're honest. There's a penalty and a price to pay, but in the end you are forgiven when you atone for those acts, and you can move on. o There are choices that we have in our life. You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that. o Disclose as much as possible as quickly as possible. If you're direct and you shoot straight, it's hard for the media to spin anything other than truth. o Don't give excuses. It doesn't excuse your actions. What you did was wrong. You knowingly did something wrong. Go to sanluisobispo.com to post a comment on this story. LOAD-DATE: November 15, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The San Luis Obispo Tribune All Rights Reserved

67 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Tribune (San Luis Obispo, California)

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News November 15, 2006 Wednesday

One man's fatal mistake is Boy Scouts' life lesson
BYLINE: Larissa Van Beurden-Doust, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 916 words Nov. 15--Two nights after Scott Waddle learned that nine people -- including four teenagers -- died because of his actions, he briefly considered using a ceremonial dagger in his home to stab his 13-year-old daughter, his wife and then himself. That would have been the easy way out. Instead, Waddle dealt head-on with the international fallout that occurred after the nuclear submarine he was in charge of surfaced into a Japanese fishing boat near Hawaii on Feb. 9, 2001. The now-retired Navy commander recalled that night while in San Luis Obispo on Tuesday to speak at an annual dinner for the Boy Scouts of America Los Padres Council. By telling the story of that day and the choices he made afterward, Waddle hopes others will learn that failure is not final. Setbacks will be made, and there will be a price to pay, he said, but it's better to be upfront and completely honest when a mistake is made. A deadly error In early 2001, three months before his 20th anniversary with the Navy, Waddle was captain of the USS Greeneville, stationed in Pearl Harbor. That fateful day, several civilians were onboard. Waddle ordered that the submarine perform a maneuver that brings it to the surface rapidly. But the crew did not do a thorough job making sure there was no ship above. "Complacency had kind of set into the crew," Waddle said. "The team that day, myself included, we erred." The massive submarine hit the Ehime Maru, a fishing and high school training vessel operated by a Japanese school. The submarine's massive rudders tore through the boat. It sank within 10 minutes. At first, Waddle heard someone say that all those on the boat had been saved. He didn't realize that meant just those who had made it into life rafts. In the end, nine people died. Four were 17 years old. Eight of the bodies were recovered; Waddle still remembers the name of the one who was never found. "There was a time when I thought, 'There's no way I could have screwed up; there's no way I could have made a mistake. We're too good,' " Waddle said. "It became evident that, yeah, I did make mistakes as captain." Waddle chose not to hide from the incident. He had dark periods. The murder/suicide thought came after his wife, Jill, said she had kissed their daughter, Ashley, goodnight -- something he realized four other families couldn't do. But sitting in his front yard that night, after he decided not to kill them all, looking into the dark waters of Pearl Harbor, Waddle said, he prayed and heard a voice say that he needed to do what's right.

One boy at his daughter's school told her that her dad was a murderer. People posted messages online calling Waddle a killer and even Satan. Editorial cartoons showed that he let the 140 members of his crew party instead of work. Newly elected President George W. Bush had to apologize to Japan. Relations between the countries were strained. A military court of inquiry decided not to court-martial Waddle. It found there was no criminal intent. He was instead allowed to retire with full pension and an honorable discharge. The one thing Waddle said he would do differently is apologize in person to the Japanese families sooner. The Navy had asked him to keep quiet, he said. "I know the families suffered a lot," he said. "I honor those who lost their lives, and there isn't a day that I don't reflect on it." A lesson in accountability Though the incident has faded from the minds of most Americans, Waddle chooses to travel the country as a paid speaker. He hopes it can serve as a lesson for other leaders. "The tendency it seems today is for parents to cover up for their kids, make excuses," Waddle said. "Few people are held accountable." People who make excuses and try to hide their mistakes are rampant in America's business and political world, Waddle said, citing examples: Former Rep. Mark Foley blamed alcohol and childhood sex abuse after a sex scandal involving congressional pages surfaced; Kenneth Lay of Enron and Bernard Ebbers of WorldCom denied wrongdoings but were convicted. "There are choices that we have in our life," Waddle said. "You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that." Take it from him Advice from Scott Waddle: --Failure is not final. You can have setbacks. Let it be a defining time in your life and nothing more than that. Learn from it, but keep your character, integrity intact. Tell the truth. The American public is very forgiving when you're honest. There's a penalty and a price to pay, but in the end you are forgiven when you atone for those acts, and you can move on. --There are choices that we have in our life. You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that. --Disclose as much as possible as quickly as possible. If you're direct and you shoot straight, it's hard for the media to spin anything other than truth. --Don't give excuses. It doesn't excuse your actions. What you did was wrong. You knowingly did something wrong. Go to sanluisobispo.com to post a comment on this story. Copyright (c) 2006, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: November 16, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20061115-SO-1115-One-man-s-fatal-mistake-is-Boy-Scouts-life-lesson

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SO Copyright 2006 The Tribune

68 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Tribune (San Luis Obispo, California) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News November 15, 2006 Wednesday

One man's fatal mistake is Boy Scouts' life lesson
BYLINE: Larissa Van Beurden-Doust, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 906 words Nov. 15--Two nights after Scott Waddle learned that nine people -- including four teenagers -- died because of his actions, he briefly considered using a ceremonial dagger in his home to stab his 13-year-old daughter, his wife and then himself. That would have been the easy way out. Instead, Waddle dealt head-on with the international fallout that occurred after the nuclear submarine he was in charge of surfaced into a Japanese fishing boat near Hawaii on Feb. 9, 2001. The now-retired Navy commander recalled that night while in San Luis Obispo on Tuesday to speak at an annual dinner for the Boy Scouts of America Los Padres Council. By telling the story of that day and the choices he made afterward, Waddle hopes others will learn that failure is not final. Setbacks will be made, and there will be a price to pay, he said, but it's better to be upfront and completely honest when a mistake is made. A deadly error In early 2001, three months before his 20th anniversary with the Navy, Waddle was captain of the USS Greeneville, stationed in Pearl Harbor. That fateful day, several civilians were onboard. Waddle ordered that the submarine perform a maneuver that brings it to the surface rapidly. But the crew did not do a thorough job making sure there was no ship above. "Complacency had kind of set into the crew," Waddle said. "The team that day, myself included, we erred." The massive submarine hit the Ehime Maru, a fishing and high school training vessel operated by a Japanese school.

The submarine's massive rudders tore through the boat. It sank within 10 minutes. At first, Waddle heard someone say that all those on the boat had been saved. He didn't realize that meant just those who had made it into life rafts. In the end, nine people died. Four were 17 years old. Eight of the bodies were recovered; Waddle still remembers the name of the one who was never found. "There was a time when I thought, 'There's no way I could have screwed up; there's no way I could have made a mistake. We're too good,' " Waddle said. "It became evident that, yeah, I did make mistakes as captain." Waddle chose not to hide from the incident. He had dark periods. The murder/suicide thought came after his wife, Jill, said she had kissed their daughter, Ashley, goodnight -- something he realized four other families couldn't do. But sitting in his front yard that night, after he decided not to kill them all, looking into the dark waters of Pearl Harbor, Waddle said, he prayed and heard a voice say that he needed to do what's right. One boy at his daughter's school told her that her dad was a murderer. People posted messages online calling Waddle a killer and even Satan. Editorial cartoons showed that he let the 140 members of his crew party instead of work. Newly elected President George W. Bush had to apologize to Japan. Relations between the countries were strained. A military court of inquiry decided not to court-martial Waddle. It found there was no criminal intent. He was instead allowed to retire with full pension and an honorable discharge. The one thing Waddle said he would do differently is apologize in person to the Japanese families sooner. The Navy had asked him to keep quiet, he said. "I know the families suffered a lot," he said. "I honor those who lost their lives, and there isn't a day that I don't reflect on it." A lesson in accountability Though the incident has faded from the minds of most Americans, Waddle chooses to travel the country as a paid speaker. He hopes it can serve as a lesson for other leaders. "The tendency it seems today is for parents to cover up for their kids, make excuses," Waddle said. "Few people are held accountable." People who make excuses and try to hide their mistakes are rampant in America's business and political world, Waddle said, citing examples: Former Rep. Mark Foley blamed alcohol and childhood sex abuse after a sex scandal involving congressional pages surfaced; Kenneth Lay of Enron and Bernard Ebbers of WorldCom denied wrongdoings but were convicted. "There are choices that we have in our life," Waddle said. "You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that." Take it from him Advice from Scott Waddle: --Failure is not final. You can have setbacks. Let it be a defining time in your life and nothing more than that. Learn from it, but keep your character, integrity intact. Tell the truth. The American public is very forgiving when you're honest. There's a penalty and a price to pay, but in the end you are forgiven when you atone for those acts, and you can move on. --There are choices that we have in our life. You can either be accountable and responsible for your actions, or you could try to hide behind an excuse and place blame elsewhere. But people see through that.

--Disclose as much as possible as quickly as possible. If you're direct and you shoot straight, it's hard for the media to spin anything other than truth. --Don't give excuses. It doesn't excuse your actions. What you did was wrong. You knowingly did something wrong. Copyright (c) 2006, The Tribune, San Luis Obispo, Calif. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: November 16, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20061115-SO-1115-One-man-s-fatal-mistake-is-Boy-Scouts-life-lesson PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SO Copyright 2006 The Tribune

69 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) November 14, 2006 Tuesday Idaho Edition

Spokane County may settle Hahn suit; $325,000 would go to two men who say deputy molested them;
BYLINE: Jonathan Brunt and Bill Morlin Staff writers SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 599 words Spokane County commissioners today will consider paying $325,000 to two men who say they were molested by a county sheriff's deputy in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The men filed a lawsuit in 2004 that alleges the county was negligent for the actions of Deputy David Hahn, in part because Hahn was allowed to keep his job even after his commanders were told that he abused boys. Under the deal being considered, Robert Galliher, now 37, would receive $225,000 and Douglas Chicklinsky, 41, would be paid $100,000, county documents say. The money would come from the county's risk pool, a fund dedicated to paying claims against the county.

Hahn committed suicide Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36 after he was confronted at least a second time about the allegations. According to the resolution that will be voted on today, the law firm representing Spokane County recommended the payments. Commissioner Todd Mielke said the county and attorneys representing the men came to a preliminary agreement within the past two weeks. "The thought is we're probably going to come out the same if we negotiate a settlement," Mielke said. The lawsuit that prompted the proposed settlement was filed after a news story in which Chicklinsky, Galliher and his brother, Brett, all alleged they had been sexually abused as teenagers - more than 20 years ago - by Hahn. They said the sheriff's deputy abused them while he was on duty, in uniform, and off duty when he would take them on outings after befriending their families. "Every time I see a cop in uniform, my heart really just starts pounding," Chicklinsky said in a series of interviews for the article. Chicklinsky and Galliher both declined to comment Monday on the proposed settlement. Their attorney, John Allison, was out of town and couldn't be reached for comment. The proposed settlement comes five months after Terry Lackie, a private attorney hired to represent the county, attempted to have the entire lawsuit dismissed as insufficient. Superior Court Judge Neal Rielly dismissed two of four plaintiffs and left intact a claim that the county, through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told Hahn was sexually abusing boys. The judge dismissed claims from Brett Galliher and another from a fourth defendant from Oklahoma who happened to be visiting Spokane when the June 2003 newspaper article about Hahn was published. The Oklahoma man alleged that Hahn had abused him, too, when he was a teenager living in Spokane. The judge ruled that the abuse against Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher occurred on separate occasions after the county and the Sheriff's Office knew or should have known about it. At the time of the abuse, Hahn's partner at the Sheriff's Office was Deputy Jim West. The two men also were co-leaders of a Boy Scout troop based on Spokane's South Hill. After the lawsuit was filed, Galliher said in a January 2004 letter to a counselor and in a April 2005 sworn deposition that he also was sexually abused in the late 1970s or early 1980s by West. That allegation and similar ones from former Boy Scouts who were in the Hahn-West troop in the late 1970s and early 1980s led to a lengthy investigation by The Spokesman-Review. That investigation resulted in a series of news stories, beginning May 5, 2005, after West had left his post as state Senate majority leader and been elected mayor of Spokane. West denied knowing that his friend Hahn had molested boys when the two served as deputies and Boy Scout leaders. West also emphatically denied he had ever molested anyone himself. LOAD-DATE: November 16, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

70 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) November 14, 2006 Tuesday Metro Edition

County may settle Hahn suit; $325,000 would go to two men who say deputy molested them;
BYLINE: Jonathan Brunt and Bill Morlin Staff writers SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 690 words Spokane County commissioners today will consider paying $325,000 to two men who say they were molested by a county sheriff's deputy in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The men filed a lawsuit in 2004 that alleges the county was negligent for the actions of Deputy David Hahn, in part because Hahn was allowed to keep his job even after his commanders were told that he abused boys. Under the deal being considered, Robert Galliher, now 37, would receive $225,000 and Douglas Chicklinsky, 41, would be paid $100,000, county documents say. The money would come from the county's risk pool, a fund dedicated to paying claims against the county. Hahn committed suicide Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36 after he was confronted at least a second time about the allegations. According to the resolution that will be voted on today, the law firm representing Spokane County recommended the payments. Commissioner Todd Mielke said the county and attorneys representing the men came to a preliminary agreement within the past two weeks. "The thought is we're probably going to come out the same if we negotiate a settlement," Mielke said. The lawsuit that prompted the proposed settlement was filed after a news story in which Chicklinsky, Galliher and his brother, Brett, all alleged they had been sexually abused as teenagers - more than 20 years ago - by Hahn. They said the sheriff's deputy abused them while he was on duty, in uniform, and off duty when he would take them on outings after befriending their families. "Every time I see a cop in uniform, my heart really just starts pounding," Chicklinsky said in a series of interviews for the article. Chicklinsky and Galliher both declined to comment Monday on the proposed settlement. Their attorney, John Allison, was out of town and couldn't be reached for comment. The proposed settlement comes five months after Terry Lackie, a private attorney hired to represent the county, attempted to have the entire lawsuit dismissed as insufficient. Superior Court Judge Neal Rielly dismissed two of four plaintiffs and left intact a claim that the county,

through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told Hahn was sexually abusing boys. The judge dismissed claims from Brett Galliher and another from a fourth defendant from Oklahoma who happened to be visiting Spokane when the June 2003 newspaper article about Hahn was published. The Oklahoma man alleged that Hahn had abused him, too, when he was a teenager living in Spokane. The judge ruled that the abuse against Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher occurred on separate occasions after the county and the Sheriff's Office knew or should have known about it. At the time of the abuse, Hahn's partner at the Sheriff's Office was Deputy Jim West. The two men also were co-leaders of a Boy Scout troop based on Spokane's South Hill. After the lawsuit was filed, Galliher said in a January 2004 letter to a counselor and in a April 2005 sworn deposition that he also was sexually abused in the late 1970s or early 1980s by West. That allegation and similar ones from former Boy Scouts who were in the Hahn-West troop in the late 1970s and early 1980s led to a lengthy investigation by The Spokesman-Review. That investigation resulted in a series of news stories, beginning May 5, 2005, after West had left his post as state Senate majority leader and been elected mayor of Spokane. West denied knowing that his friend Hahn had molested boys when the two served as deputies and Boy Scout leaders. West also emphatically denied he had ever molested anyone himself. West publicly said he would sue The Spokesman-Review - something he never did before dying of cancer 15 months later. West's conduct, including his use of City Hall computers to contact dates on a gay Web site and offers of city jobs and appointments, led to the lifelong Republican's recall. The City Council subsequently adopted a new ethics code and a streamlined process to recall a mayor. SIDEBAR: DEPUTY DAVID HAHN The sheriff's deputy and Scout leader committed suicide in 1981 at age 36 after he was confronted about sexual abuse allegations. LOAD-DATE: November 16, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

72 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Baltimore Sun (Maryland) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News October 31, 2006 Tuesday

Fair or not, blame rises to the top
BYLINE: Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun SECTION: LIFESTYLE LENGTH: 1933 words Oct. 31--Patricia Dunn is out. Joe Torre stays in. Dennis Hastert, for now, is hanging on. The high-profile jobs of chairing Hewlett-Packard's board of directors, managing the New York Yankees and running the U.S. House of Representatives could hardly differ more in their scope and meaning, but events of recent months have brought leaders of those institutions, and others, face-to-face with a law of human behavior older and more formidable than American corporate life itself. When crisis hits an organization, someone's going to pay the price. Few in ancient Jerusalem probably really believed that a hoofed mammal had caused their troubles for the previous 12 months, but that didn't keep the author of Leviticus from calling for a high priest to place his hands on a "scapegoat's" head once a year, confess upon it the sins of the Israelites, and drive the beast away to "bear upon [it] all their iniquities unto a land not inhabited" (16:22). To Ben Dattner, a professor of industrial and organizational psychology at New York University, little has changed. "How does the saying go?" he says. "'Heads are gonna roll?' or 'Somebody's gonna have to take the fall?' Sometimes it's justified and sometimes it's not, but when there's a major failure, lapse in judgment or some perceived lapse in ethics, people do want to see a single human agent held responsible." Bosses try to hang on too long. Top dogs only too happy to benefit from group success deny knowledge of what went on below them. Low-level managers might jump first or get pushed out. Responsibility and culpability don't always mesh. And leaders and those near them get caught up in organizational dynamics that, rational or not, might as well be stamped on our behavioral DNA. Harry Truman set the standard for accountability with that famous sign on his desk: "The buck stops here." But when failure strikes a group, be it corporation, sports team or branch of government, responsibility can seem as elusive as a greased football. President Bush accepted responsibility in September 2005 for what he termed the federal government's flawed response to Hurricane Katrina -- just about the time Michael Brown, the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency whom Bush had just commended, resigned in disgrace. Ravens football coach Brian Billick admitted to arrogance that had cost the team wins last year but remains boss. He let go his offensive coordinator recently, taking over that job after his team kept struggling to score points. Then there's Patricia C. Dunn. Two years ago, Hewlett-Packard Co., the Silicon Valley computer giant and the nation's 11th largest company, made her chairwoman of its board of directors. One of her first acts was to write a confidential document meant for board members only. A week later, to her dismay, an account of it appeared in The Wall Street Journal. She had a leaker on her hands. Dunn hired a team of private investigators to find the turncoat. To John Collard, an Annapolis-based corporate turnaround specialist, Dunn was only protecting her constituents' interests. "Boards report to stockholders," he says. "If there's any sort of wrongdoing that's going to hurt the company, she should take action." But, according to prosecutors, investigators behaved badly, setting up sting operations, rooting through trash and using false identities to obtain the phone records of board members and journalists. The California attorney general brought fraud and conspiracy charges against Dunn, another HP boss and three investigators. The scandal stunned Wall Street and triggered a purge of the company's upper ranks. Was Dunn responsible? She says no. "At no time in this investigation was I responsible for designing its

methods," she told a congressional panel looking into the matter. "I do not accept personal responsibility for what happened." "It's her best defense," said Jonathan Turley, a prominent commentator on legal issues. "Not ignorance of the laws [in question], but ignorance of the act." It's not the first time a business leader has offered such a rationale when something goes badly awry. Jeffrey K. Skilling, recently sentenced to more than 24 years, and the late Kenneth L. Lay argued vainly to a jury that they were unaware of underlings' actions that unraveled Enron Corp. Bernard J. Ebbers, the exchief executive of the former WorldCom Inc., sought to portray himself as a "country boy" intimidated by the workings of the global telecom giant he led -- before he, too, was sent to prison. And, in Maryland, William L. Jews, CEO of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, called himself a mere "potted plant" as the company sought to make changes that would net him and others millions in bonuses. At HP, however, as early as last February, an officer in the company's own security department had warned higher-ups that the private eyes were using methods that would damage the company's reputation and might be illegal. Dunn quit HP in late September at the urging of attorneys. She and the others could face up to 12 years each in prison. An ouster at the top can relieve pressure from within and without, create a symbolic fresh start or re-establish a sense of fairness. "Sometimes, whatever the facts prove to be," says Collard, president of Strategic Management Partners Inc., "if you're sufficiently damaged by events that you can't do your job, [resignation] is often the best choice." Under Mark Hurd, the new CEO, who is widely perceived as untouched by the scandal, HP's stock price has risen. In the harsh calculus of organizations, that may be all that matters. "As long as your company is doing very well," said Rob Enderle of the Enderle Group, a tech research firm in San Jose, Calif., "you are given an almost unlimited amount of latitude." If you're the owner of the New York Yankees and you've spent millions on your team, you believe that "Yankee fans, like Americans expect a winner." So when the Detroit Tigers, with their $82 million payroll, bounced George Steinbrenner's $198 million juggernaut from the American League playoffs this month, the Boss' wrath was all but biblical. The words weren't etched on tablets, but their meaning was clear. "I am deeply disappointed about our loss this year," he thundered in a statement. "We have to do better. And I deeply want a championship. It's about time." For days, he made it clear he was prepared to sacrifice his manager, fan favorite Joe Torre. Within the scope of his duties, Torre's 11 straight playoff finishes and four World Series wins were far above the norm. His kindly demeanor had calmed many an organizational storm and given a famously arrogant franchise a likable face. And don't players, not managers, win or lose ballgames? Torre "didn't get any atbats; he didn't throw any pitches" in the playoffs, pitcher Jaret Wright said in an interview. "We did." To Michael J. Burke, a professor of organizational behavior at Tulane University, bosses under fire should keep such a reasoned perspective. "You want [them] to branch out to gather more information, to examine the facts as others see them, to consider the meaning of [their] decisions to various constituent groups," he says. Too often, though, a bunker-style mentality kicks in. Dattner calls it "going with your dominant response, keeping your loyalists close, engaging in what's known in organizational psych as 'groupthink.'" Yankee fans recall the 1970s-era Steinbrenner, raging at his hapless "baseball people" and sacking manager Billy Martin just about whenever the mood hit. The 21st-century Steinbrenner calmed down long enough to consult other stakeholders -- loyal customers (most of whom love Torre), players such as Derek Jeter (another vote of confidence)and more, and withheld his sacrifice to baseball's gods. "You're back for another year," he told Torre on Oct. 10. "I expect a great deal from you. The responsibility is yours, Joe, and all of the Yankees.'"

Well, almost all the Yankees: Three days later, he sacked the team's two advance scouts. New scandals recycle images we've seen. "We have before us witnesses from Hewlett-Packard to discuss a plumbers operation that would make Richard Nixon blush," Michigan Democratic Rep. John D. Dingell told a congressional hearing last month. As he faced impeachment in 1974, Nixon faced a question that has become a benchmark of postmortem reassessment: "What did he know, and when did he know it?" As next week's elections loom, Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert is dogged by the same query -- one that also has been aimed at authority figures from President Ronald Reagan (Iran-Contra) and Cardinal Bernard Law (the priest sex-abuse scandal) to newsman Dan Rather (CBS' disgraced report on President Bush's military record), New York Times boss Howell Raines (Jayson Blair's fabrications) and Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld (prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib). Several witnesses have testified that Hastert, or at least members of his staff, were made aware long ago of inappropriate e-mails to teenage pages sent by Mark Foley, a former six-term Republican congressman from Florida. "I don't know enough yet to say if this is just another case of Democrats stirring a dirty pot," says Collard, whose "turnaround" clients have included Bush and his father, former President George H.W. Bush and former President Bill Clinton. "Certainly, with an election coming, the Democrats would love nothing more than to have Denny Hastert's head on a stick so they can parade it around and say, 'See? [Republicans] are like this guy. Vote for us.'" Unless Hastert knew of specifically actionable offenses and did nothing, he adds, the speaker shouldn't be on the hook. "How many people report to him? Hundreds. If some midlevel manager is caught embezzling, does the CEO resign? The answer is no." But in the post-Enron environment, Dattner takes a broader view. "Even if he or she isn't directly aware of those [offenses]," he says, "has a leader sent a clear message about ... what will or will not be tolerated? Did he or she have a chance to correct this kind of lapse before? It comes down to the kind of culture the leader established." Organizations redefine themselves at moments of crisis: An ouster at the top can signal a divorce from the past, a reckoning with error, a change in direction. It can rally, depress or divide the stakeholders. It can trigger a new search for truth or short-circuit the process altogether. "If a leader steps down, it may lessen the pressure for a root-cause analysis of what really happened," Dattner says. "Have you ever heard the [business] joke, 'The Six Phases of a Project?'" he asks with a laugh. "They are: Enthusiasm, Disillusionment, Panic, Search for the Guilty, Punishment of the Innocent and Rewards for Those Who Had Nothing to Do With It." Eons ago, long before congressional hearings, corporate trials and sports playoffs, an Old Testament prophet found hope in a similar absurdity. "Surely [the Messiah] took up our infirmities and carried our sorrows," said Isaiah (53: 4-5) in the book that bears his name. "Yet we [saw him as] stricken by God. ... The punishment that brought us peace was upon him. By his wounds, we are healed." To see more of The Baltimore Sun, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.baltimoresun.com. Copyright (c) 2006, The Baltimore Sun Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: November 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

ACC-NO: 20061031-BZ-LEADER-RESPONSIBILITY-20061031 PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: BZ Copyright 2006 The Baltimore Sun

73 of 265 DOCUMENTS Sarnia Observer (Ontario) October 28, 2006 Saturday

Puzzle to help keep kids safe
BYLINE: LINDSEY COAD, The Observer SECTION: NEWS; Pg. A1 LENGTH: 482 words She bottled up her emotion after being sexually assaulted at age five. Wendy Smith-Reeve was "scared, lost, confused and lonely," but she didn't speak out. Her male abuser was a friend of the family. "He told me no one would ever believe me because I was a kid," she recalled. Now a grown woman, Smith-Reeve is sharing her experience and building her self-esteem in the process. For the past 12 weeks, she joined nine other local abuse survivors for a collective goal to educate and safety train today's youth in a bid to reduce their vulnerability. It's a recovery model based on the premise that survivors have a wealth of wisdom to offer despite their trauma and it will be used by other local service agencies in the future. On Friday, she unveiled the end result of their hard and sometimes emotional work: a giant, colourful puzzle designed to boost kids' awareness. It prompts discussion about building body boundaries, feeling safe and how to approach trusted adults. "When I saw it unravel, I almost started to cry," Smith-Reeve said. "If I can help one child through these projects, I will be so gratified. I know we can never stop the abuse but if we can put a dent in it, that's important to me." The pilot project was one of three funded by a $200,000 grant from the Ministry of the Attorney General in 2004. It was sparked by a service gap for sex abuse survivors who live with a mental illness, said Michelle Batty, executive director of Sarnia-Lambton's Sexual Assault Survivors' Centre. "It truly is something to be proud of," Batty told the group. Her centre will use the prototype when it visits schools during its public education campaign, and distribute accompanying guides for teachers and parents.

Batty plans to apply for another grant in order to reproduce the prototype, so it can be used by counsellors and groups like Scouts and Guides throughout the city. She also wants to share the idea with other sexual assault centres in the province. The Knowledge is Power - Putting all the Pieces Togetherpuzzle was decided upon after social worker Denise McKinlay talked with agencies and clients about the biggest local needs. One of her top three recommendations was a pilot "social action project" that would create awareness. It also built the self-confidence of survivors who took part. Some were scared or anxious at first, but warmed to the idea when they realized they weren't alone. "I think it's really empowering to have a voice," said Gloria Large, 58, who was physically and sexually abused and has multiple personalities. "As a child, I was silenced. Silence is golden only for the perpetrators," Large said. She was excited to be part of the puzzle team because she wants hurting kids to reach out. "If that's all they live, that's normal. This is a puzzle that can teach them it's not OK to live that way. They don't deserve it." To contact the writer: lcoad@theobserver.ca LOAD-DATE: October 28, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Denise McKinlay, left, Michelle Batty and Gloria Large unveil the risk reduction resource puzzle. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Sarnia Observer All Rights Reserved

74 of 265 DOCUMENTS Deseret Morning News (Salt Lake City) October 21, 2006 Saturday

12-year Scout derby helper a registered sex offender
BYLINE: Jeremy Twitchell Deseret Morning News LENGTH: 411 words SPANISH FORK -- A situation in Spanish Fork is casting a shadow over a childhood favorite -- the Pinewood Derby. For the past 12 years, Chester Milburn and his imaginative racetracks have been a welcome addition to Pinewood Derby races held by local Cub Scout packs. Parents became upset last week after finding out Milburn is a registered sex offender -- and Milburn has

found himself haunted by a past he's tried to put behind him. "These parents that are upset, I think, are good LDS people," Milburn told the Deseret Morning News. "But they need to go back and study more about forgiveness and repentance." Shauna Warnick, a local Scouting committee leader, found out about Milburn's past in a committee meeting last Thursday and, like other parents, was immediately worried. "I was surprised and disappointed," said Warnick, from Spanish Fork. "The people who are supposed to communicate to us need to let us know things like this more quickly." In 1996, Milburn pleaded guilty to three counts of attempted sex abuse of a child and one count of attempted forcible sex abuse -- all third-degree felonies. Milburn paid a $2,000 fine and served 275 days in jail and three years of probation. Upon his successfully completing his probation in 1999, all four charges were amended to Class A misdemeanors. Milburn's victims were girls, and his probation did not include a ban on being around young men. For the past 12 years, Milburn and his family have operated Milburn Raceways, a small business that provides racetracks for Pinewood Derby competitions. Last week, Milburn received a letter from an attorney representing the Boy Scouts of America informing him that he could no longer for business purposes use the names "Pinewood Derby," "Raingutter Regatta" or "Space Derby," all of which are BSA-sponsored events. Milburn canceled all his scheduled races and considered selling his equipment, but after a potential buyer withdrew, he decided to investigate the matter and see if his family can continue to run the racing events under different names. Most of the races Milburn supplies are sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon), from which Milburn was excommunicated for his criminal offenses. Milburn said he has since been rebaptized and worked his way back to full activity in the church, and while he understands the concerns of parents, said he wishes they would be more supportive of his efforts to atone. E-mail: jtwitchell@desnews.com LOAD-DATE: October 21, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Deseret News Publishing Co.

75 of 265 DOCUMENTS Modesto Bee October 21, 2006 Saturday ALL EDITION

BISHOP BLAIRE
BYLINE: BY SUE NOWICKI, BEE STAFF WRITER

SECTION: LIFESTYLES; Pg. G1 LENGTH: 2100 words DATELINE: STOCKTON The leader of the Catholic Diocese of Stockton shares his thoughts on the pope, the priest shortage, pedophiles and much more, but stays mum on one subject -- his favorite meal *** The Most Rev. Stephen E. Blaire, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Stockton for more than five years, recently sat down with The Bee. In a wide-ranging interview, the 64-year-old discussed everything from his childhood to Santa Claus to pedophile priests to Pope Benedict XVI. Here, edited for space, are his comments: Q: Describe your childhood. A: My father had been married twice before he married my mother. The first family -- he had one child, and that whole family died out. Then he married the second Mrs. Blaire. They had 10 children and then she died. Then he married my mother. He was 59 years old at the time. I think she was 39. It was her first marriage. My mother was not able to conceive. We had a Chinese doctor, and he said, "I've got to give you some herbal treatments." By golly, she did conceive. I was the oldest of this last family of three children. We played a lot of games. In those days, your lives were not regulated as children. We were very creative -- one day, we'd create a store, and the next, we'd create a little travel agency. We played school. I'd have a magic show and used to have a little neighborhood newspaper. We were very imaginative as kids. Q: What kind of trouble did you get into as a child? A: I suppose one of the worst things I did is that I had a paper route, and one day I didn't feel like delivering them, so I took them down to the L.A. River and dumped all my papers in the river. I remember it caused so much trouble, I would never do it again. Q: What is one of your favorite family memories? A: The excitement of Christmas Eve, when I had to stay out of the kitchen as my parents were wrapping gifts. In those days, they didn't have midnight Mass, so we'd always go to the first Mass on Christmas morning. There was the excitement of the Mass and then getting home to open the gifts; we'd have to wait until we had breakfast!(laughs) Q: Did you believe in Santa Claus? A: Oh, yeah. I remember the day I said to my mother, "Is there really a Santa Claus?" And she hemmedhawed around. I think she didn't want my younger brother and sister to hear the answer. Q: Do you think it's a bad thing today for Catholic parents to let their children believe in Santa Claus? A: I don't think so. Probably it's a good thing growing up to realize that the magical things of childhood are just exactly that. I wonder if that isn't the first point in life when you begin dealing with reality and that all dreams don't come true. Q: Before becoming bishop, you lived all your life in Southern California. What do you like and dislike about living in the Central Valley? A: I do like living up here. I like the friendliness. When I lived in Los Angeles, I never knew my neighbors. I wasn't here a day and I met all my neighbors. So I like the atmosphere much better. There's nothing I don't like, but what I miss is that from where I lived in Los Angeles, I could be anywhere

in 20 minutes -- to downtown L.A., west L.A., Hollywood, all the theaters, the wide variety of options that you don't have in a smaller town. And I miss my friends, of course. Q: You said at one point that you'd like to double the number of priests in the diocese. How are you doing with that goal? A: Not very well. I think what I actually said was that we need to double the priests to staff new parishes and meet all the needs that exist. We have about 70 priests working in the parishes. We're going to ordain four more this next year. We have 11 seminarians that are associated with our diocese. Q: How will you address the priest shortage? A: There are two things we'll be paying more attention to. I think we'll be taking a new look at how we distribute priests. We're going to look more holistically -- are the priests fairly distributed around the diocese? The second thing we're going to spend some time looking at is developing more lay leadership. We'll be looking at maybe even lay pastoral associates. It's like at a doctor's office. Often now, you may or may not see the doctor. Even if you see the doctor, someone else will take your temperature and so forth beforehand. It's the same thing in the parish -- maybe someone will come in with a need and it may be that a trained lay person will be able to take care of that need. But if people want to see a priest, I think we have to make that option available. Q: How do you decide which priest to send to a parish? A: Our policy now is you apply to be pastor of the parish and a personnel board reviews the application. Then they generally send two representatives out to see what the needs of the parish are. It's not working well because the people of the parish don't tell you their needs; they tell you what they want. And nobody can measure up -- Jesus himself probably couldn't measure up. So we need a better system of identifying the needs of the parish. And we're talking about a new form of training for priests who want to be pastors, so when an opening occurs, only priests who have been through the program could apply. Not every priest wants to be a pastor or is capable of being a pastor. Q: Describe your typical day: A: I get up at 5 o'clock every morning. The first hour, I do my exercises. Then I clean up and have my breakfast. I read four papers every day -- The New York Times, The Modesto Bee, The Stockton Record and the San Francisco Chronicle. Then I spend an hour in prayer, and by then, it's 9 o'clock and I consider my workday beginning. I try not to interrupt that early-morning routine, except that I may have a Mass somewhere. There is no such thing as a standard day. Every day is very different. A lot of meetings. Today, I came in at 9 and got caught up on some paperwork. Then our administrative team met from 10 to 12. I went home for a bite to eat for lunch and put my laundry in the washer. Came back about a quarter to 1. Tried to catch up on phone calls and other things hanging fire. Then there was this appointment. At 2:30, I will meet with the vicar for the priests to go over all the personnel issues. I will try then to make some phone calls and leave about 5 to drive to Danville, where the deacons are having their retreat. I'll have dinner with the deacons and give them an hour update on what's going on in the diocese. Then in the morning (Saturday), I'll have Mass for them at 9:15 and will drive back here, come into the office and try to catch up on my work. I have a Mass at 4 o'clock with the charismatic youth. On Sunday, I have Mass at the cathedral at 9 o'clock. Then I have a Mass at noon at St. Linus, where we're dedicating a new rectory. Then we have awards for all the Scouts at 4 o'clock. But the following weekend would be very different. You never get caught up on work. Q: Where do you live?

A: I have a home in Stockton that belongs to the diocese. Q: Do you have someone who cooks for you? A: No. The cathedral is across the street, and I like eating dinner there. There are other priests there, and there are people. I like breakfast alone because I read four newspapers. But I like company at dinner. Q: What's your favorite meal? A: I will never tell you because if it appeared in the paper, every time I went to eat at someone's home, it would be served. I love food. I love Mexican food; I love Italian food. Q: When you get a day off, what do you do? A: Yesterday, I went to the doctor first. Then I had to stop at a parish for something that had to be done. Then I went home and wrote my homily for this weekend. But about 3 o'clock, I had a friend who came from Los Angeles who I haven't seen for quite a while, and we had a nice dinner and a nice visit. Every time, it's different. Sometimes I work in the yard, and sometimes I play golf. Q: What do you do when you get a week off? A: I have a priest friend in Los Angeles. We usually go away for two or three days to play a little golf. Then I spend another three days catching up with other people there. I still have friends from my first assignment. Q: Besides the Bible, do you have one or two other books that you enjoy, fiction or nonfiction? Have you read "The Da Vinci Code"? A: I have read it. I didn't care for it. I like to read theology. I'm studying a commentary on the relationship between Scripture and tradition. Interestingly enough, this is a commentary on the Vatican Council document on divine revelation, and it was written by a man named Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) (laughs). I like to read theology, and I like to study the Scriptures. I try to work my way through a couple of books of the Bible every year, where I study it in depth. I'm currently studying Acts of the Apostles. Q: You've spoken about meeting the new pope a few times and called him a gentle and very organized man who has a solid theology. Now that he's been pope for a few months, what do you think of him? A: I met him in Rome a few weeks ago. He's very, very cordial, and he takes a few moments to chat with you, and he asked about the diocese. He had been to San Francisco several years ago, so I explained where we were located. When he was Cardinal Ratzinger, I always found that when we visited Rome -- you visit every five years on an official visit and you visit the congregations there -- I always found his was the best organized, and he would always have important points to go over. Then he always wanted to hear from you, and he would listen carefully. I was always impressed by that. Q: Is there anything you would like to see him do or address? A: I think there are issues the church has to address, but for him, personally, I think his talks and homilies are very profound. It's said that people used to go to Rome to see Pope John Paul II, but they go to listen to Ratzinger. I like reading his little addresses to people because they're usually very well thought out and based on scholarship. I'd like to see him create some better structures for the universal church to dialogue. Q: How do you feel the diocese is doing regarding the priest sex abuse issue? A: I think our diocese has done well in addressing the issue. I'm part of a national committee to see what kind of education we should provide for children. We don't want to put any burden on children as if it's their fault to protect themselves against abuse. So how much information do you give children? What kind of training do you give parents?

There are some dioceses that have not settled their cases, like Los Angeles. But we've settled our cases here. We've just got a couple that we have to work out the technicalities. Of course, you don't know who will come forward tomorrow. Q: Are there other steps you think need to be taken? A: I think the most important thing is to protect children. That's the No. 1 responsibility we have. I think we've taken the right steps. Do we need to improve the quality of what we're doing? Oh, yes. We still have to keep working at it, supervising it, training teachers, training parents. We'll never stop training. Q: What's your greatest challenge as bishop? A: I think it's to meet the pastoral needs of the people. You have this ever-growing Catholic population and fewer number of priests available, so how do we meet the pastoral needs of the people? Q: What's your greatest joy? A: I like going out to the parishes, celebrating Mass in the community and meeting the people. Q: Pastors are appointed for six-year renewable terms. Do bishops have terms, or is it for life? A: We're appointed forever (laughs). Actually, now bishops are asked to submit their resignations at the age of 75. That's not to say you can't submit it sooner. (laughs again) Q: Do you have something else that you'd like to do before you retire? A: No. I like being bishop. I like what we're involved in. But does it have headaches? Indeed it does. Does it have frustrating days? Indeed it does. But on the other hand, it gives you an opportunity to do some wonderful things. Q: What's your greatest passion? What would you like to see done or do yourself if you could? A: I enjoy preaching and teaching. What I'd like to see are parishes that are functioning well and alive -where the liturgy is well-celebrated, where people are involved, where people feel at home in their parishes, where they can go to get their needs met. To me, the infallible sign of a good parish is that if someone is hurting, the first place they think of going is to their parish. If that's happening, I am happy. Bee staff writer Sue Nowicki can be reached at 578-2012 or snowicki@modbee.com. LOAD-DATE: October 22, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: (JOAN BARNETT LEE / THE BEE) It's hard to assess parish needs, Blaire says. Ask about needs and you often hear about wants. 'And nobody can measure up -- Jesus himself probably couldn't measure up.' Bishop Blaire says he has no such thing as a typical day, though most days have one thing in common -- a lot of meetings. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 McClatchy Newspapers, Inc. All Rights Reserved

76 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Salt Lake Tribune

October 21, 2006 Saturday

Repentant sex offender complies, ends association with Scouts
BYLINE: By Jason Bergreen The Salt Lake Tribune SECTION: LOCAL LENGTH: 497 words For more than 12 years, Chester Milburn helped organize pinewood derby races for Boy Scout troops, church groups and other Utah organizations. But last week, the 60-year-old Spanish Fork man received a letter from a lawyer with the Boy Scouts of America informing him he was not welcome at their events because he is a registered sex offender. A former Boy Scout himself, Milburn was convicted in 1996 on three class A misdemeanor charges of attempted sexual abuse of a child and one class A misdemeanor charge of attempted forcible sex abuse. The children involved were former neighborhood girls between the ages of seven and 14, Milburn said during a phone interview with the Salt Lake Tribune. For his crimes, Milburn said he served nine months in jail, completed three years of probation, paid a $2,000 fine and underwent therapy for about two years. Afterwards, he returned to his hobby of renting and setting up pinewood derby courses for youth groups. He advertised his pinewood derby services on his Web site at http://www .milburnraceways.com. On Oct. 13, Milburn posted a message on his Web site stating he was disposing of his equipment and had cancelled all scheduled racing events. Quitting was his response to the BSA lawyer's cease and desist letter he had received two days earlier. "They really don't want me at the Scout events," Milburn said. John Gailey, a spokesman for the Utah National Parks Council of the Boy Scouts of America, said before the lawyer's letter was sent, Milburn was verbally warned several times to stop attending Boy Scout events. "The safety of our youth members and participants is our highest priority," Gailey said. "We choose to err on the side of caution when determining who has access to our members. Registered sex offenders are not allowed to register as a volunteer, nor participate in scouting events or functions." Once the BSA discovered Milburn was renting tracks to troops, another letter was sent to the 36 Boy Scout districts stretching from Draper to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon warning members about Milburn, Gailey said. Though disappointed, Milburn said he understands BSA's point of view and those expressed by others who feel it's not appropriate for him to be around minors. Milburn said he continued promoting the pinewood derby events because he enjoyed watching others have fun. He said his job consisted of setting up the race track and taking it down. During the races he stood near the head of the track. "I always tried to make myself visible," he said. "I've never done anything wrong at events . . .. I'm not looking for other victims." No complaints were ever filed against Milburn accusing him of abusing Boy Scouts, Gailey said. And though Milburn's Web site is now closing down, his past record and mug shot still hangs prominently on another Internet Web site: The official state of Utah sex offender registry. "I'm sorry about what I did years ago and I'm sorry about this now," Milburn said.

jbergreen@sltrib.com LOAD-DATE: October 21, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Chester MilburnShuts down site PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Salt Lake Tribune All Rights Reserved

77 of 265 DOCUMENTS Deseret Morning News (Salt Lake City) October 20, 2006 Friday

Scout helper an abuser
BYLINE: Jeremy Twitchell Deseret Morning News LENGTH: 557 words SPANISH FORK -- A situation in Spanish Fork is casting a shadow over a childhood favorite -- the Pinewood Derby. For the past 12 years, Chester Milburn and his imaginative racetracks have been a welcome addition to Pinewood Derby races held by local Cub Scout packs. Parents became upset last week after finding out Milburn is a registered sex offender -- and Milburn has found himself haunted by a past he's tried to put behind him. "These parents that are upset, I think, are good LDS people," Milburn told the Deseret Morning News. "But they need to go back and study more about forgiveness and repentance." Shauna Warnick, a local Scouting committee leader, found out about Milburn's past in a committee meeting last Thursday and, like other parents, was immediately worried. "I was surprised and disappointed," said Warnick, from Spanish Fork. "The people who are supposed to communicate to us need to let us know things like this more quickly." In 1996, Milburn pleaded guilty to three counts of attempted sex abuse of a child and one count of attempted forcible sex abuse -- all third-degree felonies. Milburn paid a $2,000 fine and served 275 days in jail and three years of probation. Upon his successfully completing his probation in 1999, all four charges were amended to Class A misdemeanors. Milburn's victims were girls, and his probation did not include a ban on being around young men. For the past 12 years, Milburn and his family have operated Milburn Raceways, a small business that provides racetracks for Pinewood Derby competitions. Their tracks were also used in the film "Down and

Derby," a comedy about Pinewood Derbies that was released last year by local media distributor Excel Entertainment Group. Last week, Milburn received a letter from an attorney representing the Boy Scouts of America informing him that he could no longer for business purposes use the names "Pinewood Derby," "Raingutter Regatta" or "Space Derby," all of which are BSA-sponsored events. Milburn canceled all his scheduled races and considered selling his equipment, but after a potential buyer withdrew, he decided to investigate the matter and see if his family can continue to run the racing events under different names. Most of the races Milburn supplies are sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon), from which Milburn was excommunicated for his criminal offenses. Milburn said he has since been rebaptized and worked his way back to full activity in the church, and while he understands the concerns of parents, said he wishes they would be more supportive of his efforts to atone. Warnick said the reaction to Milburn is not meant to be an attack on him. "I don't want to be inflammatory or accusatory of him at all," she said. "I just want to protect our children." Milburn said he is sorry for what he did and willing to accept any personal consequences, but he is worried about the effect this situation will have on his family. "My past -- I think about it every day," he said. "I think of what I've done to mess up my life." Warnick said Milburn is good at what he does, but she was pleased to hear that local leaders asked him to stop. "He runs a good operation ... I just think that if he's on the sex offender registry, he ought not to have any dealings with children," she said. E-mail: jtwitchell@desnews.com LOAD-DATE: October 20, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Deseret News Publishing Co.

82 of 265 DOCUMENTS Ottawa Citizen October 12, 2006 Thursday Final Edition

The Best of CanWest: Online extras available for seven-day subscribers
BYLINE: The Ottawa Citizen SECTION: NEWS; Pg. A2 LENGTH: 328 words

These stories, from CanWest papers across the country, are available exclusively online for seven-day subscribers at www.ottawacitizen.com. Hard to Believe In an age of globalization and the erosion of religious values, it's difficult for young people to develop beliefs. Sometimes they have a tougher time because they have no religious background at all. A recent Montreal conference discussed matters of belief, ranging from figuring out their spiritual values to the dullness of traditional religion. By the Montreal Gazette's Donna Nebenzahl. Searching for Bobby Orr How might things have turned out differently had Montreal Canadiens scout Scotty Bowman lured a 13year-old Bobby Orr from his Parry Sound home, or if the Leafs hadn't turned up their noses at the prodigious young talent? In his new book Searching for Bobby Orr, author Stephen Brunt looks at the career of one of the most talented players to lace on skates. By the Montreal Gazette's Dave Stubbs. Fingering Out Talent Superior athletic ability and love of exercise may, literally, be at your fingertips. British researchers have found women whose ring fingers are longer than their index fingers achieve higher levels in sports, particularly running, soccer and tennis, and that sporting potential may be the product not of random hormones, but inherited genes. By the Edmonton Journal's Chris Zdeb. Also on the Web for Seven-Day Subscribers Risky Treatment: Study suggests anti-psychotic drugs aren't worth the risk for Alzheimer's patients. Socialist in the Senate: For 30 years a party of one, Congressman Bernie Sanders seems likely to ascend to the U.S. Senate. How Bankrupt? A fourth Roman Catholic diocese in the U.S. tries to dodge liability for sex abuse. Baby Shopping: Whose interests are really served when rich westerners adopt Third World children? Democrats Pony Up: But Republican senators are stingy in donations to colleagues seeking re-election. To subscribe to The Citizen, call 613-596-1950 LOAD-DATE: October 12, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Photo: (See hard copy for photo description.) DOCUMENT-TYPE: General PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Ottawa Citizen, a division of CanWest MediaWorks Publication Inc. All Rights Reserved

84 of 265 DOCUMENTS Tulsa World (Oklahoma)

September 27, 2006 Wednesday Final Home Edition

Gala benefits tuition assistance program in Catholic schools
BYLINE: DANNA SUE WALKER World Scene Writer SECTION: Social; Pg. D2 LENGTH: 584 words An Italian feast awaits those attending the third annual St. Francis of Assisi Tuition Assistance Gala at 6 p.m. Oct. 4 at Holy Family Cathedral, 122 W. Eighth St. The evening will begin with a prayer service followed by a gourmet dinner and program in a huge tent located on the Holy Family grounds. Julie M. Fenster, co-author of the best selling autobiography "Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism," is the keynote speaker. Because of the priest sex abuse scandal, the author says she was compelled to give a fresh perspective on the history of the priesthood. The book's subject, McGivney, was a beloved 19th century American-born priest who founded the Knights of Columbus. He was a dedicated parish priest who worked tirelessly to overcome the barriers brought on by poverty and prejudice. Her additional works include "Race of the Century" and "Ether Day." Gala chairs are Tom and Karen Nally, and Steve and Mary Kevin McNamara. Team leaders include John Johnson, Todd Goldsmith, Ken Brune, the Rev. Matt Gerlach, John Condon, Janet Pagano, Bob and Margie Huffman, John and Linda Vestring, Kip and Pat Leikam, Mike and Claudia Harveth, and Doug and Debbie Tally. The original sponsors of the St. Francis of Assisi Tuition Assistance Trust are PennWell Corp., and the P.C. and Frances Lauinger Catholic Education Endowment established by their children. Major donors for the event are Alan R. Staab and Sharon D. Voskuhl, Joseph and Kathy Craft, Randy and Jean Foutch, Steve and Mary Kevin McNamara, Tom and Karen Nally, and Mrs. Robert J. Stanton. Additional sponsors are Nick and Barbara Allen, Ken Brune, F&M Bank and Trust, Judith Smith, Jack and Jane Charon, John W. Condon Family, Mr. and Mrs. W.K. Dunbar, Marge and John Gaberino Jr., Mike and Claudia Harveth, Mary Kathleen Keith, Mike and Gina Lodes, Moran Family Foundation, Bob LaFortune, Mag Sullivan, Janet Pagano, Pat and Kip Leikam, Lloyd Whitley, Bill and Cathrine Sheehan, Bishop Kelley High School and Cascia Hall Preparatory School. Also, Apache Corp., Ken and Pat Fike, Tim and Margaret Clark, Bob and Jeanne Sullivan, and Amy and Mike Westbrook. DeWayne Crawl is the evening's designer and event planner. Chef Drew Flatt of the Doubletree Hotel at Warren Place is in charge of the menu. Pianist Donald Ryan will play. Monsignor Gregory Gier and the Rev. Matt Gerlach are in charge of the prayer service. The Most Rev. Edward J. Slattery, bishop of the Diocese of Tulsa, will preside during the prayer service. The presentation of colors will be provided by Indian Nations Council of Boy Scouts Pack and Troop 173, School of St. Mary's. Chorale ensembles from Cascia Hall and Bishop Kelley will perform. Proceeds from the event will benefit students attending 12 Catholic schools in Tulsa, including Bishop Kelley and Cascia Hall. The gala has raised more than $150,000 in the past and has helped boost tuition assistance. For the school year 2006-2007, 496 students applied for assistance, and $242,250 has been distributed.

Historically, some 93 percent of the students who are awarded a scholarship complete their enrollment in the Catholic school of their choice. For tickets to the gala, call Paula Coyne at the chancery at 294-1904, or e-mail sfoa.gala@dioceseoftulsa.org. Cost is $100 per person, and dress is business casual. Donations can also be mailed to Diocese of Tulsa, St. Francis Gala, P.O. Box 690240, Tulsa, OK 74169-0240. Danna Sue Walker 581-8342 dannasue.walker@tulsaworld.com LOAD-DATE: September 28, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Tulsa World

85 of 265 DOCUMENTS Tulsa World (Oklahoma) Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News September 27, 2006 Wednesday

Tulsa World, Okla., Danna Sue Walker column: Gala benefits tuition assistance program in Catholic schools
BYLINE: Danna Sue Walker, Tulsa World, Okla. SECTION: LIFESTYLE LENGTH: 622 words Sep. 27--An Italian feast awaits those attending the third annual St. Francis of Assisi Tuition Assistance Gala at 6 p.m. Oct. 4 at Holy Family Cathedral, 122 W. Eighth St. The evening will begin with a prayer service followed by a gourmet dinner and program in a huge tent located on the Holy Family grounds. Julie M. Fenster, co-author of the best selling autobiography "Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism," is the keynote speaker. Because of the priest sex abuse scandal, the author says she was compelled to give a fresh perspective on the history of the priesthood. The book's subject, McGivney, was a beloved 19th century American-born priest who founded the Knights of Columbus. He was a dedicated parish priest who worked tirelessly to overcome the barriers brought on by poverty and prejudice. Her additional works include "Race of the Century" and "Ether Day." Gala chairs are Tom and Karen Nally, and Steve and Mary Kevin McNamara.

Team leaders include John Johnson, Todd Goldsmith, Ken Brune, the Rev. Matt Gerlach, John Condon, Janet Pagano, Bob and Margie Huffman, John and Linda Vestring, Kip and Pat Leikam, Mike and Claudia Harveth, and Doug and Debbie Tally. The original sponsors of the St. Francis of Assisi Tuition Assistance Trust are PennWell Corp., and the P.C. and Frances Lauinger Catholic Education Endowment established by their children. Major donors for the event are Alan R. Staab and Sharon D. Voskuhl, Joseph and Kathy Craft, Randy and Jean Foutch, Steve and Mary Kevin McNamara, Tom and Karen Nally, and Mrs. Robert J. Stanton. Additional sponsors are Nick and Barbara Allen, Ken Brune, F&M Bank and Trust, Judith Smith, Jack and Jane Charon, John W. Condon Family, Mr. and Mrs. W.K. Dunbar, Marge and John Gaberino Jr., Mike and Claudia Harveth, Mary Kathleen Keith, Mike and Gina Lodes, Moran Family Foundation, Bob LaFortune, Mag Sullivan, Janet Pagano, Pat and Kip Leikam, Lloyd Whitley, Bill and Cathrine Sheehan, Bishop Kelley High School and Cascia Hall Preparatory School. Also, Apache Corp., Ken and Pat Fike, Tim and Margaret Clark, Bob and Jeanne Sullivan, and Amy and Mike Westbrook. DeWayne Crawl is the evening's designer and event planner. Chef Drew Flatt of the Doubletree Hotel at Warren Place is in charge of the menu. Pianist Donald Ryan will play. Monsignor Gregory Gier and the Rev. Matt Gerlach are in charge of the prayer service. The Most Rev. Edward J. Slattery, bishop of the Diocese of Tulsa, will preside during the prayer service. The presentation of colors will be provided by Indian Nations Council of Boy Scouts Pack and Troop 173, School of St. Mary's. Chorale ensembles from Cascia Hall and Bishop Kelley will perform. Proceeds from the event will benefit students attending 12 Catholic schools in Tulsa, including Bishop Kelley and Cascia Hall. The gala has raised more than $150,000 in the past and has helped boost tuition assistance. For the school year 2006-2007, 496 students applied for assistance, and $242,250 has been distributed. Historically, some 93 percent of the students who are awarded a scholarship complete their enrollment in the Catholic school of their choice. For tickets to the gala, call Paula Coyne at the chancery at 294-1904, or e-mail sfoa.gala@dioceseoftulsa.org. Cost is $100 per person, and dress is business casual. Donations can also be mailed to Diocese of Tulsa, St. Francis Gala, P.O. Box 690240, Tulsa, OK 74169-0240. Copyright (c) 2006, Tulsa World, Okla. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: September 27, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060927-TU-0927-Tulsa-World-Okla-Danna-Sue-Walker-column PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: TU Copyright 2006 Tulsa World

86 of 265 DOCUMENTS The New York Post September 22, 2006 Friday

NO BLARNEY: JACKO EYES LEPRECHAUN PARK
BYLINE: Lukas I. Alpert SECTION: All Editions; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 167 words Michael Jackson's love for little people knows no bounds. The Gloved One is reportedly scouting around Ireland for an estate where he can open an amusement park with - no joke - a possible leprechaun theme. "Michael is deadly serious about this idea," an anonymous source told The Irish Daily Mirror. "He loves the whole idea of leprechauns and the magic and myths of Ireland." The source, who estimated the park would cost around $635 million, added that Jacko has "always wanted to open his own theme park and he thinks Ireland is the perfect place and it will be built around the leprechaun theme." The paper says the cash-strapped, globetrotting singer has been meeting with Irish businessmen to raise the money. Jackson - who owns a child-theme park built around his Neverland Ranch in California - has not been seen much in the United States since he was acquitted on kid sex-abuse charges in 2005. Instead, His Weirdness has been spotted primarily in the Middle Eastern nation of Bahrain. LOAD-DATE: September 22, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 N.Y.P. Holdings, Inc. All Rights Reserved

87 of 265 DOCUMENTS Sunday Mail September 10, 2006, Sunday

WE'RE NO 1 IN SCOTLAND 488,650 UP 17875
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 10 LENGTH: 145 words ONCE again your support has made us the biggest-selling newspaper in Scotland. Official figures show we sold an average of 488,650 every week in August - an increase of 17,875 on the previous month. And that's just at home - we sold 533,776 including sales outside Scotland. It proves you love our exclusive news and sports stories, witty columnists and our sevendays and Right at Home mags. (The London-based News of the World limped in 180,000 behind us with sales of 307,903, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation figures for August 2006.) NO. 1 FOR NEWS Tragedy of troops dead in plane crash Scout leader's kid sex abuse shame Sweet Sixteen star gets gunned down Teen football star held in shooter rap NO. 1 FOR SPORT Neil Lennon opens his heart to Mail Arsenal's bid for Killie star Naismith NO. 1 FOR COLUMNS Comic and actress Elaine C. Smith Writer and radio host Alison Craig LOAD-DATE: September 10, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Scottish Daily Record & Sunday Mail Ltd.

88 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Gold Coast Bulletin (Australia) September 9, 2006 Saturday Main Edition

GOLD COAST HONOURS NOMINEES
SECTION: Pg. 127 LENGTH: 10721 words The fourth Gold Coast Honours awards will be held at the Marriott Surfers Paradise on Wednesday, September 20. It's a five-star night at a bargain price. Call the Marriott direct to book your ticket. On these five pages we detail the nominees in each category COMMUNITY SALLY JACOBS: A director of Breastscreen Queensland's Gold Coast service, she is described as a passionate, compassionate and dedicated person who goes above the call of duty and is a role model for the service. She also supports sexual assault victims and is a Schoolies volunteer. LOIS LEVY: She has protested, campaigned and rallied, and will do everything to protect her beloved Gold Coast. In 1989, she co-founded the Gold Coast and Hinterland Environment Council (Gecko) to help protect the region's natural wonders. MARION YORK: Head co-ordinator with Sport and Recreation for disabled athletes and president of the Queensland Special Olympics, she is now organising the Special Olympics national games and has worked for disabled athletes for 16 years. JOHN KNIGHT: As Dr James Wright is Australia's best-known GP. In 1973 he set up Medi-Aid, a foundation to help elderly battlers find comfortable homes, bought dozens of units on the Gold Coast and houses up to 600 people at half-price rent. BOB NANCARROW: A retired volunteer worker, he has spent hundreds of volunteer hours restoring and arranging displays of artefacts for the Gold Coast Historical Museum at Bundall. His carpentry skills have proved invaluable to the society. He delights in hosting school groups and in 2005 was elected president. NATASHA EDWARDS: A director of the Swell Sculpture Festival, she was determined to build art and culture on the Gold Coast by providing a free outdoor sculpture festival. BILL HOYER The chairman of the Gold Coast Project for Homeless Youth, he has worked for the welfare of disadvantaged Aboriginal youth since 1971, is on the community advisory committee for the Numinbah Correctional Centre, and is now working to house homeless young people in the city. JULIA WILKINS: She has raised more than $100,000 for the Leukaemia Foundation, speaks at schools and clubs and mentors less experienced charity ambassadors. She runs sausage sizzles, sells raffle tickets and does whatever she can to raise funds. SUSIE CHRISTIE:

She works for charities including Rosies as a street worker; works for the Hear and Say Centre; organises volunteers to work at the Bridge to Brisbane fun run; works for Opportunity International to help povertystricken Timor; helps the Sujit Foundation organise supplies for Fiji to house orphaned boys; and helps the National Breast Cancer Foundation. FRANCIS HICKMAN-SMITH: He created the seniors golf club at the Merrimac Seniors Golf Club, where he has been captain, secretary and sponsor for 14 years. He provides his home for functions and provides great pleasure to more than 40 members. JOY CONEYBEAR: In 2004, she had a stroke that paralysed her left side. She underwent an emergency stent procedure that had not been performed in Australia before and went on to amaze doctors with her recovery, being released from hospital a month after the stroke. MICHELLE GABRIEL: The outgoing president of the Gold Coast branch of the Queensland Association for Gifted and Talented Children, an organisation to support the families of gifted children, she works tirelessly to gain better outcomes for these children. DARRYL GREGOR: The founding partner of Southport's The Eye Centre, he is an internationally recognised cataract and refractive surgeon, a benefactor of the Bond University Medical School and one of the first ophthalmologists in Australia to perform laser eye surgery. BRAD HOLMES: He teaches disabled children to surf, including deaf and blind children, and teaches tai chi and Qigong to children, all for free. He teaches students aged four to 66, using a special craft to work with paraplegics and sign language to communicate with the hearing-impaired. RON DICKSON: He was the man who had a large role in securing the Champ Car race on the streets of Surfers Paradise in 1991, which became Indy and helped introduce motor sport to the Gold Coast. JOAN REED: She provides tea and coffee every morning for early-morning walkers at Burleigh Beach, a daily ritual for the past 15 years. LIONEL BARDEN: He established the Gold Coast Abused Child Trust in 1997, and secured land from the Gold Coast City Council and raised funds to build a centre for the children at Labrador. BILL FRY: A sports massage therapist who is known as 'Singing Fingers', he was trainer and masseuse for the Seagulls Rugby League Club during the 1970s and now operates from the Tugun Surf Lifesaving Club, helping many lifesaving stars.

LARRY DAWSON: He founded the ManKind Project in Australia which offers training and support to men to develop lives of integrity, accountability, and connection to feeling. It challenges men to develop their abilities as leaders, fathers and elders. LAURIE KELLY: He started Chevron After Hours medical service in 1981, makes himself available to the community 24 hours a day, is practice principal of three surgeries and believes everyone should be entitled to good health care. JEANNIE WALLACE: A 'chronic volunteer', she works for Queensland Swimming and has represented the Gold Coast in Sydney and Melbourne at national events at her own expense. She is a volunteer guest speaker for community groups. ALAN MCFARLANE: President of Coomera Soccer Club, he also coaches, runs the club, works full-time and puts together a golf charity day to raise thousands for Queensland skin cancer. ANGELA DRISCOLL: She has been involved in youth forums and community consultation forums; co-ordinates the Chill Out zones in Surfers Paradise; started Expressive Ground, a safe place for young people to hang out; and is a foster mum to troubled teens. NOEL REYNOLDS: He cares for two elderly residents and looks after his elderly neighbours. He paints, mows, shops and phones to check they are all right. FIONA MCCARTHY: The 28-year-old works for AFL Queensland, referees junior games, runs programs all over southeast Queensland, volunteers with the Nobby Beach Surf Lifesaving Club and is a volunteer crew member with the Westpac Rescue helicopter. KAREN SMITH: An exercise physiologist, she started as program co-ordinator for the late Dr Geoff Cornish in a walking program for people with cardiac, lung or circulatory problems. She runs two early-morning walking programs. BRUCE CURTIS: He co-ordinates the largest junior hockey club in Australia and introduced junior Minkey hockey, an innovative hockey coaching program, to 16 local schools. He was a key driver of the development of hockey fields at Labrador and is president of the Labrador Junior Hockey Club. BETTE BEARD: She was involved with the first shopping centre to provide a free Justice of the Peace service at Ashmore City Shopping Centre. Is dedicated to the service and turns up every week without fail. PAUL STEVENS: He is the chairman of the VIII Nation Games Organising Committee and is responsible for organising the 2006 Special Olympics Games on the Gold Coast. The former chief executive of the Gold Coast City Council has devoted himself to community service in his retirement. RAYLEE TAYLOR: A retired TAFE hairdressing teacher, she has devoted the past 12 years to youth suicide prevention and

is chairperson and founder of Care for Life. She is associated with Compassionate Friends bereaved by suicide and with a Rotary suicide prevention committee. LILLY KEY: The 71-year-old is always helping her elderly neighbours, walking an 80-year-old neighbour's dog, while cooking meals for another neighbour, organising him to attend lunches with a community group and mending his clothes. She also drives around many neighbours who need transport. STEVE GRATION: The Save Our Spit alliance president, he led the fight and organised rallies to prevent a cruise ship terminal at the Spit and is involved with the Main Beach Progress Association. HELEN PURVIS: A community nurse who provides home visits, she has cared for, listened to, treated, loved, washed, cleaned for and looked after patients all over the Gold Coast for 15 years and is on call 24 hours a day and weekends. KYLIE MITCHELL-SMITH: The creative director of the Swell Sculpture Festival at Currumbin, her motto is getting art to the people and she has turned an idea for an inspiring outdoor public arts festival into a unique cultural event that attracts the world's best artists. JAMES PARK: The employment consultant for the House With No Steps, a facility for people with physical disabilities, he has guided and encouraged many of the service's clients and nothing is ever too much trouble. JULIANA TING: A Carrara pharmacist who makes all her customers feel special, she provides old-fashioned service and is a respected businesswoman. DEBBIE TAYLOR: The manager of the St Vincent de Paul shop in Southport, she is caring, compassionate and goes the extra mile for everyone, treating her customers as VIPs. SALLY GREGORY: The national vice-president (Queensland) of the Australian Bravery Association, she supports bravery medal-holders who have suffered personal loss or extreme trauma due to their heroism. JUNE JONES: She is a volunteer at the Red Cross in Surfers Paradise despite no longer driving and having difficulty walking. She makes arts and crafts to sell in the shop. MOYRA GALTON: She has raised more than $40,000 in the past four years for the Queensland Cancer Fund. She has helped many local cancer patients and their families. COLIN PERINI: A local seascape artist, he tries to bring beauty into people's lives and his 10.5m seascape at Gold Coast Airport at Coolangatta called The Sea Sings to My Heart greets tourists to the city. KIRI STINSON: Through the Gold Coast Gives campaign, a program initiated by the Gold Coast City Council, she has strengthened the support of local government with community organisations including the donation of hundreds of pieces of ex-council furniture.

PAUL GALE: He rallies donations from local businesses and residents via Radio station Sea FM and has taken part in charity fundraisers like a gruelling run from Coolangatta to Southport and up the Q1 building. ROBERT MARKS: For 11 years he has printed a Carrara, Southport and Hinterland community newsletter, covering information on local council issues, and has often delivered them himself. PAUL TAYLOR: The volunteer chairman of the Kurrawa Surf Lifesaving Supporters Association board of directors has performed countless volunteer hours spearheading the direction of community involvement with the club and has helped it achieve many awards. TRISH WAGHORN: The manager of the St Vincent de Paul shop at Nerang, she also attends university to obtain her chaplaincy qualifications and looks after the poor, sick, elderly and prisoners. MOIRA MORRISON: She donates her original oil paintings to charities including the Queensland Cancer Fund, Barnardos, local surf clubs, the Leukaemia Foundation, police social clubs, Volunteer Marine Rescue and Coast Guards, and World Vision. BOB PANTER: He has been involved in cycling since 1975. The prominent cycling trainer has been a mentor to riders like Robbie McEwen and encourages and helps young sportspeople. He has also been associated with the Southport High School P and C Association for 15 years. BILL HECK: He has been involved with numerous organisations including the Beenleigh Historical Society, Opera in the Cane Fields, Beenleigh PCYC, Cantabile Singers, Cane Quest, Trinder Park Aged Home, Woongoolba State School, Woongoolba Bowls Club and Beenleigh-Yatala Chamber of Commerce. MARIANNE GEVERS: She volunteers her time on the reference committee on elderly abuse prevention in Queensland and on the Gold Coast, is secretary of the Committee on the Ageing, secretary of Toastmasters, president of Alzheimers Australia Gold Coast, and vice-president of Alzheimers Australia Queensland. KEITH TAYLOR: He is a committed teacher of first aid and few have his skills, experience, knowledge and dedication. He has taught more than 20,000 students since 1997 for the Queensland Ambulance Service. JENNIFER PURDY: She runs Gold Coast Panache magazine, Australia's longest running city magazine, and her People's Choice awards contribute to the colour and image of the Gold Coast.

CARLITA KEENE: With her husband Brian, she performs for many retirement villages and musical clubs from Brisbane to Murwillumbah and anywhere their music can be appreciated by older people. COMMUNITY (Cont'd) RICHARD ANDERSON: He has planted many trees and bushes and made bush tracks in a plantation in Nerang which provide joy to locals, He also keeps the area tidy, weeded and sprayed. LANCE FOLEY: He has worked with youth, especially at-risk youth, and disadvantaged families since 1987. He has been the area co-ordinator of the Neighbourhood Watch group in Palm Beach since 1991 and is the chaplain at Miami High School and Caningeraba State School. BILL AUSTIN: An opthalmologist for 26 years, he is described as a beautiful, gentle man with an old-fashioned and caring bedside manner. In 1976, he started the Western Queensland Eye Service, travelling to care for people in remote areas and despite his own ill health, practises three days a week and as a volunteer with the Gold Coast Palliative Care Group. PETER LINNELL: For many years, he volunteered with the Gold Coast branch of the State Emergency Service and sacrificed much family time to help in crisis situations. Now the SES controller for Gold Coast City Council, his dedication ensures the service is one of the most effective voluntary emergency services in the state. JOAN RACKLEY: She started the Burleigh Heads Amateur Swimming Club in 1954 before building and running the existing pool, was on the inaugural Burleigh Heads Kindergarten committee and worked tirelessly to buy the land where the kindergarten was completed. She was also on the inaugural committee of the Burleigh Heads Golf Club and remains a member 51 years later. MAX CHRISTMAS: He has a history of community service of more than 30 years, including being involved with the Gold Coast Tourism Bureau, surf lifesaving, the Surfers Paradise Outrigger Canoe Association, Neighbourhood Watch, the Gold Coast Homeless Youth organisation, and Gold Coast Arts Centre. JASON MURAKAMI: He is the co-founder of the Innocence Project, designed to help people who have been wrongly convicted. The Griffith University-based project has been an innovation in education and he provides his time freely to it. SEAMUS BRADLEY: A chauffeur with Kingscliff Coast Limousines, his bubbly personality brightens all who come in contact with him and he is always willing to help elderly people in moving house or with emergencies, day or night. BURTONE LEYSHON: He has a doctorate in theology, has held Pentecostal training assembly meetings, offers pastoral care, and preaches on Sundays, at times without payment. His ministry touches those on the streets of Surfers

Paradise and he is known for his humility, integrity and diligence.. ROCHELLE SMITH: She is the instructor of the Surfers Paradise Physical Culture Dance Club, coached the team to a state title, and has won the individual national title, despite last year undergoing numerous operations and having rheumatoid arthritis. EDNA YORSTON: For 11 years she has cared for cancer patients at John Flynn Hospital and Pindara Hospital and provides home visits, helping people get to doctor's appointments and do their household chores. She is a tireless fundraiser for cancer research. BEV HAMMOND: She has volunteered since 1971, as secretary of the Currumbin State School P and C; organising the school art show and the Palm Beach Springfest and Art Show; and formed the Currumbin Central Netball Club. ASHLEY EBSWORTH: A retired chiropractor, he is a member of the Gold Coast and Queensland Accordion clubs, organising concerts annually and monthly meetings in Burleigh Waters. COLIN NEIL: A dedicated lifesaver of 14 years, he has received 25 lifesaving awards, helped to create the rescue watercraft service on the Gold and Sunshine coasts, and started the early-morning patrols. He trains water police, and lifesavers overseas. ANN-MARIE COOK: SPORT Affectionately known as 'Cookie' to her team, she is the world's only female manager of a powerboat race team. She is in charge of the Maritimo racing fleet of three 40ft catamarans, each with fighter-jet cockpits which can travel almost 300 km/h. She is making waves in the male-dominated sport. SARAH CHALMERS: She is on the executive committee of the Calisthenics Association of Queensland, is a coach with the Queensland Calisthenics Coaches Council, is in the Australian federation for the discipline, and is considered a role model and mentor to the young coaches. PETER OPPERMANN: For more than 40 years he has been associated with the district and regional cricket association in Beenleigh and with Beenleigh Tennis Club administration. He has been on the executive of the Beenleigh Sports Club since its inception and given a lifelong commitment to sport and sports administration. MATTHEW BELCHER: He is ranked fifth in the elite 470 Olympic sailing world circuit, has won state, national and world titles, and is regularly named Queensland sailor of the year. He acts as a mentor to young Gold Coast sailors, and

volunteers coaching at local yacht clubs and his old school, The Southport School. JON NORTON: The president of the Gold Coast District Golf Association, Pappy, as he is known, has devoted his life to helping junior golfers on the Gold Coast. More than 60 of his pupils, including Adam Scott, have turned professional. ROD PATISON: He is the head of department of Palm Beach Currumbin High School's nationally recognised sports excellence program, has been a state and national schoolboy rugby league coach, and has guided many students to NRL clubs, including Ben Ikin, Darius Boyd, Ben Hannant and Steven Michaels of the Broncos. SELWYN APANUI: He takes pride in his Aboriginal heritage; is a founder of Aboriginal rugby league team the Wollumbin Warriors; organising sponsorship; coaches a 13s rugby league team and a senior team at Tugun; and helps local Aboriginals deal with drug, alcohol, legal and housing issues. PAUL BROUGHTON: The man who was given a football when he was six years old went on to develop a passion for rugby league into a career as a professional rugby league player, then chairman of the Gold Coast NRL bid team and now chairman of the Titans. He worked tirelessly to get the Gold Coast Titans accepted in the NRL competition. ETHAN ROLFF: The Kingscliff backstroker who trains under coach Greg Salter and has a never-say-die attitude to his chosen sport of swimming. He is a former Commonwealth Games representative and competed in the Pan Pacific championships in Vancouver in August. He is training for the world championship trials in Brisbane in December. LYNSEY ARMITAGE: At only 22, she is already a lawn bowls veteran. Having started playing when she was 11, the Commonwealth Games gold medallist has had wins at club, state, national and international level and has been named Queensland Lady Bowler of the Year and Queensland Representative Bowler of the Year. ANNA-LOUISE KASSULKE: A Special Olympics National Sports and Training Team member, she has volunteered with the Special Olympics for 16 years; held positions at regional, state, national and international level; and has shown an extraordinary commitment to people with disabilities in sport. LAWRIE MCPHEE: He has coached basketball teams in various competitions at Runaway Bay, including representative teams, three evenings a week and weekends for the past 10 years, despite having health problems and working full-time. He was recently awarded life membership of the Runaway Bay Basketball Club. KELVIN KERKOW: The Australian indoor bowls champion and Commonwealth Games bowls champion, his shirt-stripping efforts have placed his sport in the spotlight. He has represented Australia at national and international competitions and won two world titles, achievements that came after he spent two years in a wheelchair due to an injury which paralysed him at age eight. REG FREE:

He has won numerous state and national rowing championships, been international oarsman three times, and coached internationally, including his sons Marcus and Duncan, who competed at the world rowing championships. He has also coached rowing at surf clubs and The Southport School, and has taken several crews to state and national championships. BRIAN FULLER: He takes part in long-distance bike rides for charities, including the Make a Wish Foundation, and for a family whose son suffered from leukaemia. He is an endurance athlete who competes for Australia in ironman long-course races and is competing in the world ironman championships in Hawaii in October. MATTHEW COLE: A 25-year-old with cerebral palsy, he is a second dan black belt in Hapkido, and a dual world champion, and his Ashmore club where he teaches has won back-to-back world championships at Seoul and Carrara. DICK JOHNSON: The owner of Dick Johnson Racing, he had five touring car championships and three Bathurst 1000 wins and operates Australia's longest-established professional race team, including a successful driver-development program. The business employs 50 staff. ENTERTAINMENT MAURIE SERVICE: The news director at radio 4GG when the station opened in 1967, he was appointed news director of radio 4CRB-FM at Burleigh Heads where he has been for the past 11 years. He was an entertainer with music groups at local hotels and restaurants through the 1970s. PAULINE DAVIES: The director, co-ordinator and driving force for the Spotlight Golden Girls, ladies who entertain at nursing homes, senior citizens clubs, retirements villages and other organisations around the city, she joined Spotlight Theatre as a founding member in 1958. MATTHEW COULTER: Called the Kangaroo Kid, he has entertained crowds in Australia, Europe, the UK and the US, performing stunts on his quad bike. He has performed in front of the Queen and Prince Charles and always promotes the Gold Coast when overseas, giving away Gold Coast hats and T-shirts. RICKI-LEE COULTER: The singing sensation and former Australian Idol star has had three top Aria singles and her self-titled album was nominated for album of the year at the Urban Music Awards in July. She has had success with the Young Divas, and supports charities. PHIL AVALON: A leading light in the film community, he has written, produced and directed a diverse range of feature films, casting Mel Gibson in his first feature film. He directed Liquid Bridge and is to produce Dark Island and direct SWOOP. He volunteers time to film students, and at film festivals. DEBBIE FITZSUMMONS: The Kirra music teacher plays in an all-girl band called Delisch which often performs free for charity. She toured Australia and America with The Four Kinsmen, playing keyboards and acting as the group's musical director. She established a scholarship program for the historic organ at St Martin's Anglican Church in Mullumbimby. SIMON HEART: He is an internationally acclaimed magician who gives his time to charities and was the only Australian

magician to be the opening act at the 2003 Prestigious Magic Convention in the UK and to be invited to perform at the World's Escapology Fair in the US. He performs Houdini's legendary suspended straightjacket escape. AMY THOMPSON: The 18-year-old has studied jazz, tap and ballet since the age of four and has performed lead roles in high school musicals and local musical theatre productions such as Rent, Brigadoon, Annie, Footloose and I'm Sorry. She has a day job at Dreamworld and teaches weekend dance classes at Merrimac High School. PAUL ALLEN: For 25 years, the man who started Melbas on the Park has shown the Gold Coast how to party with his famous nightclub and restaurant. He has made a major contribution to the Gold Coast entertainment and dining scene and given many young people a start in the industry. ALAN WHITE: The band master of the Gold Coast City Wind Orchestra, he has been playing in bands for more than 40 years and took the orchestra to the National Band Championship C Division in Brisbane this year and was invited to represent Australia in Taiwan at the International Band Festival. KATE PETERS: She has a passion for high-quality theatre productions, has staged numerous pantomimes for children, runs a weekly stage column in The Gold Coast Bulletin and is a driving force of the Gold Coast Theatre Alliance, organising workshops for training local actors and drama students, as well as performing charity shows. LYN BRAIN: The rock and roll dance lover has been dancing since she could walk and has 14 Australian dance titles and an Asia Pacific Masters gold medal to her name. Lyn and husband Peter started the Coast to Coast Rock 'n' Roll club at Helensvale and Runaway Bay three years ago to give free rock 'n' roll dance lessons.. BERNIE BROWN: A singer, musician, compere, dancer, composer and event organiser, he has worked all over Australia and at restaurants and clubs on the Gold Coast. He also teaches students privately and for Education Queensland. CARISSA WARREN: The house captain at Somerset College, she has written and directed house plays. She starred in a show she helped write, which won a Gold Coast Schools Drama Festival award. TANIA EDMUNDS: Principal soprano, music director and co-founder of Opera Eagle's Nest, she has performed more than 200 Opera Eagle's Nest concerts in six years, including for charity. She is also the singing teacher and choral director at St Hilda's School. NIGEL LONG: He has toured the world with the Tap Dogs for more than a decade and brought joy to people from royalty to the person in the street. He is an ambassador for the Gold Coast on his many overseas trips and teaching young dancers in his Tap Pup classes. FERNANDO ALVAREZ: He toured the country for 15 years with the Dance of the

White Horses show, taking his Spanish dancing horse show to thousands of people. It was the highest ticket-selling act to travel New Zealand. He has offered his horses at free shows for disabled and hospitalised children. CHRISTOPHER ERNST: His band The Black Market Rhythm Show, which he manages and fronts as singer and main songwriter, has national airplay with ENTERTAINMENT (Cont'd) Radio Triple J and he has set up his own entertainment business called Black Duck Magic. YOUTH BROOKE MUIR: She is a member of the Burleigh Surf Lifesaving Club and volunteers to help homeless people through Rosie's Youth Mission at Burleigh. She has also written stories for The Gold Coast Bulletin's TXT4U as a student reporter. JAMES MCALLAN: He has worked as a theatre technician, supporting artists such as James Morrison, since the age of 15 and at 19 has set up a crewing business to help the entertainment industry in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast, employing other young people to develop technical production skills. JESSICA LEKICH: This five-year-old was determined to raise money for sick kids at the Gold Coast Hospital by using her loose tooth to raise more than $3000. She fronted her school assembly and doorknocked in her quest to raise funds. BRONTE KELLY: The young ballet dancer has been awarded a high distinction from the Royal Academy of Dance in London for her Advanced Foundation examination and has scored a full-time place at the Australian Ballet School next year. REGAN SALTER: While training for an AFL career, the 13-year-old achieves top marks, won his college athletic championship and is middle school sports captain, travelling from his home in Brisbane to the Gold Coast to school and train. He plays in local Aussie rules teams, and will attend the Brisbane Lions academy. MADELINE ARNOLD: The Year 11 student is an actress and donated her time to do a film about child sex abuse to raise awareness of the issue. She set up a Spirit committee at her school to help other students, puts out a Year 11 newsletter and is already doing university study, one subject at a time while still at school. Is a member of Interact and Zenith. CHANTELLE DAY: The 17-year-old Robina High School student is a cook, cleaner and carer to her mother who suffers from kidney disease. She is school captain and works at a local fish and chip shop. TAMARA DORRINGTON: The Year 11 St Stephen's College student is the 2006 Australian ambassador to the Arctic to track polar bears. She completed the Kokoda Challenge on the Gold Coast this year. MATTHEW GREEN: The Year 12 student at Palm Beach Currumbin High School is dedicated to World Vision after attending a

leadership course. He co-ordinates the 40-hour Famine at the school, speaks at school assemblies and sponsors a child. He is also school vice-captain. KRISTEN DOWNS: A Helensvale High School student, she is in the school band, is involved in equestrian competitions , and hopes to become a youth ambassador for World Vision. She is also a student reporter for TXT4U. MICHAEL BLAIR: A Year 11 student from St Stephen's College, he is a representative baseball player and has just returned from the Global Young Leaders Conference in the US. JASMIN BELL: A Year 12 student at Trinity Lutheran College, she was offered a job as a television presenter on Totally Wild, which will involve researching, filming, interviewing and presenting two days each week. She also combines modelling with her academic pursuits. CLARE HOBLER: The 15-year-old has achieved her dream of acceptance to the Australian Ballet School. She has won classical ballet awards at eisteddfods, including best classical dancer, and was accepted to the junior extension program of the Queensland Ballet. EMMI DIXON: She dreams of playing in the Australian Olympic hockey team, and has represented the Gold Coast and Queensland in the sport. She has just returned from an under-16 championship in Newcastle, where she was selected to play for Australia at Beijing in 2007. MICHAEL KELLY: At only 11, this incredibly bright student, who aims to study at Cambridge University, has completed 12 years of schooling in just over four years. Education Queensland has given approval for him to jump six years in the senior school system, from Year 6 to 11 and 12 in just 18 months. A student at Nerang State School, his IQ is in the genius range with a list of academic achievements to match. DANIEL GLAUBERT: He organised a LiveAid charity concert which helped a Mozambique school which had no school essentials. He hopes to hold another similar event, and takes part in public speaking for the Smith Family. RYAN BARNETT: A Year 12 student at Helensvale State High School, he is also a student at the Showbiz Express Circus and Dance School, where he learns clown skills and voluntarily performing at Gold Coast events. Was recently nominated for an award for AFL Gold Coast juniors in the Youth Umpire Development Award. RHEA ROBERTSON: A 15-year-old performing arts student who was chosen to attend the new Queensland Academy of Creative Industries, has performed in local productions and last year was awarded most outstanding actress at the Gold Coast Secondary Schools Drama Festival. HANNAH MCCOLL-WAYNE: This 17-year-old scholarship student has given up afternoon activities such as dance classes to tend to environmental or social issues like Clean Up Australia Day, weekly visits to retirement homes, tree planting for Gecko, caring for animals or attending Save Our Spit rallies.

PAUL BLEAKLEY: He was the junior mayor of the Gold Coast for part of 2005, then went to North Carolina in the United States to finish his studies. There, he became a member of the local Honour Society, was interviewed by Princeton and Harvard universities, won a President's Scholarship for Pfeiffer University and worked as a volunteer with disadvantaged students. The 17-year-old is now at Griffith University, studying law. BUSINESS MICHAEL SEARLE: The managing director of the Gold Coast NRL, he fought tirelessly to ensure the Gold Coast Titans gained entry to the NRL and will oversee the management and implementation of the team's entry in 2007. A top sports administrator, he is the managing director of International Sports Australia, a sports marketing agency which represents some of Australia's leading professional surfers, and is changing the perception of sport as a business. ANGELA MCGREGOR-GOODWIN: She runs a training company called Quality Training Solutions and in just three years has secured highprofile contracts for it. STACEY ROBERTS: She is the owner of Sharkey's Healing Centre, a world-renowned natural therapies and fertility clinic which has helped bring more than 4000 babies into the world for families who had given up hope. DENNIS RICHTER: He is the manager of Aussie Junk Recycle Shop, which provides recyclable goods to pensioners and the under-privileged and is helping the environment by diverting goods away from waste landfill sites. It also helps the homeless, schools and charities. FIONA BRYANT: A fashion designer and head designer in a local bridal salon, her designs are known for their attention to detail. She provides many women with 'the gown of their dreams'. PETER HAMPTON: He has been involved in the pharmaceutical industry since 1969, and built the Oxenford Medical Centre building in 1996. Now in its 10th year of operation, it has six full-time general practitioners, and five dentists and full-time radiation and pathology specialists. JOHN NEUMANN: The Currumbin businessman, at 18, with his brothers and an engine from a 1924 Chevy floated on 44gallon drums in the Currumbin Creek, created his first sand dredge and launched an empire. Fifty years on, the Neumann Group has an annual turnover of more than $600 million and a staff of more than 650. He designed and built his dredges, which he then exported. He is managing director of Neumann Petroleum, Neumann Contractors and Neumann Steel. MICK PIRIE: The patriarch of one of the Gold Coast's longest-established businesses, Pirie Doors at Bundall, he is a respected local business identity and quiet achiever who has supported the Gold Coast community for the past 50 years. He is also a veteran athlete with many Australian and international athletics records. PHILL GALE: He is general manager of one of Australia's largest shed kit suppliers, Wide Span Sheds. He helped those affected by Cyclone Larry, has supported charities and employs

25 people. WINSON WOO: He began his real estate career on the Gold Coast less than 10 years ago but is already well-known, following a successful export career in NSW where he achieved Exporter of the Year in Agriculture in 1995. He is a committee member of the Gold Coast Chinese Society. BRUCE NICHOLLS: The managing director of Whale Watching Gold Coast, the pioneer whale-watching service on the Gold Coast, he also runs the Tall Ships Cruises out of Marina Mirage for 18 years. He is a long-time member of the Gold Coast Tourism Bureau Board and a tourism campaigner. ELAINE HOLLINGSWORTH: At 78, she has sold more than 100,000 copies of her publication Take Control of Your Health and Escape the Sickness Industry. A former Hollywood actress known as Sara Shane in the '50s and '60s, she acted with stars including Clark Gable, James Mason, Sean Connery and Fred Astaire. She is director of the Hippocrates Health Centre at Mudgeeraba. SHARYN PAYNE: An accountant who started her business from home, she goes out of her way to make sure every client is satisfied and is part of BNI, a business group, where she holds a leadership position. LUKE MORGAN: At just 21, has has registered his sixth business, and has worked full-time from the moment he was legally allowed to, at 14 years and 9 months. His businesses include landscaping and security, and he has completed a university degree. LEE ANN HICKS: A sales person at Mitre 10 at Runaway Bay, her customers say she is an example of the perfect sales person; courteous, friendly and knowledgeable about all aspects of hardware. VIV LIPKE: She runs the Yatala-based Ice Craft Internat-ional with her son and just one other staff member. The firm is the internat-ional patent holder and sole manufacturer of reusable ice sculpture moulds, and exports to more than 100 countries. ROBERT and LAURIE FRASER-SCOTT: The husband and wife team runs one of Queensland's fastest growing privately owned businesses groups with an asset portfolio comprising hotels, childcare centres, retail and commercial centres, a supermarket, a wholesale nursery and commercial property development. DARREN BELL and GEORGIE TERRY: The two work for a company called Eventco-ordination at Mermaid Beach after meeting at Movie World where they both worked. TALAN MILLER: As an 18-year-old, he held his first team-building event and has since led his company, Sabre Corporate Development, to be the largest team-building company in the Asia Pacific area. Last year he held 140 events in Australia

and overseas. TOM RAY: As director of the Ray Group, he has rallied staff since the death of his parents Brian and Kathy in a plane crash and carried on the business in a way in which his father would have been proud. PETER GATES: A self-employed engineer, he established a process for improving mineral separation and from his hinterland garage, set up a factory to export his mineralseparation machines. DEBBIE BRUCE: The director of the Linkcom Group, a marketing and event management company, she started small with an online bridal directory and held her first bridal expo in 1999. The directory now boasts more than 3000 members and the expos have expanded throughout Queensland and southern states. RAY MILTON: He has made a major voluntary contribution to the real estate industry on the Gold Coast after beginning his real estate career in Surfers Paradise in 1970. He led the Gold Coast Real Estate Institute branch, and is the longest-serving member and a life member of the board of the Real Estate Institute of Queensland. NINO MIANO: He opened a jewellery store in Surfers Paradise in 1974 and became a leading designer, was co-founder of the Gold Coast Italo Australian Club in 1976, opened award-winning Volare Italian restaurant in 1992, and is on numerous industry and business bodies. JOHN LONGHURST: He created Dreamworld after buying land in then unknown Coomera in 1974 with a mission statement for it to be a place of 'fun, entertainment and escapism for all people of all ages'. He taught himself to drive a bulldozer and worked 12-hour days to create the theme park. He has also worked as a truck operator, lawn mower manufacturer and boat builder. DAVID BROWN: He is the general manager of the Crowne Plaza Hotel and has helped it become the No. 1Crowne Plaza hotel in the South Pacific region. He is highly respected by his staff and is known for being able to motivate and communicate with them. He also organises charity fundraising events. EDUCATION FIONA MUNROE: The artistic director of Gold Coast Dancers Company, she is dedicated to ensuring her charges become ballet stars. Many of her students work professionally in London and perform regularly in local dance productions. TERRY GIMPEL: The principal of Guardian Angels School, he is an unsung hero of the school, who after Cyclone Larry devastated Innisfail, the next EDUCATION (Cont'd) day began fundraising to help the Good Counsel Primary School and then billet 142 students from the

school on the Gold Coast. He achieved his aim and recently took long-service leave to travel to Innisfail and check on staff and students. KAY FLYNN: She has dedicated more than 30 years to teaching, judging and developing classical ballerinas and is considered ballet royalty on the Gold Coast. She represents the art of dance on the Gold Coast City Council's cultural development committee and guides her students to the Australian Ballet Academy in Melbourne. KATHERINE BROWN: A cello teacher who has helped her students in a variety of competitions, she teaches students at All Saints and The Southport School and each year holds a free concert to give her students the chance to shine. MATT BEATTIE: He is a Coombabah High School teacher who saved a student's life when the student convulsed and had trouble breathing in the school grounds. Matt used his volunteer lifesaving training to get the unconscious student breathing again before ambulance crews arrived. SHARON WICKING: A teacher's aide at Southport State Preschool who for many years has worked with preschoolers, she is loved by her charges and her colleagues and always puts the needs of the children first. JAMES CASEY: He is the longest-serving martial arts teacher on the Gold Coast, who has held executive positions in the sport in Australia, been a top referee, trained more than 200 state and national champions and 22 world champions, been Australian and Queensland karate coach and hosted national and world championships. BRENDAN CALLAGHAN: A teacher at All Saints Anglican School and co-ordinator for Year 8, his students say he is enthusiastic, encouraging, unique, inspiring and dedicated. He often quotes his role model Einstein during his science lessons and wants all his students to become little Einsteins. JANE HELY: Until recently the sole teacher at the Broadbeach Waters Kindergarten and Preschool, 'Miss Jane', as she is known, puts in the extra effort to make sure her pre-school is a special place for everyone. ALISON KENNAN: The head of the English department at Robina State High School, who teaches Years 11 and 12, she is considered an inspiration to her students and other teachers, has a passion for her students' welfare and education, and spends many hours out of work time helping students and staff. STEPHEN MCGRATH: Head of the Junior School at St Andrews Lutheran College at Tallebudgera, he is a devoted headmaster who knows all 580 of his students by name and takes pleasure in honouring each child and presenting them with a Freddo Frog on their birthday.

MATT EDWARDS: A Year 3 teacher at Assisi Catholic College, he has a wonderful ability to get children laughing and learning, and is strict but fair. Children love going to school because Mr Edwards is their teacher, who goes the extra mile to help them and always makes himself available to parents. SANDY BOURNE: A Year 6 teacher at The Southport School, she adores teaching boys, makes school a fun place for her students, and has turned her classroom into a mini zoo using her reptile licence. Her students say of her: ''She makes us all feel special and that we are all good at something.'' GEORGE EARL: He established the Bond University Mirvac School of Sustainable Development, Australia's first tertiary program formally recognising long-term sustainability as integral in urban planning, design development and strategic asset management. IVAN BRKICH: His students say the senior teacher at Varsity College is dedicated, motivated and passionate, an outstanding educator, role model and disciplined mentor. AMANDA BOLLINGER: She has danced for royalty, as the principal dancer in some of Europe's best ballet companies and with multi-million dollar Disney productions, and is now passing on her talents at her own professional studio in Southport. JOHN EAST: A teacher at Gilston School, he is said by his students to be competent, caring and kind and he finishes each day with a song while he plays guitar. PETER FIELDER: A trainer at the Boss Institute of Advanced Technology, he teaches an introductory program in bricklaying at Gold Coast schools, has trained hundreds of young people in construction, and is considered a great tradesman, teacher and mentor. ALLEN WILLIAMS: He started the College for Law and Justice Administration after working at TAFE managing the Diploma of Justice Administration, where he designed the course and helps to mould students in policing and justice administration. DEL MCLEOD: A teacher at Merrimac High School in the Special Education Unit, she is devoted to her students, never wants to leave at the end of each day, and is loved by all her students. SALLY FARRELL: A teacher at Elanora State School, she is a motivated teacher who provides her students with interesting and captivating programs and her class recently won the Beat the Bulletin competition. Her students are encouraged to be independent learners. LYNN LLOYD: She is the 'go to' person, the 'Mrs Fix it', when parents are having problems with their children at school, when a tuckshop committee needs help running its business, or when a P&C committee is looking a little lost. As the community participation officer for the entire Gold Coast school district, she helps solve problems at more than 60 schools.

KULDEEP KUMAR: An associate professor at Bond University, he is a winner of several teaching excellence awards and many Indian students come to study at the Gold Coast because he is such a popular teacher. His work on bankruptcy prediction and breast cancer detection is considered world class. RICHARD JOHN: His Science on the Go project at Griffith University has provided training and professional development for more than 450 primary and secondary school science teachers and through science shows, camps, workshops, on campus tours and internships, he has introduced science to more than 20,000 Gold Coast students. HANK LEWERISSA: A dedicated music teacher for more than 20 years, many of his students have gone on to be music teachers themselves and he has a unique ability to teach children to enjoy music. Many of his students have won competitions and musicals. MONIQUE MCMULLEN: In more than 10 years' teaching at Palm Beach-Currumbin, she has spent many hours helping students with the rock eisteddfod and school musicals, including many weekends and holidays. CHARMAINE BUCHANAN: She has worked with students of a Certificate III in Business Administration since 1998, and is devoted to her students, working tirelessly with industry in their job placement. Her success rate is high and more than 5000 students have received her personal attention. JOY WHEELER: A teacher at Varsity Lakes College, she aims to nurture children, and has undertaken study at her own cost and time to further her knowledge in education and literacy. She specialises in helping children with special needs. SHARYN STUBBS: The deputy principal of Helensvale State High School is regarded is an exceptional educator who leads by example and gets in and gets her hands dirty, sacrificing her own time to help with musicals, the special needs unit and rock eisteddfods. BILL BONDFIELD: The principal of Palm Beach Currumbin State School since 1989, his vision has seen the school at the forefront of education. He has designed nationally recognised programs in sport, academic and performingarts excellence, and vocational education. He is chairman of the Gold Coast Principals' Alliance which promotes state schools. MARIE HANSON: A Guardian Angels teacher of 32 years, she has taught from Years 1 to 7 and has devoted her life to her students, including going on school camps, learning another language, becoming a computer whiz, and helping with swimming and athletics carnivals, drama presentations and dances. CHRIS TOBIN: The principal of Merrimac State High School, and formerly the manager for education services at Education Queensland's Robina office, he always shows enthusiasm and commitment to the job. He set up a Positive Learning Centre at Labrador to give students another pathway to complete their education, and is pas-

sionate about his students' needs. NICHOLAS COUBROUGH: He teaches music performance, production, screen and live theatre production courses at Gold Coast TAFE's Ashmore and Coolangatta campuses, helps with amateur theatre locally, and consults on theatre productions. MATTHEW SMITH: He teaches music performance and production, screen and live theatre production at Gold Coast TAFE's Ashmore and Coolangatta campuses, owns a production business and works as a freelance audio and lighting technician, and is committed to inspiring students. SHARRON STATON: A teacher at All Saints Anglican School, she is the Nairn Theatre's manager and technical theatre teacher, training students in real work environments to continue further study or open businesses. CHRISTINE MACKIE: An exchange teacher from Canada based at St Brigid's Primary School, she has taught the students all about Canada and has brought to life another country for the students. DEBORAH HYDE: The librarian/teacher at Robina High School, she is a pocket rocket with more than 20 years' teaching experience and not even open heart surgery could suppress her dedication to her students. SHARON CRONE: She has been a teacher at Benowa High School for 25 years and head of the communication department for 20 years. The success of the junior and senior debating teams is a result of her drive, her English extension class achieves outstanding results and she is a great staff mentor. SUE PESCOT: A school nurse at Kumbari Avenue Special School, she is a friend and comforter to all, someone who listens, never judges and treats everyone as an equal. TONY MCDONALD: A Year 7 teacher at Broadbeach State School, he provides a balanced learning environment for his students and is a role model, mentor and friend to them. VANESSA REBGETZ: A foundation staff member at Upper Coomera State College since it opened in 2002, she has been a class teacher, head of department and the college dean. She is now deputy principal of Fensham Senior School and displays a passion for teaching and great caring for all her students. VOLUNTEER YVONNE CODY: The founder of Pets for Therapy, she has been helping provide therapeutic love and caring visits with pets to hospitals, hospices, nursing and aged care homes with the help of her volunteers for the past 16 years. HELENE MCCOWAN: A registered nurse who gave up her career to teach primary school children moral values through religious education in state schools, she now covers 27 state schools across the coast. BRUCE HARDSTAFF:

The group leader of the Nerang Scout Group for the past eight years, he pours his heart and soul into the movement and knows each child by name. He is also a member of the committee for his local church and is on the committee for the Nerang Environment Council. MAVIS CHAPMAN: She has worked as a volunteer at St John's Drop-in Centre at Surfers Paradise for almost 25 years, cooking meals for the homeless and lunch for at least 45 people once a week. In her 80s, she takes pride in helping needy people. ASHLEY EBSWORTH: A retired chiropractor, he has devoted years to the Gold Coast and Queensland Accordion Clubs, organising 19 major concerts a year and monthly meetings at the Burleigh Waters Community Centre, sharing his love of accordion music. KERRY LARKIN: He has been involved with the Queensland Cancer Fund since 1973 and is chairperson of the Southport Volunteer Branch. He served on the medical and scientific committee of the fund from 1981 to 1993, taught surgery in East Africa and is now retired, but still does community speaking and fundraising for the cancer fund. TRACIE HEATON: She is the co-ordinator for the Swell Sculpture Festival, responsible for more than 100 VOLUNTEER (Cont'd) volunteers, and developed a program for local schools, Swell for Kids, which provides children with a semester of visual arts and an excursion to Swell to build their own sculptures. LARRY DAWSON: He is the founder of the ManKind Project in Australia, a non-profit training organisation for men which aims to support men develop lives of integrity, accountability, and connection to feeling. WENDY FAWNS: She raises funds for the Queensland Cancer Fund, and has entered the Nurse of the Year quest while working four days a week at Gold Coast hospital. PAT WILLIAMS: The volunteer co-ordinator for 21 years since its inception at the Citizens Advice Bureau, a community legal centre in Southport, she gives of her time two days a week and is motivated by a desire to give back to the community. SUE HUTCHINSON: The superintendent of the Mermaid Beach division of the St John Ambulance Volunteers, she is a qualified first aid instructor and trains volunteers to the highest level of first aid practices. ROSIE THOMPSON: She started Chicks @ Lunch to raise money from her friends to help support the animals at the Coombabah Animal Shelter. From four ladies, the group now regularly has grown to 180. THOMAS ROLFE:

He is the inspiration and driving force of the Woodwork and Craft Club on the Gold Coast, a group of volunteers which offers tuition to the public, and makes and donates wooden toys to charity. He has built churches and schools in South Pacific missions. ALBERT SMALL: He joined Lions International in 1961 and has a 100 per cent attendance record for 45 years. He is a Lions Youth of the Year chairman, is active in drug programs in schools and in the Lions Hearing Dog program, supplies air-conditioners to terminally ill people, as well as wheelchairs and voice machines, and sells Lions Christmas cakes. JOHN WISEMAN: A tireless community worker and JP, he provides breakfast for the homeless, transport for elderly people and makes himself available for medical students to practice their skills. CLAUDETTE NEAVE: She has volunteered with Rosie's Youth Mission since 1992 doing street, court and prison outreach, fundraising, administration, presentation and training. She built Rosie's court presence from one to four days weekly, helps prisoners re-establish in the community, and works with the disabled and African refugees. CAROLYN GROVES: She volunteers her time at the Hopewell Hospice as a cook, care giver and counsellor often up to 50 hours a week. After beating cancer, she is donating her time to the hospice that helped her do it. NORMA KOLKKA: She has volunteered for more than 25 years at the Northcliffe Surf Club where she is a gold card life member and volunteers at the ADCARE Charity shop in Southport. GRAHAM DABELSTEIN: He is a Meals on Wheels driver who works five days a week, often doing a double run involving 18 homes when there is a shortage of drivers. PAM MCKELLAR: She uses her skills as a hairdresser for the Queensland Cancer Fund, helping ladies who have cancer to choose wigs and turbans from the fund's Wig and Turban Library. She helps sufferers at Young Women's Network meetings where she is affectionately known as 'Mum'. SALLY PAXTON: If there is someone in her southern Gold Coast community who needs help, she is the first person to put her hand up. She is the organiser of the Malfunction Longboard contest, a life member of the Super 8s Longboard Club, and involved in the fight to save Kirra Hill and the historic Coolangatta State School. RON BAGNALL: He is a life member of the Palm Beach Surf Lifesaving Club, and every weekend he helps set up, clean and store equipment. LYNDEL WALTON: She is the treasurer, secretary, canteen lady and referee organiser with the Robina City Soccer Club, where she ensures the club runs smoothly. CAROLE GREEN: She is known as 'the bird woman of Hope Island' and is a registered carer with the Gold Coast branch of the Wildlife Preservation Society, spending the past 30 years caring for sick and injured wildlife.

CHRIS RYAN: He has been a volunteer with the Southport Surf Life Saving Club for the past 10 years and gets enormous satisfaction out of helping and encouraging nippers. He helps raise funds and is always coming up with new ideas to help. JO RODGERS: She is an active member of the North Kirra Surf Life Saving Club, trains and tests members, performed 380 hours last season and is the club captain for the third season in a row. She raised more than $20,000 in the Conrad Jupiters Summer Surf Girl competition. BRIAN WOOD: Every day without fail, for years, he has cleaned the streets of debris and rubbish around his Surfers Paradise home, and sorted bins for apartment blocks, to keep his area clean. SUE OLNEY: She has been volunteering her time to the sick and needy at the Gold Coast Hospital for more than 25 years and clocks up about 300 hours every year. She was volunteer co-ordinator for 15 years. WANDA HAMILL: The president of the Coolangatta/Tweed Partners of Veterans Association and vice-president of the NSW branch, she works tirelessly to help the partners of returned servicemen deal with depression, post traumatic stress and alcoholism. CATHERINE 'Kitty' CAMPBELL: They call her 'The Motivator' because she manages to get people to a chilly walking track at 5.30am before sunrise and get them exercising. She co-ordinates the Just Walk It program for the Heart Foundation. FRED WOODLEY: The president of the Paradise Point and Northern Districts Progress Association is responsible for activities including Opera in the Park, dragonboat regattas, rock 'n' roll concerts and the suburb's great New Year's Eve activities. DICK and ANNE SAYER: The couple volunteers with the Anglican Church at the Isle of Capri, helping organise services and public concerts in which Anne often performs. MARGARET JARDEN: She has been volunteering at the respite centre at Runaway Bay since 1998, despite being the same age as many of her clients. She is the escort for bus trips, dresses up for theme days and models in fashion parades. STEVE JONES: He is the longest-serving captain of the Surfers Paradise Surf Lifesaving Club and has performed more than 4000 hours of voluntary patrols and more than 300 rescues. He lectures about lifesaving to universities and schools. DAVE NEAL: He has volunteered at Kirra Haven, an aged-care centre, three days a week every day for five years. He runs popular gentle exercise classes and a weekly art class, sings karaoke, holds singalongs and looks after the budgie aviary. Staff and residents call him an 'absolute legend'.

BETH COOMBES: In 1996 she started a volunteer service at a nursing home in Hope Island, organising bingo, indoor bowls, exercises and outings. When the home closed, she volunteered at Allamanda Hospital, and is CPR for Life co-ordinator. RACHEL WHALEBONE: She is a volunteer in the special care (dementia specific) unit in the Kirra Haven Aged Care Centre, six hours a day, twice a week. She serves meals, helps residents to eat, reads to them, and makes sure the residents feel special. CHRIS ANDERSON: A dedicated volunteer committee member of the Gold Coast Little Athletics Club, her passion for young athletes has been a catalyst in her devotion to the sport for 15 years. She has been centre manager, secretary, treasurer, canteen convenor, and state team selector. Members call her the club guru. CHARLES BLAKE: He has offered 50 years of service as a Justice of the Peace in Queensland and is devoted to helping others through his many activities as a JP. PETAR NOVAKOVIC: He is an ophthalmic surgeon who flies his plane to isolated Aboriginal communities to provide free specialist medical services such as cataract eye operations. RICHARD BURTON: He leads an exercise group three mornings a week for the Gold Coast City Council Keep Active Campaign, helping people of all ages keep fit, and teaches personal training at TAFE. IRENE GREEN: She volunteers at the Southport Endeavour Toastmasters Disability branch, the only disability Toastmasters in the world, and works to promote the abilities and achievements of people with a disability. FAY HENDERSON: She is president of Dragons Abreast Gold Coast, the Pink Ladies who help survivors of breast cancer regain upper-body strength. She is a tireless breast cancer awareness advocate. STEVE BAKER: An accountant with more than 30 years' business experience, he is a volunteer member of the board and treasurer of FSG Australia, a non-profit organisation which helps people with disabilities. He is also involved with the Broadwater Netball Association, Holy Family Church at Runaway Bay, and Coomera Anglican College, helping them gain grants and to hold sports events and other activities. COURAGE SEAN KEELER: He risked his life for nearly half an hour to fight a crazed bull which was savagely mauling his neighbour. Mr Keeler grabbed sticks and rocks and attacked the bull until he managed to chase it away. ANDREW KNIGHT: He helped save the lives of three trawlermen in a rescue off Ballina in May, 1983, when he and a fellow Ballina surf club member got the men's stricken trawler towed to safety. Mr Knight was swept away from his IRB and spent two hours swimming to shore. JOSHUA ROUGHHEAD:

On May 24 this year, this Year 8 Varsity College student noticed a woman, who had been trapped by a jammed door, waving her arms from a bathroom window. Joshua phoned the police for help while his mate went inside to help the woman. ZACHARY LAWRENCE: On May 24 this year, this Year 8 Varsity College student noticed a woman, who had been trapped by a jammed door, waving her arms from a bathroom window. While his mate phoned the police, Zachary went inside, comforting her until police arrived. GABE JOSE: Working on a special traffic operation, Senior Constable Jose pulled over a vehicle on the M1 at Pimpama at night on June 24. He was struck in the face with his own baton and bitten 35 times in a frenzied attack by two people and is recovering, but has vowed to be return to keep people safe on the roads. KEN LLOYD: He saved the life of a 29-year-old surfer trapped on rocks in treacherous seas last April. The Surfers Paradise surf club member, in pounding 6m swells at Burleigh, put his wave runner up on rocks several times before grabbing the surfer and taking him to safety. TONIA CHRISTENSEN: In March 2002, she saved 23 elderly and disabled residents in her care at Hope Island After Care and Respite Centre, which had caught on fire. She kept going back into the fire to save residents. She then helped the residents find new homes. CHARLES TAYLOR: In June 2000, the 70-year-old wrestled with a bank robber armed with a .22 calibre rifle, who had pointed the gun at a female teller in a local bank. He was struck on the head and body with the bandit's rifle. He then threw a rubbish bin at the robber and got his registration details for police. JIMMY DAVIS: Last April, the Tallebudgera 10-year-old was swimming with a fellow nipper in front of his local surf club when he noticed a father and his son in trouble in a dangerous sweep. Jimmy took hold of the man's panicking five-year-old son and swam him to safety while his mate went to get a lifeguard to save the father. COLIN BROOKS: The pilot of a light aircraft and three of his passengers owe their lives to this man and his trusty boardshorts. The Surfers Paradise hero singlehandedly pulled the pilot and passengers from the wreck of a twinengine Piper Aztec, which crashed into the ocean off Cairns in November, 1996. He kept them afloat in choppy conditions by getting them to hold on to his boardshorts. LIFETIME BARBARA CRAIG: Her achievements include being a medical officer with Breastscreen Queensland for 14 years, a palliative care physician at the Gold Coast Hospital, a Gold Coast Hospital Ethics Committee member and an ethics lecturer at the Bond University Medical School. LESLIE TAYLOR: A former professional boxer and Surfers Paradise opal trader, he became an unofficial instructor with the

Gold Coast Police and Citizens club, led a gospel singing group which visited nursing homes once a week for 20 years, and was a pianist and singer. KEITH FULTON: He has dedicated his life to fundraising for the Leukaemia Foundation since its inception 31 years ago, in memory of his son Warren. He attends all the foundation's events and is always happy to help, whether it be selling raffle tickets or manning a barbecue. FONDA FULTON: Since losing her son Warren to leukaemia 31 years ago, has been tireless in her efforts to improve the lives of leukaemia patients and their families. She is treasurer of the Gold Coast branch of the Leukaemia Foundation, patient support person for the Gold Coast, and a life member. EDWINA KEIDS: She lost her husband to cancer in 2004. For the past 18 months, she has been full-time carer for an elderly 90-year-old relative. JIM SIMPSON: He is a Nobby Beach local who has volunteered with Sea Rescue, Volunteer Coast Guard, Rotary and Volunteering Queensland. He set up Retirees Australia, a service for seniors, is a member of five seniors committees, and takes an active interest in researching and doing what he can to highlight issues for the elderly on the Gold Coast. DAWN and JOY RANSLEY: The pair has been teaching dance for more than 50 years and been with the renowned Ransley Gold Coast Dance Centre for more than 20 years. LOAD-DATE: September 10, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: GCB Copyright 2006 Nationwide News Pty Limited All Rights Reserved

90 of 265 DOCUMENTS Richmond Times Dispatch (Virginia) August 15, 2006 Tuesday State Edition

2-Minute T-D
SECTION: GENERAL; Pg. A-2

LENGTH: 618 words IN THE NEWS SNAP A PICTURE Tanner Lewis, 4, of St. Joseph, Mo., had his photo taken yesterday with an alligator at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Mo. "He was brave till we got there," said Tracy Whorton, his grandmother. (Photo cutline) A GERMAN CONNECTION Europe's longest wooden bridge, which is 787 feet long, spans an area of the 2007 Bundesgartenschau, or German Federal Garden Show, near Gera, Germany. (Photo cutline) NATION LOW-PATHOGENIC BIRD FLU? Scientists have discovered the possible presence of bird flu in the U.S. in wild swans near the banks of Lake Erie. But it does not appear to be the worrisome strain that the government has long feared. A6 RECRUITER MISCONDUCT RISING A report by the Government Accountability Office finds that military recruiters have increasingly resorted to overly aggressive tactics and even criminal activity to attract young troops to the battlefield. A12 NATIONAL BRIEFS A12 WORLD BRITISH DROP THREAT LEVEL Britain lowered its terrorist-threat level, and a court granted a government request for more time to interrogate the last of 23 people in an alleged plot to bomb passenger jets. A6 DIFFERENCES ON BOMBING CAUSE U.S. and Iraqi officials disagreed on what caused a deadly series of explosions in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad on Sunday. The number of casualties also was in dispute. A3 WORLD BRIEFS A3 METRO CONFEDERACY MUSEUM CUTS The Museum and White House of the Confederacy will reduce its operating hours. The museum will close Wednesdays, from Labor Day to Memorial Day. Also, the White House will be closed for public tours in January and February. C1 SEARCH FOR EGYPTIANS ENDS Two Egyptian exchange students who failed to show up for their college program in Montana were arrested Sunday in Richmond. Mohamed Saleh Ahmed Maray, 20, and Mohamed Ibrahim Fouaad El Shenawy, 17, were the last of 11 Egyptian students to be apprehended. B1 MISSION CONVENTION The challenges facing missionaries, such as tribal conflicts and extreme poverty, are being discussed at the 109th Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention. B1 VIRGINIA CAMPAIGN ACCUSATIONS The campaign of U.S. Senate candidate Jim Webb has accused Sen. George Allen of making a racist slur against one of Webb's aides. B3 ELECTROCUTION PROBE Three witnesses to the electrocution of four National Scout Jamboree leaders did not recall seeing signs warning of high-voltage power lines, according to documents the Army released this month. But a photograph included in the documents does show the presence of a sign. B2 HALIFAX SEX-ABUSE CASE A Halifax County man is facing 12 life sentences and 335 years in prison after pleading guilty to 36 child-pornography and sex-abuse charges, the prosecutor said. B1 ORANGE DELAYS SUBDIVISION VOTE At the developer's request, the Orange Town Council deferred voting on a proposal to build a subdivision that would boost the town's population by 40 percent. B2 BUSINESS

AVERAGE GAS PRICE DROPS The average U.S. retail price of regular gasoline fell for the first time in seven weeks, dropping 3.8 cents to $3 a gallon in the week ended yesterday, the U.S. Energy Department said. The price is 45 cents a gallon higher than a year ago. B7 ANTHEM LAYOFFS Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield has notified about 30 information-technology employees and managers in the Richmond area that they will be laid off. That represents about 1 percent of the health insurer's local work force. B7 WALL STREET The Dow rose 9.84, and the Nasdaq gained 11.33. B8 SPORTS GOOD NEWS FOR PORTIS Washington hopes to have running back Clinton Portis back in time for its Sept. 11 regular-season opener. D1 EDITORIAL PAGE: Are high-speed chases appropiate law-enforcement tools? A10 LOAD-DATE: August 17, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: A head start on the headlines in today's Times-Dispatch GRAPHIC: PHOTO PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Richmond Newspapers, Inc. All Rights Reserved

91 of 265 DOCUMENTS Richmond Times Dispatch (Virginia) August 15, 2006 Tuesday Final Edition

2-Minute T-D
SECTION: GENERAL; Pg. A-2 LENGTH: 634 words IN THE NEWS SNAP A PICTURE Tanner Lewis, 4, of St. Joseph, Mo., had his photo taken yesterday with an alligator at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Mo. "He was brave till we got there," said Tracy Whorton, his grandmother. (Photo cutline) A GERMAN CONNECTION Europe's longest wooden bridge, which is 787 feet long, spans an area of the 2007 Bundesgartenschau, or German Federal Garden Show, near Gera, Germany. (Photo cutline)

NATION LOW-PATHOGENIC BIRD FLU? Scientists have discovered the possible presence of bird flu in the U.S. in wild swans near the banks of Lake Erie. But it does not appear to be the worrisome strain that the government has long feared. A6 RECRUITER MISCONDUCT RISING A report by the Government Accountability Office finds that military recruiters have increasingly resorted to overly aggressive tactics and even criminal activity to attract young troops to the battlefield. A12 NATIONAL BRIEFS A12 WORLD BRITISH DROP THREAT LEVEL Britain lowered its terrorist-threat level, and a court granted a government request for more time to interrogate the last of 23 people in an alleged plot to bomb passenger jets. A6 DIFFERENCES ON BOMBING CAUSE U.S. and Iraqi officials disagreed on what caused a deadly series of explosions in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad on Sunday. The number of casualties also was in dispute. A3 WORLD BRIEFS A3 METRO SEARCH FOR EGYPTIANS ENDS Two Egyptian exchange students who failed to show up for their college program in Montana were arrested Sunday in Richmond. Mohamed Saleh Ahmed Maray, 20, and Mohamed Ibrahim Fouaad El Shenawy, 17, were the last of 11 Egyptian students to be apprehended. B1 POWHATAN RAISES CASH PROFFER Powhatan County's Board of Supervisors voted to raise the county's maximum cash proffer to $12,344 per housing lot, a 70.6 percent increase from the previous amount of $7,236. B1 MISSION CONVENTION The challenges facing missionaries are being discussed at the 109th Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mission Convention. About 5,000 are expected at the meeting at the Greater Richmond Convention Center this week. B1 CONFEDERACY MUSEUM CUTS The Museum and White House of the Confederacy will reduce its operating hours. The museum will close Wednesdays, from Labor Day to Memorial Day. Also, the White House will be closed for public tours in January and February. C1 VIRGINIA CAMPAIGN ACCUSATIONS The campaign of U.S. Senate candidate Jim Webb has accused Sen. George Allen of making a racist slur against one of Webb's aides. B1 ELECTROCUTION PROBE Three witnesses to the electrocution of four National Scout Jamboree leaders did not recall seeing signs warning of high-voltage power lines, according to documents the Army released this month. But a photograph included in the documents does show the presence of a sign. B2 HALIFAX SEX-ABUSE CASE A Halifax County man is facing 12 life sentences and 335 years in prison after pleading guilty to 36 child-pornography and sex-abuse charges, the prosecutor said. B2 FEDERAL PROSECUTIONS OF GANGS A state prosecutor who has led anti-gang investigations will be able to take cases to federal court to punish members with stiffer penalties. B2 BUSINESS DELL RECALLS BATTERIES Dell Inc. said it will recall 4.1 million notebook computer batteries because they can overheat and catch fire. B7 ANTHEM LAYOFFS Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield notified about 30 information-technology employees and managers in the Richmond area that they will be laid off. That represents about 1 percent of the health insurer's local work force. B7

WALL STREET The Dow rose 9.84; the Nasdaq rose 11.33. B8 SPORTS GOOD NEWS FOR PORTIS Washington hoped to have running back Clinton Portis back in time for its Sept. 11 regular-season opener. D1 EDITORIAL PAGE: Are high-speed chases appropiate law-enforcement tools? A10 LOAD-DATE: August 17, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: A head start on the headlines in today's Times-Dispatch GRAPHIC: PHOTO PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Richmond Newspapers, Inc. All Rights Reserved

93 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Nelson Mail (New Zealand) August 1, 2006 Tuesday

Would you trust me with the kids?
BYLINE: CLARKE, Alan SECTION: FEATURES; GENERAL; FOCUS; Pg. 7 LENGTH: 1039 words Last week I did something my wife reckons confirms my impending senility. No, I didn't hop on the plane for Auckland thinking I was heading home for tea. I didn't park the car at the bottom of the Nelson Yacht Club's privately owned ramp at low tide and wander off into work, or declare an intention to stand for the mayoralty. No. I offered my services as a baby-sitter. Though I've performed this pleasurable duty many times for my eldest grand-daughter (now aged six) and we've both survived intact and perhaps even better for it, it was not my ability or suitability that sparked my wife's concerns. It was that I'd offered to do so for a young couple who live up the street a little and with whom I've struck up the odd conversation without really knowing them that well, or them me. ``Just offering must seem weird,'' my wife said. ``There've been enough problems over the years already

with men being accused of things they'd never dream of doing. Why put yourself at risk?'' To be honest, that thought hadn't occurred to me for a moment. I was simply chatting with the young couple and mentioned that, if they ever got stuck without a baby-sitter for their two youngsters, we lived nearby and would be happy to help. ``We're pretty particular, we don't just trust anyone,'' the young mum said. ``Yep, well, I'm a paedophile,'' I joked. ``No ... but I mean, we're a bit wary about getting young teenagers in if we don't know them - they might get their boyfriends in or get into alcohol or anything,'' she continued. Young teen? She certainly wasn't referring to me. We turned the conversation to other matters and went on our way. About three the next morning, the conversation returned to haunt me. I suddenly realised what the orchardist and taxi-driver, who two years back both made bomb jokes at Nelson Airport and got nabbed by the law and handed hefty fines by an unamused judiciary, must have felt. There are some things you just don't joke about in this overly sensitive age. Bombs at airports is one. Paedophilia is another. I figured, too, that the way we picture ourselves could easily be quite different from how others see us. Any abuse of the innocent - particularly children - is despicable. How anyone could want to rob them of the trust that is theirs as of right is beyond my comprehension. Yet how might a parent know that a virtual stranger would mean no harm to their children? In the young mum's eyes, I'd probably fit the bill as well as anyone for a potential abuser. Forgive me, but I'm male, for starters. Middle-aged. My wife and I live alone, our children having grown up and moved on. I'm aware that despite the stranger-danger campaigns of a couple of decades back, most of the abuse of children comes from family or friends. There have been too many instances of people in positions of trust who've deliberately joined organisations - church groups, scouts, etc - so as to meet and prey on children. How would anyone differentiate between me and some paedophile seeking to ingratiate himself into a young family's circle of friends and acquaintances? Indeed, the young couple - whom I like and admire - both work in social services fields and are probably exposed to the reality of child abuse more than most of us. So why, indeed, should they trust me? How can anyone tell the difference between a caring individual who really does just love kids and genuinely enjoys helping others - as I consider myself to be - and an apparently plausible, devious molester? The answer, I guess, is that we can't. And much as I'd hate to be considered a potential risk to anyone, a parent's first duty is to the safety of his or her children - and that simple rule has led in part to a much less appealing and enjoyable society than the one I grew up in. Consider the fact that now just 17 percent, or 4624 of the country's 26,305 primary school teachers, are male. Some recent research indicates that the most relevant parent as regards individual children's development is the same-sex one. Too many children are denied that advantage, and then miss out on a suitable substitute at such a vital, formative, age because men now consider primary teaching just too risky. Then there's the airline seating policy of refusing to put men beside unaccompanied children. Wrong as it might seen, it is also understandable. Our roads illustrate another aspect of the safety-first approach to modern parenting. Compare the

volume of traffic during school holidays with the rest of the year, especially around school drop-off and pickup times. Forty years ago I walked each day to school and back. It was a stroll of around 3km each way on an LSZ road in a semi-rural area. Nothing exceptional there. I guess it taught road safety, self-reliance and helped keep us fit. Even so, I remember a man once stopping his car near the school and asking if we ``wanted a lollie''. We ran back and reported the incident to the school, and a week or two later a policeman delivered the strangerdanger message. I guess the issue's been around as long as we've had men. In more recent times, media reports and greater emphasis on various types of abuse have contributed to a loss of confidence and diminishing trust in others. There's also been a palpable reduction in ``neighbourliness''. But I guess if that helps keep some kids safer, then that's the price that has to be paid. The office of the Children's Commissioner says figures it had gathered for the period 2000-2004 showed there were 937 sex abuse convictions where the victim was under 12 years of age. Of these, all but six were associated with male offenders. However, it was unable to break the figures down into whether the offenders were strangers, relatives, family ``friends'', babysitters or in some other relationship with their victims. There is no statistic, of course, for those children whose abuse never makes it on to the crime sheets at all. And I guess older children are also among the prime predators of younger siblings or kids in the neighbourhood. Incidentally, the young couple did call on our help for a few hours the next Saturday night. My wife and I answered the call together - seemed the safest policy all round. And you know what? It is nice to feel both useful and trusted. LOAD-DATE: August 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Nelson Evening Mail Limited All Rights Reserved

94 of 265 DOCUMENTS THE SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER July 29, 2006 Saturday

BOY SCOUTS MUST RELEASE RECORDS ON SEX ABUSE CLAIMS INFORMATION WAS SOUGHT FOR LAWSUIT AGAINST GROUP
BYLINE: P-I STAFF AND WIRE SERVICES

SECTION: NEWS; Pg. B2 LENGTH: 928 words Dozens of reports of alleged sexual abuse of Washington boys are included in the files that the Boy Scouts of America must turn over to three men alleging years of molestation by a scoutmaster. The reports are part of at least 1,000 such files compiled nationally by the Boy Scouts that can be used in a lawsuit against the organization, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday. Proceedings in that suit, which stopped while the dispute over the redacted files was decided, might resume early next year. The plaintiffs, two of whom live in south King County, say the documents detailing alleged sexual abuse and other misconduct by volunteers across the country since the 1940s show the Boy Scouts' system for tracking and preventing abuse was ineffective. While Boy Scouts officials promoted the organization as a safe place for children, they failed to disclose to the public the scope of the abuse and "that the system didn't work very well," plaintiff attorney Mark Honeywell said Friday. Although volunteers were kicked out when a complaint was lodged against them, the "guys would change their middle initial and re-up (as a scoutmaster in a different location) and abuse another Scout," he said. Plaintiffs' attorneys had previously gathered about 1,900 of the Boy Scouts' records, compiled from 1971 to 1991, from another attorney who obtained them in a separate court case. They won release of at least 1,000 more files - reports made before 1971 and after 1991 - in the Washington state lawsuit. Overall, the number of reports filed in Washington number "in the dozens," Honeywell said. "As a matter of public interest, this is probably the single largest compilation of known or suspected child molesters anywhere," said Tim Kosnoff, an attorney for the plaintiffs. D. Michael Reilly, an attorney representing the Boy Scouts, responded Friday that "the number of files BSA (Boys Scouts of America) holds does not establish the existence of a problem; instead it's an example of BSA's dedication going back decades in doing what BSA can to protect youth. "The truth is," he said, "there is no fail-safe method to screen abusers. Unfortunately, child sexual abuse is a societal problem that requires attention from all youth-serving organizations." In a statement, Boy Scout officials said the organization has been a leader in "developing youth protection programs." "BSA appealed to the Washington Supreme Court out of concern that the trial court's order in this case risked undermining the effectiveness of those programs," the statement said. Starting in the late 1980s, the Boy Scouts began training boys how to recognize, resist and report abuse by the general public, Honeywell said. The Irving, Texas-based organization also teaches parents and volunteers how to spot and report abuse, and said it began background checks on new volunteers in 2003. Supreme Court justices referred to the three plaintiffs as T.S., M.S. and K.S. in their opinions Thursday. The underlying lawsuit claims the three were sexually abused by their scoutmaster, Bruce Phelps, 53, of Seattle, from 1971 to 1983. The suit named Phelps, the national organization and its local branches as defendants. Kosnoff and Honeywell, the plaintiffs' attorneys, said Phelps had admitted to sexual abuse in a deposition and settled his portion of the case several months ago.

Phelps' attorney, Kenneth Kagan, confirmed the settlement but said Phelps did not admit to all of the plaintiffs' allegations. Two of the plaintiffs - brothers Tom Stewart, 43, of Enumclaw, and Matt Stewart, 42, of San Diego - previously revealed their identities to the public. The third plaintiff, who is not related to the Stewarts and who lives in south King County, has chosen to remain anonymous, Honeywell said. In the case decided Thursday, Boy Scouts attorneys argued that King County Superior Court Judge Michael Fox should have used a more detailed legal test in deciding whether to release the files to the plaintiffs. The Supreme Court's majority, however, said that three-part test was meant for cases of an organization seeking to protect privileged communications with its members. No such privilege exists in this case, Justice Susan Owens wrote for the majority. "Indeed, the opposite is true: a society interested in protecting children from criminal assaults would not reasonably leave to the discretion of a children's social club the disclosure of information regarding criminal assaults on children," Owens wrote. Chief Justice Gerry Alexander and Justices Barbara Madsen, Bobbe Bridge, Charles Johnson, Tom Chambers and Mary Fairhurst also signed the majority opinion. In their dissent, Justices Jim Johnson and Richard Sanders said the three-part test should have been applied because of broader privacy guarantees found in the state constitution. Many of the more than 3,000 misconduct files in the case rely on news accounts and court records, along with rumors and tips from parents and others, plaintiffs' attorneys said. The Boy Scouts have been keeping such files since the group's inception in 1910, but had destroyed records when the alleged perpetrators either turned 75 or died, Honeywell said. The files in Thursday's ruling have the names of alleged victims and perpetrators redacted, as well as names of alleged victims' parents. Those files are shielded by a court order, but will be made public in any eventual trial, Kosnoff said. "They have thrown just an unbelievable amount of money and effort at preventing us from getting these records and telling the world about them," he said of the Boy Scouts. LOAD-DATE: July 31, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Seattle Post-Intelligencer

98 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Times Leader Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune News Service July 9, 2006 Sunday

A church re-educates itself
BYLINE: Mark Guydish, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Times Leader SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 1504 words Jul. 9--It's a sunny spring Saturday in a still sleepy Montrose and Gerard "Father Gerry" Safko flashes a disarmingly warm smile in the chilly basement of the Holy Name of Mary Church rectory. He offers a few quips about a failed turkey hunt before settling into serious business: Child sex abuse. Safko comes across as easy going, but he has taken on the heavy task as facilitator, or trainer, for the VIRTUS program, adopted by the Diocese of Scranton in the wake of the priest sex scandals. Every cleric, every employee, every volunteer who deals regularly with children, throughout the 11 county diocese gets some training to recognize suspicious behavior, prevent abuse and report concerns. There is a separate program for Catholic school students. This is not optional. It is a mandate promulgated by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops as part of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, enacted in 2002. That makes the Catholic Church a rarity. By comparison, other organizations often make such training optional. The Boy Scouts of America, for example, have a voluntary online course. The National YMCA provides manuals that local organizations can incorporate into their training. While the state Department of Education has many safeguards against abuse of minors by teachers -spokesman Michael Storm cited mandatory background checks, mandatory abuse reporting, a ban on hiring teachers convicted of abuse, and a strict teacher code of conduct -- the state doesn't expressly require training similar to what the church now calls for. When the Conference of Catholic Bishops agreed to require the training, it left details up to each diocese. The Scranton Diocese, like others including Philadelphia, opted for the VIRTUS program developed, according to a press release, "by The National Catholic Risk Retention Group, Inc. of Lisle, Ill. a non-profit organization that provides risk control services to one-third of the Catholic dioceses in the U.S." Though trademarked in all capital letters, "VIRTUS" is not an acronym. Rather, the company Web site explains, it is a word that "derives from Latin, and means valor, moral strength, excellence, and worth. In ancient times, virtus denoted a way of life and manner of behavior that always aspired to the highest, most positive attributes of people and aspects of human interaction." The diocese asks for volunteers, such as Safko, to become facilitators, who go through all-day sessions. "Our goal is to have a broad range of individuals participating, in particular lay people," Diocese Spokesman Bill Genello wrote. "Currently there are two priests, two deacons, several women religious, as well as teachers, school principals, Diocesan personnel, etc." All told, there are 25 facilitators now. The costs are adding up. In the three years since launching VIRTUS, The Diocese of Scranton has spent more than $314,000 training roughly 13,000 people. That includes paying for about 7,000 of them to register for more training and updates through an online component, and a companion program for children from kindergarten to grade 10. And there is no end in sight, Genello said. "The program will go on indefinitely." Why? Safko summed it up to the four people attending the April 29 session, his third so far (a light crowd because it was scheduled for those who had missed earlier sessions): "We are the eyes and ears of the diocese, and of God." This, he concedes, is a different attitude from the pre-scandal church. "Years ago, we treated (abuse) like alcoholism, like an addiction," he said, trying to fix it by reprimanding

a priest and putting him in another assignment. "It didn't work. So the only option now is whoever is suspected is dismissed, temporarily at first while an investigation continues, then permanently" if the allegations prove true. "There have been very, very few false reports," Safko said. One study found 5 percent of all abuse reports were falsely made, "And that was by adults. Only 1 percent were falsely made by kids. "I do know of one case that was a lie. A priest, who was a friend of mine, was accused of fondling a girl," Safko said, adding that this occurred in different diocese. "He told me â[#x20ac][#x2dc]I have no attraction to girls. I have no attraction to boys. I'm a gay man.' " Even so, the accused priest was put through "a barrage of tests" before the charges were deemed unfounded. In the end, "he didn't leave the priesthood because of that. He left the priesthood because he fell in love with another man." Such straight talk peppered the three-hour session. Safko made it clear he believes the only way to prevent abuse is to face its many ugly facets head on. The centerpiece of the training, two videos, reinforced that attitude, featuring abusers discussing their tactics and experts giving stern advice and stark statistics supplemented by Safko: -- The abused often become abusers. "The cycle must stop," Safko said. -- They might start abusing children when they are still children themselves. -- One study of abusers found that 11 percent of all abusers were strangers, 29 percent were relatives, and 60 percent were people known to the victim. -- Of all church-related abuse, about half the cases were committed by volunteers. -- Twenty-one percent of men who molested boys were gay. As Safko later noted, an abusers sexual orientation isn't what compels the abuse. A lack of sexual maturity is the primary culprit for pedophilia. -- Abuse rates in the general population are stark. Estimates run up to one in every 10 males being abused before becoming an adult. For females, the top estimate is one in every five. -- No one is sure how many people are attracted to minors, but estimates for the general population -- as well as for priests -- range up to 7 percent. Relatively few will actually respond to those impulses and abuse a child. Abusers in the videos talked glibly of tactics, of how they hung around children, gained their confidence and won the parents' trust. They not only groom the child, one expert warned, they groom the caregiver. They can be personable, even charismatic. Victims gave bleak accounts of their sagas. "I tried to kill myself when I was 15," one boy said. "When our daughter was molested, it nearly destroyed our parish," a woman said. "And for a long, long time I lost my faith." After the first video, Safko sought reactions from his trainees. "Powerful," replied Jeffrey Keyes from St. John the Evangelist in Susquehanna. "I thought it was very powerful, but disturbing." Others echoed the sentiment. Safko, who underwent a full day's training to become a facilitator, told them, "My first reaction was that I was angry, and also a little guilty because of the role we all play with children. ... My biggest fear is that we would be afraid to be with children. We can't be afraid to have feelings of love for children, but in a healthy way. "Children who are not touched develop problems, too." Safko lost a bit of his ease when he explained the psychology that prompts an adult to molest a child. He hesitated, looking for a clear way to explain a complex concept experts in the videotapes had only touched on. "They are psychosexually ... slow ... their development has been arrested. They have not progressed into a healthy adult sexuality." That means they are attracted to the lack of physical sexual development in children: the smooth, hairless skin; the softer, younger features.

The second video outlined a five-step plan to prevent abuse. -- Know the signs, including suspicious behavior by adults around kids: Giving inappropriate gifts, touching children excessively, showing more excitement when with children than with adults, ignoring basic rules by inviting kids to their home or other private places, and letting the children do things their parents forbid. -- Control access to children in church settings, starting with mandatory, standardized, written application forms for volunteers and staff, background checks and face-to-face interviews. -- Monitor programs for kids, making sure you know where the child is at all times, restricting access -- by both children and adults -- to secluded areas. Parents should always feel free to visit a program their kids are in. -- Be aware of what is going on in your child's life. Talk to them and make sure they know they can talk to you, and that you really listen. -- If you suspect something, tell someone. "You don't need proof to give your observations," Safko said. "You are not accusing, you are just pointing out. "Let the authorities do their jobs. If there's nothing there, there's nothing there. If there is, you prevented something worse. The most important thing is to admit our human frailty." Copyright (c) 2006, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Times Leader Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: July 9, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060709-WB-0709-A-church-re-educates-itself PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: WB Copyright 2006 The Times Leader

99 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Wilkes Barre Times Leader (Pennsylvania) July 9, 2006 Sunday

A church re-educates itself
BYLINE: MARK GUYDISH, mguydish@leader.net

SECTION: A; Pg. 9 LENGTH: 1549 words It's a sunny spring Saturday in a still sleepy Montrose and Gerard "Father Gerry" Safko flashes a disarmingly warm smile in the chilly basement of the Holy Name of Mary Church rectory. He offers a few quips about a failed turkey hunt before settling into serious business: Child sex abuse. Safko comes across as easy going, but he has taken on the heavy task as facilitator, or trainer, for the VIRTUS program, adopted by the Diocese of Scranton in the wake of the priest sex scandals. Every cleric, every employee, every volunteer who deals regularly with children, throughout the 11 county diocese gets some training to recognize suspicious behavior, prevent abuse and report concerns. There is a separate program for Catholic school students. Martina Lingobardo and Jeffrey Keyes take part in a VIRTUS training session held at Holy Name of Mary Parish in April. They agreed that segments of the program about child sex abuse were 'powerful.' Rev. Gerard Safko presides over a VIRTUS training session held at Holy Name of Mary Parish in Montrose in April. While the group was small this time, the program is vast, training most staff and volunteers in the 11-county Scranton Diocese. 'Those abused as children can become abusers,' Father Gerard Safko tells his trainees during a lesson about how to detect and prevent sex abuse. 'The cycle has to stop.' This is not optional. It is a mandate promulgated by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops as part of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, enacted in 2002. That makes the Catholic Church a rarity. By comparison, other organizations often make such training optional. The Boy Scouts of America, for example, have a voluntary online course. The National YMCA provides manuals that local organizations can incorporate into their training. While the state Department of Education has many safeguards against abuse of minors by teachers spokesman Michael Storm cited mandatory background checks, mandatory abuse reporting, a ban on hiring teachers convicted of abuse, and a strict teacher code of conduct the state doesn't expressly require training similar to what the church now calls for. When the Conference of Catholic Bishops agreed to require the training, it left details up to each diocese. The Scranton Diocese, like others including Philadelphia, opted for the VIRTUS program developed, according to a press release, "by The National Catholic Risk Retention Group, Inc. of Lisle, Ill. a non-profit organization that provides risk control services to one-third of the Catholic dioceses in the U.S." Though trademarked in all capital letters, "VIRTUS" is not an acronym. Rather, the company Web site explains, it is a word that "derives from Latin, and means valor, moral strength, excellence, and worth. In ancient times, virtus denoted a way of life and manner of behavior that always aspired to the highest, most positive attributes of people and aspects of human interaction." The diocese asks for volunteers, such as Safko, to become facilitators, who go through all-day sessions. "Our goal is to have a broad range of individuals participating, in particular lay people," Diocese Spokesman Bill Genello wrote. "Currently there are two priests, two deacons, several women religious, as well as teachers, school principals, Diocesan personnel, etc." All told, there are 25 facilitators now.

The costs are adding up. In the three years since launching VIRTUS, The Diocese of Scranton has spent more than $314,000 training roughly 13,000 people. That includes paying for about 7,000 of them to register for more training and updates through an online component, and a companion program for children from kindergarten to grade 10. And there is no end in sight, Genello said. "The program will go on indefinitely." Why? Safko summed it up to the four people attending the April 29 session, his third so far (a light crowd because it was scheduled for those who had missed earlier sessions): "We are the eyes and ears of the diocese, and of God." This, he concedes, is a different attitude from the pre-scandal church. "Years ago, we treated (abuse) like alcoholism, like an addiction," he said, trying to fix it by reprimanding a priest and putting him in another assignment. "It didn't work. So the only option now is whoever is suspected is dismissed, temporarily at first while an investigation continues, then permanently" if the allegations prove true. "There have been very, very few false reports," Safko said. One study found 5 percent of all abuse reports were falsely made, "And that was by adults. Only 1 percent were falsely made by kids. "I do know of one case that was a lie. A priest, who was a friend of mine, was accused of fondling a girl," Safko said, adding that this occurred in different diocese. "He told me 'I have no attraction to girls. I have no attraction to boys. I'm a gay man.' " Even so, the accused priest was put through "a barrage of tests" before the charges were deemed unfounded. In the end, "he didn't leave the priesthood because of that. He left the priesthood because he fell in love with another man." Such straight talk peppered the three-hour session. Safko made it clear he believes the only way to prevent abuse is to face its many ugly facets head on. The centerpiece of the training, two videos, reinforced that attitude, featuring abusers discussing their tactics and experts giving stern advice and stark statistics supplemented by Safko: The abused often become abusers. "The cycle must stop," Safko said. They might start abusing children when they are still children themselves. One study of abusers found that 11 percent of all abusers were strangers, 29 percent were relatives, and 60 percent were people known to the victim. Of all church-related abuse, about half the cases were committed by volunteers. Twenty-one percent of men who molested boys were gay. As Safko later noted, an abusers sexual orientation isn't what compels the abuse. A lack of sexual maturity is the primary culprit for pedophilia. Abuse rates in the general population are stark. Estimates run up to one in every 10 males being abused before becoming an adult. For females, the top estimate is one in every five. No one is sure how many people are attracted to minors, but estimates for the general population as well as for priests range up to 7 percent. Relatively few will actually respond to those impulses and abuse a child. Abusers in the videos talked glibly of tactics, of how they hung around children, gained their confidence and won the parents' trust. They not only groom the child, one expert warned, they groom the caregiver. They can be personable, even charismatic. Victims gave bleak accounts of their sagas. "I tried to kill myself when I was 15," one boy said. "When our daughter was molested, it nearly destroyed our parish," a woman said. "And for a long, long time I lost my faith." After the first video, Safko sought reactions from his trainees. "Powerful," replied Jeffrey Keyes from St. John the Evangelist in Susquehanna. "I thought it was very powerful, but disturbing." Others echoed the sentiment.

Safko, who underwent a full day's training to become a facilitator, told them, "My first reaction was that I was angry, and also a little guilty because of the role we all play with children. ... My biggest fear is that we would be afraid to be with children. We can't be afraid to have feelings of love for children, but in a healthy way. "Children who are not touched develop problems, too." Safko lost a bit of his ease when he explained the psychology that prompts an adult to molest a child. He hesitated, looking for a clear way to explain a complex concept experts in the videotapes had only touched on. "They are psychosexually slow their development has been arrested. They have not progressed into a healthy adult sexuality." That means they are attracted to the lack of physical sexual development in children: the smooth, hairless skin; the softer, younger features. The second video outlined a five-step plan to prevent abuse. Know the signs, including suspicious behavior by adults around kids: Giving inappropriate gifts, touching children excessively, showing more excitement when with children than with adults, ignoring basic rules by inviting kids to their home or other private places, and letting the children do things their parents forbid. Control access to children in church settings, starting with mandatory, standardized, written application forms for volunteers and staff, background checks and face-to-face interviews. Monitor programs for kids, making sure you know where the child is at all times, restricting access by both children and adults to secluded areas. Parents should always feel free to visit a program their kids are in. Be aware of what is going on in your child's life. Talk to them and make sure they know they can talk to you, and that you really listen. If you suspect something, tell someone. "You don't need proof to give your observations," Safko said. "You are not accusing, you are just pointing out. "Let the authorities do their jobs. If there's nothing there, there's nothing there. If there is, you prevented something worse. The most important thing is to admit our human frailty." LOAD-DATE: July 9, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Wilkes Barre Times Leader All Rights Reserved

101 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) July 7, 2006 Friday Sunrise Edition

EDITORIAL: Settling Tualatin's sex abuse case

SECTION: Editorial; Pg. D06 LENGTH: 539 words SUMMARY: The city will pay only $28,750 and admit no wrongdoing after police officers have sexual contact with a teenage girl Tualatin got an easy out, probably too easy, in its settlement with a young woman who was sexually abused as a girl by city police. The victim, now 22, settled her potential lawsuit against the city for $75,000, far below the $1 million originally sought. The city's actual share of that, after payments by its insurance carrier and others, is a mere $28,750 --hardly enough to buy a traffic light. The city offered the victim no counseling. It offered no formal apology, although she did at least receive a heartfelt personal apology from the chief of police, according to her attorney. Nor did the city admit any wrongdoing. Nor did it accept responsibility for any future claims stemming from the abuse. This is a sweet deal for Tualatin, which had a strong upper hand in this conflict. The young woman dreaded the trauma of depositions and trial testimony. She was exhausted over the matter and in a hurry to get on with her life. And, like so many sexual abuse victims, she may not have fully grasped the nature of what happened to her and how the adverse effects of it may not become clear to her for years to come, according to Portland attorney Dennis Steinman, who represented her. Tualatin may not have to admit any wrongdoing, but we're bound by no such legal posture. We see plenty of wrongdoing here. For starters, it was wrong for male police officers to begin having sexual contact with a girl just turning 16. She was in the Tualatin Police Department's Explorer post, through a program run by a subsidiary of the Boy Scouts of America, which is matching Tualatin's share of the settlement payout. Adding to the shame, many officers in the department maintained an unholy code of silence. An inquiry last year discovered that more than a dozen of the department's 36 sworn officers had heard about the abuse after it began in 1999, but none spoke out. That was wrong, too. The abuse got exposed only after gossip about it spread to Hillsboro police, who blew the whistle. After a criminal investigation, three Tualatin officers and one Oregon State Police trooper resigned and gave up their law enforcement certifications. All escaped charges when the victim refused to cooperate with prosecutors. That's not an unusual response from young victims of sexual abuse. They often perceive themselves, and not their abusers, to be the ones at fault. They often don't quite see how they've been harmed, and how that harm can become manifest many years later in overpowering feelings of guilt, regret and self-loathing. If such a fate awaits Tualatin's victim --and let's pray it does not --the city appears to be safely inoculated against having to accept any responsibility for it. That's no doubt the result of some high-priced legal advice, and it's a good outcome for the city of Tualatin. In a more humane and fair world, however, the young woman --without even having to ask --would have been offered intensive counseling. That and a formal published apology to her and every other girl and boy who ever participated in Tualatin's Explorer program, which we're glad to hear has been indefinitely suspended. LOAD-DATE: July 8, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2006 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

102 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Mirror July 1, 2006 Saturday Ulster Edition

I HEARD MY SON BUT NOT HIS 20-YEAR OLD VOICE.. IT WAS LIKE HE WAS A CHILD AGAIN CRYING OUT FOR HELP; EXCLUSIVE: MOTHER OF ABUSE SUICIDE VICTIM SPEAKS OUT
BYLINE: BY ALLISON MORRIS SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 16 LENGTH: 1308 words IT took years for sex abuse victim Paul Anthony Carson to learn to live with the nightmare of his childhood. Just when he thought he had banished the bad dreams he had kept secret from his family they exploded around him in a pet shop one Christmas Eve. Paul had just bought a pet snake for a friend and standing before him as he turned from the counter was the man who had tormented him as an altar boy. He had helped put serial sex monster Martin Kerr behind bars just six months earlier with evidence he told nobody but the police. And there he was, browsing through a shopping centre among the decorations, the Santas - and the kids. Kerr had been released from prison for his Christmas holidays. Paul's first reaction to the cruel chance encounter was violence. Then came black despair. And then suicide. All that happened seven years ago and this Sunday the former altar boy would have celebrated his 28th birthday. For years he had kept the abuse hidden. Unknown to his family or friends he had gone to the police and made a statement about the abuse he suffered after other frightened boys made claims against Kerr. His mother says the two-year sentence handed down to Kerr was an insult and less than a shoplifter would expect . As her loving son skipped out the door on his way to serve on the altar at St Peter's Cathedral in West Belfast his mother Jean could not have been more proud.

Paul Anthony Carson could light up a room in an instant, with a head of glossy curls he looked like a cherub and had a generous and bubbly nature to match. He had become an altar boy at the age of seven and along with several of his young friends his weekends would centre around church activities and football. JEAN says she noticed a change in him as he grew from a boy to a young man. His love of life diminished and a sadness replaced his once happy-go-lucky nature. She added: "You couldn't put your finger on it, there was just something not right. "It was probably something only a mother could see but it worried me terribly." As the family tried to come to terms with Paul Anthony's depression Jean struggled to find answers to her son's problems. Then one day the local priest knocked on he door and told Jean there was something she needed to know. Two young boys who had served as altar boys in St Peter's parish had came forward to say they had been sexually abused by church sacristan Martin Kerr. Former scout master Kerr had ingratiated himself into the local community. He had been involved in several roles that put him in direct contact with young boys for more than 20 years. The Church believed there were more victims yet to come. Jean remembers: "I asked Paul Anthony outright, 'Son, tell me, did he hurt you?' "But he just said, 'Don't worry about me, pray for those other boys.' "I had my suspicions, but there was little I could do. He just didn't feel ready at that time to share his hurt. "I could only believe what he was telling me but I still had my suspicions." Kerr appeared in court in June 1998 charged with 48 counts of sexual abuse against three boys spanning a decade. Unknown to any of his family or friends Paul Anthony was one of those boys. At the time, aged 19, he had gone to the police and made a statement helping secure a conviction against the serial paedophile. Of the 48 charges of sexual abuse Kerr faced, 18 related to crimes committed against Paul Anthony. Despite the seriousness of the crimes Kerr was jailed for just two years. The judge took into consideration his guilty plea and probation reports stating he had an unhappy childhood. Jean said: "The first time my son tried to take his own life was on the night Martin Kerr was sentenced. "The shock was horrendous, I couldn't understand what would drive my child to such lengths. "I could see his pain, you just feel so helpless." Paul Anthony attempted suicide twice more before finally confiding in his parents he had been sexually abused by Kerr. Jean added: "In some ways I naively thought, 'Right, now we know what's wrong we can help him'. "But like all Kerr's victims he carried a degree of guilt. This monster had manipulated their young minds to such a degree they were terrified. He made them think they were to blame. "The only thing that kept us going was knowing that at least Martin Kerr was behind bars." On Christmas Eve 1998 Paul Anthony Carson went to a pet shop close to Belfast city centre, to buy presents for his friends.

JEAN was hopeful as it was one of the first times he had ventured across the door in more than six months. She said: "We thought he was on the mend and knowing that Kerr was behind bars gave him the courage to go outside and face the world. "He got up that morning and it was like someone switched on the light. He asked me did I need anything in the shop, he went and got a few bits for me and then said he was going to buy presents for his friends." But then, in the pet shop, he came face to face with his tormentor. Just six months into his sentence Kerr had been released on Christmas parole. As the law stands the family did not have to be informed that Kerr had been released. Paul Anthony flew into a rage and lashed out at the man who had stolen his childhood, before running off and phoning home. Jean said she'll never forget the phone call: "I could hear Paul Anthony's voice but not his 20-year-old voice, it was like he was a child again. "He was whispering, 'Mummy please come and get me, Martin Kerr is here, help me'. "I said, 'Son, it can't be, Martin Kerr is in jail you must be mistaken'. "But he kept repeating, 'He's not, he's here please come and get me'. He was on the ground hiding in the pet shop like a scared rabbit crying out for help. "I phoned the police. I didn't know what else to do. When they phoned back, they said, 'Mr Kerr says he'll let it drop he doesn't want to press charges, he doesn't know why the young man attacked him'. "I said he may not know the man standing in front of him but he knows the boy all right." FOLLOWING the meeting with his abuser, Paul Anthony sought help for his depression and tried to rebuild his life. Jean recalled: "He went to football training again and started talking about university. "I thought that maybe confronting Kerr had give him courage but the hurt was hidden so deep." In July 1999, 21-year-old Paul Anthony Carson was found hanging in the bedroom of his family home. She added: "There was this loud repetitive music coming from his room. "I had a terrible headache and as I walked past his room I said, 'Son, I have never asked you to turn your music off before but my head is splitting'. "I walked into the bedroom and there he was. He had been doing so well. The day before he bought new trainers and collected new glasses he said he'd need for studying. "My son was planning for the future. I don't think it was premeditated. But whatever horrors that Wednesday night brought - my son just couldn't face waking up on Thursday morning." Jean has since campaigned tirelessly for lengthy sentences for paedophiles. Last year Kerr came before the courts again, this time charged with three counts of sexual abuse against another former altar boy in the mid 90s. Kerr was given just 12 months probation, increased to 12 months in prison on appeal. He was out within six months and now lives in a Belfast city centre hostel, less than two miles from the Carson family home. Jean said: "Had Martin Kerr been given a proper sentence and been made to serve the full term I'm sure it would have helped Paul Anthony and his other victims. "The message sent to those children was what he did requires no more time in jail than if he had been caught shoplifting. "There are many more victims of Martin Kerr out there who have yet to find the courage to come forward.

"The sentences handed down by the courts do nothing to encourage those young people to speak up." ulster@mirror.co.uk LOAD-DATE: July 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: INNOCENCE: Paul and sister Susannah' PAIN: Jean Carson' HIDDEN TORMENT Paul Anthony Carson PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 MGN Ltd. All Rights Reserved

105 of 265 DOCUMENTS Daily Star June 30, 2006 Friday Scottish Edition

SEX ABUSE SHAME OF SCOUTS LEADER
BYLINE: by DAVE FINLAY SECTION: NEWS; 35 LENGTH: 251 words A SHAMED scoutmaster was jailed for eight years yesterday after committing sex crimes against boys. Former teacher Paul Firth molested 13 boys, aged between eight and 16, over a 22-year period. Lord Wheatley said there was a high risk he would re-offend and had his name added to the sex offenders' register. Bachelor Firth, 54, often took children on camping trips where he would prey on his victims and subject them to abuse. The paedophile was originally due to stand trial in 2000 but vanished and was later extradited from Spain. The former assistant head teacher at St Machar Academy in Aberdeen admitted a total of 13 indecency offences against boys committed between 1974 and 1996. Advocate depute Adrian Cottam earlier told the court that Firth was a leader with two Aberdeen Scout groups and worked as a teacher at Hazlehead and St Machar Academies in the city. Mr Cottam said: "It was well known that the accused preferred to share a tent with one or two of the boys as opposed to sleeping in a tent with other leaders."

Firth has already been jailed for three years for other sex offences against children. The court heard that Firth's first victim had joined the cubs in 1973 when he was aged seven or eight. Another victim, who is now dead, was abused by Firth at camps and at Firth's then home in Holburn Street, Aberdeen. Other youngsters recalled being fondled by Firth on camping trips. Defence counsel David Burns QC, said that Firth, who has been suspended since 1999, had expressed "shame and regret". LOAD-DATE: June 30, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: PAEDOPHILE: Paul Firth PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 EXPRESS NEWSPAPERS All Rights Reserved

106 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Express June 30, 2006 Friday Scottish Edition

Scout leader jailed for child sex abuse
SECTION: NEWS; 17 LENGTH: 180 words A SCOUTMASTER was yesterday jailed for eight years for a string of sex crimes against boys as young as eight. Paul Firth, 54, former assistant headteacher at St Machar Academy in Aberdeen, admitted 13 offences against boys aged eight to 16, between 1974 and 1996. Advocate depute Adrian Cottam told the High Court in Edinburgh that Firth's victims were abused during camping trips in the north of Scotland. Mr Cottam said: "The accused preferred to share a tent with boys as opposed to sleeping in a tent with other leaders, which would be normal practice." Police were called in after one victim told his father. Firth, formerly of Aberdeen, has already been jailed for three years for other sex offences against children. After his release, he was arrested on further charges. Lord Wheatley told Firth:"These children were often of a vulnerable age. The effect of what you did has had significant consequences for many of them." Lord Wheatley also ordered that Firth should be put on the

sex offenders' register and a further register which would prevent him working with youngsters. LOAD-DATE: June 30, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: REPEAT OFFENDER: Firth PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 EXPRESS NEWSPAPERS All Rights Reserved

107 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Scotsman June 30, 2006, Friday 1 Edition

Jail for pervert who abused boys at scout camp then fled
BYLINE: JOHN ROBERTSON Law Correspondent SECTION: Pg. 22 LENGTH: 775 words A FORMER teacher and scout leader who once fled Scotland and had to be extradited from Spain was jailed for eight years yesterday on a catalogue of child sex abuse charges. Paul Firth, 54, of Aberdeen, has already served three years for indecency offences against boys, and a judge was warned that he posed a high risk of committing more crimes. Lord Wheatley said the latest batch of charges, which happened mainly on camping trips, were not the worst examples of their kind, but Firth's abuse of his position was particularly grave. "You were a deputy headteacher and a scout master, and parents entrusted their children to you to be looked after. These children were often vulnerable and the effect of what you did clearly has had significant consequences for many of them," the judge said. Firth pleaded guilty to 13 offences committed between 1974 and 1996, involving 13 boys aged between eight and 16. Over the period, he was a scout leader in Aberdeen and a science teacher at the city's Hazlehead Academy and St Machar Academy, where he was assistant head teacher. He had been arrested in 1999 but he fled on a yacht days before he had been due to stand trial in 2000. An extradition agreement was reached with the Spanish authorities and Firth was returned to Scotland. However, the agreement restricted the charges he could face, and he was convicted in 2003 at Aberdeen Sheriff Court of abusing two boys and sentenced to three years' jail. The case attracted publicity and more victims were traced by police or came forward to make statements

against Firth, leading to the second prosecution. The advocate-depute, Adrian Cottam, said: "In his position as scout leader and teacher, it was regular practice for the accused to arrange camping trips to various locations, including Templar's Park, Aberdeen, an official scout campsite, and Blairhillock Bothy at Tarland, which has since been demolished. Other locations were used, such as Glenelg, Kyle of Lochalsh and Elgin. "It was a well-known fact that the accused preferred to share a tent with one or two of the boys as opposed to sleeping in a tent with the other leaders, which would be normal practice. "The impression gained from most witnesses is that they appeared happy with the arrangements of sharing a tent with the accused and most of the boys enjoyed his company as a whole as he was a very good scout leader. "He was well respected by the boys and other leaders and, indeed, was seen as a 'father figure' to a number of boys. "The teachers and other scout leaders were also aware that the accused shared a tent with young boys. None of them ever drew any conclusion or suspicions from this and it was their opinion that the accused felt more comfortable with the relaxed atmosphere with the boys, rather than the more formal atmosphere with the leaders. "Given the respect he had gained from both the boys and the adults alike, nobody felt the need to question him." However, in the mid-1990s rumours began to circulate and boys feared sharing a tent with Firth. The head teacher of St Machar, Leonard Taylor, spoke to Firth, who would not directly confirm or deny the rumours. He was given a written warning. The matter was brought to the attention of the police when one of Firth's victims, who was having difficulties dealing with the memories of what had happened to him, sought help. He confided in his father and then reported the abuse. The court heard that many of the boys had told no-one until they were contacted by the police. Some had been left so traumatised that they had required psychiatric treatment. The defence counsel, David Burns, QC, said Firth had expressed deep shame and regret. A background report had assessed him as at high risk of reoffending, but that was if he were not supervised or treated. "His last offending was some years ago, which suggests he is capable of placing restraints on his behaviour, and he is willing to participate in programmes [for sex offenders] in prison," Mr Burns said. Lord Wheatley said he would have imposed a ten-year sentence, but he was obliged to give Firth a discount for pleading guilty and the term would be restricted to eight years. Firth's name was also put on the sex offenders' register and on the child protection register which will stop him working again with children. Detective Superintendent Alan Smith, of Grampian Police, said: "From the day Paul Firth failed to turn up at the High Court in Dundee in October 2000, he was pursued relentlessly. As a result of the public response to a Crimewatch appeal, Grampian Police, working closely with the Crown Office, was able to bring Firth back from Spain in June 2003." LOAD-DATE: June 30, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Scotsman Publications Ltd. All Rights Reserved

108 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Times (London) June 30, 2006, Friday

Scout leader jailed over sex abuse at camp trips
BYLINE: Shirley English SECTION: HOME NEWS; Scotland; Pg. 32 LENGTH: 679 words A FORMER deputy head teacher and Scout master was jailed for eight years yesterday for molesting 13 boys over more than two decades. Paul Firth, 54, from Aberdeen, preyed on children as young as eight between 1974 and 1996. He abused them at his flat, in a church hall and during camping trips he organised. It was his practice to share a tent with the Scouts rather than the other leaders and because he was so well-known and respected no one had any suspicions. It was not until one boy, unable to cope with what had happened, told his father of Firth's abuse that the catalogue of crimes over a 22-year period finally came to light. Yesterday Judge Lord Wheatley, sitting at the High Court in Edinburgh, told Firth that he had betrayed a position of absolute trust. "In my view the seriousness of the breach of trust in this case is at the extreme end of the scale. You were a deputy head teacher and Scout master and parents entrusted their children to you to look after over a very long period," the judge said. Some of the families of his victims, many of whom suffered psychological problems in later life, were in court to see the former deputy head of St Machar Academy in Aberdeen sentenced. David Burns, QC, for the defence, said that Firth felt "deep shame and regret for his actions". But Lord Wheatley said: "These children were of a vulnerable age and the offences have clearly had significant consequences for them. I am further concerned in this case by the terms of the psychiatric report which makes it clear that you still present a high risk of reoffending should you be released and that you are to a significant extent still in denial over what you have done." Firth, a bachelor, has been placed on the sex offenders register and also on a register that will ban him from ever working with children. He was originally due to stand trial in 2000, but absconded to Spain and became a fugitive. Grampian Police pursued him and after a Crimewatch appeal he was located and extradited in June 2003. In October that year he was found guilty of child abuse charges and sentenced to three years in prison. The publicity surrounding his trial resulted in further offences coming to light and on his release from Craiginches Prison in January this year he was rearrested and charged with other crimes. That resulted in Firth pleading guilty last month to 13 new charges of indecent assault and lewd, indecent and libidinous practices on boys aged 8 to 16 between 1974 and 1996. The court was told that it was regular practice for Firth, who was originally charged with 27 offences, to arrange Scout camping trips with boys to various locations in the north of Scotland. At other times he had boys staying over at his house, sometimes on the night before camping trips, and plied them with alcohol before the indecent assaults.

His abuse left some of his victims needing treatment for depression and psychiatric problems. Adrian Cottam, advocate depute, told the court that Firth's victims were subjected to abuse at various sites, including Templars Park in Aberdeen, an official Scout campsite, a bothy in Tarland, Glenelg, Kyle of Lochalsh and Elgin. He said it was well known that Firth preferred to share a tent with one or two of the boys, but as most of the Scouts seemed to enjoy his company and some even viewed him as a father figure, other teachers and Scout leaders had no suspicions. But towards the middle of the 1990s some boys began to "fear sharing a tent" with Firth as rumours circulated about what happened on camping trips. Police were called in after one victim confided in his father. In 1998, Leonard Taylor, the head teacher at St Machar Academy, spoke to Firth about the rumours, which the deputy head did not confirm or deny. He was given a written warning and then suspended in 1999. The court was told that Firth's first victim had joined the Cubs in 1973 when he was aged seven or eight. The abuse happened during a camping trip after the boy was frightened by Firth's ghost stories and was told to move his sleeping bag nearer to the Scout leader. LOAD-DATE: June 30, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Times Newspapers Limited All Rights Reserved

109 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Southland Times (New Zealand) June 24, 2006 Saturday

Beware: It's not always a stranger
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 2 LENGTH: 2055 words KIA MARAMA wKia Marama is a 60-bed special treatment unit for child-sex offenders at Rolleston Prison. wIts name means "let there be light and insight" . wOpened in 1989, it was the first treatment facility of its kind in the world. wAuckland's Te Piriti unit (1994) was modelled on Kia Marama. wA 1998 evaluation found the programme reduced graduate reoffending risk by 50 percent in its first five years. wRecent figures show those treated after 1994 have a reconviction rate of less than 5 percent over an average follow-up period of five years.

Continued from page C1 Kia Marama: The exterior of the Kia Marama unit (Rolleston Prison), where up to 40 rehabilitating paedophiles are treated each year. Christopher Zaal Michael Gray 77524 BARRY HARCOURT On the case: Detective Stephen Dalton, of Invercargill, has spent the past 10 years gathering evidence against Southland's child sex offenders. COURT CONVICTIONS Convictions entered in southern (Dunedin included) courts for sex offences against children between 2003 and 2005. wChild abuse offenders sent to jail -- 24 (2003), 13 (2004), 13 (2005). wChild abuse offenders not jailed -- 10 (2003), 6 (2004), 10 (2005). wChild abuse offenders granted final name suppression -- 5 (2004), 3 (2005). (NOTE: Each case may have multiple victims associated with it.) w158 charges for the 34 cases in 2003. w46 charges for 19 cases in 2004. w77 charges for 23 cases in 2005. I TS index screamed offenders' names by area and occupation and each entry carried a brief summary of their offence. "Heterogenous" takes on new meaning when 38 religious affiliates, 27 caregivers, eight public servants (including military and police), 14 scout leaders and 10 healthcare paedophiles dirty the book's pages, with other sections including educators, pensioners, students and unemployed.Thirty of those names are associated to Southland. Rutherford says there's no single pathway to child sex abuse but it's widely agreed the nurture rather than nature argument holds sway. "It is learned but in so many different ways." Some had been victims, others were never abused and came from backgrounds where they were over-indulged. She says it's clear, though, that most offenders took their first offensive step during adolescence and into their early 20s. The key moment was when a "cognitive distortion" overcame any inhibition, sometimes aided by earlier abuse, drugs and alcohol or watching child pornography.That distortion, combined with a "sexual preoccupation" (a common trait) normalised the behaviour and, as it increased, empathy for victims dropped and rationalisation took control. This is where offenders often saw the abuse as a romance or an educational period for the child. "There is a whole range of things they tell themselves that allows them to do what they do. (But) it's not an addiction ... it's not a chemical change in the brain ... it's a behaviour -- not a high," Rutherford says. Detective Stephen Dalton, of the Invercargill Police child abuse investigation team, has been almost exclusively involved in bringing abusers like Matheson, Zaal and Gray to court since 1996 and agrees most men begin offending in their late teens. Many would be without partners, but not always, and victims in "many cases" were well known to them. "These people will ingratiate themselves in some way with a family where they've identified a likely child target," he says. "This family association will often increase in intensity, with the offender visiting more frequently until he becomes a trusted family friend whom the child's parents would never suspect of being an abuser. "This, of course, makes it more difficult for the child to disclose any abuse. It also gives the abuser privileges of contact with the child he would not otherwise get or receive." This most common method of offend-

ing is known as "grooming" . Rochelle Walker, who has counselled paedophile victims for six years, says grooming includes bribery, coercion and trickery to get children alone. "They may look for opportunities to fulfill the child's need for attention or take advantage of the way the child responds to family rules, structures and consequences," she says. Children became confused when the abuse was minimised by words like `its OK to watch this (porn)' -breaking down normal responses, reactions and barriers. Incorrect messages of what would happen if they talked would be fed to the child, as well as gifts and items to keep them quiet. "This ... (causes) confusion that, because they enjoyed and took gifts, they will be in trouble." Some offenders would also threaten to hurt loved ones, Walker says. Rutherford says offenders tend to get good at spotting successful targets -- those having difficulties at home or with friends or those who have already been abused. However, while the children are being groomed, often the parents are too. "They may do things that are helpful to the parents ... helping with debt, babysitting ... helping out around the house. They become trusted." Grooming timelines varied between offenders and could be as low as about five minutes (offering lollies in the park) or as long as five years in a bid to isolate the child. "Children are taught to comply to adults," Rutherford explains. Both Dalton and Rutherford said it's important adults trust their gut instincts and act if they think they're being groomed. Watching the adult-child interaction could be revealing because there were tell-tale signs to grooming, Rutherford says. "Spending more time with the child than the adult friends ... touching the child more than normal, offering to take the child away a lot or offering to take just one of the children away." Subtle, flirtatious behaviour more suited to adult romance or the introduction of sexual talk around children were also indicators. "That's not normal (and) if you put that all together over time there's a lot going on. When parents are being groomed they get that gut feeling but often dismiss it. By the time it gets (to that) stop, it's gone too far." Rutherford says one of the reasons paedophiles get away with it is that asking people about their sexual intentions is not the social norm. "In this context it's entirely appropriate to ask ... that's how you protect people ... that's being a parent -- trust your gut and do something about it." Walker says alarming statistics indicated one in three girls and one in four boys will be sexually abused. Many victims believed it was their fault, which continues into adulthood. "Because the perpetrator is often known and has hurt them in this way -- it affects their ability to trust others ... changing the child's belief of who are reliable and safe in their lives." Loss of confidence and self-esteem could lead to regressive behaviour and withdrawal, and ways to aid memory suppression was sought through drugs and alcohol. Dalton says any disclosure from children should be treated as true until proved otherwise -- not dismissed out of hand. "Children who make disclosures of abuse and are not believed often grow up harbouring feelings of bitterness and rejection ... the simple act of listening to the victim and accepting their complaint as valid is often all that's required to begin the healing process." Parents should listen to what the child says and record details but resist the temptation to carry out their own questioning of the child, which could later be criticised in court as suggestive or leading.

Parents should contact Child Youth and Family or the police to discuss disclosure and take advice. Walker agrees the initial disclosure period is crucial for the child's healing process. "The reaction of significant others is critical. It's important the children feel they're believed ... protected, and for the abuse to stop." Parents should also get support to help them help the child through it. "They're also coming to terms with the fact that someone they've known, and been part of their family relationships, has destroyed and betrayed their trust (and) can feel guilty they did not recognise what occurred." Educating children about their bodies and sexual abuse while allowing open and honest communication can prevent children being victimised, Walker says. "Help them understand its their body and no one else can tell them what to do with it, that sometimes people try and trick them into doing things and (the child) is not to blame because its wrong. Let them know you want to know about their worries (and they) have help." R UTHERFORD says up to 40 men are treated at the Kia Marama treatment unit every year. More than 800 have been since 1989. Because the offending was "basically a behavioural and thinking disorder over time" , treatment was possible. "If it's learned, they can learn something else." She confirms anywhere from 40 to 60 percent of offenders had once been a victim but was quick to point out "the other half have no history" . She also says of every 100 victims, only one of those would become an abuser. "It's a distortion to say `I did this because I was abused as a child'." Rutherford says that's "passing the blame," -- a practice also treated. Abusers enter Rolleston prison's Kia Marama unit in the final year of their sentence. The first three months adapts them to the "therapeutic community" , where "the norm" for inmates was to challenge inappropriate behaviour, before the nine-month therapy and change phase begins. The men are assisted to develop honest insight into what they do, the choices they made during the offending and the impact of those choices. This includes a "demanding" victim empathy period where they're required to assume the identity of the victim in a group and talk from that perspective. A "change" period then introduces self-monitoring, where personal and relationship skills, previously lacking, are learned and a safety plan in preparation for release is designed. This reintegration with support and monitoring includes help from government agencies such as probation services and the police. Rutherford says New Zealand rehab for child abusers is world leading, with graduates having a recidivism rate of less than 5 percent over an average monitoring time of five years, compared to 25 percent recidivism for untreated prisoners. Those men who refuse treatment still had to be released at the end of their sentence, but if considered a "high risk" could be closely monitored by probation for up to 10 years. But for some people that's understandably not enough. The Sensible Sentencing Trust takes a cynical view of paedophile rehabilitation and on its website suggests chemical castration for men like Zaal, who reoffended even after completing the Kia Marama programme. The trust took Coddington's lead by posting its own sex offender registry page, challenging the Government to follow other countries by making an "open-to-the-public" register. Coddington's proposed Sex Offenders Registry Bill was first called before Parliament in 2003 and is due for its next select committee hearing on August 31. She says her book and proposed registry were meant "to send a clear message" to offenders they would

be monitored for much longer after conviction or prison release. Rutherford agreed secrecy of any sort bred abuse and lists could be positive, if treated realistically. "We don't expect the community to welcome them with open arms (but) keep in mind it's unhelpful and unsafe to react and revictimise them." In the West Coast town of Blackball in 2005, residents drove a recently relocated recidivist paedophile out of town when they learned of his whereabouts. Dalton said parents needed to be aware there were "predators" living and working in the community. Scenarios like Blackball often led offenders to live transient lives, not being able to settle for any lengthy periods before having to move on again. Rutherford says offenders who hide and change their names don't rehabilitate as well as offenders who are around people who know their offending, their treatment plan and can respectfully challenge them. "That's the best scenario for a person whose been through treatment to stay safe (for the community)." She also advised against becoming complacent to the warning signs by relying on conviction lists; summed up best by the Invercargill cop that catches them. "There will always be child abusers in the community," Dalton says. LOAD-DATE: June 23, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Southland Times Company Limited All Rights Reserved

110 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Southland Times (New Zealand) June 24, 2006 Saturday

Robbers of Innocence Robbers of innocence
BYLINE: ROBINSON Jeremy SECTION: FEATURES; GENERAL; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 2736 words They walk the same streets, eat in the same restaurants. They're contributing members of decent society but are also the perpetrators of the most evil acts a parent can think of. They target and use our children for sexual gratification. Jeremy Robinson investigates paedophiliac behaviour through the eyes of professionals who deal with the fallout. A MIDDLE-AGED man wearing a suit and tie, face twisting, stumbles against the varnished framing of the Invercargill District Court dock.

He'd been a valuable scout leader throughout the 80s and 90s, in charge of boys at camps and field trips. Now he was a convicted paedophile. He looked as if he couldn't believe it, but the jury was convinced. Perhaps it still had vivid recollections of a similar, emotionally charged moment in the courtroom a couple of days earlier. A strong young man of 28 had told the jury what had been done to him more than 18 years before. He had looked at the man and wept. He spoke of early memories of scouts, of being sexually assaulted while being driven home, and again in his tent while camping. The man denied it. No one but the judge and lawyers could have known that, a few months ago, another jury had found the same 40-year-old scout leader, Kenneth John Matheson, guilty of sexually violating a 10-year-old boy in late 1986, early 1987. Three alleged victims had given evidence at that trial. They had all been aged under 16, living near the man in Yarrow St. They told how they came to be alone with the man when he let them into his room to watch TV or listen to music. After the 28-year-old had told his story and left the jury told his abuser, through its guilty verdict, that he couldn't get away with it any more. It had taken just two hours to decide whom to believe, and the 40-year-old scout leader stood shaking his head. It's a scenario played out in Invercargill and New Zealand courtrooms over and over again. In 2002, Christopher Peter Zaal, 45, a married Invercargill man, was convicted. He had lured his victims under the guise of martial arts training. He had himself been a paedophile victim and abused 16 children, mostly boys, over a 12-year period. In 2004, Michael William Gray, a 51-year-old water treatment plant operator, was convicted. He invited boys aged 9 to 14 to his workplace, where he would let them look at porn. He was also abused as a child but chose to groom at least eight boys for his own sexual gratification. There are many, many more stories that all pose the same question. Why? Who are these people, what were their backgrounds and how did their social boundaries get so distorted? Bronwyn Rutherford spends most of her time exploring those issues. The principal psychologist of Kia Marama, the nation's leading custodial rehabilitative centre for child sex offenders at Rolleston Prison, she has been treating the problem for eight years. She says one of the biggest misconceptions people have to realise about child abusers is that the problem is closer to home than most people think. Consider the New Zealand stereotype, she says: "The dirty old man in a raincoat and the stranger, that somehow the monster is visible (is wrong). (Paedophiles) are very different to all other offenders. "They come from all socio-economic groups, white collar, blue collar, low socio-economic and all ranges of mental ability. They are a very heterogenous group." In 2004 journalist and former Act MP Deborah Coddington published her latest edition of The New Zealand Paedophile and Sex Offender, a book that took "almost" every newspaper court clipping in the country between 1990 and 2003 and bound it in a register of convicted offenders. Continued page C2 Continued from page C1 ITS index screamed offenders' names by area and oc-

cupation and each entry carried a brief summary of their offence. "Heterogenous" takes on new meaning when 38 religious affiliates, 27 caregivers, eight public servants (including military and police), 14 scout leaders and 10 healthcare paedophiles dirty the book's pages, with other sections including educators, pensioners, students and unemployed.Thirty of those names are associated to Southland. Rutherford says there's no single pathway to child sex abuse but it's widely agreed the nurture rather than nature argument holds sway. "It is learned but in so many different ways." Some had been victims, others were never abused and came from backgrounds where they were over-indulged. She says it's clear, though, that most offenders took their first offensive step during adolescence and into their early 20s. The key moment was when a "cognitive distortion" overcame any inhibition, sometimes aided by earlier abuse, drugs and alcohol or watching child pornography.That distortion, combined with a "sexual preoccupation" (a common trait) normalised the behaviour and, as it increased, empathy for victims dropped and rationalisation took control. This is where offenders often saw the abuse as a romance or an educational period for the child. "There is a whole range of things they tell themselves that allows them to do what they do. (But) it's not an addiction ... it's not a chemical change in the brain ... it's a behaviour -- not a high," Rutherford says. Detective Stephen Dalton, of the Invercargill Police child abuse investigation team, has been almost exclusively involved in bringing abusers like Matheson, Zaal and Gray to court since 1996 and agrees most men begin offending in their late teens. Many would be without partners, but not always, and victims in "many cases" were well known to them. "These people will ingratiate themselves in some way with a family where they've identified a likely child target," he says. "This family association will often increase in intensity, with the offender visiting more frequently until he becomes a trusted family friend whom the child's parents would never suspect of being an abuser. "This, of course, makes it more difficult for the child to disclose any abuse. It also gives the abuser privileges of contact with the child he would not otherwise get or receive." This most common method of offending is known as "grooming" . Rochelle Walker, who has counselled paedophile victims for six years, says grooming includes bribery, coercion and trickery to get children alone. "They may look for opportunities to fulfill the child's need for attention or take advantage of the way the child responds to family rules, structures and consequences," she says. Children became confused when the abuse was minimised by words like `its OK to watch this (porn)' -breaking down normal responses, reactions and barriers. Incorrect messages of what would happen if they talked would be fed to the child, as well as gifts and items to keep them quiet. "This ... (causes) confusion that, because they enjoyed and took gifts, they will be in trouble." Some offenders would also threaten to hurt loved ones, Walker says. Rutherford says offenders tend to get good at spotting successful targets -- those having difficulties at home or with friends or those who have already been abused. However, while the children are being groomed, often the parents are too.

"They may do things that are helpful to the parents ... helping with debt, babysitting ... helping out around the house. They become trusted." Grooming timelines varied between offenders and could be as low as about five minutes (offering lollies in the park) or as long as five years in a bid to isolate the child. "Children are taught to comply to adults," Rutherford explains. Both Dalton and Rutherford said it's important adults trust their gut instincts and act if they think they're being groomed. Watching the adult-child interaction could be revealing because there were tell-tale signs to grooming, Rutherford says. "Spending more time with the child than the adult friends ... touching the child more than normal, offering to take the child away a lot or offering to take just one of the children away." Subtle, flirtatious behaviour more suited to adult romance or the introduction of sexual talk around children were also indicators. "That's not normal (and) if you put that all together over time there's a lot going on. When parents are being groomed they get that gut feeling but often dismiss it. By the time it gets (to that) stop, it's gone too far." Rutherford says one of the reasons paedophiles get away with it is that asking people about their sexual intentions is not the social norm. "In this context it's entirely appropriate to ask ... that's how you protect people ... that's being a parent -- trust your gut and do something about it." Walker says alarming statistics indicated one in three girls and one in four boys will be sexually abused. Many victims believed it was their fault, which continues into adulthood. "Because the perpetrator is often known and has hurt them in this way -- it affects their ability to trust others ... changing the child's belief of who are reliable and safe in their lives." Loss of confidence and self-esteem could lead to regressive behaviour and withdrawal, and ways to aid memory suppression was sought through drugs and alcohol. Dalton says any disclosure from children should be treated as true until proved otherwise -- not dismissed out of hand. "Children who make disclosures of abuse and are not believed often grow up harbouring feelings of bitterness and rejection ... the simple act of listening to the victim and accepting their complaint as valid is often all that's required to begin the healing process." Parents should listen to what the child says and record details but resist the temptation to carry out their own questioning of the child, which could later be criticised in court as suggestive or leading. Parents should contact Child Youth and Family or the police to discuss disclosure and take advice. Walker agrees the initial disclosure period is crucial for the child's healing process. "The reaction of significant others is critical. It's important the children feel they're believed ... protected, and for the abuse to stop." Parents should also get support to help them help the child through it. "They're also coming to terms with the fact that someone they've known, and been part of their family relationships, has destroyed and betrayed their trust (and) can feel guilty they did not recognise what occurred." Educating children about their bodies and sexual abuse while allowing open and honest communication can prevent children being victimised, Walker says. "Help them understand its their body and no one else can tell them what to do with it, that sometimes people try and trick them into doing things and (the child) is not to blame because its wrong. Let them know you want to know about their worries (and they) have help." RUTHERFORD says up to 40 men are treated at the Kia Marama treatment unit every year. More than 800 have been since 1989. Because the offending was "basically a behavioural and thinking disorder over time" , treatment was possible. "If it's learned, they can learn something else." She confirms anywhere from 40 to 60 percent of offend-

ers had once been a victim but was quick to point out "the other half have no history" . She also says of every 100 victims, only one of those would become an abuser. "It's a distortion to say `I did this because I was abused as a child'." Rutherford says that's "passing the blame," -- a practice also treated. Abusers enter Rolleston prison's Kia Marama unit in the final year of their sentence. The first three months adapts them to the "therapeutic community" , where "the norm" for inmates was to challenge inappropriate behaviour, before the nine-month therapy and change phase begins. The men are assisted to develop honest insight into what they do, the choices they made during the offending and the impact of those choices. This includes a "demanding" victim empathy period where they're required to assume the identity of the victim in a group and talk from that perspective. A "change" period then introduces self-monitoring, where personal and relationship skills, previously lacking, are learned and a safety plan in preparation for release is designed. This reintegration with support and monitoring includes help from government agencies such as probation services and the police. Rutherford says New Zealand rehab for child abusers is world leading, with graduates having a recidivism rate of less than 5 percent over an average monitoring time of five years, compared to 25 percent recidivism for untreated prisoners. Those men who refuse treatment still had to be released at the end of their sentence, but if considered a "high risk" could be closely monitored by probation for up to 10 years. But for some people that's understandably not enough. The Sensible Sentencing Trust takes a cynical view of paedophile rehabilitation and on its website suggests chemical castration for men like Zaal, who reoffended even after completing the Kia Marama programme. The trust took Coddington's lead by posting its own sex offender registry page, challenging the Government to follow other countries by making an "open-to-the-public" register. Coddington's proposed Sex Offenders Registry Bill was first called before Parliament in 2003 and is due for its next select committee hearing on August 31. She says her book and proposed registry were meant "to send a clear message" to offenders they would be monitored for much longer after conviction or prison release. Rutherford agreed secrecy of any sort bred abuse and lists could be positive, if treated realistically. "We don't expect the community to welcome them with open arms (but) keep in mind it's unhelpful and unsafe to react and revictimise them." In the West Coast town of Blackball in 2005, residents drove a recently relocated recidivist paedophile out of town when they learned of his whereabouts. Dalton said parents needed to be aware there were "predators" living and working in the community. Scenarios like Blackball often led offenders to live transient lives, not being able to settle for any lengthy periods before having to move on again. Rutherford says offenders who hide and change their names don't rehabilitate as well as offenders who are around people who know their offending, their treatment plan and can respectfully challenge them. "That's the best scenario for a person whose been through treatment to stay safe (for the community)." She also advised against becoming complacent to the warning signs by relying on conviction lists; summed up best by the Invercargill cop that catches them. "There will always be child abusers in the community," Dalton says. INFORMATION LINKS The Sensible Sentencing Trust website provides links to several lists of convicted child abusers, national and international,

through its article "Information wants to be free" . Deborah Coddington's book The New Zealand Paedophile and Sex Offender can be ordered through Alister Taylor Publishers, Auckland. The Sex Offender Registry Bill is before a Government select committee in August. COURT CONVICTIONS Convictions entered in southern (Dunedin included) courts for sex offences against children between 2003 and 2005. Child abuse offenders sent to jail -- 24 (2003), 13 (2004), 13 (2005). Child abuse offenders not jailed -- 10 (2003), 6 (2004), 10 (2005). Child abuse offenders granted final name suppression -- 5 (2004), 3 (2005). (NOTE: Each case may have multiple victims associated with it.) w158 charges for the 34 cases in 2003. 46 charges for 19 cases in 2004. 77 charges for 23 cases in 2005. KIA MARAMA Kia Marama is a 60-bed special treatment unit for childsex offenders at Rolleston Prison. Its name means "let there be light and insight" . Opened in 1989, it was the first treatment facility of its kind in the world. Auckland's Te Piriti unit (1994) was modelled on Kia Marama. A 1998 evaluation found the programme reduced graduate reoffending risk by 50 percent in its first five years. Recent figures show those treated after 1994 have a reconviction rate of less than 5 percent over an average follow-up period of five years. -------------------CAPTION: On the case: Detective Stephen Dalton, of Invercargill, has spent the past 10 years gathering evidence against Southland's child sex offenders. Photo: 77524 BARRY HARCOURT Kia Marama: The exterior of the Kia Marama unit (Rolleston Prison), where up to 40 rehabilitating paedophiles are treated each year. Christopher Zaal Michael Gray LOAD-DATE: July 3, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Southland Times Company Limited All Rights Reserved

111 of 265 DOCUMENTS Metropolitan News Enterprise (Los Angeles, California)

June 22, 2006, Thursday

S.C. to Decide Whether City Liable for Alleged Sex Abuse by Official Justices Also Grant Review in Dispute Over Sierra Club Election Procedures
BYLINE: By KENNETH OFGANG, Staff Writer SECTION: Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1379 words The California Supreme Court yesterday agreed to decide whether the City of Los Angeles and/or the Boy Scouts of America may be held liable to a pair of former Explorer scouts who claim they were abused by an officer who later became a top LAPD official. The justices, at their weekly conference in San Francisco, unanimously granted review in Doe v. City of Los Angeles, B178689. The Court of Appeal for this district, Div. Four, ruled Feb. 24 that the plaintiffs, identified only as John Doe and John Doe 2, cannot show that the city or the BSA knew, or had reason to know, of any unlawful sexual conduct by David J. Kalish and that their claims against those defendants were barred by the statute of limitations. Justice Daniel Curry, who has since retired, wrote the opinion. Deputy Chief The plaintiffs are among six men who claimed to have been molested by Kalish in the 1970s when he was an Explorer troop supervisor. He later rose through the ranks to become an LAPD deputy chief before a five-month criminal investigation into the molestation allegations ended his career. He was not charged-prosecutors cited a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that a statute extending the limitations period for child molestation cases could not be applied to cases in which the original limitations period had expired-but was relieved of his duties and retired in 2003. In dismissing the suits, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert L. Hess said neither the city nor the Boy Scouts could have predicted that Kalish might have sexually abused teenage boys. The plaintiff did not identify "any person whose knowledge could create liability on the part of either the city or the Boy Scouts, or what they knew and when," Hess said. Curry, writing for the Court of Appeal, agreed. Suit Time-Barred The justice explained that under Code of Civil Procedure Sec. 340.1, a plaintiff claiming to have been sexually abused as a minor generally may sue the molester's employer or principal prior to the plaintiff's 26th birthday. After that, claims are time-barred unless filed during a one-year revival period that expired at the end of 2003, as the suit against Kalish was. An otherwise-barred suit against an employer or principal that was filed during the revival period, however, is timely only if the defendant "knew or had reason to know, or was otherwise on notice, of any unlawful sexual conduct by an employee, volunteer, representative, or agent," and failed to take reasonable steps to prevent such misconduct from recurring. The plaintiffs, Curry noted, had conceded that there was no evidence the Boy Scouts or the city had actual knowledge of any molestations by Kalish, so dismissal was required absent a sufficient showing of constructive knowledge. No such showing was made, the justice said.

"[A]ppellants may not merely allege that respondents knew facts that raised a generalized prospect or possibility of sexual abuse by Kalish," the jurist wrote. "Rather, appellants were obliged to allege in specific terms that respondents knew facts that-if acted upon in a reasonable manner-would have prompted them to investigate Kalish with a thoroughness likely to establish that he had engaged in unlawful sexual abuse." Claims Deficient The justice noted that as to the Boy Scouts, the only allegations related to constructive knowledge were that the LAPD acted as the organization's agent and that the BSA was thus chargeable with the same knowledge that the LAPD had. Assuming that to be true, however, the claims fail because the claims against the LAPD were deficient, Curry said. The plaintiffs, Curry explained, merely alleged that the LAPD was aware that incidents of sexual abuse had occurred within its Explorer program, and that various officers, including possibly Kalish, were involved in non-sexual misconduct, including having program participants work on improvements to his home and providing beer to underage scouts. "[T]hese facts reasonably support the conclusion that LAPD should have made a general inquiry into alcohol- and chore-related misconduct by LAPD officers within the programs, but not that LAPD should have launched an investigation focused on Kalish that would uncovered his sexual misconduct," the jurist wrote. In other conference action, the justices: -Agreed to decide whether a group of Sierra Club members who are opposed to the conservation organization's leadership and want a change in its policies may sue for alleged unfair treatment during the organization's 2004 board election. The First District Court of Appeal ruled in March that the bulk of a suit by a group calling itself Club Members for an Honest Election falls under the "public interest" exemption from the anti-SLAPP statute. The dispute has its roots in efforts to change the leadership and focus of the club, whose 750,000 members and $ 95 million budget make it the largest environmental group in the country. Among other things, the dissidents want the group-which has never taken a position on the issue-support stricter immigration controls. Supporters of the current leadership have accused the dissidents of promoting racism and claim to represent the views of the majority of members. They say the dissidents are seeking to take advantage of the fact that 90 percent or so of the members do not vote in the annual board elections. The board consists of 15 members, five of whom are elected each year. The board elects the president, who is the only board member to draw a salary. Board candidates are nominated by a committee appointed by the board, or by petition. Dissidents won one seat in the 2002 election and two in 2003. Prior to the 2004 election, the board circulated to its chapters an article concerning what the author called the "narrow, personal, one issue agendas" that were being pursued by unnamed "people and parties" as a result of the low participation numbers in the club's elections. The board also voted to approve an "urgent election notice" informing members of "an unprecedented level of outside involvement" in the election and the fact that certain outside groups "may be attempting to intervene" in the election. Following the board meeting, the dissident group and one of the candidates nominated by petition filed suit in San Francisco Superior Court. They claimed that the actions taken by the board, including allowing three "fake candidates" to circulate ballot statements in which they disclaimed any desire to be elected and asked members to vote for other candidates aligned with the incumbent leadership, violated fairness requirements in the California Corporations Code and the club by-laws. The plaintiffs asked for a preliminary injunction barring the winners of the 2004 election-which resulted in a sharp increase in turnout and victory for candidates backed by the nominating committee-from taking of-

fice. They also sought to mandate changes in procedures for future elections. San Francisco Superior Court Judge James Warren, who has since retired, held that to the extent the suit sought to correct allegedly unfair procedures, it was in the public interest and fell under Code of Civil Procedure Sec. 425.17(b)'s exception to the anti-SLAPP law and the Court of Appeal agreed. The case is Club Members for an Honest Election v. Sierra Club, A110069. -Denied review of a ruling by this district's Court of Appeal that the Los Angeles County Civil Service Commission cannot hear a claim for back pay by a former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who retired under threat of prosecution four years ago. Jesse Zuniga was among several defendants indicted in connection with an alleged scam in which inmates and department employees supposedly conspired to use stolen credit cards to withdraw cash from automated teller machines. Zuniga agreed to retire from the Sheriff's Department in exchange for dismissal of all charges, but then claimed a right to be paid for the 10 months that elapsed between his being relieved of duty and the date of his official retirement. The Court of Appeal ruled that the Civil Service Commission had no jurisdiction in the matter because Zuniga was no longer a county employee. LOAD-DATE: December 22, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2006 Metropolitan News Company

112 of 265 DOCUMENTS Burnley Express June 16, 2006

Scoutmaster's Sex Abuse
SOURCE: Burnley Express LENGTH: 795 words

A MAN who sexually abused eight boys in his role as a Scoutmaster has been sentenced to four years in prison. Kenneth Allan Fawcett was told by a judge he had carried out a serious catalogue of crime. The offences were committed at Scout camps, at his home and also in the changing rooms of Nelson swimming baths. Judge Anthony Russell told the 61-year-old defendant: "You abused your position as a Scoutmaster to indecently assault boys entrusted into your care by their parents. "It was a gross breach of trust, repeated on many occasions and which has had a marked effect on your victims".

Fawcett, of Fife Street, Barrowford, had earlier pleaded guilty to 26 charges of indecent assault and three of indecency with a child. The offences spanned periods between 1974 and 1990. As well as being involved with the Scouts, the defendant had been a keen train spotter and would take boys on train spotting outings that would involve them being away from home overnight. Miss Janet Ironfield (prosecuting) told Preston Crown Court that one of the victims came forward after becoming concerned, in the summer of 2004, that Fawcett was still acting as a Scout leader and that he might possibly take the opportunity to abuse children. As a result of his formal complaint, other males came forward with information. Seven of the charges concerned a boy who was abused while under 15 years. This took place in the changing room at Nelson swimming baths, as well as at Scout camp. One night at camp, the defendant asked the boy to take all his clothes off and share a double sleeping bag. Abuse also took place at Fawcett's then home in Barnoldswick. One boy was described as having felt "dirty" after an offence was carried out against him. Fawcett was interviewed three times in all by police and, at that stage, denied the allegations against him. Miss Ironfield added: "Many of the individuals have tried to put the matter behind them and to move on with their lives. "Having seen press articles about the defendant, and having been approached by police officers, seven of the complainants came forward, telling of very similar acts over a number of years while the defendant was holding a position of Scout leader". Fawcett had no previous convictions. Mr Kevin Donnelly (defending) said Fawcett had earlier been unable to recall the offences and had therefore found it very difficult to accept committing them. But he recognised the sheer weight of evidence against him, the unlikelihood of eight independent individuals concocting allegations against him. His lawyer said: "He admits he committed these offences, he remembers committing these offences. "The acts have unquestionably had serious consequences for those subjected to the abuse. "The degree of sexual activity, although serious, is not of the most serious kind that courts sometimes hears. Fifteen or sixteen years ago the offending came to an end and there has been nothing since." The court heard from Barrowford vicar the Rev. John Hallows, who had known the defendant since 2001. Fawcett was a member of St Thomas's Church's congregation and a member of the Parochial Church Council and Mr Hallows described him as an open, friendly and caring person, very willing to be involved in anything happening in the church. In passing sentence, the judge told Fawcett : "It is very sad to see you in the dock of this court, having heard all the good things I have read about you. But there are some bad things as well. The judge said that only a custodial sentence was appropriate for the offences. There were six month sentences to run consecutively, regarding each of the victims. "I recognise the sentence will be very hard for you and very hard for you and your family and friends to come to terms with." The defendant will be on the sex offenders' list indefinitely. A 10-year Sexual Offences Prevention Order was made. That bars him from associating or contacting anyone under the age of 17 unless directly supervised by someone approved by social services. And he must not undertake any activity which might bring him into contact with under-17s. l Fawcett was awarded a top Scout honour, the Silver Acorn, in recognition of his work for the movement

in 1998. He became involved with the Scouts in 1970 when he was appointed pack leader in Barrowford. Later, he moved to the 1st West Craven Pack in Barnoldswick and over the next decade moved backward and forward between the two groups. He became Assistant District Commissioner for the Pendle area, and then for the whole county. LOAD-DATE: June 16, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2006 Johnston Press Plc

113 of 265 DOCUMENTS Sunday Star June 11, 2006 Sunday U.K. 1st Edition

JACKO BOY'S NEW FIGHT FOR LIFE; Cancer blow for bullied Gav
BYLINE: EXCLUSIVE by MIKE PARKER in L.A. SECTION: NEWS; 35 LENGTH: 518 words THE boy who accused Michael Jackson of molesting him is in a living hell as he faces a new cancer battle. Gavin Arvizo, 16, who has already lost a kidney, has been told the chances of making a 100% recovery are slim. On top of that Gavin has had to endure. . . Being bullied unmercifully at school. Bombarded with internet hate mail. Having his dreams of becoming a professional footballer shattered. All this is despite the fact that the family are in a witness protection programme. A close friend told the Daily Star Sunday last night: "They are really in the doldrums and Gavin couldn't be more miserable. Life has taken a terrible downward turn for him after things had been looking up. "He thought he had beaten the cancer but he has been told his hell isn't over yet." On Tuesday, Gavin and his mother Janet, stepdad Jay, brother Starr and sister Davellin will be treated to a slap-up "anniversary dinner" paid for by sympathetic staff at the Santa Barbara District Attorney's Office in California. But there will be few smiles around the table exactly a year to the day since Jackson, 47, was acquitted

of ten charges of molesting Gavin and plying him with booze with intent to seduce him when he was 13. The family's current "safe house" is in a leafy Los Angeles suburb close to Gavin's school. But the friend added: "Janet and Jay are talking about trying to relocate the family. "They are in the witness scheme but Gavin's face is so well known that he's picked on all the time at high school. "Some kids who have his e-mail address have been sending him really vicious, nasty, hurtful messages. "He's a handsome young man and he'd love to meet a girl and date but he's treated like a pariah. "They have virtually no money of their own and while they remain in the protection plan it's up to the federal authorities where they stay." High school coaches declared him a highly-talented footballer with huge prospects. But professional scouts have been put off by the gloomy verdict on his health. And the friend continued: "After the world media circus surrounding the trial, it's been very difficult for them. "Don't forget, a jury returned verdicts which indicated they didn't believe the testimony of Gavin, his brother and his mom. "They will be forever stigmatised by that. Gavin has been on the receiving end of some terrible taunts at school but he's a brave kid. "The family thought - Gavin especially - that they could build bright new lives once the Jackson fuss died down. But it just hasn't worked out that way." Bar him from kids MICHAEL Jackson's biggest critic has warned Japanese orphanage chiefs not to let the star adopt kids from the country. The star has sparked fresh outrage from Los Angeles-based attorney Gloria Allred over claims he wants to adopt more children. Allred was formerly a lawyer for Jordy Chandler, who received GBP 16million from Jackson, right, for withdrawing sex abuse allegations in 1993. The singer toured three orphanages in Japan two weeks ago. But Allred said: "I would be extremely concerned for the safety of any child living with Mr Jackson considering abuse allegations." LOAD-DATE: June 13, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: BIG BUDDIES: Jackson with Gavin at Neverland. The superstar was cleared of molesting the boy, then 13 AGONY: Gavin after court verdict a year ago. He had hopes of making it as a pro footballer. But his dreams have been shattered PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 EXPRESS NEWSPAPERS All Rights Reserved

114 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) June 9, 2006 Friday Idaho Edition

Sex abuse suit avoids dismissal; But judge drops two plaintiffs who say sheriff's deputy molested them;
BYLINE: Bill Morlin Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 607 words A Superior Court judge refused a request from Spokane County to dismiss a lawsuit brought by men who allege they were sexually abused more than two decades ago by former sheriff's Deputy David Hahn. Judge Neal Rielly, however, did dismiss two of the four plaintiffs from the suit, agreeing the county couldn't have known about Hahn's abusive behavior when they were sexually abused. The judge, in an order filed last week, also dismissed claims that the county was negligent in hiring Hahn in the mid-1970s and in investigating claims that he was sexually abusing boys. But Rielly left intact a claim that the county, through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told about the abuse allegations. Rielly also said he was "satisfied under a liberal interpretation" that the men's claims were being brought within the statute of limitations, even though the abuse occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s. After being confronted at least a second time about the allegations, Hahn took his own life Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36. The plaintiffs who remain in the suit are Douglas Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher, who described their allegations of abuse in a June 2003 story in The Spokesman-Review. Galliher and another man, Michael Grant, also told the newspaper last year that they were sexually abused in the late 1970s and early 1980s by Hahn's partner in the Sheriff's Office, former Deputy Jim West. Galliher made the same allegations against West in a sworn deposition taken last year by Terry Lackie, the private attorney hired to defend Spokane County in the case. Hahn and West were friends and co-Scoutmasters for a Boy Scout troop on Spokane's South Hill. Before he was recalled from office last year as Spokane's mayor, West emphatically denied ever molesting boys or knowing that Hahn was allegedly involved in such activity. Chicklinsky and Galliher "remained absolutely ready to go to court to press their claims," their attorney, John Allison, said Wednesday. Allison said he was still reviewing Judge Rielly's ruling and hadn't decided whether he would ask him to reconsider his dismissal of two of the four plaintiffs. "We certainly expect that at least two of the claims would remain," he said. "We're disappointed that two of these plaintiffs' claims have been dismissed, but all four of these men remain very dedicated to seeing that the truth of this sad history be told and that future tragedies of this type be

avoided," Allison said. Even though the two other men are no longer plaintiffs, Allison said he expects to call them as witnesses at trial. "There are other victims we have learned about and spoken with who would be called as witnesses to establish a pattern of outrageous conduct on Hahn's behalf while a sheriff's deputy, a church youth counselor and a Boy Scout leader," Allison said. A trial date set for this spring was stricken. Allison said he expects to return to court within 30 to 45 days to get a new trial date, possibly later this year. Lackie said Wednesday he was pleased with the court's ruling dismissing two of the plaintiffs. "I'm not shocked that he didn't dismiss the entire action," Lackie said. Lackie said he will schedule a private meeting within a month with Spokane County commissioners to discuss whether to attempt to settle the case out of court or prepare for trial. The county has spent approximately $200,000 so far in the defense of the suit, filed in 2003. "I will present the facts and the status of the case, but it will be up to my clients, the commissioners, to decide whether to proceed to trial or resolve this," Lackie said. LOAD-DATE: June 10, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Bill Morlin can be reached at (509) 459-5444 or by e-mail at billm@spokesman.com. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

115 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) June 9, 2006 Friday Metro Edition

Judge won't drop sex abuse suit; But he dismisses two plaintiffs who say deputy molested them;
BYLINE: Bill Morlin Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 2 LENGTH: 606 words A Superior Court judge refused a request from Spokane County to dismiss a lawsuit brought by men who allege they were sexually abused more than two decades ago by former sheriff's Deputy David Hahn.

Judge Neal Rielly, however, did dismiss two of the four plaintiffs from the suit, agreeing the county couldn't have known about Hahn's abusive behavior when they were sexually abused. The judge, in an order filed last week, also dismissed claims that the county was negligent in hiring Hahn in the mid-1970s and in investigating claims that he was sexually abusing boys. But Rielly left intact a claim that the county, through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told about the abuse allegations. Rielly also said he was "satisfied under a liberal interpretation" that the men's claims were being brought within the statute of limitations, even though the abuse occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s. After being confronted at least a second time about the allegations, Hahn took his own life Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36. The plaintiffs who remain in the suit are Douglas Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher, who described their allegations of abuse in a June 2003 story in The Spokesman-Review. Galliher and another man, Michael Grant, also told the newspaper last year that they were sexually abused in the late 1970s and early 1980s by Hahn's partner in the Sheriff's Office, former Deputy Jim West. Galliher made the same allegations against West in a sworn deposition taken last year by Terry Lackie, the private attorney hired to defend Spokane County in the case. Hahn and West were friends and co-Scoutmasters for a Boy Scout troop on Spokane's South Hill. Before he was recalled from office last year as Spokane's mayor, West emphatically denied ever molesting boys or knowing that Hahn was allegedly involved in such activity. Chicklinsky and Galliher "remained absolutely ready to go to court to press their claims," their attorney, John Allison, said Wednesday. Allison said he was still reviewing Rielly's ruling and hadn't decided whether he would ask him to reconsider his dismissal of two of the four plaintiffs. "We certainly expect that at least two of the claims would remain," he said. "We're disappointed that two of these plaintiffs' claims have been dismissed, but all four of these men remain very dedicated to seeing that the truth of this sad history be told and that future tragedies of this type be avoided," Allison said. Even though the two other men are no longer plaintiffs, Allison said he expects to call them as witnesses at trial. "There are other victims we have learned about and spoken with who would be called as witnesses to establish a pattern of outrageous conduct on Hahn's behalf while a sheriff's deputy, a church youth counselor and a Boy Scout leader," Allison said. A trial date set for this spring was stricken. Allison said he expects to return to court within 30 to 45 days to get a new trial date, possibly later this year. Lackie said Wednesday he was pleased with the court's ruling dismissing two of the plaintiffs. "I'm not shocked that he didn't dismiss the entire action," Lackie said. Lackie said he will schedule a private meeting within a month with Spokane County commissioners to discuss whether to attempt to settle the case out of court or prepare for trial. The county has spent approximately $200,000 so far in the defense of the suit, filed in 2003. "I will present the facts and the status of the case, but it will be up to my clients, the commissioners, to decide whether to proceed to trial or resolve this," Lackie said. LOAD-DATE: June 10, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

NOTES: Bill Morlin can be reached at (509) 459-5444 or by e-mail at billm@spokesman.com. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

116 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by Knight/Ridder Tribune News Service June 9, 2006 Friday

Sex abuse suit avoids dismissal: But judge drops two plaintiffs who say sheriff's deputy molested them
BYLINE: Bill Morlin, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 658 words Jun. 9--A Superior Court judge refused a request from Spokane County to dismiss a lawsuit brought by men who allege they were sexually abused more than two decades ago by former sheriff's Deputy David Hahn. Judge Neal Rielly, however, did dismiss two of the four plaintiffs from the suit, agreeing the county couldn't have known about Hahn's abusive behavior when they were sexually abused. The judge, in an order filed last week, also dismissed claims that the county was negligent in hiring Hahn in the mid-1970s and in investigating claims that he was sexually abusing boys. But Rielly left intact a claim that the county, through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told about the abuse allegations. Rielly also said he was "satisfied under a liberal interpretation" that the men's claims were being brought within the statute of limitations, even though the abuse occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s. After being confronted at least a second time about the allegations, Hahn took his own life Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36. The plaintiffs who remain in the suit are Douglas Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher, who described their allegations of abuse in a June 2003 story in The Spokesman-Review. Galliher and another man, Michael Grant, also told the newspaper last year that they were sexually abused in the late 1970s and early 1980s by Hahn's partner in the Sheriff's Office, former Deputy Jim West. Galliher made the same allegations against West in a sworn deposition taken last year by Terry Lackie, the private attorney hired to defend Spokane County in the case.

Hahn and West were friends and co-Scoutmasters for a Boy Scout troop on Spokane's South Hill. Before he was recalled from office last year as Spokane's mayor, West emphatically denied ever molesting boys or knowing that Hahn was allegedly involved in such activity. Chicklinsky and Galliher "remained absolutely ready to go to court to press their claims," their attorney, John Allison, said Wednesday. Allison said he was still reviewing Judge Rielly's ruling and hadn't decided whether he would ask him to reconsider his dismissal of two of the four plaintiffs. "We certainly expect that at least two of the claims would remain," he said. "We're disappointed that two of these plaintiffs' claims have been dismissed, but all four of these men remain very dedicated to seeing that the truth of this sad history be told and that future tragedies of this type be avoided," Allison said. Even though the two other men are no longer plaintiffs, Allison said he expects to call them as witnesses at trial. "There are other victims we have learned about and spoken with who would be called as witnesses to establish a pattern of outrageous conduct on Hahn's behalf while a sheriff's deputy, a church youth counselor and a Boy Scout leader," Allison said. A trial date set for this spring was stricken. Allison said he expects to return to court within 30 to 45 days to get a new trial date, possibly later this year. Lackie said Wednesday he was pleased with the court's ruling dismissing two of the plaintiffs. "I'm not shocked that he didn't dismiss the entire action," Lackie said. Lackie said he will schedule a private meeting within a month with Spokane County commissioners to discuss whether to attempt to settle the case out of court or prepare for trial. The county has spent approximately $200,000 so far in the defense of the suit, filed in 2003. "I will present the facts and the status of the case, but it will be up to my clients, the commissioners, to decide whether to proceed to trial or resolve this," Lackie said. Copyright (c) 2006, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: June 9, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060609-SR-0609-Sex-abuse-suit-avoids-dismissal PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2006 Spokesman-Review

117 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by Knight/Ridder Tribune News Service June 9, 2006 Friday

Judge won't drop sex abuse suit: But he dismisses two plaintiffs who say deputy molested them
BYLINE: Bill Morlin, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 657 words Jun. 9--A Superior Court judge refused a request from Spokane County to dismiss a lawsuit brought by men who allege they were sexually abused more than two decades ago by former sheriff's Deputy David Hahn. Judge Neal Rielly, however, did dismiss two of the four plaintiffs from the suit, agreeing the county couldn't have known about Hahn's abusive behavior when they were sexually abused. The judge, in an order filed last week, also dismissed claims that the county was negligent in hiring Hahn in the mid-1970s and in investigating claims that he was sexually abusing boys. But Rielly left intact a claim that the county, through the Sheriff's Office, was negligent in retaining Hahn after senior commanders were told about the abuse allegations. Rielly also said he was "satisfied under a liberal interpretation" that the men's claims were being brought within the statute of limitations, even though the abuse occurred in the late 1970s and early 1980s. After being confronted at least a second time about the allegations, Hahn took his own life Aug. 28, 1981, at age 36. The plaintiffs who remain in the suit are Douglas Chicklinsky and Robert Galliher, who described their allegations of abuse in a June 2003 story in The Spokesman-Review. Galliher and another man, Michael Grant, also told the newspaper last year that they were sexually abused in the late 1970s and early 1980s by Hahn's partner in the Sheriff's Office, former Deputy Jim West. Galliher made the same allegations against West in a sworn deposition taken last year by Terry Lackie, the private attorney hired to defend Spokane County in the case. Hahn and West were friends and co-Scoutmasters for a Boy Scout troop on Spokane's South Hill. Before he was recalled from office last year as Spokane's mayor, West emphatically denied ever molesting boys or knowing that Hahn was allegedly involved in such activity. Chicklinsky and Galliher "remained absolutely ready to go to court to press their claims," their attorney, John Allison, said Wednesday. Allison said he was still reviewing Rielly's ruling and hadn't decided whether he would ask him to reconsider his dismissal of two of the four plaintiffs. "We certainly expect that at least two of the claims would remain," he said. "We're disappointed that two of these plaintiffs' claims have been dismissed, but all four of these men remain very dedicated to seeing that the truth of this sad history be told and that future tragedies of this type be avoided," Allison said.

Even though the two other men are no longer plaintiffs, Allison said he expects to call them as witnesses at trial. "There are other victims we have learned about and spoken with who would be called as witnesses to establish a pattern of outrageous conduct on Hahn's behalf while a sheriff's deputy, a church youth counselor and a Boy Scout leader," Allison said. A trial date set for this spring was stricken. Allison said he expects to return to court within 30 to 45 days to get a new trial date, possibly later this year. Lackie said Wednesday he was pleased with the court's ruling dismissing two of the plaintiffs. "I'm not shocked that he didn't dismiss the entire action," Lackie said. Lackie said he will schedule a private meeting within a month with Spokane County commissioners to discuss whether to attempt to settle the case out of court or prepare for trial. The county has spent approximately $200,000 so far in the defense of the suit, filed in 2003. "I will present the facts and the status of the case, but it will be up to my clients, the commissioners, to decide whether to proceed to trial or resolve this," Lackie said. Copyright (c) 2006, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA. LOAD-DATE: June 9, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060609-SR-0609-Judge-won-t-drop-sex-abuse-suit PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2006 Spokesman-Review

118 of 265 DOCUMENTS Idaho Falls Post Register (Idaho) June 7, 2006 Wednesday Main Edition Former Post Register reporter praised by news anchor while receiving Livingston Award BYLINE: By DEAN MILLER, SECTION: THE WESTPg. C1 LENGTH: 520 words NEW YORK - Charles Gibson of ABC News on Tuesday praised former Post Register reporter Peter Zuckerman's courage for investigating pedophile Boy Scouts camp staffers of eastern Idaho's Grand Teton

Council. Gibson made the remarks as he presented Zuckerman the $10,000 Livingston Award for young journalists. Gibson noted that Zuckerman and the Post Register persevered even after defenders of the Grand Teton Council outed him as gay in a community that is not considered gay-friendly. No one named in the Scouts' Honor series, published 17 months ago, has requested a correction or clarification of the story, which detailed the contents of court files sealed by Boy Scouts attorneys after leaders were caught abusing Scouts. Three Livingston Awards are given annually to the best American reporters for international, national and local reporting. The Scouts' Honor investigation also won the Scripps Howard Foundation's national award for distinguished service to the First Amendment. In a brief speech at the podium of the Yale Club ballroom, across the street from Grand Central Station in Manhattan, Zuckerman, 26, said the bravest people involved in the story were the victims of Scout leader pedophiles. They risked shame and public attacks by the Grand Teton Council and its defenders in order to warn the public of the Grand Teton Council's actions, he said. Despite the controversy, Zuckerman said, the Post Register's readers thought about the story and acted, pushing for tougher child sex abuse laws and tougher rules against judges hiding case files. In doing that, he said, Idaho Falls proved that small towns can be big. Christiane Amanpour of CNN International presented the international prize to Edward Wong, 33, of the New York Times for his reporting on the Iraq war, and New York Times managing editor Jill Abramson presented the national reporting award to CNN reporter Robin Mejia, 32, for an investigation that demonstrated the fallibility of ballistics, fingerprint and DNA evidence. The Livingston Awards are judged by Tom Brokaw of NBC News, Los Angeles Times Editor Dean Baquet, Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune, Boston Globe columnist Ellen Goodman, former Newsweek editor Osborn Elliott, plus Gibson, Amanpour and Abramson. Past winners include William F. Buckley, Jr.; Amanpour; New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, the author of the best-selling books ""Freakonomics"" and ""The Lexus and the Olive Tree""; Gregg Easterbrook of the Atlantic Monthly; and other reporters now working for top national publications. Zuckerman is tied for the youngest person to win a Livingston Award. Zuckerman lives in Los Angeles, where he works for the Los Angeles Daily Journal, a trade paper for lawyers. Post Register Executive Editor Dean Miller can be reached at 542-6766. On the INTERNET For more information: n www.livawards.org/ awards/2005winners.html For a list of past Livingston Award winners: n www.livawards.org/past/ To read the Scouts' Honor stories: n www.postregister.com/ scouts_honor/index.php n Many well-known journalists are past recipients of the Livingston Award Livingston, Continued on Page C7

LOAD-DATE: June 7, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright2006The Post Register All Rights Reserved

119 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Boston Globe May 25, 2006 Thursday THIRD EDITION

A HEALING PILGRIMAGE FOR CARDINAL
BYLINE: BY KATHY MCCABE, GLOBE STAFF SECTION: GLOBE NORTH; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1141 words MIDDLETON - A simple country church, St. Agnes Catholic Parish is a place where folks feel at home. Most parishioners sit in the same pew each week. It's not unusual for someone to get up and open a stained glass window to let in some fresh air on a warm day. Babies receive baptismal robes, embroidered by a group of women dubbed "The Holy Stitchers." People make shepherd's pie and egg-salad sandwiches for a local soup kitchen. "You feel love here," said Helen Yebba , 79, a member of the church for two years. Yet St. Agnes also aches for the victims of convicted child molester Christopher Reardon , the parish's former religious education director. Reardon, a lay worker arrested at the parish picnic in 2000, is serving a 40- to 50-year sentence in state prison for sexually abusing 29 boys. On Saturday , Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley will visit St. Agnes to apologize for the scandal, one of the largest child sex-abuse cases in state history. O'Malley will celebrate the 5 p.m. Mass as part of a nine-day pilgrimage he is making to parishes affected by sex abuse in the Archdiocese of Boston. "He will acknowledge the sin of abuse," said Barbara Thorp , head of the victim outreach office for the archdiocese. "Cardinal Sean realizes we are a suffering church. He hopes his personal presence will lead to healing." The Rev. Michael A. Hobson , the pastor at St. Agnes, said O'Malley will find a resilient parish. "We are deeply wounded," said Hobson, who came to the parish three years ago. "At the same time, we are still optimistic and moving forward." O'Malley will start his nine-church pilgrimage today, with Mass at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston. Victims or their representative have agreed to speak in each parish. His other stops will be in Stoneham, Brockton, Lowell, Needham, Weston, Hingham, and Bellingham, with the novena ending June 3 with a

procession from the Boston archdiocese's chancery to St. Columbkille parish in Brighton. "He has been profoundly impacted by the tremendous spiritual suffering of victims," said Thorp, who added that O'Malley has met privately with victims since his appointment as archbishop in 2003. "He recognizes our focus must now be on the emotional damage, and its aftermath, on people." St. Agnes differs from the eight other parishes O'Malley will visit. Abuse victims at the other parishes came forward as adults, saying priests abused them decades ago. Most of St. Agnes' victims are now in their early 20s and were teenagers or younger when they reported Reardon. "They are a much younger group of victims and families," said Thorp, who declined to say if any are still receiving therapy or other support from the archdiocese's Office of Pastoral Support and Outreach. "The abuse is especially raw and painful" at St. Agnes. Reardon also was found to have abused boys at the Danvers YMCA, where he worked as a swim coach. He was indicted on 125 counts of abuse, including child rape, and pleaded guilty to 75 counts. The 29 victims received money from an $85 million settlement the archdiocese reached with a total of 550 victims who filed civil lawsuits. Reardon also was an aide in the Middleton schools, and a volunteer with the Boy Scouts. Thorp said she would not be surprised if more Reardon victims emerge. The 29 were identified from a list of more than 200 children's names that police reported finding on Reardon's computer. "When victims are young, especially, there is often a delay in their ability to feel safe enough to come forward," Thorp said. "It's entirely possible that some day more victims could come forward . . . If they do, I can't stress enough that we will provide whatever help we can." The Reardon victims were never publicly identified, and it was never disclosed how many of the 29 victims were from the St. Agnes congregation, according to the Essex district attorney's office. Alan Grenier, a Danvers lawyer who represented six of them, said some have gone to college or gotten married. "Time heals a lot," Grenier said. St. Agnes has spent the last six years trying to heal as well. "As soon as I got here," said Hobson, 43, the affable pastor known to many as Father Mike, "I was impressed by the faith of the people. Certainly, a lot of people left the parish, and the Catholic faith altogether, and that pains us . . . We want people to come back." Some never thought about quitting St. Agnes. "I just felt so connected to that church, I needed to be there to see it through," said Jodi Sampson , 38, a mother of three who leads a faith-based reading group at the parish. "I think what has come of this, is we are much more open and aware of what's going on." Working with the archdiocese, the parish adopted new rules to keep children safe. At least two teachers are assigned to religious education classes. Staff and volunteers, including religious education teachers, Eucharistic ministers, and others who may have contact with children, must take a child safety course required by the archdiocese. Criminal background checks are run annually on staff and volunteers at all parishes, as required by the archdiocese. First Holy Communion class this year at St. Agnes was one of the largest, with 75 students. Attendance at Christmas and Easter services has swelled to 1,100, from about 750 three years ago. A Knights of Columbus chapter is starting again, after disbanding for several years. Religious education draws more than 500 children, and a summer Vacation Bible School has a waiting list. "I don't think anyone hesitates to bring their kids here," said Michelle Carroll , a mother of three from West Peabody who joined St. Agnes two years ago. "You can't judge a parish by one very bad incident. When you step inside this church, there is a holy feeling." Kathy McCabe can be reached at kmccabe@globe.com. SIDEBAR: TRACING AFTERMATH OF A TRAGEDY Figures related to the Archdiocese of Boston's response to its child sex-abuse scandal since 2002:

299 Survivors who have received therapy, at a cost of $1.16 million* 600 Approximate number of survivors or family members who have contacted the Office of Pastoral Support and Outreach 626 Personal letters of apology and invitation to meet sent by Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley 2,000 People who have volunteered to serve on teams to prevent child abuse 60,000 Criminal background checks ordered by the archdiocese on priests, staff members and volunteers who work with children 119,000 Approximate number of children trained in personal safety and abuse prevention 135,000 Approximate number of clergy, employees, and volunteers trained in child-abuse prevention as part of their training to work with children * Valid through June 30, 2005, as outlined in the document, "Financial Disclosure of the Archdiocese of Boston Regarding Sexual Abuse Settlements and Related Costs," April 19, 2006. SOURCE: ARCHDIOCESE OF BOSTON LOAD-DATE: May 31, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: GLOBE NORTH 3 GRAPHIC: PHOTO PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Globe Newspaper Company

122 of 265 DOCUMENTS Aberdeen Press and Journal May 20, 2006 Saturday

Firth used position of power to molest boys
BYLINE: Angela Taylor SECTION: Pg. 12 LENGTH: 433 words Paul Firth spent decades using his position of power and respect to molest boys left in his care. Despite previously being convicted of sex crimes against children, the former scout master remained defiant and protested his innocence.

His plea of guilty yesterday, to half of the 26 child abuse charges he faced, came as a remarkable aboutturn. When he first faced being brought to justice for the catalogue of sickening abuse against his male pupils and scouts, he secretly sold his house at Cushnie, near Alford, for less than £80,000. On the eve of his High Court trial he fled the country in his 32ft yacht Romalo, which he bought with the proceeds. He claimed he had fled because he was in fear for his life. Firth spent time in the Moroccan port of Tangier, but he was eventually tracked down in the Spanish enclave of Cueta. He was then flown back to Aberdeen by Grampian Police officers, following an extradition battle. When the 54-year-old was initially prosecuted in 1999, he had faced 19 sex abuse charges and was to stand trial at the High Court in Dundee. But under the extradition process 17 charges had to be dropped by the Crown. He went to trial on the remaining two at Aberdeen Sheriff Court, and was jailed for the maximum three years after being found guilty by a jury in October 2003, of abusing two scouts, aged 10 and 11, on hiking and camping trips. Sheriff Annella Cowan, who put Firth on the sex offenders register indefinitely, branded him "evil and selfish". He was released from prison after serving half his sentence and remained defiant, protesting his innocence, and lodged an appeal against his conviction. The appeal was later abandoned. Earlier this year, many of the cases which had to be dropped under the extradition process were reraised. Detectives arrested him at his Victoria Road home at about 7.30pm on January 23 this year. He was charged with 19 child abuse offences, some dating back to the 1970s. Eight further charges were later added, after more of his victims came forward after publicity about the case. The former scout leader, who joined the Scout Association in 1972 and left it in 1994, was elevated to the position of assistant district commissioner. He was born in Fareham, Hampshire, and went to school at Elgin Academy. He studied science at Robert Gordon's Institute of Technology in Aberdeen in the early 1970s. Firth took up his first teaching post at Hazlehead Academy, Aberdeen, where he taught physics. He remained at that school until about 1980, then moved to Powis Academy, which later merged with Hilton Academy to form St Machar Academy. LOAD-DATE: May 21, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Aberdeen Press and Journal All Rights Reserved

123 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Mirror May 20, 2006 Saturday

Scots Edition

SEX ABUSE TEACHER PREYED ON SCOUTS
BYLINE: BY RON MOORE SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 16 LENGTH: 175 words A FORMER Scoutmaster and teacher yesterday admitted a string of sex crimes against boys in his care. Convicted sex offender Paul Firth, 54, confessed to 13 indecency offences between 1974 and 1996. The ex-assistant head would organise camping trips to prey on Scouts and pupils, the High Court in Edinburgh heard. His victims were aged from eight to 16. Firth shared tents with boys instead of other adults, the court heard. Advocate depute Adrian Cottam said other teachers and Scout leaders did not suspect foul play. He said: "It was their opinion he obviously felt more comfortable with the relaxed atmosphere with the boys." Firth, formerly of Alford, Aberdeenshire, is already serving a three-year sentence for lewd behaviour towards two boys aged 10. Judge Lord Wheatley yesterday called for reports before sentencing. He also placed Firth, who taught at St Machar and Hazlehead Academies in Aberdeen, on the Sex Offenders Register. He said: "Your pleas demonstrate an appalling litany of abuse of children when you had a position of absolute trust." LOAD-DATE: May 20, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: BEAST: Firth PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 MGN Ltd. All Rights Reserved

125 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) May 20, 2006 Saturday Metro Edition

In brief

SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 519 words SPOKANE KALLAS DROPS OUT OF SHERIFF'S RACE Former Tukwila, Wash. police Detective John Kallas said Friday he is ending his candidacy to become Spokane County sheriff. Kallas, who planned to run as a Democrat, made the decision one day after he announced he was running. He attributed the move to a Spokesman-Review article, which he said had done a "hatchet job" on him. When announcing his candidacy, Kallas said he wanted Democrats to vote for Republican Ozzie Knezovich for sheriff in the Republican primary, a strategy that concerned county Democratic leaders because anyone who votes in the GOP primary can't vote in Democratic races. Kallas said Friday he will continue to campaign for Knezovich. - Jonathan Brunt POST FALLS ARMED FORCES PARADE TO HONOR GUARD UNIT Post Falls salutes present and former members of the military today with an Armed Forces Day parade at 10 a.m. Mayor Clay Larkin will make good on his 2004 promise to the soldiers of the 116th Engineer Battalion of the Idaho Army National Guard before they deployed to Iraq. Larkin told them they would be welcomed home in a manner befitting their heroism and service. The parade will include about 100 soldiers and some of the equipment of the 116th. Also appearing will be Brig. Gen. Alan Gayhart of the Idaho Army National Guard. All veterans organizations in Kootenai County have been invited to take part with their color and rifle guards. The parade is expected to last about half an hour. It will travel east on Seltice Way between Frederick and Idaho streets. Saturday is the 56th anniversary of President Truman proclaiming Armed Forces Day, created to honor all men and women in all branches of the services. - Staff reports SPOKANE CONVICTED RAPIST MOVES DOWNTOWN Police warned Friday that a level 3 sex offender, the kind considered most likely to commit new sex crimes, has moved to downtown Spokane. Tony L. Colville, 53, was convicted in 1991 in Island County, Wash., of first-degree rape and first-degree burglary, both with a deadly weapon. Colville didn't know the 51-year-old woman he raped. He was a suspect in other sex-abuse cases in which he wasn't charged, police said. Colville refused sex-offender treatment in prison, and is not under supervision, according to police. - John Craig ATHOL

CRAFT SHOW TO BENEFIT KIDS OF FALLEN TROOPS More than 20 vendors will sell everything from jams and jellies to handmade clothes and yard ornaments from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. today at the Athol Community Center in honor of Armed Forces Day. Athol American Legion Post 149 is sponsoring the craft show and flea market, known as the Blue Star Salute. Vendors paid $15 to reserve space at the center, with the proceeds going to the Legacy Scholarship Fund, a scholarship fund for children of military personnel killed on active duty since 9/11. The community center is located at 30355 N. 3rd St. Booths will be outside and inside. The Legion will be conducting a flag retirement ceremony with the local Boy Scouts. Anyone with a worn or damaged United States flag is invited to bring it for proper disposal. - Staff reports TYPE: Briefs LOAD-DATE: May 24, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

126 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Southland Times (New Zealand) May 16, 2006 Tuesday

Scout boss found guilty of sex abuse
SECTION: NEWS; NATIONAL; Pg. 5 LENGTH: 375 words A MAN entrusted with the care of young Invercargill scouts in the 1980s and 90s was found guilty for the second time, of abusing a boy after a trial ended in the Invercargill District Court yesterday. Ken John Matheson, 40, wearing a suit and tie, stumbled in the dock as he shook his head in disbelief at the jury's verdict, his second failed trial defence in a year for allegations of sexual ahbuse. Matheson, a sentenced inmate, was jailed for three years by Judge Peter Butler in November last year on charges of sexually violating and assaulting a 10-year-old boy in 1987. He was granted interim name suppression so this most recent trial would not be prejucided. This week Judge Kevin Phillips presided over seven allegations that Matheson sexually assaulted one of his scouts between November 1989 and November 1993 in Te Anau, Invercargill, Wellington, Waihola and Bluff. Five of those charges were dismissed on Friday. The court heard Matheson had responsibility over boys

at Jellicoe Sea Scouts from November 1985 until 1997. He was also involved in the scouts again in 2002 between March and June. Crown solicitor Mary-Jane Thomas said at the trial opening last Wednesday the case would come down to whom the jury believed, the victim or Matheson. The victim, now 28, gave an emotional account of how he would wake to find Matheson sexually assaulting him at scout regattas in Waihola and Wellington in late 1990, despite being in a shared tent. Matheson elected to give evidence in his defence, again strongly denying the accusations. Ms Thomas told the jury she was confident in calling Matheson a 'plausible' liar who had pulled the wool over the eyes of a lot of people for many years. "He was a fine strapping man ... the boss in charge of kids. Was it risky, yes, impossible, no, could he cover it up if discovered, yes, is he an idiot, no. 'Let today be the day you people, the community, say he can't do it anymore." Defence counsel Bill Dawkins said the danger of such emotion should be left out of jury reasoning as sex trials, especially man against child, "cut to the core'. Judge Phillips agreed jurors had to put emotions aside. It took them just two hours to return the verdict. Matheson was remanded in custody until June 23 for sentencing. LOAD-DATE: May 23, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Southland Times Company Limited All Rights Reserved

127 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) May 15, 2006 Monday Street Final Edition

Explorer posts take on abuse
BYLINE: LUCIANA LOPEZ, The Oregonian SECTION: Local News; Pg. A04 LENGTH: 1029 words SUMMARY: Reforms | Tighter rules and other changes are studied after sex scandals in Tualatin, elsewhere

Police-based Explorer posts from Oregon to Texas to New York are restricting ride-along hours and requiring more thorough background checks in part to prevent sex abuse of teen participants. Such changes follow numerous high-profile cases nationwide. In Oregon, three Tualatin police officers and a state trooper resigned last year after investigators found the men had sexual contact with a teenage female Explorer several years ago. In 1997, a 15-year-old girl from North Bend won $80,500 in a city lawsuit after she accused a police sergeant of kissing, fondling and harassing her. And last year, a former Oregon state trooper pleaded no contest to charges of official misconduct stemming from on-duty sex in his patrol car with a 20-year-old Explorer. As a result, some posts have closed, and officials are weighing additional reforms, from re-examining the program's checks and balances to the culture in police agencies, where silence --like that which kept Tualatin officers from reporting misconduct by their own --can be the rule. Exploring programs, which include professions besides police, are coordinated by the Learning for Life subsidiary of Boy Scouts of America. Abuse in law enforcement posts is "certainly a lot more prevalent than any other Exploring program that we have," said Kevin Patterson with Learning for Life of the Cascade Pacific Council in Portland. Learning for Life annually reviews the rules for Exploring programs, he said, and immediate changes are often sent out apart from the yearly updates. For example, last year the program began instituting criminal background checks for all adults working with Explorer posts. Some of those rule changes --such as the prohibition against police ride-alongs after midnight --have led police agencies to leave the Exploring program, Patterson said. Learning for Life also has the option of pulling a post's charter, though Patterson could not remember that happening in the six years of his involvement with the program. And, he added, the law-enforcement posts have more rules to follow than other posts, such as those in medicine and sports. Yet Learning for Life officials remain unsure about why law enforcement posts have the most sex-abuse cases. "We do have guidelines that programs are supposed to follow, so your guess is as good as mine as to why it happens more there than anywhere else," Patterson said. Abuse cases have led to the dissolution of some posts. Tualatin's program remains suspended almost a year after the allegations of sex abuse came to light. The Dalles suspended and later closed its program after learning that a male police officer had abused a former Explorer. "The city came to the conclusion that for the time being it would be best if we didn't have one," said Jay Waterbury, The Dalles police chief. Police department culture can exacerbate the problem, such as when internal misdeeds go unreported by fellow officers. Two university professors cite the damage caused by such silence in an article for the journal Public Integrity. "(L)ittle or no discipline is imposed when police officers witness fellow officers engaging in misconduct," wrote Terrance Johnson of Lincoln University and Raymond Cox of the University of Akron. "As a result, public safety officers believe that it is acceptable to break the law or the rules of the department." Limits on loyalty The two recommended that agencies work with professional organizations to help create broadly recognized guidelines, comparable to efforts by the American Bar Association and the American Medical Association. Such partnerships could contribute to a shift in police culture and organization, which often works more to protect the status quo than to encourage change, they wrote. And though officers are often loyal to one another for the right reasons, those ties should have a limit, said Dan Carlson, director of the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration, which runs the Center for Law Enforcement Ethics. "One of the things I always try to make clear is there's a big difference between loyalty and blind loyalty." The center emphasizes decision-making as an independent skill because simply lecturing on right and

wrong does not necessarily lead to a grasp of ethics, Carlson said. He tells people to take a broader view of their actions, such as weighing who else might be affected. "Can you stand in front of the 10 o'clock news crew with a microphone in front of your face, and can you take pride in explaining your actions?" Carlson said. One way to address police cultures of silence and make Explorer posts safer could be to bring in outside adults, such as parents, said Samuel Walker, a criminal justice professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha who has studied abuse at law enforcement Explorer posts. If other people know what's going on, he said, it can reduce the risk of abuse. Authority figures The imbalance of power in the Exploring program needs scrutiny as well, said Judy Cohen, medical director of the Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. Police officers already have status as authority figures; becoming mentors sways power further to their side, she said. Buddying up the Explorers, two to an officer, could diminish the likelihood of abuse, Cohen said. And forming closer peer friendships also could make the teens less vulnerable. Parents can prepare children at home by making clear the limits of authority figures, said Alvin Rosenfeld, a child and adolescent psychiatrist in New York who has studied abuse. Parents can send the message that "I think it's important that you respect authority, but even people in authority have no right to intrude" in your personal space. But Rosenfeld said young people still need adult mentoring programs. "One of the great things that's missing in the culture is this sort of mentorship" so that teens can find adult models, he said. "Those programs I think are terrific." Luciana Lopez: 503-294-5976; lucianalopez@news.oregonian.com ILLUSTRATION: Sidebar text -- EXPLORERS LOAD-DATE: May 18, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

130 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Denver Post April 28, 2006 Friday FINAL EDITION

Foes wrap sex-abuse bill in distortions

BYLINE: Jim Spencer Denver Post Staff Columnist SECTION: DENVER & THE WEST; Pg. B-01 LENGTH: 708 words After a few of her colleagues finished bashing personal-injury lawyers, after those same folks talked of bankrupting the Catholic Church and the Boy Scouts, after they reminisced fondly of being smacked by nuns back in the day, state Senate President Joan Fitz-Gerald told me bluntly why Colorado should make it easier for child sexual-abuse victims to sue pedophiles and institutions that cover up their crimes. "If there's any organization out there that doesn't feel (the effect of) civil justice and civil penalties for allowing perpetrators near children, they should," FitzGerald said. After three days of emotional debate and a one-vote victory, Fitz-Gerald was not dismissive of opponents. The Democrat from Jefferson County merely emphasized the reality that propels one of the ugliest fights of this legislative session: Liability versus accountability. Sexually assaulting a child "was wrong in 1860," said Fitz-Gerald. "It was wrong in 1960. It (is) going to be wrong in 2060." Accusations of religious discrimination and money-grubbing ambulance chasers do not change that. Neither do limits on monetary damages in civil suits. The sex-abuse bill passed by the Senate must still pass the House in its revised form and dodge Gov. Bill Owens' veto. "This will be a fight to the very last day of the session," Fitz-Gerald said. Let's make the risks clear. Cases since 1971 can be brought under a one-year suspension of the statute of limitations for old acts of pedophilia. But damages in each of those cases are capped at $150,000. New cases have caps on damages of $150,000 for public institutions and $366,000 to $732,000 for private. Unless they routinely cover up for child molesters, it will be darn difficult for any institution to go bankrupt under these restrictions. Yet Centennial Republican Sen. Jim Dyer claimed the one-year suspension of the statute of limitations was "a naked attack" on the Catholic Church and the Boy Scouts. Victims, said Dyer, could damage organizations whose current staff had nothing to do with victims' suffering. Should that happen, it will be because the proposed law is about naked attacks - naked attacks on kids by adults never held accountable by public and private institutions. The suggestion that the bill will entice Coloradans to make or be manipulated into fraudulent allegations of child sexual abuse is not just absurd, it's offensive. Think about it like this: As Colorado's legislature wrestles with a law expanding civil liability for child sexual abuse, South Carolina's legislature debates a bill to make repeated rape of a child a death- penalty offense. Fitz-Gerald folded her sex-abuse bill into the amended House bill that the Senate adopted Thursday. But from the beginning, Fitz-Gerald, who is Catholic, led the charge. For that, she came under withering personal attacks by her own church. The Catholic hierarchy blasted the sex-abuse bill as an attempt to ruin the church. Last week, the Colorado Catholic Conference ran a newspaper ad urging people to call legislators in opposition. It was hard, Fitz-Gerald said, "sitting at Mass on Sunday and having the work you're doing to protect children mischaracterized. ... This is about children ... who were shamed by the acts done to them. ... They went through life wondering what they did to deserve either rape or sodomy or both. ... This whole thing started with The (Denver) Post" and "relentless digging into victims and who their predators were. ... Meanwhile, the church was attacking, attacking, attacking."

Attacking so hard that the final Senate vote had 14 Democrats and four Republicans barely prevailing over four Democrats and 13 Republicans. The most disappointing moment came when Democratic Sen. Abel Tapia of Pueblo spoke against the sex-abuse bill. Tapia, who is Catholic, talked of parochial-school nuns breaking rulers over knuckles. Standards were different 40 years ago, Tapia explained. "He missed the point by a yardstick," Fitz-Gerald said. "He thinks that corporal punishment that might have been acceptable in the past ... is similar to criminal acts of sexual abuse on a child." Never was. Never will be. Jim Spencer's column appears Monday, Wednesday and Friday. He can be reached at 303-820-1771 or jspencer@denverpost.com. LOAD-DATE: April 28, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Column PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Denver Post All Rights Reserved

131 of 265 DOCUMENTS Irish News April 24, 2006 Monday

Sex-abuse victim haunted by a past of turmoil and living hell - Damian McAleenan was just 13 years old when he was sexually assaulted by notorious paedophile Fr Sean Fortune. A quarter of a century later he is still looking for answers from the Catholic Church and struggling to come to terms with his traumatic experience. Southern correspondent Valerie Robinson reports
SECTION: Pg. 14 LENGTH: 979 words When Fr Sean Fortune was sent to Belfast as a young Catholic priest there was already concern among Church leaders about his paedophilic tendencies. The cleric, who died by suicide in March 1999 while facing 66 charges of child sex-abuse and rape, had been accused of raping a boy while still a seminarian at St Peter's College in Wexford. The victim told the school principal but was not believed.

Damian McAleenan (40) had just entered his teens when he came into Fortune's sights. The 13-year-old, who grew up on Belfast's Ormeau Road, was in the scouts and Youth Encounter when he was abused by Fortunes after being lured to the priest's home in the city. It later emerged that Fortune had already been banned from scout activities in the Republic but had successfully concealed his past from the northern authorities. "I didn't tell anyone. I thought I was protecting my parents because if I'd said anything my father might have killed Fortune. "It was Belfast and can you imagine hearing that a local father had gone smacking a priest who was really respected among all the parents, with all the mothers?" The youngster steered clear of his abuser, avoiding being alone with him during trips to Gorey in Co Wexford and the Isle of Man, but he remained alert: "When we were in Gorey on a scouts trip I saw him playing his games with two young fellas and I told him I'd tell what he'd done if he didn't keep away from them." As a child, Mr McAleenan felt his only option was to remain silent and keep away from Fortune. He once told a priest from the Republic that he had never had any problems with the cleric - because his friend was standing within earshot. As an adult, the self-employed Belfast man now remains convinced that he could have saved other boys if he had spoken up in 1979. Fortune did not remain long in Belfast where the Church authorities quickly found that he was "unmanageable" and the then bishop of Down and Connor, Dr William Philbin, had him removed after hearing allegations that he had sexually propositioned a student. Once back across the border, the priest would go on to target boys while serving in Dundalk and Wexford - and the Church continued to turn a blind eye to his activities. In the 1990s, Mr McAleenan, with the demons of his past buried deep inside, moved to Wexford and was horrified to hear his abuser regularly celebrating Mass on a local radio station. "One day a friend mentioned that a local priest was up for sexual abuse. I was wondering if it was him. I went to the gardai and said I'd been abused while in Belfast. "They told me this priest had never been to Belfast but when I mentioned Fortune it all came out. It was the same priest." Mr McAleenan made an official complaint to the Garda in 1995, hoping that his attacker would finally be brought to justice. Other victims, like One In Four founder Colm O'Gorman, revealed that they had been repeatedly assaulted by Fortune in Wexford and Dundalk. The revelations rocked the Catholic Church but the greatest shock came when Bishop of Ferns Brendan Comiskey admitted knowledge of allegations of child abuse surrounding a number of priests in his diocese when he was first appointed in 1984. However, during the following 15 years he failed to protect children from priests like Fortune. Instead, the bishop sent Fortune for treatment to London and later put him in charge of a media and journalism school. Facing charges of abuse against 29 boys, the priest died by suicide during the first week of his trial in 1999, leaving his victims angry and with many unanswered questions. Mr McAleenan was among four victims who went public about their ordeal in a 2002 BBC documentary Suing the Pope, investigating the Church's unwillingness to bring paedophiles to book. "The Church had stuck a wolf among lambs. Fortune was left free to abuse kids wherever he went and they did nothing to stop him." Mr McAleenan said. "I think my parents thought when I did the documentary that I'd be played by an actor or I'd be silhouet-

ted and my voice would be disguised but I had to go public to ease my own conscience. "I believed that if I'd only spoken up sooner I could have saved other people. "People needed to know what had been going on." After the documentary Bishop Comiskey fled the diocese, reemerging at a US alcohol-treatment clinic. He later resigned, without ever answering the question posed by Fortune's victims - why was the priest allowed access to children when his sick compulsion was known? At the time, Mr McAleenan's solicitor hand-delivered a letter to the Vatican, seeking its files on Fortune four years later he is still awaiting a reply. Last October, the report of the government-appointed Ferns Inquiry detailed more than 20 allegations of abuse against the priest. Church leaders had ignored repeated warnings that the priest was a danger to children. In two cases families claimed that young people died by suicide because of Fortune's abuse. Mr McAleenan said: "I've been eaten up with guilt because people's lives could have been saved if I'd spoken up sooner." "I went through counselling for a while after the documentary but some feelings don't go away. I know I was only a child but if I'd told someone maybe Fortune would have been stopped." Twenty-seven years after Mr McAleenan was attacked, some old wounds still open easily and Bishop Comiskey's recent comment that he had "found peace" particularly stung. "There are people who (died by) suicide because of what happened," he said. "Their parents are still trying to come to terms with that loss, while other people like myself are trying to get on with their lives, but we do not feel fulfilled or at peace. "I can't believe that Comiskey has found it so easy to move on when there's so much suffering. "It came too soon and there are still too many people out there hurting. We will never get all the answers we want." LOAD-DATE: April 24, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Irish News Limited All Rights Reserved

132 of 265 DOCUMENTS Aberdeen Evening Express April 18, 2006 Tuesday

Child porn case due to resume

SECTION: Pg. 12 LENGTH: 308 words A Former city cub leader accused of a child porn charge is due back in court tomorrow. Richard Carroll, who was also a nursery worker, denies downloading indecent images of young boys. His long-running trial, which has been adjourned several times, is due to resume at Aberdeen Sheriff Court tomorrow. Carroll, 34, has lodged a special defence of incrimination claiming that if the crime was committed it was by an unknown person or another man known only as Tom. The offence, involving 41 pornographic pictures of youngsters, was allegedly committed at his home at 11 Donbank Terrace between November 2, 2001 and May 23, 2003. Carroll spent several years in charge of the 27th Aberdeen cub scout group and was responsible for the care of boys between eight and 11. He also worked at the Timber Kinder nursery in Seaton and at a home for the disabled. The court has previously heard that Grampian Police was told that Carroll's credit card was used to access Russian child porn sites. Officers searched Carroll's home and seized his computer. Det Insp Campbell Thomson said websites were discovered that involved the abuse of young boys. Pictures of boys from Carroll's cub pack were also found in his room. Some of the computer images had boys' names on them and at least half of the Christian names matched a list of Carroll's cubs. Carroll allegedly told police he was being blackmailed and sexually abused by a man known only as Tom. He said he was scared of him and that he would sometimes borrow his computer. He gave a vague description of Tom, could give no details of the alleged sex abuse and repeatedly said he had no idea how the images got on to his computer. The court heard police were unable to trace Tom and DI Thomson said he was surprised Carroll, who thought child porn was "disgusting", could not give a better description. ashaw@ajl.co.uk LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Aberdeen Evening Express All Rights Reserved

133 of 265 DOCUMENTS Aberdeen Evening Express April 18, 2006 Tuesday

Child porn case due to resume
SECTION: Pg. 12 LENGTH: 308 words A Former city cub leader accused of a child porn charge is due back in court tomorrow. Richard Carroll, who was also a nursery worker, denies downloading indecent images of young boys. His long-running trial, which has been adjourned several times, is due to resume at Aberdeen Sheriff Court tomorrow. Carroll, 34, has lodged a special defence of incrimination claiming that if the crime was committed it was by an unknown person or another man known only as Tom. The offence, involving 41 pornographic pictures of youngsters, was allegedly committed at his home at 11 Donbank Terrace between November 2, 2001 and May 23, 2003. Carroll spent several years in charge of the 27th Aberdeen cub scout group and was responsible for the care of boys between eight and 11. He also worked at the Timber Kinder nursery in Seaton and at a home for the disabled. The court has previously heard that Grampian Police was told that Carroll's credit card was used to access Russian child porn sites. Officers searched Carroll's home and seized his computer. Det Insp Campbell Thomson said websites were discovered that involved the abuse of young boys. Pictures of boys from Carroll's cub pack were also found in his room. Some of the computer images had boys' names on them and at least half of the Christian names matched a list of Carroll's cubs. Carroll allegedly told police he was being blackmailed and sexually abused by a man known only as Tom. He said he was scared of him and that he would sometimes borrow his computer. He gave a vague description of Tom, could give no details of the alleged sex abuse and repeatedly said he had no idea how the images got on to his computer. The court heard police were unable to trace Tom and DI Thomson said he was surprised Carroll, who thought child porn was "disgusting", could not give a better description. ashaw@ajl.co.uk LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Aberdeen Evening Express All Rights Reserved

135 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Chicago Daily Herald April 4, 2006 Tuesday C1 Edition; C5 Edition; C10 Edition; D1 Edition; D7 Edition

Untraditional path to priesthood Man feels call to serve God after career, marriage
BYLINE: Eric Peterson, Daily Herald Staff Writer SECTION: NEIGHBOR; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 685 words The Rev. Phil Henseler, the new parish administrator of St. Matthew Catholic Church in Schaumburg, has hardly followed the traditional career path of a Roman Catholic priest. Nearly 50 years old, the first half-century of his life has included careers in the U.S. Navy, the American oil industry and the insurance field as well as a decade-long marriage. But Henseler believes his experience in uniting a spiritual search with the cares and concerns of an ordinary working life does more to connect him with the members of his congregation than divide him from them. "We respond in our own time, in God's time," he said of his later calling to the priesthood. Ordained in May 2000, Henseler has spent the past six years as an associate priest at St. Raymond Catholic Church in Mount Prospect. "It was a great place for me to start," Henseler said. There he was in charge of the parish's Human Concerns Commission which helps look after ailing members of the church, as well as the scouting programs and the 150-strong altar server program. But his time at St. Raymond unexpectedly came to an end several weeks ago because of the sudden resignation of St. Matthew's long- serving pastor, the Rev. Joe Wilk. Henseler was told he was being considered as a good candidate to succeed Wilk, but would be immediately assigned to St. Matthew as parish administrator. The weeks and months to come are generally considered a honeymoon period in which both Henseler and the parish community will get to know one another and determine if they're "a good fit." If they are, Henseler may eventually receive the title of pastor his predecessor had. The early years of Henseler's life were in Springfield, but he's since become familiar with many different parts of Illinois and the United States. He attended high school at Benet Academy in Lisle and majored in engineering at the University of Notre Dame. His Navy service started out as repayment of his obligation for an ROTC scholarship, but ended up as something he wished to pursue as a career. He served for three years aboard the USS Ingersoll but was discharged for a medical problem. "I greatly enjoyed the Navy," he said. "Thanks be to God, it was a time of peace." He married in 1982, shortly after leaving the Navy, and was led by his earlier engineering degree to Texas for a job as an oilfield engineer at Schlumberger Well Services. Within a few years the bottom fell out of what had been a prosperous time for the oil industry, but it was nevertheless the start of Henseler's transformation into an honorary Texan. He received an MBA from the University of Texas, which led via a connection there to a job as a financial and marketing analyst for Liberty Mutual Insurance in Boston. The early '90s proved to be an especially trying time for Henseler. His marriage ended, he came home to Illinois to look after his ailing mother and he found himself temporarily out of work. Though he found some satisfaction in a job he took at Mercy Hospital, his decision to join a seminary in Texas in 1995 was a culmin-

ation of many things he'd been reflecting on in his life. "I was dealing with those 'What am I going to with the rest of my life?' kind of questions," he said. His first three years in the seminary were spent in San Antonio, but he finished the last two in Mundelein. Aside from being a part of the best and worst moments of people's lives through his presiding at weddings, baptisms and funerals, Henseler sees part of his role as leading the parish through trying times for both the Catholic Church and the nation. Between the church's sex abuse scandals and the war on terrorism going on overseas, Henseler sees the parish community as a place where people can come together for comfort in a time of trouble. "The main thing you can do is point people to timeless wisdom," he said of his leadership role. Though business administration is not why he or anyone else generally seeks the priesthood, he feels his experience in the business world may have better prepared him for that part of his new position's tasks than someone who entered the seminary in early adulthood. LOAD-DATE: April 6, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: schhenseler_2na032306bc The Rev. Phil Henseler has found himself in a busy, getting-to-knowyou period with his new congregation since being named parish administrator of St. Matthew Catholic Church several weeks ago. Bob Chwedyk/Daily Herald schhenseler_1na032306bc The Rev. Phil Henseler is the new parish administrator of St. Matthew Catholic Church in Schaumburg. Bob Chwedyk/Daily Herald PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Paddock Publications, Inc.

136 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Patriot Ledger (Quincy, MA) March 27, 2006 Monday ROP Edition

OUR OPINION; Lift time limits on sex abuse cases
BYLINE: Joann Fitzpatrick SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 8 LENGTH: 494 words The hurdles confronting victims of sex abuse crimes who want to bring their perpetrators to justice are many: financial, emotional, psychological, legal.

One of the biggest barriers is the statute of limitations, the time limit on when a person can be charged with rape or other abuse crimes, including incest, using children for pornography, indecent assault on a retarded person. Itâ[#x20ac][TM]s a long list. As was demonstrated repeatedly in recent sex abuse cases involving Catholic priests, it can take decades for a person to acknowledge what happened to them as a child or adolescent and then try to have the perpetrator answer for the crime. A set of bills before the Legislature would eliminate the statute of limitations for bringing either a criminal or civil case against a person accused of rape or other, specific sex abuse crimes. The current statute of limitations is 15 years for rape, 10 years for incest, and six years for indecent assault and other sex abuse crimes. Removing the statute of limitations is the right thing to do. These crimes are among societyâ[#x20ac][TM]s worst, and what sets them apart from other crimes is that they are usually committed by a person close to the victim â[#x20ac]" a parent, uncle, cousin, a camp counselor, scout leader, a priest. The perpetrators are almost always authority figures and the crimes still have a stigma attached to them, which is why it is easy, or necessary, for so many victims to erase them from memory. Itâ[#x20ac][TM]s a survival mechanism. The incident can be buried, but not its effects. And the evidence is incontrovertible: Victims of sex abuse crimes suffer in varying degrees from the inability to trust or to have satisfying relationships, guilt, addiction, and worse. Imagine the moment of awakening and then learning that the monster who abused you two decades ago is beyond the reach of the law. The damage is then compounded. The principal opposition to removing the statute is the fear that men and women will falsely accuse a person of doing something decades ago that may be impossible to prove. In reality, law enforcement proceeds with just 20 percent of sex abuse allegations; thatâ[#x20ac][TM]s the number in which district attorneys believe a conviction can be obtained. In other words, the bar is high. District attorneys cannot waste precious time on cases that have little chance of succeeding. Despite all the publicity around the priest sex abuse scandal, abuse by clergy represents just a fraction of sex abuse cases in Massachusetts and nationwide. The church scandal has helped to bring this subject into the open, where it belongs. Changing the statute of limitations is one aspect of reform. But education is the first step in addressing this scourge. Children must be taught to know when touching is inappropriate and to tell an adult about it. Adults must emphasize that the victim has no reason to be ashamed. When this crime in no longer kept secret, it will be easier to bring the perpetrators to justice. LOAD-DATE: April 5, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Patriot Ledger

137 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Centre Daily Times (State College, PA)

March 24, 2006 Friday

Diocese will have to pay damages
BYLINE: Susan Evans, The (Johnstown) Tribune-Democrat SECTION: A; Pg. 5 LENGTH: 561 words The Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown will decide in the next 30 days whether to pay $1 million in punitive damages in a sex-abuse case or appeal to the state Supreme Court. The state Superior Court this week upheld the damages, first awarded 12 years ago by a Blair County jury that found the diocese negligent in supervising Francis Luddy, an employee who was accused of sexually abusing Michael Hutchison Jr., formerly of Altoona. "While the diocese is disappointed with the ruling and disagrees with it on a legal basis, it acknowledges the suffering the Hutchison family has endured," said a diocese statement released Thursday. "Our prayers for their healing continue," the statement said. "The diocese will be reviewing the Superior Court's opinion within the next 30 days before deciding if it will appeal the decision to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court." The Luddy case was among the first to make public accusations of sexual abuse by priests. It gained national attention and motivated more victims to step forward and diocese nationwide to examine their policies. The Blair County jury in 1994 found that the diocese had failed to rein in Luddy, now a defrocked priest. Luddy had continued to serve parishes even though the diocese had complaints that he had abused several children. This week's ruling marks the third time the case has been before the Superior Court, most recently to decide whether the Blair County jury's punitive damages award was properly supported by the evidence. Richard Serbin, the Altoona lawyer who represents Hutchison, praised the newest ruling. "There is a feeling of relief with the ruling," Serbin said, "but frankly there's a feeling of disappointment that it has required so many appeals. "It shouldn't have taken all of these years, and no amount of money is going to undo what Michael has suffered, while Luddy never served a day in jail." In the new ruling, the Superior Court says it is "outrageous" that the diocese ignored reports of child sexual abuse. "The court was critical of what it called the 'abysmal disregard for safety' shown by multiple leaders of the diocese who knew what was going on," Serbin said. Despite the delays, the Luddy case has changed society's attitudes and brought about positive changes, he said. "When I first filed these claims in 1987, the Hutchison family took a lot of abuse," Serbin said. "And I was accused of acting in an outrageous manner as an attorney filing these claims. "I knew there was a very strong basis, and I later learned that the problem was far greater than even I realized. Look at what's been exposed in recent years, since 2002 and thereafter, and the information is still coming out. The public now has an appreciation that this is real and that a pedophile can be a priest, a Scout leader, or a community leader." The diocese has already paid compensatory damages in the Luddy case totaling $1.4 million with in-

terest and $1.8 million in legal fees. It has argued that its insurance carriers should pay some of the damages. Hutchison, who said the abuse began when he was about 10 or 11 and continued in the 1980s until he was 17, has said that if he ever received money from the case, he would use it to help others. Serbin still has other sex-abuse cases in court -- at one time as many as 150 -- but some were dismissed because of statute of limitations rulings. LOAD-DATE: March 24, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Centre Daily Times All Rights Reserved

138 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Dallas Morning News (Texas) Distributed by Knight/Ridder Tribune News Service March 19, 2006 Sunday

The Dallas Morning News Steve Blow column: Sometimes parents are seduced, too
BYLINE: Steve Blow, The Dallas Morning News SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 688 words Mar. 19--It is a seduction. That's the thing you have to remember. Stomachs turn just thinking about a sexual predator's seduction of a child. Grooming, they call it. Patiently. Sweetly. One tiny step at a time. Until the unthinkable somehow seems normal. But what we forget is that usually another seduction is taking place. Patiently. Sweetly. One tiny step at a time, parents are seduced, too. And the unthinkable somehow begins to seem normal -- like sending children to swim parties and sleepovers in a predator's home. No doubt many of you read with horror last week how parents entrusted their little girls to the care of Dennis Drummond, the Plano soccer coach charged with indecency with a child.

Our first reaction is to condemn such irresponsible parenting. That was certainly my first take. But with a little more thought, I recalled a time when my children were young and little questions nagged about an individual in their lives. Was it all as wholesome as it seemed? Or was I seduced as a parent? So far as I know, nothing untoward ever happened. But sometimes I still wonder about intentions. And I remember an incident from my own youth when a high school teacher took a special interest in me. I can flatly say that nothing happened there. But my parents had deep concerns and made it clear to the teacher that his attention was unwelcome. I was furious. I liked him. I was flattered by his interest. In hindsight, who knows? As an adult, I can see that my parents may have been exactly right. The point is that these things are seldom as cut and dried as they appear in the newspaper afterward. In fact, the expectation of such black-and-white clarity helps perpetuate sexual abuse, I'm told. "I hear people say all the time, 'If I ever had any suspicion, I would take action,' " said Peter Pollard. He is public education director for Stop It Now!, a national campaign to fight child sex abuse. "That attitude creates a feeling of safety," he said. "There's a feeling that if it ever came into our family, we would know it and we would do something about it." Reality is usually very different, he said. "It's complicated. It's very complicated." Consider all the angles: This almost always involves someone we like and trust. It is someone our child loves and respects. Often our child's favorite sport or activity is involved. Do we disrupt that? We begin to question our suspicions. And how would other parents react? Would our child be ostracized? Would we be believed? After raising questions, how horrible would the fallout be? All those factors work together to paralyze us, sometimes to actually blind us, Mr. Pollard said. "Only in retrospect do people say: 'Oh, my God. Why didn't I understand what was going on?' " Let's be clear that Mr. Drummond is only accused at this point, not convicted of anything. But the allegations alone ought to prompt self-examination, both organizationally and personally. Every youth organization should make sure it has the best possible safeguards in place. We can be proud that locally based Boy Scouts of America has led the way in developing best practices. Its multilayered approach starts with regular education of boys about the "3 R's" of sexual misconduct -"recognize, resist and report." The Boy Scouts also have a "two-deep" policy in which no adult is ever alone with an unrelated child. Scouting spokesman Gregg Shields said local Scout councils are happy to share such policies with any youth organization. On a personal level, we need to thoroughly examine our attitudes and preconceptions. Have we been seduced as parents? Because the issue is complicated, the Stop It Now campaign operates a toll-free help line (1-888-7738368), where parents can confidentially ask questions or discuss suspicions. Condemning other parents is easy. But it doesn't get us closer to protecting our children. E-mail sblow@dallasnews.com Copyright (c) 2006, The Dallas Morning News Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. For information on republishing this content, contact us at (800) 661-2511 (U.S.), (213) 237-4914 (worldwide), fax (213) 237-6515, or e-mail reprints@krtinfo.com. LOAD-DATE: March 20, 2006

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060319-DA-0319-The-Dallas-Morning-News-Steve-Blow-column PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: DA Copyright 2006 The Dallas Morning News

140 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Globe and Mail (Canada) March 17, 2006 Friday

Stains in the fabric of trust
BYLINE: JOHN IBBITSON SECTION: COLUMN; Pg. A4 LENGTH: 673 words It now goes without saying in Ottawa that if a journalist has lunch with a politician or public servant, the journalist - or, more precisely, the shareholders of the journalist's news organization - will pick up the cheque. Neither side wants to see that cheque appearing in a publicly scrutinized expense account. The Radwanski effect, named after the disgraced former privacy commissioner who loved a good meal, has been bad for the restaurant trade, and for some newspaper profit margins. And it has been bad for George Radwanski; this week, the RCMP charged him with fraud and breach of trust. Mr. Radwanski's lawyer promises a vigorous defence. But, at the level of public trust, the damage has already been done. Mr. Radwanski's contribution was to accelerate the decline of deference. Citizens are increasingly suspicious of people in political or civil authority, who all too often justify that suspicion. On gloomy days, you wonder how we're going to run the place, if this keeps up. Before the Second World War, few people graduated from high school. After the war, most people did. The spectacular rise in education levels created a generation of literate, restless citizens who weren't prepared to defer to the judgments of their betters. The questioning poetry of the 1950s gave way to the demonstrations of the 60s and the investigations of the 70s. Assorted scandals, Watergate being the granddaddy, discredited the political class. Blatant sensationalism discredited the media. The police had long been under suspicion; now judges were criticized for ideological bias. In Canada, the Senate is a permanent object of ridicule. The House of Commons disgraces itself with every Question Period. With Parliament's integrity impugned, governments have turned to royal commissions and public inquiries. The former routinely go over budget and report only after everyone involved is dead; the latter have come under increasing attack, with judges/commissioners accused of conducting vendettas.

Parliament appointed independent officers to guard the guardians. But Mr. Radwanski brought public opprobrium to the office of privacy commissioner; Ethics Commissioner Bernie Shapiro has been criticized for bias and incompetence. Even Auditor-General Sheila Fraser has come under fire, for sensationalizing her reports. Somewhere along the way, people stopped going to Rotary, or sending their kids to Scouts. The Catholic Church was humiliated by allegations of sex abuse by priests that the church hierarchy conspired to cover up. Other denominations were discredited by a revisionist theology that seemed to believe in not much of anything. As Fareed Zakaria has warned in The Future of Freedom, democracy only lasts one election, unless majority will is constrained by institutions that protect civil order from the rule of the mob. If those institutions become too discredited, the centre may not hold. Populists argue that citizens themselves can fill in the void: referendums, recall and the like can sweep away mediating elites, so government truly reflects the will of the people. And who needs Rotary when we're on the Internet? But the people show little interest in direct government. Voter turnout is declining, referendums in U.S. elections often produce contradictory results, with citizens demanding lower taxes, increased services and balanced budgets. And whatever the Internet is, it is not collegial. At this point, the pundit is expected to propose a sweeping solution, preferably in ringing tones. But there is no sweeping solution. There are reforms - citizens assemblies, proportional representation, mandatory voting - that might be encouraged. Probably all we can do is muddle along, hoping that not many Radwanskis await us down the road, to further strain and stain the fabric of trust. And on less gloomy days, we can remind ourselves that nothing is going on today that wasn't going on before, except that at least now we're hearing about it. For what it's worth. jibbitson@globeandmail.com LOAD-DATE: September 14, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Bell Globemedia Publishing Inc. and its licensors All Rights Reserved

143 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Boston Herald March 8, 2006 Wednesday ALL EDITIONS

Op-Ed;

Time mustn't be on the side of pedophiles
BYLINE: By JOSEPH E. GALLAGHER JR. SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 029 LENGTH: 520 words When a child is raped by a trusted authority figure, he or she often is not able to come forward for decades. At this point, in Massachusetts the sexual predator is difficult to prosecute because our state still imposes archaic statutes of limitations on prosecuting sex crimes against minors. A child who has been raped must prosecute within 15 years of his or her 16th birthday. A minor who suffered incest must press charges within 10 years. If the child ``only'' was sexually abused but no penetration occurred, he has even less time: He must take legal action within six years. Civil cases allow a threeyear time frame. The result is an ignored public safety crisis in our state. Credibly accused child molesters are living in our neighborhoods. On March 14 two bills to eliminate the statute of limitations on all child sexual assault cases involving criminal or civil prosecution have a hearing before the Joint Committee on the Judiciary. These bills were principally crafted in response to the profoundly disturbing crisis not only in the Catholic Church, but in society as a whole, namely, family members, Boys' Club leaders and Scout leaders. Victims of clergy sex abuse and their advocates have worked tirelessly to convince a reluctant Legislature, attorney general and governor to support the repeal of these statutes. More than 98 percent of all priests accused of sexual abuse of a minor have never been involved in any legal proceedings. The primary reason and line of defense is the statute of limitations. Three years ago when the focus of the crisis shifted from changing the church to working with the Legislature, there was little support or interest among lawmakers for the repeal of the statutes. Many of the lawmakers are lawyers and defense attorneys who were determined to resist surrendering their principal line of defense in the name of justice. Now, three years later after exhaustive efforts to educate and lobby our politicians about the appropriateness of such legislation, the bills' support is widespread. The governor supports lifting the statutes. Attorney General Tom Reilly said he will support the repeal, stating, ``A predator of a child should never be out of reach of the law.'' And most district attorneys now agree that these statutes tie the hands of prosecutors. Most importantly, there are 72 legislators, Democrats and Republicans, who have signed on to these bills. The elimination of the statute of limitations for criminal and civil statutes is, by far, the most effective tool for the prevention of childhood sexual abuse. Homicide is currently the only crime without a statute of limitations in Massachusetts. Why should it be any different for those who leave a child alive, but kill his spirit? Victims hauntingly call it ``soul murder.'' With passage of the repeal, prosecutors' hands will be untied, sexual predators of children would be held accountable and victims of soul murder might finally experience the redemptive effect of justice. Joseph E. Gallagher Jr. is co-founder of the Coalition of Catholics and Survivors, an advocacy group for victims of clergy sexual abuse. LOAD-DATE: March 8, 2006

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Boston Herald Inc.

145 of 265 DOCUMENTS Telegraph Herald (Dubuque, IA) March 8, 2006 Wednesday

Evaluation intense; Screeners look for risk factors
BYLINE: ERIK HOGSTROM SECTION: OTHER; Pg. a1 LENGTH: 653 words Church officials rely on a battery of screenings to filter out potentially abusive priests. "I'm not sure you could find a screening process that is more extensive than this one," said the Rev. Scott Bullock, director of seminarians for the Archdiocese of Dubuque. Prospective priests face several tests, psychological analyses and questions about their sexual history all before gaining admittance to the seminary. "That is not to say the process is perfect," Bullock said, "but it has improved dramatically." In past generations, a parish priest's recommendation ushered in a relatively uncomplicated acceptance process into the seminary. Bullock described the current process as a four- to eight-year period of "very intense evaluation." "It requires a man to meet with two psychologists - one is not sufficient," Bullock said. "We need the experts to tell us." Those psychologists use a variety of tools to judge a candidate's suitability to a priest's role, including the celibacy requirements. "Screening is very helpful because we can identify risk factors," said Thomas G. Plante, professor and chairman of the psychology department at Santa Clara University in California. The author of "Psychological Patterns Among Roman Catholic Clergy Accused of Sexual Misconduct," Plante has helped screen prospective priests for 18 years. Screeners consider a variety of risk factors that can point toward a possibility for sexual abuse. Initially, screeners attempt to identify psychological problems that commonly occur in conjunction with abuse, including hints of personality disorders, substance abuse or anxiety disorders.

"Another risk factor is a history of sexual violation themselves," Plante said. "A third risk factor is impulsecontrol problems in general." Prospective priests who exhibit problems controlling anger, food intake, alcohol consumption or gambling present a "red flag." "A fourth risk factor would be a history of unsuccessful adult relationships - sexual or not," Plante said. An inability to forge or maintain healthy adult relationships could signal a potential for problems. "If a man never dated, there is probably a part of that man that is not fully developed," Bullock said. Such a situation might not automatically disqualify a seminary candidate, "But it could call for further evaluation," Bullock said. Plante said the changing profile of newly ordained priests assists the screening process. "In the old days, priests entered religious life at a younger age - often in their teens," Plante said. Current seminarians face as many as eight years of religious training before ordination. "People are entering the priesthood so much later; the average age is 29," Plante said. "And a person doesn't wake up at age 40 and decide to become a sex offender." Instead, that proclivity can begin at a relatively youthful age. The current age of applicants and length of time before ordination, Plante said, means "we can screen those who have demonstrated their colors." "It is so much easier to do that now than generations in the past," he said. Other screenings occur at frequent intervals during a seminarian's career. "These are the most evaluated men in the nation," Bullock said. "We are inviting more and more people to comment on this man." Those who might balk at such scrutiny are reminded of its result. "We tell them what we are doing is for the good of the church," Bullock said. Plante said current screening methods can greatly reduce the number of potentially abusive priests. "You can't bring the number to zero," he said, just as efforts to root out all potentially abusive Scout leaders and other youth workers have not been 100 percent successful. "But we can sure try," he said, "using the best science we've got." Publicity surrounding the clergy sex abuse scandal has tightened the screening process further, Bullock said. "The priesthood is no place to hide," he said. "Now everybody knows that." LOAD-DATE: March 8, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Priests and deacons of the Archdiocese of Dubuque participate in a service of atonement at St. Raphael Cathedral in 2003. Prospective priests face several tests before gaining admittance to the seminary. Mug - Scott Bullock PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Woodward Communications, Inc. All Rights Reserved

146 of 265 DOCUMENTS Chicago Sun Times March 4, 2006 Saturday Final Edition

Remember, accused priests innocent until proved guilty
BYLINE: John Maher, Special to The Chicago Sun-Times SECTION: EDITORIALS; Pg. 15 LENGTH: 671 words At a news conference in Turin on Feb. 9, the day before speedskater Chris Witty was to lead the U.S. Olympic team into the opening ceremony of the Turin Games, she described how a neighbor, a married man, had sexually abused her as a child in a Milwaukee suburb. A week earlier, the Rev. Daniel McCormack, a priest of the Chicago archdiocese, was charged with aggravated sexual abuse of an 11-year-old boy. He had earlier been charged with abusing two other children. Witty, who won a gold medal in the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics, said the trusted neighbor had begun abusing her when she was 4 years old and had continued until she was 11. In Witty's case, the offender apparently was not sued civilly and made no payment of damages, as is true in most cases of sexual abuse of children. On the day of Witty's news conference, the 11-year-old boy claiming sexual abuse by McCormack and his mother sued Cardinal Francis George and the Chicago Archdiocese for negligence in allowing the priest to remain as pastor of a parish after allegations of sexual abuse had been made. McCormack has not been convicted of any crime. Cases of sexual abuse of children are not rare. Roughly 1.15 million cases were reported between 1990 and 2002. In 1990, there were 119,000; the number was down to 88,000 in 1999 and remained at about that number up to 2002, the latest year of publication of government statistics for such offenses. In April 2002, Time magazine cited studies indicating that half of child sexual abusers are the parents of the victims, and 18 percent are other relatives of the victims. Pedophiles also include teachers, coaches, Scout masters and others who work with youngsters. Priests accused of sexual abuse of children are a fraction of 1 percent of all such abusers. Ideally, there should be no priest who sexually abuses a child, but, ideally, no parent should sexually abuse a child. To turn from the ideal to financial reality, while most sexual abusers of children are not sued for damages, Catholic dioceses have been sued for negligence for not removing accused priests from ministry. Since the 1950s, the Catholic Church in the United States has spent about $1 billion in costs related to child sex abuse cases. In January 2005, the diocese of Orange, Calif., agreed to a $100 million settlement in a suit involving about 90 plaintiffs, who alleged abuse between 1936 and 1996 by 44 persons, including 31 priests and two nuns. Payments to individuals ranged from about $500,000 to $4 million.

A report published by the Chicago Archdiocese in January 2003 said that, in the past 40 years, 55 allegations of sexual abuse of children by 36 archdiocesan priests were determined to be founded. Other allegations had been found to be foundless accusations of innocent priests. At the time the report was published, there had been no allegations of sexual misconduct in the previous 12 years. The archdiocese had spent $7.9 million on counseling, settlements, and other forms of assistance to victims. It had spent $4.3 million on legal fees, including $1.3 million to defend a priest and school principal found not guilty by a jury. The late Cardinal Joseph Bernardin was accused of sexual abuse by a former seminarian who later recanted. Contrary to the traditional legal principle, priests accused of sexual abuse of children are apparently deemed guilty until proved innocent. Moreover, while conviction in a criminal trial requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt, the standard for finding liability in a civil suit for damages is less rigorous, and settlements are sometimes made both to avoid the cost of the trial and the possibility of a jury finding that is more costly than a settlement. The pain experienced by sexual abuse victims is real and deserves compensation, but, as the latest episode in the scandal unfolds, it should be remembered that false accusations have been made and that very few priests have been found, in fact, to have sexually abused children. John Maher is a free-lance writer from Jefferson Park. LOAD-DATE: March 4, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Opinion; Crime PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Chicago Sun-Times, Inc. All Rights Reserved

149 of 265 DOCUMENTS Aberdeen Press and Journal February 28, 2006 Tuesday

Inverbervie man on sex abuse charges
SECTION: Pg. 3 LENGTH: 494 words Two boys were sexually abused by a man in a north-east town, it has been alleged. Nigel Innes, 42, appeared on petition at Aberdeen Sheriff Court yesterday in connection with the claims. He faces two charges one alleging that he indecently assaulted a youngster at an Inverbervie address and a second alleging that he used lewd, indecent and libidinous practices and behaviour towards another boy at the same address.

The charges are understood to date from October 2002 to 2003. Innes, of 42 Hallgreen Cottages, Inverbervie, appeared from custody and made no plea during the brief private hearing before Sheriff Douglas Cusine. He was released on bail. No plea made AN ALLEGED drug dealer, said to be concerned in the supply of more than £30,000-worth of illicit substances, appeared in court for a second time yesterday. Gordon Ferries, 34, of 25 Polinar Place, Inverurie, is accused of being concerned in the supply of cannabis and amphetamine in Inverurie and elsewhere in Aberdeenshire, on February 19. He made no plea and was granted bail, but the Crown appealed that decision and he was remanded in custody. Kintore spring fair KINTORE Primary School PTA will be showing off the new village school with a spring fair on Saturday, March 11. The fete, which runs between 10am and 1pm, will feature stalls selling pottery, cards, leather goods, crafts, paintings and cosmetics, among others. Tickets cost £1.50 for adults and 50p for children. For more information contact Bethany Carlier on 01467 633646. Church meeting KEMNAY Churches' Good Morning Group will meet at 10.15am today in the village's Church Centre, with a World Day of Prayer discussion. Newcomers will be welcome. Speed limit ABERDEENSHIRE Council has this week brought in a 20mph speed limit at Baker Street in Oldmeldrum, with speed cushions now in place as part of the traffic-calming strategy. Garden club METHLICK Garden Club will meet at 7.30pm tonight in the village's Scout hut, when plans for the forthcoming session will be reviewed. New members will be welcome. Fundraising night ELLON Ladies' Circle will hold a fundraising ladies' night in the town's Station Hotel from 7.30pm-9pm tonight, with a range of stalls offering everything from Reiki to Fairtrade items and beauty and health tips. Proceeds from the event will go to PAGES - Parents Advisory group for Education and Socialisation - which runs the Esslemont Rainbow Centre. B993 diversion ABERDEENSHIRE drivers will face diversions this week on the rural B993 Kemnay-Alford road, with essential road repairs continuing at Tillyfourie until Friday. Diversions will be sign-posted. Comedy contest INVERURIE performers will be taking the stage tomorrow in an inaugural Laughter Forum at Aberdeen's Club Snafu. Taking part in the 8.30pm comedy acts knockout show will be comedy magic-man Alan Innes with Allan Petrie and entertainer Sean Wilson. They will among six acts competing in what is planned as a monthly showcase contest. LOAD-DATE: March 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Aberdeen Press and Journal All Rights Reserved

150 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Seattle Times February 27, 2006 Monday Fourth Edition

Lawyers team up to take on abuse cases
BYLINE: Janet I. Tu, Seattle Times staff reporter SECTION: ROP ZONE; Local News; Pg. B1 LENGTH: 1455 words One is the product of a Catholic home, parochial schools and a Jesuit college. He's cool-headed and analytical, speaking in measured tones. The other is the grandson of Jewish immigrants from Russia. He's demonstrative, advocating for clients in passionate torrents. Together, Seattle-area attorneys Michael Pfau and Timothy Kosnoff represent the vast majority of sex-abuse victims who've sued the Roman Catholic Church in Seattle and in Spokane, where the diocese has filed for bankruptcy. Their work as a team began just three years ago but already has been highly successful, including a recent settlement proposal from the Spokane Diocese that goes beyond a sizable dollar amount. The nearly $46 million offer includes concessions victims considered crucial: from a written apology from the church to forums for them to speak and write about their ordeals and a promise from Catholic officials to stop calling them "alleged" victims. Certainly, the two lawyers have detractors. Particularly in Spokane, there is resentment among some parishioners who believe the lawyers are profiting while the Catholics may lose their parishes and schools to pay settlement costs. But to their clients, Pfau and Kosnoff are driven by a larger cause. "They're real advocates of sexual-abuse victims," said Cheryl Corrigan, widow of a Spokane man, Tim Corrigan, who killed himself the same day he told her about being abused by former Spokane priest Patrick O'Donnell. "They're personally committed to their clients." Michael Corrigan, Tim's brother, has been particularly impressed by Pfau's tenacity. In taking depositions from church officials, Pfau asked "the questions all of us wanted to ask," Corrigan said. "Go, Mike!" And colleagues talk of Kosnoff's investigatory zeal in personally tracking down errant priests all the way to Ireland in one case. "He would just sort of show up on their doorsteps and say: `I'd like to talk to you,' said bankruptcy attorney James Stang, who worked with Kosnoff on the Spokane cases. "And apparently some of them did." Catholic education

Pfau, 41, grew up in a devout Catholic family in Milwaukee. He attended a Catholic grade school, a Jesuit high school and the Jesuit-run Boston College. It was only after college, when he came to Tacoma to work with abused children through the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, that he got to know many non-Catholics. It was his Jesuit education, Pfau says, that instilled in him a sense of social justice and has helped him empathize with abuse victims and their families. "I understand what the religion taught, the tenets involving social justice and honesty. And I think that helps me understand how badly betrayed the victims and their families feel." Kosnoff, 52, says he developed a skepticism of organized religion at an early age. It galls him, he says, when "powerful institutions are able to shield this kind of activity from the public eye under the guise of freedom of religion." Shortly after graduating from Indiana University, Kosnoff went to work for a farm-laborers organization, where he saw the group's lawyers taking on big companies. That got him into law. "I saw this David and Goliath play out," he said. "It inspired me." But it wasn't until the mid-1990s, after stints as a criminal-defense lawyer and as a prosecutor, that he and another attorney represented a man claiming abuse by a Mormon high priest. The case eventually settled in Portland for $3 million. "I became hooked on learning why this could happen in the religious culture." By 2002, Kosnoff, a sole practitioner, was specializing in such cases, and Pfau had done such work through his law firm, Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, Malanca, Peterson & Daheim, where he is a partner. The two lawyers met for the first time that year at a hearing involving James McGreal, a Seattle priest who had been accused of molesting numerous boys. Work together At a coffeehouse across from the courthouse, Pfau and Kosnoff talked for hours. The two agreed they wanted to avoid the acrimony that developed among some lawyers suing the Boston Archdiocese. Now, it seems like "they've worked together forever," said Stang, the bankruptcy attorney. "They seem very, very connected" in their thought process and strategy. Both say they are risk takers. But where Kosnoff describes himself as optimistic and "excessively exuberant" at times, Pfau is more cautious and skeptical. "I try to step back and remember that in addition to emotion and passion, these people also need very clear thinking and lawyers to make good decisions." Clients credit them both with being good listeners and communicators. "Any time you need them, you can e-mail or call. I've never had them not call back within 24 hours," Cheryl Corrigan said. Mark Mains, a plaintiff in the Spokane cases, credits Pfau and Kosnoff with understanding how strongly victims felt about the parts of the proposed settlement that didn't involve money. Those provisions from a written apology to victims and their families, to letting victims tell their stories in the diocesan paper distinguish the proposed settlement from other such cases across the country. The lawyers got that these terms were to be negotiated first even before the money, Mains said. Critics But there are some who believe they've gone too far. Sharon Clizer, principal at the Spokane Diocese's Holy Family Catholic School, says she feels for those who were abused. But she also believes parishioners and parochial students are being asked to pay dearly

for something that wasn't their fault. "Money will not heal the victims. How much is enough to make them feel better? Oh, yes, we know who will feel better the attorneys who will be smiling as they write out a check for their kids' college or that new boat or car." She is also afraid for her school. "We have lived with a shadow and threat over our head wondering how much this will harm our schools," Clizer said. "It has been insane the kinds of paperwork the victim's attorneys have requested. ... Can't someone stop this insanity?" Michael Patterson, an attorney for the Seattle Archdiocese, said that while Pfau and Kosnoff have settled past cases for reasonable amounts, in some pending cases they "are asking for amounts that are substantially higher than that. There's really no rational reason for it." It's true that Pfau and Kosnoff are making good money from the cases, though neither will say exactly how much. Together they represent 70 victims in Spokane and about 30 in Seattle; Pfau by himself has almost 90 others in Seattle, some of whom already have settled. Typically, attorneys take such cases on contingency, earning between 30 and 40 percent of any final settlement or jury award, if there is one. That's a relatively high cut because such cases are complex and risky, said Jeff Anderson, an attorney in St. Paul, Minn., who has filed lawsuits against more than half of the country's Catholic dioceses. And they require emotional commitment, too, he said, because abuse victims can be "so wounded that they become difficult to work with and difficult to protect." When a diocese declares bankruptcy, the emotional stakes go even higher, said David Clohessy, national director of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. "In one fell swoop, when a bishop declares bankruptcy, some Catholics move from sympathy to anger regarding victims." Ramifications For the attorneys, as well, such cases can get personally troubling. Pfau used to attend St. Joseph Church near his home on Seattle's Capitol Hill. But at one point, "I just said: `I can't go into a Catholic church any more.' "Thousands of kids have been sexually abused by priests. That caused me to question the faith I grew up in. It caused me to withdraw from it." He's begun to go back once in a while, but "with grave cynicism and lot of skepticism" about church leadership. His children a 3-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter are baptized Presbyterian, his wife's religion. Still, Pfau and Kosnoff said, they have witnessed positive moments: the bonds forged among abuse victims. The painful secrets some kept for decades finally being revealed to family and friends. The two have taken on other institutions as well, including the Boy Scouts of America and the Mormon Church, the latter case resulting in a recent $4.2 million jury award to two women abused by their stepfather, a Mormon priest. Their next big case will be against the Morning Star Boys' Ranch in Spokane, a Catholic home for boys where allegations have surfaced of physical and sexual assaults dating back decades. "There are so many victims who tell basically the same story," Pfau said. "We're looking forward to digging in and finding out what happened there." Janet I. Tu: 206-464-2272 or jtu@seattletimes.com LOAD-DATE: February 28, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: photo; Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times : Seattle-area attorneys Michael Pfau, left, and Timothy Kosnoff represent most of the sex-abuse victims who've sued the Catholic Church in Seattle and Spokane. (0397956442)

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Seattle Times Company

151 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) February 25, 2006 Saturday Idaho Edition

Child sex abuse bill clears Senate panel; Measure would end statute of limitations
BYLINE: Meghann M. Cuniff Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 359 words DATELINE: BOISE A bill that would eliminate the statute of limitations on child sexual abuse cases cleared a Senate committee Friday after testimony from just one of more than a dozen people who were there to speak in support. "I don't have the heart to hear it," said Senate Majority Leader Bart Davis, R-Idaho Falls, after he made a motion to send the House-passed bill, HB 534, to the full Senate. Current law limits the length of time a victim has to report child sexual abuse to five years after the victim's 18th birthday, but Pocatello resident Paul Steed told the committee that many child victims are so scarred by their experiences that they're unable to speak out before they turn 23. Steed's two sons were sexually abused as Boy Scouts. One son reported the abuse within the statute of limitations requirement and the family filed suit, but Steed said no other victims have come forward. "Twenty-three years old is a very quick window," Steed said. HB 534 would not apply retroactively. The House unanimously approved the bill last week, and a House committee heard more than two hours of emotional testimony from parents and abuse victims during the bill's hearing. "I've never heard more powerful testimony than we heard in the House Judiciary and Rules committee," Rep. Debbie Field, R-Boise, told the Senate committee. Field is sponsoring the bill with Rep. Donna Boe, DPocatello. Many who testified in front of the House committee were signed up to speak at the Senate committee meeting, but committee members said there was no need. "I don't think there's any question in my mind about what the situation is in Idaho," said Sen. Mel Richardson, R-Idaho Falls.

Committee Chairman Denton Darrington, R-Declo, had previously expressed concerns about the bill, but he said its overwhelming support trumped those concerns. Blackfoot Police Chief David Moore attended the meeting to give the testimony he gave to the House committee about the sexual abuse he endured as a child. He said he was relieved the committee approved the bill without asking for more testimony. To become law, the bill needs passage in the full Senate and the governor's signature. LOAD-DATE: March 1, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Meghann M. Cuniff can be reached toll-free at (866) 336-2854 or by e-mail at meghann.cuniff@gmail.com. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

152 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman-Review (Washington) Distributed by Knight/Ridder Tribune News Service February 25, 2006 Saturday

Child sex abuse bill clears Senate panel: Measure would end statute of limitations
BYLINE: Meghann M. Cuniff, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS LENGTH: 405 words Feb. 25--BOISE â[#x20ac]" A bill that would eliminate the statute of limitations on child sexual abuse cases cleared a Senate committee Friday after testimony from just one of more than a dozen people who were there to speak in support. "I don't have the heart to hear it," said Senate Majority Leader Bart Davis, R-Idaho Falls, after he made a motion to send the House-passed bill, HB 534, to the full Senate. Current law limits the length of time a victim has to report child sexual abuse to five years after the victim's 18th birthday, but Pocatello resident Paul Steed told the committee that many child victims are so scarred by their experiences that they're unable to speak out before they turn 23. Steed's two sons were sexually abused as Boy Scouts. One son reported the abuse within the statute of limitations requirement and the family filed suit, but Steed said no other victims have come forward.

"Twenty-three years old is a very quick window," Steed said. HB 534 would not apply retroactively. The House unanimously approved the bill last week, and a House committee heard more than two hours of emotional testimony from parents and abuse victims during the bill's hearing. "I've never heard more powerful testimony than we heard in the House Judiciary and Rules committee," Rep. Debbie Field, R-Boise, told the Senate committee. Field is sponsoring the bill with Rep. Donna Boe, DPocatello. Many who testified in front of the House committee were signed up to speak at the Senate committee meeting, but committee members said there was no need. "I don't think there's any question in my mind about what the situation is in Idaho," said Sen. Mel Richardson, R-Idaho Falls. Committee Chairman Denton Darrington, R-Declo, had previously expressed concerns about the bill, but he said its overwhelming support trumped those concerns. Blackfoot Police Chief David Moore attended the meeting to give the testimony he gave to the House committee about the sexual abuse he endured as a child. He said he was relieved the committee approved the bill without asking for more testimony. To become law, the bill needs passage in the full Senate and the governor's signature. Copyright (c) 2006, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash. Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News. For information on republishing this content, contact us at (800) 661-2511 (U.S.), (213) 237-4914 (worldwide), fax (213) 237-6515, or e-mail reprints@krtinfo.com. LOAD-DATE: February 27, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH ACC-NO: 20060225-SR-0225-Child-sex-abuse-bill-clears-Senate-panel PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: SR Copyright 2006 Spokesman-Review

156 of 265 DOCUMENTS North Devon Journal February 16, 2006 Thursday

Sex abuse scout leader gets longer jail term
SECTION: Pg. 19 LENGTH: 367 words

A scout leader who sexually abused three boys, one of whom was sick beforehand after being plied with alcohol, today had his "unduly lenient" jail term increased by top judges. Keith Richard Taylor, 42, of Windsor Road, Northam, was jailed for two-and-a-half years at Exeter Crown Court last October, after being found guilty of four counts of indecent assault. Last Thursday London's Criminal Appeal Court agreed with submissions made on behalf of the Attorney General, Lord Goldsmith QC, that the term was "unduly lenient". Lord Justice Keene, sitting with Mr Justice Stanley Burnton and Sir Richard Curtis, said the appropriate sentence in the Crown Court would have been five years, double that imposed. But, because Taylor faced the stress of being sentenced a second time, he imposed one of four years. Lord Justice Keene said the sentence had to reflect the fact the victims had been deeply troubled and upset by the abuse they suffered, as well as the absence of any guilty pleas which meant they had to relive "these unhappy experiences" at the trial. Two victims were aged 11 when Taylor molested them, while the third was 14. In one case, he plied a lad with lager and vodka before the boy vomited and went to sleep after being cleaned up. He awoke to find himself being molested. One victim was so affected by his ordeal that he could not verbally describe what had happened and had to write the details in the form of a letter. Lord Justice Keene said Taylor had a previous conviction for indecent assault on a 10-year-old boy, although this happened in 1979 when he was aged 15. He noted a probation officer report said Taylor now recognised his responsibility for the offences and had asked to be assessed for a sex offenders treatment programme. Aggravating features included the fact there were three victims and alcohol was administered to one boy, "almost certainly to secure his sleeping compliance". Lord Justice Keene also referred to victim impact statements, which were not seen by the sentencing judge. "They indicate one victim could not sleep after the offence," he said. "Another refers to the offence as having a devastating effect on his relationship with girls and he feels very insecure." LOAD-DATE: February 17, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 North Devon Journal All Rights Reserved

157 of 265 DOCUMENTS St. Petersburg Times (Florida)

February 15, 2006 Wednesday Correction Appended 0 South Pinellas Edition

Cloud again over Explorer program
BYLINE: JACOB H. FRIES SECTION: CITY & STATE; Pg. 1B LENGTH: 440 words DATELINE: LARGO A Boy Scout program aimed at exposing young people to law enforcement is once again at the center of sex abuse allegations. Pinellas detectives are investigating whether a former sheriff's dispatcher had inappropriate sexual contact with a 15-year-old boy in the agency's Explorer program. A second investigation is looking into whether the same 15-year-old had sexual contact with a 17-yearold boy in the Explorer program. Under state law, a 15-year-old cannot consent to sex. No one has been arrested in either case. The Explorer program allows boys and girls of ages 14 to 21 to train alongside deputies in various units, from forensics to the SWAT team. Sheriff's spokesman Mac McMullen released few details about the allegations, which concern events that occurred two to three years ago. "The investigation is still open," McMullen said. "Interviews are being conducted, and detectives are working with the state attorney for a resolution." The identities of the two teenagers and the former dispatcher, also a male, were not released because the case is still under investigation. This is not the first controversy involving a local Explorers program. In 2000, Largo police began an internal investigation into allegations and found that three officers had had sexual relationships with female Explorers and two officers knew or heard rumors about possible misconduct but failed to report what they heard to supervisors. The allegations involving the sheriff's program surfaced on Tuesday as the agency released records concerning another employee, Deputy Jason O. Brown. Brown, a 9-year veteran on patrol, received a 10-day suspension last week after an internal probe found he did not report that the dispatcher may have committed a crime. He had also failed to be forthcoming when detectives initially questioned him about the sex allegations, according to internal affairs investigators. Brown could not be reached for comment Tuesday. He told internal affairs detectives, however, that he suspected the dispatcher might be having a relationship with the boy but was unable to confirm it. The teen had answered Brown's questions with conflicting statements, and the dispatcher denied there was a relationship, Brown told detectives. Brown also worried that his suspicions were based on his own jealousy; he had dated the dispatcher in the past. He cited another reason for his not coming forward: He said he was hoping to be transferred to the

agency's sexual predator and offender unit and thought the case might reflect poorly on him. "Yes, I could have done more maybe and if I had to do it all over again, I would do it differently," he said. LOAD-DATE: February 17, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DISTRIBUTION: CITY & STATE; METRO & STATE; TAMPA & STATE CORRECTION-DATE: February 16, 2006 CORRECTION: The Explorers program that is the subject of a Pinellas County Sheriff's Office investigation is different from a program that was closed by the Largo Police Department several years ago. The headline and first paragraph of a story Wednesday were unclear about the separateness of the programs. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Times Publishing Company All Rights Reserved

158 of 265 DOCUMENTS Cornwall Standard Freeholder (Ontario) February 14, 2006 Tuesday Final Edition

Time for 'healing and closure': Judge lays out agenda for inquiry
BYLINE: Terri Saunders, Standard-Freeholder SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1323 words DATELINE: CORNWALL CORNWALL - Healing, closure and the chance to move forward. In the opening moments of the Cornwall Public Inquiry Monday morning, Judge Normand Glaude established the theme of hearings into decades of abuse of children and how a number of public institutions responded to hundreds of allegations leveled at dozens of men by just as many victims. "This is an opportunity to find ways of supporting the community of Cornwall as it moves forward," said Glaude. "It may be a lengthy and sometimes difficult process." The first day of the Cornwall Public Inquiry got off to a quiet start with just one witness - a child sexual abuse expert - taking the stand in an effort to educate the commission on abuse and how it affects victims and the communities in which the abuse occurs.

But outside the inquiry, those who are most interested in the commission's outcome were vocal about what they hope will happen over the course of the coming year. With tears brimming in his eyes, Steve Parisien faced a veritable sea of cameras and microphones and delivered his own message to victims of sexual abuse just like him. "I think this inquiry will be vitally important for the victims in order to help them through the proper healing process," he said. "We need that healing process and we need to get closure." Glaude himself hit on the same sentiment several times in a 14-minute opening statement during which he outlined his own hopes for what the inquiry will accomplish. "The commission is mindful this has been a painful and difficult time in the community," said Glaude. "There is a need for healing and closure." In front of what amounted to just a handful of observers seated in the public gallery of the inquiry room at The Weave Shed, the inquiry heard testimony from David Wolfe, a renowned expert on child sexual abuse and the impact of the abuse on victims. A professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, Wolfe has testified in 38 civil and criminal trials regarding sexual abuse, adult survivors of child sexual abuse, child welfare and effects of family violence on children including the Mount Cashel court case which focused on the abuse of young boys at the hands of a group of Christian brothers who ran a boys' home in St. John's, Newfoundland. Wolfe said child sexual abuse is nothing new in organized society and its existence should not come as a surprise to anyone. "This has been going on since the dawn of time," he said. "It was always denied; accepted." Wolfe said there are two types of abusers - pedophiles and hebephiles. In the case of the latter, perpetrators prey on children who have reached puberty, while pedophiles tend to victimize younger children, usually between the ages of seven and 13. He also said pedophiles tend to be men who often prey on young boys. "(Male victims) are more available to men. It's more acceptable in our society for men to be with young boys than with young girls," said Wolfe, pointing out the likelihood of grown men being in close quarters with boys through things such as sports coaching and boy scouts. "The offender sees them as sexually mature enough to be attractive, but young enough to be lured." Wolfe also shattered any illusions which might remain held in the community that a sexual predator is a "dirty old man" unknown to a child who tries to entice his victim through the offering of gifts or candy, something he defined as "stranger danger." "We want to believe this is some evil force," said Wolfe. "It more likely occurs at the hands of an acquaintance." For many members of the community who have come forward in recent years with allegations of abuse, that acquaintance was often a member of the clergy. Of the 15 men charged, several of them were Catholic priests working within the Alexandria-Cornwall diocese. Wolfe said victims of sexual abuse at the hands of clergy often results in delayed disclosure. "These perpetrators were viewed by their victims as messengers of God," he said. "Victims often ask themselves, 'Why would this messenger of God also do something I now see destroyed my life?'" Wolfe said abusers often seduce or groom their victims by offering them things the children otherwise might not have. "They (abusers) look for what's missing in the victim's life - love, someone that's nice to them and doesn't hit them, spending time with the child," he said. "Very often abusers actually become close family friends." Wolfe said the tendency of abusers to become personally involved with a victim's family is one way of maintaining contact with the child.

"The abuser will also seduce the caregiver through friendship," he said. "That way they can spend more time with the victim with the approval of the caregiver, which often results in the caregiver also feeling victimized when the abuse is disclosed." The disclosure of abuse will likely be some of the most difficult testimony the inquiry will hear beginning at the end of March when the first victims are expected to take the stand. "It will be gut wrenching," said Paul Scott, spokesperson for Citizens for Community Renewal, one of the more than a dozen groups which have received standing at the inquiry. "It will be very hard for many people to hear." Scott said he's optimistic the healing and closure which has already become a central theme of the inquiry will happen in time, but not before the community is forced to come to terms with the decades of abuse suffered by the children of Cornwall and the surrounding area. "We have to begin to prepare ourselves," he said. "It will be a rude awakening, but an important one." The inquiry continues today. ON THE STAND THIS WEEK NICHOLAS BALA Nicholas Bala is an expert on the evolution of legislation, law, and legal processes involving children and, in particular, child sexual abuse. Since 1980, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Law at Queen's University and a visiting professor at McGill, Duke and the University of Calgary. His primary area of teaching and research interest is Family and Children's Law with a focus on child abuse and child witnesses; child welfare law, family violence; best interests of children; and juvenile justice, among others. He has published extensively and his work is regularly cited by the Supreme Court of Canada and Courts of Appeal in a number of provinces. Bala is a member of the National Judicial Institute Program Planning Committees for Child Witnesses and High Conflict Parental Separations and is editor of the N. J. I. Electronic Benchbook on Child Witness. He is the principal investigator of an interdisciplinary research project on child witnesses funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. NICO TROCME Nico Trocme is an expert in the reporting of child abuse and, in particular, child sexual abuse. Considered to be one of Canada's leading researchers in the field of child welfare, he recently joined McGill University as the Philip Fisher Chair in Social Work and as Director of the Centre for Research on Children and Families. He was principal investigator for the 1998 and 2003 Canadian Incidence Studies of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect, considered the most comprehensive source of data on victims of child abuse in Canada. Dr. Trocme also directed the development of a framework for tracking child welfare service outcomes currently being implemented by governments across Canada. As the founding Director of the Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare at the University of Toronto, Dr. Trocme spent the last five years developing a Canada-wide network of researchers and policy makers to promote and support evidence-based child welfare policy. In his current role of Director of the Centre for Research on Children and Families, Dr. Trocme is focusing on developing a McGill-based interdisciplinary community-researcher partnership to conduct and disseminate research for effective programs and policies for vulnerable children and youth and their families. LOAD-DATE: February 14, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: Colour Photo: Labrecque, Standard-Freeholder; CENTRE OF THE STORM: Steve Parisien, centre, a victim

of sexual abuse, is questioned by national media. Monday was the first official day of the Cornwall Public Inquiry.; Photo: Labrecque, Standard-Freeholder / QUESTION SESSION: David Wolfe, an expert in child sex abuse, left, speaks with lawyer Peter Engelmann, who is serving as lead counsel for inquiry. Monday was the first official day of the Cornwall Public Inquiry.; Photo: Nicholas Bala; Photo: Nico Trocme DOCUMENT-TYPE: News PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Cornwall Standard Freeholder All Rights Reserved

159 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Denver Post February 13, 2006 Monday FINAL EDITION

EDITORIAL Extend window of justice for sex abuse The legislature should extend the statute of limitations for victims to sue over abuse by priests and others whose assaults took place years ago.
SECTION: DENVER & THE WEST; Pg. B-07 LENGTH: 676 words There is no question that public and private institutions should be subject to the same standard when it comes to civil court procedures and penalties involving the victims of child sexual abuse. That said, the Denver Catholic archdiocese is overreacting to legislation proposing to lift the statute of limitations for victims seeking damages for the pain they suffered years - even decades - earlier at the hands of an adult. Whether it was a pedophile priest, a school teacher or a Boy Scout official, responsible adults and their institutions should not be able to avoid accountability for their acts. The church is arguing that Colorado law makes it tougher to sue public schools under routine governmental immunity laws and therefore it should be just as tough to sue the church for its pedophile priests. Church officials say sexual misconduct in public schools is a more serious problem than it is in the Roman Catholic Church. To prove its point, the church has come up with 85 cases of public school teachers in Colorado dating back to 1997 who had their licenses revoked or denied due to alleged sexual misconduct. Apparently the church considers that far more serious than Colorado priests who allegedly repeatedly molested altar boys and other young boys. The numbers game is a blatant effort by the church to divert attention from its responsibility to compensate priests' victims. The fact is, the church is under pressure because officials knew that priests were abusing children in their own flock yet covered it up, quietly moving the priests from parish to parish. In Color-

ado, at least two priests have been accused in court by two dozen young men of abusing them as boys. The number of victims might be even bigger, but their day in court has long ago passed, thanks to the statute of limitations that some lawmakers want to relax or eliminate for future cases. The statute of limitations for suing a church or other private institution is two years from the date of a victim's discovery of injury. The same is true for bringing a suit against a school or other public entity under governmental immunity laws. The Denver archdiocese, in a letter read in each parish, questioned why the victim of a priest can "wait a lifetime" before suing the church, while "the victim of exactly the same and even more frequent abuse" in a public school loses their claim after 180 days. In fact, the window is two years, said Tom Roberts, a lawyer representing clients suing the church. Governmental immunity doesn't shield public employees from "willful and wanton" conduct, he said. A school also could be sued under the Federal Civil Rights Act. The church has every right to be wary of the potential embarrassment and financial pain that could result if more lawsuits are filed because of the legislation. More important, though, is to do right by any victims and set the church on a positive course in dealing with any future claims. Up for debate today, Senate Bill 143 would open a window for lawsuits by those who have lost their day in court because the statute of limitations ran out. A one-year window in California led to about 800 lawsuits. Senate President Joan Fitz-Gerald said she has proposed two years for Colorado, aware that it can take decades for a victim to come to terms with what was done to them. In Ohio, lawmakers heard dramatic testimony while weighing a one-year window. Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Gumbleton of Detroit, who was sexually abused by a priest when he was a boy and broke his silence after 60 years, recently urged the legislature to pass the bill, knowing full well it would cause the church pain. "It might seem easier to keep the evils hidden," Gumbleton said. "But I am convinced that a settlement of every case by our court system is the only way to protect children and heal the brokenness within the church." Providing a temporary window for lawsuits is critical to giving sexual assault victims the opportunity to have their day in court. As Gumbleton said, ``I do believe that the abusers need to be exposed.'' LOAD-DATE: February 13, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Editorial PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Denver Post All Rights Reserved

160 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Denver Post February 10, 2006 Friday FINAL EDITION

Standard for sex-abuse suits under fire Legislation could loosen

time limits for some abuse lawsuits, a change the Catholic Church opposes.
BYLINE: Eric Gorski Denver Post Staff Writer SECTION: A SECTION; Pg. A-01 LENGTH: 1230 words Democratic lawmakers, victims' advocate groups, lawyers and the Roman Catholic Church are squaring off in a high-stakes battle over whether it should be easier for victims of child sexual abuse to sue churches and private institutions in Colorado. The push to loosen or drop statutes of limitations for victims seeking justice decades later is a new front in the national Catholic clergy sexual-abuse crisis. Four years after the scandal erupted, legislators in a handful of states are considering such reforms - and meeting resistance from the church. But the church's argument in Colorado appears to be a novel one: that it's unfair to hold churches and private nonprofits to a different standard than public schools, which under governmental immunity are difficult to sue under state law. "We are arguing that everyone should be held to a higher standard," said Tim Dore, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, the lobbying arm for the state's three dioceses. "Child abuse is child abuse. It should be treated the same, be it in a private or public institution. This is a societal issue." Supporters of three statute-of-limitations bills in the legislature call that a red herring - an attempt to steer attention away from the church's problems and muddy a debate over justice for the victims. "It's unfortunate if what they're saying is that, 'Other people have gotten away with it, why aren't you going after them?"' said state Senate President Joan Fitz-Gerald, sponsor of a bill that would open a two-year window for lawsuits against private entities, no matter how old the incidents. The church's strong public statements on the legislation are in keeping with Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput's belief that Catholics are called to carry their faith into the public square. In a letter read from pulpits last weekend, Chaput called the legislation "unfair, unequal and prejudicial" and anti-Catholic. Chaput declined an interview request this week. Under Colorado law, victims of child abuse in public schools must file notice to sue within 180 days of an incident, and damages are capped at $150,000. Generally, victims have until they turn 24 to sue churches and private groups, and caps on damages don't exist in most cases. Fitz-Gerald, who is Catholic, said that she was motivated by allegations against Colorado Catholic clergy, but her bill targets no one group. The legislation would apply to private child-care centers, churches and groups such as the Boy Scouts. "If the Catholic Church was so concerned about making changes in current laws, why haven't they been lobbying for us to change it before this?" said House Majority Leader Alice Madden, D-Boulder, a co-sponsor of Fitz-Gerald's bill. "I will not coddle pedophiles, no matter who they work for." So far, no other church or private organization has publicly opposed the legislation. Colorado law spells out the reasons for sovereign immunity: that public bodies provide essential public functions that could be disrupted or made too expensive for the taxpayer if exposed to unlimited liability. The doctrine does not shield public employees in cases of "willful and wanton conduct." "We understand governmental immunity," lobbyist Dore said. "But the heart of the issue is for a child who

is abused in a public or a private institution: is that abuse any less or different?" Other factors should be taken into consideration, said Barbara Blaine, president of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, a key player in pushing states to change their laws. Any citizen can make a public records request to seek information on cases of abuse in public schools, she said. But because the church has not been forthcoming with details about accused priests, no one in Colorado knew about the scope of the problem until victims came forward last summer, she said. Since then, more than two dozen lawsuits have been filed accusing the archdiocese of protecting and reassigning priests known to be offenders. "In the public sector, there are checks and balances," Blaine said. "The schools operate in a democracy. The bishops act like a monarchy. They are completely accountable to no one." In testimony last week on one bill, the church tried to bolster its argument that sexual abuse and misconduct in public schools is a more serious problem than it is in churches. One of the witnesses was Patrick Chappell, a Holy Family High School junior who was a public school student when he was molested. He wasn't molested in school; he was victimized in Estes Park by his employer, a well-known former member of the local school board, who later was convicted. "I don't think it's a good idea to change our legal system," Chappell said in an interview. "I don't think true healing comes from chasing around the person who molested you 30 years ago." A 2004 federal study on sexual abuse in public schools found that 6.7 percent of students report being physically abused by an educator, said Charol Shakeshaft, a Hofstra University professor who testified for the church last week. At the same time, Shakeshaft said in an interview, it's impossible to say whether abuse is more rampant in one setting than another because so little reliable data exist from schools, churches and youth organizations. She said she supports lifting barriers to suing private and public entities because research shows that victims need years to find the strength to go public. Experts say children are most frequently abused at home. Public schools are not immune to lawsuits, however, said Tom Roberts, a lawyer representing plaintiffs suing the archdiocese. Schools can be sued under the federal Civil Rights Act if a known offender was moved from school to school, Roberts said. "It's not like there is a cocoon around school districts that you can't recover damages under any circumstances," said Lauren Kingsbery, legal counsel for the Colorado Association of School Boards. But Martin Nussbaum, a Colorado Springs lawyer working with the Catholic Conference, countered that making a civil rights case would be a stretch legally, especially with old cases. "We have a very large industry that is all geared up to make hundreds of millions of dollars suing entities for failing to protect children," he said. "If there was that pool of potential plaintiffs, where are the lawsuits?" Staff writer Eric Gorski can be reached at 303-820-1698 or egorski@denverpost.com. ----------------- Statute-of-limitations bills SENATE BILL 143: Opens a two-year window for child sex-abuse lawsuits against churches and other private entities no matter how old the incidents. Allows for actions against an institution even if the person accused is dead. Sponsors: Sen. Joan Fitz-Gerald, D-Jefferson County; Rep. Alice Madden, D-Boulder Status: Committee hearing scheduled for Monday HOUSE BILL 1088: Removes statute of limitations for civil suits and criminal charges involving child-sex

abuse. Does not apply to old cases. Sponsors: Rep. Rosemary Marshall, D-Denver; Sen. Paula Sandoval, D-Denver Status: Won committee approval. Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Yuma, has filed an amendment expanding the bill to cover public institutions. HOUSE BILL 1090: Removes statute of limitations for civil suits and criminal charges involving child sex abuse. Removes damage caps that apply in some cases. Sponsor: Rep. Gwyn Green, D-Golden Status: Held over - yet to reach committee LOAD-DATE: February 10, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Denver Post All Rights Reserved

161 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) February 2, 2006 Thursday Idaho Edition

Scandal may cost parishes; Sale of churches possible in settlement
BYLINE: John Stucke and Virginia de Leon Staff writers SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1327 words With a $45.75 million settlement offer on the table to pay victims of clergy sexual abuse, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Spokane now faces a new dilemma: how to pay for it. Bishop William Skylstad and his attorneys remain hopeful that six insurance carriers will put in tens of millions of dollars toward the settlement. Anything less and the diocese confronts the difficult task of asking parishioners to pay by selling churches and schools. It remains a troublesome aspect of the scandal for some 97,000 Catholics in Eastern Washington. "Will my church be sold?" asked attorney Ford Elsaesser, who represents the Association of Parishes. Skylstad on Wednesday didn't offer an estimate of how much parishioners may need to give. Nor would the bishop promise Catholics that schools and churches would not be sold to fund the settlement, saying only that the diocese would "cross that bridge" later. The diocese has only $10 million in cash and property at its

disposal. The parishes are worth untold millions more. "I call on the entire Catholic community to support the resolution I've proposed," Skylstad said during a noon press conference at the chancery. "As we move hopefully toward a global settlement, we as a Catholic community are willing to shoulder our fair share of the burden and to take responsibility for a significant portion of the total anticipated expense of the settlement." More than a year after filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the bishop offered a settlement this past week to 75 victims of clergy sexual abuse. Attorneys and a committee of five victims recommended approval of the deal Tuesday night. They plan to meet individually with the rest of the victims to explain the offer's details and solicit approval during the next four months. No one will be forced to accept the claim, said James Stang, lawyer for the victims. If the 75 victims do not unanimously approve the deal, negotiations will continue. The settlement offer also must be approved by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The Association of Parishes withheld support of the settlement offer. It was left out of the negotiations. "We can't say one way or the other until we can be assured parishes won't be liquidated and what amount of money will be needed," said Elsaesser. "At the end of the day, (the bishop) has to tell Catholics 'This is your target,' " he said. "There just simply has to be protections from the outright sale of parish property, and we don't have that." Parishioners anticipate making a "substantial and meaningful contribution," likely in the range of $6 million to $10 million, Elsaesser said. But selling parish property to settle diocese claims is an emotional and hotly contested issue within the association, which aims to push ahead with its appeal of U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Patricia Williams' ruling that parish property is held in trust for the benefit of the diocese and thus available to settle claims. The Rev. Steve Dublinski, the diocese's vicar general, said several Catholic entities in Spokane have been "invited to participate" in the settlement agreement, but no commitments have been made. "We want to be in solidarity with our church but we have to be careful to maintain our corporate separateness and the stewardship we've been given to help the poor," said Rob McCann, executive director of Catholic Charities. Any aid provided by Catholic Charities would have to come in the form of a loan with interest and must be approved by the nonprofit's 12-member board, he said. Simply giving money to the diocese "would be a misuse of our nonprofit status." Yet Catholic Charities, Catholic Cemeteries and other church-associated groups are facing complex legal challenges within the context of the diocese bankruptcy. Victims contend the nonprofits belong to the diocese - much like the parishes. The issue is pending in the bankruptcy court, said Catholic Charities attorney James King. The bishop's settlement offer to victims averages $610,000 per person, though the victims committee will set up its own method of assigning dollar amounts to claims. As important was a list of reforms and initiatives designed to protect children and prevent future cases of abuse, Stang said during a Wednesday press conference at the Davenport Hotel. Those "noneconomic conditions" include: Reporting the names of admitted and credibly accused perpetrators on the diocesan Web site; Increasing the Diocesan Review Board by two members whose appointments must be approved by victims of clergy abuse; Allowing victims to tell their stories of abuse each month in the Inland Register, the diocesan newspaper; Eliminating the use of "alleged" each time diocesan officials and attorneys refer to victims of abuse.

During his press conference two hours later, Skylstad spoke with both humility and hope as he addressed victims of abuse and the broader Catholic community. "First and foremost, I want to publicly apologize for and on behalf of myself and the Catholic Church in this diocese for the terrible wrongs that were inflicted upon you in the past," Skylstad told victims, many of whom were in the room. "I can only hope and pray that, with today's announcement, we can together begin to take the first small steps toward reconciliation and forgiveness. "I apologize for the fact that this day has been so long in coming." The bishop also addressed those who have expressed their anger over the abuse, as well as the bankruptcy proceedings. "I ask for your forgiveness and for your prayers," he implored. "For those who feel this settlement will be a burden for the next several years, a burden we can't as a church afford, I would say that this scandal is a burden we can no longer afford not to resolve." The bishop noted that this proposed settlement is not the end, "but the beginning of the end." The diocese still needs to reach a settlement with claimants who are not part of the group of 75 victims. It's not clear how much more money that will require. In addition to the 75, the diocese is aware of another 15 claims. Joe Shickich, who represents many of those victims in the bankruptcy, said he expected Skylstad to offer equal terms. The settlement offer does not affect the March 10 deadline for victims of sex abuse to file claims against the diocese. Attorneys for the diocese also did not have a figure Wednesday for the total amount spent so far on the bankruptcy proceedings. Skylstad said he has no regrets about filing for bankruptcy. "This is, for me, a moment of hope," he said. "A moment to address healing and reconciliation ? a moment of gratitude." The whole process has been even tougher for victims, said Mark Mains, one of three brothers sexually abused by Patrick O'Donnell, a priest who has admitted to molesting more than a dozen boys "There's no euphoria, no celebration for me," Mains said. "But I'm relieved to know that this is something to promote healing and to help protect children in the future." Mike Pfau and Tim Kosnoff, the two Seattle lawyers at the lead in the case, commended their clients' courage to come forward and speak about the crimes committed against them. Pfau said that victims believed the diocese attempted to divide them by filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. "They wanted to wear them out," he said. "Ironically, the bankruptcy had the opposite effect." He and Kosnoff have represented people throughout Eastern Washington who had been molested as children by Catholic priests, Mormon church officials, Boy Scout leaders and others in power. "Looking at all these cases globally reveals some very dark things," Pfau said. The two now plan to focus on allegations of sex abuse surrounding Morning Star Boys' Ranch. "We will leave no stone unturned finding out what happened at that place," Kosnoff said. SIDEBAR: WHAT'S NEXT If the deal is not approved unanimously by all 75 alleged victims, negotiations will continue. U.S. Bankruptcy Court must approve the settlement offer. LOAD-DATE: February 3, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

162 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) February 2, 2006 Thursday Metro Edition

Scandal may cost parishes; Sale of churches possible in settlement
BYLINE: John Stucke and Virginia de Leon Staff writers SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1327 words With a $45.75 million settlement offer on the table to pay victims of clergy sexual abuse, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Spokane now faces a new dilemma: how to pay for it. Bishop William Skylstad and his attorneys remain hopeful that six insurance carriers will put in tens of millions of dollars toward the settlement. Anything less and the diocese confronts the difficult task of asking parishioners to pay by selling churches and schools. It remains a troublesome aspect of the scandal for some 97,000 Catholics in Eastern Washington. "Will my church be sold?" asked attorney Ford Elsaesser, who represents the Association of Parishes. Skylstad on Wednesday didn't offer an estimate of how much parishioners may need to give. Nor would the bishop promise Catholics that schools and churches would not be sold to fund the settlement, saying only that the diocese would "cross that bridge" later. The diocese has only $10 million in cash and property at its disposal. The parishes are worth untold millions more. "I call on the entire Catholic community to support the resolution I've proposed," Skylstad said during a noon press conference at the chancery. "As we move hopefully toward a global settlement, we as a Catholic community are willing to shoulder our fair share of the burden and to take responsibility for a significant portion of the total anticipated expense of the settlement." More than a year after filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the bishop offered a settlement this past week to 75 victims of clergy sexual abuse. Attorneys and a committee of five victims recommended approval of the deal Tuesday night. They plan to meet individually with the rest of the victims to explain the offer's details and solicit approval during the next four months. No one will be forced to accept the claim, said James Stang, lawyer for the victims. If the 75 victims do not unanimously approve the deal, negotiations will continue. The settlement offer also must be approved by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The Association of Parishes withheld support of the settlement offer. It was left out of the negotiations. "We can't say one way or the other until we can be assured parishes won't be liquidated and what amount of money will be needed," said Elsaesser.

"At the end of the day, (the bishop) has to tell Catholics 'This is your target,' " he said. "There just simply has to be protections from the outright sale of parish property, and we don't have that." Parishioners anticipate making a "substantial and meaningful contribution," likely in the range of $6 million to $10 million, Elsaesser said. But selling parish property to settle diocese claims is an emotional and hotly contested issue within the association, which aims to push ahead with its appeal of U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Patricia Williams' ruling that parish property is held in trust for the benefit of the diocese and thus available to settle claims. The Rev. Steve Dublinski, the diocese's vicar general, said several Catholic entities in Spokane have been "invited to participate" in the settlement agreement, but no commitments have been made. "We want to be in solidarity with our church but we have to be careful to maintain our corporate separateness and the stewardship we've been given to help the poor," said Rob McCann, executive director of Catholic Charities. Any aid provided by Catholic Charities would have to come in the form of a loan with interest and must be approved by the nonprofit's 12-member board, he said. Simply giving money to the diocese "would be a misuse of our nonprofit status." Yet Catholic Charities, Catholic Cemeteries and other church-associated groups are facing complex legal challenges within the context of the diocese bankruptcy. Victims contend the nonprofits belong to the diocese - much like the parishes. The issue is pending in the bankruptcy court, said Catholic Charities attorney James King. The bishop's settlement offer to victims averages $610,000 per person, though the victims committee will set up its own method of assigning dollar amounts to claims. As important was a list of reforms and initiatives designed to protect children and prevent future cases of abuse, Stang said during a Wednesday press conference at the Davenport Hotel. Those "noneconomic conditions" include: Reporting the names of admitted and credibly accused perpetrators on the diocesan Web site; Increasing the Diocesan Review Board by two members whose appointments must be approved by victims of clergy abuse; Allowing victims to tell their stories of abuse each month in the Inland Register, the diocesan newspaper; Eliminating the use of "alleged" each time diocesan officials and attorneys refer to victims of abuse. During his press conference two hours later, Skylstad spoke with both humility and hope as he addressed victims of abuse and the broader Catholic community. "First and foremost, I want to publicly apologize for and on behalf of myself and the Catholic Church in this diocese for the terrible wrongs that were inflicted upon you in the past," Skylstad told victims, many of whom were in the room. "I can only hope and pray that, with today's announcement, we can together begin to take the first small steps toward reconciliation and forgiveness. "I apologize for the fact that this day has been so long in coming." The bishop also addressed those who have expressed their anger over the abuse, as well as the bankruptcy proceedings. "I ask for your forgiveness and for your prayers," he implored. "For those who feel this settlement will be a burden for the next several years, a burden we can't as a church afford, I would say that this scandal is a burden we can no longer afford not to resolve." The bishop noted that this proposed settlement is not the end, "but the beginning of the end." The diocese still needs to reach a settlement with claimants who are not part of the group of 75 victims. It's not clear how much more money that will require. In addition to the 75, the diocese is aware of another 15 claims. Joe Shickich, who represents many of those victims in the bankruptcy, said he expected Skylstad to offer equal terms.

The settlement offer does not affect the March 10 deadline for victims of sex abuse to file claims against the diocese. Attorneys for the diocese also did not have a figure Wednesday for the total amount spent so far on the bankruptcy proceedings. Skylstad said he has no regrets about filing for bankruptcy. "This is, for me, a moment of hope," he said. "A moment to address healing and reconciliation ? a moment of gratitude." The whole process has been even tougher for victims, said Mark Mains, one of three brothers sexually abused by Patrick O'Donnell, a priest who has admitted to molesting more than a dozen boys "There's no euphoria, no celebration for me," Mains said. "But I'm relieved to know that this is something to promote healing and to help protect children in the future." Mike Pfau and Tim Kosnoff, the two Seattle lawyers at the lead in the case, commended their clients' courage to come forward and speak about the crimes committed against them. Pfau said that victims believed the diocese attempted to divide them by filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. "They wanted to wear them out," he said. "Ironically, the bankruptcy had the opposite effect." He and Kosnoff have represented people throughout Eastern Washington who had been molested as children by Catholic priests, Mormon church officials, Boy Scout leaders and others in power. "Looking at all these cases globally reveals some very dark things," Pfau said. The two now plan to focus on allegations of sex abuse surrounding Morning Star Boys' Ranch. "We will leave no stone unturned finding out what happened at that place," Kosnoff said. SIDEBAR: WHAT'S NEXT If the deal is not approved unanimously by all 75 alleged victims, negotiations will continue. U.S. Bankruptcy Court must approve the settlement offer. LOAD-DATE: February 3, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 Spokane Spokesman-Review

163 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) January 6, 2006 Friday Sunrise Edition

IN MY OPINION THE ARCHDIOCESE BANKRUPTCY Assets ruling creates new class of victims

BYLINE: Robert Le Chevallier SECTION: Editorial; Pg. B09 LENGTH: 565 words Last week's decision by federal bankruptcy Judge Elizabeth Perris against the Catholic Archdiocese of Portland will lead to a new class of victims and cause more suffering among the children and the needy of our state. Perris ruled that the assets of Catholic parishes and schools are subject to the hundreds of millions of dollars in claims of child sex-abuse plaintiffs (and their attorneys). Generations of Catholics contributed their hard-earned salaries to build those parishes, schools and social service agencies. Irish, Italian, German, Latino, Vietnamese and other working-class immigrants sacrificed so that their children could have a better life. Catholics established endowment funds to enable those of modest means to attend Catholic schools. These are now the funds, among others, that the plaintiffs seek to tap as a source of compensation. More than 8,900 students attend Catholic elementary schools, and more than 5,000 students attend Catholic high schools in the archdiocese each year. That saves the tax-paying public almost $100 million a year. But education is only part of the charitable services provided by the Catholic Church in this state. Catholics contribute millions of dollars a year in social services to the poor, to refugees, to the sick and the elderly through Catholic Charities and through St. Vincent de Paul councils established in each parish. These programs, while independent of the archdiocese, are at risk if parishes and schools are burdened with excessive debt in order to pay the claims against the archdiocese. Case law in Oregon has created almost an unlimited liability for sex-abuse claims. Statutes of limitations have been extended for claims that are up to 50 years old. The effect of these laws is wreaking serious havoc on our charitable institutions. Legal reform is needed to protect both children from sex abuse and the charities and social service agencies of our state that work primarily with children. Reforms put in place in the archdiocese should reduce the potential for future claims. No one can work or volunteer in any Catholic parish or school today without a criminal background check. Any priest today with an incident of suspected child abuse is investigated. If the evidence is credible, the priest is removed permanently. Rightly or wrongly, bishops in the past saw priestly abuses as a moral issue that, upon proper repentance, was a treatable condition and not an intractable psychological compulsion. No bishop in the country follows that approach today. The Catholic Church is not the only organization that has seen these types of claims. Boy Scout leaders, soccer coaches, teachers, youth workers, probation officers and even ministers of other churches have been accused. We are now creating a new class of victims. With the claims now pending against the archdiocese, there is a serious risk that some of today's children will be deprived of the excellent schools and services that so many Catholic and non-Catholic youth have benefited from. There are no shareholders in a charity. Only the beneficiaries of a charity are hurt when donations are not used for their intended purpose. A reasonable settlement should be reached between the archdiocese and the claimants. But legal reforms are needed so that today's children are not harmed by excessive financial claims. -- Robert Le Chevallier is a lawyer in Lake Oswego. LOAD-DATE: January 12, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2006 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

164 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey) January 6, 2006 Friday FINAL EDITION

Charities lose sex-lawsuit
BYLINE: DEBORAH HOWLETT, STAR-LEDGER STAFF SECTION: NEW JERSEY; Pg. 20 LENGTH: 611 words Acting Gov. Richard Codey yesterday signed into law a measure that will allow lawsuits against churches, private schools and other nonprofit institutions for past negligent hirings of employees who sexually abused children. In a flurry of bill-signings, Codey also gave his approval to a measure that permits local governments to ban political donations by contractors. Nonprofit organizations such as churches and private schools have long had ironclad immunity against such lawsuits. The Charitable Immunity Act allows the victims of sexual abuse to sue nonprofit institutions for negligence in the hiring or continued employment of a perpetrator. New Jersey is the 48th state to pass such a law. "This provides real justice for those who were sexually assaulted and abused," said Sen. Joseph Vitale (D-Middlesex), who pushed to enact the law for six years. "This ensures that institutions, whether for profit or not, are held accountable for their actions." Prompted largely by the child sex abuse scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church, the bill (S540) applies across the board to private schools, Scout troops, Little Leagues and others. It permits the organizations to be sued if they negligently hire or supervise someone who sexually abused a child. It also resolves a question pending before the New Jersey Supreme Court on whether the charitable immunity shield should apply to the prestigious American Boychoir School in Princeton against a lawsuit by former student John Hardwicke. Codey also signed a measure to permit municipalities, counties and school boards to enact stronger bans on government contractors making donations to political candidates. "Today we take another step forward toward real ethical reform in New Jersey," Codey said. The ban on so-called "pay-to-play" (S1987) is part of an ethics package Codey has made a focus of his 14-month tenure.

Other bills Codey signed would: Require stores to redeem gift cards at full value unless conditions and limitations are disclosed to the original buyer and conspicuously printed on the card (A1079). Growing in popularity, gift cards are expected to generate $85 billion in sales by 2007. They often have hidden fees or expire quickly, according to Assemblyman Joseph Cryan (D-Union). Allow public school students to opt out of lessons requiring animal dissection when they have moral or other objections to dissection (A2233). The law requires schools to provide an alternative project for pupils who refuse to dissect, vivisect, incubate, capture or otherwise harm or destroy animals as part of their instruction. Allows disabled athletes to join a sports team from the public school district in which they reside, regardless of whether a parent enrolls the child in a special private school (A2381). Gives law enforcement authorities greater legal power to obtain private information from an Internet service provider about subscribers (A3786). The law, aimed at pedophiles who use the Internet to prey on children, would require ISPs to tell police how long a subscriber stays online as well as how the service is paid for, including any credit card or bank account numbers. Currently, ISPs served with a subpoena are required to tell police only a customer's name, address, telephone number and the unique number assigned to a customer's computer. Allows cities and towns to increase to $2,000 the $1,250 maximum fine that can be imposed for the first violation of a municipal ordinance (A3732). The law requires that prior to imposing a fine of more than $1,250 for violating housing or zoning codes, municipalities must allow 30 days for the property owner to fix the problem. LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: nsl Copyright 2006 Newark Morning Ledger Co. All Rights Reserved

165 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Toronto Star January 5, 2006 Thursday

Ontario vs. Gardens over sex abuse costs
BYLINE: Rick Westhead, Toronto Star SECTION: NEWS; Pg. A01 LENGTH: 602 words

Queen's Park has filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against the parent company of the Toronto Maple Leafs, demanding it repay the costs to treat victims of the sex abuse scandal at Maple Leaf Gardens. The lawsuit raises the prospect that Ontario will pursue claims against other organizations that have also had numerous sex abuse-related judgments against them, such as the Catholic Church, and the Boy Scouts of Canada, said William Blakeney, a Toronto lawyer who specializes in insurance claims. "If OHIP has paid out money, they certainly have a right to go out and sue to get it back where there's been a judgment," Blakeney said. The sex scandal at the Gardens first surfaced in the mid-1990s when victim Martin Kruze, who later committed suicide, came forward with his story of repeatedly suffering sexual abuse there. Some 90 other victims came forward after Kruze, and confidential settlements were reached in many cases. In the late 1990s, a mediator settled dozens of sexual abuse claims for what was believed to be more than $5 million. Yet in a statement of claim filed Dec. 23 in Ontario Superior Court, the province alleged Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment Ltd., which owns the Maple Leafs, basketball's Toronto Raptors and the Air Canada Centre, remains responsible for the abuses that took place at Maple Leaf Gardens, the hockey team's former home. Holding up its hockey team as "a model of virtue to young male adults who were interested in hockey, sports and sporting arenas, (Maple Leaf Sports) promoted its arena and hockey team with the intention of attracting young male adults to its premises for the purpose of accumulating profit for itself and its hockey team." Maple Leaf Sports is "vicariously responsible for the illegal acts (and) negligence" of employees, the government's lawsuit alleges. "The plaintiff therefore claims reimbursement from the defendant, MLSE, for all past and future OHIP insured services incurred as a result of these incidents (of) assaults, abuse and harassment." The government's case has not been proven in court and Maple Leaf Sports has not filed a statement of defence. A Maple Leaf Sports spokesperson yesterday said the company has not been served with the lawsuit and declined to comment. Under Ontario law, if a person is injured in an accident caused by someone else's negligence or wrongdoing, and makes a claim for damages or initiates a lawsuit, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care can recover its costs for health care treatment. Each year, according to government statistics, the province recovers more than $12 million from insurance companies through so-called subrogation, a term used to describe the ministry's right to recover costs for an injury caused by the fault or negligence of another person. The government, which was urged by the provincial auditor general last month to be more diligent in pursuing subrogation claims, spends about $2.5 million a year to pursue the 13,000 active cases it typically has on file. Royal & SunAlliance Insurance Co., the sports company's insurer, is also listed as a defendant. A Royal spokesperson declined to comment. In its 10-page claim, the government alleged that OHIP has covered the cost of counselling, psychotherapy and other services for "various victims of the assaults" who have suffered from, among other things, hallucinations, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, self-mutilation and bedwetting. Dan Strasbourg, a spokesperson for the health ministry, wouldn't say whether the government plans to pursue subrogation claims against other prominent agencies such as the Catholic Diocese or boy scouts.

LOAD-DATE: January 5, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: COLUMN PUBLICATION-TYPE: NEWSPAPER Copyright 2006 Toronto Star Newspapers, Ltd.

166 of 265 DOCUMENTS COURIER MAIL December 30, 2005 Friday First with the news Edition

Opinions & Letters
SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 30 LENGTH: 1522 words Mail to: The CourierMail GPO Box 130 Brisbane 4001, fax 07 3666 6690, or email cmletters@qnp.newsltd.com.au Stupidity, impatience SOME people are blaming the condition of roads for fatal accidents. A motor vehicle is a machine that is held together by bolts and nuts. The biggest nut in control of the steering wheel causes accidents; poor roads make responsible drivers more careful upon the road.-- Colin J. Farquhar, Holland Park. December 29 * IMPATIENCE! This should be added to ''the big four'' causes of accidents. Sue Kenyon and Jan Woods covered this subject well with their letters (C-M, Dec 28). As for M. Scott's letter (Dec 27) about speed, if an accident does occur while the driver is speeding, the damage to the vehicle and the occupants will be much greater and more likely to cause fatalities than if the vehicle was moving at a reasonable speed.-- Don Graham, Kippa-Ring. December 28 * TODAY, about 10.25am, an express train to the Gold Coast was approaching the railway level crossing at Trinder Park. Red lights were flashing and the barriers were down. The driver of a small red car ignored the red lights and drove around the barriers, just making it to the other side of the crossing as the train bore down. Speed does not kill people driving cars; people's stupidity kills them.-- Harry Gunhold, Logan Central. December 28

Forfeit vehicles? WE hear the same message every year about the deaths on our roads. I have been a police officer for 17 years and operational police officers do everything they can to reduce the road toll but no one cannot legislate against stupidity. Let's forget about the civil libertarians; get serious and think about the rights of the innocent parties. The media should stop criticising the police for hiding speed cameras and focus on the real issues. Contributing to the state's revenue is voluntary. Perhaps automatic forfeiture to the state of vehicles driven by the offenders might make them think twice. -- Scott Jenkin, Parkinson. December 28 Questionnaire would be worthless PREMIER Peter Beattie suggests making drivers caught speeding or drink-driving fill out a ''why I am stupid'' questionnaire. If he really believes that will help reduce the road carnage, he is living in a fantasy land. There is only two ways to reduce the carnage: have roads and associated lighting improved or rebuilt to today's needs; and adopt the philosophy that a driver's licence is a privilege, not a right. Drivers with a 0.05 blood alcohol content or caught exceeding the speed limit by 20km/h should lose their licence immediately for six months for a first offence. If we removed the court's discretion to issue special drivers' licences, the penalty would hit home. If they get caught driving while suspended, give them six weeks in jail and a further 12 months' licence suspension. Harsh? Well, what we have now is not working so how about getting these irresponsible idiots off our roads?-- Geoff Daniels, Ayr. December 29 * PREMIER Peter Beattie has suggested introducing a questionnaire for offending motorists to complete. To what end? To bury police in yet more paperwork or to provide data for bureaucrats to create useless reports?-- Roseanne Schneider, Yeronga. December 29 Police cars, cameras as deterrent D. CLEMENTS (Letters, Dec 29) hits the nail on the head in the debate about the road toll by calling for ''a constant visual deterrent on the roads''. Rather than rolling out a handful of high-powered V8 coupes for police (I have yet to encounter anyone who has seen one), why not spend the same amount on a considerably greater number of marked four-cylinder sedans? No one will try to overtake a marked police vehicle, and the effect on tired or downright stupid drivers of seeing one might just save a life or two. Subject to obvious concerns relating to safety, there should be no real impediment to the smaller vehicles being operated by one police officer.-- John T. Tunn, Coorparoo. December 29 * D. CLEMENTS, in his criticism of the use of speed cameras, says ''speed is a major factor in only a minor percentage of accidents''. Doesn't this back up the State Government's stance that speed cameras do work and they do act as a deterrent to the majority of road users and, therefore, reduce one cause of road accidents -- speeding. As for raising revenue, there is a consequence, financial or otherwise, for breaking any law. If the law in question helps reduce death and injury, it is a law worth keeping.-- D. Forde, Kuraby.

December 29 Licences conditional on courses, tests IN THE light of the appalling road toll and a serious accident in a suburban street in Bellbowrie yesterday, I was prompted to add my thoughts to the many being expressed on this subject. A driver's licence should be a privilege earned through extensive practical training. Defensive driving courses and what are known as advanced driving courses should be mandatory before a licence is granted. (The latter should be considered basic and not advanced.) About a year after obtaining my licence, I won a defensive driving course in a contest. That was an eyeopener for a teenager but not nearly as much as the advanced course I did some years later as a member of a car club. With an experienced driver-trainer in the passenger's seat at Lakeside Raceway, I experienced handling a car in a skid, safe braking in an emergency and many essential skills for safe, every-day driving. There should be periodic practical tests for licence renewal after a certain number of years. Yes, it would cost, but what price a life? It need not cost the taxpayers dearly; it should be on the basis of user-pays. It is all a matter of priorities.-- Margaret de Wit, Bellbowrie. December 29 'Good bloke' character reference for pedophile I READ Bettina Arndt's column ''Sex abuse damage is relative'' (Perspectives, Dec 29) with mounting fury. I read it again to make sure I had not misread her the first time. I hadn't. Robert Potter, in his position as a Scout leader in NSW, sexually assaulted young boys in his care. He was given eight years' jail. Arndt, in effect, gives this man a good character reference. He earned the trust of boys and their parents alike, she says, over 24 years of service to the Scouts, and we should not expect his friends to treat him like something that has ''just crawled out from under a rock''. Yes, we should, Ms Arndt, because he has. I have worked in the area of mental health for 28 years. I have come in contact with pedophiles and, in greater numbers, their victims. Pedophiles, in most instances, are narcissists who see no wrong in what they have done. The victims, whom I see in a mental health setting, are very damaged individuals who bounce backwards and forwards between courts and hospitals. Those tough enough to stay out of this loop often suffer a lifetime of sexual dysfunction. Yes, the majority of childhood sexual assault victims suffer at the hands of friends or relatives but what the hell has that to do with this case? Arndt says: ''Apart from this aberrant sexual behaviour, the man appears to be a good bloke''. Most of them do appear this way. That's so they can ingratiate themselves into families and organisations where they will have access to children. I have compassion for people with mental and emotional problems but Arndt's short-sighted approach to this man and his supporters at court makes me sick.-- Scott Ferguson, Haberfield, NSW. December 29 Over and out until next year I REFER to Hugh Leonard's letter about Christmas lights displays being turned off too soon (C-M, Dec 28). We have been entering the 4KQ Christmas lights competition for 18 years and are fortunate to have been winners. We started preparations in August, checking bulbs, repainting and making new items. We decorated our home in October and spent most of November decorating our garden. Our lights were on from 7pm to 10pm from December 1 to December 25 inclusive. After lights out each night, we spent an

hour putting away valuable items because of the threat of theft and vandalism (which we experienced in past years). Three nights a week we hand-watered the garden. We rarely got to bed before 1am. We delayed Christmas celebrations with our own family by one day so that the public could view our lights on Christmas night. From December 27, we spend four weeks dismantling our display in the heat and humidity. Many competition entrants face a similar situation. Our advice to Leonard is to get moving early next year and view the lights during the official viewing weeks before Christmas. -- Walter and Beverley Wood, Kenmore. December 29 Health scare PRIVATE health insurers are pushing the Federal Government for a rise in premiums. I feel ''bitter'' (not better) now. -- Terry Marsden, Mansfield. December 29 Letters and e-mail must be dated, carry the full address of the writer and a daytime telephone number for verification. Letters should be concise, topical, not more than 300 words and are submitted on condition that Queensland Newspapers, as publisher of The Courier-Mail, may edit and has the right to, and license third parties to, reproduce in electronic form and communicate these letters. LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: CML Copyright 2005 Nationwide News Pty Limited All Rights Reserved

167 of 265 DOCUMENTS COURIER MAIL December 30, 2005 Friday First with the news Edition

Sexual assault destroys lives
BYLINE: Hetty Johnston SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 31 LENGTH: 934 words Pedophiles are unlikely to get caught, writes child protection activist Hetty Johnston

The pedophile has a 90 per cent chance of avoiding detection ATTEMPTS to minimise the effects and seriousness of sexual assault against children and vulnerable young people should not go unchallenged. The repercussions of sexual assault on our children have been well documented over many decades by every leading agency and inquiry in Australia and internationally. Effects such as suicide, substance abuse, mental disorders, eating disorders, family breakdowns, youth homelessness, sexual dysfunction and confusion, crime, and anti-social behaviours are universally agreed upon. One in five Australian children will be sexually assaulted in some way before they reach the age of 18 -not rich kids or poor kids, not black or white -- everyone's kids. The facts are that child sexual assault has destroyed more lives than any other crisis ever to have faced our nation's children. And yet, despite this, otherwise intelligent individuals continue to downplay, ignore or remain ignorant of the horror being perpetrated on our youth and, instead, choose to stand in defence or sympathy of this most convincing of con-men, the child sex offender. The truth is that the ''moral panic'' Bettina Arndt refers to in her Perspectives article (''Sex abuse damage is relative'', C-M, Dec 29) is entirely justified and, in fact, the evidence is that we have not panicked enough. Arndt makes some interesting observations about the court case where a Scout leader was convicted of pedophilia, including that ''apart from his aberrant sexual behaviour, the man appears to a good bloke. The court was crowded with people who came to support him, including former members of his Scout team and other Scout leaders''. What Arndt didn't tell us is that child sex offenders need to garner this absolute trust and friendship of their victims, their work colleagues, their friends and the children's family to carry out their premeditated assault. The ''dirty old man in the black jacket'' or the nasty, sleazy character would not fare well in convincing those around him to trust him (or her) with the care and protection of children, nor would the children themselves respond well to such a character. The ''good bloke'' image is a means to an end. This is not to say that all sex offenders are monsters but rather to serve as a modus operandi of the child sex offender -- a necessary reality check for the unsuspecting. Successful unfettered access to children demands that the pedophile must make many friends, win many hearts, build enormous trust and engender confidence, credibility and a good reputation with the people around them. And, just like the best of con-artists, the victims don't understand that they are the victims until after the ''sting'' is felt. Some people who, by their innocent involvement, based solely on their trust and friendship for the conman -- the offender -- will find it difficult to accept that they, too, have been conned -- they, too, were groomed; that they, too, were a necessary step in the process of gaining access to the ultimate goal, the children. Those people are the ones who packed the courtroom in New South Wales to support former Scout leader and convicted pedophile Robert Potter. ''Anti-pedophile fanaticism'' is necessary if we are to protect our children from these most masterful of chameleons. It is true that most children (about 85 per cent) will be offended against by someone known and trusted to them and their family rather than the stranger.

However, in about 70 per cent of cases, the offender does not live in the house where the child resides. The case of the former Scout leader that Arndt refers to in her article falls into that category. This was not a stranger but someone known and trusted. It is worth noting that the child generally suffers even more when the offender is a family member -- not less. Tendencies to minimalise, marginalise or downplay sex crimes committed by family members against their own children is dangerous. Are we seriously suggesting these crimes are less abhorrent, less traumatic, less important or perhaps, that they are a private family problem? Arndt claims most convicted sex offenders do not re-offend. I do not agree but I acknowledge that the issue of recidivism rates for pedophiles presents as a controversial topic. To the contrary, it is my view that most sex offenders do not get caught once -- let alone a second time. If we consider that only 10 per cent of child sex offenders ever come to the attention of the police and that only about 1 per cent of those are convicted we start to understand the detection ''black hole'' that exists. The pedophile has a 90 per cent chance of avoiding detection altogether and a 99 per cent overall chance of avoiding conviction -- pretty good odds for the pedophile. No wonder, then, that even though the rising community awareness and the good work of the police finally is starting to close the gap on the pedophile, the recorded recidivism rates are so low at present. Commentary or movies that depict the pedophile as the poor misunderstood character are necessary -generally they are a sad lot with a woeful tale. Feel sympathy for them if you can but do it by insisting they seek and receive real therapeutic help and long-term monitoring for what is commonly accepted as a addictive compulsion to sexually interact with our young. Do it with not only your hearts open but, more importantly, with wide open eyes, ears and mind. Hetty Johnston is the executive director of Bravehearts hj@bravehearts.org.au LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: CML Copyright 2005 Nationwide News Pty Limited All Rights Reserved

168 of 265 DOCUMENTS COURIER MAIL December 29, 2005 Thursday First with the news Edition

Sex abuse damage is relative
BYLINE: Bettina Arndt SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 21 LENGTH: 759 words Do we expect his friends to treat him like something that crawled out from under a rock? THIS month Robert Potter, a New South Wales Scout leader, was convicted of pedophilia, having confessed to sexual activity with four male teenagers in his troop. Apart from his aberrant sexual behaviour, the man appears to be a good bloke. The court was crowded with people who came to support him, including former members of his Scout team and other Scout leaders. Scout Australia NSW is holding an inquiry to see whether the man's supporters had breached the Scout code of conduct in attending the trial. Yes, there were some appalling incidents, where victims apparently were teased by some of the supporters. But for others, their sin was simply to be there as friends of the accused. The Sydney Morning Herald newspaper -- well-known for its ideological zeal -- printed the names of other Scout leaders who dared to be present, quoting the CEO of Scouts Australia NSW, as saying Scout leaders who supported Potter do not represent the Scouts. Come on! Yes, the man committed a crime and is being harshly punished for his actions -- eight years of jail for mutual masturbation and oral sex. But do we really expect his friends, the people who volunteered with him in the 24 years he gave to the Scouting movement and the boys who feel they benefited from his leadership, to treat him like something that crawled out from under a rock? They are being subjected to a witch-hunt so the Scout movement can emerge squeaky clean by offering up more fodder to anti-pedophile fanaticism. Recently there have been hopeful signs that the moral panic over pedophilia was losing some of its grip. Some sanity has returned following the madness of the 1980s and '90s when we saw tirades in Parliament about pedophile rings, kindergartens being investigated for satanic rituals, huge court cases over repressed memories involving grotesque sexual rituals including mangled pets and enforced abortions -cases which invariably failed to produce evidence any such events had occurred. Thankfully we are now gaining some perspective on real risks to children, where abuse from family members and particularly single mums' boyfriends poses a far greater threat than any stranger danger. Yet the bizarre move by some airlines to ban men from sitting next to unaccompanied children shows we still have a long way to go. Reviewers and audiences alike have reacted well to new movies showing sex offenders in a sympathetic light. Kevin Bacon in The Woodsman presents a sympathetic view of the convicted sex offender released from prison who struggles with his demons and ultimately wins. (Contrary to the claims of zealots, most convicted sex offenders do go straight -- recidivism rates of child sex offenders are among the lowest in the criminal population.) Then there was the extraordinary documentary, Capturing the Friedmans, which uses home videos to tell the true story of retired teacher Arnold Friedman who was convicted, along with his teenage son Jesse, of horrific abuse of children attending computer lessons in their home.

Friedman collected child pornography and confessed to some long-past sexual activity with children. Yet the two accused still touched the heart strings -- the loving, intelligent father and his sweet, bumbling son -- convicted of ludicrously implausible crimes through dubious evidence. In March, Sydney audiences are to be treated to British playwright Alan Bennett's new smash hit, The History Boys. The play features a beloved history teacher, Mr Hector, who has his students lining up for a ride home on his motor cycle, despite receiving regular fondles en route. The boys take their teacher's groping in their stride and leap to his defence when the school attempts to get rid of him. The boys' response reflects common experience -- the latest research shows such minor abuse rarely has lasting consequences. One of Robert Potter's victims claimed Potter's groping led him to infidelity, a mental breakdown and attempted suicide -- luckily the literature shows such extreme reactions to be highly unusual. Many sex abusers are not cruel monsters. Yes, some do terrible things and children must be protected from any adult behaviour which can cause them harm. But the real question is why we take such a perverted, obsessive interest in these sexual crimes and fail to show similar passion over the unspeakable cruelty -- emotional and physical abuse -- which so many children regularly endure. Bettina Arndt is a social commentator and writer bettinaarndt@hotmail.com LOAD-DATE: December 28, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: CML Copyright 2005 Nationwide News Pty Limited All Rights Reserved

169 of 265 DOCUMENTS

San Jose Mercury News (California) December 29, 2005 Thursday

Scout leader enters plea; NO CONTEST TO ABUSING 3 BOYS

BYLINE: Howard Mintz, Mercury News SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 552 words A longtime Los Altos scoutmaster pleaded no contest Wednesday to felony charges of molesting three Boy Scouts from the late 1980s to the early 1990s, a legal move that comes six months after one victim came forward to investigators because of fears other children could be harmed. Gregory Allen Wagner, 43, entered the pleas in Santa Clara County Superior Court to nine counts of sex offenses against a child. David Grewal, who came forward last summer with the initial allegations against Wagner, hopes the case sends a message to victims reluctant to disclose their child abuse. Grewal, now 29, said Wednesday that he kept the molestation secret for years until a conversation with his fiance persuaded him that other Boy Scouts were in danger. Grewal was as young as 12 when, he maintains, he was molested by Wagner, affiliated for 20 years with the Peninsula-based Troop 31 of the Boy Scouts' Pacific Skyline Council. Grewal added that for years he justified his silence by trying to believe he was the only victim, but he finally reached the conclusion that was unlikely. ``I felt other people were probably at risk,'' said Grewal, who has moved to the East Coast and is currently a graduate student at Harvard University. ``I had a duty to do something.'' Until his arrest last August, Wagner had spent 20 years as a scoutmaster, putting him regularly in contact with hundreds of boys 12 to 17 years old. He was dismissed from the troop when the allegations surfaced. James Blackman, Wagner's lawyer, could not be reached for comment Wednesday. Wagner's arrest last summer came amid a shocking string of revelations of sex-abuse allegations on the Peninsula, where a popular Palo Alto middle school gym teacher and a prominent local girls' soccer coach were also arrested in separate cases. Prosecutors and sheriff's investigators alleged that Wagner molested his victims on camping trips, and they suspect he may have molested others over the years who have yet to tell their stories. Sam Liccardo, the deputy district attorney who prosecuted the case, said other victims surfaced after Grewal presented his evidence to Deborah Johnson, a detective in the sheriff's department. Grewal said that Wagner violated Boy Scout policies which forbid a scoutmaster to be alone with a youngster without another adult present, in part by befriending families. Grewal said Wagner once took him on a camping trip alone and slept with him in a tent. ``I really don't want other kids to go through what I went through,'' said Grewal, who plans to address the sentencing judge. ``I'm glad he spared our family and his family a trial. A lot remains to be seen and we don't know how the sentencing will come down.'' Wagner faces a 27-year prison term when he is sentenced in March, but is likely to serve much less time, according to Liccardo. John Richers, scout executive for the Pacific Skyline Council, said there has been increasing emphasis on training and education to protect Boy Scouts against abuse, and that a number of meetings have been held with parents and children since Wagner's arrest. ``We're trying 100 percent,'' Richers said. ``But a person who wishes ill and is going to violate the law makes it tough and we have to be tougher as an organization.'' Contact Howard Mintz at hmintz@mercurynews.com or (408) 286-0236.

LOAD-DATE: December 29, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 San Jose Mercury News All Rights Reserved

170 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Village Voice (New York) December 20, 2005 Tuesday

LAW AND DISORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT
BYLINE: Tom Robbins SECTION: COVER STORY; Pg. 28 LENGTH: 2580 words Back in 1997 police arrested a man named Ronald Taylor, who worked as an assistant public school principal in Harlem. Taylor, 50 years old at the time, easily ranked as a parent's worst nightmare. His arrest came after the mother of a student walked into a local police precinct and reported that Taylor had lured her 15-year-old son to his apartment with an offer to play with his video game collection. He then proceeded to sexually molest him. When cops went to investigate they found Taylor had tricked up his West Harlem apartment as a kids' game room. They also found some 400 X-rated videos. Unlike a score of school-personnel sex-abuse cases from that era, Taylor's arrest got little news play. The Times ran a short item on an inside page and the Daily News carried one as well, on page 79. The lack of attention was partly because the arrest did not emanate from the efficient publicity machine of Edward Stancik, the late special commissioner for investigation for city schools. For 12 years until his death in 2002, Stancik's gaunt features were a staple on TV newscasts as he told of corrupt bureaucrats and twisted sex abusers nailed by his office. Such cases made Stancik wildly unpopular in the teachers' union offices and the old Board of Education headquarters on Livingston Street in Brooklyn, where he was viewed as a merciless inquisitor, a publicity hound whose investigations were measured mainly for their TV and news-ink potential. On the other hand, many politicians, journalists, prosecutors, and parents adored him, viewing Stancik as a valiant warrior against an intractable bureaucracy. So what if he knew how to use the media? What better way to send a message to the public and bad guys alike that wrongdoing won't be tolerated? When Stancik died at age 47 of heart failure in March 2002, there were some misgivings expressed about his occasional overzealousness. But the editorial call was to make sure the watchdog office he'd led didn't lose its fangs. But a few months after Stancik's death, something unusual in the world of law enforcement happened. A former top investigator in his office, an ex-detective who had been a supervisor there for five years, sat down and wrote two lengthy letters to city officials alleging that a top Stancik deputy named Regina Loughran had

dropped the ball in several important cases, either delaying arrests or letting the bad guys get away altogether. In some instances, it was alleged, Loughran had changed cases from being "substantiated" to "unsubstantiated." The complaints were investigated by city attorneys, and several were confirmed. Yet Loughran today remains as powerful as ever, serving as the $151,000 number two official in the special investigators' office. Former and current investigators, both men and women, who spoke under condition of anonymity, told the Voice they were puzzled by the inaction. "If we had caught someone in the education system behaving this way, they'd be long gone," said one former investigator. Among the cases the investigators cited was that of Ronald Taylor. According to the former detective and others familiar with the case, nearly a year before Taylor's arrest by police, investigators in Stancik's office had asked permission to launch a probe of the school official. The request was made after a prison social worker contacted the investigations office to say that an inmate was claiming to have been sexually abused by Taylor, his former teacher. Investigators initially dismissed the charge as one more prisoner trying to reduce his sentence. But the details of the story were disturbingly precise: Taylor had asked the student, then 15 years old, to carry a crate of milk up to his apartment. Once he got him inside, Taylor had sexually assaulted him. The inmate described the apartment in detail. Investigators drove to upstate Green Haven Correctional Facility to interview the inmate, who convinced them that a sexual predator was loose in the schools. The statute of limitations had expired on the earlier assault, but the inmate said he was willing to wear a recording device to a meeting with Taylor to see if he could get him talking about other victims. The investigators relayed that offer to Loughran, then the attorney-incharge of the child sexual-abuse unit and a key figure in the office. Loughran refused. "The issue for her seemed to be, 'Why spend the time and money to get this kid out of jail and wire him up for a case that's too old,' " a former investigator told the Voice. "We argued that if we have this one person there are probably others out there at risk." Loughran was adamant. But the investigators, most of them retired NYPD detectives who lived by chain of command, declined to appeal the decision over her head. The case was closed. Nine months later, the outraged mother of another victim filed her complaint with police. Taylor was immediately arrested and later sentenced to serve up to three years in prison. Under questioning, he said something that chilled both cops and school investigators. He said he was HIV-positive. Ed Stancik's public posture was of a manager with a stern "the buck stops here" policy. But according to the former detective and others, the often ailing commissioner ceded wide authority to Loughran, a hardworking former sex-crimes prosecutor whose ability to turn out clearly written reports was highly prized by Stancik and his successor. Investigators said Loughran was also often tempestuous, given to sudden rages and sulks. What made their jobs most difficult, however, was her apparent skittishness about dealing directly with outside prosecutors who were needed for any criminal referrals. "She just seemed intimidated or something," said one veteran ex-detective who worked in the office for years. "If we had a tape we needed to get to the D.A. she would have you drop it off with the officer in the lobby, rather than make a call to the prosecutor personally." As a result, the investigators said, the case of the predatory assistant principal was just one of the instances in Stancik's old office where the system simply broke down. There was the case of the art instructor accused of having displayed nude photos of himself to disabled students, confiding that "what a girl wants is a big dick." (The photos weren't found, and Loughran decided the students' testimony was "problematic," ordering investigators to change their findings from "substantiated" to "unfounded." When Board of Ed administrators asked for investigators to testify against the teacher to bar him from further employment, Loughran refused to allow it.) There was the 48-year-old male teacher who admitted driving a 17-year-old female student to a funeral home parking lot in the Bronx and asking her, "What if I told you I wanted to go down on you?" (The teacher said he was trying to help her learn to fend off improper advances. The principal vouched for the teacher, and the girl later admitted she'd neglected to say they were also drinking beer at the time. Loughran said her

testimony was inconsistent and ordered the case dropped.) And there was Paul Kerner, a 61-year-old teacher at Sheepshead Bay High School who romanced an 11th-grade girl, taking her to Atlantic City casinos and a motel where he coerced her into performing fellatio and other sex acts. The investigator on the case urged Loughran to make a quick criminal referral to prosecutors, but the deputy balked. "I don't know what to do, let's hold off," she said, according to a report of the incident. The office dithered so long that the victim called the investigator, complaining that Kerner was now stalking her, and asking why he hadn't been arrested yet. The investigator asked Loughran for permission to take the case to a friend at the FBI. Loughran expressed skepticism that the bureau would be interested, but reluctantly agreed. But when the FBI came seeking the backup documents for the case, Loughran balked again, forcing agents to get a grand jury subpoena. (Kerner was eventually convicted in federal court, where he received a 33-month sentence. Annoyed at the investigator who had called the bureau, Loughran allegedly had him transferred out of the sex-crimes unit.) Yet another disturbing case posed an investigative challenge, one that Stancik's former detectives readily accepted, given the stakes, but which Loughran flat-out rejected. In that instance, a former city high school student, now a grown man and a member of the Army Reserves, called the office to say that his former principal had repeatedly sexually abused him a few years earlier. According to his story, he had been a fatherless youngster whom the principal had taken under his wing, bringing him on camping trips to Lake George and elsewhere where he had repeatedly molested him. On the advice of his therapist, the man had decided to confront and report his abuser. Once he did, the principal immediately resigned. The Stancik investigators were able to get a consensually recorded telephone conversation in which the principal admitted his sexual abuse of the former student. Like the Ronald Taylor case, however, the acts were too old to prosecute. But investigators said the ex-principal (a Boy Scout troop leader who still lived with his mother) fit the profile of "a classic pedophile," and they believed he had to have preyed on others. The next step, they proposed to Lough-ran, would be to wire up the ex-student and have him meet with the former principal to see if they could pick up leads on other victims. They would also talk to teachers and students at the principal's school to find out if other boys had been similarly "befriended." Loughran wouldn't hear of it. According to two former investigators, she said, "He is out of the system. Shut it down." (Loughran has denied using those words.) In an effort to try to breathe new life into the case, one of the investigators reached out to a federal prosecutor he knew who was familiar with sex-crime statutes to ask if there was any other law the ex-principal might have violated. Loughran later said she was "upset" and "embarrassed" by the call, which she said duplicated her own research and had been made without her permission. Investigators said it was much more dramatic than that. "She was livid," said one of them. When the investigator was asked why the call had been made, he responded: "Because I'm trying to catch the son of a bitch." According to the investigators, Lough-ran retaliated by shifting one of the two probers who had worked the case, considered one of the office's most productive teams, out of the sex unit. Loughran later insisted the assignment change had been made by Stancik, not her. But it still wasn't over. The former principal, concerned at possible civil liabilities, offered to purchase a $250,000 house for the victim in exchange for a promise not to pursue further legal action. When Loughran learned of the offer, she allegedly said that the victim might be arrested for extortion, a suggestion that appalled the investigators. (As it happened, the deal fell through.) "He had been a principal for 20 years, he had such power," said one of the investigators recently. "All he had to do was find another weak kid. We felt there had to be other victims. It was so egregious to shut it down. Pedophiles don't do it once and then go home. You don't have to be Columbo to figure that out." The two letters detailing the complaints about the bungled past cases landed on the desk of city department of investigations commissioner Rose Gill Hearn in early 2003. Hearn technically oversees the schools investigation unit (its offices are located in the same Maiden Lane building as DOI), but because of its sensitive mission it operates largely independently. Still, Hearn took

the complaints seriously, assigning a pair of senior attorneys to look into them. Over the course of several months, the attorneys interviewed 10 current and former employees of Stancik's old special commissioner's office, including Loughran. During the interviews, the attorneys turned up another instance, in which a complaint about a Bronx teacher accused of sodomizing several young male students had been confirmed by the Stancik office but had somehow never been referred to prosecutors. Those findings were in turn forwarded to Stancik's successor, Richard J. Condon, a former police commissioner who in the past headed investigative squads for the Manhattan and Queens district attorneys. When Condon took over in June 2002, he retained Loughran, bumping her up a notch to first deputy commissioner. A DOI spokesperson, Emily Gest, said the office hadn't ordered any changes or discipline for Loughran, but had "shared the facts and findings of its investigation, for Commissioner Condon to take any necessary remedial actions." Condon said that he too took the complaints seriously, spending hours wading through old investigative files. "I was not a witness to this history," he said. "Most of these things happened years before I got here." The standard he used in examining the cases, Condon said, was whether Loughran had had a "rational basis" for her decisions. In two instances--that of the art instructor who had shown the nude photos, and the teacher who had posed the obscene remarks to the student--Condon said he disagreed with Loughran's actions, but cautioned that even this conclusion was "probably unfair." As for the failure to make a criminal referral in the Bronx sodomy case, Condon said the explanation was simple. "She screwed up. It happens." He noted that the office had handled a total of 1,800 cases during the period under review. Loughran also later told DOI's inquiry that she was "baffled" how she had failed to make the referral, but said if she was to blame so were her former bosses, Stancik and Robert Brenner, who served as Stancik's first deputy commissioner. (Brenner, now with the investigations firm Kroll Inc., did not return calls.) At the end of the day, however, Condon said he chalked up the complaints to honest disagreements. "I am used to investigators and prosecutors arguing over whether cases should be prosecuted," he said. Condon told the Daily News' Kathleen Lucadamo, who asked about the probe last month, that he considered Loughran "one of the straightest, most hardworking prosecutors I have ever worked with." He told the Voice that he'd encountered none of the erratic behavior by Loughran described by the investigators. "I have been here three and a half years working next door to this woman and I have never seen the behavior these people describe," he said. In a letter to DOI, however, Condon said he had changed office procedures to make sure he personally reads all complaints that come into the office and examines "every substantiated and unsubstantiated case." Loughran, who declined to speak to the Voice, wrote Condon a lengthy defense of her actions, insisting that her decisions at the office had been "common-sense based and not capricious by any rational standard." The investigators, past and current, remain unconvinced. "This isn't just disagreeing over cases," said one. "Yeah, there's always tension [in other investigative offices] between the investigators and the prosecutors. But it's always motivated by respect, and everyone understands they're a team. Here, you don't get that. And they're supposed to be about helping the kids." LOAD-DATE: December 14, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: illustration: Glynis Sweeny PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 V V Publishing Corporation All Rights Reserved

171 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Patriot Ledger (Quincy, MA) December 17, 2005 Saturday City Edition

FAITH; "Awareness is the path of immortality; Thoughtlessness is the path of death."; - BUDDHA; Our South Shore, home of the stark Pilgrims, has become an American tapestry, rich in religious diversity
BYLINE: Lane Lambert SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1884 words PICTURES BY AMELIA KUNHARDT STORY BY LANE LAMBERT PART I OF III When Robert and Catherine Berlo join friends and fellow parishioners for Mass at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Quincy this weekend, they'll be following the generations-old faith of their ancestors in Ireland and Germany. Across town, Asian immigrants Johnson Tran and Sandy Wong-Ng will carry on their homeland traditions, too, at the Thousand Buddha Temple. So will lifelong Muslim Zaida Shaw, at the nearby Islamic Center of New England. Others will take a different path - among them, Ed Dann of Hanover, who grew up Catholic and now is active at the evangelical North River Community Church in Pembroke. From parish and mosque to storefront and synagogue, South Shore believers worship with a myriad of rituals - stately Congregational hymns, Portuguese-language liturgies, praise songs, Arabic Quran recitations and Chinese sutras. Once the domain of the Calvinist Anglican dissenters like the Pilgrims and now among the most Catholic areas of the country, the South Shore has become home to pilgrims of global diversity - a profusion that Boston University theology professor Nancy Ammerman says is a predominant feature of American religion in the 21st century. "This has been going on for a long time, and there is no reason to see that it will change," she said. At the same time, she and Miami (Ohio) University professor Peter W. Williams says the religious landscape is the product of patterns of settlement and immigration, "almost a microclimate." That trend can be seen most clearly in Quincy Point, where one of the city's oldest Congregational churches shares the neighborhood with two Catholic churches, two Pentecostal congregations, New England's oldest mosque and the South Shore's first Buddhist temple.

In Plymouth, the Pilgrim heritage is still claimed by a range of churches, from First Parish Unitarian to the New Testament Church, Plymouth Rock Bible Church and even the ultra-orthodox Twelve Tribes Christian movement. The South Shore and Massachusetts were overwhelmingly Congregational until the mid- to late 1800s, when Irish and Italian immigration transformed the state into Catholic strongholds. In the 1960s, federal immigration reform opened the doors to large numbers of Hispanics, Asians and Middle Easterners. While those patterns have been felt across the nation, Ammerman and Williams said New England and America's largest cities were most affected. The Deep South, by contrast, remains heavily Baptist, with more black churches than any other part of the country. Lutherans, Methodists and Catholics hold sway across the Midwest, while the Pacific Coast is home to the largest percentage of "nones," who claim no religious affiliation. New England was the original territory for the country's first evangelical movement, the "Great Awakening" of the mid-18th century, but evangelicals are noticeably fewer in number now. Beyond Boston, black congregations are all but nonexistent. Bethel AME Church in Plymouth is an exception. On the other hand, Jewish and Muslim populations are comparatively larger than in most of the country's urban and suburban centers. Even so, Williams said the spread of evangelical churches like North River is one of the most significant trends of the last two decades. "What you're seeing might not look so dramatic, given the strong Catholic presence," he said. "But it's in your area, too." "More terror preached" The Pilgrims' Calvinist faith wasn't the first to be planted here, of course. The Wampanoag tribe had practiced their Great Spirit worship and healing ceremonies for centuries. A few Wampanoags and members of other tribes adopted Christianity as "praying Indians" all through the 1600s - some heard sermons at Ponkapoag Pond - but most resisted. As the Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay colony fought them and forced them out, they were equally unforgiving with dissenters in their own ranks - among them, the Rev. Peter Lenthal in Weymouth, who was banished to Rhode Island in 1639 with Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson. The state's oldest Episcopal parish was established in Hanover without incident in 1727, but some movements still stirred controversy. In 1744, according to an account in an old Kingston town history, the First Parish congregation there was so incensed when their pastor invited the famous evangelist George Whitefield to speak that they locked both men out of the church. As late as the 1820s, the hellfire and brimstone theology of the Baptists and Methodists still provoked scorn from orthodox Congregationalists like the Rev. Elijah Leonard of Marshfield, who wrote that some of his members abandoned Second Parish because "they wanted more terror preached." Other changes were already gathering force. South Shore congregations such as First Parish in Plymouth and Old Ship Church in Hingham were Unitarian in spirit if not doctrine by the late 1700s. The Rev. Leonard's church declared itself Unitarian in 1836, two years after his death. Within a decade, however, the Unitarian controversy paled as the arrival of impoverished Irish immigrants grew from a trickle to a steady stream. A handful of Catholics lived in Boston before the Revolutionary War. The first Mass was celebrated there in 1788, but not on the South Shore until 1826, when a priest visited Quincy. (He got an informal, personal welcome from President John Quincy Adams.) The Boston diocese created the first local parish, St. Mary's in Quincy, in 1840. By the late 1870s the South Shore had eight parishes. Catholic immigration was swamping the old Protestant order. "They felt overwhelmed" On the South Shore, as in Boston, most Yankee Protestants regarded these developments with alarm and suspicion.

"They felt Catholicism was a blasphemous religion ... and they felt overwhelmed," said Boston College historian Thomas O'Connor, who grew up in the Catholic enclave of South Boston and is a longtime Braintree resident. "They really believed that these Papists would take over the New World as they had taken over so much of Europe." The first serious trouble erupted in 1834, when a mob of Boston workingmen burned an Ursuline boarding school in Charlestown. No such violence seems to have occurred south of Boston, although Quincy Historical Society director Ed Fitzgerald said the anti-Catholic Know-Nothing Party attracted a fair amount of support in the Quincy area in the late 1840s and early 1850s. After the Civil War, the storm gradually subsided as Catholics and Protestants became neighbors. The once-exclusive Adams Academy enrolled Irish students. By the 1880s, Randolph and surrounding towns were electing Irish selectmen. At the same time, parishes were becoming ever-stronger centers of Catholic faith and life. This religious separatism reached its apogee under Cardinal William O'Connell. From World War I into the 1940s he urged families to send their children to Catholic schools and Catholic Boy Scout troops, and warned them against even attending Protestant church services or weddings. "His attitude was, they're nice people, but they're going to get you," O'Connor said. Lifelong Congregational church member Betty DeCristofaro of Quincy had a few youthful encounters with Cardinal O'Connell's doctrine. She sometimes attended novenas with a Catholic friend, "but she told me she couldn't set foot inside our church," DeCristofaro recalled. Cardinal O'Connell's successor, Cardinal Richard Cushing, reversed those practices. He made a point of joining interfaith events. "Like a mission field" As Irish and Italian Catholic immigration peaked around the turn of the 20th century, the South Shore's first Jewish community took root in Quincy. The Grossmans, Litchmans and other families founded the Ahavath Achim synagogue in 1903. In 1918 the Beth Israel Synagogue opened in Quincy Point, near the Fore River shipyard. Two more were built in Sharon and Milton during World War II, but the biggest burst of expansion came in the 1950s and '60s, with post-war migration from Boston to the suburbs. In those same years Quincy became home to New England's first mosque. A small Lebanese and Syrian Muslim community of Fore River shipyard workers and shop owners formed in the 1920s. By the 1960s, Zaida Hassan Shaw's family and others had collected enough money - some donated by Christian and Jewish friends - to build a mosque with a proper prayer room. The Islamic Center was dedicated in 1964. "It was so wonderful to finally be able to worship the way we're supposed to," Shaw said. Through the 1960s, the reforms of the Second Vatican Council rippled through South Shore parishes, as they did everywhere. Churchgoers like Robert and Catherine Berlo got used to hearing the Mass in English instead of Latin, and seeing their priest face-to-face. More change came in the late 1980s and '90s, as evangelical congregations like North River Community Church multiplied and the Thousand Buddha Temple opened, to serve a swelling Asian immigrant community. Johnson Tran and Sandy Wong-Ng were delighted when they heard by word-of-mouth that Sister Sik, a Hong Kong master, had begun regular services in a Quincy house. Until then, they and their parents had to drive to New York City a couple of times a year for special occasions. "We were so happy," Tran said of the Thousand Buddha Temple's 1996 dedication. "We had found something like family again." So did Randolph native Lisa Goldstein, who grew up going to the synagogue, but converted to Buddhism because it gave her a spiritual inspiration she'd never felt from Judaism.

Ed Dann of Hanover took a different leap, trading the Catholicism of his youth for a born-again faith at the contemporary-style North River Church. The construction contractor never imagined such a thing would happen. He was baptized, confirmed and married at St. Paul's in Hingham, the church for which his great-grandfather had helped lay the foundation in the 1870s. He and his wife, a former United Methodist, visited North River not long after the Rev. Paul Atwater started it in 1989. At 42, Dann has been the drama-ministry leader there for 15 years. In a congregation of 600, he is one of at least 300 former Catholics. "I still have a love for the Catholic Church," he said. "But I feel that my spiritual gifts can be used better where I am." Evangelicals continue to make quiet inroads here - the area's newest congregation, Stoughton-based Grace Church, has gathered at an area hotel function room for a couple of months. But converts like Dann are well aware how Catholic the South Shore and the state still are. In a place where more than half the population is at least nominally Catholic and a growing number claim no faith tradition, "it's like being in a mission field" to be an evangelical, Dann said. Catholics don't see it that way. While the last few years have been a trial for the Archdiocese of Boston and local parishes, with priest sex-abuse scandals and parish closings that have driven some younger Catholics away, devout members like the Berlos are clinging to their ancestral faith with renewed conviction. "When I go to Mass and communion, I trace that back to St. Peter (in the first century)," Robert Berlo said. "How could I have that, and give up what I have?" Lane Lambert may be reached at llambert@ledger.com. LOAD-DATE: December 30, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Patriot Ledger

172 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey) December 16, 2005 Friday FINAL EDITION

Charitable immunity nears end
BYLINE: ROBERT SCHWANEBERG, STAR-LEDGER STAFF SECTION: NEW JERSEY; Pg. 30 LENGTH: 315 words

A bill that would allow lawsuits against churches, private schools and other nonprofit institutions for past negligent hirings of employees who sexually abused children gained final approval yesterday in the Senate. The bill, which retroactively strips these charities of their long-held immunity against lawsuits, passed the upper house, without debate, by a vote of 34-1. The Senate, which had previously passed such legislation, agreed with Assembly changes to the bill and sent it to acting Gov. Richard Codey for his consideration. Codey, as Senate president, was among those voting for it yesterday. Sen. Gerald Cardinale (R-Bergen) cast the only "no" vote. "Today, we are one step closer to having true justice for the victims of sexual abuse," said Sen. Joseph Vitale (D-Middlesex), the sponsor. Although prompted largely by the child sex abuse scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church, the bill applies across the board to private schools, Scout troops, Little Leagues and other charitable organizations. They would lose what had been an ironclad immunity against lawsuits by the people they serve and could be sued if they negligently hire or supervise someone who sexually abuses a child. That change would apply retroactively to any lawsuits that have not already been resolved. Victims would still have to observe the time limits for suing, but they are quite flexible in cases of childhood molestation. Many of the cases against Roman Catholic dioceses that were pending when the bill was introduced five years ago have since been settled. Phillipsburg lawyer Gregory Gianforcaro said he still has a dozen cases "against various religious entities." The bill would resolve a question, currently before the New Jersey Supreme Court, as to whether charitable immunity shields the prestigious American Boychoir School in Princeton against a lawsuit by former student John Hardwicke. LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: nsl Copyright 2005 Newark Morning Ledger Co. All Rights Reserved

173 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey) December 13, 2005 Tuesday FINAL EDITION

Charities could face sex-molester lawsuits
BYLINE: ROBERT SCHWANEBERG, STAR-LEDGER STAFF SECTION: NEW JERSEY; Pg. 17

LENGTH: 665 words Churches, private schools and other charities that negligently hire employees who sexually abuse children would retroactively lose their immunity against lawsuits under a bill that passed the Senate last night 635. The bill, one of the most emotional considered this term, passed as more than a dozen victims of childhood sexual abuse and their relatives and supporters watched from the Senate gallery. They broke into applause as the running vote tally showed it would pass. "Justice is coming for the children in New Jersey, and it is a great day," said Mark Crawford of Woodbridge, who was molested as a teenager by a parish priest. Several victims hugged Sen. Joseph Vitale (DMiddlesex) and Assemblyman Neil Cohen (D-Union), who have worked to change the law for more than five years. "It's been a long time coming," Cohen said. The vote followed a half-hour of debate that was at times emotional, and centered on the bill's retroactivity. Several opponents said they could support legislation that removed charitable immunity for future cases of child molestation but not a bill that could open the door to lawsuits over abuse that occurred decades ago. Assemblyman John McKeon (D-Essex) urged his colleagues "not to change the rules after the fact" and announced he would vote against the measure. "Shame on you," someone yelled from the gallery. Assemblyman Michael Patrick Carroll (R-Morris) said that allowing charities to be sued will mean they have less money to educate children and to aid the poor, hungry and homeless. He warned that some needy people may go hungry, tuitions may rise and some schools might fail so that money can be paid to victims of molestation and their lawyers. "I don't care about lawyers making money. I care about the cavalier attitude of some institutions that just moved people around," Assemblyman Joseph Malone (R-Burlington) replied. Assemblyman Patrick Diegnan (D-Middlesex) said that as a Catholic, he finds it "incomprehensible" that the church is "seeking to hide behind a shield" of charitable immunity. "Forget the technicalities; let us do what is right for these victims," Diegnan said. "Let us at least today give them a voice; give them access to the courts." Although prompted largely by the sex abuse scandal that engulfed the Roman Catholic Church, the bill (S540) would apply across the board to private schools, churches, scout troops, Little Leagues and other charitable organizations that negligently hire or supervise child molesters. Charities would still be protected against lawsuits in other cases, such as a parishioner slipping on the church steps. The bill had passed the Senate in May 2004 and now goes back to the upper house for approval of minor changes made in the Assembly. Vitale predicted that would be done and the bill sent to acting Gov. Richard Codey, who is expected to sign it. The legislation would retroactively carve out an exception to a 1958 law that shields New Jersey charities from lawsuits by people receiving their services. That protection had been ironclad, but was weakened in March 2004 when a state appeals court ruled the prestigious American Boychoir School in Princeton could be sued for allegedly allowing a choirmaster to repeatedly molest a student, John Hardwicke, more than three decades ago. That case went to the New Jersey Supreme Court, which heard arguments more than a year ago but has yet to rule. "I'm very surprised," Vitale said. "I don't know whether the Supremes were waiting for us or we were waiting for them. It's really a very long time." While enactment of the bill would remove the issue of charitable immunity from Hardwicke's case, other questions about his lawsuit would still have to be resolved by the Supreme Court.

The bill would not abolish the time limits for filing lawsuits, but those limits can be rather flexible in cases of childhood sexual abuse. Some victims in their 50s have been allowed to sue. Hardwicke said, "I'm just looking forward to having a day in court." LOAD-DATE: April 19, 2007 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper JOURNAL-CODE: nsl Copyright 2005 Newark Morning Ledger Co. All Rights Reserved

176 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) December 6, 2005 Tuesday Correction Appended Sunrise Edition

Abused girl, telltale clues point to killers
BYLINE: STEVE DUIN, The Oregonian SECTION: Local News; Pg. B01 LENGTH: 2388 words SERIES: RANDY GUZEK (THIRD OF FIVE PARTS) Author's note: On the night of June 28, 1987, Rod and Lois Houser are murdered in their Terrebonne home by two Redmond teenagers, Randy Guzek and Mark Wilson, and a disgraced Marine named Donald Ross Cathay. A major crimes team quickly mobilizes to pursue the killers. Tammy and the tablecloth. On that simple axis --a 14-year-old girl and a family's blue "everyday" linen tablecloth --the investigation into the brutal murders of Rod and Lois Houser would turn. Fate would work its magic. Innocence would have its revenge. But before we pull one teenage girl from the wreckage of several Oregon families, we must first catch up to the Houser daughters. The daughters found the shattered bodies of their parents. And only one would eventually decide she could live with the vision she carried away with her that night. Rod and Lois Houser had been dead for 42 hours when Sue Shirley and Maryanne Christman drove up to the lonely house on the ridge above the Deschutes. It was dusk on that Tuesday night; they'd heard nothing from their parents since Sunday. The house was dark, the cars in the driveway, the front door unlocked.

Because neither had ever stumbled onto a crime scene, they didn't recognize the thick odor when they opened the door. The bodies and the family dog, Shady, had been locked in the house for two hot summer days. They quickly realized the house had been ransacked. Maryanne headed toward the living room, while Sue crept up the stairs to her parents' bedroom. Because her father's body was wrapped in a quilt, Maryanne hadn't found him in the darkness downstairs before her sister began to scream. She was staring at the table her mother had refinished, wondering where the tablecloth had gone, when Sue wailed, "Oh, my God, it's the worst! It's the worst!" Sue ran down the stairs and pulled her sister from the house. They drove to the nearest neighbor's, Jack Linden's place, a half-mile away. Ken Berg and Glen Wood were working outside on a tractor and they stood, transfixed, as the two women stumbled from the car, Sue screaming, "Our parents need help," Maryanne falling to the ground and crawling across the gravel toward them. Berg and Wood drove Maryanne back to the house while Sue called the police. The two men recognized the smell; they wouldn't let Maryanne inside. When Berg finally told Maryanne her father was dead, she staggered into the backyard and threw up. In a daze, she looked out into the bleak darkness of the river valley. "I could see across the river this convoy of law enforcement cars," she recalled in 1997, "with their lights flashing and their sirens going." The first officers on the scene were Senior Trooper Gerry Miller, then an 18-year veteran with the Oregon State Police, and Sgt. Michael Lee Johnston, a Deschutes County sheriff working the graveyard shift. Miller and Johnston went through the house, room by room, guns drawn, gingerly approaching the body in the living room where the dog kept its vigil. When they'd seen enough, and told the daughters both parents were dead, Maryanne sprinted for the house. It was all Miller and Johnston could do to stop her. "I literally had to tackle her," Miller said. "The officers had to handcuff her and haul her off in an ambulance," prosecutor Josh Marquis said. "But can you imagine anything more horrific than going to check on your parents and finding their mutilated, rotting bodies?" Invaluable investigator Anything? Lynn Fredrickson can. He was an Oregon State Police investigator for 27 years, majoring in sex abuse cases. "I was so used to living in the sewer," he said. Molested by a junior Boy Scout leader when he was 14, Fredrickson developed a unique empathy for sex abuse victims. He knew which questions to ask. He never winced. "I was good at talking to people," he said, "and gaining their confidence." Fredrickson talked to far too many in the Redmond of the 1980s. What he saw and heard got Fredrickson and his wife started on 20-year careers as foster parents. And it gave Fredrickson --"the cop who really broke the case," Marquis says --an incredible running start on the investigation into the murders of Rod and Lois Houser. On June 4, 1987, almost four weeks before the murders, Fredrickson got a call from Children's Services Division in Redmond. A CSD staffer needed Fredrickson to check out complaints by a high school freshman that she was being sexually abused by her father and two of her brothers. Abandoned by everyone who shared her name, Tammy Guzek had finally come forward. "I can still see her that day in my mind," Fredrickson said. "She was wearing this knit hat. I didn't get everything the first time; you rarely do. But the abuse, the way she described it, was horrific." For the next several weeks, after Tammy was removed from her home, Fredrickson gained her confidence and investigated her accusations. He was all over the Guzek family, conducting interviews, collecting evidence, preparing for the indictments that would roll out in July. All the while, Tammy was sharing the sordid secrets of her family. About the insurance scam involving the motor home and Lake Billy Chinook. About her brother Randy and his tempestuous relationship with Anne Houser.

It was inevitable, then, even as the major crimes team came together in the hours after the Housers' bodies were discovered, that two members of the team would look immediately for a link with the Guzeks: One was Redmond Police Detective Richard "Dick" Little, an old Navy man, solid and soft-spoken, a fixture on the force, a guy the high school kids ribbed over his name. Little still remembered the phony rape charge Anne unloaded on Randy in February. The other was Fredrickson, an exceedingly private man who'd worked with Little on several ugly sex abuse cases. The OSP detective was armed with Tammy's frightening stories about her family and Randy's connection with Anne. On the night of June 30, as Maryanne Christman and Sue Shirley were winding their way up to their parents' home, Randy Guzek and Mark Wilson took two girls to see "The Secret of My Success" at Redmond Cinemas. Wilson wore Rod Houser's Nike Airbreakers. In his wallet was the $60 Randy Guzek gave him as his share of the take from the Housers' place. When they brought their dates back to Joel Guzek's house on Jackson Street, Jill Armstrong pulled Randy and Mark into the back room. Listening to the police scanner, she'd heard the news about the double murders in Terrebonne. Even as they spoke, Joel was burning the Housers' credit cards and checks in a burn barrel in the backyard. One night later, Deschutes County Detective Marvin Combs and Brian Mikkelborg, an OSP arson investigator, arrived at Jackson Street to interview the Guzeks about their relationship with Anne Houser. From Mikkelborg's police report: During the course of the interview while sitting in the living room, writer noticed the television set matched the description of the one given by victim William Morgan. Writer also noticed that the men's dresser shown in the photographs provided by Mr. Morgan was located in the hallway between the living room and the kitchen of the Guzek residence. That wasn't all. There was a coffee table and end table, a lamp, couch and chair, all a perfect match for the furniture stolen from the Morgans' place at Crooked River Ranch, a burglary and arson Mikkelborg was still investigating. He filed the information away. When the major crimes team wrapped up the Houser case, Mikkelborg would pay the Guzeks another visit. All things in their time. More pieces of the puzzle On July 2, Joel, Jill, Randy and Mark Wilson drove to Reno, Nev. Near La Pine, Wilson later testified, Joel Guzek turned around "and asked if we really thought it was worth it. The defendant looked at me and got a big grin on his face and said, 'Yes, it was.' " Hold that thought, Randy. They returned from Reno on July 5. For the next several days, Fredrickson said, "Tammy is calling me almost every day during the homicide investigation. She was calling me to make sure I was still alive because she knew her family. She said she knew her family was going to kill me." But Tammy had other things to share. A federally licensed firearms dealer, Fredrickson knew exactly what kind of rifle had been used in the murder of Rod Houser. "It wasn't popular at the time to have these high-cap magazines, so there was only one gun capable of doing that: the Ruger 10/22," Fredrickson said. Not only did Tammy describe seeing that rifle in the family war chest, but she led detectives to the woodpile on the Walnut Street lot where Randy and her dad did their target shooting. Tammy, curiously enough, wasn't the only adolescent girl moving the investigation along. Another was parked at Fredrickson's dinner table. "In an incredible coincidence, we had a girl placed in our home for foster care," said Fredrickson, who retired in 1999. And one July night over dinner, after hearing the state trooper mention Guzek and Wilson, she sat up in her chair and offered a curious twist: She'd seen the boys on that fateful Sunday, hours before the

murder, she said, and made plans to meet them at Lake Billy Chinook. Somehow, they got their wires crossed. They never hooked up. Determined to see them, "she sneaks out of her bedroom window on the morning of the homicide and goes over to the Guzeks' house," Fredrickson said. "And as she walks over there, she sees the Guzeks unloading property just before daylight. "She's in my home telling me this. How wild is that? It was like a piece of the puzzle. How could that piece of the puzzle fall into place at that time? Because their time was up. Someone was going to make sure they paid for what they did." The tablecloth On July 9, George Roshak, an Oregon State Police detective, returned to Jackson Street with a search warrant, checking on Mikkelborg's information about the furniture. Roshak was 10 seconds inside the front door when he glanced into the dining room. "The first thing I notice," he said, "is the dining table has the tablecloth from the murder scene. This was an unusual tablecloth. A unique fabric. There were matching napkins, so I'd seen the fabric at briefings. There is absolutely no question. "I was going, 'Whoa! Timeout, everyone. Take a look.' " The Guzeks, it seemed, had shut the burn barrel down far too soon. Randy Guzek, Roshak remembers, looked like he was going to be sick. That afternoon, perhaps feeling a tightening of the noose, Guzek unloaded on Fredrickson. "He said the rumor on the street was Anne was definitely the murderer," Fredrickson said. "He told me he'd read in the Redmond newspaper that the Housers had been shot 20 times each. . . . (And) he told me that his sister and Anne Houser were really good friends and that someone should check on Tammy's whereabouts on the night of the homicide." The police had never released any information about the manner of death, much less the number of shots. Randy Guzek wasn't the only member of the clan shooting his mouth off. Sitting in the Deschutes County jail on the sex abuse charges involving his daughter, Joel Guzek sent a note to Little, asking to talk. Little had arrested Joel often enough that Guzek trusted him; that the Guzeks once burglarized Little's home in Lake Park Estates, Joel apparently believed, was a stunt the detective never took personally. When Little and Marvin Combs pulled Joel into the detective's room, Guzek said he was worried about being charged with arson in the fire at the Morgans' ranch. "I don't want to be arrested for something I didn't do," Joel told Combs. Just in case, Guzek said, he had information to trade. That night, Joel Guzek took Little and Combs down to a Redmond storage unit, unlocked and opened No. 208 and showed the detectives the booty from the Housers' home and 10 other local burglaries. The next morning, July 10, he led them to the guns. He was doing anything to save himself, Fredrickson said, "even selling out his kids." "You're under arrest" Mark Wilson was back at his parents' home, where members of the major crimes team found him. The murder weapons in hand, they told Wilson he had to come to the police station. "I asked them if I could follow them down in my car, so I could come back after," Wilson said. "That's how outlandish my thoughts were." Randy Guzek was nabbed later that day at Jackson Street. "I'm the one who stuck a gun under his chin when he was fast asleep on the coach," Fredrickson recalled, "and said, 'Get up. You're under arrest.' " I'm guessing Fredrickson was savoring the moment. I'm guessing he was thinking about Tammy. Donald Ross Cathay was the first to confess; he would later tell the jury he decided to come clean "when they (the cops) said that Randy's dad and Jill were pointing me and Mark out." Cathay told police that Wilson killed Rod Houser and Guzek his wife. Investigators then confronted

Wilson and suggested he drop the self-serving lies. He did. Gene Goff, a criminal investigator for the Deschutes County sheriff's office, served Randy Guzek with the official warrant in jail. "I read the warrant to him," Goff later said. "It was for two counts of aggravated murder and two counts of burglary. And I read it to him in full. I asked him if he had any questions about it. He asked me, 'What's it mean? What's aggravated murder?' And I said, 'That's the one that packs the death penalty.' "He turned and said, 'Big (expletive) deal.' I asked him, I said, 'What did you say?' And he turned back and stared at me and shook his head and turned around and walked back in his cell." Eight months and eight days later, the state of Oregon sentenced Randy Lee Guzek to die by lethal injection for the murders of Rod and Lois Houser. The sentence prompted a cake order at the bakery in Redmond where Guzek's mother, Kathleen, worked. The purchase requested icing that spelled out, "Bye-bye, Randy," and included a hangman's noose. Eighteen years, four months and 26 days later, Guzek had not yet exhausted the first of 10 steps for appeal available to each and every lifer on Death Row. Wednesday: Why Guzek gets another chance before a sentencing jury. To read previous chapters, go to http://www.oregonlive. com/news/oregonian/steve_duin/ Steve Duin: 503-221-8597; Steveduin@aol.com; 1320 S.W. Broadway, Portland, OR 97201 LOAD-DATE: January 5, 2006 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH CORRECTION-DATE: December 9, 2005 CORRECTION: PUBLISHED CORRECTION RAN FRIDAY, : * Donald Ross Cathey is serving a life sentence for the murders of Rod and Lois Houser. His surname was misspelled in columnist Steve Duin's series this week about the crime. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Oregonian All Rights Reserved

178 of 265 DOCUMENTS Seattle Times (Washington) December 2, 2005, Friday

Even the mayor wonders: Who is the real Jim West?

BYLINE: By David Postman SECTION: DOMESTIC NEWS LENGTH: 4291 words SPOKANE, Wash. _ Only one name appears on the ballot in this city's Dec. 6 recall election: Mayor Jim West. But which West will voters have in mind when they decide whether to dump the first-term mayor? The professional politician who was leading the city to a long-overdue renaissance? Or "therightbi-guy," one of the names the mayor used while cruising online for young men? Or darker still, the former sheriff's deputy and Boy Scout leader who stands accused of molesting young boys decades ago? In this toughest campaign of a 25-year political career, West says he's pitted against a caricature of himself drawn by recall sponsors and The Spokesman-Review, the local newspaper that since May has published nearly 150 stories about West, reporting allegations that he used his position as mayor to lure young men and that West sexually abused boys decades ago. "I have no opponent other than the person they created who is supposedly me," West said. The mayor created his own "imaginary person" through which he lived a vast and secret online life. But he says it would also be unfair for voters to judge him as that character. "What it really allows me to do is be somebody I'm not," West said. But even he has difficulty sorting out the real from the make-believe. "And this is weird. This is incredibly weird for me. This is an imaginary person and this is a real person," he said, pointing with a finger on each hand. "And there are points in time where they cross over a little bit. But few and far between." Politicians in scandals of this proportion often quickly resign, go off to seek counseling or detoxification or plow on with blanket denials. West, though, has been talking more and more about his conflicted sexuality and self-doubt in ways almost unheard of for a candidate on the campaign trail. He also follows one well-worn path: Blame the newspaper. West's first campaign fundraising appeal focused on The Spokesman-Review _ which sparked controversy by hiring someone to pose as an online teenager to expose West _ and its editor, Steven Smith: "Are Steven Smith and The Spokesman-Review the ultimate authority in Spokane or is it the people? The choice is ours." For his part, Smith is surprised the scandal has burned so long. "There are days I feel Mayor West is just making it too easy and that we are in a position of having to continue to write these stories," Smith said. "Now I think that's his responsibility, not ours." Smith says West could have saved himself further scrutiny by resigning. "But nevertheless," Smith said, "you've got to ask yourself periodically, how do I feel about this? And there are days I don't feel really great about it. Proud of our journalism. But I just feel like this guy is standing up there and allowing us to whack away at him. "And we're grinding him into dust." That last sentence is said without boast. It's Smith's assessment of where the story has gone. West has cancer. So many elements are at play in the West saga that it's easy to forget that. He was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2003. It quickly spread to his liver. He has had four surgeries and is on his fourth

round of chemotherapy. It's clear he's not well. He's regained much of the weight he originally lost, though he looks more bloated than robust. There's a gray pallor to his skin, and his hair is clumped in thin patches. There doesn't seem to be any loss of energy. He's as eager as ever to talk about backroom machinations, political intrigue and how he most recently outsmarted the opposition. His love for political gamesmanship helped make West one of the most powerful Republican figures in Olympia. He spent 20 years in the Legislature, rising to chair the powerful Senate Ways and Means Committee and serving as the Senate majority leader. But mayor of Spokane is the job he always dreamed of holding. Early in his tenure, West was hailed by The Spokesman-Review and local leaders for bringing a professionalism to the office. Even after the sexual-misconduct allegations, he was named "Best Local Official" in Spokane Coeur d'Alene Living magazine. "Reprehensible actions aside, the guy can lead and readers still seem to respect him for all the good he has done for the city," the magazine wrote. Not a great review. But good enough for a mayor in trouble that the magazine sits outside West's office on the fifth floor of City Hall with a Post-it on the page and the entry highlighted in yellow. Looking out his office window, West points to where the Monroe Street Bridge and the city's refurbished tramway crisscross the Spokane River. The reopening of the 90-year-old bridge was a high point in the nascent West administration. After the scandal broke, his staff asked West if he wanted to forgo the balloons and the band and instead have a simple ribbon cutting or maybe no public appearance at all. "I said, 'We're going to have a three-day party,'" West recalled. And they did. But as quickly as he turns away from the window, he grabs a transcript of one of his online chats with The Spokesman-Review's hired computer expert who was posing as a local high-school boy going by the handle "motobrock34." Nearby is a pile of letters and e-mails from supporters, including former Scouts, testifying to West's soundness and wishing him well. There is an audio copy and a transcript of his interview with The Spokesman-Review that he pores over looking for discrepancies. Battling the allegations gives him strength, he says, to fight cancer. Last May, West's political world began unraveling after The Spokesman-Review reported on two men who say West molested them in the 1970s when they were young boys in Spokane. Both say they were also molested by West's good friend and fellow sheriff's deputy, David Hahn. West has denied those charges. In one interview he offers a circumstantial argument against those claims: If he were an abuser there'd be more victims coming forward. The newspaper, with its aggressive search for more victims, would have found someone else. "Where are they? Pedophiles don't abuse just one person," West said. "Maybe in a case of an uncle abusing or a father or something abusing a family member, but pedophiles who abuse strangers don't abuse one person." But there is mystery even to West about his past. Can he understand how strange it looks to some that he worked with two men _ Hahn and another fellow Scout leader, George Robey Jr. _ who both committed suicide after being suspected of sexually abusing children? "And don't you think that maybe made me to question, 'What's wrong with me?'" West said. Pressed to elaborate, West demurred, then said, "What was it about me that caused this to happen? Or not to cause it to happen, but had these people lined up? Was it just being (in the) cosmic space in the wrong place at the wrong time?"

Any crime committed in the 1970s would be beyond the statute of limitations. Because of that, law enforcement, government officials and sponsors of the recall against West have paid little attention to the sexabuse claims _ the worst accusations West faces. The newspaper, too, has done little to advance those allegations. Instead, much of the public attention and the reporting has focused on a narrower legal question: Whether West misused his office by offering City Hall positions to entice young men into sexual relationships. In one of the initial stories, The Spokesman-Review reported that West had offered an internship to someone he thought was a high-school senior. After that, others came forward to say West had also offered them city positions. Last month, an investigator hired by the city concluded those actions had violated city and state laws. West continues to deny the charges. ___ The allegations against West churn dark memories in Spokane. There have been child sex-abuse allegations in the ranks of the Spokane County Sheriff's Office, the Boy Scouts, a ranch for troubled boys and the Catholic Church _ a diocese so battered by accusations of molestation it has filed for bankruptcy. This scandal is about the mayor's actions, to be sure. But many people talk of what it says about Spokane, its history, its newspaper; about the business community; and about how and why city residents don't demand more from their leaders. The city's power structure has been shaken. The mayor's former business backers and his own Republican Party want him to resign. The newspaper that endorsed West finds itself hailed by former critics as a voice of the people. Still, the city's most powerful groups stood on the sidelines in the days and weeks after The SpokesmanReview expose. It was Shannon Sullivan, a self-described unemployed, uneducated, single mom from the poor side of town, who organized the recall-petition drive that will culminate in the Dec. 6 election. "It surprised me that we would sit down and take this as a community," Sullivan said. "This good-old-boy thing is going to come to an end. It is the people who took back this city." Some worry a recall will continue the civic unease that has given Spokane an unbroken chain of oneterm mayors since 1974. At stake, they say, is the city's recent success and its efforts to head off life as a branch-office town. Steve Eugster is a former city councilman, attorney and sponsor of the city-charter change that gave Spokane a strong-mayor form of government. He has been one of West's most outspoken defenders _ a defense that often centers on attacking The Spokesman-Review _ and says the mayor is being persecuted for his personal life. "You may not like the guy but he is the kind of strong mayor I had in mind when I advanced the strongmayor petition," Eugster said. West's fate has taken on symbolic power in a city longing for change. Spokane has a chronic inferiority complex. It's a complex so universally recognized it's become an icon. Civic self-doubt is Spokane's Space Needle. When Spokane was named an All-America City last fall, The Spokesman-Review editorialized that it was time to get over the complex _ a complex so rooted here that the newspaper said the same thing when the city first won the award in 1975. "There was widespread abuse of children in this city for years by priests, by sheriff deputies, by Boy Scout leaders _ some of them the same _ and you know, you want resolution to that. You do want a white knight to come in and make the bad guys pay in some way," said Jess Walter, a Spokane born-and-bred novelist and former Spokesman-Review reporter. "I certainly know a lot of people for whom getting rid of Jim West will be a step in the right direction. It will

speak well of Spokane if we can do that." The newspaper, too, has a past to overcome. Local critics have long been suspicious of power wielded by the Cowles family, which owns the paper and other extensive business holdings. Real-estate dealings have created the most questions for the Cowles family _ specifically, a downtown shopping mall and parking-garage deal with the city that went sour, causing years of controversy and litigation. The Spokesman-Review's stories have generated a host of rumors, including an unsubstantiated one that the newspaper investigated West only because the mayor got the better of the Cowles family in a settlement of that litigation. "I've never seen conspiracy theorists like the people who have Cowles conspiracies," Walter said. "If they get the weather wrong they say, 'Well, Stacey (Cowles, the publisher) clearly wanted everyone to come inside and shop so they predicted rain.' It's just insanity." Smith, who worked at six other newspapers before becoming editor of The Spokesman-Review in 2003, sees himself as the new sheriff in town. His Stetson is a fedora and he often wears a foreign correspondentissue trench coat. He says there were compromises and ethical lapses under the old regime at the paper, when Cowles' business interests trumped journalism. The paper has written about that since he took over. Smith, 55, sees darker demons to exorcise from the paper's gothic building. He says the paper "failed to actively pursue" stories about sex abuse in Spokane in the 1970s and 1980s, including allegations about the local Catholic Church and church-run organizations. "The result is we put children in danger because you allow situations to continue," Smith said. The publisher of the paper, Stacey Cowles, the son of the man who was in charge of The SpokesmanReview then, isn't so sure. "I can't believe my father would ever have said, 'Look, we're not going to go there,' " Cowles said. But after a moment of reflection, Cowles said, "Maybe it's possible." He said that decades ago there were striking religious divisions in town between Catholics and Protestants that the paper may have wanted to avoid stirring up. ___ Like so much about Spokane's past, doubts are just under the surface. As West talks about his life, one pictures a blur of men in uniform. West's father was a postal worker. Young Jim went from the Boy Scouts, where his troop leader was an Air Force man, to join the Army, then the sheriff's department, then returning to the Boy Scouts as an adult leader. West said the system of rules behind those uniforms "definitely makes life simpler." There also is a sense of belonging and camaraderie, he said, that he felt particularly in the Army and the Scouts. They can be tough on a young man, too. West's first Scout leader was a tough disciplinarian. Infractions were dealt with by sending a Scout through "the belt line," a column of Scouts using their belts to whip the offender as he ran down the line. West was born in Oregon but raised in Spokane. As he was about to start his senior year of high school, his father took a job in Reno, Nev., and West wanted to stay behind. A family he didn't know agreed to take him for the year. West attended the University of Nevada, Reno, but dropped out. He stayed behind, though, when his family moved several months later, still living in a fraternity house, the place he had one of his earliest homosexual experiences. West was married from 1990 to 1995. He remains friendly with his ex-wife, who, along with her mother,

have donated to West's anti-recall campaign. He said it wasn't until after his divorce that he admitted to himself that he was attracted to men. He still professes to be unsure. "It's hard for me to say this, but I'm curious about men. But you know, I have relationships with women," he said. "I'm basically an asexual. I'm not driven by sex. I mean, God, I could probably count on a couple of hands _ besides my marriage itself _ how many sexual encounters I've had my entire life." About five years ago West began to use the Internet to explore his homosexual attractions. "It was just a curiosity thing," West said. "Then you get in there and you chat with people and they don't know who you are and you don't know who they are. In some cases, you're just teasing them, razzing them." When West talks about his online relationships, he speaks as if it is technology that draws him in; the computer is the force he feels, not a magnetic pull to young men. He said the Internet leads to isolation, reduces inhibitions and takes away a needed sense of shame. "It just lowers all those social norms potentially," West said. That's why he felt compelled to apologize to the citizens of Spokane. "I think for many people I let them down," West said, "They knew me, but they didn't know everything _ sitting at home, being bored, getting online and chatting with people instead of watching TV or reading a good book or whatever. You know, not very proud of it. "So, that's wrong. And then chatting with 'motobrock' who was an 18-year-old _ started out fairly innocent, but went where it shouldn't have. And that was wrong." To repent, he says, he has sworn off the Internet and sex. "It created this cleft, this fault, that this was like, wow, that is a place I can't go to anymore: the Internet or any kind of sexual relationship with anybody." The transcripts of West's online chats obtained by The Spokesman-Review are thick with sexual innuendoes, explicit cybersex and ramblings about living a closeted and sexually confused life. "It's role-playing. I mean, it's like a game," West said. But the persona he chose wasn't vastly different from his real life. He described himself as middle-aged and generally accurately described his interests and background. He said he worked in a business related to marketing and traveled a lot and had occasion to meet famous people. He said his name was Jim. "If you're going to role-play, why would you play someone just like yourself?" asked Ryan Oelrich, 24, a Spokane man who chatted with "therightbi-guy" and "Cobra82nd," West's salute to his army division. And as the case with other chats, "therightbi-guy" and "Cobra82nd" would bring up the mayor. "He'd say, 'Did you see the mayor on the news today? He's a big, fat, ugly man, isn't he?'" Oelrich said. Before Oelrich knew West's identity, the mayor went to a friend of the young man's and told him to have Oelrich apply for a seat on the city Human Rights Commission. West initially offered Oelrich the chairmanship. Oelrich turned that down but accepted a position on the commission. Eventually, Oelrich confronted West in his online persona and the mayor confirmed who he was. He asked Oelrich to keep his identity secret. After West admitted who he was, Oelrich says, the mayor's online behavior became more aggressive _ bordering on stalking. Oelrich, who sees his appointment now as part of a clumsy seduction, resigned and filed a discrimination complaint with the commission. The commission found West acted inappropriately but did not find that Oelrich had been discriminated against. West denied any wrongdoing. Oelrich said he urged West to quit hiding his homosexuality.

"I don't think he ever would come out," Oelrich said. "The answer was, 'No, there is no way I can achieve the dreams I have if I was openly gay.'" ___ It's a Sunday afternoon in April and West is on his computer, chatting under the cover of one of his screen names, jmselton. jmselton: we trust each other right? motobrock34: of course After months of sporadic online chats, according to The Spokesman-Review transcript, West sent his photograph to someone he thought was a Spokane high-school senior. motobrock34: what is that? jmselton: this is me They were to meet for the first time the next day. The online and real-life Jim West were ready to merge. The two were going to meet for a round of golf the next morning. Instead, West was watched by a photographer for The Spokesman-Review and the paper's computer consultant as he looked around for "motobrock." The computer setup was a ruse _ a word Smith, The Spokesman-Review's editor, prefers to "sting" _ arranged by the newspaper. That tactic has generated plenty of heat. Some journalists and academics criticized the paper for what they saw as a form of entrapment. West has also made much of the fact that one of the chat transcripts was clearly jumbled and incomplete. He was right, despite a column by the paper's online publisher jabbing hard at West for raising the issue in June and stating the paper "won't always sit quietly when statements are being made about us that we believe to be patently false." The transcript was corrected last month, four months after West's complaint. An editor's note was attached to another transcript July 2 saying that because of technical difficulties the paper's computer expert lost the electronic record of the part of the chat where West first made the offer of an internship to "motobrock." Instead, the expert had to rely on his notes for that allegation that has become central to the recall. Two sources of the most serious allegations also tell conflicting stories of how one of them says he came to be molested by West. The discrepancy is clear from interviews and a deposition with two men that The Spokesman-Review posted on its Web site as part of its investigation of West. Michael Grant says David Hahn, West's fellow sheriff's deputy and close friend, picked him up one day in his departmental car, molested him, and later introduced him to West. Robert Galliher, who also alleges West raped him, says that Grant told him it was West, not Hahn, who picked him up that day in a sheriff's car, in uniform, and molested him. The discrepancy has never been mentioned in any of the newspaper's stories. Smith said he does not think that is a substantive conflict and that the newspaper has tried to be straightforward about how memories of events of 25 years ago can be hazy. Smith did put one thing in the paper he's sorry for. In June he wrote a column _ under the headline "Civic Response to West a Model of Timidity" _ scolding Spokane residents for a lack of appropriate outrage at West. He aimed this barb at the Catholic Church: "Are clergy embracing the mayor because this previously and admittedly irreligious politician now has found Jesus and won the Lord's forgiveness?"

Smith believes what he wrote, but says that coming under his name it made the story too personal and made things harder for his reporters. Smith concedes that the tone of some of the news stories in the early coverage was over-amped. Also, at one point, he asked columnist Doug Clark to back off the story a bit. (Clark made The Spokesman-Review's crusade a multimedia _ and R-rated _ affair with a parody song posted on the paper's Web site, "I Did It Bi Way.") Smith says the West tale has followed an unpredictable arc: It started with shocking allegations of pedophilia and Internet cruising. Then the story went through a bizarre stage with stories, for example, about whether West masturbated in his office and the like. "I don't think anyone can argue on the absurd angle," Smith said. West's story now, he said, is "just grindingly pathetic and sad and dismal." On a recent Friday morning, West greeted a visitor at City Hall by saying what his looks hinted at. "I pulled an all-nighter." Why? "Just doing stuff." There's not even sleep to relieve his isolation. His father, Jack, is 80 and lives in town. They see each other occasionally but have yet to talk about the scandal engulfing West. After West's career in public office, many of his friends are political people. And political people run from trouble. West has heard very little from those he served with in the Legislature. He understands that. "I'm going to be protective of them. I'm a friend first," he said. "They haven't turned against me, said things against me. But they don't need my baggage and I'm not going to give it to them." Psychoanalysis, he says, "is not me." That leaves his newfound religion. "I've repented," he says. And that includes a relationship with God that began with the pre-scandal cancer diagnosis. He joined Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, a predominately black church in the neighborhood where West grew up. West began attending after Pastor Lonnie Mitchell Sr. invited him during a mayor's prayer breakfast. West feels welcome there. On a recent Sunday he is greeted by first name, as "Mr. Mayor" and with the occasional hug. His guest was pulled aside by an elderly woman and told firmly, "You pray for him." The congregation is racially diverse. West claps to the gospel music with some self-consciousness. (He points out a white man who, he says, "is the only white guy here with real rhythm.") Mitchell announces his sermon by saying he wants to talk about something so powerful "sometimes we even love it more than God. What is it that's so much fun? It's sin." Specifically, Mitchell charts a course of sin from watching scantily clad women on MTV _ "a foothold to the devil" _ to looking at dirty movies and becoming subsumed in the online world. "The next thing you know you are looking at things on the Internet you had no idea existed. You better stop peeking. Peeking will get you hurt," Mitchell bellowed in his full crescendo. "Peeking will mess your mind up. Peeking will set you apart from everybody." The pastor warns his congregation that if they are not in right standing with God only hell awaits. And hell is "a real place," Mitchell promises. And, he warns, "it's hot." There are lots of "amens" and heads nodding and parishioners urging Mitchell on. The mayor listens and says quietly, "He's talking to me."

___ THE ALLEGATIONS IN THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW Accusations of molestation: Two men told the newspaper they were molested by West decades ago, when he was a deputy sheriff and Boy Scout leader. They say they also were molested by West's good friend and fellow deputy David Hahn, who later committed suicide. The statue of limitations has expired on any potential crime, and there is no police investigation. Accusations of misuse of office: The Spokesman-Review stories have alleged that West used his mayoral powers to try to entice young men into sexual relationships, including offering an internship to the newspaper's hired computer expert who was posing as a Spokane high-school boy in online chats with West. The stories also allege that West used his city computer to cruise for men online. An investigator hired by the City Council says West violated city and state laws. The FBI also is investigating. Accusations of hypocrisy: Newspaper articles have asserted West's political and private lives were hypocritical, since he voted against civil-rights protections for gays as a state legislator but had sex with men. ___ Visit The Seattle Times Extra on the World Wide Web at http://www.seattletimes.com/ LOAD-DATE: December 2, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH KR-ACC-NO: K4899 JOURNAL-CODE: SE Copyright 2005 Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service Copyright 2005 The Seattle Times

179 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Seattle Times November 27, 2005 Sunday Fourth Edition

Even the mayor wonders: Who is the real Jim West?
BYLINE: David Postman, Seattle Times chief political reporter SECTION: ROP ZONE; News; Pg. A1 LENGTH: 4413 words Spokane Mayor Jim West is fighting many battles, from accusations of sexual abuse to ravages of a lifethreatening illness. As he prepares for his recall election, he discusses how, much like his own city, he struggles with self-doubt and an uncertain identity.

SPOKANE Only one name appears on the ballot in this city's Dec. 6 recall election: Mayor Jim West. But which West will voters have in mind when they decide whether to dump the first-term mayor? The professional politician who was leading the city to a long-overdue renaissance? Or "therightbi-guy," one of the names the mayor used while cruising online for young men? Or darker still, the former sheriff's deputy and Boy Scout leader who stands accused of molesting young boys decades ago? In this toughest campaign of a 25-year political career, West says he's pitted against a caricature of himself drawn by recall sponsors and The Spokesman-Review, the local newspaper that since May has published nearly 150 stories about West, reporting allegations that he used his position as mayor to lure young men and that West sexually abused boys decades ago. "I have no opponent other than the person they created who is supposedly me," West said. The mayor created his own "imaginary person" through which he lived a vast and secret online life. But he says it would also be unfair for voters to judge him as that character. "What it really allows me to do is be somebody I'm not," West said. But even he has difficulty sorting out the real from the make-believe. "And this is weird. This is incredibly weird for me. This is an imaginary person and this is a real person," he said, pointing with a finger on each hand. "And there are points in time where they cross over a little bit. But few and far between." Politicians in scandals of this proportion often quickly resign, go off to seek counseling or detoxification or plow on with blanket denials. West, though, has been talking more and more about his conflicted sexuality and self-doubt in ways almost unheard of for a candidate on the campaign trail. He also follows one well-worn path: Blame the newspaper. West's first campaign fundraising appeal focused on The Spokesman-Review which sparked controversy by hiring someone to pose as an online teenager to expose West and its editor, Steven Smith: "Are Steven Smith and The Spokesman-Review the ultimate authority in Spokane or is it the people? The choice is ours." For his part, Smith is surprised the scandal has burned so long. "There are days I feel Mayor West is just making it too easy and that we are in a position of having to continue to write these stories," Smith said. "Now I think that's his responsibility, not ours." Smith says West could have saved himself further scrutiny by resigning. "But nevertheless," Smith said, "you've got to ask yourself periodically, how do I feel about this? And there are days I don't feel really great about it. Proud of our journalism. But I just feel like this guy is standing up there and allowing us to whack away at him. "And we're grinding him into dust." That last sentence is said without boast. It's Smith's assessment of where the story has gone. West has cancer. So many elements are at play in the West saga that it's easy to forget that. He was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2003. It quickly spread to his liver. He has had four surgeries and is on his fourth round of chemotherapy. It's clear he's not well. He's regained much of the weight he originally lost, though he looks more bloated than robust. There's a gray pallor to his skin, and his hair is clumped in thin patches. There doesn't seem to be any loss of energy. He's as eager as ever to talk about backroom machinations, political intrigue and how he most recently outsmarted the opposition. His love for political gamesmanship helped make West one of the most powerful Republican figures in Olympia. He spent 20 years in the Legislature, rising to chair the powerful Senate Ways and Means Commit-

tee and serving as the Senate majority leader. But mayor of Spokane is the job he always dreamed of holding. Early in his tenure, West was hailed by The Spokesman-Review and local leaders for bringing a professionalism to the office. Even after the sexual-misconduct allegations, he was named "Best Local Official" in Spokane Coeur d'Alene Living magazine. "Reprehensible actions aside, the guy can lead and readers still seem to respect him for all the good he has done for the city," the magazine wrote. Not a great review. But good enough for a mayor in trouble that the magazine sits outside West's office on the fifth floor of City Hall with a Post-it on the page and the entry highlighted in yellow. Looking out his office window, West points to where the Monroe Street Bridge and the city's refurbished tramway crisscross the Spokane River. The reopening of the 90-year-old bridge was a high point in the nascent West administration. After the scandal broke, his staff asked West if he wanted to forgo the balloons and the band and instead have a simple ribbon cutting or maybe no public appearance at all. "I said, `We're going to have a three-day party,' " West recalled. And they did. But as quickly as he turns away from the window, he grabs a transcript of one of his online chats with The Spokesman-Review's hired computer expert who was posing as a local high-school boy going by the handle "motobrock34." Nearby is a pile of letters and e-mails from supporters, including former Scouts, testifying to West's soundness and wishing him well. There is an audio copy and a transcript of his interview with The Spokesman-Review that he pores over looking for discrepancies. Battling the allegations gives him strength, he says, to fight cancer. Last May, West's political world began unraveling after The Spokesman-Review reported on two men who say West molested them in the 1970s when they were young boys in Spokane. Both say they were also molested by West's good friend and fellow sheriff's deputy, David Hahn. West has denied those charges. In one interview he offers a circumstantial argument against those claims: If he were an abuser there'd be more victims coming forward. The newspaper, with its aggressive search for more victims, would have found someone else. "Where are they? Pedophiles don't abuse just one person," West said. "Maybe in a case of an uncle abusing or a father or something abusing a family member, but pedophiles who abuse strangers don't abuse one person." But there is mystery even to West about his past. Can he understand how strange it looks to some that he worked with two men Hahn and another fellow Scout leader, George Robey Jr. who both committed suicide after being suspected of sexually abusing children? "And don't you think that maybe made me to question, `What's wrong with me?' " West said. Pressed to elaborate, West demurred, then said, "What was it about me that caused this to happen? Or not to cause it to happen, but had these people lined up? Was it just being [in the] cosmic space in the wrong place at the wrong time?" Any crime committed in the 1970s would be beyond the statute of limitations. Because of that, law enforcement, government officials and sponsors of the recall against West have paid little attention to the sexabuse claims the worst accusations West faces. The newspaper, too, has done little to advance those allegations. Instead, much of the public attention and the reporting has focused on a narrower legal question: Whether West misused his office by offering City Hall positions to entice young men into sexual relationships. In one of the initial stories, The Spokesman-Review reported that West had offered an internship to

someone he thought was a high-school senior. After that, others came forward to say West had also offered them city positions. Two weeks ago, an investigator hired by the city concluded those actions had violated city and state laws. West continues to deny the charges. The allegations against West churn dark memories in Spokane. There have been child sex-abuse allegations in the ranks of the Spokane County Sheriff's Office, the Boy Scouts, a ranch for troubled boys and the Catholic Church a diocese so battered by accusations of molestation it has filed for bankruptcy. This scandal is about the mayor's actions, to be sure. But many people talk of what it says about Spokane, its history, its newspaper; about the business community; and about how and why city residents don't demand more from their leaders. The city's power structure has been shaken. The mayor's former business backers and his own Republican Party want him to resign. The newspaper that endorsed West finds itself hailed by former critics as a voice of the people. Still, the city's most powerful groups stood on the sidelines in the days and weeks after The SpokesmanReview exposé. It was Shannon Sullivan, a self-described unemployed, uneducated, single mom from the poor side of town, who organized the recall-petition drive that will culminate in the Dec. 6 election. "It surprised me that we would sit down and take this as a community," Sullivan said. "This good-old-boy thing is going to come to an end. It is the people who took back this city." Some worry a recall will continue the civic unease that has given Spokane an unbroken chain of oneterm mayors since 1974. At stake, they say, is the city's recent success and its efforts to head off life as a branch-office town. Steve Eugster is a former city councilman, attorney and sponsor of the city-charter change that gave Spokane a strong-mayor form of government. He has been one of West's most outspoken defenders a defense that often centers on attacking The Spokesman-Review and says the mayor is being persecuted for his personal life. "You may not like the guy but he is the kind of strong mayor I had in mind when I advanced the strongmayor petition," Eugster said. West's fate has taken on symbolic power in a city longing for change. Spokane has a chronic inferiority complex. It's a complex so universally recognized it's become an icon. Civic self-doubt is Spokane's Space Needle. When Spokane was named an All-America City last fall, The Spokesman-Review editorialized that it was time to get over the complex a complex so rooted here that the newspaper said the same thing when the city first won the award in 1975. "There was widespread abuse of children in this city for years by priests, by sheriff deputies, by Boy Scout leaders some of them the same and you know, you want resolution to that. You do want a white knight to come in and make the bad guys pay in some way," said Jess Walter, a Spokane born-and-bred novelist and former Spokesman-Review reporter. "I certainly know a lot of people for whom getting rid of Jim West will be a step in the right direction. It will speak well of Spokane if we can do that." The newspaper, too, has a past to overcome. Local critics have long been suspicious of power wielded by the Cowles family, which owns the paper and other extensive business holdings. Real-estate dealings have created the most questions for the Cowles family specifically, a downtown shopping mall and parking-garage deal with the city that went sour, causing years of controversy and litigation.

The Spokesman-Review's stories have generated a host of rumors, including an unsubstantiated one that the newspaper investigated West only because the mayor got the better of the Cowles family in a settlement of that litigation. "I've never seen conspiracy theorists like the people who have Cowles conspiracies," Walter said. "If they get the weather wrong they say, `Well, Stacey [Cowles, the publisher] clearly wanted everyone to come inside and shop so they predicted rain.' It's just insanity." Smith, who worked at six other newspapers before becoming editor of The Spokesman-Review in 2003, sees himself as the new sheriff in town. His Stetson is a fedora and he often wears a foreign corespondentissue trench coat. He says there were compromises and ethical lapses under the old regime at the paper, when Cowles' business interests trumped journalism. The paper has written about that since he took over. Smith, 55, sees darker demons to exorcise from the paper's gothic building. He says the paper "failed to actively pursue" stories about sex abuse in Spokane in the 1970s and 1980s, including allegations about the local Catholic Church and church-run organizations. "The result is we put children in danger because you allow situations to continue," Smith said. The publisher of the paper, Stacey Cowles, the son of the man who was in charge of The SpokesmanReview then, isn't so sure. "I can't believe my father would ever have said, `Look, we're not going to go there,' " Cowles said. But after a moment of reflection, Cowles said, "Maybe it's possible." He said that decades ago there were striking religious divisions in town between Catholics and Protestants that the paper may have wanted to avoid stirring up. Like so much about Spokane's past, doubts are just under the surface. As West talks about his life, one pictures a blur of men in uniform. West's father was a postal worker. Young Jim went from the Boy Scouts, where his troop leader was an Air Force man, to join the Army, then the sheriff's department, then returning to the Boy Scouts as an adult leader. West said the system of rules behind those uniforms "definitely makes life simpler." There also is a sense of belonging and camaraderie, he said, that he felt particularly in the Army and the Scouts. They can be tough on a young man, too. West's first Scout leader was a tough disciplinarian. Infractions were dealt with by sending a Scout through "the belt line," a column of Scouts using their belts to whip the offender as he ran down the line. West was born in Oregon but raised in Spokane. As he was about to start his senior year of high school, his father took a job in Reno, Nev., and West wanted to stay behind. A family he didn't know agreed to take him for the year. West attended the University of Nevada, Reno, but dropped out. He stayed behind, though, when his family moved several months later, still living in a fraternity house, the place he had one of his earliest homosexual experiences. West was married from 1990 to 1995. He remains friendly with his ex-wife, who, along with her mother, have donated to West's anti-recall campaign. He said it wasn't until after his divorce that he admitted to himself that he was attracted to men. He still professes to be unsure. "It's hard for me to say this, but I'm curious about men. But you know, I have relationships with women," he said. "I'm basically an asexual. I'm not driven by sex. I mean, God, I could probably count on a couple of hands besides my marriage itself how many sexual encounters I've had my entire life." About five years ago West began to use the Internet to explore his homosexual attractions.

"It was just a curiosity thing," West said. "Then you get in there and you chat with people and they don't know who you are and you don't know who they are. In some cases, you're just teasing them, razzing them." When West talks about his online relationships, he speaks as if it is technology that draws him in; the computer is the force he feels, not a magnetic pull to young men. He said the Internet leads to isolation, reduces inhibitions and takes away a needed sense of shame. "It just lowers all those social norms potentially," West said. That's why he felt compelled to apologize to the citizens of Spokane. "I think for many people I let them down," West said, "They knew me, but they didn't know everything sitting at home, being bored, getting online and chatting with people instead of watching TV or reading a good book or whatever. You know, not very proud of it. "So, that's wrong. And then chatting with `motobrock' who was an 18-year-old started out fairly innocent, but went where it shouldn't have. And that was wrong." To repent, he says, he has sworn off the Internet and sex. "It created this cleft, this fault, that this was like, wow, that is a place I can't go to anymore: the Internet or any kind of sexual relationship with anybody." The transcripts of West's online chats obtained by The Spokesman-Review are thick with sexual innuendoes, explicit cybersex and ramblings about living a closeted and sexually confused life. "It's role-playing. I mean, it's like a game," West said. But the persona he chose wasn't vastly different from his real life. He described himself as middle-aged and generally accurately described his interests and background. He said he worked in a business related to marketing and traveled a lot and had occasion to meet famous people. He said his name was Jim. "If you're going to role-play, why would you play someone just like yourself?" asked Ryan Oelrich, 24, a Spokane man who chatted with "therightbi-guy" and "Cobra82nd," West's salute to his army division. And as the case with other chats, "therightbi-guy" and "Cobra82nd" would bring up the mayor. "He'd say, `Did you see the mayor on the news today? He's a big, fat, ugly man, isn't he?' " Oelrich said. Before Oelrich knew West's identity, the mayor went to a friend of the young man's and told him to have Oelrich apply for a seat on the city Human Rights Commission. West initially offered Oelrich the chairmanship. Oelrich turned that down but accepted a position on the commission. Eventually, Oelrich confronted West in his online persona and the mayor confirmed who he was. He asked Oelrich to keep his identity secret. After West admitted who he was, Oelrich says, the mayor's online behavior became more aggressive bordering on stalking. Oelrich, who sees his appointment now as part of a clumsy seduction, resigned and filed a discrimination complaint with the commission. The commission found West acted inappropriately but did not find that Oelrich had been discriminated against. West denied any wrongdoing. Oelrich said he urged West to quit hiding his homosexuality. "I don't think he ever would come out," Oelrich said. "The answer was, `No, there is no way I can achieve the dreams I have if I was openly gay.' " It's a Sunday afternoon in April and West is on his computer, chatting under the cover of one of his screen names, jmselton. jmselton: we trust each other right? motobrock34: of course After months of sporadic online chats, according to The Spokesman-Review transcript, West sent his photograph to someone he thought was a Spokane high-school senior.

motobrock34: what is that? jmselton: this is me They were to meet for the first time the next day. The online and real-life Jim West were ready to merge. The two were going to meet for a round of golf the next morning. Instead, West was watched by a photographer for The Spokesman-Review and the paper's computer consultant as he looked around for "motobrock." The computer setup was a ruse a word Smith, The Spokesman-Review's editor, prefers to "sting" arranged by the newspaper. That tactic has generated plenty of heat. Some journalists and academics criticized the paper for what they saw as a form of entrapment. West has also made much of the fact that one of the chat transcripts was clearly jumbled and incomplete. He was right, despite a column by the paper's online publisher jabbing hard at West for raising the issue in June and stating the paper "won't always sit quietly when statements are being made about us that we believe to be patently false." The transcript was corrected early this month, four months after West's complaint. An editor's note was attached to another transcript July 2 saying that because of technical difficulties the paper's computer expert lost the electronic record of the part of the chat where West first made the offer of an internship to "motobrock." Instead, the expert had to rely on his notes for that allegation that has become central to the recall. Two sources of the most serious allegations also tell conflicting stories of how one of them says he came to be molested by West. The discrepancy is clear from interviews and a deposition with two men that The Spokesman-Review posted on its Web site as part of its investigation of West. Michael Grant says David Hahn, West's fellow sheriff's deputy and close friend, picked him up one day in his departmental car, molested him, and later introduced him to West. Robert Galliher, who also alleges West raped him, says that Grant told him it was West, not Hahn, who picked him up that day in a sheriff's car, in uniform, and molested him. The discrepancy has never been mentioned in any of the newspaper's stories. Smith said he does not think that is a substantive conflict and that the newspaper has tried to be straightforward about how memories of events of 25 years ago can be hazy. Smith did put one thing in the paper he's sorry for. In June he wrote a column under the headline "Civic Response to West a Model of Timidity" scolding Spokane residents for a lack of appropriate outrage at West. He aimed this barb at the Catholic Church: "Are clergy embracing the mayor because this previously and admittedly irreligious politician now has found Jesus and won the Lord's forgiveness?" Smith believes what he wrote, but says that coming under his name it made the story too personal and made things harder for his reporters. Smith concedes that the tone of some of the news stories in the early coverage was over-amped. Also, at one point, he asked columnist Doug Clark to back off the story a bit. (Clark made The Spokesman-Review's crusade a multimedia and R-rated affair with a parody song posted on the paper's Web site, "I Did It Bi Way.") Smith says the West tale has followed an unpredictable arc: It started with shocking allegations of pedophilia and Internet cruising. Then the story went through a bizarre stage with stories, for example, about whether West masturbated in his office and the like. "I don't think anyone can argue on the absurd angle," Smith said. West's story now, he said, is "just grindingly pathetic and sad and dismal."

On a recent Friday morning, West greeted a visitor at City Hall by saying what his looks hinted at. "I pulled an all-nighter." Why? "Just doing stuff." There's not even sleep to relieve his isolation. His father, Jack, is 80 and lives in town. They see each other occasionally but have yet to talk about the scandal engulfing West. After West's career in public office, many of his friends are political people. And political people run from trouble. West has heard very little from those he served with in the Legislature. He understands that. "I'm going to be protective of them. I'm a friend first," he said. "They haven't turned against me, said things against me. But they don't need my baggage and I'm not going to give it to them." Psychoanalysis, he says, "is not me." That leaves his newfound religion. "I've repented," he says. And that includes a relationship with God that began with the pre-scandal cancer diagnosis. He joined Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, a predominately black church in the neighborhood where West grew up. West began attending after Pastor Lonnie Mitchell Sr. invited him during a mayor's prayer breakfast. West feels welcome there. On a recent Sunday he is greeted by first name, as "Mr. Mayor" and with the occasional hug. His guest was pulled aside by an elderly woman and told firmly, "You pray for him." The congregation is racially diverse. West claps to the gospel music with some self-consciousness. (He points out a white man who, he says, "is the only white guy here with real rhythm.") Mitchell announces his sermon by saying he wants to talk about something so powerful "sometimes we even love it more than God. What is it that's so much fun? It's sin." Specifically, Mitchell charts a course of sin from watching scantily clad women on MTV "a foothold to the devil" to looking at dirty movies and becoming subsumed in the online world. "The next thing you know you are looking at things on the Internet you had no idea existed. You better stop peeking. Peeking will get you hurt," Mitchell bellowed in his full crescendo. "Peeking will mess your mind up. Peeking will set you apart from everybody." The pastor warns his congregation that if they are not in right standing with God only hell awaits. And hell is "a real place," Mitchell promises. And, he warns, "it's hot." There are lots of "amens" and heads nodding and parishioners urging Mitchell on. The mayor listens and says quietly, "He's talking to me." David Postman: 360-943-9882 or dpostman@seattletimes.com Spokane Mayor Jim West Age: 54 Hometown: Spokane Personal: divorced, no children Education: attended University of Nevada, Reno; received bachelor's degree in criminal justice from Gonzaga University Work experience: deputy sheriff, Spokane County; Boy Scout camp director; scuba-shop operator Military experience: joined U.S. Army in 1971, personnel specialist and paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne Division

Political experience Mayor of Spokane: elected in 2003 after an unsuccessful attempt in 2000. State Legislature: state senator, including stint as Senate majority leader, 1987-2003; state representative, 1983-86 First elected office: Spokane City Council, 1980-82 Party affiliation: Republican Previous trouble: agreed to a plea bargain to get misdemeanor harassment charges dropped for a threatening telephone message he left for the head of the state homebuilders association, 1998 The allegations in The Spokesman-Review Accusations of molestation: Two men told the newspaper they were molested by West decades ago, when he was a deputy sheriff and Boy Scout leader. They say they also were molested by West's good friend and fellow deputy David Hahn, who later committed suicide. The statue of limitations has expired on any potential crime, and there is no police investigation. Accusations of misuse of office: The Spokesman-Review stories have alleged that West used his mayoral powers to try to entice young men into sexual relationships, including offering an internship to the newspaper's hired computer expert who was posing as a Spokane high-school boy in online chats with West. The stories also allege that West used his city computer to cruise for men online. An investigator hired by the City Council says West violated city and state laws. The FBI also is investigating. Accusations of hypocrisy: Newspaper articles have asserted West's political and private lives were hypocritical, since he voted against civil-rights protections for gays as a state legislator but had sex with men. LOAD-DATE: November 28, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH GRAPHIC: photo,map; Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times : Jim West's political career reached a pinnacle in 2003 when he was elected mayor of his hometown. Now he faces a recall election. (0397167140) photo,map; Spokesman-Review Editor Steven Smith, right, prepares to talk about his newspaper's work on The Mark Fuhrman Show. Fuhrman, at left, controversial for his police work in the O.J. Simpson case, is a new fan of Smith's, telling the editor, You're on the curve of changing Spokane. There's no one with a spine in this town. (0397167132) photo,map; Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times : Spokesman-Review Editor Steven Smith says coverage of the West story went from shocking, to bizarre and then moved to the point where it's just grindingly pathetic and sad and dismal. West, Smith says, is standing up there and allowing us to whack away at him. (0397167137) photo,map; Spokane Mayor Jim West (0397167155) photo,map; Louie Balukoff / The Associated Press, 1993 : In 20 years in the Legislature, West, shown here in 1993, rose to be chairman of the powerful Senate Ways and Means Committee and was chosen by fellow Republicans to be Senate majority leader. (0397346615) photo,map; Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times : Embroiled in scandal and fighting an aggressive cancer, West puts in long days on the job. Above, he attends a night meeting at a branch library to discuss potential service cuts, launching into a lengthy monologue about his agenda. He's a political machine, library patron Cindy Hval said. (0397167153) photo,map; Stacey Cowles, publisher of The Spokesman-Review, has long been a supporter of West's. I feel very conflicted about Jim and the contrast between his record as a public official and these other allegations and activities, Cowles said. He said it's an important debate for Spokane: We try to act like a real city, and I think any other city would be doing the same. (0397167162) photo,map; A bust of the late publisher William H. Cowles looks out toward the Review Building, which is reflected in windows of the production facility. (0397167168) photo,map; The Seattle Times: Spokane (G0MVV2HN) photo,map; Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times : Jim West, pausing in a discussion about his recall election, says, I made a mistake. It was wrong, you know. I'm sorry for it; not doing it anymore. Let's move on and get

back to running the city. (0397167147) PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Seattle Times Company

181 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) November 20, 2005 Sunday Idaho Edition

Evaluating the paper's coverage;
BYLINE: Richard Roesler Staff writer SECTION: A; Pg. 9 LENGTH: 2975 words To our readers: Mayor Jim West has made The Spokesman-Review his "opponent" in the upcoming recall election. The nature of his campaign puts the newspaper, its staff, journalism and news values in the unusual and uncomfortable position of being part of a major news story. That is a role news organizations strive to avoid. But failing to report the mayor's allegations against the newspaper and examining those allegations as we would examine any politician's campaign issues would be irresponsible. With mail-in ballots in the mail to Spokane voters, this is the appropriate time to report on the issues raised by the newspaper's investigation of the mayor. Olympia Bureau Chief Richard Roesler was assigned the difficult task. His report below was edited by Assistant City Editor David Wasson. None of the principal reporters or editors involved in the West investigation reviewed this story prior to publication. --Tom Woodbury was shopping at Wal-Mart this spring when he saw the headline. "West tied to sex abuse in the '70s, using office to lure young men," it read. Six months and more than a hundred stories later, the 63-year-old retired factory worker still reads the paper every morning. But his initial shock, he said, has given way to something else: distaste and story fatigue. "I think it has been fair," Woodbury said of the coverage. "But how much more do we need to know?" In coffee shops, workplaces, homes and letters to the editor, similar questions have come up repeatedly since May. Is Spokane Mayor Jim West the victim of his own misbehavior and indiscretions, or the victim of a crusading newspaper's witch hunt? And even if the stories are fair, how much is enough? A new poll, paid for by the newspaper and KREM 2 News, suggests that many readers are just as ambi-

valent as Woodbury. Out of more than 1,100 Spokane residents asked, 44 percent said they approve of the paper's coverage of West, while 43 percent said they disapprove. Women and people over age 45 tended to approve; men and younger people tended not to. "He's fair game, but it's maybe a little too much overplayed," said Spokane's Marc Buckley, 33, working downtown on a recent Thursday. "It's been overdone, like the Monica Lewinsky thing. It reminds you of a tabloid." "The coverage was necessary, valuable, and I'm glad they did it," said Paul Lindholdt, an Eastern Washington University English professor. "But as it continues, it gets to be overbearing. It's like they're beating a drum - or using a club." Others, even some of West's longtime fans, say the ongoing coverage and continuing revelations led them to rethink their initial anger at the newspaper. Back in July, for example, Dick Westerman wrote a letter to the editor comparing the reporters to vultures, ambulance-chasing dogs and sharks attracted to blood. Now, after months of additional stories and revelations, he's less sure. "We thought we were supporting a guy as solid as the rock of Gibraltar," Westerman said, "and now we find out that's not the case." 'EITHER SLOPPY OR MALICIOUS' Among those who aren't ambivalent at all: Jim West. "I think they thought they had a story," he said recently, sitting in his fifth-floor office at City Hall. "They found out they didn't, so they had to embellish what they did have." Since the first stories broke, the newspaper has published more than 145 stories about West, plus columns, editorials and dozens of related documents. Humor columnist Doug Clark has repeatedly lampooned the mayor, at one point recording for the paper's Web site a Frank Sinatra knockoff titled "I did it BiWay." Among the recurring themes: *Allegations that West, as a sheriff's deputy in the 1970s, molested two boys. *West, a longtime state lawmaker, repeatedly voted against gay-friendly bills. *Mayor he used his city-owned laptop to visit a gay dating site - that included sexual images - while traveling. *West repeatedly offered city jobs or positions to young men in whom he was sexually interested. One, purportedly a Spokane high school senior in a gay chat room, was in fact a computer expert hired by the newspaper to confirm a real 19-year-old's report that he had met West in the same chat room and had consensual sex. "In my view, the story remains all about protecting young people, protecting children," said the paper's top editor, Steve Smith. "? The issue is not dating sites. The issue is trying to date teenagers when you're the 54-year-old mayor of Spokane." West adamantly denies ever molesting anyone. Gay or not, he said, he's a conservative, and voted like one. He said that he has never abused his powers as mayor and that city policy allows banking, e-mailing and other personal use of the computer while traveling on city business. "I was told I could use it for personal use when I traveled," he said. Shortly after the stories broke, West apologized to city employees for bringing shame and embarrassment on the city. But as the coverage mounted, West has said he's the victim of a personal vendetta by the paper, which is printing stories that he asserts are thin on facts and thick on innuendo. "They are either sloppy or malicious, and they're so close to their story they can't see it," he said.

'IF THEY CAN DO THIS TO ME ?' In a recent interview, West pointed to a stack of printouts of the paper's stories and transcripts. Many were marked up heavily with a red pen. He pointed to the first sentence of the first story: "For a quarter century, the man who is now Spokane's mayor has used positions of public trust - as a sheriff's deputy, Boy Scout leader and powerful politician - to develop sexual relationships with boys and young men." "Stated as fact! That's a blatant falsehood," West said. Not until seven paragraphs later does the story mention that West, asked if he has ever abused a child, said, "Never. Never. Absolutely not." West leafed through the newspaper's transcript of his Feb. 19 online chat with the "student." Parts of the conversation are clearly not in the correct order. "Your computer consultant presented this as accurate. But there are breaks," he told an S-R reporter. "Your computer consultant is a ? liar. This is what's going to break you guys." Initially, the paper insisted that all its transcripts were correct. "I'm mystified as to why Mayor West would tell television reporters that the transcripts we've posted online are in any way incomplete," S-R online publisher Ken Sands wrote in a note to readers in July. The paper, he warned, would not sit quietly by in the face of "patently false" statements. The newspaper's editors now say that nine out of 23 printed pages from the Feb. 19 chat were accidentally placed in the wrong order before the transcript was typed up for the paper's Web site, with some sentences also left out. The inadvertent error, they said, had no bearing on the allegations against West. Once the Dec. 6 election is over, West said, he'll sue the newspaper for invasion of privacy and computer trespass. "If they can do this to me," he said, "they can do this to anyone." 'THE FACTS HAVE BEEN THE FACTS' The paper's coverage does have numerous defenders, some of them past critics. "From what I've seen, it's been interesting, it's been pretty thorough, and it's been fair," said John Irby, an associate professor who teaches news reporting and writing at Washington State University. He and others said it's hard for West to claim invasion of privacy when the mayor allegedly used his cityowned computer to look for young men to date while on city trips. "How he could possibly imagine that his privacy had been invaded, as a public figure using public equipment, is beyond me," said Steve Blewett, a journalism professor at Eastern Washington University. "A lot of people think he's being picked on. I don't think so at all," said Ruth Fairline, 82, a temporary worker for Spokane Transit. "When we elect a public official, we elect them for what they are. And he had this little secret and wasn't being honest with us." "The facts have been the facts," said nurse's aide Kevin Boak. "Some people say he's being hounded, but I think the public has a right to know what's going on in the mayor's office." West probably didn't help himself in the public eye when he initially denied, according to an interview transcript, using a city computer to visit the Gay.com Web site. He now admits it. And when the newspaper requested a copy of his hard drive, West's lawyers argued against it. They said the city computer contained images automatically saved while West was browsing on a gay Web site, images that would be "highly offensive to a reasonable person." "This is an issue about a public official who's using public resources to pursue private issues and gains," said Dave Demers, an associate professor at WSU's communications school and a vocal critic of the paper in the past. "?You can't make a privacy argument if you're downloading sexual pictures of naked people onto your computer."

'UNDERCOVER JOURNALISM' The paper's decision to put a fake student in the chat room was criticized this spring by several prominent editors at larger papers, who called it wrong for newspapers to deceive people. "We are not private investigators, we are journalists," Philadelphia Inquirer editor Amanda Bennett told the trade journal Editor & Publisher. "This is a form of undercover journalism that, thankfully, went out of vogue in the early 1980s," Baltimore Sun editor Tim Franklin told the magazine. According to the newspaper's new poll, which was released Saturday, many readers also are uneasy about the newspaper's tactic. Asked when, if ever, a newspaper is justified in using deception, 40 percent of city residents said never. Another 42 percent said such deception "might" be justified on rare occasions if there's no other way to confirm information. Just 1 percent of those polled said that a newspaper should use deception "whenever necessary." Spokesman-Review Editor Steve Smith's response to critics: The paper needed positive proof that the person online - who went by the name "RightBi-Guy" and "JMSElton" - was in fact Mayor West. Under the circumstances, Smith said, "I knew of no alternative then, and I know of no alternative now." "I think it fits into a long history of investigative journalism in the United States, which historically has provided really useful information to the public," said Susan Ross, a media expert at WSU, "but often really tiptoes on the line that makes most professional journalists feel squeamish." "You already had evidence that he was doing it," said Jorma Knowles, a 21-year-old student skateboarding near City Hall on a recent afternoon. "From my view, entrapment is trapping someone into doing something they wouldn't have done." 'IT'S OVERKILL' Still, even some of those who see the story as legitimate say they think the paper is overplaying its hand. They object to the tone of the coverage and what they say is a steady cascade of loaded language and headlines hammering West. "A cloak of secrecy was placed Tuesday over the City Council's investigation of alleged 'workplace misconduct' by Mayor Jim West," one story began. "West denies sex act in City Hall," read one banner headline. "Panel says West actions bad," read another. One story aired critics' contention that West had launched a public-relations campaign, citing - among other things - a boosterish annual speech and his presence at a ceremony for completion of a street project. "Civic response to West a model of timidity," read the headline on one column, which described West's attorneys as "hired-gun lawyers." "Our reluctance to pass judgment mind-boggling," read another. Ross, at WSU, considered canceling her subscription over a banner story that said West's city computer contains sexual images. "Computer records show Mayor Jim West's taxpayer-owned laptop contained links to images of men engaged in sex acts with other men," the story began. The next sentence described the images as "close-ups of male genitalia" and "sexually explicit poses by various men, many of them in their 20s." To her, that's unnecessarily loaded language. "I get the sense," she said, "that there's sort of a media vigilantism going on." To Lindholdt, at Eastern, it's as if the paper is trying to compensate for lost credibility over thin early reporting on River Park Square - a controversial downtown project involving the newspaper's owners - by being

"overzealous" now. "And it's overkill," he said. CREDIBILITY AND TRANSPARENCY Smith said the paper has toned down some of its coverage. An oft-repeated four-paragraph recitation of the allegations against West, he said, was shortened to two sentences after reader complaints. "I think there have been times, in all of the stories we've done, when we might have engaged in hyperbole," he said. "We tried very hard in the editing after the first few weeks to be aware of that." And many of the stories, he said, have been coverage of West's reactions, not a rehashing of the allegations. More than 20 of the stories have been largely about West's press conferences, statements, legal arguments and accomplishments as mayor. Still, Smith said, reporters are trained to provide detail. In the story cited by Ross, he said, it wouldn't have been enough to simply say the images were sexually graphic. "At some point you have to explain what those images are, and if you're going to do that, you might as well put it in the lead," he said. "We're dealing with some pretty unpleasant stuff, and it's better to be specific about it than be vague and leave it to people's imaginations." The newspaper posted an unusual amount of its source materials - interview transcripts, depositions, chat room conversations - on its Web site to let readers judge for themselves. Smith has written columns and taken part repeatedly in online chats to explain the paper's coverage of West. To Demers, a former reporter, the paper is being overly defensive. "I think Smith feels like he has to defend everything all the time," he said. "Just let it go. It goes along with the territory." "I understand the argument; we've had those debates in-house," Smith said, citing a similar internal debate over whether to report the story you're reading now. But today's readers expect to be more involved in news and determinations of honesty than in the past, he said. "The newspaper that just says, 'We stand by our story' and stops there," he said, "is not doing justice to this interactive society that we live in - and does not help its credibility." 'THIS IS NOT THE FAMILY' Some readers have theorized that the newspaper's coverage of West is linked to West's role in settling the longstanding dispute between the city and the Cowles family, which owns the newspaper. Not the case, according to Smith, publisher Stacey Cowles and West himself. "On the one hand, you've got critics who say the family profited from the settlement," Smith said. "They can't turn around and then say, 'They're out to get the mayor because of the settlement.'" "Everyone wants to put this on the family," West said. "This is not the family. This is about Steve Smith and (investigative reporters) Bill Morlin and Karen Dorn Steele." Cowles said the story has put him in a difficult spot - he likes West, although he said he thinks what the mayor's done has been "tragic." "I guess my personal feeling is I wish we weren't having to cover something like this," Cowles said. Personally, he said, he thinks the paper has positioned some of the stories too prominently in the paper. But the stories themselves, he said, have been thorough and careful. "I have no say in terms of what appears in the pages of the daily newspaper, with the exception of the editorial column," Cowles said. Starting about a year ago, Smith periodically updated him on the brewing story, he said, but he had no involvement in it. "I respected the newsroom's independence and integrity in pursuing the story," he said.

'HE THOUGHT HE'D GET A PULITZER' In a letter to supporters and in interviews, West has portayed the paper's coverage as a personal vendetta. Smith has made it personal, West said, by giving speeches and interviews about the coverage and by writing a June 19 column criticizing local educators and the clergy for failing to take a public stance against West. "He thought this was probably a two-month story that he'd get a Pulitzer Prize for," West said about Smith. "I pissed him off by staying here." Smith said there's nothing personal about it. He and the paper, he said, are handy targets for an embattled politician. He now wishes someone else had written the column, he said, but stands by what he said. "The whole thing is disappointing and distressing, and it breaks my heart to be involved in uncovering his behavior," Smith said. He's disappointed and dismayed by the allegations, he said, "but there's no vendetta involved." He said he doubts that West will ever file the lawsuit. For one thing, he said, courts have judged Internet conversations to not be private. Secondly, he said, the state law that prohibits recording a phone conversation without all parties' consent doesn't apply to Internet chats. The paper has lost about 40 to 50 subscribers over the West coverage, Smith said - a fairly small number given a newspaper's constant subscriber turnover. West - who early on described the story as "a brutal outing" - said that the coverage would have a very different tone if he weren't gay. "If I had to go to match.com or eharmony.com, would this be the same story? No," he said. Blewett, the Eastern professor, disagreed. "I don't think that the story was, 'Is West gay?'" He said. "The story was, 'Is West a sexual predator?' There was enough smoke there that it's the job of the newspaper to find out if there's any fire." LOAD-DATE: November 23, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Richard Roesler can be reached at (360) 664-2598 or by e-mail at richr@spokanenews.net. GRAPHIC: Using deception PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

182 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Salt Lake Tribune November 18, 2005 Friday

Ex-Boy Scout leader is charged with abusing a teenage troop member

SECTION: UTAH; Pg. B9 LENGTH: 140 words A former Boy Scout leader has been charged with sodomizing one of the members of his Tooele County troop. Tooele County prosecutors on Nov. 4 charged Nicolas Kurtis Barnard, 22, with two-first degree felony counts of sodomy on a child. The counts stem from two occasions at Barnard's home when he was a Boy Scout leader, said Tooele County sheriff's Detective Jim Dekanich. Barnard, of Tooele, had befriended the 13-year-old Boy Scout and started to give him gifts. The boy's mother became suspicious of what was going on and called the Sheriff's Office on Nov. 2, Dekanich said. Barnard was arrested Nov. 3. He also worked at Hollywood Connection in West Valley City, where he was involved with a hockey team and ran an overnight camp. Dekanich asked people who believe their child may be a victim to call him at 435-843-3336. -- Justin Hill LOAD-DATE: November 18, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Salt Lake Tribune All Rights Reserved

183 of 265 DOCUMENTS Buffalo News (New York) November 8, 2005 Tuesday FINAL EDITION

POLICE & COURTS - Final
SECTION: LOCAL; Pg. B3 LENGTH: 735 words Two sought in robbery of Sunoco station

East Aurora police are looking for two armed robbers who took an undetermined amount of money from a Main Street service station shortly after midnight. The two thieves wielded a shotgun and handgun when they entered the Sunoco station at 175 Main St., police said. Police are looking for a white male, about 5 foot 7 and 200-plus pounds with reddish sideburns, and a black male, about 5 foot 11 and 160 pounds, according to Detective Lt. Steven Bierut. The robbers were last seen running from the station at about 12:08 a.m. ----Sex abuse of Scouts gets 12 1/2-50 years LITTLE VALLEY -- James Molyneaux, a retired Portville teacher, was sentenced Monday to 121/2 to 50 years in prison for sexually abusing five members of a Boy Scout troop he once led. Cattaraugus County Judge Larry M. Himelein imposed the sentence on Molyneaux, 62, based on his July 19 conviction on five child sodomy and sex abuse counts involving incidents in 1997 and 2000 at a Franklinville camp and Molyneaux's Portville home. Molyneaux retired in July 2000 as a sixth-grade English teacher at Portville Central School. He has been jailed without bail since the jury verdict. During a three-day trial, two of the victims, now 16 and 21, testified about the attacks. The two were 12 and 13 at the time of the crimes. ----Four counts of rape bring term of four to 12 years ALBION -- A man who pleaded guilty to four counts of rape in a scheme in which his victims sold drugs for him was sentenced Monday in Orleans County Court to four to 12 years in prison. Ronald Nichols, 26, of Maple Road, Lyndonville, entered his guilty plea in August. He was handed consecutive sentences of two to six years on two second-degree rape charges. Orleans Judge James P. Punch also ordered that terms of one to three years for a third-degree rape charge and two to six years on a second-degree rape charge be served concurrently. Nichols committed the crimes in 2003 and 2004. His victims ranged in age from 13 to 15. ----Injured worker awarded $1.64 million by jury Vincent Tronolone, a Buffalo-area construction worker who suffered permanent neck and shoulder injuries when he fell off a scaffold during the renovation of the Praxair property in the Town of Tonawanda, has been awarded $1.64 million by a Buffalo jury, court officials and his attorneys said Monday. After a two-week negligence trial before State Supreme Court Justice Joseph R. Glownia, the jury ordered Praxair to pay Tronolone, 50, for the injuries that ended his career as a unionized construction laborer. Mark H. Cantor, Marc C. Panepinto and Charles H. Cobb, Tronolone's attorneys, said he has been unable to work since he fell off a poorly installed scaffolding while working for a subcontractor at the site at East Park Avenue at about 2 p.m. May 31, 2001. Tronolone was on a crew doing remedial work and the removal of radioactive contaminants on the Praxair property left over from the Manhattan Project during World II. Currently, Tronolone is able to work only sedentary jobs because of his injuries, Cantor said. Court officials said attorneys for Praxair are expected to appeal the jury verdict. -----

School Board member denies confrontation JAMESTOWN -- Jamestown School Board member Deann Nelson pleaded not guilty Monday to seconddegree unlawful imprisonment connected to an alleged confrontation with a district official in the Fourth Street administration building. School Superintendent Ray Fashano said that at about 11 a.m., Nelson stopped Human Resources Director Karen Peterson from leaving her own office. Nelson was there to obtain some information she had requested, said Fashano, who termed the confrontation "disturbing." Nelson was released on her own recognizance Monday. She faces a pretrial conference Dec. 20. ----Girl, 12, charged in stabbing of other girl A 12-year-old Buffalo girl was arrested Monday and charged with stabbing a 14-year-old girl in her left chest on Sunday night, police said. The victim, whose identity was not released, was treated in Women and Children's Hospital. Her injuries are not believed to be life-threatening. Ferry-Fillmore District Officer Paul Mullen arrested the girl, whose name was not released as a young offender, and charged her with assault and criminal possession of a weapon. Ferry-Fillmore District police said the attack occurred at about 6:50 p.m. at the victim's home on Shepard Street. LOAD-DATE: November 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Briefs PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Buffalo News

184 of 265 DOCUMENTS Buffalo News (New York) November 8, 2005 Tuesday NIAGARA EDITION

Sexual abuse of Scouts gets 12 1/2-50 years
BYLINE: By Matt Gryta - NEWS STAFF REPORTER SECTION: LOCAL; Pg. B3 LENGTH: 209 words

James Molyneaux, a retired Portville teacher, was sentenced Monday to 121/2 to 50 years in prison for sexually abusing five members of a Boy Scout troop he once led. Cattaraugus County Judge Larry M. Himelein imposed the sentence on Molyneaux, 62, based on his July 19 conviction on five child sodomy and sex abuse counts involving incidents in 1997 and 2000 at a Franklinville camp and Molyneaux's Portville home. Jailed without bail since the jury verdict, Molyneaux did not comment during the sentencing. He retired in July 2000 as a sixth-grade English teacher at Portville Central School. Jay D. Carr, the Olean lawyer who prosecuted the case as a special prosecutor after Cattaraugus County District Attorney Edward Sharkey cited a conflict of interest, could not be reached to comment after the sentencing. During a three-day trial, two of the victims, now 16 and 21, testified about the attacks. The two were 12 and 13 at the time of the crimes. A Little Valley jury deliberated less than three hours before finding Molyneaux guilty of first- and seconddegree sodomy in two 2000 incidents and of first- and second-degree sodomy and first-degree sex abuse in three 1997 incidents. Court officials said an appeal is expected. e-mail: mgryta@buffnews.com LOAD-DATE: November 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Buffalo News

185 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Guardian (London) - Final Edition November 3, 2005 Correction Appended

G2: Saying it with flowers: Before 1997 they were almost unknown in this country but Diana's death unleashed a flood of flowers and since then floral tributes have popped up on lampposts, trees and bridges across the country. What do they tell us about the changing British way of death?
BYLINE: Blake Morrison and Rosie Anderson SECTION: Guardian Features Pages, Pg. 8 LENGTH: 4197 words

You pass them on concrete urban highways or hedge-lined country roads, a fading bouquet tied to a lamppost or a gaudy array of still- cellophaned blooms, and, however brief the glimpse, the heart always sinks a little at the symbolism. Someone Died Here. And whoever it was didn't die peacefully, in the fullness of age, but suddenly, violently, without warning. Until 10 years ago, roadside floral tributes were virtually unknown in Britain. Now there are parts of the country where you can't go half a mile without seeing them. In my part, south-east London, I recently passed three new ones within a week and it wasn't as if I was looking out for them. That's how they work, by catching you (just as those they commemorate were caught) unawares. Over time you can become almost immune to the wayside shrines you know but then, out of nowhere, there will be a new one, attached to a railing or a tree or (these are the worst) a B elisha beacon, and that shadow will pass over again: Someone Died Here. The majority commemorate road-crash victims. But some are more exotic: on Upper Street, Islington, in north London, outside a 24-hour supermarket, the spot where a young man collapsed after being stabbed; in a park in Reading, the bench where a schoolgirl was murdered; on the Orwell Bridge in Suffolk, where a man jumped to his death; and outside King's Cross, by Edgware Road and in Tavistock Square, the tributes to those killed by terrorist bombs on 7/7. The who, when and how aren't always clear, even if you stop to look. But the flowers sanctify the death-spot: whatever happened, this is where. Lilies, roses, tulips, carnations, sunflowers, all varieties of flower can serve. Often the flowers have withered and died, as they would at a graveside, adding to the sense of melancholy. But flowers are only part of the tribute - the least personal part, in fact. There are also teddy bears and fluffy toys; T-shirts, team jerseys and football scarves; laminated photos of the victim or his/her celebrity idol; even favourite brands of beer and cigarette packets, competing with the wind-blown litter. Beer cans seem in poor taste, where drink has contributed to the fatality. But sometimes broken glass and smashed-up car parts are included, too. You never quite know what you are going to find. Unlike grave slabs, the memorials change from day to day. Then there are the words, insufficient to measure up to the calamity, but eloquent in their very ineloquence: here was a life - chances are, a young life - abruptly cut short; and here are mourners too young or raw with grief to take that in. "Why?" usually features, with a range of different inflections, from the hysterical to the existential: why my son/daughter/husband/wife? Why someone so young? So randomly? So cruelly (an innocent killed by another's recklessness or malevolence)? Why at all, in a universe overseen by a supposedly benevolent God? Verses are common, too, poorly rhymed, misspelled, unpunctuated and all the more authentic for it ("Woke up to hear you past away/Who was to know your day is come so soon"). Whoever the victim, he or she is sure to have been "best" in some way, a peerless mother or saintly child or incomparable mate. Unless the words are spelt out with flowers ("RIP Son") or spraypaint ("Sadly Missed"), reading them requires the passer-by to stop and look. For most people, this is an awkward experience: we can feel intrusive, voyeuristic, as though we've stumbled into a stranger's funeral or a private bedroom. But roadside tributes are public displays. They aren't so much left there as curated. They demand we stop and snoop, so that the anonymous deceased can be granted a posthumous celebrity, 15 minutes of floral fame. As Willie Loman's widow says in Death of a Salesman, "Attention must be paid". If you're a certain kind of person, you will find the clamour of this demand intensely annoying. Julian Barnes described the public reaction to Princess Diana's death as "look-at-me grief"; the magazine Granta spoke of "the fascism of flowers". Roadside memorials (RMs) come from the same school of emotional exhibitionism: the escalation of grief. The young have grown up with them, and take them in their stride, but for anyone whose memory goes back further than 1997 they are bewildering. When did death move out of the cemetery like this? Are British RMs a passing fashion, imported from the continent or the US? Or do they answer a deep spiritual need? What do they tell us about the kind of people we've become? 'I want people to know' Sue Cini got the call every parent dreads one night in March 2003. Her son Lee, aged 20, had been out celebrating Red Nose Day when the car in which he was a passenger was involved in an accident near the north circular in London. Lee's car was moving at less than 20mph when a car came speeding down Bounds Green Road - "a racetrack" Sue calls it - lost control, crossed the white line and smashed into it. Lee and two fellow passengers, Alana Beck and Lisa Hulme, were killed; so were the two occupants of the other car - five

young people dead in a single incident. Today, at the spot, a black metal plaque commemorates Lee, Alana and Lisa - there's no mention of the two young men in the other car. That the plaque has been tastefully done, with a poem under the names ("No farewell words were spoken/No time to say goodbye"), is partly down to Haringey council who were, says Sue, "brilliant" about giving the bereaved families what they asked. But the plaque isn't enough for Sue. Nor, though there are three of them at the site, is the image of a weeping or bleeding anemone and the words Remember Me, on the little sign that the charity RoadPeace puts up, whenever requested, to mark the deaths of road accident victims. About once a month, Sue also brings fresh flowers. Bounds Green Road isn't a congenial place for remembering the dead. The traffic's loud and angry, there's a demolition site across the road, and as Sue, in spitting rain, ties white lilies to the railings, crisp packets and Pepsi cups swirl about her feet. She admits that for a time after Lee's death, she found it impossible to come here without breaking down and that two of Lee's siblings will do anything to avoid the place. But to Sue this anonymous patch of grass, metal and concrete is a sacred site. "Not that I'm religious," she explains, "but Lee took his last breath here and because he never came home that night I need to come here, to understand." On the face of it, Sue is a good example of the new breed of secularised mourner, someone for whom a roadside memorial is more significant than a headstone in a churchyard. But the truth is more complex. Lee was buried in a nearby cemetery, and, after she has finished paying her respects by the roadside, Sue drives me there. Over the grave is a curved, elaborate headstone in black marble, inspired by the website of Bruce Lee, the star after whom her son was named and with a photograph of Lee inscribed in the marble. She runs her hands across it in the rain. This is where she comes to talk to Lee, she says. It's not that one site is more important than the other. Some bereaved people keep a third site, a bedroom at home, which they tend like a shrine. Each site serves its own purpose. Not everyone responds to death as Sue and her family have done. Stern pragmatists would find it too fetishistic: let go, they would say, move on. Yet Sue's demeanour suggests that she has moved on. Yes, she's glad that the other driver, the one who killed Lee, did not survive ("That would have been unbearable, Lee dead and him walking around"), but whatever bitterness she feels has been channelled into a worthwhile cause. In the two years leading up to Lee's death, there were 16 other deaths and serious injuries on the same stretch of road. Sue fought to get chevrons put in, campaigned to get speed cameras installed (there have to be at least four deaths at a spot before the police consider it), and spends time lobbying for RoadPeace so that others don't suffer Lee's fate. The roadside plaque in Bounds Green Road isn't just an act of piety, it's there to serve as a warning. "I can't accept Lee had to die as he did," Sue says. "I want people to know." 'You mark the spot. You own it' Outside Britain, roadside memorials have a long history. In Mexico and the Hispanic south-west of the US, they are called descansos , after the places where pallbearers would rest during a funeral procession the name denotes "the interrupted journey" of life. In Greece they are known as kandylakia , and you often find them on hairpin bends, stone shrines designed like miniature churches, with a votive candle burning inside at night. Most cultures seem to have some version of them, to honour the dead or to banish the evil spirit that stole their lives. No one seems certain when the first roadside floral tribute appeared in this country. There were none for the little girl run over by the school bus in Skipton, when I was a child in the 1960s; and none for my friend Nick Proctor when he died in a car accident one New Year's Eve. The ordinary dead had no memorials then, except in graveyards and local papers. And in the era before grief and trauma counselling, the ordinary bereaved were expected to grin and bear it in the privacy of their own home. There wasn't such an abundance of flowers available, either. Even if there had been, no one would have thought of tying their sorrow to a lamppost. With celebrity or highly publicised deaths, the story was different. The tree on Barnes common where Marc Bolan was killed in 1977 became a shrine. And 20 years later came the death of Princess Diana, when 15,000 tonnes and 50m blooms were piled outside Buckingham and Kensington Palace. In between, in 1984, flowers were laid for WPC Yvonne Fletcher, shot dead during the siege of the Iranian embassy in St James's

Square. And in 1993, after the murder of James Bulger, the people of Liverpool laid flowers on the railway embankment below where the little boy's body was found - among them a red rose from one of the killers, Robert Thompson, who (investigators later claimed) took pains to be seen by television cameras in the hope that his look-at-me-grief might serve as an alibi. It's not surprising when people are impelled to lay flowers by seeing footage of others doing the same. But it's remarkable to watch the vogue for ostentatious mourning taking hold in the private sphere. I've always assumed that those who create roadside memorials are closely related to the victim. But according to Gerri Excell of the University of Reading, total strangers who just happen to live nearby sometimes bring flowers too. She has thought about tying a flower to a lamppost at random, to see if others follow suit. Excell is Britain's leading authority on roadside memorials: the phenomenon of RMs has not gone unnoticed in academe. The first ever international symposium on them took place in New South Wales last year, with papers such as Highway to Heaven: the Cosmology of the Road side Memorial and an exhibition of photographs taken by Sergeant John Robinson of the New Zealand highway patrol. There has been at least one academic study published - Holly Everett's Roadside Crosses in Contemporary Memorial Culture (University of Texas Press, 2002). And needless to say, there are also websites, on which folklorists, semioticians, sociologists and amateur collectors display their findings. Excell noticed her first roadside memorial, by a tree, some 15 years ago. But the tradition has a long history here, she says, mentioning the crosses erected by Edward I in 1290 to mark the stages of the funeral procession of his wife, Eleanor, from Nottinghamshire to London. "What's different now," she says, "is that it isn't just stars and royals who get such treatment, but anyone who dies suddenly and tragically. The area of an accident spot is usually sanitised within an hour or two, with nothing to show a person has gone. So you mark the spot. You take possession and own it. You simultaneously mark your respects and declare your outrage." What intrigues Excell about British RMs is "their lack of religious iconography". In Australia and much of the US, road deaths are marked by white crosses and, although the Aussies sometimes supplement these with macho regalia such as bike helmets and beer cans, the symbolism is mainstream Christian. Here, by contrast, we go for flowers and personal effects. Some British RMs betray their Catholicism with sacred hearts or rosary beds, but most are secular and individualistic, using icons intimately associated with the deceased. "I remember one accident so recent I could see the skid marks and smell the oil," Excell says. "There were bits of tyre on display among the flowers and even sweets from the glove compartment." The pagan, do-it-yourself element in RMs appeals, Excell thinks. "Cemeteries have strict rules about what you can and can't have: no soft toys, no putting "Daddy" (it has to be "Father") no candles, etc. With roadside memorials you can do your own thing. It's not that people have no spiritual beliefs any more, but those beliefs are often eclectic, a bit of Zen here, a bit of Christianity there. And when you've just lost someone in an accident, you can also lose faith in God: how could He have allowed this? So the roadside memorial becomes a better expression of how you feel than a gravestone. "It can also be a way of unifying people. When someone young has died, you find the peer-group holding vigils or leaving notes, or maybe even pouring out a canned drink for their lost friend - "Here, have this one on me". They could never do that in a cemetery." Excell expects the phenomenon to keep growing. "When you've seen someone else create a memorial, it's natural to think you can do it bigger and better. I agree there's an element of me-ism about it and I'm not sure I'd want to do it myself, but how can you tell unless it happens to you?" Though she admires the design of RoadPeace's "Remember Me" signs (now marking over 2,000 accident sites across Britain), she worries about them having a depersonalising or institutionalising effect. In France, thanks to a campaign by the Ligue Contre la Violence Routiere, ghoulish full-size silhouettes or dummies - black with a white surround and red seeping through the head - have recently been erected where motorists died. But in Britain RMs have no official mandate. They are a "bottom-up" phenomenon, Excell says, populism at its most brazen, and further evidence of how traditional hierarchy is losing its grip. 'They shove death in our faces' The anarchic nature of roadside memorials is a worry to those in power. Some local authorities remove

them after a certain period (four weeks at most) and in a few cases offer to put up benches or plant cherry trees instead. But there is no agreed nationwide policy, and most councils are confused as to how to react. The worst feel positively threatened and become draconian in their efforts to ban them. Eric Leeman knows this to his cost. Two years ago, his younger son, Michael, a schoolboy, was killed, along with another passenger, on the A46 near Market Rasen, when the car in which they were travelling hit a tree. It wasn't so much Eric and his wife, Susan, who created a roadside shrine but Michael's schoolfriends. Many personal notes and inscriptions were left. But when Eric came to visit the site just two weeks after the accident, the local council - West Lincolnshire - had already cleared it. Eric wrote letters, argued, campaigned, "tried to remember Michael by doing something". His ambition was to erect a permanent marker of some kind, partly for the purposes of road safety, since fatalities in Lincolnshire are among the highest in the country. The police were all in favour, he says, but the council argued that a sign would distract passing drivers. So Eric took flowers and a crucifix, and put up a RoadPeace sign on his own initiative. Next time he went back, these too were gone. Either the local farmer had removed them or the council had done so on his behalf. "We were told that there's an annual service for road victims in Lincoln cathedral, the Sunday after Armistice Day," Eric says. "But I'm not religious and to me that's no way to remember Michael. Marking the spot would be a solace to us. I'd like to put up a white pole but the council won't wear that, either. We've tried all sorts. But they don't want to know." The council argument that a memorial would be distracting to drivers is, Eric thinks, a feeble excuse: "They allow signs and commercial billboards all over the place. What they don't want to admit is how many road deaths there are on their roads." Brigitte Chaudhry, founder of RoadPeace, agrees: "It's total hypocrisy. The authorities are happy to put up signs that make big money. But if we campaign to put up signs they treat us as troublemakers, and expect us to keep quiet when our children have been slaughtered." Other families around the country feel similarly aggrieved. But it isn't just local authorities that object to roadside memorials. Many motorists hate them, and air their road rage on local radio stations or websites. RMs are macabre, they say; they make the roads seem like one long graveyard or blood-strewn alleyway: "They shove death in our faces and ram it down our throats." Moreover, RMs are themselves a death trap, since they encourage drivers to "rubberneck" and expose pedestrians to undue risk. "I'd rather enjoy the scenery than be reminded of someone else's grief," one man complained. "I've enough grief of my own." In the US these arguments have been raging for years. One radio station in Florida offered listeners $ 100 for every RM torn down and brought to its reception desk. Many states ban them altogether. Others allow them only where drugs or alcohol have been a contributory factor to the accident. Resistance to RMs creates some strange bedfellows. American Christians oppose them because such shrines remove power from the church; American atheists oppose them because of the use of crosses. The issue has become so hotly contested that it has inspired a feature film, Descansos, now in post-production, which "tells the story of opposing viewpoints when two people meet under unusual circumstances involving a roadside memorial". On the basis that where America leads Britain follows, we can expect the issue to become hotter here, too. 'It's an old tradition' "It isn't the English way of doing things', Eric Leeman was told when pushing for a memorial for his son. He doesn't agree: "There are lots of standing stones down lanes, to mark where so-and-so died. It's an old tradition." Eric is right. I remember one such stone, on the eroding sand-cliffs above Dunwich in Suffolk, marking the death, by drowning, of one John Brinkley Easey. The stone has gone now, along with the ground it stood on. But there has always been an urge to mark the byways of innocent deaths. Wordsworth writes about it in his poem The Thorn, which describes a woman wailing, "Oh misery," next to the thorn tree where her baby died. There are some griefs no conventional burial mound can contain. The tradition of ostentatious grieving is an old one, too. In his book The Likes of Us: A Biography of the White Working Class, Michael Collins describes the mourning of eight boy scouts from Walworth in 1912 after they drowned on an outing to Kent: flags flown at half-mast, all work in London docks brought to a halt, the eight bodies brought back along the Thames in a naval vessel by order of the Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, and a crowd close to a million gathering to watch. As Collins says, in those days the English

working class knew how to mourn. And they were mourning their own, not some fabled princess. With our one-minute silences, Aids ribbons and flowing tears, we are said to have become a mawkish culture, post-Diana. But perhaps, deep down, we always were mawkish and the sober rituals that most of us grew up with (the black ties and pursed lips) were just a passing phase. In roadside memorials we have rediscovered our garish heart * Patricia Wilson A22, Willingdon, Eastbourne, July 4 2004 Patricia Wilson was born profoundly deaf but she always got on well. "She was quick to learn and was a little comedian," says her mother Viv Brooks. When Patricia died, she was in the middle of divorcing her husband, with whom she had a daughter Catherine and a son Leigh. "Pat was going through a very sad time. The night of her death, she had sat alone getting into a state. She drove to a friend's, who tried to calm her down," says Viv. But at 12 she left and at 12.30 she had crashed. "They reckon she lost control and the car hit a lamppost and swivelled round to face the direction she came from." She was in hospital for a week, badly brain damaged. Her kidneys failed and she caught pneumonia. In the end she had a massive heart attack. "The first year is so hard. It's afterwards you question all these things. The police asked, 'Do you think she could have done it deliberately?' and her sister, Jackie, said, 'She could have'. Why didn't she talk to us about her problems?" Patricia was very close to her sister Jackie, who "does most of the lamp-post. It's a way of keeping in touch, and we're able to say we're 'just popping up to see Pat' still. I don't want the world to forget her, even though I know it's nothing to do with them." Sharmin Ahmed London, N1, September 30 2005 Fifteen-year-old Sharmin Ahmed was knocked down by a number 19 bus on a zebra crossing in Islington, north London. Sharmin's elder sister Rakki says the family still aren't sure what happened. "Sharmin was doing her first week of work experience at an old people's home in Islington," she says. It was about 1.30pm and "we think she was coming back from lunch when she was hit by the bus. She was dragged along quite a way before the bus stopped, and then taken to the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel." Police informed Sharmin's parents that their daughter had been seriously injured at around 3.15pm. She died at 3.30pm, just after her father arrived at the hospital. Almost immediately people started laying flowers. "We live in Holborn, but Sharmin was at school in Islington at Elizabeth Garrett," Rakki says. "She was really popular, so the flowers have been left by friends at school and everyone who knew her." Fresh flowers are laid almost every day on the crossing. "We've been a few times, and it's nice that people show respect, so it does help to see them," Rakki says, "but in a way it makes it harder because it makes things even more real." Aiden Marley London N1, July 16 2000 In the early hours of the morning on July 16 2000, police were called to Prebend Street, where the smart houses of Islington meet the Packington estate. Residents had reported a fight. Twenty-one-year-old Aiden Marley, a keen amateur boxer, was found lying unconscious on the pavement, just a few minutes away from his own front door. "We think he was called out on his mobile," Father Shaun Lennard, the family's parish priest explains. "He was attacked and hit his head on the curb. He died in hospital." Four men were arrested and bailed and another man went voluntarily to a police station. It is thought that the dispute was over a girlfriend. In 2001, Christopher Bland, 21, was acquitted at the Old Bailey of man-

slaughter. "No one was held responsible in the end," Father Lennard says. "It was not seen as murderous intent." An abundance of flowers appeared almost immediately after the attack, followed by a candlelit vigil every night throughout that summer. Five years later, fresh flowers replace the old ones every couple of weeks. A memorial service for Aiden was held in July this year at the nearby Roman Catholic Church of St John the Evangelist. Rory Blackhall Livingston, August 18 2005 Rory Blackhall disappeared after being dropped by his mother, Michelle, a short way away from his primary school in Livingston, West Lothian. He was found three days later in nearby woodland. He had been asphyxiated. The only suspect - Simon Harris, 37, a loner on bail awaiting trial on sex-abuse charges - was later found hanged at his home. Around 50 bouquets lie by the path that Rory walked to school. Marion Stewart, 53, also from Livingston, is in tears as she places a bunch of purple flowers on the grass. On them, is a plain piece of card which merely says: "WHY?" "I lost my son. He was 25. He fell asleep and never woke up. He had no pain. And I know how I felt. I couldn't even think how this woman and her husband and her whole family felt. I just can't imagine. "I can't remember the name of the flower but I picked the colour purple because it's the highest colour in the spiritual world. I hope it will help. I hope it will help everybody. Even if it's the slightest wee thing." LOAD-DATE: November 3, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH CORRECTION-DATE: November 4, 2005 CORRECTION: * Yvonne Fletcher was shot dead during a protest outside the Libyan embassy in St James' Square in 1984, and not at the Iranian embassy siege, which took place in 1980 at Princes Gate, Kensington (Saying it with flowers, page 8, G2, yesterday). Mira Katbamna wrote the profiles for Sharmin Ahmed and Aiden Marley in the feature. We said in error they were all done by Rosie Anderson. Copyright 2005 Guardian Newspapers Limited

186 of 265 DOCUMENTS Sunday Times (London) October 30, 2005, Sunday White collar criminals BYLINE: Dearbhail McDonald SECTION: Features; Eire News 15 LENGTH: 1810 words

In the wake of the Ferns report the government has promised to pass new laws to protect children, but will the measures go far enough, asks Dearbhail McDonald When the silver Renault 25 reversed at breakneck speed on the main road from Wexford town to Fethard-on-Sea, Patrick Bennett knew that he was in trouble. The 13-year-old was hitchhiking home from Wexford hospital where he had been treated for burns to his face. The man who pulled over and offered him a lift home was Fr Sean Fortune, one of Ireland's most prolific clerical sex abusers. It was 1980 and Bennett was all too aware of the rumours that surrounded Fortune. Local children nicknamed him Batman because of the priest's penchant for appearing ominously out of nowhere in his sweeping black cassock. "Something inside me told me it was him. I didn't want to get into the car but it was late and you could never say no to a priest," said Bennett, now a recovering alcoholic and drug addict. On their journey Fortune asked Bennett about his sexuality and his burns, and offered him a cure, a "magic cream". After masturbating himself, Fortune smeared his semen into the boy's wounds and then dropped him off at home. A week later the Wexford priest tracked down the teenager at a local hotel where he worked, isolated him in a dry goods store, and buggered him. These "minor incidents", as Bennett now describes them, marked the beginning of four years of serial rape. "It was basically whenever and wherever he saw me after that," said Bennett, who now owns a restaurant in Wexford. He estimates that he was raped up to three times a day, three times a week by Fortune. "Three times a day, how can any man physically do that?" he wonders. "I am 39 years old, and I have no control over my bowels. People might not want to read this, but I have to confront the legacy of Sean Fortune every time I go to the toilet. If I do have a solid bowel movement, I feel as if I am being raped again, because I can feel him. I can see him and I can hear him. That's not abuse, it is evil." Last week the diocese of Ferns was branded the most evil Roman Catholic diocese in the world after publication of a report that unveiled a sickening catalogue of more than 100 incidents of child sex abuse by 21 priests over a period of 40 years. The report, the first state inquiry into clerical sex abuse, detailed how predatory paedophiles, protected by their superiors, went to great lengths to "groom" young victims. They set up boy scout movements, youth clubs and introduced FAS schemes; they offered jobs and accommodation to their young targets. The Catholic church provided a perfect haven for their crimes. Indeed many of these paedophiles were attracted to the priesthood precisely because of the unfettered access it gave them to vulnerable children. In the wake of the report, the government has promised enhanced vetting procedures to protect children and vulnerable adults from abuse. But can paedophiles be kept out of the priesthood, and will children ever be entirely safe from clerical abuse? THE full horror of how children were systematically abused in the 100,000 strong diocese of Ferns was unleashed last Tuesday. Much of the abuse was already in the public domain, but the devil lurked in the minute details of new and even well-known allegations laid bare in the report. By the early 1990s several Ferns priests were already household names because of their abuse of local children. Fortune, whose reign of terror began in the 1970s during his days as a seminarian, was the diocese's most prolific abuser. He continually raped boys, even after complaints were made about his behaviour, molesting them at boarding school, on youth retreats, at his home, in public toilets, even in a radio studio. When Ian, 16, asked the media-savvy priest to teach him how to operate a sound desk, Fortune pinned him to the desk and buggered him. Fortune, two of whose victims took their own lives, committed suicide in 1999 awaiting 66 charges of ab-

use against young boys. Only two of his 20 abusing colleagues were convicted. Fr James Doyle, who also targeted teenage hitchhikers and began abusing young boys when he was a seminarian, was jailed after sexually assaulting a 12-year-old boy in his family home. The assault was stopped after the boy's father heard his son's screams from the bathroom. Fr Donal Collins, a teacher at St Peter's College in Wexford, plied his victims with alcohol. Under the guise of the young scientist of the year competition, the priest enticed young boys to his room where he abused them. On one occasion, he molested 20 boys in one sitting. Collins was given a three-month suspended sentence for his crimes. Many of the abusers in Ferns died before their victims could secure justice. Canon Martin Clancy, a school manager who used his music and sex education classes to abuse girls, died before his crimes were exposed. One child, Ciara, who was abused by the cleric from the age of 11, gave birth to his daughter Rachel at the age of 14. In 1993, when he died, Clancy left Ciara £3,000 to be used for her "musical pursuits". Fr James Grennan left behind a divided community when he died in 1994. Six years earlier the Monageer parish priest abused 10 young girls -all under the age of 13 -during confession on the altar. When he returned to his church two weeks later to celebrate confirmation, several families walked out in protest. Brendan Comiskey, the then bishop of Ferns, dismissed the complaints and joined Grennan on the altar to celebrate "a very joyful, happy, sunny summer day". Investigating gardai "lost" vital files containing the girls' complaints. Grennan continued to abuse. The day after he died a teenage boy attempted suicide. "I'm just living to die, in the hope that I will find happiness in the next life," said Rosemary, 42, who was raped from the age of eight for four years by a Ferns priest who is now dead. Rosemary endured repeated rapes in his presbytery to spare her younger sisters a similiar ordeal. "They're still getting away with it. Even today there are miracles attributed to the beast who abused me," she said. "He is revered and even though he is dead he can't be named. What horrifies me most is that this all could have been stopped years ago." Indeed it could. Last week's report from the inquiry, led by Frank Murphy, a retired Supreme Court judge, observed that several serial abusers, including Fortune, had already started abusing children during their priestly formation. No priests were screened or vetted prior to their training, and despite clear warnings about their suitability for the priesthood, Fortune and Doyle were ordained. The report even suggested that priests' propensity to abuse young boys was "striking" when compared with the general population. Almost one in seven paedophiles, the inquiry was told, say gaining access to children is the primary reason they join professions such as the priesthood. "The majority of child sex offenders are aware of their sexual interest in children while they are still children," said Joe Sullivan, a psychologist and child sex crime consultant who advised the Ferns inquiry. Sullivan, who conducted a study of professionals who sexually abused the children with whom they worked -more than half of whom were Roman Catholic priests said access is a prime attraction. "About 15% said gaining access to children to abuse was their primary reason for choice of profession," he said. "A further 42.5% said it was not the primary reason, but did play a part in their decision to work with children." Sullivan's research confirms that many priests, when they make the final step into their vocation, are aware of their attraction to children and this -coupled with unfettered access -is a motivating factor in their choice of career. "The priesthood attracts men who are attracted to children," agreed Fr Tom Doyle, an American priest and canon lawyer who gave expert evidence to the inquiry.

Doyle, an outspoken defender of victims of clerical sex abuse, lost his job as a Vatican lawyer after writing a detailed report 20 years ago that warned American bishops of an imminent sexual abuse crisis. He said the "seminary subculture" and the working conditions -including social isolation and forced celibacy -drive many priests who are not previously sexually deviant to abuse children. "The priesthood attracts men who have a predatory proclivity but it also attracts those who are emotionally and psychologically immature," he said. "When they get into the seminary system, they stay immature. "These young men are taught to devalue sexual relations, to denounce sexuality. Enforced celibacy creates an atmosphere of repression, and the more these natural sexual urges are repressed, the more attractive it becomes to them to abuse." SINCE 1989, all candidates for the diocesan priesthood in Ireland must undergo a stringent interview process and mandatory psychological assessment before being admitted. Prior sexual history is an integral part of these rigorous tests, but there are concerns that determined child abusers can still slip through the net. "It is not a foolproof process," said Patrick Randall, a principal clinical psychologist at the Granada Institute in Dublin, who vets candidates for priesthood. "Many men try to join the priesthood to address a psychological deficit in themselves. Most priests who commit abuse are not paedophiles whose primary erotic outlook is towards children. But the working conditions of the priesthood, the fact that they are isolated and don't form meaningful relationships with adults and the ease with which they relate to children can lead them to abuse. "The clerical collar still allows priests unparalleled access to children." Only a handful of diocesan priests are now ordained each year. Vocations have declined, perhaps partly because of the clerical sex abuse scandals, and priests ordained abroad are filling the diocescan gaps. In the wake of the Ferns report, the government has promised to set up an inquiry into the Dublin archdiocese, where there have been allegations against almost 70 priests, and has ordered an audit of all dioceses to check abuse allegations are being handled properly. It has also promised to improve vetting procedures and to create new laws to strengthen child protection. Victims say the government must implement change immediately and not allow the church to run its own affairs for much longer. "I wake up some mornings angry that I am alive, but I decide to give it one more day," said Bennett. "How hard is it for the government to get its act together? It is nothing compared to what we have to live through every day." LOAD-DATE: November 5, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 Times Newspapers Limited

187 of 265 DOCUMENTS Irish News October 28, 2005

The Ferns Report - Deluge of sex abuse allegations;

BYLINE: Diana Rusk SECTION: Pg. 6 LENGTH: 964 words

Although the spotlight has been shone on clerical sex abuse in Ferns, the Catholic Church's six northern dioceses have also been at the centre of a series of sexual abuse convictions and allegations. Archdiocese of Armagh Eight priests have been suspended in the last five decades due to allegations of sexual abuse, according to a diocesan spokesman. He refused to say if any are currently suspended following allegations. The one conviction within the diocese came in November 2004. One of the longest sentences ever given to a clergyman for sexual abuse in Ireland was imposed on Father Michael Gerard McQuillan. The Armagh city priest was ordered to serve 12 years in prison after he was found guilty of 40 sexual abuse charges against five children. In a statement following the sentencing at Newry Crown Court, the Archbishop of Armagh, Sean Brady, above left, personally apologised for the hurt caused to Fr McQuillan's young victims. "To those who have suffered abuse in this case and who have been so gravely wronged, I offer my most sincere sympathy," he said. Diocese of Down and Connor Four priests are suspended in the diocese following allegations of sexual abuse. Spokesman Fr John McManus said the information was being given in order to remain "open and honest" but warned parishioners not to make dangerous comparisons. Nine Down and Connor priests have been suspended for allegations of sexual abuse over the last 50 years and there have been two convictions for abuse. In 1994 the conviction of a priest who served in west Belfast brought down the Irish government and opened the floodgates for hundreds of sexual abuse claims. Fr Brendan Smyth, a priest from the Norbertine Community, was jailed for four years for sexually abusing children over a 20-year period. Following his release from Magilligan Prison, Fr Smyth was sentenced at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court after admitting 74 counts of sexual abuse in the Republic. He was given a 12-year sentence but died a year later in prison. Fr Sean Fortune, who had served in south Belfast, appeared before Wexford District Court in March 1999 on 29 charges of sexual abuse. Fr Fortune, who had spent two years working at Holy Rosary parish in south Belfast, died by suicide while on bail for the charges of serious sexual abuse against boys. It later emerged that police had investigated at least three claims of abuse relating to Fr Fortune's time in Belfast. Last April Fr Daniel Curran was given a suspended 18-month sentence after admitting two counts of indecent assault against a boy while serving at St Paul's parish in west Belfast. The court heard how the chaplain for a troop of scouts had plied a boy with alcohol before taking him to

a cottage near Tyrella beach in Co Down and sexually abusing him during the 1980s. Last month Co Down priest Father John McCallum was found guilty of 25 charges of viewing pornographic photographs of children between April 1999 and June 2004. The former Kilcoo parish priest has been placed on the sex offenders' register and was sentenced yesterday to a year in jail. Diocese of Derry Two priests are "not in active ministry" following allegations of child sex abuse, a diocesan spokesman said. Fr Gerard John McCallion was jailed for two years at Derry Crown Court in January 1996 after pleading guilty to nine charges of indecent assault of two girls aged nine and 10 in Derry's Creggan estate between May 1987 and August 1988. The diocese said six priests have been suspended or stood down following sex abuse allegations. Fr Andy McCloskey made a five-figure payment without liability to a man who alleged the priest had made a sexual approach to him in 1992, when he was aged 18. Bishop of Derry Seamus Hegarty reinstated Fr McCloskey in 1993. Diocese of Clogher There has been one conviction relating to child sex abuse in the diocese, according to a spokesman. Monsignor Liam McDaid said that a number of suspensions have been made over the last 20 years arising from four allegations of child sex abuse. He refused to be drawn on the total number of priests under investigation although it has been reported that up to five cases were being examined. "I don't think it is appropriate to give a name or number in this case because that would be encouraging a manhunt," he said. "However, they are either deceased or not in active service in the diocese." Diocese of Raphoe The diocese did not respond to queries yesterday about current suspensions or convictions. Fr Eugene Greene was jailed for 12 years in 2000 for abusing children over a period of 30 years. The Co Donegal-based priest served in several parishes across the county and from the 1960s raped or sexually assaulted at least 26 boys. In 2003 former diocesan secretary Paul McDaid was sentenced to two years in prison with the last six months suspended after he was found guilty of possessing 3,000 images of child pornography. He left the priesthood in 1996. In June of this year Fr Patrick McGarvey was prosecuted following an incident in 2004 in Foyleside Shopping Centre in Derry. He was found guilty of observing a person in his twenties for sexual gratification in a public place. Diocese of Dromore Five priests have been suspended for allegations in the diocese in the last five decades, a spokesman said. Two were tried but were later acquitted. Fr PATRICK MCCAFFERTY In yesterday's coverage of the Ferns Report, a front page story incorrectly said Fr Patrick McCafferty

had been abused as a priest. In fact, Fr McCafferty was abused by a priest while a seminarian. We are happy to make this clear. LOAD-DATE: October 31, 2005 Copyright 2005 The Irish News Limited

189 of 265 DOCUMENTS Irish News October 27, 2005

The Ferns Report - Priest's victim slams 'no allegations' claim;
BYLINE: Maeve Connolly SECTION: Pg. 4 LENGTH: 490 words

The auxiliary bishop of Down and Connor has been criticised by a Belfast victim of Fr Sean Fortune for claiming that no allegations of child sex abuse were made against the priest while he was in south Belfast. Bishop Donal McKeown, right, yesterday angered Damien McAleenan, whose case is detailed in the Ferns report. Now living in Wexford, Mr McAleenan was sexually assaulted at 14 and made a complaint to gardai in 1995. The report contains another allegation from a Belfast schoolboy which caused Fr Fortune's dismissal from the diocese. Speaking on Radio Ulster yesterday Bishop McKeown said he had "checked" and it was his understanding that "there were no allegations of any misbehaviour by him of a criminal nature within Down and Connor" during his time in the Holy Rosary Parish from August 1970 until May 1980. However, Mr McAleenan said the Ferns report contradicts the bishop. It states that during this time Fr Martin Kelly, spiritual director at St Malachy's College in Belfast, was approached by a student from St Mary's College who said he and a friend had been sexually propositioned. It is understood the priest had tried to get into bed with the teenagers. Fr Kelly reported this to the bishop and Fr Fortune was dismissed. In September 1980 he moved to Dundalk and on the advice of a Down and Connor priest his plan to have local schoolboys visit his home was forbidden by a senior cleric. Mr McAleenan's complaint involved an altercation in the priest's house when he asked the teenager "to play a game" of "tapping each other's private parts". He said the priest then fondled him. A month later the teenager was on a scouts' camping trip when he saw the priest engage two younger

boys - aged 11 or 12 - in the same "game" and so he "called them away" from Fr Fortune. A priest visited Belfast to ask if there was any sexual abuse or lewd behaviour by Fr Fortune. "I said no because I was standing beside a friend when he asked me." The RUC and gardai later interviewed Mr McAleenan about the abuse. Contacted last night, Bishop McKeown said he had not been "trying to be evasive or deny that it had ever taken place". "My understanding of child sexual abuse is that there is a genital dimension to it, that there is touching, and that's what I was thinking when I was asked about child sex abuse in the radio interview," he said. The St Mary's student had been 17 or 18 years old, he added, and the incident had concerned "inappropriate comments". He added that Mr McAleenan's complaint had been made 15 years after Fr Fortune had been dismissed from Down and Connor. "There were no reports that he had abused any child or young persons during his time but there was a report from the spiritual director of St Malachy's through the two sixth-form students and of other unusual behaviour and the bishop told him to leave," he said. LOAD-DATE: October 29, 2005 Copyright 2005 The Irish News Limited

190 of 265 DOCUMENTS Irish News October 27, 2005

The Ferns Report - Catalogue of abuse spreads throughout the north;
BYLINE: Diana Rusk SECTION: Pg. 8 LENGTH: 959 words

Although the spotlight has been shone on clerical sex abuse in Ferns, the Catholic Church's six northern dioceses have also been at the centre of a series of sexual abuse convictions and allegations. - Archdiocese of Armagh Eight priests have been suspended in the last five decades due to allegations of sexual abuse, according to a diocesan spokesman. He refused to say if any are currently suspended following allegations. The one conviction within the diocese came in November 2004.

One of the longest sentences ever given to a clergyman for sexual abuse in Ireland, it was imposed on Father Michael Gerard McQuillan. The Armagh city priest was ordered to serve 12 years in prison after he was found guilty of 40 sexual abuse charges involving five children. In a statement following the sentencing at Newry Crown Court, the Archbishop of Armagh, Sean Brady, personally apologised for the hurt caused to Fr McQuillan's young victims. "To those who have suffered abuse in this case and who have been so gravely wronged, I offer my most sincere sympathy," he said. - Diocese of Down and Connor Four priests are currently suspended within the diocese following allegations of sexual abuse. Spokesman Fr John McManus said the information was being given in order to remain "open and honest" but warned parishioners not to make dangerous comparisons. Nine Down and Connor priests have been suspended for allegations of sexual abuse over the last 50 years and there have been two abuse convictions. In 1994 the conviction of a priest who served in west Belfast brought down the Irish government and opened the floodgates for hundreds of sexual abuse claims. Fr Brendan Smyth, a priest from the Norbertine Community, was jailed for four years for sexually abusing children over a 20-year period. Following his release from Magilligan Prison, Fr Smyth was later sentenced at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court after admitting 74 counts of sexual abuse in the Republic. One of his victims shouted "Rot in hell, Smyth" as the priest was led from the court to begin his 12-year sentence. He died a year later in prison. Fr Sean Fortune, who had served in south Belfast, appeared before Wexford District Court in March 1999 on 29 charges of sexual abuse. Fr Fortune, who had spent two years working at Holy Rosary parish, south Belfast, died by suicide while on bail for the charges of serious sexual abuse against boys. It later emerged that police had investigated at least three claims of abuse relating to Fr Fortune's time in Belfast. Last April Fr Daniel Curran was given a suspended 18 month sentence after admitting two counts of indecent assault against a boy while serving at St Paul's parish in west Belfast. The court heard how the chaplain for a troop of scouts had plied a boy with alcohol before taking him to a cottage near Tyrella beach in Co Down and sexually abusing him during the 1980s. Last month Co Down priest Father John McCallum was found guilty of 25 charges of viewing pornographic photographs of children between April 1999 and June 2004. The former Kilcoo parish priest has been placed on the sex offenders register and is due to be sentenced today. - Diocese of Derry Two priests are currently "not in active ministry" following allegations of child sex abuse, a diocesan spokesman said. Fr Gerard John McCallion was jailed for two years at Derry Crown Court in January 1996 after pleading guilty to nine charges of indecent assault of two girls aged nine and 10 in Derry's Creggan estate between May 1987 and August 1988.

The diocese said six priests have been suspended or stood down following sex abuse allegations. Fr Andy McCloskey made a five-figure payment without liability to a man who alleged the priest had made a sexual approach to him in 1992, when he was aged 18. Bishop of Derry Seamus Hegarty reinstated Fr McCloskey in 1993. Details of the incident emerged earlier this year. - Diocese of Clogher There has been one conviction relating to child sex abuse within the diocese, according to a spokesman. Monsignor Liam McDaid said that a number of suspensions have been made over the last 20 years arising from four allegations of child sex abuse. He refused to be drawn on the total number of priests under investigation although it has been reported that up to five cases are being examined. "I don't think it is appropriate to give a name or number in this case because that would be encouraging a manhunt," he said. "However, they are either deceased or not in active service in the diocese." - Diocese of Raphoe The diocese did not respond to queries yesterday about current suspensions or convictions. Fr Eugene Greene was jailed for 12 years in 2000 for abusing children, including altar boys, over a period of 30 years. The Co Donegal-based priest served in several parishes across the county and from the 1960s raped or sexually assaulted at least 26 boys. In 2003 former diocesan secretary Paul McDaid was sentenced to two years in prison with the last six months suspended after he was found guilty of posessing 3,000 images of child porn. Some of the children were as young as three. He left the priesthood in 1996. In June of this year Fr Patrick McGarvey, was prosecuted following an incident in 2004 in Foyleside Shopping Centre in Derry. He was found guilty of observing a person in his twenties for sexual gratification in a public place. - Diocese of Dromore Five priests have been suspended for allegations in the diocese within the last five decades, a spokesman said. Two were tried but were later acquitted. LOAD-DATE: October 29, 2005 Copyright 2005 The Irish News Limited

191 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Mirror October 27, 2005, Thursday

DEVILS OF THE CHURCH: NEVER AGAIN; - BERTIE AHERN YESTERDAY CHILDREN NOW AND FOR THE FUTURE MUST BE ABLE
BYLINE: BY DAMIEN LANE SECTION: Eire Edition; NEWS; Pg. 6,7 LENGTH: 1007 words HIGHLIGHT: SHAME: The Ferns Report has revealed the Church's failure to deal with child sex abuse; HORROR: Kenny was shocked by the report; ACTION: Ahern has promised further probes

EVERY diocese in Ireland WILL be investigated to root out paedophile priests, Taoiseach Bertie Ahern promised yesterday. The horrific scale of systematic abuse uncovered in The Ferns Report means each parish in the country will be probed for similar crimes. The Government has also vowed to prosecute anyone who puts a child in danger by ignoring abuse allegations. Mr Ahern told the Dail no child should have to endure such abuse ever again. He said the inquiry into the violation of children by priests in the Dublin Archdiocese is next and from there the probe will be rolled out nationwide. Mr Ahern added: "It is my view to try to deal with Dublin. "We have said all along that we will await this report and then see how best we can proceed into a national audit or some means of investigation. "We will deal with it and I think the audit has to be national. "It has to look at those who have been prosecuted and how these things were dealt with." Mr Ahern said Attorney General Rory Brady was urgently examining how to investigate every diocese. He added: "Whatever we do around the country, and I don't want to give some suggestion off the top of my head, but I think we have to work that out and we will do that very quickly." Mr Ahern said he had read a large part of the report last night and added: "It's shocking to everybody's sense of how our children should be protected. "We have built on our knowledge to ensure it never happens again. "For the Catholic Church itself across the country, a national audit would be in everybody's interests because where abuse has gone on, it has to be cleared out once and for all and be dealt with. "Children now and for the future must be able to grow up in an environment of trust and respect which will not be broken to completely and utterly destroy lives." Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny told the Dail a nationwide probe into church child abuse is vital. He said: "Having read this report last night and as the father of young children myself the words used in this House yesterday barely do justice to the horror suffered by so many people. "There clearly is a national consensus that we have to deal with this suffering and institutional failure."

Mr Kenny pointed out that many of the Ferns abuse victims were not believed when they were children. He added: "A climate existed in this country where it was not safe for children to disclose abuse and where adults would not be empowered to respond. "We would be failing in our duties for today's children and tomorrow's children if we do not admit or acknowledge that abuse can occur everywhere at anytime." Sinn Fein's Caoimhghin O Caolain told the Dail: "The Ferns Report is a grotesque catalogue of Church and state delinquency that casts a dark shadow over not only the lives of those directly affected by the abuse but also over the entire country. While those who were directly involved in this systematic abuse of young children over many, many years are ultimately responsible for their own actions and should be punished accordingly there has been serious criminal neglect on behalf of both Church and state authorities, which allowed this abuse go unchecked and unpunished, and which must be dealt with urgently and robustly. "The cavalier and dismissive approach adopted by the Church and indeed gardai at senior management level, indicates _ a mindset corrupted by its own sense of infallibility." A spokeswoman for the One In Four organisation, set up for victims of child sex abuse, said: "What we propose is the establishment of a Standing Commission of Investigation whose remit could be expanded to facilitate inquiries or investigations into individual dioceses or other areas once a clear need for such an inquiry had been determined. "In the first instance such an investigation should, as planned and committed to by Government, focus on the Archdiocese of Dublin. Once that module is completed and reported upon it could then determine the need for further modules whether nationally or locally. "The implications of The Ferns Reports findings of glaring gaps in existing powers to respond to third party, or extra-familial, child abuse must be properly considered in planning the need for further inquiries. "What we must surely acknowledge is that there may well be a need for investigations and inquiries into concerns that extend beyond clerical sexual abuse." A new law to punish those who fail victims of abuse will be enacted, Justice Minister Michael McDowell promised yesterday. Mr McDowell said that anyone in a position to protect children, who fails in their duty to do so, would be liable to criminal prosecution. He added: "It means that if you are in a position to stop something happening and you have the means at your disposal to prevent further damage to children and you fail wrongly to follow those steps... you commit a criminal offence." However, the law will not be retrospective, meaning charges could not be brought against shamed former Ferns bishops, Brendan Comiskey and Donal Herlihy. Minister McDowell did not rule out introducing "mandatory reporting" whereby anyone looking after children MUST report allegations of abuse to the relevant authorities. A VICTIM of Fr Sean Fortune said his reign of terror might have been cut short if his complaints had been listened to. Damian McAleenan, 39, was abused by Fortune while he was a priest on the Ormeau Road in South Belfast. Mr McAleenan, who was attacked by Fortune when he was an altar boy, said: "Fortune was a cause for concern practically from the day he was ordained and nothing was done for more than 25 years. "He could have been stopped a lot earlier." However, Mr McAleenan claims the bishop said no formal complaints were made against Fortune. He added: "It was his bizarre behaviour and pig headedness like trying to set up his own scout movement that led to him [Fortune] being sent back to Ferns."

LOAD-DATE: October 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 MGN Ltd.

192 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Sun October 27, 2005 20ST BEAST'S REIGN OF EVIL KNEW NO LIMITS BYLINE: Kim Kelly LENGTH: 541 words Scandal of Ferns Full extent of Fr Fortune's abuse revealed DEPRAVED Father Sean Fortune was the most notorious child abuser in the Ferns diocese, this week's shocking report reveals. The 20st beast began raping and assaulting children before he was ordained - but he was still allowed to become a priest. He continued his campaign of terror north and south of the border for 20 YEARS. Fortune brazenly abused little boys in front of witnesses and even stalked his victims - chasing them through the streets in his car. He committed suicide with a cocktail of drugs and drink shortly before he was due to stand trial for 66 charges of buggery and sex abuse. In his suicide note he protested his innocence, claiming his victims and the media were lying. He even blamed Bishop Brendan Comiskey who he said was "responsible for all this as he raped and buggered me". Dr Comiskey and the Ferns inquiry dismissed the allegations as "baseless". The Ferns Report on child sex abuse in the diocese contains details of complaints from 25 boys who said Fortune raped and abused them. Statements were also made by other unnamed children from Belfast - where Fortune set up a Boy Scouts troop. Pranks The vile pervert was just 23 and training to be a priest when the first complaint against him was made. His victim was told he would be thrown out of the college if he continued to say he had been raped six times by Fortune in the shower cubicles. Fortune was ordained and became involved in the Catholic Boy Scouts of Ireland - where he had his

pick of vulnerable youngsters. He regularly took young boys on camping trips where he fondled and abused them. He would pleasure himself in front of the children - and tell them it was a prank. Fortune also organised religious "retreats" where he climbed into bed with boys and forced them to commit sex acts. Once he even raped a young boy in a sound booth while taking a communications course at a hospital radio station. Some boys said they were subjected to years of brutal rapes, up to three times a week. The Ferns report also outlines how the beast would offer youngsters large sums of cash to sleep with him. He would later blackmail them and tell them he would let their parents know about the depraved behaviour. Despite his young victims making complaints to gardai, parents and other priests, nothing was done about Fortune. Rumours circulated around Wexford that he was gay and had abused children. But many parents refused to believe their children's allegations of abuse. And the diocese became split between those who supported Fortune and those who knew of his shocking crimes. Bishop Brendan Comiskey knew of the allegations when he was appointed to the diocese in 1983. But Fortune was allowed to continue until 1993 before he was removed. Comiskey sent Fortune to London to study media and communications and to seek therapy. Just two years later Fortune was posted as curate in another parish. That year, in 1995, he was arrested by gardai investigating allegations of abuse in the 1980s. In 1999 Fortune locked himself away in his house and took an overdose rather than face trial. LOAD-DATE: November 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: English PUB-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 NEWS GROUP NEWSPAPERS LTD

194 of 265 DOCUMENTS Irish News October 26, 2005

The Ferns Inquiry - Abuser was moved and promoted;
SECTION: Pg. 12

LENGTH: 211 words

Notorious child abuser Fr Sean Fortune was ordained as a priest in 1979 despite having being reported for abusing a schoolboy and boy scouts during his training at St Peter's College in Co Wexford. Fr Fortune, above, was posted to Holy Rosary parish in south Belfast as a curate for two years, after which he returned to Ferns. It later emerged that police in Belfast had investigated at least three claims of abuse alleged to have taken place in the 1970s. He continued to abuse boys in his new parish at Fethard-on-Sea in Co Wexford and was left there for six years before the then Bishop of Ferns, Dr Brendan Comiskey, removed him. However, Fr Fortune was sent to London to study media and communications and to seek therapy with a number of psychiatrists. Two years later he was brought back to Ireland and not only given another parish and curacy, but also made the director of a Catholic media organisation, the National Association of Community Broadcasting. Fr Fortune turned his role to his sexual advantage, raping a 15-year-old boy in a studio booth where he recorded religious programmes. He died, aged 45, by suicide at his home in New Ross, Co Wexford, after appearing in court charged with sex abuse against boys. LOAD-DATE: October 30, 2005 Copyright 2005 The Irish News Limited

195 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Irish Times October 26, 2005

Fortune abused children while a seminarian
BYLINE: Martin Wall SECTION: Ireland; Ferns Report; Pg. 8 LENGTH: 642 words

Fr Sean Fortune Fr Sean Fortune, who took his own life in March 1999 while facing 66 charges of child sex abuse and rape, had abused children while a seminarian in Co Wexford, according to the Ferns inquiry. The report sets out more than 20 allegations of abuse of young people from his time as a seminarian and throughout his time working as a priest in Belfast, Dundalk and Wexford. In two cases families claimed that young people had killed themselves because of Fr Fortune's abuse. The first complaint about him was made by a student at St Peter's College, a seminary and a boys' sec-

ondary school in Wexford. The boy claimed he had been violently raped by the then seminarian in a shower. The boy, identified as Stephen (real names of victims were not used in the report), told the inquiry that the then principal of the college had reacted angrily to the complaint and did not believe him. The inquiry says that an allegation of sexual abuse against boy scouts by Fr Fortune was passed to the then bishop of Ferns, Dr Donal Herlihy, in 1979. But it was not clear if this was before or after Fr Fortune's ordination. The inquiry says it is satisfied that Sean Fortune did engage in child sexual abuse during his years as a seminarian and that despite clear warning signs, this did not prevent his ordination. It says if guidelines on the "norms for priestly training" published by the Irish Episcopal Commission in 1973 had been properly applied by St Peter's College, Sean Fortune would not have been ordained. It says that if Bishop Herlihy had been told of the allegations made against Fr Fortune of the abuse of boy scouts and students, then it was "inexcusable" that he ordained and admitted him to a vocation that required and provided unsupervised access to young people. The report tells of how on ordination Fr Fortune was sent to Belfast but was soon regarded as "unmanageable". It says that the then bishop of Down and Connor Dr William Philbin had Fr Fortune removed from the diocese within hours of hearing allegations that the priest had sexually propositioned a student. It was "improbable" that Dr Philbin would not have told Dr Herlihy the reasons for the departure. The report says Dr Herlihy had received reports from a psychologist at UCD, indicating the dangers of giving Fr Fortune unsupervised access to young people. It criticises Dr Herlihy for still appointing Fr Fortune to the parish of Poulfour. "That a curate with Dr Fortune's history could open youth clubs and build reconciliation rooms for young people in the basement of his house represented a serious lack of supervision and a failure to have regard of the dangers posed by a man with his history." The report says that Dr Herlihy's successor as Bishop of Ferns, Dr Brendan Comiskey, became concerned in late 1985 about Fr Fortune's relationships with young men. However, it is critical of the fact that it took the bishop two years to remove Fr Fortune from the parish. It says the decision of Bishop Comiskey to later appoint Fr Fortune to another parish at Ballymurn was "ill-advised and dangerous". "Bishop Comiskey failed to put in place any proper monitoring of supervision of Sean Fortune in Ballymurn." It also maintains that it is difficult to comprehend the bishop's failure to remove Fr Fortune from Ballymurn, having received complaints about the sexual content of his classes at Bridgetown VEC. "If the bishop was correct in believing that he could not remove a curate whose current conduct confirmed existing suspicions, children might be exposed indefinitely to grievous dangers." The report says that Garda handling of Fr Fortune's case was professional and effective. However, it expresses concern at the level of co-operation provided by Bishop Comiskey at the initial stage of the investigation. LOAD-DATE: October 26, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 The Irish Times

196 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Sun October 26, 2005 GUILTY SINNERS BYLINE: Petrina Vousden LENGTH: 1467 words Pervert priests terrorised kids for 40 years Scandal of Ferns THE evil of rampant child sex abuse by Catholic priests in the diocese of Ferns went on for FOUR DECADES. ONE HUNDRED cases of sex attacks by TWENTY-ONE priests are catalogued in the 271-page inquiry report. It confirms COVER-UPS and INACTION that left children exposed to the perverted clerics. And it expressed REVULSION at the "extent, severity and duration" of the abuse of children by priests. The report reveals how Co Wexford cleric Canon Martin Clancy had a secret child by a 14-year-old girl he RAPED. Sex fiend Clancy began abusing her when she was just 11. He left money for his victim in his will. Former Bishops of Ferns Brendan Comiskey and Donal Herlihy are slammed for their handling of the scandal. Torture The Garda are also criticised for their response in some of the abuse cases. Some officers were reluctant to investigate the clergy and adequate records of complaints were not made before 1990. One police probe was "neither appropriate or adequate". The Health Board also come under fire for its "inconsistent" response. The inquiry ordered in 2003 by the then Health Minister Micheal Martin and headed by retired Supreme Court judge, Francis Murphy said the priests used their social standing to prey on children. They left a legacy of torture and trauma in their wake. Last night a Government source said: "The number of priests accused of sex abuse in Ferns is believed to be among the highest uncovered, proportionally, in any Catholic diocese worldwide." Bishop Herlihy failed to take "even basic precautions" to protect children from known abusers. Two trainee priests were ordained in the mid-1970s despite allegations of child sex abuse against them. Fr Donal Collins who was accused in 1966 was removed from his post and sent to the diocese of Westminster. Two years later the bishop returned him to his position as a teacher at St Peter's Secondary School in the diocese of Ferns. The priest was not treated or assessed.

The report said: "It does not appear that the Diocese of Westminster was alerted to the reasons for the priest's transfer." Virtually no restriction was placed on the priest after his return to St Peter's. "The fact that no records were kept of these matters meant that no impediment to the appointment of this priest as principal of St Peter's in 1998 was apparent," said the report. Pupils at St Peter's reported in 1996 that Fr Collins measured the penises of up to 20 boys in the school dormitory. Fr Collins admitted "inappropriate behaviour" to the inquiry but denies that any sexual abuse occurred. Sacked In 1973, the Bishop became aware of a complaint against another priest who had allegedly abused a young girl. The priest was sent to the Diocese of Westminster which was told of the allegations. The priest received no assessment or treatment and was later appointed to chaplaincy positions and managerial roles in locals schools before being transferred abroad. Bishop Herlihy sent two priests for assessment following complaints against them in the 1980s. Despite "unfavourable" reports from a psychologist, both men were given curacies and went unmonitored. The inquiry said the move was "inexplicable". Comiskey received allegations against ten priests when he was Bishop of Ferns from 1984 to 2002. None of the priests were stood aside from active ministry. The report said no child protection measures were put in place in dioceses where pervert priests were sent after complaints against them. Ten of the priests in the report are now dead. Sex abuse allegations against six of them were not made until after their deaths. Three priests who are still alive have been sacked. Damaged Seven have stood aside from active ministry at the request of acting Bishop of Ferns Eamonn Walsh. Another priest has retired. Some of 21 priests in the report are identified only by letters of the Greek alphabet. Among those names are Sean Fortune, who committed suicide, and and James Doyle who were defrocked last year. Serial sex offender Fortune was sent to London for a year by Bishop Comiskey in 1987. He continued to perform duties as a priest there and attended a media course. He returned to Ireland the following year without the bishop's permission. The abuse has seriously damaged the Catholic Church. It paid out Euro 128million in compensation three years ago to victims of abuse in children's homes run by religious orders. The Dublin diocese is facing hundreds of legal actions over abuse. The report said that it is satisfied that procedures adopted by the current acting Bishop of Ferns Eamonn Walsh are "appropriate and adequate" to protect children. *SEAN FORTUNE TWENTY-stone pervert Fortune was one of the Church's most prolific sex abusers.

He committed suicide in 1999 shortly before he was due to stand trial for 66 charges of sexual abuse and gross indecency against eight young men. The 45-year-old left a note to his family blaming the media for spreading "lies" about him. Two of his victims abused in the 1980s received six-figure compensation settlements from the Church. Fortune, above, served as a curate in Wexford where he abused children for years. It is understood he drugged some of his young victims. In the 1970s Fr Fortune raped a 13-year-old boarder at St Peter's College seminary in Wexford town as he trained for the priesthood. He also assaulted Boy Scouts. He attacked victims on camping trips and pretended sex abuse was a game. *JIM GRENNAN GRENNAN was accused of abusing ten girls preparing for confirmation in the 80s. The parish priest of Monageer, Co Wexford, would bring them up to the altar and get them to kneel on red cushions before kissing and fondling them. As he abused each victim, the rest of the class was forced to sit in their seats with their eyes shut. Fr Grennan told them that by closing their eyes in God's house they were showing respect. The case was probed by cops and the South Eastern Health Board. No charges were brought and the Garda file went missing. Grennan died in 1994. *MARTIN CLANCY THE late Canon Martin Clancy was accused of abusing five young girls - and even fathered a child with one. In 1974 he raped a 14-year-old identified as Ciara who became pregnant. The distressed girl went to England and gave birth to a daughter, Rachel. Two years later Clancy acknowledged the tot as his own and gave Ciara two cheques for £500 each. The Ferns report states: "She said that Canon Clancy threatened to have Rachel taken from her if Ciara told anybody he was the father." Clancy died in 1993 and left £3,000 for Rachel in his will. *DONAL HERIHY HERLIHY was Bishop of the Ferns Diocese for 20 years from 1963. He is accused of failing to respond to any of the abuse allegations that were on file by the time his successor Brendan Comiskey became bishop. Sex abuse victim Colm O'Gorman, who got a Euro 300,000 settlement in 2003 after suffering at the hands of Fr Fortune, said Church leaders had to accept some blame. He added: "The Church authorities were negligent in how they handled cases of clerical sexual abuse and that led to the abuse of more and more children." *JAMES DOYLE SIXTY-year-old Doyle and his cohort Collins were sacked last year after a plea to the Vatican by the acting Bishop of Ferns Eamonn Walsh. It emerged that the perverts led boys through the red light district of Amsterdam and leered at the infamous window displays of prostitutes. They then primed their young victims with hash and booze before abusing them, the Ferns report stated. In 1990, Doyle, who was a teacher at the college, was convicted of indecent assault on a teenage boy.

He received a one-year suspended jail term. *DONAL COLLINS DEPRAVED Collins and James Doyle were the first Irish priests to be sacked by Pope John Paul II for vile abuse. The pair both worked at St Peter's College in Wexford and lured innocent victims on school trips to Amsterdam - Europe's sex capital. The Fern report said Collins, 64, regularly abused boys over 20 years. He had been removed from the college by his bishop in 1966 for inspecting naked boys but was reappointed to a teaching position two years later. He eventually became principal. No records of complaints against him were kept by the college. In the years that followed, there were allegations that he fondled boys and forced them to commit sex acts. He was given a four-year sentence in 1998, with three years then suspended, for sexual abuse against boys during the 1970s and 1980s. LOAD-DATE: November 22, 2005 LANGUAGE: English PUB-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 NEWS GROUP NEWSPAPERS LTD

197 of 265 DOCUMENTS Idaho Falls Post Register (Idaho) October 25, 2005 Tuesday Main Edition Stowell abandons plea for sentence leniencyConvicted sex offender leaves prosecutor surprised BYLINE: PHIL DAVIDSON, pdavidson@postregister.com SECTION: THE WESTPg. C01 LENGTH: 248 words Brad Stowell won't protest the sentence he received for molesting two boys. Bonneville County Prosecutor Dane Watkins said he was ready to oppose Stowell's motion at a court hearing Monday, but that wasn't necessary as Stowell's request for leniency was withdrawn. Stowell pleaded guilty about seven years ago to two counts of sex abuse of a minor, but he was on probation until late April when 7th District Judge Richard T. St. Clair revoked the then-32-year-old's probation. St. Clair's decision came after Stowell admitted he'd looked at Internet pornography, had fantasized about boys he'd molested, had spent time alone with boys and had become aroused when a girl sat on his lap. The judge sentenced Stowell to two to 14 years in prison, the original suspended sentence he received

after pleading guilty. Stowell, a former Boy Scout leader, admitted to molesting at least 24 boys since the late 1980s. Stowell originally filed an Idaho Criminal Rule 35 motion to correct or reconsider the judge's sentence. Rule 35 allows defendants one last chance to ask the court for leniency or, in rare cases, to ask the judge to correct an illegal sentence, Watkins said. "Rule 35s get filed all the time," he said. "Most of the time, it's one more plea for leniency." Watkins said he was prepared to object to the motion until he learned Monday that it was dropped. He said he couldn't speculate why Stowell would take such action. Efforts to reach Curtis Smith, Stowell's attorney, were unsuccessful. LOAD-DATE: October 25, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright2005The Post Register All Rights Reserved

198 of 265 DOCUMENTS Lexington Herald Leader (Kentucky) October 6, 2005 Thursday Correction Appended

Woodford man gets five years in prison for sex abuse of boy; BECAUSE HE'S APPEALING CONVICTION, HE MIGHT REMAIN FREE UP TO A YEAR
BYLINE: By Greg Kocher; CENTRAL KENTUCKY BUREAU SECTION: CITY & REGION; Pg. B3 LENGTH: 511 words DATELINE: VERSAILLES A former Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentor convicted of sexual abuse was sentenced yesterday to five years in prison, but he won't go to prison any time soon. John "Tim" Jenkins is appealing his Aug. 19 conviction and has filed a motion for a new trial. The motion is based on testimony heard at trial that never came up during pre-trial preparations, defense attorney Guthrie True said. If Woodford Circuit Judge Paul Isaacs turns down the motion for a new trial, the appeal will go to the state Court of Appeals. That means Jenkins will remain free for possibly a year.

Jenkins was released from jail Sept. 12 on a $100,000 bond after Isaacs cited a rule allowing bail for a defendant whose sentence has not begun. Jenkins, 55, was a mentor to a boy through Big Brothers/Big Sisters of the Bluegrass. He was accused of sodomizing and abusing the child in 2003, when the boy was 8. In 2001, Jenkins was paired with the boy. UK football games, baseball games and target shooting were some activities they did together. They also went swimming at Falling Springs Arts and Recreation Center. On Oct. 8, 2003, lifeguards became alarmed while watching Jenkins play with his "little brother" and another boy, then 6. Details the boys told on the stand had never been described before, True said. "We can deal with changes in the story that we know about prior to trial," True said. "What we can't deal with, and what I think the Constitution says a person charged with a crime shouldn't have to deal with, is being confronted with a new version of the facts for the first time at trial, without any opportunity to address them." True said Jenkins, a manager at one of the two Osram Sylvania plants in Versailles, is grateful that he was acquitted on two counts of first-degree sodomy that might have led to a minimum 20-year sentence. "He regrets ever having become involved in the (Big Brothers) program at all, but that's water under the bridge," True said. "He probably made an error in not having another adult with him when he was with the two boys at the swimming pool." Isaacs also ordered Jenkins to pay a $250 fine for indecent exposure. The judge warned Jenkins not to violate the conditions of his appeal bond, or he would risk going to jail. Those conditions say Jenkins is not to leave Woodford County without written consent of the court, except to consult with his attorney in Frankfort. Jenkins was to surrender any passport to the Woodford County sheriff, according to the judge's Sept. 9 order. In addition, the order prohibited Jenkins from "any activity which would put him in contact with any child under the age of 18 without the physical supervision of the child's parent or guardian." No child younger than 18 is allowed to visit Jenkins' Versailles home unless the parent or guardian is present. Jenkins also is barred from activities such as Big Brothers, Boy Scouts of America or any athletic event involving children. Reach Greg Kocher in the Nicholasville bureau at (859) 885-5775 or gkocher1@herald-leader.com LOAD-DATE: October 10, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH CORRECTION-DATE: October 8, 2005 CORRECTION: A story on Page B3 Thursday incorrectly said that John "Tim" Jenkins, who was convicted of sexual abuse and indecent exposure, is employed by Osram Sylvania in Versailles. Jenkins is no longer employed there, a company spokesman said. Copyright 2005 The Lexington Herald Leader All Rights Reserved

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Centre Daily Times September 29, 2005 Thursday

Official's sex-abuse case moves forward; Harris Twp. supervisor, Boal Mansion CEO accused of inappropriately touching two boys
BYLINE: lbrenckl@centredaily.com SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 583 words By Lara Brenckle BELLEFONTE -- Harris Township Supervisor and Boal Mansion CEO Christopher G. Lee was bound over for trial following his preliminary hearing on sexual abuse charges in front of District Judge Allen Sinclair on Wednesday. Lee sat quietly and did not look at the two boys, ages 10 and 8, who testified about separate incidents in which they allege that Lee touched them inappropriately. Lee was arraigned Friday on three counts each of indecent assault, corruption of minors and harassment, but Sinclair dropped one of those counts after agreeing with Lee's attorney, Joseph Amendola, that prosecutors had not presented enough evidence to prove all of the counts. Assistant District Attorney Lance Marshall began his questioning with the 10-year-old, asking him to recount what happened on the night of June 3, when the boy, his mother and younger brother spent the night at the Boal Mansion with Lee. The boy said that the four of them had been watching videos -- "Toy Story" and "The Mask" -- and that he had put pajamas on for bed. The boy said that his mother and younger brother went to bed in another room, and that he and Lee were on the pull-out sofa in the TV room. Lee, the boy said, kept asking him if he was hot and tried to take off the boy's pajamas. The 10-year-old said he was "on-and-off asleep" when he detected Lee first touching his genital area. The boy said he took Lee's hand and pulled it out of his pants. The boy said he then wandered through the mansion, eventually finding his mother's room. He said he woke her up and told her, "I think Chris is one of those child abusers." On cross-examination, Amendola asked the boy what made him say that he thought Lee was a child abuser. "I watched this movie because of Cub Scouts about sexual abuse, and I'm not one of those sure-sure guys, I usually say I think, and I thought it might be like that, but I wasn't sure," the 10-year-old said. The boy then recounted an earlier time when Lee had allegedly put two of his fingers in the boy's mouth while they were wrestling. The boy said he had told his mother about the incident because he felt uncomfortable.

Amendola asked why his mother continued to see Lee with them, and the boy replied, "She didn't see some of the red flags." The boy's 8-year-old brother also took the stand and said that Lee touched him three to four times, sticking his hand down his pants, but that he didn't know the touch was bad until after his brother told their mother about his experiences. After the hearing, Amendola said Lee steadfastly maintains his innocence and thinks the situation is a terrible misunderstanding. Amendola said that on the night of the alleged incident, Lee had discovered that the boy was a bed-wetter and slept in diapers. "Chris was concerned that he might wet the bed," his attorney said. "He checked on him one time during the night to see if he was wet." Amendola said that he will immediately start filing motions to get a second charge dismissed and that he fully intends Lee to take the stand during the trial. When asked if Lee plans to resign as a Harris Township supervisor, Amendola said he did not think he should. Harris Township Manager Amy Farkas said the board takes no position on Lee's case and considers it a personal matter. "He can legally remain a supervisor, and he will do so until he tells us otherwise," she said. Lee remains free on his own recognizance. Lara Brenckle can be reached at 235-3902. LOAD-DATE: September 29, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 Centre Daily Times (State College, PA) All Rights Reserved

201 of 265 DOCUMENTS Herald News (Passaic County, NJ) September 29, 2005 Thursday All Editions

Man gets time for child sex abuse; Former scoutmaster in custody since '04
SECTION: OUR TOWNS; Pg. E06 LENGTH: 326 words DATELINE: NEWARK

NEWARK - A former assistant scoutmaster was sentenced to 8 years and a month in federal prison for traveling from New Jersey to Pennsylvania to fondle a 7-year-old boy. He also awaits sentencing in state court on charges he sexually assaulted and endangered a child. Kevin W. Hildreth, 36, who had lived in Nutley, received the maximum term suggested by federal sentencing guidelines from U.S. District Judge William H. Walls. Hildreth pleaded guilty in both cases. He has been in custody since June 2004, when he was among hundreds snared following a global investigation into child pornography Web sites. At sentencing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Kevin Walsh said Hildreth told Nutley police after his arrest that he had raped and sexually assaulted at least nine children in New Jersey and Pennsylvania over the course of 16 years. "I have an illness and I am a sexual predator," Hildreth said, according to the police report read in court. On the federal charges, Hildreth said he went to Scranton, Pa., in May 2004 to commit sexual acts with the boy. He also pleaded guilty in April to a separate count of possessing child pornography on his personal computer. In state Superior Court in June, Hildreth pleaded guilty to sexual assault and endangering the welfare of a child, which were among the sexual abuse and kidnapping charges he faced from the Essex County prosecutor's office. The charges stem from two towns. Hildreth had been a caretaker for three children in Nutley, where he fondled them and videotaped one in a sexually explicit act, the Essex County prosecutor's office said in October when he was charged. He also was charged with committing similar acts upon three children in Belleville, police say. Hildreth committed the acts while supervising children at the Wesley Methodist Church in Belleville, where he was a volunteer and assistant scoutmaster for Boy Scout Troop 301 at the church until about six years ago, the prosecutor's office said. LOAD-DATE: September 29, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 North Jersey Media Group Inc., All Rights Reserved

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Philadelphia Inquirer September 25, 2005 Sunday CITY-D EDITION

Those who are named in the grand jury report

SECTION: NATIONAL; Pg. A24 LENGTH: 3431 words Edward V. Avery Ordained: 1970 Allegations:He abused a 12-year-old boy in the late 1970s. Post:St. Philip Neri Church, Montgomery County. Church response:After receiving a complaint about the abuse in 1992, the church made Avery a chaplain at Nazareth Hospital for a decade. In 2003, a new archdiocesan review board, which considers allegations of abuse, found that the accusation made against Avery 11 years earlier was credible. Status:Avery, now 63, was placed on administrative leave in 2003 pending his removal from the priesthood. Michael C. Bolesta Ordained: 1989 Allegations:He abused 11 teenage boys, mostly 16 and 17, in 1990 and 1991. Post:SS. Philip and James Church, Chester County. Church response:After the church received a complaint in 1991, Bolesta was given a psychological evaluation in 1991 and reassigned to parishes in Philadelphia. From 1992 to 1994, he was vicar at St. Agatha and St. James Church and a chaplain at Children's Hospital. He later was a hospital chaplain. Status:Bolesta died at 62 last year. Robert L. Brennan Ordained: 1964 Allegations:The report said he engaged in inappropriate or suspicious behavior with more than 20 boys from 1988 to 2004. Posts:St. Ignatius, Bucks County; St. Mary, Montgomery County, Resurrection of Our Lord, Philadelphia. Church response:He was given repeated psychological evaluations and transferred from one parish to another. He was advised by archdiocesan leaders to "keep a low profile" - but he was not barred from contact with young people. Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua testified before the grand jury that he considered Brennan's problems "innocuous-sounding boundary issues." Status:Brennan, now 67, was appointed a chaplain at Camilla Hall, a retirement home for nuns, last year. Leonard W. Broughan Ordained:1955 Allegations:Broughan, a member of the Carmelite order who worked in the Philadelphia Archdiocese, abused a male student at Roman Catholic High School in Philadelphia beginning in 1972. Posts:Roman Catholic High School and residence at St. Philip Neri. Church response:When the former student disclosed the abuse in 1993, the archdiocese directed the man to take his complaint to the Carmelite order. The grand jury report has no information on how the order handled the matter.

Status:Broughan died at 69 in 1998. Craig R. Brugger Ordained:1973 Allegations:He abused a 15-year-old boy in 1974 and received pornographic material in 1989. Posts:St. Ann Church, Chester County (1974 case; principal of St. James Catholic High School for Boys in Chester (1989 case). Church response:When the national scandal broke in 2002, the church placed him on leave. Status:Brugger, now 58, was removed from active ministry in 2004. Removal from the priesthood is pending, according to information on the archdiocese Web site. James J. Brzyski Ordained:1977 Allegations:He was described in the grand jury report as one of the archdiocese's "most brutal abusers emotionally as well as physically." His confirmed victim count was 17, and the grand jury said it could have been far higher. In one case, he is alleged to have repeatedly anally raped a 12-year-old boy after falsely convincing the boy that his mother approved the sex acts. Posts:St. John the Evangelist, Bucks County; St. Cecilia, Philadelphia. Church response:After a complaint was filed in 1984, Brzyski admitted to a church official that he was a child molester. He was removed from his duties, but parishioners were told nothing. As a result, he kept visiting the family of one accuser, who says the abuse continued for four more years. A priest who knew of the abuse told The Inquirer that he was instructed not to tell anyone. "This comes from the highest authority. You're to keep your mouth shut," he was told. Brzyski left active ministry and took a teaching job in Metuchen, N.J. Later, he moved to Chesapeake, Va., where he remained a priest with restrictions on his ministry. He was arrested in Virginia in 2002 on charges of molesting a teenager, but the charge was dismissed. Status:He was defrocked this year. John A. Cannon Ordained:1948 Allegations:He abused eight male teenagers in the 1950s and 1960s. Posts:Roman Catholic High School and residence at St. Monica, Philadelphia. Church response:He was ordered in 1964 to "desist" and transferred to St. Eugene, in Delaware County as an assistant pastor. He taught for two decades at Cardinal O'Hara High School, Delaware County. The church barred him from priestly duties in 2004. Status:Cannon, now 83, agreed last year to accept church supervision. Pasquale R. Catullo Ordained:1963 Allegations:He abused a female student on a date not specified in the report. Posts:Archbishop Kennedy High School and his residence at SS. Cosmas and Damian, both in Montgomery County. Church response:Notified of the abuse in 1969, the church took no action for 15 years. Status:Catullo, now 75, also agreed last year to church supervision. Gerard W. Chambers

Ordained:1934 Allegations:He molested six altar boys in the 1950s, and anally and orally raped at least one victim. The jury said he was suspected of widespread sexual abuse in a 29-year career of active priesthood. One victim attempted suicide and was institutionalized at a state mental hospital. Posts:Four victims described sexual abuse by Chambers at St. Gregory in West Philadelphia and Seven Dolors in Montgomery County. Church response:The archdiocese repeatedly reassigned Chambers to parishes where he had access to children, making him, at one point, chaplain to an orphanage for boys. He repeatedly was placed on health leave between reassignments. In 1963, he was placed on permanent health leave. Status:Chambers died in 1974 at 67. Richard J. Cochrane Ordained:1972 Allegations:He sexually assaulted a 14-year-old male student in 1991. Post:Malvern Preparatory School, Chester County. Church response:He was arrested in 1999 and charged with sexual assault after the victim filed a criminal complaint. Status:Cochrane, now 60, was sentenced in 2003 to 11/2 to four years in prison. John P. Connor Ordained:1962 Allegations:He was arrested in 1984 on charges of molesting a 14-year-old male student while on a weekend trip to Cape May. Connor, who admitted the attack, was permitted to undergo treatment at a church-affiliated institution in Toronto. Post:Theology teacher at Bishop Eustace Preparatory School, Camden County. Church response:After Connor's arrest, Bevilacqua accepted his transfer to Pittsburgh, when Bevilacqua headed that diocese, and then to Philadelphia. This was done, the jury said, under a policy of "bishops helping bishops." Bevilacqua told the pastor supervising Connor in Philadelphia that he had transferred there to be near his sick mother - saying nothing about his sex abuse. At the parish, Connor showered attention and gifts on one boy, the grand jury said. The jury also said that Bevilacqua's testimony about his knowledge of Connor's sex abuse was "untruthful." Status:Connor, now 73, retired in 2002. James J. Coonan Ordained:1965 Allegations:He was involved with a 14-year-old male and a 15-year-old male in 1966 or 1967. Post:Queen of the Universe, Bucks County. Church response:After the complaint was made in 2002, the church limited Coonan's duties to saying private Masses and further restricted him in 2004. Status:Coonan, now 68, retired in 2002 and agreed last year to live under church supervision. Nicholas V. Cudemo Ordained:1963

Allegations:A church official called him "one of the sickest people I ever knew." He had a pattern of molesting and sexually assaulting grade-school and teenage girls in parishes and Catholic schools in the archdiocese from 1964 to 1985. The grand jury said Cudemo raped an 11-year-old and later helped her get an abortion; molested a fifth grader in the confessional; invoked God to seduce and shame his victims; and maintained sexually abusive relationships with several girls simultaneously. Posts:St. Stanislaus and Archbishop Kennedy High School in Montgomery County; Cardinal Dougherty High School and St. John Neumann High School in Philadelphia; and residences at SS. Cosmas and Damian and St. Titus, Montgomery County, and St. Helena, Center Square. Church response:The diocese transferred him from residence to residence, parish to parish, and school to school. Cudemo refused to undergo inpatient hospitalization. After the national scandal erupted, his duties as a priest were curtailed. Status:Cudemo, now 69, was defrocked this year. John J. Delli Carpini Ordained:1976 Allegations:He molested a 13-year-old boy from the time the victim was an eighth grader in 1977 until 1983. Posts:St. Luke the Evangelist, Montgomery County; St. John the Evangelist, Philadelphia; Roman Catholic High School, Philadelphia; and residence at St. Monica, Philadelphia. Church response:He was placed on six-month leave in 1998. Therapists diagnosed him as having "a sexual disorder." He was reassigned as a chaplain to a home for retired nuns and then placed on administrative leave in 2002. He was removed from ministry in 2004. Status:Delli Carpini, now 56, was defrocked this month. Edward M. DePaoli Ordained:1970 Allegations:While a teacher of morals and ethics at an archdiocese high school in 1985, he was arrested on child pornography charges when porn worth $15,000 was found in his room at Holy Martyrs rectory in Montgomery County. He was convicted in 1986 and sentenced to one year on probation. On three later occasions, child pornography and "inappropriate magazines" were found in his possession. Posts:Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Bucks County; Bishop McDevitt High School, Montgomery County; St. John the Baptist, Philadelphia; and St. Gabriel Rectory, Montgomery County. Church response:After the conviction, Bevilacqua advised in the memo that "for the present time, it might to more advisable for [Father DePaoli] to return to the active ministry in another diocese." This would "put a sufficient period between the publicity and the reinstatement in the active ministry of the archdiocese," Bevilacqua wrote. The report said a New Jersey diocese then took in DePaoli, just as Bevilacqua had accepted Connor after his conviction. After his stay in New Jersey, DePaoli returned to a Philadelphia parish. A nun then complained that his behavior there made her worry about the safety of children. She was fired from her position, the jury said. Status:DePaoli, now 60, was defrocked this year. Michael J. Donofrio Ordained:1976 Allegations:He abused a male teenage parish worker in 1982 and 1983, the report said. In a separate

filing with the grand jury, Donofrio said there was "absolutely no truth" to the allegation. Post:St. Thomas Aquinas, Philadelphia. Church response:The archdiocese sought in 2003 to have him relieved of his duties. Status:Despite archdiocese efforts, Donofrio, now 55, is working as a missionary in Peru. William J. Dougherty Ordained:1969 Allegations:He abused a female high school student at a time and place not specified in the report. Church response:Restrictions were imposed on his ministry in 2004. Status:Dougherty, now 62, requested the permission of the Vatican last year to leave the priesthood. Philip J. Dowling Ordained:1956 Allegations:He abused two sisters, 10 and 11, in the 1960s, the grand jury said. Posts:Corpus Christi, Philadelphia; and St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, Montgomery County. Church response:The church barred Dowling from ministry this year after The Inquirer published an article in which he admitted abusing one of the sisters. Status:Dowling, now 76, is retired and living under church supervision according to information on the archdiocese Web site. Peter J. Dunne Ordained:1954 Allegations:He sexually abused a 14-year-old male beginning in 1958 and at least three others over an unspecified period. He was diagnosed as an "untreatable pedophile." Posts:Cardinal Dougherty High School, Philadelphia; residence, St. Bartholomew, Philadelphia. He was assistant director of the archdiocese scouting program. Church response:The church permitted him to remain an active priest for seven years after receiving information in 1986 about his sexual abuse of an altar boy. Status:Dunne, now 79, retired in 1995 to Kintnersville, Pa., where, according to the grand jury, he "was known to take boys for sleepovers" at his rural cabin. He agreed last year to live under church supervision. Thomas J. Durkin Ordained:1964 Allegations:He molested eight boys, most between 11 and 14, from 1964 to 1966. Posts:St. Charles Borromeo, Bucks County; Holy Savior, Linwood; and Holy Spirit, Delaware County. Church response:The diocese transferred him from parish to parish. Durkin left active ministry in 1968. Status:Durkin, now 67, was defrocked this year. James M. Dux Ordained:1948 Allegations:He abused at least 13 boys and girls from the 1960s to the 1980s. Among other acts, he is accused of molesting a 9-year-old boy while a summer guest at the boy's family home in Michigan. Posts:St. Anthony of Padua, Montgomery County; St. John the Baptist, Philadelphia; St. Philip Neri and St. Eugene, Delaware County.

Church response:The church, after transferring him among parishes, directed him in 1995 to have no contact with children. Status:Dux, now 82, retired in 1994. He agreed last year to live under church supervision. Leonard A. Furmanski Ordained:1959 Allegations:Furmanski abused children throughout his 44 years as a teacher, principal and pastor. Among other offenses, he molested a Catholic high school student in Delaware County after the student came to him for help after being raped by another teacher there. He lay on top of a 12-year-old girl, rubbing his penis against her on the pretense of sex education. He arranged for sexual encounters between this girl and an altar boy, asking about their sex later. Posts:Cardinal O'Hara High School in Delaware County; St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, Bucks County; Sacred Heart, Bridgeport. Church response:In part by providing therapists with inadequate information about Furmanski's conduct, the archdiocese twice cleared the priest of being an abuser, the grand jury said. It also bullied one victim, accusing him of seeking money and telling his wife she might lose her job if her husband persisted with his complaint. In 2003, in a new round of interrogation by church officials, Furmanski admitted to "fondling boys" and was removed from any church assignments. Status:Furmanski, now 73, lives under supervision at a church retirement home in Darby. Francis J. Gallagher Ordained:1973 Allegations:Gallagher was arrested in 1989 on charges of soliciting sex in Sea Isle City, N.J., from two young men, age 18 and 20. Shortly after the arrest, he admitted to church officials that he had abused two teenage brothers at an unspecified time and place. Post:Cardinal Dougherty High School, Philadelphia, at time of arrest. Church response:After Gallagher received therapy, he was assigned to Immaculate Conception Church in Jenkintown. He worked there for nine years, with no restrictions on access to children, then at another parish with a school. Status:After the national clergy scandal broke in 2002, the church fired Gallagher as a priest, but told him his education degree might help him find a new job. Gallagher, now 60, became a teacher of students at colleges left unidentified in the grand jury report. Removal from the priesthood is pending, according to information on the archdiocese Web site. Joseph P. Gallagher Ordained:1973 Allegations:While assigned to the large St. Monica's parish in South Philadelphia, he abused a 12-yearold boy at an unspecified location. Post:St. Monica's, Philadelphia. Church response:After the church received the complaint about the boy in 1974, Gallagher underwent therapy, then was sent to a new parish. Status:In 2002, he was put on leave. Gallagher, now 58, was barred last year from any priestly service, but was left in a church facility to live under supervision. Stanley M. Gana Ordained:1970

Allegations:Gana sexually abused "countless" boys, the grand jury report said, some for years. Posts:Our Lady of Calvary and Ascension parishes, Philadelphia. Church response:When a seminarian came forward in 1991 to say Gana had abused him, the report says, the archdiocese launched an investigation of the seminarian, kicking him out. Mgsr. William J. Lynn, the chief investigator of abuse, told the seminarian that Gana had not only abused children, but slept with women, stolen church money and abused alcohol. "You see," Lynn was quoted as saying, "he's not a pure pedophile." Status:Gana, now 63, was removed from ministry in 2002, after the scandal broke. He is now living under church supervision in Philadelphia, according to information on the archdiocese Web site. Joseph P. Gausch Ordained:1945 Allegations:Gausch abused young boys - continuing to do so even after victims had come forward. The abuse included fondling, masturbation, oral sex and attempted anal rape. He told one victim no one would believe him because he was black. Posts:St Joseph, Carbon County; Our Lady of Peace, Delaware County; Queen of the Universe, Bucks County; Good Shepherd, Philadelphia; St. Stanislaus, Montgomery County; and St. Bridget, Philadelphia. Church response:In 1974, after Gausch admitted he was a molester, the church's chancellor wrote: "because of the possible future scandal, we will transfer him in the near future." Status:Gausch died in 1999 at 83. Francis A. Giliberti Ordained:1970 Allegations:In the 1970s, Giliberti was said by students to run a so-called anti-masturbation "boot camp" and would walk in on students while they were masturbating. One victim was so traumatized by sexual acts with Giliberti that he later set his penis on fire with lighter fluid. Posts:He taught at Cardinal O'Hara High School and lived at Nativity B.V.M., both in Delaware County. Church response:After two victims came forward in 2002, the church obtained a psychological evaluation that found Giliberti no threat. Two years later, a third victim surfaced. That year, the church deemed charges against him credible and removed him from ministry. Status:Giliberti, now 68, is living under church supervision. John E. Gillespie Ordained:1953 Allegations:In 1994, two brothers alleged abuse by Gillespie. In 1997, the mother of another boy complained that Gillespie had asked in the confessional, "Do you touch yourself? Did you ever sexually hurt yourself?" The church said the seal of the confessional barred any investigation. After another complaint, in 2000, Gillespie admitted being a molester. Posts:Immaculate Conception, Bucks County; Our Lady of Calvary, Philadelphia; Mother of Divine Providence, Montgomery County. Church response:Therapists warned the church in 2000 that Gillespie wanted to apologize to victims, warning: "If he pursues making amends, he could bring forth more difficulty for himself and legal jeopardy." Status:After his admission, Gillespie was ordered to resign as pastor of Our Lady of Calvary, but was named emeritus pastor. In 2004, Gillespie, now 77, was ordered to be in a supervised church facility. Thomas J. Grumm

Ordained:1975 Allegations:Grumm abused a 15-year-old boy in about 1976 and another teenage boy in the late 1980s. Post:Cardinal Dougherty High School, Philadelphia. Church response:After complaints were made in 2001, Grumm was told to retire. Status:Grumm, now 56, was barred from priestly service in 2004 and told to live under church supervision. LOAD-DATE: September 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 Philadelphia Inquirer All Rights Reserved

203 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Centre Daily Times September 23, 2005 Friday

Advocates urge lifting limits on child sex-abuse cases
BYLINE: By Joann Loviglio SECTION: A; Pg. 7 LENGTH: 545 words The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA -- Even if Pennsylvania lengthens its statute of limitations for child sex abuse lawsuits, as recommended by a grand jury in the Philadelphia archdiocese probe, advocates also urge that the statute be lifted entirely for at least a year to allow even older cases to move forward. Passing a law to abolish the statute of limitations would "protect our grandkids from that day forward, but it doesn't address past abuse," David Clohessy, national director of the Survival Network of Those Abused by Priests and Other Clergy, said Thursday. "And abusive priests get a free pass and access to a current crop of victims." Clohessy said that states should look at what California has done. The state lifted the statute of limitations for civil lawsuits in sex-abuse cases for all of 2003. The Philadelphia grand jury on Wednesday released a scathing report documenting assaults on minors by more than 60 priests since 1967 and alleged that church leaders covered up the abuse, a claim the archdiocese denied. Among its recommendations on combating the molestation of children by priests, the grand jury recommended lengthening or abolishing the statute of limitations for sexual abuse. Amid the clergy abuse scandal nationwide, the statute of limitations in Pennsylvania for victims to lodge

sexual abuse allegations was extended in 2002 to a victim's 30th birthday; victims previously had only two years after their 18th birthday. "Victims ... are simply not in a position emotionally and psychologically to come forward ... until well into adulthood," said Deputy District Attorney Ronald Eisenberg. "So even the somewhat longer statutes applicable to child sexual abuse weren't long enough." John Salveson, of the Survival Network's Philadelphia chapter, said that in several weeks the group will present its suggestions to change the laws, including a one-year window in which people with cases beyond the statute of limitations can file civil suits. After California abolished its statute of limitations, hundreds of victims of abusive clergy, coaches, teachers, Scout leaders and others "were able to seek justice in the courts, expose their persecutors, warn parents and protect children," Clohessy said. He said that about a dozen other states are considering similar measures, including Ohio and New York, where similar bills have passed one chamber of the legislature and are awaiting debate in the other. In Illinois, a law was passed that suspends the statute of limitations when an abuser uses "coercion, duress or deceit to intimidate a victim, which covers most cases of molestation," Clohessy said. However, he and others said that convincing lawmakers to support such measures can be a tough sell. Some states have seen lobbyists from the church rise in opposition to such bills, saying they could harm many religious and children's institutions that have nothing to do with abuse scandals. "I have spoken to the legislature before and looked at the notes of the legislative history of the statute of limitations (legislative proposals), and one of the impediments is the objection of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference ... to enlarging the statute of limitations," District Attorney Lynne Abraham said. LOAD-DATE: September 26, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 Centre Daily Times (State College, PA) All Rights Reserved

204 of 265 DOCUMENTS Lincolnshire Echo September 20, 2005 My sex abuse ordeal at hands of my evil dad SECTION: News; Courts; CrownCourt; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 565 words

Brave Duncan Fairhurst helped jail his father - 30 years after being a victim of his evil sex assaults. The 35-year-old was raped by his dad during a 10-year ordeal which began when he was just four years old. The abuse only ended when Duncan tried to kill himself with an overdose, aged 14. Today, 69-year-old Clifford Fairhurst was beginning an 11-year prison sentence.

A judge at Lincoln Crown Court called him an "unmitigatedly wicked" man after he was found guilty of systematic indecent assault and rape against two young boys. And now Duncan has waived his right to anonymity to reveal how his father's attacks almost cost him his life. "The abuse started when I was very young, so at the time I thought everything that he did was normal," he said. "It was only when I got to puberty and started fancying girls that I realised that there was something wrong with what he was doing." Duncan began drinking and taking drugs to try to numb his emotional pain. He was eventually admitted to hospital after taking an overdose of paracetamol. Although the abuse ended shortly after, he barely spoke to his father and moved out at 18. In fact, it wasn't until 2003 when he saw his dad walking hand in hand with a five-year-old boy that he decided to report the abuse to police. He said: "That was the moment when I realised that if I didn't speak out other children could suffer like I did." Yesterday, Fairhurst, formerly of St Michael's Close, Billinghay, but now living in Julian Road, Leicester, was jailed by Judge John Machin. Judge Machin said Fairhurst was "concerned only with satisfying his perverted and constant lust." A week-long trial heard how he began abusing his son when he was six. In the 1980s he then began abusing another boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons. A jury found him guilty of 14 counts of indecent assault, indecency with a child and serious sexual assault, dating from between 1976 and 1989. At an earlier hearing, Fairhurst had pleaded guilty to four charges of indecent assault and four charges of indecency with a child. These pleas were reflected in his sentence. After hearing the sentence Duncan said he was delighted and relieved to see his father finally brought to justice. But he also warned that there could be dozens more of his father's victims in Lincolnshire. He says his father, a poultry dealer, had been involved with youth football and Scout groups in Lincolnshire, and may have been using them to lure victims. "I think there could be many more victims out there needing help, people who have never spoken out," he warned. "It was only once I reported him to the police that I started to think about it, and I realised that my father had always been involved in various children's groups. "He was involved in other youth groups, church groups and boys football clubs in Sleaford, Ruskington and Billinghay." He also thinks his father may have been part of a paedophile ring, who swapped images of abused children, as he was photographed and videoed being raped by Fairhurst. Duncan believes these fears have not been fully investigated by Lincolnshire Police and is planning to complain to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. The jury at Lincoln Crown Court cleared Fairhurst of two charges, one of sexual assault and one of attempted sexual assault. LOAD-DATE: September 21, 2005 LANGUAGE: English © Copyright 2005 Lincolnshire Echo

205 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Mirror September 19, 2005, Monday

250 KIDS IN SOCCER 'ABUSED'
BYLINE: BY JUSTINE SMITH SECTION: Eire Edition; NEWS; Pg. 17 LENGTH: 156 words HIGHLIGHT: VICTIM: Star Brazil

250 suspected cases of child abuse at British soccer clubs are being probed by FA chiefs, it was revealed yesterday. And two other cases are being examined at Premiership clubs. Most incidents are of bullying, an Independent Football Commission report out this week says. But some involve paedophiles posing as talent scouts. Coaches, adult players, refs and parents also pose a risk, it adds. In the past five years the FA has banned around 70 people from the game. IFC chief Prof Derek Fraser said: "Children playing football must be protected from abuse." His report makes 23 suggestions, including curbs on identifying youngsters in matchday programmes. In 1998 Celtic Boys' Club coach Jim Torbett was convicted of sex abuse. His victims included ex-Man United star Alan Brazil. This year Christopher Norris, youth coach at Scottish side Morton, was found guilty of having lewd photos of children. LOAD-DATE: September 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 MGN Ltd.

206 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Mirror September 19, 2005, Monday

250 KIDS IN SOCCER 'ABUSED'
SECTION: Scots Edition; NEWS; Pg. 19 LENGTH: 156 words HIGHLIGHT: VICTIM: Star Brazil

SOME 250 suspected cases of child abuse at soccer clubs are being probed by FA chiefs, it was revealed yesterday. And two other cases are being examined at Premiership clubs. Most incidents are of bullying, an Independent Football Commission report out this week says. But some involve paedophiles posing as talent scouts. Coaches, adult players, refs and parents also pose a risk, it adds. In the past five years the FA has banned around 70 people from the game. IFC chief Prof Derek Fraser said: "Children playing football must be protected from abuse." His report makes 23 suggestions, including curbs on identifying youngsters in matchday programmes. In 1998 Celtic Boys' Club coach Jim Torbett was convicted of sex abuse. His victims included ex-Man United star Alan Brazil. This year Christopher Norris, youth coach at Scottish side Morton, was found guilty of having lewd photos of children. LOAD-DATE: September 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 MGN Ltd.

207 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Chronicle of Philanthropy September 15, 2005

Making Charities Accountable
BYLINE: Ben Gose SECTION: MANAGING; Pg. 29 LENGTH: 2287 words John Hardwicke Jr. says he was molested almost daily during his second year at the American Boychoir School, in Princeton, N.J., in 1970 and 1971.

Donald B. Edwards, president of the prestigious private school, says he has no reason to doubt that at least some sexual abuse occurred. But whether Mr. Hardwicke can sue the boarding school for the abuse he endured is a question that is now under consideration by the New Jersey Supreme Court. New Jersey is one of only a handful of states that provide total immunity for charities from lawsuits that charge them with negligence, the legal term for the failure to provide adequate care for others. A handful of other states allow such lawsuits, but place limits on how much money charities have to pay for harm they caused. In Massachusetts, for example, people who can prove they were hurt by a charity can obtain no more than $20,000. Corporations do not get similar protections in the states. State measures shielding charities from lawsuits were established to ensure that donations went to charitable activities rather than to legal payments, and they were common throughout the United States roughly a century ago. But most states have eliminated or sharply pared such protections since the 1940s, largely due to court rulings that found that the immunity was unfair to people who suffered at the hands of a charitable organization. New Jersey's Battle The immunity statutes are now under assault in some of the states in which they remain, including New Jersey and Massachusetts, where critics are arguing that the laws are archaic and unjust. While Mr. Hardwicke tests the strength of New Jersey's Charitable Immunity Act in court -- he is attempting to argue that the school's involvement in the abuse was intentional, rather than an act of negligence -- a bill in the state Legislature would exempt sexual abuse from the act's protections. The bill has passed the Senate, and advocates think they have enough votes in the General Assembly. Albio Sires, a Democrat who is the speaker of the General Assembly, has not yet scheduled it for a vote. Only one charity -- the New Jersey Catholic Conference -- has publicly lobbied to preserve the act without changes. Critics of charitable-immunity laws say that when the vast majority of the very organizations that theoretically benefit from the laws are reluctant to defend them, it is time for such laws to go. "It is very much in the interest of charities to oppose charitable immunity," says Harvey P. Dale, director of the National Center on Philanthropy and the Law at New York University. "In the competition for donations, and fees for service, enlightened charities would want to say, 'We give you as good or better care than in the for-profit world.' I don't think they can do that by saying, "By the way, if you get hurt, screw you.'" Defenders of immunity statutes argue that they are necessary because charities are far more financially vulnerable than for-profit corporations. Mr. Edwards, who arrived at American Boychoir in 1999 and has not personally been accused of abuse, says that the school has made a good-faith effort to reach a financial settlement with Mr. Hardwicke. Mr. Edwards says that Mr. Hardwicke told the school's former president that his real goal was to shut the school down. Keith E. Smith, a lawyer for Mr. Hardwicke, says the settlement offer -- reportedly $200,000, although Mr. Smith declined to confirm -- was inadequate, and that his client has no ambitions of forcing the school to close. "If a plaintiff's goal is to put a legitimate charity out of business, I think the school's attorneys really don't have any choice but to take advantage of what the law says," says Mr. Edwards. Legal Challenge The Hardwicke case centers on whether New Jersey's immunity law protects charities from any civil lawsuit, or only from lawsuits in which the charity was charged with negligence, rather than with acting intentionally to cause harm. Mr. Hardwicke, who now lives in rural Maryland, says that his abuse at American Boychoir was coordinated by Donald Hanson, who was the choirmaster, but that he was also attacked by at least three other staff members, including the headmaster, Anthony Edward Battaglia, according to court documents. Mr. Hanson, who is accused of molesting several students during his 12 years at the school, was not immediately fired when the school learned of the abuse of a student in 1981, some 10 years after Mr. Hard-

wicke left the school. However, Mr. Hanson was required to move off campus and his contact with students was restricted. The school's board kept Mr. Hanson on for several more months because firing him would have forced the cancellation of a major tour by the choir, and it believed the financial fallout might have forced the school to close, according to court testimony by school officials. In March 1982, five months after learning about the sexual abuse, the board accepted Mr. Hanson's resignation for reasons of "personal health." The board's chairman, Stephen N. Howard, wrote a letter to parents praising Mr. Hanson, saying: "His story at the Boychoir School is one of total devotion to the boys and dedication to the best interests of the School." Mr. Hanson, who has not responded to the lawsuit or spoken to the news media, apparently lives north of Toronto (he's a native of Canada), but may have left the country. Mr. Battaglia, the former headmaster, who lives in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., has denied molesting any students. The school's actions go beyond mere negligence to reckless indifference to the welfare of students, Mr. Smith says. "Charities should not be permitted to put dollars ahead of the children, particularly when we're talking about the sexual abuse of our children," he says. But Jay H. Greenblatt, the school's lawyer, says the Hardwicke camp is making a seman-tics argument, and that the Charitable Immunity Act was clearly intended to cover cases like this one. "If there is fault by the school, it's in negligently hiring, supervising, and maintaining the staff," Mr. Greenblatt says. "You're back to negligence again. It's a matter of how you want to use the words." In January 2003, Judge Jack Sabatino of New Jersey Superior Court sided with the school, writing that the immunity law "insulates charitable organizations from liability for any degree of tortious conduct, no matter how flagrant." Following that ruling, Mr. Hardwicke persuaded Lawrence Lessig, a former classmate at American Boychoir, to join his legal team. Mr. Lessig, a well-known Stanford University law professor, argued before a three-judge appellate-court panel that granting immunity to American Boychoir in this case would turn New Jersey into "a haven for sex abuse by charitable institutions." In February 2004, the appellate court sided 2-1 in favor of Mr. Hardwicke. "A child's fundamental right to bodily integrity cannot be found secondary to a charity's well-being," the court said. Legislation Pending The case was heard by the state's Supreme Court last November, but the court has not yet issued a ruling. Both sides in the Hardwicke case think the court may be waiting to see whether the Legislature makes changes to the Charitable Immunity Act. The New Jersey bill would void immunity for churches and charities when negligent hiring or management allowed pedophiles to sexually abuse children. "These laws were intended to protect institutions from frivolous lawsuits, but certainly not from cases of gross negligence," says Mark Crawford, who says he was sexually abused by a Catholic clergy member as a boy in New Jersey, is lobbying for the change in the immunity law. William F. Bolan Jr., executive director of the New Jersey Catholic Conference, which opposes the bill, notes that under current legislation, people who say they were abused can still sue the individual perpetrators. He believes it is unfair to saddle charities and churches with liability for sexual abuse. "The fault that gives rise to the sexual abuse is not discernable to the employer, since there is no psychological test that would uncover an individual with a proclivity to child sexual abuse," he says. Mr. Bolan says he has urged other charities in New Jersey to join him in opposing the legislation, but their executives either "don't want to stick their heads about the foxhole, or they say, 'It's your problem.'" Such a stance is shortsighted, he believes, because any number of organizations could face the kinds of lawsuits over sexual abuse that now confront the Catholic Church in parishes throughout the country. "Every day that I open a newspaper, I see stories about sexual abuse by someone -- cops, teachers, Scout leaders," Mr. Bolan says.

Mr. Sires, the New Jersey speaker of the Assembly, has waited nearly a year to schedule the immunity legislation for a vote. Joe Donnelly, a spokesman for Mr. Sires, says the bill "is still very much alive" but that some lawmakers want to add a provision that would, after a certain date, prevent people from coming forward with new abuse charges when the abuse occurred decades earlier. "Everyone is in agreement that all victims that we currently are aware of will be able to have their day in court," Mr. Donnelly says. Massachusetts Cases In Massachusetts, the charitable-immunity law dates to 1876, and was modified by the legislature in 1971 to permit damage awards against charities of no more than $20,000. Bills that would raise the ceiling have failed in recent years, though many legal observers in the state believe the cap is far too low. "It should be re-examined," says Marc G. Perlin, associate dean of Suffolk University Law School, in Boston. "There's no reason that a charitable organization or any other organization should not be liable for its negligence." Trial lawyers in Massachusetts have tried to find ways around the cap. Lawyers for the family of Howard Reid, who died in January 2004 after obesity surgery at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, are trying to circumvent the cap by arguing that the hospital falsely advertised on the radio and in newspapers that the procedure was safe and effective. Mr. Reid's heart stopped beating following a gastric-banding operation, his family says in a lawsuit in which it is asking the hospital to pay $8.5-million in damages. The state's consumer-protection statute allows people to sue businesses for unfair and deceptive trade practices, and the case is expected to make clear whether individuals can sue nonprofit hospitals under the statute. David W. White-Lief, a personal-injury lawyer in Boston, says a 2004 decision by the state's Supreme Judicial Court in another case may have opened the door for consumer-protection claims, but he says it would be a mistake to underestimate the staying power of the law capping damages against charities. "The Massachusetts courts have consistently and vigilantly guarded this immunity, even though they've criticized it for being out of touch with the costs of mistakes," he says. A year ago, a Superior Court judge in Hampden County, Mass., upheld the $20,000 cap in a case brought by a woman who was abused at age 10 by a former priest in the Catholic Diocese of Worcester. "It is well established that charitable immunity and charitable limitation of damages apply to cases involving negligent hiring and retention," Judge John A. Agostini wrote. Mr. Perlin, the law-school dean, says the limits of charitable-immunity penalties are generally more problematic with sexual-abuse cases than with medical malpractice. "The issue becomes a starker one," Mr. Perlin says. "Unlike a hospital, where doctors have funds, the parties that have been negligent in the sex-abuse cases often don't have funds." Lost Medical Records The state's highest court has upheld the damages cap even in some extreme cases. In one closely followed case, the family of a newborn who suffered severe brain damage shortly after birth at Brigham and Women's Hospital, in 1986, was unable to skirt the cap after the hospital lost medical records during the crucial period when the boy, Dylan Keene, went into septic shock. The family's lawyer, Chris A. Milne, had argued that the charitable-immunity cap should be struck in Dylan Keene's case because the missing records prevented his client from being able to sue the individual doctors and nurses who may have committed malpractice. Lower courts agreed, removing the cap and awarding the boy $4.1-million. In 2003, the state's Supreme Judicial Court found the hospital liable for the damage, but ruled that the cap on damages was a mandatory limitation, and reduced the award to $20,000. When Mr. Keene turned 17, his family decided to place him in a facility, rather than keep him at home, because they feared they could not continue to provide in-home care, in part due to reasons of cost, according to Mr. Milne.

"Why we can't find some common ground in providing for these families when we have this horrible result is really a tragedy," Mr. Milne says. Mr. Dale of New York University says that doing away with the immunity laws would end the negative attention that all nonprofit groups get when people hear about cases like Mr. Keene's and Mr. Hardwicke's. What's more, he says, the abolition of immunity laws would give charities more incentive to put in place systems that prevent harm in the first place. "When you create a system that gives you immunity regardless of fault," Mr. Dale says, "you create a system in which there's no particular incentive to avoid fault." LOAD-DATE: October 19, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 The Chronicle of Philanthropy

208 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Boston Herald September 2, 2005 Friday ALL EDITIONS

Jury finds former pro hockey scout not guilty of rape
BYLINE: By DAVE WEDGE SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 025 LENGTH: 206 words A respected pro hockey scout from Dorchester has been cleared of rape charges and will now try to rebuild his ``ruined'' life, his attorney said last night. Robert Richardson lost his job with the National Hockey League's Calgary Flames and had to shut down his successful International Hockey Academy, which he ran at Boston University for years, after being accused of rape by a former player. After a two-week trial, a Suffolk Superior Court jury deliberated for seven hours before finding Richardson not guilty yesterday of rape and indecent assault charges. ``The tragedy is that so much damage has been done to all he's accomplished over the years,'' said Richardson's attorney, Robert George. ``He has been ruined by these unfounded allegations. He has to figure out if he even wants to go back (to coaching).'' Richardson's accuser, now 22, testified that he became a drug addict after being raped by Richardson in 1998 as a teen at the BU hockey camp. The man reported the alleged sex crimes to a therapist in 2002 and hired attorney Mitchell Garabedian, who represented victims of the clergy sex abuse scandal. In a statement, Suffolk District Attorney Dan Conley said he was ``disappointed'' by the verdict but stood by the charges.

LOAD-DATE: September 2, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

209 of 265 DOCUMENTS San Jose Mercury News (California) August 27, 2005 Saturday MO1 EDITION

What's a parent to do when kids' coaches arrested?
BYLINE: By Patty Fisher; Mercury News SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 678 words I'm shell-shocked. Just a week after my younger daughter's middle-school volleyball coach was jailed on charges of seducing a 14-year-old student, I learn that my older daughter's high-school soccer coach has been charged with serving liquor to 18-year-old girls during a wild party that included streaking and group sex. People I trusted with my kids. Two of them in the same week. What's going on here? Lately there has been a steady flow of allegations of sexual abuse by local coaches, Scout leaders and teachers. I don't think there's more abuse going on; I think there's just more willingness to report it. Something opened the flood gates. Maybe it was the priest sex abuse. Maybe it was Megan's Law. But with each new report, we wonder: Are our kids safe? Why didn't we see this coming? And what could we have done to prevent it? ''The questions you're asking are the kind of questions we're asking ourselves right now,'' said Marilyn Cook, associate superintendent at the Palo Alto Unified School District. ''Good Lord, something like this shakes us all up. Everything we do we're going to re-examine.'' Cook plans to bring coaches, students and parents together to make sure everyone is clear about the boundaries. Good plan. It should have been in place years ago. When I heard that Jordan Middle School gym teacher Bill Giordano was in jail on charges of having a sexual relationship with a student years ago, my first thought was: Not Mr. G. He's such a great coach. He encouraged my daughter, stood up for her, helped her build self-confidence. Besides, I liked the guy. I was heartbroken -- and angry. How could he -- if he did -- do something so incredibly stupid? How could he let us all down? My second thought was: Maybe.

Mr. G. was always driving around with a bunch of girls in his Jeep. He took them to Jamba Juice on the way home from games. He let them hang out in his office off the gym. They joked with him, confided in him. Did we parents think this fraternizing might be out of bounds? Maybe. How many of us knew that the state interscholastic sports organization says coaches shouldn't give players rides? Did we do anything? No. When I heard the news about Jeff van Gastel, who coached the Palo Alto varsity girls soccer team to three conference championships in a row, I had a very different reaction. No heartbreak. Van Gastel was not particularly popular -- with the girls or the parents. He yelled at the team during games, played favorites, broke promises. Girls on the Paly team often complained to parents about him. We winced. But did we try to get him fired? No. Neither of these guys has been convicted. Even so, it's pretty clear their coaching days are over. What about other coaches? Palo Alto has some great ones, dedicated people who know the boundaries, who appreciate the important role sports can play in developing strong, self-confident girls. How do we support those coaches and keep our kids safe? Dick Held, a retired FBI special agent and a basketball dad who has coached at Jordan and Palo Alto High, has a unique perspective on the problem. For the past couple of years he's been consulting with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on its child sex abuse policy. ''Sports provide a unique opportunity for people who are not parents to have an effect on our children,'' he said. ''But we have to get people engaged in the notion that the safety of kids is everybody's responsibility.'' That means more folks who care about kids need to volunteer to coach. Parents have to show up to watch practices, and pick up their kids on time so coaches aren't left alone with them. It means we have to talk to our kids about what's OK and what's not, get to know the coaches and follow our instincts. That's the only way to keep our kids, and everyone else's kids, safe. As rough as this week has been for my family, there are families going through a kind of hell I never want to know. Patty Fisher writes about the Peninsula on Wednesday and Saturday. Contact her at pfisher@mercurynews.com LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 San Jose Mercury News All Rights Reserved

210 of 265 DOCUMENTS San Jose Mercury News (California) August 27, 2005 Saturday

A trusting relationship broken; AS ALLEGATIONS OF SEXUAL ABUSE IN LOCAL SCHOOLS COME OUT, DID PARENTS MISS EARLY SIGNS?
BYLINE: By Patty Fisher; Mercury News

LENGTH: 685 words I'm shell shocked. Just a week after my younger daughter's middle-school volleyball coach was jailed on charges of seducing a 14-year-old student, I learn that my older daughter's high-school soccer coach had been charged with serving liquor to 18-year-old girls during a wild party that included streaking and group sex. People I trusted with my kids. Two of them in the same week. What's going on here? Lately there has been a steady flow of allegations of sexual abuse by local coaches, scout leaders and teachers. I don't think there's more abuse going on; I think there's just more willingness to report it. Something opened the flood gates. Maybe it was the priest sex abuse. Maybe it was Megan's law. But with each new report, we wonder: Are our kids safe? Why didn't we see this coming? And what could we have done to prevent it? ''The questions you're asking are the kind of questions we're asking ourselves right now,'' said Marilyn Cook, associate superintendent at the Palo Alto Unified School District. ''Good Lord, something like this shakes us all up. Everything we do we're going to re-examine.'' Cook plans to bring coaches, students and parents together to make sure everyone is clear about the boundaries. Good plan. It should have been in place years ago. When I heard that Jordan Middle School gym teacher Bill Giordano was in jail on charges of having a sexual relationship with a student years ago, my first thought was: Oh no! Not Mr. G. He's such a great coach. He encouraged my daughter, stood up for her, helped her build selfconfidence. Besides, I liked the guy. I was heartbroken -- and angry. How could he -- if he did -- do something so incredibly stupid? How could he let us all down? My second thought was: Oh yes! We should have seen it coming. Mr. G. was always driving around with a bunch of girls in his Jeep. He took them to Jamba Juice on the way home from games. He let them hang out in his office off the gym. They joked with him, confided in him. Did we parents think this fraternizing might be out of bounds? Maybe. How many of us knew that the state interscholastic sports organization says coaches shouldn't give players rides. Did we do anything? No. When I heard the news about Jeff van Gastel, who coached the Palo Alto varsity girls soccer team to three conference championships in a row, I had a very different reaction. No heartbreak. Van Gastel was not particularly popular -- with the girls or the parents. He yelled at the team during games, played favorites, broke promises. Girls on the Paly team often complained to parents about him. We winced. But did we try to get him fired? No. Neither of these guys has been convicted. Even so, it's pretty clear their coaching days are over. What about other coaches? Palo Alto has some great ones, dedicated people who know the boundaries, who appreciate the important role sports can play in developing strong, self-confident girls. How do we support those coaches and keep our kids safe? Dick Held, a retired FBI special agent and a basketball dad who has coached at Jordan and Palo Alto High, has a unique perspective on the problem. For the past couple of years he's been consulting with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops on its child sex abuse policy. ''Sports provide a unique opportunity for people who are not parents to have an effect on our children,'' he said. ''But we have to get people engaged in the notion that the safety of kids is everybody's responsibility.''

That means more folks who care about kids need to volunteer to coach. Parents have to show up to watch practices, and pick up their kids on time so coaches aren't left alone with them. It means we have to talk to our kids about what's OK and what's not, get to know the coaches and follow our instincts. That's the only way to keep our kids, and everyone else's kids, safe. As rough as this week has been for my family, there are families going through a kind of hell I never want to know. Patty Fisher writes about the Peninsula on Wednesday and Saturday. Contact her at pfisher@mercurynews.com LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 San Jose Mercury News All Rights Reserved

211 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Denver Post August 26, 2005 Friday FINAL EDITION

A QUESTION OF TRUST - Colorado priest accused of abuse Giving justice time Legislators seek looser statutes of limitations BILLS IN THE WORKS One option is a one-year window for child sex-abuse suits regardless of when the incidents occurred.
BYLINE: Eric Gorski Denver Post Staff Writer SECTION: A SECTION; Pg. A-01 LENGTH: 955 words As allegations of child sex abuse build against a former priest of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Denver, at least two Colorado legislators are crafting bills that would loosen or do away with statutes of limitations for child sexual abuse. Democratic State Sen. Joan Fitz-Gerald, the Senate president and a Catholic, has filed paperwork to introduce a bill in 2006 that would give adults victimized as minors more time to file civil lawsuits. One strong possibility, she said, is legislation mirroring a California law that opened a one-year window for child sex-abuse lawsuits regardless of how long ago the incidents took place. State Rep. Rosemary Marshall, D-Denver, said she will introduce a bill that would eliminate the statute of limitations for criminal charges involving sexual offenses against children. Courts have held that such laws can apply only to future cases and not be retroactive, so victims from decades ago would not be able to bring charges. Both legislators said they were motivated by the clergy sexual-abuse scandal that has plagued U.S.

Catholic dioceses since 2002. In Colorado, 17 men have told The Denver Post in recent weeks that former priest Harold Robert White molested them over a 20-year period beginning in the 1960s. Evidence has surfaced showing the Denver archdiocese knew about complaints and continued to move him from parish to parish. Five men have filed lawsuits against the archdiocese claiming negligence for how it handled White, who left public ministry in 1993 and was defrocked last year. White has refused to say whether he has ever been accused of child abuse. In a brief TV interview Wednesday, White said the allegations against him contained "half-truths." The statute of limitations for negligence is generally two years, but the plaintiffs are arguing that the law allows for exemptions that apply to them. Fitz-Gerald proposes re-examining a Colorado law that states victims of child sexual abuse must take civil action by the time they are 24, except in rare circumstances, including cases of repressed memory. "Despite the archdiocese saying they are doing everything they can to create a safe atmosphere now, these victims were once little boys," she said. "There is some sense of justice not being satisfied, especially because there might be other offenders and the archdiocese is not willing to come forward with who they are." Fran Maier, chancellor of the Denver archdiocese, would not respond to Fitz-Gerald. Since the allegations against White surfaced, the archdiocese has stressed that it takes all allegations seriously, acts promptly and is committed to helping all involved heal. In California, hundreds of lawsuits were filed after the state, prompted by the clergy abuse crisis, abolished time-limit restrictions on civil suits for a year. Legislatures in New York and Ohio have pending legislation that would take the same step. "Let's see the extent of the problem," Fitz-Gerald said. "It might be something that allows victims to say that despite what they would have to go through to dredge this up again, there is justice to be had." Fitz-Gerald said any legislation dealing with the time limits would allow lawsuits against any individual or institution. Day-care centers, schools and groups such as the Boy Scouts could be sued. The Catholic Church strongly opposed the California law, arguing it was unconstitutional. Both Maier and Tim Dore, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, the public-policy arm of the state's three dioceses, said it is premature to comment on the proposal. "Truthfully, we haven't even thought enough about it to know what we're going to do," Dore said. Already allied with Fitz-Gerald is the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, a national support group that is advocating legislative fixes. "It's the best thing that could happen because that's what this is about - to change laws so victims of clergy abuse and any kind of child sex abuse can come forward, be heard and have some justice, closure and healing," said Colorado SNAP leader Troy Gray, who won a settlement in a lawsuit filed using California's one-year window. Marshall is proposing adding child sex abuse to the list of crimes that have no time restrictions for criminal prosecution: murder, kidnapping, forgery and treason. Under current state law governing child sex abuse, in most cases criminal charges cannot be pursued beyond the victim's 28th birthday. "These victims (accusing White) may not be helped by a new law," said Marshall, who was raised Catholic but is no longer practicing. "But it may be helpful for them to know Colorado is moving forward and that if it were to happen to other victims, there would be an ability to prosecute." Alaska and Maine have done away with criminal statutes of limitations for child sex assaults. Marshall said she has the support of the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault but has yet to talk to law enforcement or district attorneys. At this stage, the proposal is getting a mixed response. "I can see why a legislator might want to do that," said Cliff Riedel, Larimer County assistant district attor-

ney. "But in practice, the age of the cases and the loss of evidence is almost going to build in a statute of limitations because you're not going to be able to prove a case beyond a reasonable doubt very likely." But Eagle County District Attorney Mark Hurlbert supports dropping time restrictions on criminal cases, noting that the clergy abuse scandal has illustrated how difficult it can be for victims to come forward, even years later. "This might bring a prosecution and maybe get justice," Hurlbert said. Staff writer Eric Gorski can be reached at 303-820-1698 or egorski@denverpost.com. LOAD-DATE: August 26, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Denver Post All Rights Reserved

212 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 26, 2005 Friday Idaho Edition

Boys' ranch closure urged; Former resident says worker; sexually abused him in 1980s
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 836 words A former Morning Star Boys' Ranch resident who alleges he was sexually abused there called for its closure at a news conference Thursday. Michael Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said he lived in fear of the ranch's counselors in the early 1980s. In a lawsuit filed by two former residents this week, Gray alleged that a Morning Star counselor named James Clarke repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. "At the time, I just wanted someone to be my friend," Gray said at the news conference near the entrance to the 225-acre Catholic boys' ranch south of Spokane. "I did whatever he wanted me to." Spokeswoman P.J. Watters said Morning Star was "shocked" and "deeply saddened" by the accusations, and said the ranch remains dedicated to serving boys in need. "None of the allegations in the lawsuit have been proven," Watters said. "Anyone can say anything."

Watters said ranch policy prohibited her from disclosing whether Clarke worked at the ranch. The 12-page court file details allegations of physical and sexual assault stretching back to the 1950s. It accuses Morning Star officials of permitting the abuse and concealing it from state investigators at the Department of Social and Health Services. Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff, who represents 150 victims of clergy sexual abuse, said the two former residents, who came from troubled homes, were "perhaps the most vulnerable of any of the sex abuse victims I've represented in the past 10 years." "When men come forward and report similar kinds of acts, one has to ask what is Morning Star Boys' Ranch really about? What really went on here?" asked Kosnoff, who is representing the men along with Seattle attorney Michael Pfau. A second former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., alleges that in the 1960s two counselors forced several Morning Star boys to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their rectums. Late Thursday, another former resident of Morning Star agreed to talk to the newspaper and corroborated W.K's account that the counselors penetrated them with the flowers as a punishment when the boys were ill. "I don't know why they did it," he said. "Because they could. They were adults and we were kids." The Spokane man provided his name to The Spokesman-Review, but asked not to be identified because he does not want to be involved in the pending lawsuit. Founded by the Catholic Diocese of Spokane, the boys' ranch gained renown for caring for nearly 1,300 troubled boys, ages 10 to 18, since it opened in 1956. Several former residents have contacted The Spokesman-Review to report that Morning Star and the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner turned around their lives. Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest, went on temporary leave last month because of stress-related health problems. Mike Tornquist, administrator of the state's Division of Licensed Resources, said his staff has made several visits to Morning Star in recent months. "We have focused our efforts on doing health and safety inspections on the kids who are currently there," Tornquist said. "We're not finding any reason to be concerned about the current situation." Tornquist said it is "very unlikely we'd be able to do anything with something that far back unless it involves current staff." "Billy," identified in court documents as W.K., said he was unable to attend Thursday's news conference because of anxiety. "I'm broke down," he said. "I just couldn't stand in front of those cameras." W.K., now 50, said Morning Star used him in a promotional video for the ranch. He said his photograph was also used in promotional mailings. Written underneath the photo, he said, were the words, "Who can he turn to?" The Spokesman-Review obtained a copy of the eight-minute video "Billy of Morning Star Boys Ranch." It can be viewed at spokesmanreview.com. In the film, Billy and another boy start to fight during a football game. A staff member - apparently Weitensteiner - appears and grabs the boys by the arm. The boys are then taken into a boxing ring to fight as the narrator states, "In some cases, trial by fire can get more promising attention." The film later shows Billy with a black eye - he said it was makeup - as a man who appears to be Weitensteiner counsels him. The film ends with Billy underneath a tree, dreaming of his future. SIDEBAR: ABUSE LITIGATOR

In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and he has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

213 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 26, 2005 Friday Idaho Edition

Boys' ranch closure urged; Former resident says worker; sexually abused him in 1980s
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 836 words A former Morning Star Boys' Ranch resident who alleges he was sexually abused there called for its closure at a news conference Thursday. Michael Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said he lived in fear of the ranch's counselors in the early 1980s. In a lawsuit filed by two former residents this week, Gray alleged that a Morning Star counselor named James Clarke repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. "At the time, I just wanted someone to be my friend," Gray said at the news conference near the entrance to the 225-acre Catholic boys' ranch south of Spokane. "I did whatever he wanted me to." Spokeswoman P.J. Watters said Morning Star was "shocked" and "deeply saddened" by the accusations, and said the ranch remains dedicated to serving boys in need.

"None of the allegations in the lawsuit have been proven," Watters said. "Anyone can say anything." Watters said ranch policy prohibited her from disclosing whether Clarke worked at the ranch. The 12-page court file details allegations of physical and sexual assault stretching back to the 1950s. It accuses Morning Star officials of permitting the abuse and concealing it from state investigators at the Department of Social and Health Services. Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff, who represents 150 victims of clergy sexual abuse, said the two former residents, who came from troubled homes, were "perhaps the most vulnerable of any of the sex abuse victims I've represented in the past 10 years." "When men come forward and report similar kinds of acts, one has to ask what is Morning Star Boys' Ranch really about? What really went on here?" asked Kosnoff, who is representing the men along with Seattle attorney Michael Pfau. A second former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., alleges that in the 1960s two counselors forced several Morning Star boys to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their rectums. Late Thursday, another former resident of Morning Star agreed to talk to the newspaper and corroborated W.K's account that the counselors penetrated them with the flowers as a punishment when the boys were ill. "I don't know why they did it," he said. "Because they could. They were adults and we were kids." The Spokane man provided his name to The Spokesman-Review, but asked not to be identified because he does not want to be involved in the pending lawsuit. Founded by the Catholic Diocese of Spokane, the boys' ranch gained renown for caring for nearly 1,300 troubled boys, ages 10 to 18, since it opened in 1956. Several former residents have contacted The Spokesman-Review to report that Morning Star and the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner turned around their lives. Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest, went on temporary leave last month because of stress-related health problems. Mike Tornquist, administrator of the state's Division of Licensed Resources, said his staff has made several visits to Morning Star in recent months. "We have focused our efforts on doing health and safety inspections on the kids who are currently there," Tornquist said. "We're not finding any reason to be concerned about the current situation." Tornquist said it is "very unlikely we'd be able to do anything with something that far back unless it involves current staff." "Billy," identified in court documents as W.K., said he was unable to attend Thursday's news conference because of anxiety. "I'm broke down," he said. "I just couldn't stand in front of those cameras." W.K., now 50, said Morning Star used him in a promotional video for the ranch. He said his photograph was also used in promotional mailings. Written underneath the photo, he said, were the words, "Who can he turn to?" The Spokesman-Review obtained a copy of the eight-minute video "Billy of Morning Star Boys Ranch." It can be viewed at spokesmanreview.com. In the film, Billy and another boy start to fight during a football game. A staff member - apparently Weitensteiner - appears and grabs the boys by the arm. The boys are then taken into a boxing ring to fight as the narrator states, "In some cases, trial by fire can get more promising attention." The film later shows Billy with a black eye - he said it was makeup - as a man who appears to be Weitensteiner counsels him. The film ends with Billy underneath a tree, dreaming of his future. SIDEBAR:

ABUSE LITIGATOR In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and he has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

214 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 26, 2005 Friday Metro Edition

Closure of boys' ranch urged; Former resident alleges sexual abuse
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 878 words A former Morning Star Boys' Ranch resident who alleges he was sexually abused there called for its closure at a news conference Thursday. Michael Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said he lived in fear of the ranch's counselors in the early 1980s. In a lawsuit filed by two former residents this week, Gray alleged that a Morning Star counselor named James Clarke repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. "At the time, I just wanted someone to be my friend," Gray said at the news conference near the entrance to the 225-acre Catholic boys' ranch south of Spokane. "I did whatever he wanted me to." Spokeswoman P.J. Watters said Morning Star was "shocked" and "deeply saddened" by the accusations, and said the ranch remains dedicated to serving boys in need.

"None of the allegations in the lawsuit have been proven," Watters said. "Anyone can say anything." Watters said ranch policy prohibited her from disclosing whether Clarke worked at the ranch. The 12-page court file details allegations of physical and sexual assault stretching back to the 1950s. It accuses Morning Star officials of permitting the abuse and concealing it from state investigators at the Department of Social and Health Services. Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff, who represents 150 victims of clergy sexual abuse, said the two former residents, who came from troubled homes, were "perhaps the most vulnerable of any of the sex abuse victims I've represented in the past 10 years." "When men come forward and report similar kinds of acts, one has to ask what is Morning Star Boys' Ranch really about? What really went on here?" asked Kosnoff, who is representing the men along with Seattle attorney Michael Pfau. A second former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., alleges that in the 1960s two counselors forced several Morning Star boys to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their rectums. Late Thursday, another former resident of Morning Star agreed to talk to the newspaper and corroborated W.K.'s account that the counselors penetrated them with the flowers as a punishment when the boys were ill. "I don't know why they did it," he said. "Because they could. They were adults and we were kids." The Spokane man provided his name to The Spokesman-Review but asked not to be identified because he does not want to be involved in the pending lawsuit. Founded by the Catholic Diocese of Spokane, the boys' ranch gained renown for caring for nearly 1,300 troubled boys, ages 10 to 18, since it opened in 1956. Several former residents have contacted The Spokesman-Review to report that Morning Star and the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner turned around their lives. Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest, went on temporary leave last month because of stress-related health problems. Mike Tornquist, administrator of the state's Division of Licensed Resources, said his staff has made several visits to Morning Star in recent months. "We have focused our efforts on doing health and safety inspections on the kids who are currently there," Tornquist said. "We're not finding any reason to be concerned about the current situation." Tornquist said it is "very unlikely we'd be able to do anything with something that far back unless it involves current staff." In May, The Spokesman-Review requested the agency's investigative files on Morning Star, but the agency has not yet produced the records. It is not clear whether DSHS previously received reports on the alleged abuse referenced in the lawsuit. "Billy," identified in court documents as W.K., said he was unable to attend Thursday's news conference because of anxiety. "I'm broke down," he said. "I just couldn't stand in front of those cameras." W.K., now 50, said Morning Star used him in a promotional video for the ranch. He said his photograph was also used in promotional mailings. Written underneath the photo, he said, were the words, "Who can he turn to?" The Spokesman-Review obtained a copy of the eight-minute video "Billy of Morning Star Boys Ranch." It can be viewed at www.spokesmanreview. com. In the film, Billy and another boy start to fight during a football game. A staff member - apparently Weitensteiner - appears and grabs the boys by the arm. The boys are then taken into a boxing ring to fight as the narrator states, "In some cases, trial by fire can get more promising attention." The film later shows Billy with a black eye - he said it was makeup - as a man who appears to be

Weitensteiner counsels him. The film ends with Billy underneath a tree, dreaming of his future. SIDEBAR: SEX-ABUSE LITIGATOR In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and he has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

215 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 26, 2005 Friday Metro Edition

Closure of boys' ranch urged; Former resident alleges sexual abuse
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: B; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 878 words A former Morning Star Boys' Ranch resident who alleges he was sexually abused there called for its closure at a news conference Thursday. Michael Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said he lived in fear of the ranch's counselors in the early 1980s. In a lawsuit filed by two former residents this week, Gray alleged that a Morning Star counselor named James Clarke repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. "At the time, I just wanted someone to be my friend," Gray said at the news conference near the entrance to the 225-acre Catholic boys' ranch south of Spokane. "I did whatever he wanted me to."

Spokeswoman P.J. Watters said Morning Star was "shocked" and "deeply saddened" by the accusations, and said the ranch remains dedicated to serving boys in need. "None of the allegations in the lawsuit have been proven," Watters said. "Anyone can say anything." Watters said ranch policy prohibited her from disclosing whether Clarke worked at the ranch. The 12-page court file details allegations of physical and sexual assault stretching back to the 1950s. It accuses Morning Star officials of permitting the abuse and concealing it from state investigators at the Department of Social and Health Services. Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff, who represents 150 victims of clergy sexual abuse, said the two former residents, who came from troubled homes, were "perhaps the most vulnerable of any of the sex abuse victims I've represented in the past 10 years." "When men come forward and report similar kinds of acts, one has to ask what is Morning Star Boys' Ranch really about? What really went on here?" asked Kosnoff, who is representing the men along with Seattle attorney Michael Pfau. A second former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., alleges that in the 1960s two counselors forced several Morning Star boys to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their rectums. Late Thursday, another former resident of Morning Star agreed to talk to the newspaper and corroborated W.K.'s account that the counselors penetrated them with the flowers as a punishment when the boys were ill. "I don't know why they did it," he said. "Because they could. They were adults and we were kids." The Spokane man provided his name to The Spokesman-Review but asked not to be identified because he does not want to be involved in the pending lawsuit. Founded by the Catholic Diocese of Spokane, the boys' ranch gained renown for caring for nearly 1,300 troubled boys, ages 10 to 18, since it opened in 1956. Several former residents have contacted The Spokesman-Review to report that Morning Star and the Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner turned around their lives. Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest, went on temporary leave last month because of stress-related health problems. Mike Tornquist, administrator of the state's Division of Licensed Resources, said his staff has made several visits to Morning Star in recent months. "We have focused our efforts on doing health and safety inspections on the kids who are currently there," Tornquist said. "We're not finding any reason to be concerned about the current situation." Tornquist said it is "very unlikely we'd be able to do anything with something that far back unless it involves current staff." In May, The Spokesman-Review requested the agency's investigative files on Morning Star, but the agency has not yet produced the records. It is not clear whether DSHS previously received reports on the alleged abuse referenced in the lawsuit. "Billy," identified in court documents as W.K., said he was unable to attend Thursday's news conference because of anxiety. "I'm broke down," he said. "I just couldn't stand in front of those cameras." W.K., now 50, said Morning Star used him in a promotional video for the ranch. He said his photograph was also used in promotional mailings. Written underneath the photo, he said, were the words, "Who can he turn to?" The Spokesman-Review obtained a copy of the eight-minute video "Billy of Morning Star Boys Ranch." It can be viewed at www.spokesmanreview. com. In the film, Billy and another boy start to fight during a football game. A staff member - apparently Weitensteiner - appears and grabs the boys by the arm. The boys are then taken into a boxing ring to fight as

the narrator states, "In some cases, trial by fire can get more promising attention." The film later shows Billy with a black eye - he said it was makeup - as a man who appears to be Weitensteiner counsels him. The film ends with Billy underneath a tree, dreaming of his future. SIDEBAR: SEX-ABUSE LITIGATOR In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and he has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 27, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

216 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 25, 2005 Thursday Idaho Edition

FORMER BOYS' RANCH RESIDENTS ALLEGE SEX ABUSE; In lawsuit, pair say they were molested by Morning Star counselors;
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1671 words Two former residents of Morning Star Boys' Ranch, including one who served as its 'poster boy,' sued the Spokane boys' home on Wednesday, alleging that they were sexually abused by counselors in separate incidents in the 1960s and 1980s. The lawsuit filed in Spokane County Superior Court details a bizarre punishment in the '60s in which two counselors forced several Morning Star residents to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their

rectums. According to the lawsuit, those photographs were circulated among the staff and residents at Morning Star, and were kept in the desk of Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner, the ranch's revered director. "It was a joke to them," the former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., said in an interview last month. In a statement released Wednesday afternoon, Morning Star said, "The Ranch has never knowingly allowed or condoned abuse of any kind. Our mission has always been to serve boys in need and we have done everything in our power to fulfill that mission." The lawsuit alleges the photos "served to stigmatize, control and silence W.K. and other boys regarding the abusive conduct they were made to endure." "Why does a middle-aged priest keep photos in his desk of boys with flowers sticking out of their ass?" said Timothy Kosnoff, a Seattle attorney representing the two men. "I don't know. I don't see the humor in it." The allegations are the most recent in a string of physical and sexual accusations from former residents and their families that have surfaced in the past several months. Weitensteiner, who has been accused of physical abuse by some former residents and counselors, went on medical leave last month. The Spokesman-Review in June reported the allegations of physical and sexual abuse at the ranch, including accusations of physical abuse against Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest. In its statement, Morning Star said the newspaper's reporting "has largely been biased" and said it "has let down its readers and our community through its one-sided coverage." In the 12-page court complaint, a second former resident, Michael Gray, alleged that a counselor at Morning Star repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. In an interview on Wednesday, Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said counselor James Clarke assaulted him between 10 and 15 times - both in the counselor's apartment and in a laundry room at the boys' home. "Blind eyes were turned to it," Gray said. "I want to see (Morning Star) shut down." Clarke could not be reached for comment. Gray, who served three years in a federal prison for manufacturing marijuana, said he turned to drugs to ease the pain of the abuse, but said he is now sober. In 1995, federal authorities identified Gray as the focus of an investigation into an alleged plot to blow up a federal building, but he was never charged in the case. The court documents filed on Wednesday allege he was also physically assaulted by counselors at the ranch. "There were guys you looked up to who beat the hell out of you, and then there were guys just standing around watching," Gray said. Since it opened in 1956, the group home south of Spokane has cared for nearly 1,300 boys, including both private-pay residents and state-placed boys whose care was subsidized by taxpayer dollars. Last year, the state's Department of Social and Health Services paid the ranch more than $500,000 to care for residents. In May, The Spokesman-Review requested DSHS investigative files on Morning Star, but the agency has yet to produce them. In its statement, Morning Star said its license is in "good standing" with the agency, and that the license has never been suspended. Morning Star has "rigorous safety policies ? to keep kids safe." Those include background checks on employees and volunteers, and increased staffing to work with "boys with special needs," the statement said. "We take allegations of abuse seriously and immediately take action to follow proper reporting procedures whenever a Ranch resident is hurt, or alleges he is hurt, in any way," the statement read.

The court filing lists a series of alleged sexual and physical assaults dating back to the 1950s. Included is the allegation that the Rev. Marvin LaVoy, who served as the founding director of Morning Star, repeatedly sodomized and molested a young boy at the ranch in the 1950s. LaVoy died in 1994. In addition to the sexual allegations, the lawsuit details several occasions where Weitensteiner allegedly beat the boys at Morning Star - breaking a dinner plate over the head of one boy and beating W.K. "over the head and face" and grabbing him by his hair. "You don't have to brutalize kids to turn them around," Kosnoff said. "There were a lot of kids who have been helped with kindness and gentleness." According to court documents, the Social Security Administration determined in 1995 that W.K. was "fully, mentally disabled" as a result of his time at the boys' ranch. Now 50 years old, W.K. suffers from "anxiety and affective" disorders, according to the court filing. In the 1960s, W.K. starred in a promotional video titled, "Billy of Morning Star." The grainy black-andwhite film tells the story of "Billy," a 12-year-old resident who benefits from the structure and discipline at one of the oldest boys' homes in Washington state. The court documents say "the reality of daily life for boys at Morningstar (sic) was very different than what was depicted in the film." "It does bother me to be the poster boy and have this happen," W.K. said. "I'm a Christian person and I feel bad. But they chose me, I didn't go to them." W.K., whose parents were deaf and mute, arrived at Morning Star at age 9. He was the youngest boy at the ranch, he said, and Morning Star officials tried to return him to his parents because of his age. But W.K.'s parents said they were unable to care for him and entrusted him to the care of the boys' ranch. Though he is unclear about exact dates, he believes he lived at Morning Star from 1964 to '68. According to the court document, at age 12, W.K. and several other boys were sick and confined to their beds. After the boys were warned several times not to leave their beds, counselor William Condon and another counselor entered the room with a handful of irises and a jar of Vaseline, the documents said. "They told us to drop our drawers and lay down on the bed and spread open, greased our butt and stuck the flower in us, and stuck them straight up," W.K. said in an interview. "And then they said the first boy that ? the first flower that falls over gets hacked. That's what happened." Condon died last month, but in an interview this spring denied he ever sexually abused a child. W.K. alleged that one of the counselors recorded the scene with a camera. "I have no doubt that (Weitensteiner) saw (the photos). They were in his desk," he said. W.K. said he feared Weitensteiner and other counselors. According to the court filing, W.K. once "watched in horror as Father Weitensteiner attacked a boy so savagely that Weitensteiner and the boy crashed through the door of his office, ripping the door off its hinges." The documents say staff members "had to wrestle Weitensteiner off the boy." W.K. said he left the boys' ranch in 1968. He raised a family in Spokane, and worked as a landscaper but said he did not report the alleged abuse. "We didn't dare say anything," W.K. said. "My goodness, who would believe us? Who would believe us at that time? Nobody." Forty years after the alleged abuse, W.K. said he is terrified of Weitensteiner. W.K. said that he had struggled to discuss the events but gained courage after reading reports of other incidents involving Weitensteiner. In an interview last month, the priest widely known as "Father Joe," acknowledged striking a boy in the face with an open hand, and hitting boys with a paddle hard enough to leave bruises. But he denied several other, more serious allegations from former counselors and residents. W.K. said he had not previously come forward because he "didn't want to be the only one standing

there, saying, 'You're a liar.' " In a separate interview, Gray said he too struggled to confront the alleged abuse. Gray said the former counselor Clarke lived in an apartment at Morning Star in the early '80s and had a stash of Star Wars toys. He said the counselor also showed him adult magazines. He said he submitted to the abuse out of loneliness. "I just wanted someone to be my friend so I was willing to sacrifice myself," he said. Another former counselor who worked at Morning Star in the '80s said the ranch was warned about Clarke and his inappropriate behavior. "Morning Star had a way of turning a deaf ear to those types of issues," the former counselor said. He asked not to be identified, saying he feared Weitensteiner. The former counselor said that after Clarke left Morning Star, another boy told him that Clarke would invite boys into his room and show them adult magazines. The resident said Clarke would also wrestle with the boys in their underwear, the former counselor said. In an interview, Gray said he has never received counseling for the alleged abuse at Morning Star. He said he has struggled with anger and depression for years. "I couldn't trust anyone," Gray said. "I think about it now and it makes me sick." In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church, and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 26, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH NOTES: Staff writer Benjamin Shors can be reached at (509) 459-5484 or by e-mail at benjamins@spokesman.com. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

217 of 265 DOCUMENTS Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA) August 25, 2005 Thursday Idaho Edition

FORMER BOYS' RANCH RESIDENTS ALLEGE SEX ABUSE; In lawsuit, pair say they were molested by Morning Star counselors;
BYLINE: Benjamin Shors Staff writer SECTION: A; Pg. 1 LENGTH: 1671 words Two former residents of Morning Star Boys' Ranch, including one who served as its 'poster boy,' sued the Spokane boys' home on Wednesday, alleging that they were sexually abused by counselors in separate incidents in the 1960s and 1980s. The lawsuit filed in Spokane County Superior Court details a bizarre punishment in the '60s in which two counselors forced several Morning Star residents to pose for photographs with flowers protruding from their rectums. According to the lawsuit, those photographs were circulated among the staff and residents at Morning Star, and were kept in the desk of Rev. Joseph Weitensteiner, the ranch's revered director. "It was a joke to them," the former resident, identified in court documents as W.K., said in an interview last month. In a statement released Wednesday afternoon, Morning Star said, "The Ranch has never knowingly allowed or condoned abuse of any kind. Our mission has always been to serve boys in need and we have done everything in our power to fulfill that mission." The lawsuit alleges the photos "served to stigmatize, control and silence W.K. and other boys regarding the abusive conduct they were made to endure." "Why does a middle-aged priest keep photos in his desk of boys with flowers sticking out of their ass?" said Timothy Kosnoff, a Seattle attorney representing the two men. "I don't know. I don't see the humor in it." The allegations are the most recent in a string of physical and sexual accusations from former residents and their families that have surfaced in the past several months. Weitensteiner, who has been accused of physical abuse by some former residents and counselors, went on medical leave last month. The Spokesman-Review in June reported the allegations of physical and sexual abuse at the ranch, including accusations of physical abuse against Weitensteiner, a 73-year-old Catholic priest. In its statement, Morning Star said the newspaper's reporting "has largely been biased" and said it "has let down its readers and our community through its one-sided coverage." In the 12-page court complaint, a second former resident, Michael Gray, alleged that a counselor at Morning Star repeatedly molested and sodomized him at the ranch in 1981. In an interview on Wednesday, Gray, a 37-year-old Spokane graphic designer, said counselor James Clarke assaulted him between 10 and 15 times - both in the counselor's apartment and in a laundry room at the boys' home. "Blind eyes were turned to it," Gray said. "I want to see (Morning Star) shut down." Clarke could not be reached for comment. Gray, who served three years in a federal prison for manufacturing marijuana, said he turned to drugs to ease the pain of the abuse, but said he is now sober. In 1995, federal authorities identified Gray as the focus of an investigation into an alleged plot to blow up a federal building, but he was never charged in the case.

The court documents filed on Wednesday allege he was also physically assaulted by counselors at the ranch. "There were guys you looked up to who beat the hell out of you, and then there were guys just standing around watching," Gray said. Since it opened in 1956, the group home south of Spokane has cared for nearly 1,300 boys, including both private-pay residents and state-placed boys whose care was subsidized by taxpayer dollars. Last year, the state's Department of Social and Health Services paid the ranch more than $500,000 to care for residents. In May, The Spokesman-Review requested DSHS investigative files on Morning Star, but the agency has yet to produce them. In its statement, Morning Star said its license is in "good standing" with the agency, and that the license has never been suspended. Morning Star has "rigorous safety policies ? to keep kids safe." Those include background checks on employees and volunteers, and increased staffing to work with "boys with special needs," the statement said. "We take allegations of abuse seriously and immediately take action to follow proper reporting procedures whenever a Ranch resident is hurt, or alleges he is hurt, in any way," the statement read. The court filing lists a series of alleged sexual and physical assaults dating back to the 1950s. Included is the allegation that the Rev. Marvin LaVoy, who served as the founding director of Morning Star, repeatedly sodomized and molested a young boy at the ranch in the 1950s. LaVoy died in 1994. In addition to the sexual allegations, the lawsuit details several occasions where Weitensteiner allegedly beat the boys at Morning Star - breaking a dinner plate over the head of one boy and beating W.K. "over the head and face" and grabbing him by his hair. "You don't have to brutalize kids to turn them around," Kosnoff said. "There were a lot of kids who have been helped with kindness and gentleness." According to court documents, the Social Security Administration determined in 1995 that W.K. was "fully, mentally disabled" as a result of his time at the boys' ranch. Now 50 years old, W.K. suffers from "anxiety and affective" disorders, according to the court filing. In the 1960s, W.K. starred in a promotional video titled, "Billy of Morning Star." The grainy black-andwhite film tells the story of "Billy," a 12-year-old resident who benefits from the structure and discipline at one of the oldest boys' homes in Washington state. The court documents say "the reality of daily life for boys at Morningstar (sic) was very different than what was depicted in the film." "It does bother me to be the poster boy and have this happen," W.K. said. "I'm a Christian person and I feel bad. But they chose me, I didn't go to them." W.K., whose parents were deaf and mute, arrived at Morning Star at age 9. He was the youngest boy at the ranch, he said, and Morning Star officials tried to return him to his parents because of his age. But W.K.'s parents said they were unable to care for him and entrusted him to the care of the boys' ranch. Though he is unclear about exact dates, he believes he lived at Morning Star from 1964 to '68. According to the court document, at age 12, W.K. and several other boys were sick and confined to their beds. After the boys were warned several times not to leave their beds, counselor William Condon and another counselor entered the room with a handful of irises and a jar of Vaseline, the documents said. "They told us to drop our drawers and lay down on the bed and spread open, greased our butt and stuck the flower in us, and stuck them straight up," W.K. said in an interview. "And then they said the first boy that ? the first flower that falls over gets hacked. That's what happened." Condon died last month, but in an interview this spring denied he ever sexually abused a child. W.K. alleged that one of the counselors recorded the scene with a camera. "I have no doubt that (Weitensteiner) saw (the photos). They were in his desk," he said.

W.K. said he feared Weitensteiner and other counselors. According to the court filing, W.K. once "watched in horror as Father Weitensteiner attacked a boy so savagely that Weitensteiner and the boy crashed through the door of his office, ripping the door off its hinges." The documents say staff members "had to wrestle Weitensteiner off the boy." W.K. said he left the boys' ranch in 1968. He raised a family in Spokane, and worked as a landscaper but said he did not report the alleged abuse. "We didn't dare say anything," W.K. said. "My goodness, who would believe us? Who would believe us at that time? Nobody." Forty years after the alleged abuse, W.K. said he is terrified of Weitensteiner. W.K. said that he had struggled to discuss the events but gained courage after reading reports of other incidents involving Weitensteiner. In an interview last month, the priest widely known as "Father Joe," acknowledged striking a boy in the face with an open hand, and hitting boys with a paddle hard enough to leave bruises. But he denied several other, more serious allegations from former counselors and residents. W.K. said he had not previously come forward because he "didn't want to be the only one standing there, saying, 'You're a liar.' " In a separate interview, Gray said he too struggled to confront the alleged abuse. Gray said the former counselor Clarke lived in an apartment at Morning Star in the early '80s and had a stash of Star Wars toys. He said the counselor also showed him adult magazines. He said he submitted to the abuse out of loneliness. "I just wanted someone to be my friend so I was willing to sacrifice myself," he said. Another former counselor who worked at Morning Star in the '80s said the ranch was warned about Clarke and his inappropriate behavior. "Morning Star had a way of turning a deaf ear to those types of issues," the former counselor said. He asked not to be identified, saying he feared Weitensteiner. The former counselor said that after Clarke left Morning Star, another boy told him that Clarke would invite boys into his room and show them adult magazines. The resident said Clarke would also wrestle with the boys in their underwear, the former counselor said. In an interview, Gray said he has never received counseling for the alleged abuse at Morning Star. He said he has struggled with anger and depression for years. "I couldn't trust anyone," Gray said. "I think about it now and it makes me sick." In the past decade, Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff has emerged as one of the most aggressive litigators of child-sexual abuse cases in the Pacific Northwest. Kosnoff, 51, has sued the Catholic Church, the Mormon Church, and the Boy Scouts of America, among others, and has worked with hundreds of alleged sexual abuse victims. "I am appalled by how many cases I've come across," Kosnoff said. "It's a far greater problem than society wants to acknowledge." Kosnoff said the institutions that allegedly allowed the abuse to occur "must be held accountable. "Abuse is a devastating experience," Kosnoff said. "It is the murder of the soul of a child." LOAD-DATE: August 26, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

NOTES: Staff writer Benjamin Shors can be reached at (509) 459-5484 or by e-mail at benjamins@spokesman.com. PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Spokane Spokesman-Review

218 of 265 DOCUMENTS

Daily News (New York) August 23, 2005 Tuesday SPORTS FINAL EDITION

SCOUT PERV KEPT BOYS' UNDIES: COPS
BYLINE: BY ALISON GENDAR DAILY NEWS POLICE BUREAU CHIEF SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 4 LENGTH: 293 words A BOY SCOUT volunteer leader accused of molesting a troop member preyed on at least four other children and kept as trophies the underwear of his young victims, police sources said last night. Ronald Occhipinti was so obsessed with his victims that he took the children's underwear as sick mementos, sources said. Investigators found pairs of boys' underwear neatly wrapped in plastic bags in the home Occhipinti shared with his mother in Bayside, Queens. Many bore a note with the child's name and date of the sexual assault, law enforcement sources said. "He kept them as trophies. He's beyond sick," a police source said. Along with the trophies, investigators found hundreds of pornographic videos and thousands of obscene photos of children. Many of the photos, taken off the scoutmaster's home and work computers, were of his victims, according to cops. Occhipinti, a volunteer with Troop 183 in Great Neck, L.I., was arrested at his home Friday and charged with sexually molesting a member of his troop between 2003 and August 2005. He was accused of bringing the boy to his East Hampton Blvd. home numerous times. There he would force the boy to undress, pose in lewd positions for snapshots and occasionally perform sexual acts. Occhipinti's mother said her son had been involved with scouting for 30 years and would never hurt a child. "My Ron would never do that," Jorginia Occhipinti told The News. But an Internet photo of the victim - clearly wearing a Boy Scout troop number - led cops to Occhipinti. Investigators are interviewing every member of Occhipinti's troop, and fear other troop members may have been abused during camping trips and overnight events.

Occhipinti's abuse could date back more than 15 years, a source said. agendar@nydailynews.com LOAD-DATE: August 23, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 Daily News, L.P.

219 of 265 DOCUMENTS The Boston Herald August 21, 2005 Sunday ALL EDITIONS

Bish dad: Parents must be armed with info on thugs
BYLINE: By O'RYAN JOHNSON SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 004 LENGTH: 160 words John Bish is praising a new Web site that shows parents where sex offenders live. ``Parents have to be armed with information,'' said Bish, whose murdered 16-year-old daughter Molly Bish was abducted from a Warren pond in 2000. ``I know prior to Molly's disappearance we never thought this would happen to us.'' The Web site, mapsexoffenders.com, combines a mapping program with 38 states' data on sex offenders. Type in an address and a map pops up with sex offenders identified with red dots. Two brothers, each with children of their own, hit on the idea while helping out in a Utah search for a missing Boy Scout. ``We were out there and we were like, what can we do to help with the sex offender problem?'' said Mark Olsen, one of the site's developers. It launched in July, and has gained national attention, Olsen said, due to the growing number of high-profile child sex abuse and abduction crimes and the lack of accessible information about sex offenders. LOAD-DATE: August 21, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

220 of 265 DOCUMENTS Buffalo News (New York) August 21, 2005 Sunday FINAL EDITION

AROUND THE STATE
SECTION: NEWS; Around the State; Pg. A16 LENGTH: 475 words Sliwa to testify on alleged hit by Gotti NEW YORK (AP) -- For years, radio talk show host Curtis Sliwa routinely denigrated late mob boss John Gotti and his cohorts as murderers, drug dealers, degenerates. His tone was so strident, prosecutors say, that Gotti's son ordered an attack on the founder of the Guardian Angels. Make it personal, the younger Gotti allegedly told gunsels. Thirteen years after Sliwa took two bullets in a botched hit, he will finally get face-to-face with John "Junior" Gotti in a Manhattan courtroom. Sliwa, who is rarely at a loss for words, was expected to testify Monday in Gotti's federal racketeering trial. "I've been waiting 13 years for justice," Sliwa said just before the start of the trial last month. The courtroom showdown was expected to provide the trial's most drama: the head Angel testifying against the ex-head of the Gambino crime family. Gotti, whose father died in prison in 2002, is accused of a conspiracy to kidnap Sliwa as part of racketeering charges that could jail him for 30 years. He was indicted on the new charges in July 2004, just two months before his scheduled release on a separate 1999 racketeering conviction. ----Boy charged as adult in mother's slaying SYRACUSE (AP) -- A 13-year-old boy was charged as an adult with second-degree murder Friday after his mother died of injuries police said she suffered in a beating at her home. Joshua Brown was being held without bail in a juvenile detention facility after his arraignment. His mother, 30-year-old Rebecca Perth, died Friday morning at the hospital. Police said Brown struck his mother and when she fell to the floor, he stomped with both feet on her head and body. The incident happened Tuesday around 10:25 p.m. after Perth told him to come inside because it was past his curfew, police said. Brown was arrested shortly afterward at a friend's house. Prosecutors said witnesses and statements Brown made to police after the incident support the charge, but the judge ordered court documents sealed. Teenagers typically can be charged as adults at age 16, but the law allows for exceptions in more serious cases.

If convicted, Brown faces a maximum sentence of nine years to life. ----Scoutmaster charged in sex abuse of boy NEW YORK (AP) -- A Boy Scout leader from Queens pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that he sexually abused a boy who was a member of his troop. Ronald E. Occhipinti, a scoutmaster from Bayside, Queens, is accused of bringing the boy to his home on several occasions dating back to the summer of 2003, when the child was 11. The Queens District Attorney said Occhipinti took explicit photographs of the boy and sexually abused him. Occhipinti, an employee of a burglar alarm company, was arrested at his home early Friday morning. He was arraigned on multiple charges during the night. A judge set bail at $250,0000. LOAD-DATE: August 24, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH DOCUMENT-TYPE: Briefs PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Buffalo News

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The Myrtle Beach Sun-News August 11, 2005 Thursday TSN EDITION

Thursday Globe
SECTION: A; BRIEF; Pg. 4 LENGTH: 743 words

ACROSS THE COUNTRY TEXAS Discovery astronauts welcomed home Houston/ Discovery's astronauts arrived to a rousing celebration Wednesday as nearly 700 people crowded an airplane hangar, waving flags and holding signs that read: "Welcome Home, Astronauts!" The seven-person crew returned to Earth on Tuesday.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Army meets recruiting goal for second month Washington/ The active-duty Army made its recruiting goal for the second-straight month in July, according to Pentagon figures released Wednesday, but the boost still may not be enough for the service to meet its annual target by the time the fiscal year ends Sept. 30, officials said. OHIO Suspects in courthouse shooting arrested Columbus/ A fugitive inmate and his wife, wanted in a courthouse escape and shooting in Tennessee, were captured Wednesday night at an Ohio motel, authorities said. On Tuesday, authorities say Jennifer Forsyth Hyatte, 31, ambushed two guards as they were leading her husband George Hyatte, 34, from a courthouse hearing in Kingston, Tenn. PUERTO RICO Guantanamo detainees may see some luxuries San Juan/ The U.S. military plans to ease conditions for some detainees in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba housing them in a renovated section with televisions, stereos and a view of the Caribbean, the detention center's commanding officer said in court papers. FLORIDA Hurricane aid wrongly paid for 203 funerals Fort Lauderdale/ The federal government used hurricane aid money to pay funeral expenses for at least 203 Floridians whose deaths were not caused by last year's storms, the state's coroners have concluded. UTAH Truck full of explosives crashes, blows up Salt Lake City/ A truck carrying 35,500 pounds of explosives crashed and exploded Wednesday, leaving a huge crater in a Utah highway and injuring at least four people. OREGON Church official agrees to speak on sex abuse Portland/ Archbishop William Levada agreed Wednesday to waive diplomatic immunity and answer questions about sex abuse by Roman Catholic priests after he takes over as the church's guardian on doctrine, the Vatican post held by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger before he became pope. NEW JERSEY Girl dies, 3 hurt when tree falls at Scout camp Ocean Township/ An 8-year-old girl died and three others were injured Wednesday when a tree fell on them during a first-aid class at a Boy Scout camp, authorities said. NEW MEXICO Police: Pedal saved helicopter pilot from bullet Albuquerque/ A sheriff's department helicopter that crash-landed during a burglary investigation was

brought down by a bullet that likely would have hit the pilot had it not struck the control pedal first, authorities said. AROUND THE WORLD AFGHANISTAN Fifth U.S. troop dies in violence this week Kabul/ A U.S. service member was killed by a roadside bomb in eastern Afghanistan, the military said Wednesday, raising to five the number of Americans killed in less than a week as violence escalates ahead of next month's parliamentary elections. ISRAEL Soldiers prepare for worst pullout scenarios Kerem Shalom/ In a final drill, thousands of Israeli troops prepared Wednesday for some of the worst scenarios in next week's Gaza pullout, including Palestinian mortar fire, settler violence and equipment failure. In a small West Bank settlement also slated for evacuation, residents began turning in their weapons to help ward off violence during the withdrawal. BRAZIL Officials seek thieves who stole $67.8 million Sao Paulo/ Police on Wednesday in northeastern Brazil examined fingerprints and scoured through evidence left behind by thieves who stole $67.8 million from a Central Bank vault in one of the world's biggest heists ever. Authorities said they were able to identify some of the thieves and were searching for them in surrounding states. CHILE Ex-dictator Pinochet's wife, son arrested Santiago/ Gen. Augusto Pinochet's wife and younger son were arrested Wednesday and charged as accomplices in a tax-evasion case linked to an investigation into the former dictator's multimillion-dollar fortune overseas. ESTONIA 14 people thought dead in helicopter crash Tallinn/ A helicopter carrying 14 people, including two Americans, crashed in the Baltic Sea off the Estonian coast on Wednesday and all aboard were thought killed. From wire reports LOAD-DATE: August 11, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH Copyright 2005 The Myrtle Beach Sun-News All Rights Reserved

224 of 265 DOCUMENTS

The Washington Post August 11, 2005 Thursday Final Edition

NATION IN BRIEF
SECTION: A Section; A15 LENGTH: 482 words PORTLAND, Ore. -- Archbishop William J. Levada agreed Wednesday to waive diplomatic immunity and answer questions about sex abuse by Roman Catholic priests after he takes over as the church's guardian on doctrine -- the Vatican post formerly held by Pope Benedict XVI. Levada, 69, who will officially step down as archbishop of San Francisco next week, is heading to Rome to take over as prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. The former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger held the post for 24 years before he became pope in April; he appointed Levada to his previous job a month later. During a farewell Mass last Sunday in San Francisco, Levada was served with a subpoena to be deposed on Friday. But with his agreement to waive diplomatic immunity, Levada will now be deposed in January; he had previously refused the waiver. Abuse victims' attorneys want to question Levada regarding the bankruptcy case of the Archdiocese of Portland, which he led from 1986 until 1995, when he came to San Francisco. Last year, Portland became the first Catholic diocese in the nation to declare bankruptcy, citing sex abuse lawsuits seeking $155 million in damages. FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The federal emergency agency paid for hundreds of funerals last year of Floridians whose deaths had nothing to do with the four hurricanes that hit the state, the South Florida SunSentinel reported. The Federal Emergency Management Agency approved 319 hurricane funeral claims in Florida at a cost of $1.3 million. Several families told the newspaper that they gave FEMA letters from doctors saying stress caused by the hurricanes possibly contributed to the deaths -- even though medical examiners had blamed natural causes for the deaths. * HOUSTON -- Discovery's astronauts arrived to a rousing celebration as nearly 700 people crowded into a hangar, waving flags and holding signs that said: "Welcome Home, Astronauts!" The seven-person crew returned to Earth on Tuesday after being the first to take a space shuttle into orbit since the 2003 Columbia disaster. * ROMULUS, Mich. -- Hundreds of people were advised to stay away from their homes as a fire at a chemical plant sent acrid smoke over their neighborhoods. At least 32 people, including firefighters, were treated for breathing difficulties.

* OCEAN TOWNSHIP, N.J. -- An 8-year-old girl died and three others were injured when an oak tree crashed down on them during a first-aid class at a Boy Scout camp. * ATLANTA -- U.S. District Judge Beverly B. Martin has upheld a ruling ordering Georgia to turn over records related to its investigation of the Ku Klux Klan's possible ties to the Atlanta child killings. The state has been asked to turn over the file so the court can determine what documents, if any, to give Wayne Williams, the man convicted of two of the murders. -- From News Services LOAD-DATE: August 11, 2005 LANGUAGE: ENGLISH PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper Copyright 2005 The Washington Post

225 of 265 DOCUMENTS North Carolina Lawyers Weekly August 8, 2005

N.C. Court of Appeals
BYLINE: North Carolina Lawyers Weekly Staff SECTION: LENGTH: 16365 words Arbitration Construction Contract - Tort/Negligence - Interference With Prospective Business Advantage - Unfair Trade Practices Where the plaintiffs are not seeking a direct benefit from the provisions of their company's contracts with the defendant-general contractor, the doctrine of equitable estoppel cannot be used to force the plaintiffs to arbitrate their individual claims. We affirm the trial court's denial of the defendants' motions to compel arbitration. The plaintiffs own Atlantic Coast Construction & Utility, Inc. (ACCU), a construction company specializing in water and sewer utilities work. ACCU entered into several subcontracts with the defendant-general contractor. Each subcontract contained an arbitration clause: "Any controversy or claim between the Contractor and the Subcontractor arising out of or related to this Subcontract, or the breach thereof, shall be settled by arbitration.... " According to the plaintiffs, one of the general contractor's principals was attracted to plaintiff Angela Ellen and attempted to pursue an adulterous relationship with her. After Angela's rejections finally sank in, the defendants allegedly set out to destroy ACCU in retaliation. The plaintiffs' claims—unfair trade practices

and tortious interference with prospective business advantages—arise out of these alleged acts of retaliation. Plaintiffs Angela and Rebecca Ellen signed the subcontracts only in their capacity as officers of ACCU. Although the subcontracts provide part of the factual foundation for the complaint, the plaintiffs are not seeking any direct benefits from the contracts containing the relevant arbitration clause, nor are they asserting any rights arising under the contracts. Neither the plaintiffs' allegations of unfair trade practices nor their allegations of tortious interference depend upon the contracts. Both of the claims are dependent upon legal duties imposed by N.C. statutory or common law rather than contract law. Thus, the defendants' liability will be determined by their duties under N.C. statutory and common law, not by their duties under the subcontracts. Because the plaintiffs are not seeking a direct benefit from the provisions of the subcontracts, the doctrine of equitable estoppel cannot be used to force the plaintiffs to arbitrate their individual claims. Affirmed. Ellen v. A.C. Schultes of Maryland, Inc. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0945, 10 pp.) (Patricia TimmonsGoodson, J.) Appealed from Onslow County Superior Court. (John B. Lewis Jr, J.) N.C. App. (See accompanying story on page one.) Contract Surety - Construction Project - Payment Bond - Claims Limitation Where the defendant-surety's payment bond explicitly prohibited any claims filed more than a year after the general contractor ceased work on the construction project, and where the plaintiff-subcontractor did not file its claim within that year, the subcontractor's claim was time-barred. We affirm the trial court's order granting the surety's motion to dismiss under N.C. R. Civ. P. 12(c). Even though the subcontractor was not a party to the payment bond, the bond's express terms allowed the subcontractor to institute an action against the surety if the subcontractor was not paid by the general contractor. However, the bond's terms also placed explicit limitations on the subcontractor's right to seek payment from the surety. The subcontractor, seeking the benefit of the payment bond, must also accept its burdens. Beachcrete, Inc. v. Water Street Center Associates, L.L.C. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0944, 7 pp.) (Sanford L. Steelman Jr., J.) Appealed from New Hanover County Superior Court. (Charles H. Henry, J.) N.C. App. Criminal Practice Indecent Liberties - Continuance - Video Evidence - No Proper Foundation - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where defense counsel moved for a continuance because he had "just been provided" with two new letters written by his client that the state planned to introduce at trial, but where counsel did not explain why he needed a continuance other than "to discuss this damaging new evidence," then the defendant has failed to show that he was materially prejudiced or that he would have been better prepared had the continuance been granted. No error in the defendant's conviction of statutory rape and one count of taking indecent liberties with a child. The other count of taking indecent liberties with a child is vacated. Remanded for resentencing. The defendant failed to lay a proper foundation for admission of a videotape in which the victim denied having sex with the defendant. The trial court correctly excluded the tape. None of the witnesses offered testimony about the operation or testing of the recording equipment. The victim testified that the defendant and her mother set up videotaping equipment before leaving her alone to make a recording. She did not know if the tape offered in court was the original or one of some six copies that were made. She did not testify that she viewed the tape right after it was made, and she did not testify

that the tape proffered by the defendant accurately depicted what she had filmed. The defendant's mother testified only that the victim's mother gave her a videotape, but she had no first-hand knowledge pertaining to the contents of the tape or to the chain of custody. Finally, the defendant was absent during most of the filming and did not watch the tape after it was made. Where the statute defining the offense of taking indecent liberties with a minor sets out alternative acts that might establish an element of the offense, the defendant should not have been convicted of two separate violations of the statute arising out of a single act. Where an aggravating factor was not found beyond a reasonable doubt by the jury and was not admitted by the defendant, we must remand for resentencing. State v. Jones. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0962, 12 pp.) (Eric L. Levinson, J.) Appealed from Wayne County Superior Court. (W. Russell Duke Jr., J.) N.C. App. Multiple Counts - One Continuous Act - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where, as part of one continuous act, the defendant came into possession of several items at the same time and place, only one count of possession of stolen goods may be sustained; the trial court erred in sentencing the defendant on five counts of possession of stolen goods rather than one count. We arrest judgment on four of the five convictions and remand the remaining conviction for resentencing. Where the aggravating factors were not found beyond a reasonable doubt by a jury and were not admitted by the defendant, we remand for resentencing. State v. Phillips. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0958, 10 pp.) (Eric L. Levinson, J.) Appealed from Richmond County Superior Court. (Mark E. Klass, J.) N.C. App. Juror Qualifications - Murder & Assault - Sufficiency of Evidence - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where the record shows that the trial court carefully questioned juror Williams as to her views about the death penalty versus life imprisonment and ensured that Williams understood, inter alia, the difference between the guilt and sentencing phases of trial, the burden of proof on the state, and her duty as a juror to listen to and fully consider both sides' arguments and evidence, then the trial court's determined to its satisfaction that Williams was capable thereof was not an abuse of discretion. No error in the defendant's conviction of first-degree murder, assault with a deadly weapon, and two counts of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury. Remanded for resentencing. Where the state provided substantial evidence as to all the elements of the assault with a deadly weapon offense, the assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious bodily injury offenses, and the first-degree murder offense, then it was not error for the trial court to deny the defendant's motions to dismiss these charges for the state's failure to present sufficient evidence as to every element of he charged offenses. But where the trial court found impermissible aggravating factors and sentenced the defendant in the aggravated range, this was reversible error. No error in part, remanded for resentencing in part. State v. Yarrell. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0957, 10 pp.) (James A. Wynn Jr., J.) Appealed from Randolph County Superior Court. (Jerry Cash Martin, J.) N.C. App. Shooting Into Occupied Premises - Sufficiency of Evidence - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where there was substantial evidence from which a jury could find that the defendant had reasonable grounds to believe the Flying Salsa was occupied, the trial court did not err in denying the defendant's motion to dismiss the charges of discharging a firearm into occupied property. No error in the defendant's conviction of two counts of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury, assault with a firearm on a law enforcement officer, and discharging a firearm into occupied property. There was evidence that, prior to this incident, the Flying Salsa had stayed open until 3:00 a.m. It was located in downtown Greenville, an area described as typically "pretty crowded" at 2:30 a.m. on Sunday

mornings. The restaurant and a nightclub were both located in downtown Greenville in close proximity to the Flying Salsa. The fact that the Flying Salsa was located in an area where other establishments were open until the early morning hours shows that it was reasonable to believe that the Flying Salsa was also open and occupied at the time of the shooting. Finally, the Flying Salsa was not completely dark when the shooting occurred. But the trial court erred when it found aggravating factors without submitting them to a jury. However, where the trial court found that each aggravating factor alone outweighed the mitigating factor in this case, the trial court did not abuse its discretion. Dissent (Timmons-Goodson, J.) I am unable to conclude that a reasonable inference of defendant's guilt may be drawn from the circumstances. Instead, I conclude that evidence tending to show that the Flying Salsa was dimly lit at a time and in an area that is typically crowded creates only a suspicion or conjecture that the defendant had reasonable grounds to believe it was occupied. Therefore, because I am not convinced that the state satisfied its burden of demonstrating that the defendant had reasonable grounds to believe that the restaurant was occupied at the time of the shooting, I dissent from that portion of the majority opinion holding that the trial court did not err by denying the defendant's motion to dismiss. State v. Everette. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-09556, 18 pp.) (Linda M. McGee, J.) Appealed from Pitt County Superior Court. (Jerry B. Tillett, J.) N.C. App. Basis of Objection Switched - No Motion to Dismiss - No Plain Error - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where the defendant objected to the investigator's testimony based on hearsay, he cannot now raise a different rationale for his objection—that his testimony amounted to an impermissible opinion concerning the defendant's guilt—as it is an improper advancement of a theory on appeal which was not first argued at trial. No error in the defendant's conviction of robbery with a dangerous weapon. Remanded for a new sentencing hearing. Where the defendant did not move to dismiss the criminal charge in the trial court, he cannot now contend that the trial judge committed plain error in entering judgment because insufficient evidence existed to support his conviction. But where the defendant's sentence was enhanced beyond the prescribed presumptive range based upon a factor which was not submitted to the jury and proved beyond a reasonable doubt, he is entitled to a new sentencing hearing. State v. Battle. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0955, 7 pp.) (John C. Martin, Ch. J.) Appealed from Pitt County Superior Court. (W. Russell Duke, J.) N.C. App. Admission of Evidence - Expert Testimony - Right to Remain Silent - No Plain Error Even though the crime lab chemist (Rose) who performed the analyses was unavailable to testify, the lab report could be admitted into evidence upon the expert testimony of the crime lab supervising chemist whose opinion was based on the analysis of the non-testifying chemist. No error in the defendant's conviction of two counts of trafficking in cocaine. The expert testified that the methods employed by Rose were those reasonably relied upon by other forensic chemists, that the expert had actually calibrated Rose's machines, used the same machines for similar experiments, and reviewed Rose's work after the analysis was completed. Inherently reliable information is admissible to show the basis of an expert's opinion, even if the information would otherwise be inadmissible hearsay, and there is no evidence suggesting the information contained in Rose's test results was not inherently reliable. Where the expert was available for cross-examination, there is no Confrontation Clause violation. The defendant's entire cross-examination centered on the fact that the expert reviewed the test results of another

analyst and did not perform the tests himself. As a result, any credibility issues regarding the basis of the expert's opinion testimony were thoroughly explored before the jury. Where a detective testified that, after waiving his Miranda rights, the defendant was never upset during questioning but only quiet and slightly unresponsive, this did not amount to an impermissible comment on the defendant/s right to remain silent. Moreover, given the evidence before the jury, we cannot say they jury would likely have reached a different result had the detective's testimony and the prosecutors closing statements regarding the defendant's demeanor not been allowed. State v. Lyles. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0954, 10 pp.) (Wanda G. Bryant, J.) Appealed from Mecklenburg County Superior Court. (Robert P. Johnston, J.) N.C. App. Indecent Liberties - Priest- Penitent - Aggravated Range - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where the defendant neither attempted to cross examine the priest to whom the sexual assault victim made a confessional, nor requested a voir dire or made an offer of proof as to what he would have asked the priest, or what the priest would have revealed, the defendant's constitutional right to confront witnesses against him was not violated. No error in the defendant's conviction of taking indecent liberties with a child. Sentence vacated. Remanded for resentencing. Based on the transcript before us, we find that no testimony was erroneously admitted or excluded. Father Elzi did not testify to the contents of any statements the minor made to him. Presuming error in admitting Father Elzi's testimony, other overwhelming evidence of the defendant's guilt based on the testimony by Officers Navarez and Mendoza, the victim, and Sanchez renders any error harmless beyond a reasonable doubt. This assignment of error is overruled. But where the defendant was sentenced in the aggravated range without the aggravating factors being submitted to the jury, this was reversible error. State v. Sanchez. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0953, 7 pp.) (John M. Tyson, J.) Appealed from Mecklenburg County Superior Court. (Richard D. Boner, J.) N.C. App. Deadly Weapon - Weapon Declared Deadly - No Lesser Included Offense Charge - Sentencing - Aggravated Range - Blakely Issue - Resentencing Required Where the alleged deadly weapon (a knife with a six-inch blade) and the manner of its use were of such character as to admit of but one conclusion, the question as to whether or not the knife was deadly was one of law, and the trial court correctly took the responsibility for so declaring and correctly instructed the jury that a knife with a six-inch blade is a deadly weapon. No error in the defendant's conviction of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting werious injury. Remanded for resentencing. Even though the only evidence of the knife's length was that it was "about four inches," the trial court's mischaracterization of the knife's length was not an error so fundamental as to amount to a miscarriage of justice or which probably resulted in the jury reaching a different verdict than it otherwise would have reached. However, where the defendant was sentenced in the aggravated range without the aggravating factors being submitted to the jury, this was reversible error. State v. Caudle. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0952, 15 pp.) (Patricia Timmons-Goodson, J.) Appealed from Halifax County Superior Court. (W. Russell Duke Jr., J.) N.C. App. Child Sex Abuse - Expert Testimony - No Physical Evidence - Opinion of Child's Credibility - 23- Year-Old Abuse Incident - Extreme Time Lapse Where the trial court admitted the expert's conclusion that the defendant had abused the child based solely on the victim's own testimony without any other physical evidence of abuse, this amounted to an impermissible opinion of the child's credibility.

The defendant is entitled to a new trial. Upon plain error analysis, this court concludes that, had the jury not heard the inadmissible opinion of the expert, there is a reasonable likelihood that the jury would have reached a different result; therefore, we find plain error. Where the trial court admitted evidence of another instance of abuse to show a "scheme, plan, system or design," and where that instance occurred 23 years prior to the one alleged here, in light of the extreme time lapse, the trial court erred in admitting this evidence. Where the state was allowed to present evidence that the defendant possessed pornographic magazines and women's underwear without any showing that these played any part in the alleged offense, this was impermissible character evidence, but its admission was not plain error. Nevertheless, the admission of the testimony for the purpose of showing defendant's propensity to commit the crime should not be presented at the defendant's new trial for this same purpose. New trial. Dissent (Bryant, J.) I disagree that the trial court committed any error by admitting the testimony of the expert, and I strongly disagree that plain error was committed. This case is factually similar to many child sexual assault cases where the nature of the assault, a sexual touching, is such that one would not expect physical evidence of abuse. Therefore, in those cases where the clinical evidence of sexual abuse is based on expert medical testimony that the acts of sexual abuse alleged are unlikely to leave physical evidence, that testimony is valid and states the basis for the expert's opinion. For these reasons, I would hold Dr. Russo's testimony to be permissible medical opinion from an expert in child abuse, and would find no error in its admission. State v. Delsanto. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0951, 21 pp.) (Linda M. McGee, J.) (Wanda G. Bryant, J., concurring in part & dissenting in part) Appealed from David County Superior Court. (Mark. E. Klass, J.) N.C. App. Jury & Jurors - Unanimity - Sexual Offenses - Child Victim Where the state failed to relate the charges in the indictment and verdict to specific instances of abuse, and where the trial court did not adequately instruct the jury on the requirement of unanimity, we cannot be sure that each juror had in mind the same six instances of abuse when voting to convict the defendant of first-degree sexual offense. The defendant is entitled to a new trial on his convictions of six counts of first-degree sexual offense and seven counts of taking indecent liberties with a minor. No error in the defendant's conviction of two counts of attempted first-degree statutory sexual offense. These two judgments are remanded for resentencing. Our case law does not require victims of child sexual abuse to allege dates with specificity. Here however, the problem lies not in the lack of specificity with respect to time but in the ambiguity created by the failure to relate the charges in the indictment and verdict sheet to specific instances of abuse. Although the indictments and verdict sheets were validly drawn, they did not remove the ambiguity in the jury's verdict. None of the verdict sheets associated the offense number with a given incident or separate criminal offense. Nor did the trial court adequately instruct the jury on the requirement of unanimity. The trial court stated that the defendant was charged with 11 counts of first-degree sexual offense and gave the pattern jury instruction for that crime. It instructed the jury regarding the requirement of unanimity only as follows: "You may not return a verdict until all 12 jurors agree unanimously as to each charge. You may not render a verdict by majority vote. " Thus, the trial court did not explain the need for unanimity on each specific sexual incident. The trial court should have submitted a specific instruction with respect to unanimity of verdict as to each indictment and also assigned correlating specific alleged acts of sexual offense to each indictment. Because the trial court failed to ensure that each juror had in mind the same six instances of abuse when voting to convict the defendant of first-degree sexual offense, the defendant's right to a unanimous jury ver-

dict was jeopardized. Where evidence is presented at trial showing a greater number of separate criminal offenses than the defendant is charged with, a risk of a lack of jury unanimity is created. The defendant was charged with 10 counts of taking indecent liberties with a minor, and he was convicted of seven of these charges. Because indecent liberties does not merge with and is not a lesser included offense of first-degree sexual offense, the evidence presented on the charges of first-degree sexual offense may also support a conviction for indecent liberties. Thus, again, it is impossible to tell which particular acts correspond with which charges and convictions for indecent liberties. Even though the defendant was also charged with six counts of lewd and lascivious conduct, apparently under the indecent liberties statute, he was not prejudiced because judgment was arrested on each of the six convictions of lewd and lascivious conduct. The defendant did not receive multiple sentences for a single offense, which is the principal danger in multiplicitous indictments, and his protection against double jeopardy was not violated. Where only two instances of attempted first-degree sexual offense were presented to the jury, and where the jury convicted the defendant on both charges, there was no risk of a lack of unanimity. New trial in part, no error and remanded for resentencing in part. State v. Bates. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0963, 24 pp.) (John C. Martin, Ch.J.) Appealed from Wayne County Superior Court. (W. Allen Cobb Jr., J.) N.C. App. Indecent Liberties - Evidence - Hearsay - Medical Exam - Constitutional - Sentencing - Aggravating Factor Where the child complainants were eight and nine years old, respectively, they were old enough to understand that their interviews with registered nurses had a medical purpose and they indicated as such, and where the interviews took place in a medical center immediately prior to a physical examination, the record indicates the children had the requisite intent to make their statements for a medical purpose. No error in the defendant's conviction of two counts of taking indecent liberties with a minor child. Remanded for resentencing. The evidence also indicates that the children's statements were made at their first visit to a doctor after discovery of their allegations of sexual abuse. The statements were pertinent to medical diagnosis or treatment and were properly admitted into evidence. Where the trial court found as an aggravating factor that the defendant "took advantage of a position of trust or confidence to commit the offense," the trial court's aggravation of the defendant's sentence violated the defendant's Sixth Amendment right to a jury trial. Because a jury did not find beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant "took advantage of a position of trust or confidence" to commit indecent liberties, such error is structural error, and we must grant the defendant a new sentencing hearing. State v. Lewis. (Lawyers Weekly No. 05-07-0950, 16 pp.) (John C. Marti