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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 1
Valentine Romance!
12 charming inns
to create a special day
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c
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How to ski
big bumps
Extreme skier John Egan
shares 5 tips on skiing
Castlerock’s biggest!
WoRth It!
A new line of backcountry skis for
Eastern skiing is born right here in
Vermont. Check it out!
Dan Egan interview:
On extreme skiing
and his new role
at Killington Resort
Out of bounds!
50 skiers have called in lost
after skiing out of bounds.
What now?
Elsie Lynn skis the trees at the Middlebury College Snow Bowl. Photo by Oliver Parini
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PAGE 2 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 3
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from the cover
6-7 WoRth It!
Vermont’s newest ski line creates a back-
country board designed for Eastern con-
ditions — and it bucks tradition. Called
WoRth Skis, it was born right on Worth
Mountain at Middlebury’s Snow Bowl
by three Vermont ski addicts.
22 Valentine Romance!
We select a dozen inns and activites
to make it a special day you won’t
soon forget.
.
32 Dan Egan
In an interview at his new digs at Killing-
ton Mountain, the ski legend talks about
extreme skiing and the importance of
safety.
38 LOST!
More than 50 skiers and riders have
called for rescue services at Killington so
far this season. That’s way up and it has
slolo çolico ono rosorl o¦¦ciols lol|inq
about what to do next.
Contributing Editor Contributing writers
Lisa Gosselin Karen Lorentz, Polly Lynn
Graphic Artist/Production Advertising Sales
Jill Leduc Trish Read
trishr@wcvt.com
For news tips or to advertise call 802-388-4944 or email: info@
vtskiandride.com
Adverlising & Ediloriol Olhce:
Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine
58 Maple Street, Middlebury, Vt. 05753
802-388-4º44 (ulso oíícos oí lho Addison lndopondonl}
Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine is owned and operated by
Addison Pross lnc., u \ormonl compuny locully ownod sinco
1946. Vermont Ski and Ride Magazine is published monthly
November through March.
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ca
Editor/Publisher
Angolo Lynn º ungolo@vlskiundrido.com
Skiers are drawn to Mad River by the feeling of a true wilderness
experience unsullied by money, pretense or pomp... Mad River
Glen is simply the last great place where skiing is stripped to its
bare and sublime essence. It is far more than a ski hill- it is an
ideal, a belief, that echoes in the heart of every true skier.
- A MRG Skier
www. madrivergl en. com
Single skier photo credit: Brian Mohr/EmberPhoto.com
Single chair photo credit: John Williams
Awesome On-line Deals
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PAGE 4 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 5
Publisher’s Desk
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Records set over Christmas Week
While Vermont was beset by erce storms, oods and a drought during 2011-12, this winter
has been spectacular. is Christmas week, Sugarbush Resort set an all-time record of skier days
on Dec. 28-29, besting the resort’s previous high by 9 percent and their best holiday week by 14
percent. Stowe Mountain reported hitting a high of 9,000 skier-days on those same two days, and
personal experience will tell you that Killington’s parking lots were so full people were parking
down the access road as far as the Santa Fe Steak House. e same was true at Mad River Glen
where cars lined Route 17 for more than a mile. And, get this, Sugarbush Resort reportedly had
to turn people away because its lots were jammed and they had no place to park.
Some of those skiers and riders must have gone over to the Middlebury College Snow Bowl
(just about 20 miles south) because Manager Peter Mackey reported the best ve day run since
he’s been there — and that’s been a while.
We’re sure the state’s ski resorts are reluctant to admit there could be too much of a good thing,
but when the snow gods sent three well-timed storms that dumped three feet over the Green
Mountains — from Mount Snow to Jay Peak — everyone in the Northeast heard about it and
jumped at the chance to reap Vermont’s white gold.
It was quite a week.
“Records and near records all across the state,” Vermont Ski Areas Association President Parker
Riehle recalled with clear excitement even two weeks later. “It’s rare that we have storms spread so
evenly that everyone had great snow; even the smaller resorts knocked it out of the park.”
Nordic areas were up, too, with Trapps Touring Center in Stowe reporting a 29 percent surge
compared to last year’s holiday week.
“Super numbers,” Riehle said, “o the chart; it’s just great to see.”
While the holiday week was spectacular, the season got o to a great start back in November
when temperatures stayed cold through the month to allow the ski resorts’ snowmaking to put
down an exceptionally good base of snow for one of the best opening seasons in years. By the
middle of the month, the Green Mountain State had more ski runs and open terrain open than
anywhere in the nation leading up to a respectable anksgiving holiday. at carried over to
some good early weeks in December — most of which was attributable to superior snowmaking.
Riehle notes that Vermont’s ski resorts have broken the 80 percent mark — that is, the percentage
of runs covered by snowmaking. To put that number in perspective, Riehle said, Vermont now
has 1,300 more skiable acres covered by snowmaking than all
of New Hampshire’s skiable terrain — and that’s not counting
Vermont’s trees, glades and o-piste terrain — just the groomed
stu. It’s another reminder of why Vermont ranks third in the
country in terms of skier days each year.
tttttttttt
Of particular note in this issue are two pieces on and/or by the
Egan Brothers — Dan and John. At Sugarbush Resort, skiing
great John Egan oers a half dozen insightful tips on how to ski
big bumps, like those at Castlerock’s Lift Line or Middle Earth,
how to control speed and direction, and make it all look so easy.
He’s told me before, and I’ve watched him straightline Stein’s in a ash, but I’ve got a ways to go.
is time, however, I got him to put it down in writing. Over in Killington, Dan Egan reects
in an interview by Karen Lorentz on his career in extreme skiing, his new role at Killington as an
adventure guide and instructor, and the importance of ski safety.
ttttttttttt
Speaking of ski safety, more than 50 skiers and riders have sent out the call for rescue help
already this year at Killington Mountain Resort, prompting the state police and ski resort ocials
to meet in an eort to nd a resolution. It’s expensive for the state police to conduct rescues and,
more importantly, getting lost in the woods on a cold winter night can be deadly. e tips to
abide are obvious: don’t ski alone; take a cell phone; never go out-of-bounds mid-afternoon or
later unless you’re certain you know where you’re going (or at any other time for that matter); and
don’t ski or ride beyond your ability. Just because it’s legal, doesn’t mean it’s smart.
tttttttttt
Leading o this issue is a story on three Vermont ski addicts who have launched WoRth Skis,
a backcountry ski specically designed for Eastern conditions. I skiied it last week and while it
takes a few runs to get used to, it’s solid underfoot and a hoot in the trees. Check it out!
On a romantic note, for all you lovers out there we’ve selected 12 special getaways, complete
with suggested activities, for that special person in your lives this coming Valentine’s Day.
Hundreds of other equally romantic places abound in this charming state, but here’s a sampling
to get you thinking — with encouragement (for all you procrastinators) to book now.
Angelo S. Lynn, editor/publisher
Christy Lynn of Middlebury bends deep into a tele-turn in the trees at the Middlebury College Snow Bowl. Photo by Oliver Parini
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PAGE 6 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
WoRth It!
By Angelo Lynn
MIDDLEBURY, Vt. — Like many great ski
products, the idea behind Worth Skis was born
on the chair lift. Jason Duquette-Homan and
Dalton Harben were riding up the chairlift
at Jason’s backyard ski resort just outside of
Middlebury and belly-aching about the dirth of
backcountry skis designed for Eastern conditions.
Steeped in the lore of Vermont skiing and a
ski junkie and tech rep for the previous 15 years,
Homan said the idea to start building their own
skis sparked when they realized they had decades
of ski knowledge and ski experiences in the Eastern
backcountry and they might as well just do it.
“Powder and backcountry skis have long been
designed for Western conditions,” Duquette-
Homan said on a recent ride up the Worth
Mountain Chairlift at the Middlebury College
Snow Bowl in mid-January, “but until now there
hasn’t been a backcountry powder ski specically
designed to handle the challenging conditions of
East Coast skiing… We have tighter trees so you
have to be able to turn in a ash; we can have
deep, light snow, but we also need to be able to
shred crud; and when you’re just wanting to cruise
a run on the hardpack, it can be icy so you need
the ski to hold an edge… Nobody was doing
that… so we decided to build our own skis.”
e two met after Harben, who is an
accomplished backcountry skier with a
reputation skiing gnarly lines, suered
injuries after an equipment failure that
caused a nasty crash while skiing in New
Hamphire’s White Mountains. at
story gained coverage through Teton’s
Gravity’s online forums, the two started
talking and it wasn’t long before they got
together in their home state and started
planning ways to start a ski company that
would buck the conventional wisdom of
mainstream ski manufacturers.
at wasn’t as easy as it sounded,
however. It takes a pile of money and a lot
of time to develop prototypes, do tests,
build molds and nally produce a ski,
Duquette-Homan says. So they turned
to another Vermonter.
Turns out that through Jason’s many
years working in the ski industry —
from ski tech work at the Alpine Shop
in Middlebury and Burlington, to hard-
goods buyer/manager at the store in
Burlington — and Dalton’s passion for
dropping gnarly lines in places all across
the country and beyond, they both also
loved Praxis skis — a small-batch ski
manufacturer based in Village, Nevada near Lake
Tahoe. Praxis is owned by Keith O’Meara, who
hails from Orange County, Vermont — not far
from the state’s capital.
Joined by their third partner, Adrian Kostrubiak,
who also loves to shred the trees when he’s not
creating software at a rm in Norwich, they
contacted O’Meara, established a deal with him to
manufacture the skis once they were designed, and
they poured their energy into building backcountry
boards specically for Eastern skiing.
e key to that design, Homan-Duquette
said, was creating a tapered ski from tip to tail,
descending in a gradual taper, to keep edge contact
with the snow, while keeping a little early rise in
the tip. e design specically does not use the
traditional rocker design or pin-tailed shapes of so
many of today’s powder and backcountry skis.
“e tapered shape, rather than the rockered
shaped, allows the ski to keep more edge in contact
with the snow throughout the turn,” Duquette-
Homan says. “e pointed shape of the tip doesn’t
catch and hook, allowing the tails to slide better so
you can put the tails exactly where you want them.
e oater on the front of the ski helps initiate the
turn, making it quick and easy to change direction
— something we really need when skiing the East’s
tighter trees.”
Designed for skiing the East, Sidra Hoffman rips the powder on a pair of WoRth Skis that are designed in Vermont by an up-and-coming ski company.
Photo by Adrian Kostrubiak
A Vermont ski company is launched to make backcountry skis for East Coast conditions
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 7
The Swimming Hole • 75 Weeks Hill Road • Stowe, VT
802.253.9229 • www.theswimmingholestowe.com
The Swimming Hole is a non-profit community pool & fitness center that welcomes community support.
Competition-sized Swimming Pool • Toddler & Child Pool • Water Slide • Diving Board
Swim Lessons • Swim Club • Masters Swimming • Personal Training
Group Fitness • Spinning Classes • Kranking Classes • Yoga
MEMBERSHIPS & DAY PASSES AVAILABLE
Worth Skis are built with four basic models, ranging
in width from 98mm under foot to 118mm. To add ex,
but prevent a weakening of torsional rigidity in the ski
(common to other backcountry skis built for Western
skiing), Worth Skis are built with an uninterrupted solid
strip of ash that runs the length of the sidewall, rather than
multiple strips of wood or metal along that same section
that weaken toward the middle of the ski.
Combining the uninterrupted strip of ash to the fully
tapered ski provides a quick-turning, wide-platform ski
that’s built to blast down Sugarbush’s rugged Castlerock
terrain, bash through Jay’s famous glades, or charge the
steeps at Mad River Glen — not to mention play in the
secret stashes hidden on the Snow Bowl’s Worth Mountain.
Also unique to Worth Skis is their marketing and sales
philosophy. Each ski is custom built and designed after
consultation with the prospective buyer, who becomes, if
not a close friend, at the very least a member of a close-knit
ski community.
“We’re a Vermont ski company with Vermont values,”
Duquette-Homan says, which is short-hand for putting
the passion of what they are doing as their top priority, as
well as serving their customers. “We want to know every
person we sell a pair of skis to… we work with them to
The three owners of Worth Skis are passionate skiers who also have full-time jobs to support their hobby. Jason Duquette-Hoffman,
center, works with the Attorney General’s office in Vermont; Adrian Kostrubiak, right, is a software programmer living in Norwich; and
Dalton Harben (not-pictured) works with finance out of a Boston office. Jason’s brother, Brady Hoffman of Middlebury, far left, lends a
hand in shipping, trade shows and other tasks when he’s around.
design the the exact ski that will react the way
they want it to.”
Adding a layer of carbon to the wood-
core ski, for instance, also adds the stiness
that some Eastern skiers like when bashing
through o-piste crud. Done. Want a double
layer? at can be done too. Want the tip
softer so it oats, with a stier tail? No
problem.
“at’s the fun of what we do,” Duquette-
Homan says. “ese are one-of-a-kind skis
and we put a lot of heart and soul into every
pair we build… We love the sport, we love
Vermont and we’re psyched to be bringing a
ski company back into the state.” Speaking of
that, the trio has plans to launch a new line
of skis next year, the Green Line, with the full
production being produced in Vermont at a
new snowboard manufacturing company in
Barton. at will be in addition to the Worth
Skis still being manufactured in Nevada.
Worth Skis cost around $700 to $1,000
for the basic models, with the more expensive
ones incorporating a carbon layer. So far,
they’ve produced about 65 pairs since
ocially launching the business last
winter in the 2011-12 season, with
dreams of producing up to 200-250
pairs a year. “at would be about our
maximum, since we all currently have
full-time jobs,” Duquette-Homan says,
which is just ne with them.
“Right now, we’re thrilled to be
making skis that we really like to ski
on and sharing our vision with others.
Where it goes from there, we won’t really
know.”
Skis can be ordered directly by
calling any one of the three co-owners,
or through three Vermont ski shops:
SkiHaus in Middlebury, Outdoor
Gear Exchange in Burlington or at
the Smuggler’s Notch Resort’s Demo
Center. e demos at Outdoor Gear
Exchange also have a few mounted
with alpine touring bindings, and tele-
bindings are an increasingly popular
option.
worth
Jason Duquette-Hoffman
skis a line on a pair of skis
they call “the George,”
named after his grandfather.
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PAGE 8 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Mobile Middlebury App
Handy. Info. At your ngertips...
Ski Info. Dining. Lodging. Services. Maps. Events.
Powered by Route 802. Brought to you by Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine.
By Karen D. Lorentz
As Pico celebrates its 75th anniversary
this month, it’s appropriate to recall its rst
great homegrown competitor, the daughter
of the mountain’s founders and the best
female racer in America for many years.
Andrea Mead (Lawrence) competed in
three Winter Olympics, winning two Golds
in the 1952 games, a feat still unequalled by
an American for a single Winter Olympics
Alpine event.
She skied that year in boots secured
to her skis with a leather thong wound
around each ankle and instep and threaded
through a hole mortised in the ski. An iron
toehold kept her foot locked in—a far cry
from today’s safety bindings.
Few skiers remember those years, but
they were heady times for the U.S. Women’s
Ski Team.
Starting with the 1948 Olympics held
at St. Moritz, the second Games that
they entered, the women were on a roll.
Gretchen Fraser won Gold and fteen year-
old Andrea Mead, the youngest member
on the team, nished eighth in slalom that
year. en in 1952, the newly wed Andrea
Mead Lawrence took fourth in downhill
and rst in giant slalom and slalom, despite
hooking a tip.
In those days when a skier fell or went
o course, they were not automatically
disqualied. Spinning o the course after
she caught the course pole with her ski
tip, Mead climbed back up to the gate and
nished her run. A spectacular second run
put her in rst place.
It was a time when she was skiing
out of the sheer exhilaration of the
sport, channeling her enjoyment of
competition and all-out energy to an
ideal that incorporated her experience,
concentration, balance, and timing. at combined with
her love of “going fast” propelled her to victory.
“My purpose was to do the best job I could. I set a
standard for myself that every single time I left the starting
gate I would put 150 percent of my eort into it. I extend
myself to the maximum all the time,” she said of her 1952
races.
In 1954, she withdrew from F.I.S. races because she was
pregnant with her second child. In 1955, she won every
race she entered. A mother of three, Lawrence participated
in the 1956 Olympics, just missing another medal in
slalom by a split second and came in fourth in giant slalom.
She won her nal race in Norway that season, ending an
amazing career that spanned 14 years. She was inducted
into the U.S. Ski Hall of Fame in 1958 and the Vermont
Ski and Snowboard Museum’s Hall of Fame in 2002.
So how did this young Vermonter come to do so well?
Movement and mountains were a fundamental part of
Once upon a time in history:
Andrea Mead Lawrence, America’s legendary Olympian
Lawrence’s life since she was born in Rutland in April 1932.
Her parents Brad and Janet Mead “dreamed a mountain”
and built it, so Andrea grew up skiing at Pico Peak as it
was known then.
By the age of eight, she had climbed up Pico to ski the
2.5-mile Sunset Schuss with her father and Karl Acker, Ski
School Director.
Her father, Brad Mead, died in a tragic drowning
accident in 1942.
Acker became a coach and friend to the young girl who
possessed a singular love for having fun and going fast.
However, she was on her own during the war years as
Acker joined the 10th Mountain Division.
At the age of ten, Andrea foreran her rst slalom and
captured the prestigious Kate Smith trophy in February
1943. She became the rst North American racer to
win the Arlberg-Kandahar Downhill in 1951, another
highlight in a career of winning important ski titles.
She married David Lawrence in 1951,
who was the rst winner of the Men’s
National Giant Slalom title in 1949 at
Slide Mountain, Nevada. Both raced the
Sugar Slalom at Stowe in 1951 on the same
course. Andrea won for the women and
Dave for the men. Her time was second
only to his, causing a male competitor to
comment, “Some damned woman beat
me.”
In her book A Practice of Mountains,
Andrea wrote (in response to having
overheard that), “I was not aware that, for
women, the need to excel was supposed
to apply only to husband, home and
children.”
Having moved to the Sierras in
Mammoth Lakes, California, Lawrence
also became a climber. “We have
mountains inside us. A mountain is
never there simply to ski or climb. It is a
challenge to physical mastery and spiritual
possibility to which one goes toward risk
with as much abandon as possible,” she
wrote, a tting explanation of how she
achieved so much.
She raised her ve children in California
after having divorced in 1968. She also
became a environmental activist and led
a group ghting unchecked development
at Mammoth and served on the Mono
County Board of Supervisors for 16 years.
She founded the Andrea Mead Lawrence
Institute for Mountains and Rivers,
working for balance between economic
growth and environmental preservation.
She died in 2009 and was lovingly and
glowingly remembered in a well-attended
memorial service at the Paramount
eatre in Rutland. e many tributes
hailed her as “a hometown Olympian” as
well as California’s “most signicant and
eective citizen activist.”
Hers was a life of “striving for high-quality perfection”
in skiing and applying that same striving “to something
good, something relevant to life” as she explained to
Olympic historian David Wallechinsky in 1998.
Her life was both well lived and one that made a
dierence, not only in skiing and Olympic history but in
her passion for the preservation of wilderness places and
the earth’s beauty.
Lawrence’s book, which was co-written with Sara
Burnaby and published in 1980, explains her passions, and
the roles that the ideal of the Greek Athlete and mountains
played in her life. It is one of the best tributes to skiing
as a way to explore and extend one’s awareness that you
will likely ever read. It is a challenging book, but one that
rewards with insight and inspiration the role of sports in
our lives.
Lawrence left us a powerful gift in sharing her covenant
with mountains and her life at Pico started it all.
Andrea Mead Lawrence, daughter of Pico’s founders, raced with steely determination and sheer
exhilaration. She competed in three Winter Olympics capturing two gold medals in the 1952 Olympics,
a feat still unequalled for an American.
Photo courtesy of Pico Mountain Resort
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 9
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MOUNTAINTOP
FILM FESTIVAL
THE 10TH ANNUAL
SEVEN DAYS OF FILM FOR THOUGHT
HUMANRIGHTSFILMSINRECOGNITIONOF MARTINLUTHERKINGJR.’SBIRTHDAY
FILMS FROM AROUND THE WORLD,
EVENTS, FILMMAKERS & GUEST SPEAKERS.
JANUARY 18-24, 2013
WWW.MOUNTAINTOPFILMFESTIVAL.COM
BIG PICTURE THEATER, WAITSFIELD - 496-8994
WAITSFIELD — e MountainTop
Film Festival will oer a diverse program of
documentary and dramatic lms, addressing
social and environmental issues from around
the world. ese “lms for thought”  bear
witness to human rights violations and create
a forum for courageous individuals on both
sides of the lens to empower audiences with
the knowledge that personal commitment
can make a dierence.
e lm festival brings to life social issues,
civil rights abuses, and environmental
concerns through storytelling in a way that
challenges each individual to empathize and
demand justice for all people.
Besides showing lms from all over the
world, the festival is known to provide
a forum for discussion, direct action
and an opportunity to meet lmmakers,
community organizers and activists. e
festival’s past guests include Naomi Wolf,
Ralph Nader, Amy Goodman, Alex Gibney
and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, who spoke
at the Big Picture eater.
In recent years the focus has shifted from
lmmakers and luminaries to social activists
and community groups that give people a
chance to get involved in direct action within
the Vermont community. is year’s festival
will include a question-answer session with
lmmakers Cecily Pingree, Betting e Farm,
Eugene Jarecki, e House I Live In, a climate
panel discussion following  Chasing Ice, and
a panel discussion with environmental
coalition Beyond Nuclear after  e Atomic
States Of America screening.
e festival strives to use lm to tell
human stories that have the power to move
and to educate. e MountainTop Film
Festival oers an educational outreach
program to area high schools and makes
daytime screenings free and available for
interested students and teachers. Students
with valid ID attend the festival for free.
Festival founder and director Claudia
Becker started the festival out of what was
then the Eclipse eater in 2003. She ended
up buying the theater with her partner,
documentary lmmaker Eugene Jarecki,
and has since turned it into the Big Picture
eater & Café: a movie theater, restaurant,
event and community space. e mission,
says Becker, was to “create a local gathering
place with a global dimension, which the
festival and theater have both become!”
Opening night will feature Vermont
resident and lmmaker Ed Pincus’ early
work, Black Natchez, a cinéma vérité
account of the attempt to organize a black
community in the Deep South in 1965
during the heyday of the Civil Rights
Movement.
Other lms highlighting opening night
are:  Cloudburst, starring Oscar-winning
actresses Olympia Dukakis and Brenda
Fricker, an aging gay couple who escape from
a nursing home in Maine and drive to Nova
Scotia on a quest to be legally married; Inside
Story, about South Africa’s struggle with
AIDS; and a lm, e First Grader, about
a small school in Kenya where hundreds
of children are jostling at the chance for
the free education newly promised by the
government, and a Mau Mau veteran in his
eighties, who fought for the liberation of his
country and feels he should have the chance
of an education so long denied, even if it
means sitting in a classroom alongside six-
year-olds.
An opening night reception will be held
in the lounge from 6-8 p.m. with live music
by Anthony Santor and Friends. Films and
events will run in both theaters starting
at 3 p.m. Friday-Monday (Martin Luther
King Jr.’s Birthday) and 5 p.m. Tuesday-
ursday. For a full schedule of events,
lm descriptions and to purchase tickets,
please visit the festival website: http://www.
mountaintoplmfestival.com.
Tickets and festival passes are available at
the Big Picture eater Box O ce or online
through Brown Paper Tickets:  http://www.
mountaintoplfest.bpt.me. Tickets are $8/6
and $10 for Special Event lms.
For more information, call 802.496.8994.
**********
FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS
·ΉCHASING ICEΉ(2012, US, 116 min)
Acclaimed environmental photographer
James Balog headed to the Arctic on
assignment for National Geographic: to
capture images to help tell the story of the
Earth’s changing climate. Balog was a skeptic
about climate change, but that rst trip
north opened his eyes to the biggest story in
human history. Within months of that rst
trip, the photographer conceived the boldest
expedition of his life: e Extreme Ice
Survey. With a band of young adventurers
in tow, Balog began deploying time-lapse
cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture
Waitseld lm festival brings to life social issues, concerns
(See Film Festival, Page 16)
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PAGE 10 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Resort Address Contact Stats
4302 Bolton Valley
Access Road
Bolton, VT 05477
Main Phone:
802-434-3444
Snow Phone:
802-434-SNOW
Reservations:
1-877-9BOLTON
www.boltonvalley.com
info@boltonvalley.com
Total Trails................................................70
Total Lift ...................................................... 6
Total Acreage ....................................... 300
Vertical Drop .....................................1,704
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........312 in./26 ft.
223 Sherburne
Lodge Road
East Burke, VT
05832
Main Phone:
802-626-7300
Snow Phone:
888-Burke
www.skiburke.com
info@skiburke.com
Total Trails................................................50
Total Lift ...................................................... 6
Total Acreage ....................................... 260
Vertical Drop .....................................2,011
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........240 in./20 ft.
910 Cochran Road
PO Box 789
Richmond, VT 05477
Main Phone:
802-424-2479
www.
cochranskiarea.com
skiarea@
cochranskiarea.com
Total Trails.................................................. 8
Total Lift ...................................................... 5
Total Acreage ....................................... 150
Vertical Drop ........................................ 350
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........225 in./19 ft.
830 Jay Peak Road
Jay, VT 05859
Main Phone:
802-988-2611
Snow Phone:
802-988-9601
Reservations:
1-800-451-4449
www.jaypeakresort.com
info@
jaypeakresort.com
Total Trails................................................76
Total Lift ...................................................... 8
Total Acreage ....................................... 385
Vertical Drop .....................................2,153
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........372 in./31 ft.
4323 VT Rte 108 South
Smugglers’ Notch, VT
05464
Main Phone:
802-644-8851
Snow Phone:
802-644-1111
Reservations:
802-451-8752
www.smuggs.com
smuggs@smuggs.com
Total Trails................................................78
Total Lift ...................................................... 9
Total Acreage ....................................... 311
Vertical Drop .....................................2,610
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........312 in./26 ft.
5781 Mountain Rd
Stowe, VT 05672
Main Phone:
802-253-4754
Snow Phone:
802-253-3600
Reservations:
800-253-4SKI
www.stowe.com
info@stowe.com
Total Trails............................................. 116
Total Lift ....................................................16
Total Acreage ....................................... 485
Vertical Drop .....................................2,360
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........336 in./28 ft.
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910 Cochran Road
PO Box 789
Richmond, VT 05477
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 11
STOWE’S WINTER
ADVENTURE CENTER
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The Valley’s favorite après ski tavern! The Valley’s favorite après ski tavern!
STOWE —e 2013 Stowe Tour de Snow
– a showcase of the best of what Stowe has to
oer winter visitors, locals and neighbors —
is set for January 20 from 12-4 pm all along
the 5.3-mile Stowe Recreation Path. Families
and friends ski, walk, snowshoe or run and
participate in fun-lled activities that are
grouped into stations sponsored by local and
area businesses and organizations.
As a starting point for the event, Topnotch
Resort oers warm-up exercises courtesy of
the Spa’s Fitness Director as well as warm-up
and cool-down beverages. Other stations on
the Tour feature everything from yoga intro
sessions, Nordic terrain park, and ‘Learn to
Ski and Snowshoe’ clinics, to a dunk tank,
biathlon and paintball shooting, hockey
puck shooting, sled-pulling contest, slalom
ski course competition and snow disc golf, as
well as environmentally friendly winter arts
& crafts, winter survival station, food and
drinks, and other games and contests on skis
and snowshoes.
e Stowe Tour de Snow nishes at the
heart of Stowe Village, in the Helen day Art
Center on Pond Street where participants
are treated to more festivities, prizes, ra es,
food and contests.
All proceeds from the Tour contribute to
the enhancement of the winter use of the
Stowe Rec Path and the S.K.I.S. (Skiing
Kids in Schools) program providing cross
country ski equipment and professional
instructions to Stowe School students grades
3-8. Participants can register at Topnotch’s
Nordic Barn the day of the event from
12-2 or in advance online at http://www.
stowetourdesnow.com.
© 2012 Vermont Hard Cider Company, LLC. Middlebury, VT 05753
www.woodchuck.com
Stowe Tour de Snow spotlights village
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PAGE 12 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY

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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 13
23 South Main Street, Waterbury, Vermont
prohibitionpig.com
Featuring New England’s largest & best curated selection of craft beer,
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BOLTON VALLEY, VT — Keeping the
ever-changing dynamics of family needs
in mind, Bolton Valley makes it easy for
families to enjoy skiing and riding together
as well as enjoy the après-portion of skiing.
BOLTON AFTER DARK
e famous Bolton After Dark returns
this season where every Saturday night lift
tickets are just $19 from 4-8 p.m. Bolton
After Dark is a great way for families to
enjoy a Saturday night together in the
outdoors, plus have a bite to eat as well.
Inside the lodge, Fireside Flatbread is
the place to be starting at 4 p.m. as well,
oering up $2 atbread slices and $2 sodas
or PBR drafts. Starting at 4 p.m. a free
showing of a ski or snowboard movie will
begin and loop throughout the evening.
SKI AND PLAY
For parents with little tykes, Bolton Valley
has introduced new Ski and Play Days, where
on Wednesdays, parents can ski or ride with
a full day lift ticket and receive a full day
of daycare for their child for just $79, a
savings of 40 percent o the retail rate. Ski
and Play Day also is available on Sunday
afternoons from 1-4:30 p.m., and includes
a half day of daycare and a half day adult lift
ticket, also for just $79. Space is limited and
reservations are strongly encouraged. Extra
children may be added to either day for $30/
each. Call 802.434.6866 for details.
Bolton Valley After Dark is for family
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PAGE 14 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
VBA and
Vermont Grape
& Wine Council
initiate Passport
programs for
guests who
visit Vermont’s
breweries and
wineries.
If you’re a lover of micro-
brews and wines, the Vermont
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Breweries & Wineries
Brewers Association
and Vermont Wine and
Grape Council have
developed Vermont
Passport Challenge
prgrams for guests who
visit breweries and wineries
in the state.
ose who visit four
breweries, get a “Drink
Vermont Beer” bottle opener;
those who visit 10 breweries earn a
“Drink Vermont Beer” t-shirt; and
those who visit all the breweries
get the grand prize: a “Collectors
Set of Vermont Beer Gear.”
e rules are simple: Visit a
brewery or brewpub that is part of
the challenge (listed on the Vermont
Brewer’s Association website (www.
vermontbrewers.com); enjoy a glass
or pint and get your “passport”
stamped at that brewery with their
o cial VBA symbol. (e passport
card is available on the VBA website
or at most of the breweries.)
Prizes are given out when
the passport is mailed into the
Vermont Brewers Association, 142
Kirk Meadow Rd., Springeld, Vt.
05156.    (Be sure to indicate your
shirt size if you qualify. e oer is
valid while supplies last and is good
only for breweries & brewpubs,
not at wineries or cideries.)
A similar program is being run
through the Vermont Grape & Wine
Council. For info on rules go to www.
VermontGrapeandWineCouncil.
com.
LOCAL
1. Lawson’s Finest
The Warren Store
284 Main St.
Warren, Vt 05674
802-496-3864
www.warrenstore.com
Lawson’s Finest Liquids
Warren, VT 05674
802-272-8436
www.lowsonshnesl.com
The Warren Store is open 7 days/week, 8
a.m. – 6 p.m, bringing in a rotating line-
up of bottles delivered every Friday.
“Straight from the Green Mountains to your
head!” The Warren Store is the best loca-
lion lo índ Luwson´s boor, u smull bulch
artisanal microbrewery. Lawson’s goal is to
provide local brews of the highest quality
and freshness, while crafting unique new
recipes and emulating the best of widely
appreciated styles.
2. Shelburne
Vineyard
6308 Shelburne
Road
Shelburne, Vt
05482
802-985-8222
www.shelburnevineyard.com
Open 7 days/week, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tastings and Tours
Taste our internationally recognized,
award-winning red, white, rose and des-
sert wines; tour our state-of-the-art winery;
picnic & stroll through our vineyard and
discover how we make world-class wines
from regionally grown grapes.
3. Harpoon Brewery
336 Ruth
Carney
Drive
Windsor,
Vt 05089
802-647-5491
www.harpoonbrewery.com
Open daily, Sun-Weds 10am-6pm,
Thurs-Sat 10am-9pm.
We started the Harpoon Brewery in 1986
because—like today—we loved beer and
wanted more quality choices, and we have
spent as much time spreading the joy of
beer drinking as we have focusing on reci-
pes, ingredients, and brewing equipment.
Hopoíully our sonso oí gruliludo is roÐoclod
in both the quality of the beer and the spirit
of fun and enjoyment surrounding our beer
and breweries. We invite all of you to visit
our beautiful brewery in Windsor, Vermont.
4. Boyden
Valley
Winery
64 Vt Route 104
Cambridge, Vt
05444
802-644-8151
www.boydenvalley.com
Open May – December, 7 days/week, 10
a.m. – 5 p.m.
Jan – April, Friday – Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5
p.m.
Wine Tasting ($6+tax) all day, Tours
(FREE) 11:30am & 1:00pm, “French Gour-
met” Cheese Plates ($19.95+tax) season-
ally 10am-4pm
Boyden Valley Winery, a fourth generation
family farm, produces international award-
winning Vermont wines; bold red wines, el-
ogunl whilo winos, lighl und Ðuvoríul roso
and fruit wines, “Vermont Ice”: the premier
line of Vermont ice wines, and the NEW Ver-
mont Ice Apple Crème and Vermont Ice Ma-
ple Crème liqueurs. We offer tastings daily
from 10am-5pm, “French Gourmet” cheese
plates seasonally from 10am-4pm, and
FREE tours daily at 11:30am and 1:00pm.
5. Vermont Pub
& Brewery
144 College St.
Burlington Vt,
05401
802-865-0500
www.
vermontbrewery.com
Open 7 days/week, 11:30 a.m. – 1 a.m.
(Thu-Sat open until 2 a.m.)
Vermont Pub & Brewery is Vermont’s origi-
nal brewpub. Opened in 1988, it continues
to be a celebrated landmark and produce
world-class beer selections, which are all
uníllorod wilh no prosorvulivos.
6. Otter Creek
Brewing Company
793 Exchange St.
Middlebury, Vt 05753
802-388-0727
www.
ottercreekbrewing.
com
Open 7 days/week , 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Offers self-guided window tours and great
food. Founded in 1991, Otter Creek is one
of the oldest craft breweries in the State. We
brew all of our beers in small batches to
ensure freshness, using Vermont water, the
best domestic malts and hops, and our own
top fermenting yeast. Otter Creek is also
home to Wolaver’s Fine Organic Ales and
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 15
Tho Shod. Woluvor´s wus lho írsl USDA-
corliíod browor, louding lho induslry sinco
Tºº7. Tho Shod hus boon u \ormonl sluplo
íor gonorulions und u locul socrol lhul is
now uvuilublo rogion-wido.
7. Long Trail
Brewing Company
5520 US Poulo 4
8ridgowulor Cornors,
\T 05035
802-672-5011
www.longtrail.com
Open 7 days/week,
10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sulos und sumpling und solí-guidod lours
ul lho visilor conlor. En|oy \ormonl´s #T
solling cruíl boor ul ono oí lho mosl populur
doslinulions in lho slulo, lho Long Truil \isi-
lors Conlor. Wholhor you uro inloroslod in
on|oying somo oí our your-round, souson-
ul, cusk-condilionod or limilod ºpilol browº
rolousos, you will índ lhoro is u Ðuvor íor
ovoryonol
8. Rock Art
Brewery
ó32 Luporlo Pd./Pl.
100
Morrisvillo, \l 05óóT
802-888-9400
www.
rockartbrewery.
com
Open Monday – Saturday, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Tasting daily until 5:30 p.m. (with pur-
chase of $4 souvenir glass)
Tours run at 2 & 4 pm daily and you are
welcome to watch from the viewing win-
dow on your own ANYTIME!
Wo uro colobruling T5 yoursl En|oy sum-
plos oí our boors during your visil und huvo
u growlor íllod lo luko homo und on|oy lul-
or. Wo huvo lho bosl soloclion oí our bolllod
boors und wo ulso huvo sovorul locul \or-
monl íoods und choosos lo puir nicoly wilh
lho boors.
9. Zero Gravity
American Flatbread
TT5 Sl. Puul Sl.
8urlinglon, \T 0540T
802-861-2999
www.
omericonßolbreod.com
Zoro Gruvily Cruíl 8rowory is loculod in-
sido Amoricun Flulbroud 8urlinglon Hourlh
whoro you will índ T0-T5 houso brows on
lup ull your long. 8oors lhul uro browod íor
íood uro our muin íocus und Gormun und
Czoch-slylo lugors und u vurioly oí 8olgiun
slylos uro usuully woll roprosonlod. Cur TLA
l.P.A. is u crowd íuvorilo us is our modiovul
slylo Gruil ulo, rolousod lwico u your on lho
summor und winlor solslicos.
10. Grand View
Winery
Mux Gruy Poud
E. Culuis \l 05ó50
802-456-7012
www.
grondviewwinery.
com
Open May – October 7 days/week, 11
a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tours, tastings and retail store
Grund \iow Winory spociulizos in non-
grupo wino producod wilh churuclor und
nol swool. ll won u doublo gold uwurd íor
ils Crunborry wino, gold íor ils Slruwborry
Phuburb wino, und silvor íor ils Pour wino
lhis your ul lho Fingor Lukos lnl´l Wino Com-
polilion umong olhor uwurds.
11. Magic Hat
Brewery and
Artifactory
5 8urlloll 8uy Poud
Soulh 8urlinglon, \l
05403
802-658-BREW
MagicHat.Net
Winter Hours: Winter Tours Mon-Thurs
10-6, Thurs-Fri 3,4,5; Fri-Sat 10-7,
Sat 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Sun 12-5, Sun 1:30
Whoro uncionl ulchomy mools modorn-duy
scionco lo croulo lho bosl lusling boor on lho
plunol. Como wulch our sporos dunco und
pluyl \isil lho Arliíuclory íor FPEE sumplos,
FPEE Tours und lho mosl unusuul shopping
oxporioncol
12. Woodchuck Cidery
T53 Pond Luno,
Middlobury, \T 05753
802-388-0700
www.woodchuck.com
Facility not set up for pub-
lic tours
Cider can be purchased in
all 50 states
Tho \ormonl-busod, indopondonlly ownod
und oporulod cidory is now louding Amori-
cu´s íuslosl growing ulcohol bovorugo culo-
gory, lhrough ils visionury mix oí innovulion
und lrudilion. Thoir signuluro high quulily
produclion is nulurully glulon-íroo, which is
somolhing lhul sols lhom upurl.
13. Fresh Tracks Farm
Vineyard & Winery
4373 \T Poulo T2
8orlin, \T 05ó02
802-223-1151
www.lreshlrockslorm.
com
Como visil our bouuliíul und
susluinublo lusling room |usl 3 milos soulh
oí Monlpolior. Sil und on|oy sumpling und
sipping our soloclion oí winos ull grown und
producod on promiso horo ul lho íurm. Wo
ulso oííor dolicious locul chooso plulos lo
on|oy wilh lho winos us woll us uniquo und
locully soloclod giíls. Chock our wobsilo íor
hours und diííoronl ovonls liko livo music,
sushi, und yogu hupponing lhroughoul lho
your. Cpon Wod-Fri TT-7, Sul & Sun TT-ó.
14. Lincoln Peak Vineyard
T42 Pivor Pd
Now Huvon \T 05472
802-388-7368
www.
lincolnpeokvineyord.
com
Nov-Dec: Wed-Sun 11-5
Jan-May: Sat 11-5, M-F by chance or
appt
Jun-Oct: Daily 11-5
Tastings; wine by the glass
Wo-- lho Grunslrom íumily-- grow T2 ucros
oí grupovinos, muko wino righl horo írom
our own grupos, und lovo lo shuro how
grupos grow in \ormonl. Como luslo our
winos, on|oy u gluss by lho cozy wood slovo
or on lho winory porch, und wulk uround
lho vinoyurd. Cur winos huvo won lhroo
bosl-in-show uwurds ul lho lnll Cold Cli-
mulo Wino Comp in roconl yours. 3 milos
norlh oí Middlobury, |usl oíí Plo 7.
15. Champlain Orchards
35º7 Poulo 74 Wosl
Shorohum, \T 05770
802-897-2777
www.
chomploinorchords.
com
Open daily 10-4 No-
vember-June
Open daily 9-6 July-September
Plouso cull uhoud ií possiblo. Wo oííor
guidod luslings oí our Prunors Prido, Prun-
ors Promiso, Somi-Dry, und Crunborry Hurd
Cidors, us woll us our Spurkling und Hon-
oycrisp lco Cidors - ull mudo onsilo wilh
our ocologicully grown upplos. Picnic or
luko u shorl wulk íor slunning viows oí Luko
Chumpluin und lho Adironducks.
16. Saxtons
River Distillery
485 Wosl Pivor Pd.
8rullloboro, \T
0530T
802-246-1128
www.
soplingliqueur.com
Tasting room hours: Tues-Friday 9-5, Sat-
urday 10-5.
Suxlons Pivor Dislillory is lho homo lo Sup-
ling \ormonl Muplo Liquour. Wo will bo
udding now producls soon, so slop by und
soo whul hus |usl boon bolllodl
17. Jasper Murdock’s
Alehouse at The Norwich
Inn
325 Muin Slrool
Norwich, \T 05055
(802) 649-1143
www.norwichinn.com
Yearly Hours: Monday
5pm-9pm
Tuesday - Thursday 11:30am - 9pm
Friday & Saturday 11:30am - 9:30pm
Sunday 12pm - 9pm
1uspor Murdock´s Alos uro cruílod írom íno
English mulls, wilh hops grown in Englund,
locully, und in our own hop gurdon ul lho
lnn. Cur boor is pumpod undorground írom
lho boor collurs lo our pub ul lho lnn. Cur
browory is nol opon íor lours bul lho Alo-
houso is opon íor you lo wol your whisllo
during lho ubovo hours.
Cur ulos huvo won 4 silvor moduls und T
gold modul in lho lusl lhroo yours ul lho
Groul lnlornulionul 8oor Compolilion und
uro sold only ul Tho Norwich lnn.
18. East Shore Vineyard
Sugurbush - Lincoln Pouk
Sugurbush Accoss Pd.
Wurron, \T 05ó74
und 28 Church Sl
8urlinglon, \T 0540T
877-ESV-VINO
www.eoslshorevineyord.com.
Sugarbush Tasting Room: Open Friday-
Sunday – Noon to 6PM.
Burlington Tasting Room: Open Everyday
except Tuesday - Noon to 6PM, open later
weekends – Call for details.
Wine tasting ($7+tax) receive compli-
mentary glass.
1oin us ul our lwo promior lusling rooms
íor luslings und puirings wilh somo oí \or-
monl´s ínosl chocolulos und choosos. Eusl
Shoro \inoyurd producos u vurioly oí in-
lornulionul uwurd-winning \ormonl mudo
winos including. Truminollo, Summor Snow,
Cub Frunc, Murquollo, und \idul lco Wino.
19. Trapp Lager
Brewery
700 Trupp Hill Poud
Slowo, \ormonl 05ó72
ß02-253-5705 º
www.trappfamily.
com
Tho Trupp Lugor 8row-
ory oííors u soloclion oí
uulhonlic Auslriun lu-
gors. Slop by íor u pinl
und on|oy our moun-
luinlop viows in our Dol-
i8ukory, loungo, or dining room. Tho Trupp
Fumily Lodgo is u mounluin rosorl in lho Eu-
ropoun lrudilion by lho íumily lhul inspirod
ºTho Sound oí Musicº
Yearly Hours: Monday
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PAGE 16 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
."%."3"5)0/
“The World’s Most Beautiful Marathon ™”
Mad Half & Relays
Take it easy or take it tough!
Register at:
www.madmarathon.com
July 7, 2013
DRINK LOCAL WINE
Apres Ski Events
All Winter! All Winter!
Yoga & Wine
Himitsu
Sushi Saturday
Warm Atmosphere
Wine
Tastings
Live Music Fridays
Lunch & Dinner 7 days a week
www.arvads.com|802-244-8973
3 S. Main Street | Waterbury, VT 05676
COME EAT LIKE A LOCAL!
Your culinary home away from
home - inspired comfort food
in a relaxed community setting.
Apres Ski Live Music in The Lounge Fridays 6-9pm
a multi-year record of the world’s changing
glaciers. Panel discussion · Saturday January
19 after 5pm screening
·Ή THE HOUSE IS LIVE INΉ (2012, US
doc, 1hr 46min)
For over forty years, the War on Drugs
has accounted for more than 45 million
arrests, made America the world's largest
jailer, and damaged poor communities at
home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs are
cheaper, purer, and more available today
than ever before. THE HOUSE I LIVE
IN captures heart-wrenching stories from
individuals at all levels of America's War on
Drugs, revealing its profound human rights
implications.ΉQ&A with Vermont flmmaker
Eugene Jarecki to follow · Monday, Jan. 21
after 7pm screeningɚ
·Ή BETTING THE FARMΉ (2012, US doc,
1hr 25min) Documentary follows three
farmers and their families through the
tumultuous nrst two years of MOO Milk.
With intimate access to their triumphs and
disappointments, the nlm gives audiences
a rare glimpse at the real lives of American
farmers at a crossroads. Q&A with flmmaker
Cecily Pingree · Sunday, Jan. 20 after the 5
p.m. screening.
·ΉKRISISΉ(2012, Egypt/US doc, 62 min) A
feature documentary lm that fuses material
collected during the nlming of THE PRISM
GR2011. It is the synthesis of dinerent
stories that explore how Greece and the
Greeks are experiencing the economic crisis,
by looking into the hearts of people from
all walks of life. It is also an experiment in
collective documentary nlmmaking, as seen
through the lenses of 14 photojournalists.
THE PRISM and KRISIS are testaments
to how creativity is the best antidote to the
crisis, and that innovation can occur in the
darkest of hours.
(Continued from Page 9)
flm festival
WARREN, VT. – The West Hill House
Bed and Breakfast located in Warren, Vt.,
was ranked as a Guest Favorite for 2012
by BnBFinder, a premier site for locating
bed and breakfast inns. The Guest Favorite
Award, based on guest preferences and
independent reviews posted to the site, is
the gold standard and highest distinction
awarded by BnBFinder.
Guests at the West Hill House Bed
and Breakfast gave it high marks for
the delicious breakfast and welcoming
atmosphere provided by Innkeepers Susan
& Peter MacLaren,” said Mary White,
founder and CEO of BnBFinder. “This
award is a well-deserved recognition for
the fantastic experience they offer their
guests.”
“We are totally focused on giving guests
an experience similar to visiting a favorite
aunt or uncle, but where you don’t need
to help with cooking or housekeeping,”
said Peter. “ We are delighted our guests
consider us a favorite place to stay.”
West Hill House earns Guest Favorite rating
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 17
Mobile Middlebury App
Handy. Info. At your ngertips...
Ski Info. Dining. Lodging. Services. Maps. Events.
Powered by Route 802. Brought to you by Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine.
Happy 2013! I
hope you have all
had a chance to
enjoy Vermont’s
snowy moun-
tains. e Museum has radically changed its interior design
this fall and therefore some of the favorite exhibits have
been retired.
In case you missed it, here is an excerpt from an exhibit
that volunteer Sylvia Pope curated in 2009; it was part of
From Schussing to Shredding: e Evolution of Ski Technique.
Nine History making skis:
· Wood skis, made out of hickory for strength and resil-
ience with a layer of ash for liveliness, were dominant until
the 1950s. ɨe disadvantages of wood skis are they lose
their camber and spring, they have to be rather thick (and
therefore heavy), and do not turn well in soft snow.
In 1930, Austrian Rudolph Lettner put metal edges on
his wooden skis for protection and found that they turned
much better. Another improvement was the ridgetop, a
narrow ¨bump" which ran in front and in back of the foot.
ɨe ridge allowed the ski to bend into a more pronounced
arch without breaking. ɨere were many companies making
or importing ridgetop skis with screw on metal edges before
Museum picks 9 skis that made history; add yours
ermont
Ski Museum V
by Meredith Scott
the outbreak of World War II.
· 1940 Splitkein: ɨe 10
th
Moun-
tain Division Ski. ɨe 10
th
Mountain
Division was formed by Charles Minot
Dole to train and ght in mountain-
ous terrain. e Army ordered all their
skis painted white for camounage and
stamped the skis serial number across
the tips. ɨe skis were built by vari-
ous rms to Army specications that
included the requirement of “lami-
nated" construction. Splitkein means
“split cane” and describes the type of
laminated strips used in the construc-
tion. ɨese skis were ridgetops, and the
surplus skis were sold to many novice
skiers after the War.
· 1955 Northland Monarch: Hickory
laminated ski covered in clear varnish to
show the laminations and known for its
sturdiness and reliability. ey sold new
for $32.50. In 1955, on 225 Northland skis, Ralph Miller
was timed at over 100 mph on a downhill course in Portillo,
Chile.
· 1956 Kastle: Anton Kastle of Aus-
tria made his nrst skis in 1924. By the
mid to late ’50s, the entire American
Team was on Kastle, including Buddy
Werner and Tom Corcoran. In 1952,
two-time gold medal winner Ver-
monter Andrea Mead Lawrence was
a Kastle skier. Toni Sailer's triple gold
in 1956 was on Kastles. ɨe last of
the great wood skis, the softer more
responsive Kastles were part of the
new style of racing - the wedeln. e
tighter set slalom courses demanded
quick turns and required a supple ski.
· 1958 Head Standard: Head was
the world's nrst successful metal ski -
the most radical departure in ski-mak-
ing at that time. Made of a sandwich
of wood, aluminum top and bottom,
plastic sides and one piece steel edges,
Heads could be turned out on a pro-
duction line unlike handmade wood
skis. It turned easily in any condition
and became known as ¨ɨe Cheater,"
because any novice skier could carve
a turn like a pro. ɨe Head Standard
was NOT a racing ski. It held poorly
on ice, and at high speeds vibrated
rapidly making the ski bouncy. ɨe
later model 360 addressed these
issues.
· 1962 Kneissl White Star: Made
from epoxy/plastic with a wood lam-
inate core and a berglass casing. Fiberglass is lighter than
wood, absorbs shock better, and lacks the fast vibrations of
metal. Karl Schranz won the 1962 World
Championship at Chamonix on Whites
Stars. From then on practically all skis
were made of berglass.
· 1968 Dynamic VR-17: French ski
maker Paul Michal started perfecting
plastic skis in the 1940s. By 1962, he
began working in plastic and developed
a soft tip, stin tail high performance ski
with the mid section a stier “torsion
box.” ese elements made the ultimate
¨Avalement" ski that allowed a skier to
sit back and accelerate out of the turns,
lean forward and carve. Avalement is
French for swallowing, as if swallowing
the bumps. Dynamic worked with Jean-
Claude Killy, who perfected the tech-
nique, and in 1968 became the second
man in history to win three gold medals
in one Olympics, all on the Dynamic
VR-17s.
· 1968 Rossignol Strato: Rossignol has been making skis
since the 1930s. Emile Allais, the French bronze medal winner
in 1936, was hired to help design racing skis. Allais and Ros-
signol went on to develop successful lines of skis, including a
metal ski on which Jean Vuarnet won a gold medal in down-
hill in 1960. ɨe Strato is a nberglass sandwich with a stin
tail, soft-tip pattern and starting in 1966 became the premier
women's racing ski. Nancy Greene of Canada won gold in the
GS in the 1968 Olympics on it. It was a ski that could be used
by racers and recreational skiers.
· 1996 ɨe K2 Four: ɨe nrst really popular shaped ski
that became the best selling ski overnight. It added a gim-
mick - a piezoelectric ceramic chip under the nrst layer. When
you tapped the ski, a red light nickered. ¨If it's Blinkin,' it's
ɨinkin" was the moniker of the day. Bode Miller won the
Junior Olympics on a pair of K2 Four factory seconds.
Do you have a favorite history-making ski? Share it on
our facebook page! And stop in for a visit. ɨe Museum is
open 12-5 every day but Tuesday. Our event schedule, on line
shop, and membership information can be found at www.
vtssm.com. A museum membership makes a great gift - a $60
contribution will get you $1,250 in coupons for lift tickets,
cross country skiing, golf, lodging, and shopping, plus 2 for
1 Vermont travel cards.
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PAGE 18 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
1899 MOUNTAIN RD, STOWE PIECASSO.COM 802.253.4411
PIZZERIA & LOUNGE
SLICES CREATIVE ENTRÉES LIVE MUSIC LUNCH NEW BAR
GLUTEN-FREE MENU CRAFT BEERS GAME ROOM DELIVERY
with every
$25 purchase
6 Free Cider Donuts
• Stowe’s opinion poll: “Best Breakfast”
• Delicious soups and lunch specials
• Homemade pies, cakes, sticky buns and more
• Catering and Take-out available
Located on Mountain Rd., Stowe, VT • 253-8626
Open daily 6:30 am • mccarthysrestaurantstowe.com
Located on Mountain Rd., Stowe, VT • 253-8626
A welcoming atmosphere to share a
good cup of coffee and great conversation.
Call
Ahead for
Breakfast
& Lunch
Come Home To The Heart Of Stowe
Mountain Rd., Stowe 800-253-2232 www.stoweflake.com
150 Spa
Treatments
Aprés Ski Nightly
SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH, VT — Last
winter, Smugglers’ Notch Resort partnered
with Vermont’s Burton Snowboards to
develop the next generation of the Burton
Riglet Park, an on-snow play area with fun
terrain features designed for introducing
young children to snowboarding.
e park’s focal point is a “tree-house,” an
elevated platform with ramps that children
can ride down, a balance area inside the tree-
house and a lift chair that swings to help kids
practice getting on and o the lift. Playing
in the park on small rolling hills, miniature
box-style rails, pyramids and a mini-halfpipe
allows children to gain the necessary balance
and muscle memory to begin sliding and
making turns on sloped terrain. e park is
located at the Resort’s Sir Henry’s Learning
Area with conveyor lift access. 
“Building o of the momentum we
created during the Winter 2010-2011 season
with the introduction of the Riglet Park at
selected resorts, this tree-house concept takes
the Riglet Park to the next level,” says Je
Boliba, Global Resort Director for Burton
Snowboards.
For children in Smugglers’ all-day
snowboarding camps for ages 3-5 the
learning process is eased by a low camper to
instructor ratio and the indoor use of balance
boards to prepare them for on-slope balance
and riding. On the snow, these young
children benet from Burton’s Riglet reel, a
retractable strap attached to the snowboard
that enables an instructor to guide the child
over features with ease and allowing for a lot
of quick repetition. 
“Young kids can excel at snowboarding with
specialized support from their instructors and
Burton LTR gear. When we launched our all-
day snowboarding camp for 4- and 5-years-
olds in 2002, we were one of the rst resorts
to begin teaching snowboarding at such a
young age,” said Harley Johnson, director of
Smugglers’ Snow Sport University. “In 2010,
we began teaching 3-year-olds because we
were condent that the instructor/child ratio
and LTR equipment would help these little
ones excel on the slopes. e Riglet Park is
the latest indicator of our commitment to
promoting the sport of snowboarding to
even the youngest little rippers.”
For Winter 2012-2013, the Resort’s Snow
Sport University will oer two-hour park
sessions for ages 3-6, in addition to full day
snowboarding camp for ages 3-5.
Burton’s Riglet Park at Smuggs
is for the littlest snowboarders
CHECK US OUT AT WWW.VTSKIANDRIDE.COM
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 19
TO BOOK: 800.451.4449 or jaypeakresort.com
Photo by Lenny Christopher
SKI + SPLASH + STAY
BOOK NOW
c Cet More 1bav
$
200
iv racatiov e·tra..
PACKAGED LIFT TICKETS
VALID AT BOTH JAY PEAK &
BURKE MOUNTAIN

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PAGE 20 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Resort Address Contact Stats
4763 Killington Road
Killington, VT
05751
Main Phone:
802-422-6200
Reservations:
800-621-MTNS
www.killington.com
info@killington.com
Total Trails............................................. 140
Total Lift ....................................................22
Total Acreage ....................................... 752
Vertical Drop .....................................3,050
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........252 in./21 ft.
PO Box 1089
Waitsfield, VT 05673
Main Phone:
802-496-3551
Snow Phone:
802-496-3551
Reservations:
800-82-VISIT
www.madriverglen.com
ski@madriverglen.com
Total Trails................................................45
Total Lift ...................................................... 4
Total Acreage ....................................... 250
Vertical Drop .....................................2,037
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........216 in./18 ft.
6886 VT RTE 125
Hancock, VT 05748
Main Phone:
802-443-SNOW
Snow Phone:
802-443-SNOW
www.
middleburysnowbowl.com
snowbowl@
middlebury.edu
Total Trails................................................17
Total Lift ...................................................... 3
Total Acreage ....................................... 125
Vertical Drop ......................................1050
Avg Annnual Snowfall ......... 144 in./12ft.
4763 Killington Road
Killington, VT 05751
Main Phone:
802-422-3333
Snow Phone:
802-422-1200
Reservations:
866-667-7426
www.picomountain.com
info@picomountain.com
Total Trails................................................52
Total Lift ...................................................... 7
Total Acreage ....................................... 265
Vertical Drop .....................................1,967
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........252 in./21 ft.
1840 Sugarbush
Access Road
Warren, VT 05674
Main Phone:
800-53-SUGAR
Snow Phone:
802-583-SNOW
Reservations:
800-53-SUGAR
www.sugarbush.com
info@sugarbush.com
Total Trails............................................. 111
Total Lift ....................................................21
Total Acreage ....................................... 578
Vertical Drop .....................................2,600
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........264 in./22 ft.
14 The Green
Woodstock, VT 05091
Main Phone:
802-457-6661
Snow Phone:
802-457-6666
Reservations:
800-448-7900
www.woodstockinn.com
email@
woodstockinn.com
Total Trails................................................23
Total Lift ...................................................... 3
Total Acreage ....................................... 100
Vertical Drop ........................................ 650
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........120 in./10 ft.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 21
AT LAREAU FARM
Lodging & lift ticket packages available
Hearty farmhouse breakfast included
On the Mad River, in the heart of The
Green Mountains
Minutes from Mad River Glen &
Sugarbush
Home of American Flatbread
Pets can be accommodated
Great rates from $85 to $135
ph: (802) 496-4949/www.lareaufarminn.com
· On the Mad River, in the heart of the Green
Mountains
· Minutes from Mad River Glen & Sugarbush
· /e»æ e- -»æ:·,c¬ ¹/c zz:æc¬
· Hearty farmhouse breakfast included
· Children & pets can be accomodated
· Great rates from $90 to $135
AT LAREAU FARM

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Close to Sugarbush,
Mad River Glen,
Olé’s & Blueberry Lake
West Hi l l House
(802) 496-7162
9 unique guest rooms, really
comfortable beds, ensuite
bathrooms with steam shower
and/or Jacuzzi, gas fireplaces,
cable TVs, free phone calls & WiFi
Delicious breakfasts
3 large common areas with
fireplaces,
large TV and pool table
#1 on Trip Advisor
www.westhillbb.com
Great Ski packages

Celebrate W
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Ice and Hard Ciders
Grown and Made in Vermont
w
ith
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802-897-2777 www.champlainorchards.com
Sparkling Ice Cider
Honeycrisp Ice Cider
Pruner’s Pride Hard Cider
Semi-Dry Hard Cider
Cranberry Hard Cider
Ask for our ciders, apples, pies,
and other products at your retailer
or visit us online or in Shoreham, VT
Condos and Motel Rooms º Poulo T7, Wuilsíold, \T
T-800-7óó-782º | T-802-4ºó-2352 | www.gurrisoncondos.com
Centrally
Located in
the Heart of
Vermont.
G
reat
Rates!!
Jay Peak owners Ariel
Quiros and Bill Stenger
announced recently that they
have hired Alex MacLean to
be a project manager for the
Northeast Kingdom Devel-
opment Initiative. MacLean,
who will complete her work
for Gov. Peter Shumlin in mid
January, will lead the project’s
external aairs and assist in
fundraising eorts. is will
include aiding Stenger’s inves-
tor recruitment eorts, investor
relations and communications
eorts. MacLean’s immedi-
ate focus will be on the Burke
expansion and redevelopment
of downtown Newport.
“I’m pleased that Alex MacLean has
agreed to join the Jay Peak team,” said Mr.
Stenger. “Alex’s background and experi-
ence with this region, state government and
policy development make her an ideal t for
this role.”
MacLean, of Peacham, has worked with
Governor Shumlin over the past four years,
managing his campaigns and most recently
serving as his Secretary of Civil and Military
Aairs, and Deputy Chief of Sta. MacLean
will begin work with Jay Peak on Jan. 21. 
“I’m thrilled to be joining the Jay Peak
team,” said Ms. MacLean. “I look forward
to working with Bill Stenger and others to
create jobs and economic opportunities for
Vermonters. As a lifelong resident of the
Northeast Kingdom, I am proud to be a
part of this eort to revitalize our region.”
e Northeast Kingdom Economic
Development Initiative is a $600 million
economic revitalization project designed to
bring up to 10,000 new jobs to Vermont’s
Northeast Kingdom. Quiros and Stenger
announced their plans at a press conference
held back in September before Gov. Shum-
lin and the Vermont congressional delega-
tion.
e enterprise encompasses seven proj-
ects stretching between Jay peak Resort,
Newport and Burke Mountain Resort, and
is believed to be the largest initiative of its
kind in the state’s history.
Alex MacLean to join Northeast
Kingdom Development Initiative
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PAGE 22 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Jay Peak Resort
Once you arrive at Jay you’ll
have no reason to leave! With the
mid-week lodging special you can
bundle your stay and your play,
settle in, and relax. Impress your
date with the skiing and riding
at a Vermont resort famous for
the most snowfall in the East and
a liberal in-bounds policy that allows
you to explore and nd your favorite
terrain whether that’s in the trees, down
the steeps, the bumps, or the groomers.
Mid-way through your day, hang up the skis,
put on your suit and dive into Jay Peak’s indoor
Pumphouse Waterpark for an afternoon of warm
and wet excitement. Feel like a kid again on the water-
slides, or surf the waves and you won’t regret booking your
Valentine’s stay in Vermont rather than opting for Bermuda!
en, slow down the pace for a romantic end to your day
with a delicious meal at one of the many resort restaurants
before you cozy up with each other at Hotel Jay.
Mad River/Sugarbush
Enjoy the Mad River Valley with a stay in country charm
of Waitseld’s Tucker Hill Inn over a Valentine’s Day get-
away. Sit by the large eldstone replace and enjoy capti-
vating views in the company of your Valentine’s date. e
Tucker Hill Inn’s full country breakfast will help you start
your day smiling and prepare you the day’s adventures. Share
your aection with the folks at the Mad River Glen ticket
booth and enjoy a $14 lift ticket at one of Vermont’s nest ski
areas — all for the price of a Valentine’s Kiss with your honey
— in public! It’s all part of the thrill in a fun-lled day in the
valley. Enjoy a leisurely meal at one of the Mad River Valley’s
many classic restaurants — the Common Man, Lareau Farm
Inn, or Chez Henri are three great ones — with some of the
nest food around and spoil yourselves on a special Valen-
tine’s Day. And if it dumps that evening, book ahead and get
a snowcat ride to the top of Lincoln Peak at Sugarbush for
an early morning powder run that is truly “rst tracks.” e
perfect cap on to a Mad River Valley romantic weekend.
Mount Snow
Looking for a luxurious Vermont experience and great
deals? Head South! Mount Snow is oering a Valentine’s
Day deal featuring 2-for-$49 lift tickets. Also check our their
“Room’s on Us” mid-week special for on-mountain lodging
that allows you to get comfortable and settle in. Stay for the
Valentine’s Day
That makes 12 special things to do . . . including buying her a dozen roses!
9 Sample Vermont
itineraries to impress your
special someone, plus
3 romantic getaways . . .
weekend and play
like a local at the
nearby Chester
Winter Car-
nival (just
30 min-
utes north)
where the
communi ty
spirit warms
the heart with
sled races, a scav-
enger hunt, dog
sled rides, outdoor
skating and more. Back in
Deereld Valley, the slopes at
Mount Snow beckon, as does the
abundance of live music played at bars
throughout the valley, along with fantastic
meals in some of the quaintest restaurants in
Vermont in West Dover and Wilmington, before retiring to
the resort’s lodge and its full slate of amenities.
Burlington
Come celebrate Valentine’s Day in Vermont’s big city!
Start your day o with a trip to
the famous Vermont Teddy
Bear factory and pick out
your very own hug-
gable bear for your
sweetheart — start-
ing the day o with
a cuddly symbol of
love that will last for
years. Enjoy break-
fast at Penny Cluse
just o Church Street
in the downtown or the
funkier August bakery,,
then spend the morning shop-
ping the stores, touring the Echo
Museum on the waterfront of beauti-
ful Lake Champlain, visiting Shelburne
Museum and enjoying the many incredible
downtown restaurants for lunch, while enjoying
a stroll down Church Street. If you’re feeling brave,
venture down to the waterfront path for a stroll and enjoy
the beautiful views of the Adirondack’s across the lake. A Val-
entine’s Day reservation at the Ice House Restaurant by the
waterfront will ll you with warmth and romance, with the
cozy and rich atmosphere as well as tasty cuisine and ne
wines. Bolton Valley Ski Area is an easy 30-minute drive to
the East, and Smuggler’s Notch Resort is about the same dis-
tance to the northeast, featuring some of the steepest tree
skiing in the state.
Stowe
e Romantic Getaway package at the Green Mountain
Inn in Stowe oers a perfect backdrop to a plethora of Val-
entine’s Day activities, and won’t break the bank. But don’t
get too cozy at the Inn, for the lifts at Stowe start up between
7:30 and 8:30 in the morning and everyone knows the skiing
is best when the tracks are fresh! However, unless you’ve hit a
real powder day, take a break at noon and stop in at the mid-
mountain Cli House restaurant for lunch and enjoy some
of the nest seasonal cuisine on any mountain — or take
the Over Easy Gondola for a real treat at the Hourglass Café
at the spectacular Stowe Lodge. Stay bundled in your warm
gear and stop o for a winter cruise at Gentle Giants Sleigh
Rides on Mountain Road, just across the road from Top
Notch Resort. Snuggle in the sleigh with your sweetheart and
let your driver share some of the winter magic of a Vermont
Valentine’s day. If you have the energy, an afternoon Nordic
ski at Trapps Touring Center is a delight, including a quick
stop at the deli and brewery for a pint
of their award-winning local beer.
After a warm Jacuzzi bath at the
hotel, head to your dinner
reservations at any one of
the many award-winning
restaurants in Stowe, or
perhaps drive to the Hen
of the Woods restaurant
in Waterbury to enjoy a
meal that will make this
Valentine’s memory last.
Don’t forget the box of locally
made Laughing Moon choco-
lates (downtown Stowe) to top o
this special day!
Montpelier
Do you and your sweetheart love history?
Enjoy a romantic stay at e Inn at Montpelier for a
classic experience of Vermont’s stately living. Wake up to
a generous breakfast at the Inn and prepare for a festive tour
of Vermont’s capital city. Perhaps this will be yet another year
for the infamous “Valentine Phantom” to strike the capital
city with blankets of red heart posters covering the surfaces
of the city. Make sure your walking tour includes a trip to
the State House to view its impressive gold dome and a fun
tour throughout the eclectic group of downtown businesses.
e Vermont Historical Museum and the Hall of History
displayed at City Hall will oer a taste of some of the fasci-
nating history that tells the story of how Vermont became
the treasured state it is today. If you’re up for a half day of
skiing, Stowe Resort is 20 minutes north, Sugarbush Resort
and Mad River Glen are about 20 minutes south, Bolton
Valley Resort is 20 minutes west, and Burke Mountain is
well, about an hour east — but worth it! Once back in town,
seal the evening with a romantic dinner at the acclaimed
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 23
3 Valentine’s Day Getaways
Hartness House Inn
Springfield: Fall in love again at the
Hartness House Inn during a Vermont
romantic weekend getaway. Choose
between several romantic getaway pack-
ages, which spoil you with welcome bas-
kets with decadent chocolates, cheese
and crackers, wine, spa sessions to help
you and your sweetheart relax together, a
romantic candle-lit gourmet dinner, and
a champagne breakfast in bed. During
the day enjoy the grounds around the Inn
or venture out to nearby Okemo Resort.
Enjoy a Saturday night Valentine’s Dinner
and Dance party with the Swing Orches-
tra dance band and twirl your sweetheart
to the rhythm of the winter’s night.
Pitcher Inn
Warren: Indulge in one of the most luxu-
rious inns in the state with a getaway to the
Pitcher Inn. Located in the little mountain
village of Warren, the Pitcher Inn has become
part of the heart and soul of the Mad River
Valley. Each of the eleven guest rooms dis-
plays unique character and charm, with
handmade furniture, rich linens, and ne art
that will keep you coming back to stay. e
restaurant is a regional icon of its own, with
rened food and wine to t a true connois-
seur’s palate. Step outside and experience the
charming Warren Store, and take advantage
of the proximity of both Sugarbush Resort
and Mad River Glen during your stay, as well
as luxurious spas at the resort or in nearby
Waitseld.
Stoweake Resort
Stowe: Explore the magic of Stowe at the
Stoweake Resort. Check in for their deluxe
Spa Renewal Couples Getaway and prepare
for incredible service during an all-inclusive
Valentine’s retreat. Take advantage of the
access to the Spa where you can relax under
the 12-foot massaging waterfall at the Aqua
Solarium that feels incredible on muscles tired
from a long day of skiing or riding at Stowe
Resort or Trapps Touring Center. Pick a time
for a 50-minute couples tandem massage and
be able to share the benets of relaxed muscles
with your special Valentine. Enjoy breakfast
and dinner daily at the resort, as well as a wel-
come basket of Vermont specialty products,
chilled champagne and keepsake glasses to
remember your trip far after you’re gone.
Montpelier restaurant J. Morgan’s Steakhouse before retiring
back to the Inn.
Woodstock
If you want to impress your Valentine with a quintes-
sentially romantic Vermont getaway, head to Woodstock,
a quintessentially quaint Vermont town oozing with New
England charm. Begin the day with breakfast at Mon Vert
Cafe, downtown. e atmosphere is immediately calming
and the French-inspired food is simple, local, organic and
prepared fresh daily. From there, head to Billings Farm and
Museum, where you can witness an operating dairy farm,
museum of Vermont’s rural past and see the stunning vistas
of the Rockefeller legacy. Next head east to Quechee and visit
Simon Pearce, the world-famous glass workshop. See demon-
strations before grabbing a bite at their award-winning res-
taurant. After perusing
the gallery, ski for
the afternoon at
either Queechee
Resort or
nearby Suicide
Six in Wood-
stock before
checking into
the Woodstock
Inn, an elegant
retreat located in
the center of town.
For dinner, if you want
to dine out, walk a short
distance to the Prince and
the Pauper where you and your
sweetheart will enjoy a prix xe
meal that you’ll not soon forget.
Killington
Many a romance has begun at Killington, just ask the
locals! It must be something in the music, or is it the slopes,
or perhaps the chilly nights? Regardless, the magic here is evi-
dent. Begin your Valentine’s Day morning with a maple latte
from Liquid Art Coee Shop, make it a triple if you need a
serious pick-me-up! en head for the slopes and explore the
largest ski area east of the Mississippi, there is something for
everyone, so don’t be shy! After you and your Valentine have
taken in all the fresh air you can handle for a day,
head to the Spa in the Woods for some quality
relaxation. is will certainly rejuvenate you
for the night to come! Begin your evening
with a martini and appetizer at On the
Rocs, an elegant bar with a 1920s pro-
hibition theme. At 6 p.m. head up
to the Umbrella Bars,
where you will be
served a Broken
Leg cocktail, the
signature drink
made with warm
apple cider and ginger
brandy, before boarding a
snow-cat drawn sleigh to the
Ledgewood Yurt. Here you will
enjoy ne dining in an intimate set-
ting with only 6-8 total tables served. At
the end of this romantic adventure, if you
still have energy, dance your socks o at the
Pickle Barrel night club on the Mountain Road.
Mendon
It may not be the fanciest meal, but there is nothing
better than the wa es at Pico Mountain. If you are feeling
especially decadent, as you should be on Valentine’s Day,
get the hot fudge on top. Better breakfasts are hard to nd!
And, it is sure to give you energy for skiing or riding at Pico
Mountain, which will be in pristine conditions having been
closed the previous days! (Pico is closed on Tuesdays and
Wednesday for the 2012-13 season.) Take advantage of the
early morning turns, then head to Pyramid Holistic Well-
ness Center in Rutland where you can relax in the Salt Cave,
experience Vermont’s only Oxygen Bar, get a massage, take
a class or try Reiki, hypnosis, acupuncture, or get a chakra
reading, among many
other wellness prac-
tices oered.
When you
feel rejuve-
nated, head
back up
the moun-
tain to the
Red Clover
Inn. Be sure
to arrive
before sunset
and enjoy stun-
ning views of Pico
Mountain. e inn
oers a romantic dinner in
a classically sweet, elegant and
intimate setting.
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PAGE 24 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY

winter calendar January/February
MAD
RIVER GLEN
January 19
The Grift
4-6:30
Additional support
provided by:
BURLINGTON, VERMONT ECHOVERMONT.ORG 877.324.6386
@ECHOvt
ECHO Lake
Aquarium&
Science Center
An eye-opening exhibit challenging
perceptions and beliefs on race.
EXHIBIT ENDS JANUARY 27
OPENS FEBRUARY 9
An eye-opening exhibit challenging
perceptions and beliefs on race.
EXHIBIT ENDS JANUARY 27
A Project of American Antropological Association
Funded by Ford Foundation & National Science Foundation
Presented by
This exhibition and its tour are made possible by the
generous support of the following sponsors.
@ECHOvt
ECHO Lake
Aquarium&
Science Center
Aquarium
Science Center
Aquarium
This exhibition and its tour are made possible by the
generous support of the following sponsors.
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
VTSki&Ride_RACE_SM_5.06x6.37.pdf 1 12/28/2012 11:26:40 AM
P R E S E N T E D B Y
3k
SNOWSHOE RACE
3k or 5k SN
O
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SHO
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W
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LK
& LIL ROMPER DASH
T O B E N E F I T
S P O N S O R E D B Y
2013 TubbsRomp VSR_QTR ad.indd 1 1/4/13 12:31 PM
MAD RIVER GLEN
January 19 – Family Snowshoe Adven-
ture – Join us for this special outing for
families. While snowshoeing on easy ter-
rcin, we wi|| exp|cre Ihe fcrc cnc fcunc
of the slopes. Appropriate for ages 5 and
up – 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM
January 19 – The Grift – Live music in Gen-
eral Starks Pub – 4-6:30pm
January 26 – Full Moon Dinner &
Snowshoe – Join our Naturalist
guides for a special evening
as we explore the beauty and
nature of the mountain under
the full moon light! Enjoy a
hearty dinner at General Stark’s
Pub with Lawson’s Finest brews
on tap (cash bar) then venture out
for an easy to moderate one hour snow-
shoe trek. All ages welcome. RESERVA-
TIONS ARE REQUIRED BY 4 PM THE DAY OF
THE EVENT. CALL (802) 496-3551 EXT. 117
Cost: $30 per person. Full Moon Snow-
shoe only - $15 pp. Dinner service starts at
7pm; Snowshoe starts at 8pm. – 7:00 PM
January 27 – All About Bears Snowshoe
Hike – Have you seen the bear hair on the
8|cck 8ecr :ncw:hce Irci| :ign, cr Ihe
bite marks on the Kent Thomas Nature
Center? Mad River Glen has many of
the habitat requirements for bears, who
have long made it their home. Discover
facts and lore about this incredible large
mammal of our forests. Cost: Two hour
programs $25 adult $15 junior $65 for a
family of four – 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM
January 29 – Roll Back The Clock Day –
To celebrate MRG›s anniversary we roll
back lift ticket prices to the 1948 rate of
$3.50!
January 29 – Starline Rhythm Boys – Live
music at General Stark’s Pub – 4-6:30pm
January 29 – PHAT Event - Protect Your
Head at All Times – Members
from the VT Winter Snowsport
Research Team will once
again come to Mad River
Glen to present a «PHAT»
(Protect your Head at All
Times) Event. We›ll be raf-
fing he|meI: cff IhrcughcuI
the day!
January 29 – Vermont Specialty
Food Day at Mad River Glen – Ski
Vermont and Vermont Specialty Foods
Iecm up Ic cffer up :cmp|e: cf Iheir fne
products. Participating specialty food
producers include Cabot Cheese, Ver-
mont maple syrup, Northeast Kingdom
Mustard, Cold Hollow Cider and others.
What a great enhancement for Roll Back
the Clock Day!
February 2 – Moose on the Loose Snow-
shoe Adventure - Stark Mountain is home
to our largest mammal--the moose! See
the signs of these fascinating animals,
learn about their behavior, what they
eat and their seasonal cycles. Cost: Two
hour programs $25 adult $15 junior $65 for
a family of four. 10:30 and 1:30.
February 3 - Mountain Hardware Ski
Mountaineering Race - The Randonnee
Rally Race Series is a series of ski moun-
taineering races held at some of the pre-
mier resorts in North America. 8- 9am.
Registration Start at 10am.
February 9 - Triple Crown Unconventional
Competition - The 1st leg of the Triple
Crown Competition Series. Cost: $45.
Registration 8-9am with the competition
beginning at 11am.
February 14 - St. Valentine’s Day Kissing
Special - Kiss Your Honey in the ticket
booth and ski for just $14 each. Cost: Ski
for ONLY $14, BUT You have to kiss!
February 16 - Junior Mogul Challenge
- The 2nd leg of the Junior Triple Crown.
Open to kids 15 and under. Cost: $10.
8am Registration 11am start.
February 16 - MRG Freeskiing Team Lasa-
gna Dinner & Movie Night - Join us for a
lasagna dinner and screening of
the latest Meathead Ski the
Ec:I f|m. 5pm
February 23 – The Grift
– Live music in General
Starks Pub – 4-6:30pm
February 23 – Full Moon
Dinner & Snowshoe
Join our Naturalist guides
for a special evening as
we explore the beauty and
nature of the mountain under
the full moon light! Enjoy a hearty
dinner at General Stark’s Pub with Law-
son’s Finest brews on tap (cash bar) then
venture out for an easy to moderate one
hour snowshoe trek. All ages welcome.
RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED BY 4 PM THE
DAY OF THE EVENT. CALL (802) 496-3551
EXT. 117. Cost: $30 per person. Full Moon
Snowshoe only - $15 pp. Dinner service
starts at 7pm; Snowshoe starts at 8pm
SUGARBUSH AREA
January 18 - Late Night Dinner and Live
music at The Grill Down Under. Live acous-
tic performance from Guy Burlidge.
January 19 – Live Après Music 3PM–6PM.
Green Mountain Lounge. Castlerock
Pub, Timbers.
January 19 – Whistle Pig Whiskey Tasting
3PM–6PM. Timbers Restaurant. FREE.
January 19 – World Bazaar with Interna-
tional Vendors, African Drums, Hanna Tat-
toos and Family Friendly Food. 5:00PM–
7:00PM. Gate House Lodge. $15.95
for adults and $8.50 for kids 12
and under.
January 19 – Otter Creek
Fireworks Party 6PM.
Wünderbar. Viewing from
the bar, deck, and outdoor
frepiI {7FM ci:p|cy).
January 19 – Torchlight
Parade and Fireworks 7PM.
Lincoln Peak.
January 19 – Football Party:
8PM kickoff. Castlerock Pub. Playoff
games showing on two big screen TVs.
SUGARBUSH
January 26
Seth Yacovone
& Friends
9pm
Castlerock
Pub
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 25

January 19 – Late Night Music 9PM–
12AM. Castlerock Pub. Rock into the
night from the Starline Rhythm Boys while
enjoying beer specials from Otter Creek
and Wolavers, prizes and giveaways.
January 20 – Football Party! 1PM kickoff.
Castlerock Pub. Playoff games showing
on two big screen TVs.
January 20 – Cooking Demonstration
and Wine Tasting. 4:00PM-Pasta Bowls
and Wine Pairings
January 20 – Kids Movie and Pizza Night.
5:30PM–8:30 PM. The Schoolhouse.
Ages 4–12, $20. Reservations
required.
January 20 – 888 Vodka
Tasting. 3PM–6PM. Tim-
bers Restaurant.
January 26 – Tour De
Moon Night Skiing and
Dinner , Mt. Ellen
January 26 – Hope on the
Slopes Vertical Challenge, Lin-
coln Peak
January 26 – Late Night Music from Seth
Yacovone and Friends, 9:00PM–12:00AM
in the Castlerock Pub
February 2 – Jr. Castlerock Extreme, Lin-
coln Peak
February 2 – Meet the Brewers Night in
the Castlerock Pub
February 3 – USSMA Sugarbush-Mad
River Glen Randonnee Race
February 3 – Superbowl Party, in the
Castlerock Pub
February 9 – Late Night Music from Japhy
9:00PM–12:00AM in the Castlerock Pub
February 12 – Après Fat Tuesday Cel-
ebration, 3:00PM-6:00PM in the Cas-
tlerock Pub
February 14 – Valentine’s Day Dinner at
Timbers Restaurant
Fresh Tracks Farm
Jan. 18 – Big Hat, No Cattle from 6-9pm
Jan. 23 – Wine Down Wednesday. $3
glasses of Wine all day
Jan. 25 – Karen Krajacic Trio from 6-9pm
Jan. 30 – Wine Down Wednesday. $3
glasses of Wine all day
STOWE AREA
Arvads
January 18 – Music Fridays - Dave & Alex
Acoustic Duo
January 25 – Music Fridays - Joshua Glass
February – EVERY WEDNESDAY – Trivia
Night – You could win TWO Stowe Lift
tickets - 7-9pm
February 4 – Music Fridays – Keith Wil-
liams & Aurora Schein
February 8 – Music Fridays - Sergio & Sile
Piecaso
January 19 – Big Ol’ Dirty Bucket – 10pm
January 20 – Abby Jenne and the
Enablers – 10pm
January 26 – Entendre – 10pm
February 2 – Josh Panda & The Hot
Damned – 10pm
February 9 – Blues James Band – 10pm
February 16 – Ihe Whcrfcck: {fcrmer|y
known as Dead Sessions) - 10pm
February 23 – DJ Rekkon – 10pm
The Matterhorn
January 19 – Jimkata – 9pm
January 25 - Eames Brothers Band – 9pm
January 26 - Spiritual Rez – 9pm
February 1- Turkuaz – 9pm
February 2 - Blues For Breakfast – 9pm
February 9 - Spiritual Rez – 9pm
February 22 - Funk Collection – 9pm
Charlie B’s Pub & Restaurant
On the Mountain Rd. Stowe 802-253-
7355
Nightly 4-6 pm
OKEMO AREA
January 18 – Live Music by Chris
Kleeman – The Inn at Weathers-
fe|c - 7:30-ºpm
January 19 –
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI -
Corner of Main Street & Ando-
ver Street – 9am-1pm
- S|eigh Fice Weekenc cI 8i||ing:
Farm and Museum – Billings Farm &
Museum – 10am-3:30pm
- Chee:e Ic:Iing - VermcnI CcunIry
Store – 12-3pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI ¨Epic" cn Ckemc
Mountain – Jackson Gore – 6:30-7:30pm
- /:Lury ShcrI:: Ihe New Ycrk ShcrI Fi|m
Concert - Vermont Institute of Contem-
porary Arts -7-9pm
January 20 –
- S|eigh Fice Weekenc cI 8i||ing: Fcrm
and Museum – Billings Farm & Museum –
10am-3:30pm
- Firewcrk: Di:p|cy - Ckemc C|cck-
tower; base area – 7:30pm
January 21 – SleighRide Weekend at Bill-
ings Farm and Museum – Billings Farm &
Museum – 10am-3:30pm
January 22 – Movie: War Horse – Fletcher
Memorial Library – 12-3pm
January 24 – Thirsty Thursdays – The Killar-
ney – 4-11pm
January 26 –
- F|cnne| wiIh F|cir Funcrci:er - Jcck:cn
Gore Inn, Okemo Mountain
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI - Ccrner cf
Main Street & Andover Street – 9am-1pm
- Chee:e Ic:Iing - VermcnI CcunIry
Store – 11am-2pm
- Mi:Iy Vc||ey 8cck:´ /nnuc| NEW
VOICES Event – $10 - First Universalist
Parish – 2-5pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI ¨Epic" cn Ckemc
Mountain – Jackson Gore – 6:30-7:30pm
- Mcvie: My Week WiIh Mcri|yn - Luc|cw
Town Hall Auditorium – 7-9pm
January 31 – Thirsty Thursdays – The Killar-
ney – 4-11pm
February 1 – Opening Reception for
¨Unccn:cicu: Me::cge:" ExhiLiI - Ver-
mont Institute of Contemporary Arts –
5:30-8pm
February 2 –
- / Ic:Ie cf VermcnI - SIrcIIcn Fe:crI
Base
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI - Ccrner cf
Main Street & Andover Street – 9am-1pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI ¨Epic" cn Ckemc
Mountain – Jackson Gore – 6:30-7:30pm
February 7-9 – Lovin’ Ludlow Winter Car-
nival – Ludlow Village
February 8 – Shakin’ Skate in the Ice
House – Jackson Gore; Okemo Moun-
tain Resort – 6-9pm
February 9 –
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI - Ccrner cf
Main Street & Andover Street – 9am-1pm
- She|Lurne Vineycrc: Wine Ic:Iing
ARVADS
February 4
Keith Williams &
Aurora Schein
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PAGE 26 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY

winter calendar January/February
“The Perfect Age”
- Dave Pickerell,
WhistlePig
Master Distiller
WhistlePig has the
highest rated rye in the world.
www.whistlepigwhiskey.com
info@whistlepigrye.com
802.385.1093
Please Sip Responsibly
WP Beverage Media Ad_r7:Layout 1 1/6/12 5:59 PM Page 1
– Vermont Country Store –
12-3pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI
¨Epic" cn Ckemc Mcun-
Icin - Jcck:cn Gcre -
6:30-7:30pm
February 14 - Mcvie: Ihe
/rIi:I - Luc|cw Icwn Hc||
/uciIcrium - 7-ºpm
February 15-17 – Che:Ier, Ver-
mcnI WinIer Ccrnivc| - Che:Ier Vi||cge
February 16 –
- ¨VermcnI & 8eycnc" Fine /rI ExhiLiI -
We:Icn F|cyhcu:e - 11cm-5pm
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI - Ccrner cf
Mcin SIreeI & /nccver SIreeI - ºcm-
1pm
- Ec:I Shcre Vineycrc: Wine Ic:Iing -
VermcnI CcunIry SIcre - 8cm-3pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI ¨Epic" cn Ckemc
McunIcin - Jcck:cn Gcre - ó:30-7:30pm
February 17 -
- Icrch|ighI Fcrcce & Firewcrk: Di:p|cy
- Ckemc McunIcin Fe:crI - 7:30pm
- Ec:I Shcre Vineycrc: Wine Ic:Iing -
VermcnI CcunIry SIcre - 8cm-3pm
- ¨VermcnI & 8eycnc" Fine /rI ExhiLiI -
We:Icn F|cyhcu:e - 11cm-5pm
February 16-24 - S|eigh Fice Weekenc
cI 8i||ing: Fcrm cnc Mu:eum - 8i||ing:
Fcrm & Mu:eum - 10cm-3:30pm
February 21 – Shckin´ SkcIe in Ihe lce
Hcu:e - Jcck:cn Gcre: Ckemc Mcun-
Icin Fe:crI - ó-ºpm
February 23 –
- Ccmecy NighI wiIh 8cL Mcr|ey -
Ckemc McunIcin Fe:crI - 7-10pm
- Luc|cw Fcrmer: McrkeI -
Ccrner cf Mcin SIreeI & /ncc-
ver SIreeI - ºcm-1pm
- SncwccI Dinner cI ¨Epic" cn
Ckemc McunIcin - Jcck:cn
Gcre - ó:30-7:30pm
On Going
February Weekends - 8i||ing: Fcrm
cnc Mu:eum - Vi:iI Ihe Jer:ey herc,
crcfI hcr:e:, cxen, cnc :heep - in:ice
fcr Ihe winIer - cnc Icur Ihe re:Icrec
cnc furni:hec 18º0 Fcrm Hcu:e. /
F|cce in Ihe Lcnc, cur /cccemy /wcrc-
ncminee f|m i: :hcwn cn Ihe hcur in Ihe
IhecIer. 10:00 c.m. - 3:30 p.m.
MOUNT SNOW
Snowbarn
January 18 – Ihe Ecc wiIh DJ /DHD
Fu:h
January 19 – iLc Mcwcnc
January 20 –Mc/|i:Ier Drive
January 25 – DJ FcrjecI
Hcu:ing
January 26 – Lcve in
SIcckhc|m
February 2 – /ir Ircffc
CcnIrc||er
February 8 – l-Gcnic Scunc
Sy:Iem
February 9 – 8rcnze Fccic FeIurn
February 15 –DJ Fcfce| Hu|me
February 16 – 8crikc
February 17 – Gir|:, Gun: cnc G|cry
February 22 – DJ FrcjecI Hcu:ing
February 22 – Jchnny Neec: c
Shcve
February 23 Fichcrc Jcme:
cnc Ihe Ncme Chcnger:
KILLINGTON AREA
Killington Mountain
January 19 - NcIicnc| ScfeIy
/wcrene:: Week: Fe:crI Wice -
Ki||ingIcn ce|eLrcIe: NS// NcIicnc|
ScfeIy /wcrene:: Week wiIh evenI:,
givecwcy:, ccnIe:I: cnc mcrel
January 26
Mcn:Ier Energy´: K-Icwn Shcwccwn
EvenI ¬ 2 {Fci| Jcm): I8D. - Cc||ing c||
pcrk rcI:l Ihi: yecr´: Mcn:Ier Energy
K-Icwn Shcwccwn wi|| ccn:i:I cf Ihree
evenI:: Iwc rci| jcm: cnc c :|cpe:Iy|e.
Cpen Ic LcIh :kier: cnc ricer: cf c||
cge:. WiIh :ix civi:icn:, we´ve gcI
Icn: cf prize: up fcr grcL:. Dcn´I
mi:: cuIl
February 4 - USS/ Hc|e ShcI
Icur: Sncw:hec S|cpe - Ihe
:eccnc :Icp cf Ihe USS/
NcIicnc| Hc|e ShcI Icur Icuche:
ccwn cI Ki||ingIcn wiIh Icp ccm-
peIiIcr: cnc :ericu: prize:.
February 23 - Mcn:Ier Energy´: K-Icwn
Shcwccwn EvenI ¬ 3 {S|cpe:Iy|e):
Drecm Mcker Ierrcin Fcrk - Cc||ing c||
pcrk rcI:l Ihi: yecr, Mcn:Ier Energy´:
K-Icwn Shcwccwn wi|| ccn:i:I cf Ihree
evenI:: Iwc rci| jcm: cnc c :|cpe-
:Iy|e. Cpen Ic LcIh :kier: cnc
ricer: cf c|| cge:. WiIh :ix civi-
:icn:, Ihere cre Icn: cf prize:
up fcr grcL:. Dcn´I mi:: cuIl
Wobbly Barn
January 18 – Sicewcy:
January 19/20 – 8ig 8cng 8cLy
January 24 – DJ Ieck 1
January 25/26 – Gyp:y Wi:ccm
January 31 – Iek 1
February 1 – Fu:h
February 2 – DJ Frime
February 7 – Iek 1
February 8/9 – Gcrcen SIcIe Fccic
February 14/15 – Sicewcy:
February 16/17 – 8encerz
February 21 - Iek 1
February 22/23 – Mccern 8|i::
FeLrucry 28 - Iek 1
Pickle Barrel
January 18/19 – Lc:I in Fcri:
January 20 – Ihe Nerc:
January 24 – Iwicc|e
January 25/26 – Life:peec
February 1/2 – Ihe 8enjcmin:
February 8/9 – IcIc| WhiIecuI
February 15/16 – Li¢uic /
February 17 – Ihe Nerc:
February 22/23 – Ihe Zcc
OKEMO
January 26
Flannel
with Flair
Fundraiser
SNOWBARN
February 16
Barika
WOBBLY
BARN
February 8/9
Garden State
Radio
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 27
LcccIec 15 mi|e: frcm Micc|eLury ] FcuIe 125
Middlebury College Snow Bowl
www.rikerIncrcic.ccm
- Lcw cci|y IickeI price- $30 ccu|I/weekccy:
- Nc crcwc: cr |ifI |ine: - even cn weekenc:
- Kic: uncer ó & ccu|I: cver 70 -$8
.........................................................................................
- Kic: uncer ó & ccu|I: cver 70 -$8
......................................................................................... ......................................................................................... .........................................................................................
FLUS -
Ncrcic Ski cI FikerI Icuring CenIer
Ski the Woods
Robert Frost loved so well...
- 50 km cf mcchine-grccmec Irci|:
8:30cm - 4:30pm, 7 ccy: c week
- 5 k rcce ccur:e
- FenIc|: cnc Fepcir :hcp
Cn|y $17/ccy fcr ccu|I:
.........................................................................................
www.rikerIncrcic.ccm
......................................................................................... .........................................................................................
BOLTON VALLEY, VT — Bolton
Valley has seen nearly 10 feet of snow this
season as the ski area just 30 minutes south
of Burlington and three hours from Boston
continues to reap the benets of a very
snowy winter and one of the best for skiing
and riding conditions in recent memory.
Couple with that a host of January deals
and skiers and riders will enjoy snowy
conditions at a valued price.
January is Learn to Ski and Ride
Month and Bolton Valley will oer its
three-day Learn to Love It Program, where
participants receive three days of beginner
lessons. Upon completion of the third
day, participants receive a Learn to Love It
card, which entitles the cardholder to 50
percent o of lift tickets, lessons and rental
equipment for the remainder of the 2012-
2013 season. ese lessons are for adults
and teens only and lessons last 90 minutes.
Lessons are for rst-timers only.
Now through Jan. 18, college students
with ID can ski or ride mid-week, all day,
for just $19. In addition, every Wednesday
is College Night at Bolton Valley.
rough March 20, students can ski or
ride beginning at noon for $19. Current
college IDs also garner $2 pizza slices, hot
dogs and sodas in the base lodge cafeteria
on College Nights. (Not valid Wednesday,
Feb. 20, 2013).
Bolton offers new skiers, students great deals
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PAGE 28 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
WINNER
San Francisco World Spirits Competition
2011 Gold Medal
VERMONT MAPLE LIQUEUR
It’s getting cold outside.
Time to warm up with
Visit www.saplingliqueur.com
for more information
- Oering Ski & Snowboard
Equipment Sales & Rentals
- Full Service Tune Shop
- Junior Lease Packages
Only $99
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Closeouts & Specials
- Oering Ski & Snowboard
Equipment Sales & Rentals
- Full Service Tune Shop
- Junior Lease Packages
Only $99
Scan Here for Online
Closeouts & Specials
- Oering Ski & Snowboard
Equipment Sales & Rentals
- Full Service Tune Shop
- Junior Lease Packages
Only $99
Scan Here for Online
Closeouts & Specials
- Otterlng Skl & Snowboaro
Equipment 5ales & Rentals
- Full Servlce Yune 5hop
- junior Lease Packages Only $99
Couldn’t be better
It’s been a great season so far in Vermont with early snows like this at Bolton Valley making late November and December one to treasure.
Photo by Josh Arneson/Bolton Valley Resort
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 29
By Angelo Lynn
We asked ski legend and extreme skier John Egan, who now
serves as personal coach, instructor and head of the Adventure
Learning Center at Sugarbush Resort, for a few tips on how he
skis the big bumps and natural terrain on such steeps as Cas-
tlerock’s Liftline and Middle Earth.
He started by telling us how he sees the hill.
“I look at the hill as if I’m looking down from above while
on the chairlift and it all looks smooth and pretty soft. at’s
because what I’m looking at is the
vertical slope right down the fall
line — and that’s the line you want
to ski.
“What happens to most people
is that when they get to the top of
the run, they lose sight of the verti-
cal plane and see big moguls chalk
full of deep troughs that cut across
the slope.
“When I look down the slope, I
try to imagine a base layer of plexi-
glass on top of the moguls and pre-
tend I’m skiing on that layer as if it
were a level slope. What I think of
next is keeping my head and shoul-
ders smooth and on a level plane,
letting my legs thrust through the
plexiglass and into the troughs
and pulling them up and over the
moguls as smoothly as possible, but
using the vertical terrain and the
tops of the moguls to keep my line
straight down the fall line…. Occa-
sionally, you’ll have a trough that’s
too deep, so rather than descend
into it, the best course of action is
to skip over it to the top of the next
mogul.”
Sound easy? If not, read on to
nd out why Egan loves the Castlerock area, and some tips
that will help make runs down the bumps smoother
and easier.
“e cool thing about Castlerock is the naturally
steep and ungroomed terrain,” Egan says. “Being
able to play with that terrain is key to having fun
with it.
“Some of the moguls are the result of the stumps
or boulders that are on the hill, so there are not
‘lines‘ in the moguls like you might nd on more
mellow terrain. ere are also drop-os and some
double-fall lines that really mix up the rhythm of
the moguls. My approach is to nd the smoothest
line through all this and if that involves air, all the
better.”
Egan oered these ve tips to help master the
moguls:
1) “Being able to adjust the size and shape of the
turn is very important in this type of terrain,” Egan
notes. “If you have the ability to make the arc of the
turn be mostly up, instead of across, then you can
actually slow down by catching air!”
 
2) “e best snow is on the surface of the trail
that is parallel to the pitch of the terrain (tops and
side of the moguls) and this is where you should be looking for
your smooth and fun line down the hill. is will also keep you
e Zen of bump skiing
5 tactics from mogul master John Egan
“I look at the
hill as if I’m
looking down
from above
while on the
chairlift and it
all looks smooth
and pretty soft.
at’s because
what I’m look-
ing at is the
vertical slope
right down the
fall line — and
that’s the line
you want to
ski.”
John Egan
Egan coming down the side of the trail at Sugarbush’s Castlerock area.
Photo courtesy/John Atkinson
out of the ruts and avoid some back pain along with providing
you more room to slow the speed down without slamming into
the next bump or obstacle.”
 
3) “When the snow gets harder it is very important that you
soften up somewhat and become more uid in your moves.
Being uid and smooth will get you a much softer ride on the
hard bumps. Most folks tend to want to ‘set’ and edge and be
rm, but this only makes it harder to let the ski absorb some of
the shock for you.
 4) “Air ... some people only breathe it, but I like to ski it!
Getting in the air really tells you where your balance is and if
you are holding on to it or juggling it like you do in the rest
of your life. When walking, running,
dancing or doing most anything else
we juggle our balance quite well, but
when folks ski or ride we hear they
want to maintain or hold balance.
Air is the dierence-maker that tells
no lies and if you are ‘holding your
balance or being frozen in position,’
instead of juggling it with your natu-
ral agility, the air will not go so well.”
 
5) “To maintain speed and not get
going faster and faster every turn, you
need to nish each turn completely,”
Egan cautions. “If you’re having trou-
ble maintaining a safe speed, chances
are your moves get smaller and smaller
as you pick up speed. is is a tough
problem as we are human and when we
sense fear we slow down or stop moving
— ghting through that is hard. e
solution is to exaggerate your range of
motion to help slow your speed. ere’s
an equation that goes like this: move
fast, go slow; move slow, go fast. e
more movement on the hill, or tops of the moguls, the more
energy I’m taking out of the descent; conversely, the less move-
ment (witness downhill racers), the faster you go.
Founder and leader of Sugarbush Resort’s Adven-
ture Learning Center, John Egan, left and above, is
also a personal coach and instructor at the resort,
following a career as an extreme skier and Warren
Miller star.
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PAGE 30 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Resort Address Contact Stats Resort Address Contact Stats
PO Box 1130
Manchester Center, VT
05255
Main Phone:
802-824-5522
Snow Phone:
802-824-5522
Reservations:
800-865-4786
www.bromley.com
info@bromley.com
Total Trails................................................46
Total Lift ....................................................11
Total Acreage ....................................... 175
Vertical Drop .....................................1,334
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........144 in./12 ft.
PO Box 396
495 Magic Mountain
Access Road
Londonderry, VT 05148
Main Phone:
802-824-5645
Reservations:
802-824-5600
www.magicmtn.com
info@magicmtn.com
Total Trails................................................40
Total Lift ...................................................... 4
Total Acreage ....................................... 195
Vertical Drop .....................................1,700
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........156 in./13 ft.
39 Mount Snow Road
West Dover, VT 05356
Main Phone:
800-245-SNOW
Snow Phone:
802-464-2151
Reservations:
800-245-SNOW
www.mountsnow.com
centralreservations
@mountsnow.com
Total Trails................................................80
Total Lift ....................................................20
Total Acreage ....................................... 467
Vertical Drop .....................................1,700
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........166 in./14 ft.
77 Okemo Ridge Road
Ludlow, Vt 05149
Main Phone:
802-228-4041
Snow Phone:
802-228-5222
Reservations:
800-78-OKEMO
www.okemo.com
info@okemo.com
Total Trails............................................. 119
Total Lift ....................................................19
Total Acreage ....................................... 632
Vertical Drop .....................................2,200
Avg Annnual Snowfall ........200 in./16 ft.
5 Village Lodge Road
Stratton Mountain, VT
05155
Main Phone:
800-787-2886
Reservations:
800-STRATTON
www.stratton.com
infostratton
@intrawest.com
Total Trails................................................94
Total Lift ....................................................11
Total Acreage .................................... 625+
Vertical Drop .....................................2,600
Avg Annnual Snowfall ......... 264in./22 ft.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 31
For over 25 years we have specialized
in all Free Heel gear. AT/Telemark/
Nordic and snowshoes. NTN
Headquarters for the last 6 years.
We focus on the “

As much as the “

Mountain Meadow Cross Country Ski and Snowshoe Resort
XC and Snowshoe rentals / lessons daily • Women ski day every Sunday at 11:00
Snowshoe specific trails • Dogs welcome
Base Camp Outfitters
2363 Route 4
Killington VT, 05751
basecampvt.com
basecampvt@mac.com
Ski and Stay With Elegance
Transportation and Outhtting Available
Short Drive to Killington, Okemo, Suicide Six
47 Cobble House Road, Gaysville, VT 05746
802-234-5458 · unwind@cobblehouseinn.com
www.cobblehouseinn.com · fnd us on facebook
OKEMO, Vt. – NASTAR, the largest
public grassroots ski race program in the
world, will debut the inaugural Nature Valley
NASTAR Eastern Championships on Feb.
1-3 at Okemo Mountain. 
In addition to the NASTAR races, the
Eastern Championships will feature race
clinics with NASTAR’s National Pacesetter
AJ Kitt, an interactive sponsor village, live
music, afree screening of Warren Miller’s
Flow State, autograph sessions with World
Cup racers,great prizes and more.
  Participants will compete within their
age and ability group on Saturday, and
the top three racers in each division will
automatically qualify for the Nature Valley
NASTAR National Championships to be
held at Aspen/Snowmass, CO March 20-24.
Additionally, each rst-place racer will be
invited to compete in the Race of Champions
on Sunday. e Race of Champions is
handicapped, giving racers of all ages an
opportunity to win the Overall NASTAR
Eastern Championship title based on their
discounted time. e male and female
winners will be awarded complimentary
registration and lift tickets for the National
Championships.
  “We are excited to bring the NASTAR
Eastern Championships to Okemo,”
said Johnny Alamo, Director of
Strategic Partnerships at NASTAR. “e
Championships allows racers to complete on
an elite level and race head-to-head against
their top regional competition.”
Participants will have a chance to compete
in teams of three or more on Sunday
afternoon during the event’s Team Races.
Team members will score points based on the
handicap they earn in their age and gender
groups. NASTAR Team Points are designed
to level the playing eld so that young and
old racers have an equal opportunity to
contribute to their teams’ success.
 Schedule of Events
· Feb. 1, Friday: Race Clinics (contact
Okemo: 802-228-4041) and on site
registration
· Feb. 2, Saturday: All Division Racing
· 9am-3pm: Racing & Sponsor Village
Open
· 4pm-6pm: Awards & Racer Reception
(Warren Miller's Flow State Screening, Prize
Ram e, Live Music.)
· Feb. 3, Sunday: Race of Champions &
Team Racing: 9:30am: Race of Champions,
12:30pm: Team Race.Ή
For additional details and to register for
the NASTAR Eastern Championships, visit
http://bit.ly/UyXoEq.
Okemo to host premiere NASTAR
Eastern Championships Feb. 1-3
www.vtskiandride.com
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PAGE 32 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
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By Karen D. Lorentz
In 1990, Dan Egan and his brother, John, joined an
international expedition to climb and ski Mount Elbrus in
Russia. With bad weather, John decided not to attempt the
summit, but Dan pushed on and was trapped with others
above 18,000 feet for 36 hours in a raging snowstorm. It was a
nightmare with 33 people dying on the mountain.
Dan came close to freezing to death himself and found
himself, as he says, “having apparitions. It was a peaceful feeling
that I was going to be okay, but it would be hard on my brother
John when I died," he recalled.
But he and a Russian climber had taken over the role of
leaders to a group of about 14 people they were trapped with.
ey did “three crevasse rescues and eventually led the group to
safety, climbing down to the valley and arriving at midnight.”
From this ordeal, Dan learned the fallacy of a notion in
extreme sports-and held by some extreme sports onlookers-
that you die with a smile on your face when you’re doing
something you love. Egan doesn’t buy into the fantasy that that
justines unnecessary risk.
Death is nnal, he says matter-of-factly. ɨe thrill-seekers and
athletes who die don't come back and some don't get to raise
their families.
“ey didn’t choose to die,” Eagan said of 25 professional
athletes and friends of his who have died pursuing their passions
over the years.
Because of these direct experiences, Egan does not believe
in, nor advocate, unnecessary risk, though he has built a career
managing risks in an inherently dangerous profession.
Now as a guide and instructor for extreme skiing at
Killington (he also teaches clinics in Big Sky, Mt., and Val D'
Isere, France), he will be discussing approaches to enjoying
the beauty and challenge of natural terrain, as he teaches
how to jump drops and ski steeps, as well as avalanche safety,
backcountry awareness and an overall approach to skiing out of
bounds.Ή¨I try and temp people's level of risk," he added.
His approach to risk and challenge in his clinics is also
informed by his own understanding of how extreme or freeskiing
became popularized. He agrees that there is an irresistible 'siren
call’ via monetary reward and fame that benets the pros, in
addition to the incredible feeling of accomplishment. But he
emphasizes the need for instruction, practice and expertise
before one heeds the siren call.
¨Instruction is a good way to gain that knowledge on what
to practice and how to improve; let alone tackling moguls,
backcountry, jumps, etcetera," Egan says. His clinics will explore
the trees and the new zones Killington has recently outlined and
set aside for adventure. We met with Dan recently to get his
take on issues surrounding extreme skiing.
Q: How did you get into ¨extreme" skiing?
A. Growing up in New England we always found the
challenging conditions on hard trails fun. So whether it was
narrow trails, moguls or trees, my brothers and I always pushed
our limits.
When my brother John spent the winter of 1983 in Squaw
Valley and skied in his second Warren Miller nlm (the nrst was
at Sugarbush Resort a few years prior) his reports back to me on
the terrain were so amazing that I moved to Squaw in 1986 and
skied there through 1992.
at resort changes the way you see the mountain and has
been the jumping on location for many serious skiers looking to
break into the pro skiing scene. It was at Squaw that John and
I together joined the North Face Extreme Team and launched
our pro skiing careers as the Egan Brothers.
Q: You often speak of how ski videos popularized extreme
skiing. Can you relate one of the unexpected experiences you
had?
A: In the early 1990s I had a letter from a family who had
seen one of our extreme skiing nlms and in the letter they
complained about the clin jumps and the crazy skiing. ɨat
motivated us to start Skiclinics.com and to run ski camps and
clinics around the world to teach safety and the skills needed
to ski the steep and wild terrain. I have always been proud of
having an education side of my ski career to expand people's
views on the mountains and help them get to where they want
to go safely.
Q: Some of the athletes regularly court death on the nanks of
big mountains. Do you think that today's videos and nlms are
as much a glorication of tempting and cheating death as they
are about lines and beauty?
A: Today's tricks and aerial maneuvers performed by X-Game
athletes are as death defying as skiing 55 degree pitches in the
Alps as we did in the '80s; the dinerence is they are doing them
on manmade kickers within the resort boundaries and in the
backcountry. No longer are natural terrain features enough to
highlight brains, brawn and athleticism. ese pros are building
hits in undeveloped valleys and using snow mobiles to pull
themselves into and up to new heights, while at the same time,
blogging and posting ¨Go Pro" videos of their experiences in
real time.
e winter culture is being blended into a multi-sport
culture. Shane McConkey and his buddies crossed into this
realm when they started to ¨ski base" and now the ¨speed niers"
are going places and placing lines on the side of clis that no
one could access with out these gliders and parachutes.
is multi-sport culture is pushing the real limits of life and
death. And there is no stopping as long as companies continue
to sponsor the athletes and lms. It is here to stay.
ɨe mistake the X-Games culture is making is that they are
searching for freedom in the face of fear, and living under the
delusion that dying doing what you love is a good death.
Q: Are the athletes doing it for the money, the desire to
challenge themselves, or the wish to gain fame as the person to
ski the steepest lines on the planet?
A: ɨe athletes are professionals, the pros have big-time
contracts. From where we started in the 1980s to where
it is now, once the athletes make it on to the big stage of a
major lm or competition, they are being well paid and the
sponsors are building their brands around the athletes and their
Dan Egan: Insights
from a founder of
extreme skiing
Dan Egan relishes his role at Killington Mountain Resort as a guide and instructor of extreme skiing.
(See Egan, page 35)
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 33
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50% OFF
STOREWIDE
Spring skiing means sunshine, soft snow and great conditions at
Killington Resort. It also means great deals on your favorite gear
from skiing and snowboardings top brands at Killington Sports!
Now for the remainder of the season, we will be offering 50% off
everything store wide with exceptions of accessories and select
sunglasses and goggles.
New this year, Killington Sports Route 4 is featuring the regions only
Obermeyer Concept Shop and fifteen unique specialty shops from
Auclair, Bonfire, Bula, Burton, Giro, Gordini, Helly Hansen, Oakley,
O’Neill, Scott, Skullcandy, Smith Optics, Spyder,
The North Face, and Under Armour.
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STOREWIDE
Spring skiing means sunshine, soft snow and great conditions at
Killington Resort. It also means great deals on your favorite gear
from skiing and snowboardings top brands at Killington Sports!
Now for the remainder of the season, we will be offering 50% off
everything store wide with exceptions of accessories and select
sunglasses and goggles.
New this year, Killington Sports Route 4 is featuring the regions only
Obermeyer Concept Shop and fifteen unique specialty shops from
Auclair, Bonfire, Bula, Burton, Giro, Gordini, Helly Hansen, Oakley,
O’Neill, Scott, Skullcandy, Smith Optics, Spyder,
The North Face, and Under Armour.
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Shopping for some winter sports gear? Killington Sports, located in all of Killington
Resort’s lodges, on Route 4 in Killington and now online, has what you need to keep
warm, stylish and moving.

Killington Sports’ flagship store located at the junction of Route 4 and Killington Road
offers the largest selection of outerwear and accessories in the region under one roof.
The recently designed store boasts the region’s only Obermeyer Concept Shop plus
fifteen specialty shops from Auclair, Bula, Burton, Giro, Gordini, Helly Hansen, Oakley,
O’Neill, Patagonia, Scott, Skullcandy, Smith Optics, Spyder, The North Face and Under
Armour, plus rentals, tuning and lift tickets.
www.killingtonsports.com
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PAGE 34 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
NORTHERN
SKI WORKS
Voted by Ski
Magazine as
a Gold Medal
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Ski Shop in
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The highest quality
skis, boots, clothing,
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Consistently ranked in the
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Midweek Double Occupancy starting at 51.20!*
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By POLLY LYNN
KILLINGTON—Whether you are 8, 18 or 68, the multi-
lane, lift-service tubing park at the heart of Killington is a
good times for all ages. e eight lane course is fast and
thrilling with man-made bumps to slide over for extra excite-
ment, and occasionally a bit of air-time.
Open 4-8 p.m. ursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturdays/holidays, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays most
weeks throughout the season, tubing has become a staple
activity for many visitors since it opened last January 2012.
Tickets are for two-hour sessions and cost $17 for adults
(18+,) $15 for juniors (17 and under) and $5 for youth
under 42” tall.
New this year is the Parkside Pizza Pub, which serves up
hand-tossed pizzas, family-style pasta, and hearty warm snacks
and drinks to begin the evening. Also new is the carousel for
little sliders (under 42” tall). e snow-tubing carousel oers
age-appropriate sliding fun in addition to pint-sized snow
features to play on while older siblings hit the tubing park.
All children must
be accompanied
by an adult chap-
erone (age 18 or
older) responsible
for children at all
times. COLLEGE
FUN
Recently, Kil-
lington’s Tubing
Park hosted two
Night tubing offered
under the lights at
Killington Tubing Park
DJ Tubing Party as part of the resort’s Collegiate Week
oerings. e parties were ursdays, Jan. 10 and 17, and
consisted of tubing, dancing, pizza and beverages at the
Parkside Pizza Pub. Drink sponsors provided samples on-
site and giveaways. Look for something similar at the next
spring break.
e Tubing Park is available for parties of eight or more
(any age) by reservation.
Killington’s Tubing Park is located on East Mountain
Road across from the Killington Grand Resort Hotel. For
more information visit www.killington.com/winter/activi-
ties/tubing_park or call 800-621-MTNS.
Tubing has become a favorite activity at resorts across the state, including at Killington Resort’s Tubing Park, pictured above and at
left.
Photos courtesty Killington Resort
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 35
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personalities. is is all part of the social media marketing and
the conversation between consumers and the athletes via Twitter
and Facebook. Fame or popularity is a major part of the success.
Athletes today are being paid by their distribution or reach
via social media. Much like we were via our
distribution of the VHS, but the contracts in
some cases are ve times as much as we made.
Q: Do you worry that as we see trained
athletes going on expeditions where they have
to avoid seracs, rock fall, and glacial crevasses
or outrun avalanches that we are somehow
encouraging people to push their own limits
too far?
A: Well, Alaska has made this idea popular
— the idea of out-skiing falling snow and in
some cases avalanches. But the reality is that is
particular to Alaska and the snow conditions
there and the terrain is perfect for this big
fast, major air and straight lines. Outside of
Alaska, this is hard to duplicate. In Europe,
nearly impossible because the escape route
doesn’t exist and the consequences are too
high. Many of today’s “rock star” skiers come
to Europe and seek myself and others out to
learn how to ski the steeps and chutes because
their straight line techniques don’t work over
there. e want-to-be skier won’t have the
guts to try what they see in the movies. It’s
just too intimidating.
Q: One relatively new extreme skier’s life was recently said to
be “dened by lofty ski objectives, and he’s experienced plenty
of loss along the way.” is may be seen as an insidious ‘siren
call’ that is trickling down to the inexperienced skier. Do you
agree?
A: I always say stay away from so-called experts that are in
love with their lifestyle. at is a very dangerous place to be
— people operating from this concept are misguided and self-
seeking. I often get the questions, “how do I pick a good guide?”
My answer is always the same: “If a guide starts o by telling
how cool his lifestyle is, nd another guide. e guide’s rst
words should be about safety, and what you want to achieve.” If
someone is chasing a lifestyle of self indulgence, stay clear.
Q: What action can the experts and parents of those whose
judgment is not yet fully formed, take to temper the siren call?
A: Well, when it comes to ski resorts in the North America,
the best place to start is with the ski school. If skiers and riders
Egan
are looking for adventure on trail or o-the-beaten path, the
ski and snowboard schools have plenty of programs from park
and pipe, free-riding, coaching backcountry skills and so much
more.
Unfortunately, we have developed a culture in this country
where we look down on ski schools and guides.
It’s not like that in Europe. Over there, having an
instructor or guide for the week is the standard and
in my experience has produced adventure, fun,
safety and a structure of professionalism not found
in North America. It is, however, what you do
nd when you go on a Heli or cat-skiing vacation
because those operations are set up to deliver safe,
fun adventure.
Q: What responsibility do extreme skiers and
media have, if any?
A: I believe anyone making a living promoting
himself or herself has a responsibility to think about
how their actions will aect others. However, there
are plenty of examples in pro sports and celebrities
who don’t agree, or don’t care, what others think.
ere was a famous skier from New England
who, when they rst made it to the Olympics in
Japan, the local community got together and sent
his family over to watch him race. Years later at
his third Olympics, in an interview with me, he
mentioned that he didn’t owe his fans anything.
at he purely raced for himself.
And I instantly thought of the fundraising
eorts made for his family to watch him win his
rst Olympic medals and found that statement very sad and
o-track.
As my mother always said, “Dan, people are watching you,
rooting for you, praying for you. Don’t forget that. You’re being
helped by people you don’t even know. Be nice, be gentle and
be grateful for the things you have and don’t forget about the
people who look up to you.”
Dan Egan offers pointers for skiers seeking to be more aggressive.
Photos/Killington Resort
(Continued from page 32)
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PAGE 36 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
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KiLLiNcToN7Pico OwNcns AssociATioN
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www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-profit organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whiffletree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
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HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
™ Check In/Check Out
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RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
Carpet and Upholstery Steam Cleaning;
Tile/Grout and Restoration Work;
Property Energy Audits and Repairs
The Killington Group Offices
Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
w
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KiLLiNcToN7Pico OwNcns AssociATioN
KPOA Mcmacns
DiscouNTco Hcnc
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-profit organization representing
the absentee property owners of the
Killington and Pico Regions, giving a
voice to second homeowners in local,
Resort and State discussions and decision -
making. If you are not a member, call the
number listed below for information and
pick up your members discount card.
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Edgemont,
Highridge, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whiffletree,Winterberry,
The Woods, and other
condominiums in the
Killington Region.
HOTEL/CONCIERGE SERVICES
for owners who rent
themselves through VRBO.
™ Check In/Check Out
™ =dusekeeping
™ HZXurity Deposit
check/refund
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
CLEANING
Carpet and Upholstery Steam Cleaning;
Tile/Grout and Restoration Work;
Property Energy Audits and Repairs
The Killington Group Offices
Providing professional services to the Killington/Pico vacation home owner.
w
w
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g
802.422.2300
Killington/Pico Owners Association
KPOA Members
Discounted Here
www.killingtongroup.com | 802.422.2300
A non-profit organization
representing the absen-
tee property owners of
the Killington and Pico
Regions, giving a voice
to second homeowners in local, Resort and
State discussions and decision - making. If
you are not a member, call the number listed
below for information and pick up your
members discount card.
Renting and Managing
Private Homes, Pinnacle,
Whiffletree, Trail Creek,
Edgemont, Pico Village Square
and other condominiums in
the Killington Resort Region.
Residential and Commercial Cleaning; Carpet
and Upholstery Steam Cleaning; Tile/Grout
and Restoration Work; Property
Energy Audits and Repairs
Home of these businesses:
VACAT¡ON RENTAL8
SCAN TO BOOK NOW
Renting & Managing
Private Homes, Highridge,
Edgemont, Pico Village,
Pinnacle, Trail Creek,
Whiffetree, The Woods, and
other condominiums in the
Killington Region.
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 37
°FIrst" nn KI!!Ingtnn Rd º ¢1 5Incc 1989 º Opcn 7 Days a Wk º 9-5
www.SkiCountryReaIEstate.com Winter SeasonaI RentaIs
335 KiIIington Rd · 9 Agents · (802) 775-5111 · 800-877-5111
REALTOR®
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE
MLS
SUNRISE CONDOS
SKI IN & SKI OUT
Contemporary-styled 1- to
3-bedroom units. Some with
multi-levels, whirlpool tubs &
family rooms. All have wood
burning freplaces. On site:
Ìn & outdoor pools, exercise
room, steam & sauna, outdoor
whirlpool, tennis courts, a
seasonal restaurant and fre pit
patio area next to a pond.
1BR: $127K; 2-IeveI
3BR:$249K;
3-IeveI 3BR townhouse: $449K
PICO CONDOS
SKI IN & SKI OUT
Single and multi-level condos
located within walking
distance to the Pico Lifts and
Pico Sports Center Complex
features Studio's to 3BR units.
Some with lofts, all with wood
burning freplaces. On site
amenities: Ìndoor pool, whirlpool,
exercise room & sauna.
Studio: $87K; 1BR: $74-$83K
3BR: $195K(aII new)
HIGHRIDGE CONDOS
SKI IN & SHUTTLE OUT
Single and multi-level 1-3BR
units. Some with a private entry,
skylights & lock-off suites. Wood
burning freplaces. On site:
Video arcade,Tennis Courts and
Sports Center: Ìndoor pool &
Outdoor whirlpool. Winter Shuttle
bus to the lifts.
1 BR: $136K 2BR's: $148-
$185K
MOUNTAIN GREEN CONDOS
WALK to SNOWSHED or
SHUTTLE
Located on the perimeter of
Upper Snowshed parking area.
Three buildings. Main bldg with
amenities such as: on site
seasonal restaurant, gift shop,
ski & board shop, indoor pool
& whirlpool, steam/sauna room
& racquetball court. Walking
distance to night entertainment
and several restaurants.
1BR: $39K 2BR:$80-$118K
3BR: $115-$130K
KILLINGTON — e Bud Light Bear Mountain Mogul
Challenge is back! e event, remembered by many as the
ultimate spring competition, will once again heat up the
slopes at Killington on April 6-7 after a two-year hiatus.
About 200 amateur bumpers will take to the slopes of
Outer Limits on Bear Mountain to battle it out for top
Bear Mountain Mogul Challenge is back
honors. e top 32 men and 16 women will then compete
in a head-to-head competition, Sunday. Participants run a
dual course with sudden death format; only the winners
advance.
Here are some shots of action back in 2010.
Photos provided/Killington Resort
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PAGE 38 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Breokfost ot the Butternut
Help yoorselI to the CoIIee, Teu, und Joice Bur
1eoturing Locol Bocon, Hom ond Sousoge from Creen Mountoin Smoke House
Eggs ond Omelets
Comes uith Home 1ries ond gour choice of Wheot, White or Rge Toost
The Hoose ................. ± eggs, ± puncukes, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Cubin .................. ± eggs, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Western ............. ¿ egg omelet, hum, green pepper, onion
with Americun cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Iurmyurd ........... ¿ egg omelet, hum, suosuge, bucon und
cheddur cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Vegheud ............. ¿ egg omelet, green pepper, onion,
tomuto, broccoli, spinuch, moshroom
und swiss cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Hombre .............. ¿ egg omelet, chorizo, green pepper,
onion, julupeno peppers, cheddur cheese
und sulsu $1¿.go plos tux
All-You-Con-Eot Poncokes
comes uith Home 1ries, z hocon, z sousoge $1o.oo plos tux
Sturt oII with ¿ Puncukes und keep going...
Yoor choice oI:
Clussic Bottermilk Puncukes
The Alwuys Iuvorite Bloeberry Puncukes
Stuwberries und {whipped) Creum Puncukes
1or the kid in gou or the kids - oor Chocolute Chip Puncukes
{So±) q±±.g66o
6¿ Weuthervune Roud Killlington
1ust ojj Killinçton Rocd. Dpposite Northstcr Lodçe
Extro Bocon or Sousoge $j.oo plus tox
ConsumIng ruw or undercoked meuLs, pouILry, seuIood or eggs muy Increuse your rIsk oI Iood borne IIIness,
especIuIIy II you Iuve cerLuIn medIcuI condILIons. -ADHA
Breokfost ot the Butternut
Help yoorselI to the CoIIee, Teu, und Joice Bur
1eoturing Locol Bocon, Hom ond Sousoge from Creen Mountoin Smoke House
Eggs ond Omelets
Comes uith Home 1ries ond gour choice of Wheot, White or Rge Toost
The Hoose ................. ± eggs, ± puncukes, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Cubin .................. ± eggs, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Western ............. ¿ egg omelet, hum, green pepper, onion
with Americun cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Iurmyurd ........... ¿ egg omelet, hum, suosuge, bucon und
cheddur cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Vegheud ............. ¿ egg omelet, green pepper, onion,
tomuto, broccoli, spinuch, moshroom
und swiss cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Hombre .............. ¿ egg omelet, chorizo, green pepper,
onion, julupeno peppers, cheddur cheese
und sulsu $1¿.go plos tux
All-You-Con-Eot Poncokes
comes uith Home 1ries, z hocon, z sousoge $1o.oo plos tux
Sturt oII with ¿ Puncukes und keep going...
Yoor choice oI:
Clussic Bottermilk Puncukes
The Alwuys Iuvorite Bloeberry Puncukes
Stuwberries und {whipped) Creum Puncukes
1or the kid in gou or the kids - oor Chocolute Chip Puncukes
{So±) q±±.g66o
6¿ Weuthervune Roud Killlington
1ust ojj Killinçton Rocd. Dpposite Northstcr Lodçe
Extro Bocon or Sousoge $j.oo plus tox
ConsumIng ruw or undercoked meuLs, pouILry, seuIood or eggs muy Increuse your rIsk oI Iood borne IIIness,
especIuIIy II you Iuve cerLuIn medIcuI condILIons. -ADHA
Breokfost ot the Butternut
Help yoorselI to the CoIIee, Teu, und Joice Bur
1eoturing Locol Bocon, Hom ond Sousoge from Creen Mountoin Smoke House
Eggs ond Omelets
Comes uith Home 1ries ond gour choice of Wheot, White or Rge Toost
The Hoose ................. ± eggs, ± puncukes, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Cubin .................. ± eggs, ± bucon, ± suosuge $1±.oo plos tux
The Western ............. ¿ egg omelet, hum, green pepper, onion
with Americun cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Iurmyurd ........... ¿ egg omelet, hum, suosuge, bucon und
cheddur cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Vegheud ............. ¿ egg omelet, green pepper, onion,
tomuto, broccoli, spinuch, moshroom
und swiss cheese $1¿.go plos tux
The Hombre .............. ¿ egg omelet, chorizo, green pepper,
onion, julupeno peppers, cheddur cheese
und sulsu $1¿.go plos tux
All-You-Con-Eot Poncokes
comes uith Home 1ries, z hocon, z sousoge $1o.oo plos tux
Sturt oII with ¿ Puncukes und keep going...
Yoor choice oI:
Clussic Bottermilk Puncukes
The Alwuys Iuvorite Bloeberry Puncukes
Stuwberries und {whipped) Creum Puncukes
1or the kid in gou or the kids - oor Chocolute Chip Puncukes
{So±) q±±.g66o
6¿ Weuthervune Roud Killlington
1ust ojj Killinçton Rocd. Dpposite Northstcr Lodçe
Extro Bocon or Sousoge $j.oo plus tox
ConsumIng ruw or undercoked meuLs, pouILry, seuIood or eggs muy Increuse your rIsk oI Iood borne IIIness,
especIuIIy II you Iuve cerLuIn medIcuI condILIons. -ADHA
By Stephen Seitz and Polly Lynn
KILLINGTON – Some 50 skiers from
Killington and Pico have gone o established
trails in search of fresh, deep powder since the
start of this ski season and gotten lost in the
woods, says Vermont State Police Capt. Ray
Keefe. Most of the 50 conrmed incidents,
Keefe said, have been skiers from out-of-state
who are not familiar with the topography and
are underprepared for the conditions.
Fortunately, so far, none of the lost skiers
have been seriously injured, but that could
change.
“Killington’s typography is very unique in
that if a guest leaves the ski area boundary,
they will not lter to a basin area or the Kil-
lington Access Road, they are typically going
down a dierent ridge line that eventually
attens out,” reads a Killington Resort memo
on lost skiers. ose stuck in the backcoun-
try ats usually face at least a two-mile walk
out to the nearest road in Mendon. Without
climbing skins, water, su cient clothing and
daylight — and a ride back — this can be a
dangerous venture.
“is year has seen an unacceptable amount
of skiers, primarily at Killington Mountain,
intentionally leaving the marked trails and
eventually having to call for assistance to get
out of the woods,” wrote Keefe in a recent
police report. “We must nd a way to curtail
these reckless and poorly thought out acts by
skiers who are not physically/mentally pre-
pared to deal with the harsh Vermont winter
conditions they face upon getting lost.”
According to current state law, State Police
have the responsibility to lead searches, while
local teams, ski patrols and the ski resorts
supply support.
If they lost skiers are lucky, they’ll have cell
service and call for help. “ey call 9-1-1 and
the Ski Patrol leads them back, if they have
GPS,” Keefe said. “But that gives many of
them a level of comfort they wouldn’t have
without a phone.” And not all calls end well,
with hypothermia, frostbite, dehydration and
fatigue constant threats to health and survival.
e cost begins to add up, Keefe says.
Sometimes it’s in the form of overtime, but
when search and rescue teams need to be
called in, it can amount to thousands of dol-
lars. “is places a large drain on State Police
and dispatch resources,” he adds.
Lost!
Police say over 50 skiers/riders
have called for rescue and it’s
straining resources; what’s next?
(See Lost, page 39)
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39
VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 39
Route 4, Killington at the Time & Temperature Sign
802-422-3739
www.aspeneast.com
Open daiIy º Fridays untiI midnight
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Killington Marketing Director Sarah or-
son said the resort would try to do more to
educate skiers about staying on established
trails.
“We plan to put more signs up and post
warnings on the
snow report page,”
she said. “We’d like
skiers to be more
aware and try to
go skiing with a
buddy.”
“We’re going to
take a fresh look
at the situation,”
Keefe added. “We’re going to look at the land
owners and see who has the power to post. We
could look to make it a civil oense and write
a ticket. at way, if someone... says, ‘I don’t
have to pay this,’ we can have their license sus-
pended.”
Currently, under Vermont law, it is not ille-
gal for skiers or riders to ski out of the ski area
boundary. Skiers/riders, however, are legally
liable for all expenses for a search and rescue
eort on their behalf. Killington Resort does
not presently ne or ban lost skiers/riders
from the resort, nor do they take their season
pass or lift ticket away. (However, the resort
reserves the rights to change this at any time.)
Killington Resort does recommend that
skiers and riders stay within the ski area
boundary. e language on their trail guides
reads: “Woods and backcountry areas beyond
open and designated trails are not maintained
or checked by ski area personnel. Killington
assumes no responsibility for safety of, or
injury, death or damages to skiers or snow-
boarders going beyond open, designated areas
or the ski area boundary (shown by a dotted
yellow line bordering the map).”
Rescuing lost skiers out of bounds is not
new, but the problem has increased to new
levels this year at Killington and Pico, and has
expanded to include many more skiers and
riders who are unprepared for the venture,
resort o cials said.
ings have been dierent at Okemo
Mountain Resort, according to spokeswoman
Bonnie MacPherson.
“We haven’t had any such incidents this
year,” she said. “Part of that is the lay of the
land. Between the railroad tracks and Route
103, most can nd their way back.”
As it happens, the period from Jan. 19 to
Jan. 27 is National Safety Awareness Week at
ski resorts across the country.
On the mountain, Killington will have
Mountain Ambassadors in bright yellow jack-
ets who will display important safety aware-
ness messages. Together, with ski patrollers
and terrain park sta, they’ll be handing out
Know the Code and Smart Style stickers and
cards. orson said they are always looking to
nd more ways to get the message out.
“We’ll continue to brainstorm ideas,” she
said.
lost
(Continued from page 38)
Rescuing lost skiers out of bounds is not new,
but the problem has increased to new levels this
year at Killington and Pico, and has expanded
to include many more skiers and riders who are
unprepared for the venture, resort o cials said.
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PAGE 40 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
NRTHERN VERMNT
Bolton Valley XC
Nordic and backcountry skiing are hallmarks of Bolton
Valley Ski Resort. The highest elevation of Vermont’s
cross-country ski areas ensures great snow, usually
from early November well into April. With over 100 km
of Nordic trails, Bolton is considered by many to be the
‘best backcountry in Vermont’. The Nordic Center of-
fers both Classic and Skate skiing lessons as well as
guided tours and ski clinics. Snowshoeing is another
popular activity; the resort uses Tubbs Snowshoes as
rentals. Nordic ski and snowshoe packages with lodg-
ing are available.
CONTACT:
4302 Bolton Valley Access Rd., Bolton Valley, VT 05477
Main phone: 802.434.3444
Phone 2: 877.9BOLTON · Fax: 802.329-6871
nordiccenter@boltonvalley.com
STATS:
Typical season: ................ December - early April
Total Terrain ...............................................88 km
Machine-tracked .........................................26 km
Skating Terrain ...........................................26 km

Burke XC/Kingdom Trails
Two centers located on Darlng Hill and near Burke
Mountain offer something for everyone. At Kingdom
Trails the atmosphere is noncompetitive, our focus is
the quality of skiing and your awareness of the sur-
rounding countryside. Eight main loops make up 50 km
of trails to accommodate all skiing abilities. At the two
Nordic centers on Darling Hill and Burke XC you can
warm your feet and enjoy the splendid views.
CONTACT:
PO Box 204, Eaat Burke, VT 05872
Main phone: 802.626.0737
Phone 2: 802.535.5662
info@kingdomtrails.org
STATS:
Typical season: ................ mid December - March
Total Terrain ...............................................80 km
Machine-tracked ........................................50 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................35 km

Catamount Family Center
All year long enjoy recreating on our trails as you dis-
cover the four corners of our beautiful family farm. Go
at a leisurely pace, taking time to enjoy yourself and
your family. You can pull off the trails at scenic points to
soak up memorable views of Mt. Mansfield or Camel’s
hump to the east or Lake Champlain and the Adiron-
dacks to the west. This farm is rich in history. The first
governor of Vermont, Governor Chittenden, built the
main house in 1798 for his son Giles. It has since passed
to our famiIy and ia in ita 6th generation of ownerahip.
CONTACT:
592 Governor Chittenden Rd, Williston, VT 05495
Main phone: 802.879.6001
Phone 2: 888.680.1011· Fax: 802.879.6066
www.catamountoutdoor.com
STATS:
Typical season ................. mid December - March
Total Terrain ...............................................35 km
Machine-tracked ........................................35 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................35 km

Craftsbury Outdoor Center
For over 35 yeara, thia year-round reaort in the North-
east Kingdom on over 400 private acres has offered
outdoor activities for the whole family. In 2008, it was
re-organized as a non-profit entity whose mission fo-
cuses on lifelong sports, stewardship and sustainability.
Members (both day or annual) and winter time guests
can enjoy 85k of groomed nordic ski trails, snowshoe-
ing, orienteering, ice-skating, backcountry tours, bi-
athlon programming, and more.
The Center has space for up to 90 houseguests in its va-
riety of trailside accommodations. Choose from private
cabins to comfortable lodges - all room prices include
your meaIa in their Vermont Freah Network Member
dining hall. You’ll enjoy lots of fresh, local ingredients
with every meal!
If you’re ready for some indoor time, guests have ac-
cess to amenities such as free wifi, massage therapists,
sauna and fitness room - plus homey public spaces.
Babysitting can be arranged with advance notice.
CONTACT:
535 Lost Nation Rd, Craftsbury Common, VT 05827
Main phone: 802.586.7767 · Fax: 802.586.7768
www.craftsbury.com
STATS:
Typical season ................. mid December - March
Total Terrain ............................................ 135 km
Machine-tracked ........................................85 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................85 km

Hazen’s Notch
Located at the top of Vermont in the “Covered Bridge
Town” of Montgomery near Jay Peak Resort, Hazen’s
Notch is on the western edge of the snowy Northeast
Kingdom. 70 Kilometers of groomed and marked trails
paaa through mixed mapIe, birch and evergreen foreat
and across gentle, open meadows. There are spectacu-
lar views of Hazen’s Notch and numerous peaks over
3,000 in elevation in the Jay Range and Cold Hollow
Range of the Green Mountains, which completely en-
circle the trail system. 30 trails for all abilities provide
loops of different lengths for classical cross-country
skiing and or snowshoeing. Trail difficulty is evenly di-
vided between easy, moderate and difficult.
CONTACT:
P.O. Box 478, Montgomery Center, VT 05471
Main phone: 802.326.4799 · Fax: 802.326.4966
www.hazensnotch.org
STATS:
Typical season .......................... December - April
Total Terrain ..............................................70 km
Machine-tracked ........................................60 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................20 km

Highland Lodge & XC Center
Ski through fields and valleys, delineated by rows of
trees and sugar bushes, with stunning views over open
pasture lands of Mount Mansfield to the west, Burke
Mountain to the east, the Lowell Mountain Range to the
north and Caspian Lake below. There is no finer place
for spring skiing and picnics.
CONTACT:
Caapian Lake, 1608 Craftabury Rd., Greenaboro, VT
05841
Main phone: 802.533.2647 · Fax: 802.533.7494
www.highlandlodge.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................ December - March
Total Terrain ..............................................60 km
Machine-tracked ........................................60 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................40 km

Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center
The Jay Peak Nordic and Snowshoe Center is located
in the Golf Clubhouse and offers 20km of groomed
and tracked terrain for beginnera and experta aIike.
Pristine winding trails that amble through unspoiled
wilderness coupled with unparalled mountain views
are the hallmarks of our trail network. Snowshoers are
weIcome to experience the backcountry by day or be
guided in the evenings on our fireside tours. A true
destination resort, Jay Peak also offers ice skating, curl-
ing, lodging , dining, an indoor water park and plenty
of night life.
CONTACT:
830 Jay Peak Road, Jay, Vermont 05859.
Main Phone (802) 988-2611 x4653
Reaervationa 1-800-451-4449 · Fax (802) 988-4049
info@jaypeakresort.com.
STATS:
Typical season .............. Thanksgiving - mid-April
Total Terrain ...............................................25 km
Snowshoeing trails ....................................... 5 km

Morse Farm Ski Center
Visit Vermont’s newest, family friendly cross-country
touring center, with views of Camel’s Hump and the
Cross Country Ski Areas
Enjoy 60km of groomed trails, rated as some
of the nicest trails in New England!
Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and stay in one of
Vermont’s most scenic and historic inns tucked in the
heart of Robert Frost country with exquisite dining.
For more information go to www.blueberryhillinn.com
Blueberry Hill Ski Center
Goshen, Vermont · 802-247-6755
Enjoy 25km of groomed trails, rated as some
of the nicest trails in New England!
Enjoy lunch at the Ski Center and stay in one of
Vermont’s most scenic and historic inns tucked in the
heart of Robert Frost country with exquisite dining.
For more information go to www.blueberryhillinn.com
Goshcn, Vcrnont · 802-247-6735
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 41
Cross Country Ski Areas
Mobile Middlebury App
Handy. Info. At your ngertips...
Ski Info. Dining. Lodging. Services. Maps. Events.
Powered by Route 802. Brought to you by Vermont Ski & Ride Magazine.
Hunger Mountain range. Professionally designed sce-
nic trails offer a diverse choice of terrain, through soft-
wood forests, sugarbush and across gently rolling open
pastures. Suitable for all skill levels, from first-timers
to seasoned experts, who will
appreciate the banked turns
on our many challenging
downhill slopes.
CONTACT:
PO Box 1200 · 1168 County
Rd., MontpeIier, VT 05601
Main phone: 800-223-0090
www.skimorsefarm.com
STATS:
Typical season .......................
December - March
Total Terrain .........................
20 km ....................................
Machine-tracked ...................
20 km
Skating Terrain .....................
15 km

Sleepy Hollow Inn &
Bike Center
Come croaa-country aki or
mountain bike with us! Our
trails are challenging and
great fun. Viait Butternut Cab-
in, with a stunning view of
CameI'a Hump and Vermont'a
rolling Green Mountains. Our
eight bedroom newly reno-
vated country inn is gaining
a reputation for great service
and hospitality. We offer skiing, ice-skating, night ski-
ing, snowshoeing, single-track mountain biking, and
hiking. Our full line of rentals will surely make your
visit hassle-free and memorable.
CONTACT:
1805 8herman HoIIow Rd, Huntington, VT 05462
Main phone: 802.434.2283
Phone 2: 866.254.1524
info@skisleepyhollow.com
www.skisleepyhollow.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................ December - March
Total Terrain ..............................................40 km
Machine-tracked ........................................30 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................25 km

Smugglers’ Notch Cross Country
8muggIera' Notch Nordic 8ki and 8nowahoe Adventure
Center ia convenientIy Iocated at the center of thia
year-round resort, providing a host of exciting activi-
tiea for every member of the famiIy. P8IA-Certified in-
struction in both classical and skate skiing; daily guid-
ed anowahoe treka and night toura on 24 kiIometera
of dedicated snowshoe trails; ice skating on a natural
outdoor rink. With over 100 pair of Red Feather Snow-
shoes and plenty of skis, boots, poles and ice skates,
8muggIera' can outfit age 5 and oIder.
CONTACT:
4323 VT Route 108 8outh,
8muggIera' Notch, VT 05464
Main phone: 802.644.1173
Phone 2: 800.451.8752 · Fax: 802.644.2713
amugga@amugga.com · www.amugga.com
STATS:
Typical season ......................... December ÷ ApriI
Total Terrain ..............................................34 km
Machine-tracked ........................................23 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................28 km

Stowe XC
8towe Mountain Reaort'a 35 kiIometera of groomed and
40 kiIometera of backcountry traiIa are the higheat in
8towe. AIao avaiIabIe are 5 kiIometera of traiIa apecifi-
caIIy for anowahoeing. They're aII part of the Iargeat
connected cross-country trail network in the East... a
nordic akier'a dream, that aIao connecta with the Trapp
FamiIy Lodge XC Center, Topnotch and Edaon HiII aki
touring centers.
CONTACT:
5781 Mountain Rd., 8towe, VT 05672
Main phone: 802.253.3688
Phone 2: 800.253.4754 ¹ Fax: 802.253.3406
info@atowe.com · www.atowe.com
STATS:
Typical season ................... December - Iate ApriI
Total Terrain ..............................................70 km
Machine-tracked ........................................35 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................35 km

Trapp Family Lodge Cross Country Cen-
ter
Located on the spine of the
Green Mountains, they are
blessed with good snow
conditions all season long.
The center offers 55 km of
groomed trails that are in-
terconnected to the Stowe
Mountain Resort, Topnotch
and Edson Hill ski touring
centers, making a trail net-
work of 120 km groomed
trails and another 100 km
of back country trails. The
center has a complete re-
tail store with accessories,
clothing and equipment, a
repair shop, a ski school
and rentals of all kinds.
CONTACT:
700 Trapp HiII Rd, 8towe,
VT 05672
Main phone: 802.253.8511
Phone 2: 800.826.7000 ·
Fax: 802.253.5757
info@trappfamiIy.com ·
www.trappfamily.com
STATS:
Typical season December
÷ ApriI
Total Terrain .. 100 km
Machine-tracked 55 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................55 km
CENTRALREGION
CENTRAL VERMNT
Blueberry Hill
Blueberry Hill Blueberry Hill is continually expanding
its trail network and maintaining high grooming stan-
darda. The aki Iodge aita at juat over 1,600 feet, enaur-
ing a fair dumping with any anowatorm. 65 kiIometera
of groomed and wilderness trails spread across the
beautiful Vermont countryside, with connections to the
Catamount TraiI and Vermont'a Long TraiI. The HaIfdan
KhIune TraiI cIimba to 2,800 feet, making it the higheat
maintained ski trail in Vermont. The rental shop offers
a full line of touring, backcountry and skating skis on a
fi rat come, firat aerved baaia. We aIao have 40+ paira of
snowshoes, for both adults and children.
CONTACT:
RFD 3, Goahen, VT 05733
Main phone: 802.247.6735
Phone 2: 800.448.0707 · Fax: 802.247.3983
info@blueberryhillinn.com
www.blueberryhillinn.com
STATS:
Typical season ............... December to mid-March
Total Terrain ..............................................65 km
Machine-tracked ........................................25 km
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PAGE 42 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Cross Country Ski Areas
Skating Terrain ..........................................25 km

Blueberry Lake
“The Snow Bowl of Sugarbush.” For the last two years,
we have skied everyday of the season after open-
ing. The ski area offers 31 km of trails all of which are
groomed. Some of the trails are lit for night skiing.
CONTACT:
424 Robinson Road, Warren, VT 05674
Main phone: 802.496.6687 · Fax: 802.496.5198
STATS:
Typical season ............... December to mid-March
Total Terrain ..............................................31 km
Machine-tracked ........................................31 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................31 km

Chittenden, VT | 802.483.2311
www.mountaintopinn.com/skiride
Nordic Ski & Snowshoe Center
Classic Lodge Accommodations
Snowmobile Tours Casual Dining
Shuttle to / from Killington Resort
Vacation Rentals Affordable Packages
Winter vacation. ENDLESS FUN.
Catamount Trail Associa-
tion
The Catamount Trail is a 300-
mile public cross country ski
trail that spans the length of Ver-
mont. It offera a mixture of ung-
roomed backcountry terrain and
groomed traiIa - a aki experience
for everyone. Guidebook avail-
able. Maintained by the mem-
ber-supported nonprofit
Catamount Trail Association.
CONTACT:
Main phone: (802) 864-5794
info@catamounttrail.org
www.catamounttrail.org

Mountain Meadows XC
Area
Located in the heart of the Green
Mountains, Mountain Meadows
cross-country ski area has been
attracting skiers from all over
the world for the past 35 years.
Snowmaking, new trail marking
system, improved trails through
spectacular meadows and hard
woods.
CONTACT:
209 Thundering Brook Rd, Kill-
ington, VT 05751
Main phone: 802.775.7077
Phone 2: 800.221.0598 · Fax:
802.747.1929
www.xcakiing.net
STATS:
Typical season November – April
Total Terrain ..............57 km
Machine-tracked .......57 km
Skating Terrain ..........57 km

Mountain Top Inn and Resort
Eleven miles from Killington, 60km trails (40km
groomed) classic, skate and pristine backcountry for
skiing or snowshoeing on 350 of acres at elevation up
to 2,100 ft. Varied terrain for all skill and age levels.
Private or group lessons, rentals, snowmaking, daily
grooming, ski shop (Rossignol demo equipment & rent-
als, Tubbs snowshoe rentals), snack bar. Designated
pet friendly trails. Nordic ski and other seasonal pack-
ages available.
CONTACT:
195 Mountain Top Rd, Chittenden, VT 05737
Main phone: (802) 483-2311
Phone 2: (802) 483-6089
Reaervationa: (802) 483-2311 · Fax: (802) 483-6373
stay@mountaintopinn.com
STATS:
Typical season ...............................late Nov.-April
Total Terrain ..............................................60 km
Machine-tracked ........................................40 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................60 km

Okemo Valley Nordic Center
Okemo Valley Nordic Center features 22 km of tradi-
tional Nordic track trails and skating lanes that wind
their way through pristine meadows and Nordic hill-
sides and along the Black River.
The Nordic Center also has an additional 13 km of ded-
icated snow-shoe trails. Okemo Valley features modern
trail grooming and terrain ideally suited for all abil-
ity levels. Cross-country ski and snowshoe rentals are
available, along with group and private lessons.
CONTACT:
77 Okemo Ridge Rd, Ludlow, VT 05149
Main phone: 802.228.1396
Phone 2: 800.78.OKEMO · Fax: 802.228.7095
info@okemo.com · www.nordic.okemo.com
STATS:
Typical season ......................... December – April
Total Terrain ..............................................22 km
Machine-tracked ........................................22 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................22 km

Ole’s Cross Country Center
The combination of snow and scenery at Ole’s Cross
Country Center in the Mad River Valley is perfect for
skiing and snowshoeing. Discover 30 miles (50K) of
moderately rolling trails groomed for classic skiing
and ski skating. All abilities can ski to panoramic views
of Sugarbush or into the rare quiet of the deep woods.
Rent cross country ski gear and snowshoes at Ole’s, in-
cluding skating skis. Learn to cross-country ski better.
We offer fun lessons for beginners to coaching for rac-
ers. We love to share our favorite sport. Adventure with
us on a guided ski or snowshoe tour.
CONTACT:
PO Box 1653, WaitafieId, VT 05673
Main phone: 802.496.3430
Phone 2: 877.863.3001 · Fax: 802.496.3089
www.oIeaxc.com
STATS:
Typical season ..........................November – April
Total Terrain ..............................................50 km
Machine-tracked ........................................50 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................45 km

Rikert Nordic Center
Located 12 miles east of Middlebury on Route 125 in
Ripton, VT - 2 miles west of the Middlebury Snow Bowl.
Situated on the Bread Loaf Campus of Middlebury Col-
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 43
Cross Country Ski Areas
lege bordered by the Green Mountain National Forest
and the Robert Frost Homestead, the center offers 50
km of carefully groomed trails for classic and skate ski-
ing and snowshoeing for all abilities. Included in this
terrain is a new world class 5km FIS sanctioned race
course that was built this fall. The newly renovated
shop offers rental equipment, repairs and maintenance
and is fully ADA accessible. A staff of instructors offer
both private and group lessons.
CONTACT:
Route 125
Middlebury College Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton,VT
Phone: 802 - 443- 2744
mhuaaey@middIebury.edu · www.rikertnordic.com
STATS:
Typical Season: ..................... December - March
Total Terrain: .............................................50 km
Machine Tracked: ...................................... 50 Km
Skating Terrain: ...........................................40 km

Three Stallion Inn Touring Center
Come and enjoy the “Sporting Life” on 35 km of x-c
skiing and snowshoeing trails that criss-cross our 1,300
wooded acres and open pastures.
CONTACT:
Three Stallion Inn, Randolph, VT 05060
Main phone: 802.728.5656
Phone 2: 802.728.5575 · www.3ataIIioninn.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December – March
Total Terrain ..............................................50 km
Machine-tracked ........................................35 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................17 km

Woodstock Nordic Center
Just out from the ski center are 10 km of gentle “mead-
ow” skiing that connect to our fitness center and the 20
km of woodland trails on Mt. Peg. There are also 30 km
of trails located across the village green on Mt. Tom –
and these quite often become the favorites of those who
discover them. Skiing or snowshoeing Mt. Tom puts you
on century old carriage roads in the midst of Vermont’s
first tree farm and Vermont’s first National Park site.
CONTACT:
Route 106, Woodstock, VT 05091
Main phone: 802.457.6674
Phone 2: 800.448.7900 · Fax: 802.457.6699
emaiI@woodatockinn.com · www.woodatockinn.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December – March
Total Terrain ..............................................60 km
Machine-tracked ........................................50 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................20 km
SOUTHERNR
EGION
SUTHERN VERMNT
Brattleboro Outing Club
The BOC Ski Hut is the place to cross-country ski in
Brattleboro. It’s so close and convenient, it’s practi-
cally XC in your backyard! Just two miles from town,
the Ski Hut is where friends and family gather to make
the most of winter. Learn-to-ski programs after school,
ski and snowshoe rentals on weekends, special events
that celebrate the gift of winter. We maintain trails for
all tastes- — Classic-only trails meander through the
woods, while our fairway trails are groomed wide with
both skating lanes and stride & glide tracks. In fields
adjacent to the fairways, our Hunde-loipes (Hound
loops) for dog-lovers and their pets are groomed regu-
larly.
CONTACT:
348 Upper Dummeraton Rd. · PO Box 335
Brattleboro, VT 05302
Main phone: 802.254.4081
Contact our web page at BrattleboroOutingClub.org
xc@brattleborooutingclub.org
STATS:
Typical season ................. mid December – March
Total Terrain ..............................................33 km
Machine-tracked ........................................25 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................20 km

Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center
Grafton Ponds focuses on cross country skiing, snow-
shoeing, ice Skating (no ice skating) Biathlon, and tub-
ing on a 600-foot hill. There are 15 km of Nordic trails
groomed with a snow-cat and a tiller (which includes 5
km with snowmaking) and 15 km of back-country trails,
along with another 10 km of snowshoe trails. They offer
a wide variety of terrain and a full service cross country
center including rental, retail and snacks. A series of
winter activities, including family and kids programs,
demos, clinics and races, take place throughout the
season. Grafton Ponds is part of the Grafton Inn, which
offers special ski & stay packages.
CONTACT:
783 Townshend Road, Grafton, VT 05146
Main phone: 802.843.2400
Reaervationa: 800.843.1801 · Fax: 802.843.2245
info@graftonponda.com · www.graftonponda.com
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PAGE 44 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
Cross Country Ski Areas
STATS:
Typical season .......................................
December – Mid-March
Total Terrain ..........................................
45 km
Machine-tracked ....................................
15 km
Skating Terrain ......................................
15 km

Hildene, The Lincoln Family
Home
Hildene is a historic house built by Rob-
ert Todd Lincoln primarily as a summer
home. It is open year-round and includes
the mansion and gardens, farm and re-
stored Pullman palace car. In the winter
months, we offer ski and snowshoe rent-
als for children and adults, and lessons
by appointment.
CONTACT:
1005 Hildene Rd, Manchester, VT 05254
Main phone: 802.362.1788 · Fax:
802.362.1564
www.hildene.org
STATS:
Typical season .......................................
December – March
Total Terrain ..........................................
14 km
Machine-tracked ....................................
14 km
Skating Terrain ......................................
0 km

Prospect Mountain Cross
Country Ski Center
Prospect Mountain Cross-Country Ski
Center is located on Route 9 in Wood-
ford, Vermont, just 7 miles east of Ben-
nington. At the highest base elevation of
any ski area in the state, Prospect Moun-
tain has earned its reputation of being
the “snow magnet”. Prospect has over
35 km of expertIy groomed aki traiIa,
and offera exceIIent akiing to everyone
from racers to families. The full service
aki ahop incIudea a heated waxing room
and a profeaaionaI waxing aervice. AduIt
and children’s skis, snowshoes and baby
sleds are available for rent. The spacious Base Lodge
Restaurant is open 7 days/week. Open everyday from
9 am to 5 pm.
CONTACT:
Route 9, Woodford, VT 05201
Main phone: 802.442.2575
STATS:
Typical season ..........................November – April
Total Terrain ..............................................35 km
Machine-tracked ........................................35 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................30 km

Stratton Mountain Nordic Center
Stratton Mountain Nordic Center is located out of the
Sunbowl Lodge at Stratton Mountain Resort. We offer 10
km for cross country skiing and for snowshoeing. The
beautiful wooded trails are groomed for both classical
and skate skiing. The terrain offers something for nov-
ice to advanced skiers. Inside the base lodge we have a
full service rental and retail shop. Open daily from 8-5.
Lessons available.
CONTACT:
RR 1 Box 145, 8tratton Mountain, VT 05155
Main phone: 802.297.4114
Phone 2: 800.8TRATTON · www.atratton.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December – March
Total Terrain ..............................................10 km
Machine-tracked ........................................10 km
Skating Terrain ..........................................10 km

Timber Creek Cross Country
Ski Area
Across from Mount Snow, cradled by the
Green Mountains, is Timber Creek… a
very high quality cross country ski area.
With a dependable mountain climate
and a high elevation, an abundance of
snow becomes a way of life at Timber
Creek. The skier has a choice of adven-
tures on a trail system that meanders and
expIorea where you can aki the foreated
hills or reach up to the high Green Moun-
tain ridges.
CONTACTS:
Route 100 North, West Dover, VT 05356
Main phone: 802.464.0999
Fax: 802.464.8308
www.timbercreekxc.com
STATS:
Typical season ...December – March
Total Terrain ..........................14 km
Machine-tracked ...................14 km
Skating Terrain .....................14 km

Viking Nordic Center
Viking Nordic Centre is one of the oldest
cross-country ski centers in North Amer-
ica. With 40 kilometers of trails we offer
aomething for every akier. From the roII-
ing gentle terrain of our inner trail sys-
tem to the long loops through the woods
of our outer trail system, beginners and
experta can find terrain that wiII both
please and challenge them. After a long
day of skiing you can enjoy a hearty cup
of soup in our Olympic Café; or bring
your own lunch for a picnic at our warm-
ing hut overlooking Vermont’s Stratton
Mountain.
CONTACT:
615 Little Pond Rd, Londonderry, VT
05148
Main phone: 802.824.3933
Fax: 802.824.4574
www.vikingnordic.com
STATS:
Typical season ...December – March
Total Terrain .........................40 km
Machine-tracked ...................35 km
Skating Terrain .....................30 km

Wild Wings Ski Touring Center
CIaaaic akiing at ita beat. FamiIy akiing or aki to train.
Tracks set with Piston Bully — they last longer. Ski
through the woods or along the brook. The animal
tracks we see regularly include bobcat, rabbit and
deer. Rental and lessons available.
CONTACT:
Box 132, Peru, VT 05152
Main phone: 802.824.6793
wwxcaki@aover.net · www.wiIdwingaaki.com
STATS:
Typical season ........................December – March
Total Terrain ..............................................25 km
Machine-tracked ........................................25 km
Skating Terrain ........................................... 0 km
www. vt ski andr i de. com
º ! ´ ¦ ´ ` · ¯ í ¯ \ ¦ ` · í | ' ¯ ´ ` · ` ´ \ ' | ¦ | ´ \ ` · \ ¯ ¦` · | ` ¦ | í | ¦ | ¯ ` · ´ \ ' | \ ¯ ¯ ' | ¦ | ´ \
Want to see more?
Want to see more?
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 45
This photo spread was submitted by Mad Trees, a self-
described “group of outdoor enthusiasts dedicated to the
unique shred culture and community that exists in the
Northeast. With a passion for sliding and riding through
the dense trees of Northern Vermont, Mad Trees serves as
a medium for extending our adventures to our community
of shred heads. We can be found exploring and fun jump-
ing in our backyard, the Northern Green Mountains.”
It’s all good. Check out what they’ve been up to at vimeo.
com/madtrees, and as they say, “Spread the Shred!”
Photos, top left to right clockwise are:
Spence Lee, Sam Manna, Kerrie Lohr and Gretchen Loft
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PAGE 46 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
MOUNT SNOW REALTY
THE #1 SALES OFFICE IN THE DEERFIELD VALLEY SINCE 2010
OWN WHERE YOU PLAY VISIT ONE OF OUR CONVENIENT ON-MOUNTAIN LOCATIONS
802.464.4114 REALESTATE@MOUNTSNOW.COM MOUNTSNOWREALTY.COM
At Mount Snow Realty, our experienced staff is
dedicated to assisting you with all of your real estate
needs. With two convenient locations - our main ofce
on the rst oor of the Grand Summit Resort Hotel
and our desk in Mount Snow’s Main Base Lodge - we
are available seven days a week. Whether you are
looking to purchase a home, condo property or land
in the Mount Snow area, or sell your property, we
have the expertise to help you every step of the way.
The Old Red Mill Inn
& Restaurant
PREMI UM STEAKS, FI SH
AND CHI CKEN
GREAT SALAD BAR
SOMETHI NG FOR EVERYONE!
8ÛI]klYmjYfl•Û@ffÛ¬ÛKYn]jfÛÝÛ1-877-RED-MILL
Located in the Historic Village of Wilmington VT
AFFORDABLE LODGI NG I N THE MOUNT SNOW VALLEY
West Dover — e Mount Snow Resort is well known for
hosting events with sizzle and air with a crowd that really
enjoys the spectacle. Below are a few of the upcoming events
visitors won’t want to miss:
Torchlight Parade and Fireworks
January 20, 2013 – starts at 5:30pm
February 20, 2013 – starts at 6pm
Join the show as Mount Snow Ski & Snowboard School
instructors descend the Canyon ski trail in a beautiful
torchlight glow. Immediately following, the resort will light
up the sky with a reworks display. e festivities kick o
at 5:30 p.m. e best place to watch Mt. Snow instructors
descend Canyon is between the Clocktower and the Cape
House. is is a free event to enjoy and all base area businesses,
including Mount Snow Sports, Backside Snowboards,
Cuzzins and 1900’ Burger, stay open late for the festivities.
Grommet Jam Series: January 21 and February 18,
2013 – Finals
Grommet Jam events for 12 and under skiers and riders.
is event series is a great way for kids to get out and learn
a few things from Mount Snow’s coaches and ski school
instructors.
Coaches and instructors provide comprehensive
instruction in Grommet, which is the small feature terrain
Mount Snow hosts big-time events
park over at Carinthia, for 90 minutes in the morning. en
after a lunch break (lunch not included) we’ll have a friendly
competition immediately followed by an awards ceremony
on the Carinthia deck. Registration for this popular event is
limited to 70 youngsters so be sure to reserve a spot by pre-
registering online.
Cost: $40 (lift ticket not included) Registration: 8am –
9:30am Carinthia Base Lodge Basement Park Instruction:
10am – 11:30am Lunch Break: 11:30am – 12:45pm (pick up
kids at the park please) Competition: 1pm – 2:30pm Awards:
3:00ish (Carinthia Deck)
Bud Light Mardi Gras: February 9-10, 2013
Mount Snow loves to throw big parties and the annual Bud
Light Mardi Gras celebration is one of the favorites! Beads
will be ying, live music will be playing, libations will be
owing and good times will be had by all. It’s a weekend
of fun, so bring the family or leave the kids at home and let
loose!
C.O.M.P Snowboard rowdown: March 9
Carinthia Open Mega Plaza. is is the inaugural year for
what we are expecting to grow into the biggest snowboard
competition on the East Coast. Carinthia’s acclaimed park
builders are going to construct a one-of-a-kind, plaza-style
setup that will be loaded with rails, boxes and a whole arsenal
of unique features found nowhere else but here. Athletes will
need to choose their line carefully so they can go big, get
technical and ex their style to walk away with a piece of
the $5,000 cash purse for pros or gear from event sponsors
for the ams in this jam-style format competition. e plaza
will be located near the base area of Carinthia which is
easily accessible to spectators, so come up and check out the
inaugural C.O.M.P. and years from now you’ll be telling your
friends you saw it rst.
Carinthia Freeski Open: March 16
Mount Snow’s annual AFP certied event is back to its
roots as a freeskiing slopestyle competition that since its
inception has seen some of the biggest names in the sport on
the podium. is season’s version is going to be no dierent
with a $5,000 purse up for grabs for the pros and tons of gear
for winners in the amateur division. Carinthia’s acclaimed
terrain park builders go all out for this competition so athletes
and spectators alike can expect one of the biggest slopestyle
courses in the land. So bring you’re A-game if you want to go
home with the goods, and bring your camera because these
kids go BIG.
St. Patrick’s Day Celebration: March 17
Everyone is Irish at Mount Snow on St. Patrick’s Day! For
the fourth straight year we are oering $17 lift tickets (when
purchased in advance) and throwing a St. Patty’s Day party
that will have you seeing green. Start the day with Green Eggs
and Kegs at Cuzzins and then rock out to live Irish music
on Cuzzins’ deck all day. ere is plenty of Guinness to go
around and if you want to take a break from the party, head
out on the mountain to try and nd the hidden Pot O’ Gold
which will land you a free season pass for the following ski
season.
Bud Light Reggaefest: March 22-24
It’s springtime in the mountains of Vermont which can
only mean reggae music will be lling the air during Mount
Snow’s annual Bud Light Reggaefest. With live performances
from some of reggae’s hottest acts starting Friday night
and going all the way through Sunday afternoon, this is a
weekend not to miss. Plus, on Saturday you try to skim all the
way across the 100-foot pond during the 11th Annual Sink
or Skim Pond Skimming Competition. en on Sunday,
harness your creativity and build a contraption out of only
cardboard, duct tape and zip ties for the 6th Annual Duct
Tape Derby. It’s a spring skiing weekend at its best!
Mardi Gras at the Snow Barn is always a major attraction.
Fireworks and Torchlight Parades occur several times throughout the season.
Photos courtesty Mount Snow Resort
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VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY PAGE 47
The Austrian Haus Lodge The Austrian Haus Lodge
www.austrianhaus.com · 802·464·3911 · 1·800·487·3910
6 Abroad Road, West Dover, VT 05356
Indoor Heated Pool
Sauna · Game Room
BYOB Lounge with
Fireplace and Free WiFi
CCTV in All Rooms
Only 3 miles
from Mount
Snow!
Fireplace and Free WiFi Fireplace and Free WiFi
CELEBRATING THE HISTORY OF SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING
VTSSM.COM
MONTPELIER — The Vermont Ski
Areas Association, the Agency of Agricul-
ture and the Vermont Maple Foundation
are joining forces to promote Vermont
specialty foods at area ski resorts. Ver-
mont Specialty Food Days offer skiers
and riders the opportunity to sample
tasty treats from a variety of Vermont
food companies while visiting the state’s
ski resorts.
Participating vendors include Vermont’s
famous maple syrup, Cabot’s award win-
ning cheddar cheese, Green Mountain
Coee Roasters, Ben and Jerry’s ice cream,
Liz Lovely cookies, Vermont Peanut Butter,
Nutty Steph’s Granola, Vermont Smoke
and Cure and Two Guys in Vermont soups.

“These are always exciting and fun events
for us,” said Sarah Neith, Ski Vermont’s
Public Affairs Director. “It’s a great way
to showcase the Vermont brand and the
forged bonds between ski industry and
culinary industries in Vermont. Skiers
and riders also get to experience the com-
bined pleasure of snowy slopes and deli-
cious Vermont food – a great pairing.”
Many of the scheduled Specialty Food
Days are happening in conjunction with
other large events at the ski areas. Here’s
the schedule:
Friday, January 25: Jay Peak Resort
Saturday, January 26: Burke Mountain,
during Passholder Appreciation Weekend
Tuesday, January 29: Mad River Glen on
Roll Back the Clock Day
Saturday, February 9: Bromley Mountain
Resort
Sunday February 10:Magic Mountain
Saturday, February 16: Middlebury Col-
lege Snow Bowl during Winter Carnival
Tuesday, February 19: Smuggler’s Notch
Resort
Saturday, March 9: Rikert Nordic Center
Sunday, March 10: Stratton Mountain
Sunday, March 17: Bolton Valley Resort
on Passholder Appreciation Day
Saturday, March 30: Killington Mountain
Sunday, March 31: Pico Mountain
Saturday April 6: Mount Snow during
Brewer’s Festival.
Ski Vermont announces
2013 Specialty Food Days
Find the latest and past issues at
www.vtskiandride.com
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48
PAGE 48 VERMONT SKI AND RI DE MAGAZI NE, JANUARY/FEBRUARY
For more information on restaurants, live music, activities and events call 800.53.SUGAR or visit sugarbush.com.

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