An advertising supplement of Lancaster Newspapers, Inc.

FEBRUARY 24, 2013
Business & Industry Education Healthcare Communities Home Marketplace Leisure Activities
2 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Alison, B.S., ’05, Information Sciences and Technology
“My Penn State education taught me to find solutions fast,
and that’s what my job is all about. There’s no guessing—if you’re
a Penn Stater, employers know they can count on you.”
Deputy Project Manager, Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., Linthicum, Maryland
EXCEPTIONAL ACADEMICS. INSPIRING RESEARCH.
WORLDWIDE REACH. A NATIONAL NAME. STRENGTH IN NUMBERS.
Penn State Harrisburg
717-948-6250
hbg.psu.edu
Penn State, The Lancaster Center
717-299-7667
1-800-828-6233
lancaster@yk.psu.edu
Penn State York
717-771-4040
1-800-PSU-6227
yk.psu.edu
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 3
THE USED CAR CENTER
LANCASTER TOYOTA NEW CAR SALES
LTM COLLISION CENTER
LANCASTER TOYOTA SERVICE
AND PARTS CENTER
5270 Manheim Pike
East Petersburg, PA 17520
717-569-7373 • lancastertoyota.com
WITH THE VERY BEST AUTOMOTIVE EXPERIENCE
FOR 40 YEARS
PROUDLY SERVING
LANCASTER COUNTY
PROUDLY SERVING
LANCASTER COUNTY
4 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 BUSINESS & INDUSTRY PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
A
SSETS Lancaster
celebrates its
20th anniversary
this year, and
it continues to
assist aspiring
entrepreneurs
to create and grow sustainable
businesses through business training
programs, mentoring, and alliances
with other area business resources
such as Community First Fund,
SCORE Lancaster, and the Duke
Street Business Center (at the
Lancaster Public Library).
ASSETS was established in
1993 by Mennonite Economic
Development Associates. Jessica
King, ASSETS executive director,
said that since its inception, ASSETS
has supported well over 1,400
entrepreneurs in obtaining their
goals. The organization’s staff and
volunteers, including King, are
entrepreneurs, current small business
owners and bankers.
Maria Garcia-Iniesta, ASSETS
program director, said, “Our goal is
to have people think carefully about
what it takes to start a business.
During our 12-week business
design and management class, we
generate more questions for would-
be entrepreneurs to ask themselves.
At the end of the course, they’ll have
a realistic idea of what it takes to set-
up a business.”
She said that class members are
not only from Lancaster County, but
also York, Harrisburg and Reading.
The classes are a starting point, and
graduates may continue to research
and refine their business plan.
Garcia-Iniesta estimates that
since its inception, more than 900
people have graduated from ASSETS
training programs; approximately
500 businesses have been started, and
about 75 percent of those business
are still operational. ASSETS
graduates have started businesses in
a variety of areas including catering
businesses, restaurants, massage
studios, art galleries, hair salons,
cleaning and maintenance services,
watch repair, website design, fitness
and health centers, craft stores,
painting, daycare centers, plumbing,
E-commerce, and video and game
arcades.
In the past three years, the number
of people interested in starting a
business has increased. “After taking
our classes, if they’re still interested
in pursuing a business, it often
takes one- to two-years to start that
business,” Garcia-Iniesta said.
During the past two decades,
the organization has evolved, but
still remains true to its original
mission. In 2002, a Spanish-only
program with business training and
counseling was developed. Classes
have also been offered in Russian for
recent immigrants.
In 2003, the organization relocated
from Liberty Place to its current
location at 237 N. Prince Street,
Lancaster.
King said that the organization
has faced some challenges in the
past few years. She said that in 2010
about half of ASSETS’ funding was
through county and city CDBG
(Community Development Block
Grant) funding. That funding has
been pared back in the past two
years, and in the fiscal year that
begins July 1, funding from those
sources will be eliminated.
“As a result, we’ve had to refocus
our efforts. We’re looking at how
to work more closely with other
organizations such as the (Lancaster
County) Workforce Investment
Board and the Lancaster Chamber
— it doesn’t make sense to duplicate
services,” King said.
In refocusing its efforts, ASSETS
discontinued offering classes in
other locations such as Ephrata and
Manheim. “We liked reaching out to
other parts of the county, but it was
no longer economically possible to
do so,” King said.
Additionally the organization had
owned the four-story building where
its offices are located. Its offices
are located on the second floor,
and the first floor had been used as
a small business incubator where
entrepreneurs helped by ASSETS
could operate out of a storefront
for a while. The incubator was
discontinued when the building was
sold in December 2011 to Michael
and Deborah Apostolopoulose,
who now operate their business,
Lancaster Trophy House there.
ASSETS has reached out to serve
various cultures. Last year ASSETS
launched a pilot refugee micro-
enterprise development class to
serve resettled refugees who may be
considering employment. King said
the effort was sparked by a request
in 2011 from a local church pastor
to assist a number of members, who
were resettled refugees from Burma,
in starting a garden enterprise to
grow Thai vegetables.
King said that the initial program
was a success and a new session
began in late January. ASSETS
will also offer a class in March in
conjunction with the Pennsylvania
Guild of Craftsmen. “We have a
very diverse community, and we’re
looking to serve entrepreneurs
within that community,” King said.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
For further information about
ASSETS Lancaster, please visit
www.assetslancaster.org
ASSETS LANCASTER
Providing Business Support for Aspiring
Entrepreneurs for Two Decades
Spanish class graduates at the December 4, 2012 graduation ceremony.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 5
I
n the course
of one visit
to his Silver
Spring farm,
Tom Culton can
tell you about
the ingredient
that separates a good
Lancaster County pot pie
from a great one and, in
the same conversation,
rhapsodize about wild
tomatoes from Mexico.
“Oh … they’re beautiful,” says
Culton, holding up a handful of tiny
red treasures, small by Lancaster
County tomato standards but packing
a flavorful
punch.
Culton, 32,
is a farmer,
and proud
to be one.
On the 53 acres he shares with his
grandfather, Pete Herchelroth, 83,
Culton is also the owner of Culton
Organics, a business where you can
learn anything from the right way to
ensure that goose foie gras is fit for
the most discriminating French palate
to what kind of goat, chicken or duck
is strolling about the family property,
which dates to 1740.
Such agricultural legacies are about
as Lancaster County as you can get.
Culton himself can often be seen
walking barefoot — even in December
— around his house and grounds,
wearing one of his trademark hats.
He’ll cuddle a chicken while he’s
talking to you like a beloved pet.
He recently nursed a broken arm,
a mishap that came courtesy of a
wild boar he encountered while
he was hunting in Pennsylvania’s
Tioga County. And Culton cites his
grandfather — still very much involved
in the land — as an inspiration for
what keeps him going through life,
chickens, wild boars, and all.
“He works harder than me,” says
Culton with pride.
Culton has hosted chefs such as
France’s Joel Robuchon and Tom
Colicchio, one of the head judges
on the Bravo television network’s
“Top Chef,” at his kitchen table. His
organics business has connections
with prestigious restaurants in
Philadelphia and New York, as well
as such places as John J. Jeffries at
Lancaster Arts Hotel.
Culton’s clients might hail from
France, Belgium and England. He’s
also involved with
The Food Trust, a
Philadelphia-based
nutrition advocacy
group which runs a
seasonal market in
that city’s historic
Headhouse Square.
Indeed, Culton
is not your typical
barefoot farm boy.
There are goats on
the farm, including
Oliver, a 250-pound
male breeder of
the Oberhasli
variety, which
traces its origins
to Switzerland
(the goats are for the making of goat
cheese). There are turkeys, but not
just any kind.
“They are heritage breed turkeys,”
Culton says, noting such varieties as
“Bourbon Reds, Narragansett, and
Black Spanish,” the latter of which
pre-date the year 1500. On a recent
visit, the male turkeys were in full
mating mode, fluffing out their
colorful feathers. “They are showing
for the hens,” Culton explains (By the
way, these being wild turkeys, they
can fly, and roost in trees).
Speaking of poultry, some of the
chickens like the one Culton picks
up and carries around are Japanese
Garden chickens. Geese — and there
are many — could boast connections
to Sevastopol, the city in Ukraine on
the Black Sea.
In his greenhouses — warm,
welcome refuges on a cold day —
Culton is perfecting such delights as
Piment d’Espelette, a pepper which
will be ground into a powder for a
flavor that’s not your typical pepper
shaker fodder.
But don’t be put off by all the
exotica.
Culton does grow saffron, often
called the most expensive spice in the
world. But his involvement with the
labor-intensive treasure has a personal
connection.
His late mother, Nancy Fackler,
who passed away in 2001, enjoyed
growing the spice. “It’s a tribute
to her,” Culton says of his link
with saffron.
There’s also a tasty tie as well.
“The secret to a good pot pie
is saffron,” both Culton and his
grandfather will tell you, using almost
the same words.
Culton has big plans down the road
for his organics business, some fun,
some serious.
For instance, he’s working on having
a diner — yes, a real diner — trucked
from Kansas to Lancaster County,
where he hopes to open a restaurant
two years from now. Culton wants to
have guest chefs from all over — and
he knows a lot of chefs — do cooking
sessions there, but his place promises
to be “accessible; it’s not going to be
exclusive,” he says.
On a more patriotic level, Culton
is taking steps to hire returning
veterans from our conflicts overseas
(he has a buddy who has served tours
in Afghanistan) as part of his farming
work. Aware of the post-traumatic
stress disorders many veterans face,
Culton wants to offer what he calls
“agricultural healing.”
It all ties in with Culton’s conn-
ection with the earth.
“[It’s] the healing of the land,” he
sums up.
“The land expresses itself through
our work. You take care of the land,
and it takes care of you.”
~ Stephen Kopfinger
6 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 BUSINESS & INDUSTRY PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
G O O D H A R T S O N S , | N C .
(717} ß5ß - 2404
www.goodhartsons.com
A S|ng|e Source So|ut|on For A|| Of Your Project Needs
Power Geneneration · Hydro-Eleotrio Power · Food and Beverage · Conleotionary
Cement/Aggregate · Building Produots · Delense · Converting/Graphio Arts · Bteel Mill
Pollution Control · Foundry · Pulp and Paper · Petroleum · Chemioal · Ethanol
Alternative Fuel & Power
GOODHART SONS, |NC.
Stee| Fabr|cat|on & |nsta||at|on
Ɣ Tanks
Ɣ Bilos
Ɣ Baghouse Conversions
Ɣ Food Handling
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Ɣ Conveyors
Ɣ ABME Pressure vessels
Ɣ Large Diameter Duotwork
Ɣ Pollution Control Equipment
Ɣ Btruotural & Aooess Bteel
Ɣ Complete Plant Bhutdowns
Ɣ Produotion Lines
717-560-9501 / www.rlps.com
250 Valleybrook Drive; Lancaster, PA 17601
Since 1954, RLPS has been providing inspiring,
caring, and practical environments that quietly
support the programs and missions of the
organizations we serve. Our address and logo have
changed, but our passionfor architecture remains.
New Location New Logo
Same Vision Same Values
Helping customers sleep better for
less is Lancaster Mattress Company’s
focus. This 29-year-old locally owned
sleep shop offers an
extensive selection of
Sealy and Stearns &
Foster mattresses at
its five locations. It is
also a factory-direct
Sealy gallery, and all
products are made in
the US.
The average life of
a spring mattress is
10-years, and specialty
mattresses such as latex or memory
foam have a longer lifespan.
Miller says that Lancaster Mattress’
knowledgeable staff helps guide
customers through the mattress
selection process. Factors such as
age, how one sleeps (sleep position),
and medical conditions all affect
mattress selection.
Memory foam relieves
pressure points, which is
great for someone with
back issues. Ultra-firm
mattresses can hamper
blood circulation and
can cause a person to
toss and turn.
Lancaster Mattress
also offers free delivery
and removal of the old
mattress.
LANCASTER MATTRESS COMPANY
Focuses on A Good Night’s Sleep
Andy Miller, owner of Lancaster
Mattress Company, with a Stearns
& Foster mattress
LANCASTER MATTRESS COMPANY
1914 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster, PA
(717) 509-5940
www.lancastermattress.com
“It’s all about
comfort.
If you’re
comfortable,
you’ll sleep
better.”
Owner Andy Miller.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 7
webuild
1405 Birch Road | Lebanon, PA 17042
717-273-4122 | www.funkconstruction.com
FOLLOW US
ON FACEBOOK
HEALTHCARE • LIFECARE • COMMUNITIES OF FAITH • BUSINESS
Adaptive Reuse • Expansion • New Construction • Renovation
L a s t i n g C l i e n t R e l a t i o n s h i p s
We are very proud of our Lebanon facility and
the quality of the building makes a lasting first
impression to all...”
–Bob Rakow, NHA, Executive Director, Albright LIFE-Lebanon
Our residents remained in the apartments and our
staff performed their duties while renovations
were taking place.”
–Curt Evans, Senior Executive Director, Luthercare
Over the many years that Arthur Funk and Sons
has worked on projects with us at Cornwall
Manor, they have demonstrated integrity, quality
and value.”
–Steve Hassinger, President, Cornwall Manor
‘‘ ”
Albright Life, Lebanon, PA
St. John’s Herr Estate
Luthercare, Columbia, PA
VA Hospital, Lebanon, PA
Cornwall Manor - Bradley Hall,
Cornwall, PA
Westminster Place At Parkesburg,
Parkesburg, PA
TEMPLE BETH EL, East Petersburg, PA
Westminster Place At Parkesburg,
Parkesburg, PA Albright Life, Lebanon, PA
Cornwall Manor - Bradley Hall,
Cornwall, PA
St. John’s Herr Estate
Luthercare, Columbia, PA
TEMPLE BETH EL, East Petersburg, PA VA Hospital, Lebanon, PA
“LEED accreditation
validates our knowledge of
building “green” and our
expertise in the design and
construction of new building
and renovation projects,”
said Bob Funk, PE LEED AP,
President of Arthur Funk
and Sons, Inc., Construction
Services, headquartered in
Lebanon. “It has given us a
competitive edge in today’s
challenging times.”
Sustainable, or green,
building employs methods
of construction that are
environmentally responsible.
Funk has implemented
adaptive reuse construction
in many building projects
in the Susquehanna Valley.
The Albright LIFE-Lebanon,
a former printing company
was repurposed into a Senior
LifeCare facility; Lebanon
YMCA basketball courts
converted to a two story
sports training facility; and
Phoenixville Hospital space
reused to provide Seasons
Hospice Unit.
ARTHUR FUNK AND SONS, INC.
CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
1405 Birch Road
Lebanon, PA
(717) 273-4122
www.funkconstruction.com
YMCA-Basketball Courts repurposed to
two story cardio workout facility.
“Sustainability
focuses on the use
of the building: both
now and future,” said
Funk. “A sustainable
design extends the
life of a building
by reusing and
renovating
existing spaces.”
8 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 BUSINESS & INDUSTRY PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
or most of her
life, Kim Crow
has been very
practical, working
as an orthopedic
x-ray technician and
caring for her family.
After 27 years in
the medical field, she
decided to do something
a little impractical and express her
nostalgia for the past. The result is
her collectibles shop in downtown
Lititz, The Curiosity Shoppe,
39 E. Main St.
“I needed a break after all
those years, and I wanted to have
some fun,” says the 54-year-old
shopkeeper. “And I am!”
The fulfillment of a lifelong dream
came about after challenges in her
life, including a divorce, moving
back to Lancaster County after years
in New Jersey, and caring for her
sister who passed away after
battling cancer.
It was clearly time to start over,
and Crow took the chance. She put
her financial resources into The
Curiosity Shoppe, which she named
after the title of a Charles Dickens
novel. Everything in her charming
shop was meant to bring joy into the
lives of others and recapture the past
of Baby Boomers, just like her.
Who wouldn’t feel cheered by
Gumby, Pokey, Etch-A-Sketch, old
metal lunch boxes, school dresses
and collectibles from the 40s, 50s,
60s and 70s? Her entire shop brings
a smile to the faces of those who
remember classroom days of the 60s
or wedding photos from the 50s.
“This is the number one thing that
people comment on,” says Crow,
showing off a pretty plaid school
dress with smocking, embroidered
daisies and a sweet white collar.
“They don’t make dresses like this
anymore.”
The Curiosity Shoppe is
delightfully cluttered with nostalgia,
including a red plaid metal picnic
basket, an authentic Etch-A-Sketch,
a sock monkey, Magic 8 Ball, Ouija
board, record albums, turntable,
metal roller skates, postcards and
much more, There are old-fashioned
housewares, like Depression glass,
salt and pepper shakers, wooden
rolling pins, metal pie plates, plates
and bowls, Christmas decorations,
aprons and rotary phones.
The big attraction, however, is
Crow’s growing collection of vintage
clothing. When she first opened the
shop, Crow had just a few vintage
clothing items. But demand was
there. “Every time I had vintage
clothing in the shop, people wanted
more,” says Crow. “I always loved
clothes from the past. They are made
so well.”
Gradually, Crow expanded the
second floor of The Curiosity Shop
to include fashions from the 40s,
50s, 60s and 70s. She has everything
from prom dresses with pink tulle to
go-go boots and sexy mini dresses.
She has Asian style silk dresses from
Hong Kong and maxi skirts that hit
the floor. There are mink stoles and
fox fur jackets, as well as those odd
little wraps made of minks with tails
and tiny mink faces. There are also
lots of hats, from pillboxes of the 60s
to veiled hats from the 50s.
“Back in the day, women had
shoes, hats, gloves, dresses, jackets
and everything matched flawlessly,”
says Crow, adding that she also has
a bridal shop with wedding dresses,
bridesmaid dresses and accessories
from the past.
To find her vintage clothing, Crow
has found the perfect resource.
Seniors who are downsizing.
Many times as older women move
into retirement homes, they must
downsize and get rid of treasured
dresses, jackets, shoes, hats and
other accent pieces. Crow buys their
treasured clothing outright, which
gives them needed cash. And she
loves to hear their stories.
One dress was the dress a woman
wore on her first date with her
husband-to-be. Another dress was
worn when an older lady was mother
of the bride. Still another outfit dates
back to the 60s when the mod look
was coming into vogue.
“I am so excited to find these
wonderful outfits that have been
lovingly cared for,” says Crow. “And
I am even happier to see them go to a
new wardrobe of someone who will
appreciate them.”
Crow has found that young
women who are interested in theatre,
nostalgia, and have an offbeat, trendy
style love the vintage clothing in her
shop. Others are thrilled to find a
dress or blouse they remember from
their youth.
Merchandising and displaying
her vintage clothing and collectibles
is much of the fun. She even has a
mannequin from Zap’s in Lancaster,
known as Heidi. Crow is happy to
have the chance to put her artistic
and creative side to work at The
Curiosity Shoppe. It’s like going
back to the future.
~ Laura Knowles
A fresh start
with things
from the past
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 9
LANCASTER
1914 Fruitville Pike
(1/2 Block from K-Mart, in front of Savemart)
717-509-5940
Mon.-Sat. 10-8 • Sun. 12-5
EPHRATA
884 E. Main St.
(Rts. 222 & 322, In the Wal-Mart Plaza)
717-721-2490
Mon.-Fri. 10-8 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-5
LEBANON
1051 E. Cumberland St.
(Rt. 422 - between Home Depot & Wal-Mart)
717-273-2808
Mon.-Fri. 10-8 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-5
PALMYRA
Londonderry Square
(Rt. 422 - Behind Burger King)
717-838-2310
Mon.-Fri. 10-8 • Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 12-5
www.lancastermattress.com
YOUR SOLUTION FOR A
Free Delivery, Set-Up & Removal
(with purchase over $699)
• 0% Financing up to 24 Months
Living a longer and healthier life means
improving your quality of sleep.
We are committed to helping you
select a “Made in America”
Sealy mattress to help you wake
up refreshed. Our mission is
“Comfort and Quality for Less.”
Locally Ow
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and Operated for 29
Years m
eans less...
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uch less
d h lthi lif d L h h Li i l d h lthi lif
Better Night’s Sleep
Goodhart Sons, Inc., is a
family-owned, fully-equipped
steel fabricator and installer
located in Lancaster, PA with
more than 175,000 sq. ft. of
production space.
Founded in 1935 by Frank
G. Goodhart, his honest,
hardworking values have been
passed onto his sons, grandsons
and great-grandsons. 78 Years
and four generations later, the
company is still running strong.
“As we look ahead, we are trying to make significant technology
investments to ensure even higher levels of quality and
consistency. Ultimately though, our employees are our greatest
asset.” said Marc Goodhart, President of Fabrication.
A REPUTATION AS SOLID
AS STEEL ITSELF
GOODHART SONS, INC.
2515 Horseshoe Road, Lancaster
(717) 656-2404 • www.goodhartsons.com • Established 1935
150 employees • Memberships: AISC, ASME
Since 1954, RLPS has designed
cost-effective and meaningful
environments that support the
programs and missions of the
organizations it serves, many
of whom remain clients today.
Understanding and responding
to their needs has earned RLPS a
reputation as an award-winning
design firm committed to excellence.
It has consciously maintained a
varied practice while specializing
in the planning and design of senior
living communities, public schools,
private colleges and select facilities
including offices, churches, and
private residences.
Its staff of 60 professionals
provides feasibility study, master
planning, interior design, and
architectural services to clients
throughout the United States from
its Lancaster office.
RLPS ARCHITECTS
250 Valleybrook Drive, Lancaster
(717) 560-9501
Design firm
committed to excellence
10 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 BUSINESS & INDUSTRY PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Lancaster Toyota is celebrating
its 40th anniversary this year. The
family-owned business has come
a long way since Robert Allen Sr.
opened the dealership on E. King St.,
Lancaster. Today the Allen family
of dealerships include Lancaster
Toyota, Lancaster Scion, Lancaster
Mazda, a used car center and LTM
Collision Center—all clustered near
the Manheim Pike and Enterprise
Road intersection.
“Our business is constantly
evolving,” said general manager
Rick Price.
The facilities are clustered outside
East Petersburg, near the intersection
of Manheim Pike and Enterprise
Road, and the first facility—a
showroom was constructed there in
1974. The dealership has expanded
five times since then. A used car
facility was built in 1985. A truck
center was built in 2005, and in
2008 the used car showroom was
remodeled to become a two-story
building with administrative offices
on the second floor. An acquisition
of adjacent land allowed for the
relocation and expansion of the parts
and service department in 2011;
customers drive into this new state-
of-the-art facility, which is climate-
controlled. The dealership’s most
recent project was demolition and
rebuilding of the Toyota showroom.
“We are always trying to improve
our Sales and Service processes,”
Price said. These various projects not
only allow vehicles to be showcased,
but they also enhance the customer
experience. “Customer focus is #1
with us—our goal is to offer the
customer the best experience, and
we deliver. We have an excellent
product, an excellent owner, and the
best staff,” Price said.
Sales personnel and technicians
are certified. Many staff members
are long-term employees—more
than 30 employees have been
with the company for 20 years or
more. Price, himself, has been with
Lancaster Toyota since 1977 and
was promoted to general manager in
2008. “Everyone, from the owners
to the staff members who wash
vehicles, is committed to providing
the best customer experience—and
doing it with a smile,” Price said.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
Lancaster Toyota
Celebrates 40 Years
The new Lancaster Toyota showroom
Lancaster Toyota’s new service center
“We are
always trying
to improve
our Sales
and Service
processes.”
Rick Price, General Manager
LANCASTER TOYOTA
5270 Manheim Pike
East Petersburg, PA
(888) 424-1295
www.lancastertoyota.com
Lancaster Toyota’s used car showroom
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS BUSINESS & INDUSTRY FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 11
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12 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 EDUCATION PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
I
t all started in 1999 when
Jennifer Moorehead was
busy raising her three
children. She describes
them as being “very
inquisitive hands-on
learners.” She started
looking for a way to
answer their questions
about how the world
worked and also make
it fun for them to learn.
So Moorehead started to do simple
science experiments with them in
her garage.
It wasn’t that different from how
she, herself, was raised. Moorehead’s
father was a biologist and he would
also do fun science experiments
and activities for his children while
they were growing up. Moorehead
remembers growing their own
vegetable gardens in the backyard
and raising chickens and goats.
But what started out as just fun,
simple science experiments between
a child and parent has “quickly
snowballed” into a million dollar
business called Science Explorers.
Science Explorers, in Blue Ball,
is a hands-on science company
dedicated to providing opportunities
for children ages 4-11 to become
engaged in science by way of after-
school programs, science summer
camps, school assemblies, or scout
badge earning events. Currently
Science Explorers runs programs
in Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
and Delaware.
Moorehead explains that when
Science Explorers have an after
school science club at a school, they
work closely with the educators
there. The goal is really to help
support them. Science Explorers can
develop and design its after-school
programs around a teacher’s specific
curriculum helping to expand upon
the lessons learned in the classroom.
Moorehead said she understands
how teachers do not have the time
or the resources to delve into each
science chapter the way they would
probably like. Science Explorers does
this in fun interactive ways. They
kick off the start of the club with a
school assembly and also provide all
necessary items and materials for the
program. Tuition is usually about
$16 a week per child for a six week
program paid for by the parents.
Additionally, during the summer,
Science Explorers provides half day
camps for children ages four to 11
at area elementary schools, colleges
and universities, museums, libraries,
botanical gardens, and parks and
recreation departments. The camps
stick to the same philosophy of making
science “cool and exciting” using
fun, interactive hands on activities.
All kinds of topics are available such
as: earth science, astronomy, marine
biology and chemistry. Children
can dissect a shark or a squid, mix
together two liquids to create a solid,
make glowing slime, examine a real
heart, build and launch a rocket, lift
a person using nothing but air … all
sorts of intriguing activities.
The curriculum for the after
school clubs and for the summer
camps is developed by educators
and lessons are aligned with national
science standards. Moorehead
stressed that the experiments are not
simply “whiz-BANG!” There is real
learning going on. Instructors at the
schools and at the camps are qualified
science educators and there are about
100 of them in the field.
One school that has benefitted
from Science Explorers is George
Ross School in Lancaster city.
Principal Camille Hopkins said the
program “exceeded all expectations.”
She explained how Science Explorers
came in and met with Ross teachers
to design a program that would
enhance the science curriculum. “It
was a true hands-on science exposure.
Our students dissected a squid. They
would not have had that exposure
without Science Explorers.” Hopkins
added that because of a grant from
one of Science Explorers’ corporate
partners, Ametek, Inc., the program
was free to the school. “That was a
real blessing,” said Hopkins.
Hopkins also said that after the
2009 program there was a “big jump”
in PSSA scores with her students and
she attributes that jump to Science
Explorers. “It really gave our students
out of the box thinking. And we are
still riding that wave!” She added,
“The seeds that have been planted in
the students are really seeds of hope.
It gave them that spark (in the field of
science.) They now know they can do
that, too.”
Moorehead said 2012 was Science
Explorers’ best year ever. The
company is looking forward to 2013
and beyond continuing to help make
science fun and interesting for even
more children in the area with lots of
exciting programs.
~ Maureen Leader
SCIENCE EXPLORERS
P.O. Box 245 Blue Ball, PA
1-877-870-9517
www.ScienceExplorers.com

Remember, if it’s not fun,
we’re not doing it!

Making science fun
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS EDUCATION FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 13
There are nearly 175 charter
schools in Pennsylvania. Of those
schools, about 16 are cyber charter
schools, providing instruction
through the Internet or other
electronic and digital means.
For school districts in the state
— and in Lancaster County —the
costs to fund cyber schools comes
from the school district and tax
payers where each student resides.
That has created challenges for
many school districts.
Not only do they pay for the
students that are attending their
own brick and mortar schools,
but they pay for students in
that school district who choose
to attend a cyber school. And
although they do not provide the
education to those cyber charter
students, the school districts are
responsible for providing a subsidy
to educate those students.
A charter school is required
to provide a minimum 180 days
of instruction or 900 hours per
school year of instruction at the
elementary level or 990 hours per
school year of instruction at the
secondary level.
In addition to the costs of
educating students in a cyber
charter school, school districts
throughout Lancaster County
facilitate testing ensuring students
are reaching academic goals.
Cyber charter schools, such as
SusQ-Cyber Charter School and PA
Distance Learning Charter School
both claim to offer academic
excellence, for their students. Yet,
neither of those schools have met
requirements for AYP — or annual
yearly progress — for students in
Pennsylvania, which is 83 percent.
Meeting that goal has been
challenging enough for school
districts within their own schools,
but cyber charter schools have
even tougher hurdles, since
the students attracted to cyber
learning tend to prefer working
at their own pace. Often,
cyber schools are facing rapidly
increasing enrollment figures,
high student turnover, and
students who have chosen cyber
schools because of academic issues
and special learning needs.
Students at all state public
schools, including cyber-charters,
must take Pennsylvania System
of School Assessment tests. PSSA
scores help determine AYP, which
measures compliance with the
federal No Child Left Behind law.
Only three of the state’s cyber
charter schools made AYP in 2012,
including 21st Century Cyber
Charter School, PA Leadership
Charter School and PA Learners
Online Regional Cyber Charter
School — or STREAM Academy.
Unlike traditional schools,
students in cyber charter schools
have a much more flexible
class schedule. While students
in traditional schools have a
regulated daily schedule of about
seven hours, with organized class
periods for math, science, English
and other subjects, cyber students
are more likely to work in shorter
time periods. It is much more
difficult to track cyber students.
With cyber schools, there is
actually more self-discipline
required of students, as well as
dedication of the parents. That’s
the only way cyber students can
be accountable for meeting the
standards set for all students
in Pennsylvania.
Some school districts, like the
Warwick School District, are
making an effort to take back
students from cyber charter
schools by creating their own
cyber schools. Warwick School
District started its own Warwick
Virtual Academy in August
2012, and has already had its
first graduate. That student
needed to complete coursework
required for graduation from high
school. Through Warwick Virtual
Academy, students who may have
chosen other cyber schools can be
retained. As Warwick High School
assistant principal Scott Galen
pointed out, creating its own
online cyber school has produced
a cost savings of more than
$166,000 for the school district.
When Warwick’s cyber school
was in its planning stages, Galen
had projected that 10 to 15
students might enroll in Warwick
Virtual Academy. Just three
months later, Galen reported that
50 students were utilizing the
Warwick cyber school, including
students who had been attending
other cyber schools, students who
were about to drop out of high
school, students with special needs
and students who needed to
complete requirements
to graduate.
With concerns about the
effectiveness of cyber education,
the rising costs to school districts
and their responsibility to
cyber students in their school
districts, more school districts
are considering ways to follow
Warwick’s lead.
“Our goal is the bring back
students and not lose tuition to
other cyber schools,” said Galen.
“And I think we can do better.”
~ Laura Knowles
Enrollment in
cyber charter
schools is up
A
ccording to figures from the
Pennsylvania Department of
Education, there are more than
32,000 students in the state
attending cyber charter schools. That figure
has more than doubled in the past five years.
14 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 EDUCATION PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Millersville University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. A member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.
4883-1212
Garrison
Keillor
Thursday,
April 18,
7:30 p.m.
Winter Center - Millersville
Millersville.edu/muarts
Tickets: 717-872-3811
ALL RIGHT HERE AT MILLERSVILLE.
You don’t have to drive to New
York or Philly to see the best of
today’s arts and performance.
Bach Choir of Bethlehem
with the Millersville University
Keystone Singers
Saturday, March 9, 3 p.m.
Winter Center - Millersville
Job placement assistance provided to all graduates. Financial
aid available for those who qualify. Call to find out how you can
qualify for a scholarship! Free on-site parking!
717.299.0200
50 Ranck Avenue • Lancaster, PA
717 299 0200
• Cosmetology • Massage Therapy
• Esthetician • Nail Technology
34
For gainful employment disclosures go to: www.lancasterschoolofcosmetology.com
Call For Information On Our Next Class Start Dates!
Lancaster School of Cosmetology
Lancaster • 717.299.0200
All Services Performed by Supervised Students
20%Off
Any Hair or Nail Service Only
Not valid with any other offers or prior services.
Discount applies to highest price service only. Offer expires 4/30/13.
With this coupon. Cannot be used toward the purchase of gift certificates.
Hands-on learning in more than
100 career fields, state-of-the-art
facilities and equipment, and a 95
percent overall graduate-placement
rate are hallmarks of the educational
experience at Pennsylvania College
of Technology.
Located in Williamsport, Penn
College is a special mission affiliate
of Penn State, committed to applied
technology education. Courses are
taught by faculty who often have
relevant work experience. Small classes
ensure personal attention.
Students can choose two- or four-
year degrees; many associate degrees
provide a lead-in to the college’s
baccalaureate programs. A variety of
degree and noncredit programs align
with careers in the booming natural
gas industry.
The full college experience includes
on-campus housing, athletics, student
activities and Greek Life.
Penn College’s
Hands-On Approach
Sparks Career Success
An Open House on March 23
offers prospective students and
families an opportunity to explore
the campus and the college’s
“degrees that work.” For more,
visit www.pct.edu/openhouse.
For more about Penn College,
visit www.pct.edu, email
admissions@pct.edu or call
toll-free 800-367-9222.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS EDUCATION FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 15
C--C¯¯UN¦¯¦¯S.
¯¯|-¦¯ |/¯¯.
COMPLETE YOUP FPE5HMAN YEAP IN HAPPI5ßUPG.
FINI5H YOUP DEGPEE IN PHILLY.
TEMPLE UNlVER5lTY HARRl5BURG Vl5lT: TEMPLE.EDUIHARRl5BURG
HACC’s quality education and affordable tuition allow
students to pursue a college degree, upgrade job skills
or get training to re-enter the workforce. Students can
choose from more than 180 different academic programs
resulting in associate degrees, certificates and diplomas.
HACC offers classes at five locations in Central
Pennsylvania, including the Lancaster Campus at 1641
Old Philadelphia Pike. Course credits are transferrable
for students who wish to transfer to a four-year college or
university to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Other programs
provide students the skills and education necessary for
immediate entry into the job market. HACC offers
flexible scheduling, including day, evening and weekend
classes, as well as a large selection of online classes. If you
are at least 18 years old, have a high school diploma, or
have a GED, you are welcome to attend HACC!
LANCASTER CAMPUS OF HACC
Central Pennsylvania’s Community College
1641 Old Philadelphia Pike, Lancaster, PA
(717) 293-5000
www.hacc.edu/lancaster
Established 1964
TAKE HOLD of your future
16 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 EDUCATION PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
$PRQJ WKH QDWLRQâV WRS DVVRFLDWH GHJUHH SURGXFHUV
Ranked |n the top 10 pub||c, four-year co||eges |n the north*
KLNYLLZ [OH[ ^VYR
www.pct.edu/Iancaster
7LUU *VSSLNL PZ H ZWLJPHS TPZZPVU
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HWWSPLK [LJOUVSVN` LK\JH[PVU
` /me||ca's Ses| Co||eçes 2013, o0o||s|ed o, U.5. ^ews 8 Ho||d |eoo||
Ponn Collogo
®
and øe¸rees that work
®
aro rogistorod
in tno U.S. Patont and Tradomark Oííioo.
Open House
6DWXUGD\ 0DUFK
The Lancaster School of
Cosmetology & Therapeutic
Bodywork, 50 Ranck Ave., is
an accredited school founded
and incorporated in 1979. In
addition to being licensed by
the State Board of Cosmetology,
it is licensed by the State Board
of Private Licensed Schools, a
division of the Pennsylvania
Department of Education.
LSCTB is an innovative school,
offering quality instructors who
give practical hands-on training.
Employment options include:
hair design, color technician,
perm specialist, nail technician,
estheticians, platform artist,
sales representative, massage
therapist, and research assistant.
It also offers an open-to-the-
public salon and spa.
LANCASTER SCHOOL OF COSMETOLOGY
& THERAPEUTIC BODYWORK
50 Ranck Avenue, Lancaster, PA
(717) 299-0200
www.lancasterschoolofcosmetology.com
Cosmetology
Careers in
Millersville University is home
to theater, dance, music, art,
lectures and movies.
Upcoming events at the
Winter Visual and Performing
Arts Center range from the Bach
Choir of Bethlehem on March 9 to
Garrison Keillor on April 18. The Ware
Center features series in film, Cabaret and
Jazz in the Sky.
Tickets may be purchased at
MUTicketsOnline.com, the Student
Memorial Center Ticket Office, The Ware
Center or call 717-872-3811. For additional
events go to www.Millersville.edu/muarts.
MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY
PO Box 1002
1 South George St.
Millersville, PA
(717) 872-3011
www.millersville.edu
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS EDUCATION FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 17
Worried about the rising costs of attending a four-year college? More college-bound students are choosing instead
to earn their associate degree at HACC, and then transfer their credits to a four-year college or university to complete
their bachelor’s.
It’s a smart option. HACC credits can transfer nearly anywhere, and we even have transfer agreements with
many four-year schools.
To find out more, call the Lancaster Campus Welcome Center at 717-358-2966
or visit www.hacc.edu/lancaster
HACC gives me
an affordable path to
a four-year degree.
Lancaster: 1641 Old Philadelphia Pike 717-293-5000 | Harrisburg 717-780-2400 | Gettysburg 717-337-3855
Lebanon 717-270-4222 | York 717-718-0328 | Virtual Campus 717-221-1300 ext. 1510
HACC recognizes its responsibility to promote the principles of inclusion and equal opportunity in employment and education. Therefore, it is the policy of HACC, in full accordance with the law, not to discriminate in recruitment, employment, student admissions,
and student services on the basis of race, color, religion, age, political affiliation or belief, gender, national origin, ancestry, disability (physical or intellectual based challenges), place of birth, General Education Development Certification (GED), marital status, sexual
orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, genetic history/information, or any other legally protected classification. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of the President, One HACC Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17110, telephone 717-221-1300, ext. 1541.
LANCASTER CAMPUS OPEN HOUSE IS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013.
The Freshman Year at Temple University
Harrisburg (FYTH) is designed to offer
Temple General Education courses to full-
time students at the Harrisburg campus.
Students will enter in the Fall semester;
take classes in Fall/Spring/Summer, then
move on to Temple main campus or
Ambler campus to complete the final 3
years of their undergraduate degree (a
“1+3” program). Admission standards
and tuition rates are the same as at the
main campus.
• For more information regarding
tuition rates visit http://admissions.
temple.edu/cost-and-aid
• For more information regarding
standard university admissions
requirements visit www.temple.
edu/bulletin/enrolling/admissions/
enrolling_admissions.shtm
The purpose of the program is to allow
students from the Central PA area the
opportunity to live and work near home
while completing their initial year as full
time Temple students. This will allow for
and assist in a smooth transition to the larger
main campus.
This first year will prepare students
for a successful undergraduate experience
in a large urban university setting. It will
provide study skills and life skills training
such as communication, assertiveness,
listening and team building skills, along with
opportunities to establish relationships and
connections with other students
and university staff prior to
arriving on main campus.
Contact Anne Eckert,
Coordinator of Student
Services ake@temple.edu for
additional information.
A college experience close to home
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
HARRISBURG
234 Strawberry Street
Harrisburg, PA
(717) 232-6400
18 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 EDUCATION PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Penn State Harrisburg; Penn State,
The Lancaster Center; and Penn State
York are your local connections to
an internationally-recognized Penn
State degree. All of the resources
of a major research university are
available at your fingertips, whether
you’re interested in an associate,
baccalaureate, or graduate degree.
More than 160 undergraduate majors
are available throughout Penn
State, as are internships, research
opportunities, study abroad,
and more.
According to a “Wall Street Journal”
survey of corporate recruiting
executives in nearly 30 industries,
Penn State was named the No. 1
overall institution in the nation for
producing the best prepared, most
well-rounded graduates who are
most able to succeed once hired. A
Penn State degree can prepare you
well for a successful career.
Through continuing education,
Penn State also offers certificate
programs, professional development,
customized training for business and
industry, as well as youth programs.
Contact a specific campus to learn
more about the programs offered in
your area. Visit Penn State Harrisburg
at www.hbg.psu.edu; Penn State,
The Lancaster Center at www.
lancastercenter.psu.edu; or Penn
State York at www.yk.psu.edu.
Successful Careers start
here at Penn State
YORK
Penn State York students Brittany
Lynton and Jimmy Clark take time
to study in one of the new student
areas on campus. A commuter campus
of Penn State, York offers eight
baccalaureate degrees, seven associate
degrees, six minors, a master’s
program, credit certificates, youth
programs, a variety of programs for
businesses and organizations. Small
class size, award-winning faculty, and
the national reputation are right here
in your region.
LANCASTER CENTER
Teachers in the School District of
Lancaster participate in the English
as a Second Language (ESL) Specialist
Certificate Program offered at Penn
State, The Lancaster Center. The
Lancaster Center offers programs
geared to working adults with most
classes offered in the evening and
on Saturdays. Undergraduate credit,
certificate programs, customized
corporate training, and youth
programs are all a part of your Penn
State connection in Lancaster.
HARRISBURG
Penn State Harrisburg is an
undergraduate college and graduate
school of The Pennsylvania
State University. Convenient and
comprehensive, the campus is
located minutes from Harrisburg
International Airport and downtown
Harrisburg, and offers more than
60 associate, bachelor’s, master’s,
and doctoral degree programs. Penn
State Harrisburg brings nationally-
accredited academic programs, award-
winning faculty, and the resources of
a world-class research university to
Pennsylvania’s Capital Region.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS EDUCATION FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 19
I
magine going to high
school at the mall.
For dozens of students
who have not found
success in the traditional
high school classroom,
Lancaster Academy offers
the opportunity to earn
a high school diploma — not a
GED — at its Lancaster location
at Park City Center.
Situated at the lower level
of the mall, next to the food
court and children’s play area,
Lancaster Academy has about 75
students enrolled in the non-
traditional high school program.
According to director Diane
Tyson, Lancaster Academy is
in its 19th year of operation.
A cooperative effort between
11 school districts in the county,
Lancaster Academy has nine to
10 slots for students from
each district.
“This is a place for students
who haven’t had success in their
school district, for whatever
reason,” says Tyson.
Those reasons can include
everything from teen pregnancy
and parenting to emotional and
mental health issues, drug and
alcohol problems to depression.
Some have family problems and
for them Lancaster Academy can
be a “port in the storm,”
says Tyson.
It doesn’t hurt that this high
school is in the mall. Students can
enjoy lunch at the food court and
do a little shopping in between
classes. And if they don’t want to
mention that they are catching
up on their high school degree,
they can just tell their friends
they are heading to the mall.
“The Park City location is a
big plus,” says Tyson. “It’s not
a typical school setting, and it’s
centrally located with a learning
lab that helps to prepare
students for the working world.”
Of the 75 students currently
enrolled, seven have just
completed their class
requirements and are slated
to graduate from Lancaster
Academy with a high
school diploma.
For some students, the
traditional classroom or school
has not provided the ideal
learning environment, explains
Tyson. As a result, they may have
dropped out of school and now
realize that their action was not
well planned or thought out.
The Lancaster County Academy
provides a second chance to
earn a regular high school
diploma and acquire the needed
work skills desired by today’s
employers. The Academy is a
partnership between business
and education. Students age
16-20 must reside in a sponsoring
school district and receive
approval from the district. Adults
over the age 21 who left school
in their junior or senior year are
also encouraged to apply.
Lancaster Academy offers a
self-paced instruction, flexible
hours, career exploration, work-
based learning experiences and
links to training and education
beyond high school including
college, military and the
workforce.
The mission of Lancaster
Academy is providing individuals
with the opportunity to
experience success, become,
independent, life-long learners,
and prepare themselves to
become responsible, citizens in
an ever-changing world.
Average class size is 30 students
per three-hour session. Evening
classes are less crowded.
~ Laura Knowles
Diane Tyson
20 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Y
ou know
things aren’t
right with
Mom. It
started with
misplacing
the car keys
all the time.
Now she can’t find her way home.
She thinks the neighbors are trying
to rob her. She can’t keep track of
her medications. Always a neat
freak, the house has been messy
lately. Her daughter is concerned for
her mother’s safety.
When is it time for 24/7
supervision? “It’s usually a crisis
situation,” says Melissa Waltman,
executive director of Magnolias of
Lancaster, a memory care residence.
“Some families do their homework
before they need it.”
Magnolias of Lancaster is part
of Pittsburgh-based IntegraCare
Corporation, which operates nine
senior communities, all with a
memory care program. Magnolias
of Lancaster offers memory care
exclusively and is the only dedicated
memory care facility in the
Lancaster area.
Every detail is geared to residents
with Alzheimer’s or other forms of
dementia, from the building design
to the structured daily routine to the
activities designed for people with
memory issues.
Magnolias is home-like, with
a capacity of only 38 residents.
The front door opens to a cozy
great room with a fireplace.
Administrative offices are right
inside the door. A “reminiscence
screen” shows old and new
photographs from residents’ lives.
Off the great room are the music and
TV rooms.
Color-coded, themed residential
hallways are built around an interior
courtyard. Natural light pours in
everywhere. By the door of every
room is a recessed “reminiscence
box” for personal mementoes.
Furnishings are sparse, to avoid
overstimulation.
Two dining rooms — one for
independents, one for assistance —
serve three meals a day
restaurant-style.
Craft activities take place in
a sunroom looking out on the
courtyard. The “reminiscence room”
has vintage hats and apparel to look
at or try on. A drawer contains toys
for visiting children. A “workshop,”
complete with hardhats, is equipped
for tinkering.
Magnolias looks and feels like a
boutique hotel — all on one level,
with a circular walking pattern
so one can never get lost. “We’re
close to assisted living and half of
skilled nursing,” explains Waltman.
What sets it apart is the attention to
residents’ memory loss and the safe,
Guiding principles of memory care
IntegraCare’s memory care programs, including Magnolias
of Lancaster, have six primary objectives:
1 Provide opportunities for meaningful activities promoting quality of life.
2 Focus on remaining skills and abilities.
3 Create an environment that facilitates a sense of belonging.
4 Provide opportunities that ensure purposeful use of time.
5 Support positive behaviors and reduce risk of incidents of negative behavior.
6 Provide an experience for verbal and nonverbal communication.
These aims may look like common sense, but applying them to the facility’s
physical layout, activities, and every personal interaction is thoughtful
and deliberate. In any personal-care situation, even at home, a culture of
understanding and respect promotes a more contented environment.
Magnolias of Lancaster is located at 1870 Rohrerstown Road, near East
Petersburg, phone (717) 560-1100. Open Houses are held regularly and
are attended by family members who share their experiences. Learn more
about the facility, rates, and application at www.integracare.com.
Magnolias of Lancaster
welcomes home persons
with dementia
— continued on page 30
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 21
There is a new breed of health care
cropping up in Lancaster County.
It’s urgent care or quick care, a
type of heath care that spans the gap
between home care and the emergency
room, especially when your doctor’s
office isn’t open.
“Quick Care is an option when
your family physician is closed and
the situation isn’t serious enough for
the emergency room,” says Joanne
Eshelman, director of community
relations at Ephrata Community
Hospital.
It’s also used by patients who might
not have a family doctor or
don’t have a relationship
with a medical office.
When they have a medical
problem that doesn’t warrant a
rush to the emergency room,
Quick Care can handle the less
serious things like stitches for
a cut or treatment for an ear
infection.
Quick Care is located
in New Holland, at 435
S. Kinzer Avenue. Hours
are Monday through
Friday from 4 to 9 p.m.,
Saturday 1 to 9 p.m. and
Sunday from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
“People seem to understand
what conditions are appropriate
for Quick Care,” says
Eshelman.
For chest pains, a serious
injury, or a life-threatening
condition, the emergency room
is the place to go. Minor cuts
and bruises or a cold will heal
with home care. For everything in
between, Quick Care and urgent care
facilities can provide care for injuries
and illness, such as the flu, asthma
attacks, broken bones, cuts requiring
stitches, and other conditions.
“Most of the quick care or urgent
care facilities are associated with local
hospitals like Ephrata Community
Hospital and Lancaster General,”
says Eshelman. “But there are also
for-profit urgent care centers run as
businesses.”
Lancaster General Health Urgent
Care is located at 2118 Spring Valley
Road, near the LGH Health Campus.
Urgent Care is open Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and
weekends from 8
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Urgent Care is
the convenient way
to see a doctor without an
appointment, seven days a
week. For minor burns that
require extra care, a possible
broken bone that needs an
x-ray, a sprain or cut that
requires treatment to ease
discomfort and prevent
further injury or infection,
Urgent Care can be the
answer.
Other illnesses and injuries include
flu, sinus infections, bronchitis, skin
conditions, fractures, eye infections,
cuts, on-the-job injuries and more.
Lancaster General Health’s Urgent
Care has received a three-year
accreditation from the American
Academy of Urgent Care Medicine.
The for-profit centers that offer
non-emergency health care include
the brand-new Patient First, which
opens this winter at 1650 Oregon Pike,
Lancaster, and MedExpress Urgent
Care Center at 4 Rohrerstown Road,
Lancaster.
Patient First is a national chain,
with a business approach
to treating routine
injuries and illness,
including primary
care physicians,
x-rays, lab testing,
prescription drugs
and occupational
health. There are
Patient First centers
in Delaware, Maryland,
Florida, New Jersey,
Pennsylvania, Tennessee,
Virginia and West Virginia.
MedExpress Urgent Care is a
full-service walk-in clinic with a full
medical team that provides provide
fast, effective treatment for most
injuries and illnesses. MedExpress is
open every day from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Some patients prefer the quick care
of an urgent care facility, which will
typically cost less than emergency
room treatment. As one patient
notes, “I was there less than an hour
and left feeling great about the care I
received.”
Since no appointment is necessary
and a doctor is always on site, patients
can take comfort in knowing that care
is available when they need it. Of
course, most urgent care centers are
not open in the middle of the night.
So that high-risk allergic reaction at 1
a.m. or life-threatening asthma attack
at 3 a.m. will still require a trip to the
E.R. And when the situation could be
something as serious as a heart attack
or stroke, there is no time to waste.
A call to 911 and an ambulance is for
true medical emergencies, when life is
at stake.
~ Laura Knowles
Joanne Eshelman, director of community relations at Ephrata Community Hospital.
22 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
1671 CROOKED OAK DRIVE, LANCASTER • 717.569.5331
1510 CORNWALL ROAD, LEBANON • 717.454.0061
WWW.LANCASTERNEUROSCIENCE.COM
Lancaster NeuroScience & Spine Associates
Enriching Lives, One Patient at a Time.
(Standing) Eddy Garrido, MD; John Gastaldo, MD; Keith Kuhlengel, MD; Christopher Kager, MD;
Tony Ton-That, MD; (Seated) William Monacci, MD; James Thurmond, MD; Elliot Sterenfeld, MD
Lancaster NeuroScience & Spine Associates provides comprehensive
ĐĂƌĞĨŽƌŝŶũƵƌLJĂŶĚĚŝƐĞĂƐĞĂīĞĐƟŶŐƚŚĞďƌĂŝŶ͕ƐƉŝŶĞ͕ƐƉŝŶĂůĐŽƌĚĂŶĚ
ŶĞƌǀĞƐ͘dŚĞEĞƵƌŽƐƵƌŐĞŽŶƐĂŶĚWŚLJƐŝĂƚƌŝƐƚƐǁŽƌŬŝŶĐŽŶũƵŶĐƟŽŶǁŝƚŚĂ
ƚĞĂŵŽĨWŚLJƐŝĐŝĂŶƐƐŝƐƚĂŶƚƐ͕EƵƌƐĞWƌĂĐƟƟŽŶĞƌƐĂŶĚWŚLJƐŝĐĂů
dŚĞƌĂƉŝƐƚƐƚŽƉƌŽǀŝĚĞƉĂƟĞŶƚƐǁŝƚŚďŽƚŚƐƵƌŐŝĐĂůĂŶĚŶŽŶͲƐƵƌŐŝĐĂů
ŽƉƟŽŶƐĨŽƌƉƌĞǀĞŶƟŽŶ͕ƚƌĞĂƚŵĞŶƚ͕ĐƌŝƟĐĂůĐĂƌĞĂŶĚƌĞŚĂďŝůŝƚĂƟŽŶŽĨ
ďƌĂŝŶĂŶĚƐƉŝŶĞƌĞůĂƚĞĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶƐ͘
dŚĞƉƌĂĐƟĐĞŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐThe NeuroSpine Center͕ĂǁŽƌůĚͲĐůĂƐƐŽƵƚƉĂƟĞŶƚ
surgery center; The Center for Spine Care͕ĂĚŝĂŐŶŽƐƟĐĂŶĚƚƌĞĂƚŵĞŶƚ
center for pain; and a state-of-the-art Physical Therapy Department.
Highly-Trained Providers
Serving the Community with
Compassionate Care, Excellent Outcomes
and PersonalizedƩĞŶƟŽŶ͕ǁŚŝůĞƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐ
WĂƟĞŶƚĚƵĐĂƟŽŶ͕Excellent Customer Service
in a Secure & Friendly Environment.
Central Pennsylvania’s Premier
Brain & Spine Team
H
ershey Physical
Therapy Service
in Lititz will
celebrate their 30
year anniversary
in 2013. Henry
Hershey, owner of
Hershey Physical Therapy Service in
Lititz, was born and raised in Lititz
and started the business in 1983 with
help and support of his wife, Wendy.
At 30 years, Hershey PT is the
longest independently-owned and
operated private practice Physical
Therapy Service in Lancaster
County. Hershey loves Lititz and
takes his role in the area seriously.
He understands that clients have
choices of PT providers and makes it
his goal for his business to regularly
support and “give back” to the
community with opportunities
for student affiliation, student
scholarships, educational seminars,
injury prevention programs and
food drives.
When Hershey meets with a
patient often their first question to
him is, “Will I have to live with this
pain the rest of my life?” Hershey
and his staff are passionate about
healing through physical therapy
and value their ability to help their
patients get better and live pain free
lives.
Hershey is a Boomer and he
knows personally what it is like
to have physical issues that limit
activities. Like many Boomers he
bikes regularly to stay healthy. But
also like many Baby Boomers, he
has knee issues that he has to watch.
Hershey says a visit to a physical
therapist is often a great first step for
an injured Baby Boomer to get on
the road to returning to a pain free
active lifestyle.
And, because of recent changes
to direct access regulations, no
doctor referral is needed to make
an appointment. Hershey says that
this is a cost-effective approach that
allows immediate access to therapy
during the time when conservative
management of injury works best.
However, if the condition warrants,
a visit to their family doctor will be
recommended.
Hershey says nothing is more
important than good health and his
team at Hershey Physical Therapy
are dedicated to helping all their
patients achieve that. “If you don’t
have good health, nothing in life is
enjoyable,” said Hershey.
~ Maureen Leader
HERSHEY PHYSICAL THERAPY SERVICE
747 South Broad Street
Lititz, PA 17543
Phone: 717-627-1285
Fax: 717-626-0161
www.Hersheypt.com
Helping
patients achieve
good health
Hershey Physical Therapy is proud
to provide Korey Johnson the 2012
Scholarship Award for a student
entering the field of Physical Therapy.
Korey will be attending Lebanon Valley
College, Physical Therapy DPT program
(Doctorate of Physical Therapy).
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 23
A
D
U
L
T
D
A
ILY LIVIN
G
C
E
N
T
E
R
F
A
R
M
MARK
E
T
C
H
IL
D
CARE CEN
T
E
R
R
E
H
A
B
IL
ITATION
SE
R
V
I
C
E
S
M
A
S
O
N
IC
CHILDREN
’S
H
O
M
E
H
O
M
E
C
ARE & H
O
S
P
IC
E
.. ..., .
A retirement community and so much more!
Retirement Living
800-676-6452
Personal/Nursing Care
800-422-1207
Adult Daily Living Center
(adult day care) 361-5353
Bleiler Caring Cottage
(adults with developmental
disabilities) 361-5080
Employment 361-4522
Child Care Center
367-1121, ext. 33375
Masonic Children’s Home
367-1121, ext. 33301
Masonic Life Center
(wellness center) 361-5699
Farm Market 361-4520
Home Care 367-1121, ext. 33700
Hospice 367-1121, ext. 18449
Rehab Services
367-1121, ext. 33140
Volunteer Services
367-1121, ext. 33175
ITATION
S
B
L
E
I
L
E
R
C
ARING C
O
T
T
A
G
E
www.masonicvillages.org ™ One Masonic Drive ™ Elizabethtown, Pa.
E.O.E.
Open for Everyone.
ELIZABETHTOWN
24 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Located in historic
Lititz, Moravian Manor
truly is a “community
within a community,”
where residents find
a genuine sense of
involvement in a unique
community for rewarding
retirement living.
“As a leader among
retirement communities, we
provide attractive residences,
preeminent health care,
and supportive services to
more than 300 adults here at
Moravian Manor,” reports CEO
David Swartley.
He adds that residents have
many opportunities to connect
with the community, through
annual events, continuing
education, interaction with
all age groups, and volunteer
services that allow residents
to share their talents and
experiences to give back to
the community.
The Manor offers a full array
of lifestyles that best meet
needs now and into the future,
ranging from the independence
of residential living in beautiful
townhomes, cottages, and
apartments, to individualized
personal care in Manor West,
specialized short-term or long-
term care in Moravian Manor’s
Health Center and structured
care for persons with memory
impairment in the Herrnhut
Community. There is also an
accredited child care center,
The Children’s Corner, that
offers professional care
for infants, toddlers and
preschoolers, with the unique
benefits of intergenerational
experiences for residents
and children.
“We believe that aging has
a fulfilling purpose in life and
that our society’s elders have
enduring value to family and
community,” says Swartley,
adding that Moravian Manor is
a member of Leading Age.
Established in 1975, Moravian
Manor’s history is rooted in the
early works of the Moravian
Church in Pennsylvania. In
the early 1970s, the Lititz
Moravian Church donated
22 acres in town to construct
the retirement community.
The Manor welcomed its first
residents to the Moravian
Avenue Cottages in late 1974
and to Manor West Residential
Living Apartments (now
personal care) in January
1975. Since then Moravian
Manor has touched the lives
of thousands of people as a
people-to-people ministry, Their
guiding philosophy is based
on the mission of a not-for-
profit senior living community
offering a person-centered
approach to a full continuum
of services.
Currently, the Manor is in the
final stages of completing a
12-unit townhome project.
Looking toward the future,
Moravian Manor purchased a
72 acre parcel of land several
years ago and is currently
working on a conceptual
plan for this new endeavor,
recently named The Warwick
Woodlands, A Moravian Manor
Community. More information
regarding this project will
be announced in the coming
months.
~ Laura Knowles
MORAVIAN MANOR
300 W. Lemon St., Lititz
(717) 626-0214
www.moravianmanor.org
It’s All About Community
We believe
that aging has a
fulfilling purpose in life
and that our society’s
elders have enduring
value to family and
community.”
David Swartley
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 25
Everyone makes choices daily. When it comes to your health, the path you choose can
have a tremendous impact on your life. Maybe tomorrow. Maybe years in the future.
Lancaster General Health is here to be your partner in keeping you and your family
well and helping you make smart health choices like preparing healthy meals, taking
prescribed medications and having an annual physical.
We have the professionals, services and technology you need to become well and
stay that way.
Taking charge of your health begins with making the right choices for you and your
family. Make Lancaster General Health your first choice.
Choose well. Be well.
Go to ChooseWellBeWell.org to learn how today.
It may be one of the most beautiful views in all
of Lancaster County, with a panoramic vista of
patchwork farmland as far as the eye can see.
No wonder it is known as Fairmount Homes,
a warm, hospitable retirement community
dedicated to faith, family and community.
Located at 333 Wheat Ridge Drive near
Ephrata, Fairmount Homes was founded in 1968.
It is comprised of 52 acres in rural West Earl
Township, offering a multi-faceted continuing
care retirement community with many options.
At Fairmount Homes, there are 114 licensed
health care beds, 74 licensed personal care beds,
12 residential living residences, 58 apartments and
41 cottages.
“Our retirement community is a Five Star
rated facility, marking our 45th year, with plans
to expand our cottage community,” says Jerry D.
Lile, President/CEO of Fairmount, who goes on
to explain that Fairmount Homes is a non-profit,
church-related facility that is governed by a nine-
member board from the Weaverland Conference
of the Old Order Mennonite church.
Fairmount Homes has a unique charm,
with a variety of living options depending on
your needs. The cottage community consists
of attractive cottage units, while Fairmount’s
apartment community includes apartments
located at Crest View and Farm Crest, both
with breathtaking views of the valley. Fairmount
Homes also provides personal care at its Wheat
Ridge Campus and Farm Crest Campus in a
home-like setting.
At Fairmount Homes, their dedicated staff
of licensed nurses and certified aides provide
health care that focuses on the physical, spiritual
and psychological needs of residents. A special
care area for persons with memory loss is
designed to serve the health and safety needs of
residents. There are also options for short-term
rehabilitation stays after surgery, injury or illness.
Fairmount is licensed for Medicare and Medicaid.
Fairmount Homes
45 Years of Quality Care
To find out more about Fairmount Homes,
call 717-354-1800 or check the website at
www.fairmounthomes.org
26 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Michael E. Funk, DMD
2359 Oregon Pike, Suite 102 / The Shoppes at Landis Valley
717-394-3592
Accepting New Patients ADULTS & CHILDREN
Making beautiful, healthy smiles... one smile at a time.
Digital X-Rays (up to 80% less radiation!)
• Preventive Care
• Periodontal Care
• Cosmetic Restorations
• Crowns
• Veneers
• Implants
• Whitening
• Dentures/Partials
Now accepting Delta Dental, United Concordia & MetLife
The difference in end-of-life care
685 Good Drive, P.O. Box 4125
Lancaster, PA 17604-4125
(717) 295-3900
www.hospicecommunity.org
Serving Lancaster, York,
Adams, Berks, Chester
and Lebanon counties,
and the Hershey area

At no
time
did we feel
alone.

At home or in the home-like atmosphere
of our Hospice Inpatient Centers,
compassionate care and support is
provided for your loved one…and you.
Senior Living at Lancaster,
located in a newly renovated
building at 120 Rider Avenue,
is a 92-bed personal care home,
providing residents with meals,
medication assistance, laundry
services, fun activities, and
group outings. Marketing and
Admissions Coordinator
Kristin Levering says, “It’s
like a brand new building.”
Residents enjoy being close
to hospitals, shopping,
restaurants, and downtown
activities. Check out the triple,
semi, and private room options,
as well as suites at
www.seniorlivinglancaster.com.
Easy Living
SENIOR LIVING AT LANCASTER
120 Rider Avenue Lancaster, PA
(717) 397-3000
www.seniorlivinglancaster.com
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 27
how Accept|ng 0epos|ts
on hew homes!
"Sooncv Rathcv than Latcv"
͞tĞ ĚŝĚ Ă ůŽƚ ŽĨ ƌĞƐĞĂƌĐŚ
ďĞĨŽƌĞ ĐŚŽŽƐŝŶŐ ƚŚŝƐ ĐĂƌŝŶŐ
ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJ͘ tĞ ŚĂǀĞ ďĞĞŶ
ǁĂƌŵůLJ ǁĞůĐŽŵĞĚ ŚĞƌĞ
ĂŶĚ >ĂŶĚŝƐ ,ŽŵĞƐ ŚĂƐ
ƚƌƵůLJ ĨĞůƚ ůŝŬĞ ŚŽŵĞ ĨƌŽŵ
͚ĂLJ KŶĞ͛͘ tĞ ĂƌĞ ƐŽ ŐůĂĚ
ǁĞ ŵŽǀĞĚ ŝŶ ƐŽŽŶĞƌ ƌĂƚŚĞƌ
ƚŚĂŶ ůĂƚĞƌ͘͟
- Fred and Judy Sargent
PHolo. La||y Leleve| PHolog|apHy
www.Iandishomes.org
Ca|| lo| au appo|ulmeul

At Lancaster Cleft Palate Clinic,
patients can receive a range of care in
one place.
Dr. H.K. Cooper started the world’s
first team-centered facility to treat cleft
lip and palate in Lancaster in 1938,
according to Cordelia Moyse, director
of development and communications.
Dr. Cooper’s grandson, Dr. Rusty
Long, is now the clinic’s executive
director.
Today, 75 years later, the clinic
continues to offer services such as
multi-specialty medical and dental
evaluations, general and specialty
dental treatment, audiology testing,
speech therapy, and social work
services under one roof at 223 N.
Lime St. Patients do not have to go
to multiple offices to see doctors
who need to work closely together to
integrate and coordinate care.
About 3,000 patients in the Central
PA area were served in 2012, Moyse
said. Patients are seen from birth into
adulthood.
Fund raising events planned are the
Smiling Faces Golf Tournament June
7 at Fairview Golf Course in Lebanon
and a Gala Dinner in the Fall.
Dr. Andrea Smith examining a patient.
LANCASTER CLEFT PALATE CLINIC
223 N. Lime St., Lancaster, PA
(717) 394-3793
Lancaster Cleft Palate Clinic
A Place to Treat, Heal and Care
28 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
2048 Fruitville Pike • Lancaster • Ph. 717-519-6869
Email infor@jbuniforms.com • Hours: M-F 10-8 • Sat 10-7 • Sun 12-5
One Stop Uniform Shop One Stop Uniform Shop
A continuing care retirement community,
Pleasant View features flexible housing options,
and a variety of services and amenities. Established
in 1955, Pleasant View has 400 employees.
The J. Calvin Wenger Health and Wellness
Center offers private rooms for short or long
term rehabilitation and nursing care. Personal
Care provides active individuals assistance while
maintaining their independence. Independent
Living residents enjoy a dynamic social lifestyle.
PLEASANT VIEW
RETIREMENT
COMMUNITY
44 N. Penryn Road
Manheim
(717) 665-2445
www.pleasantviewrc.org
Relish Retirement
Lancashire Terrace, centrally
located in quaint Lancaster
County, was created with a
determination to achieve the best
by Wilmac, a privately-owned
multi-facility corporation.
Now in its second generation of
family management, Wilmac is
a recognized leader in creating
innovative adult lifestyle and
healthcare options and has
maintained an uncompromising
tradition of excellence for more
than three decades.
Lancashire Terrace provides
an independent lifestyle for
people who desire comfort,
security and social activity
within an environment that
supports and enriches their
lives. When you move into the
charming Lancashire Terrace
community, you are simply
exchanging one comfortable
home for another in our friendly
neighborhood. Take away the
drudgery of housekeeping, lawn
care, snow removal, repairs and
maintenance...and you begin to
experience the overall enjoyment
of the Lancashire Terrace
Lifestyle.
These years can, and should be,
the best years of your life.
Lancashire Terrace
A Commitment
to Caring
LANCASHIRE TERRACE
RETIREMENT VILLAGE
6 Terrace Drive, Lancaster, PA
(717) 569-3215
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 29
We were the first clinic in the world dedicated exclusively to helping
children born with facial birth defects achieve their full potential in life.
We created and continue to develop the “team concept” so that patients
with craniofacial anomalies and their families can access specialists from
medicine, dentistry, speech, hearing and social work under one roof.
We are a leader in the Americleft Project pursuing research to identify
the most effective treatments for patients.
Lancaster Cleft Palate Clinic – a pioneering institution
yesterday, today, and tomorrow
75 years of transforming lives
223 North Lime Street, Lancaster, PA 17602 717-394-3793
Before
After
Established in 1964, Landis Homes is a not-
for-profit retirement community which is home
to 700 persons living in cottages, apartments,
hybrid homes, suites, personal care and
healthcare. Another 100 persons are served
on a weekly basis in one of the two adult
day centers on the 114-acre campus, which is
surrounded by farmland.
The Heritage Memory Support center serves
persons with memory loss and their families.
Landis at Home offers personal services to
adults in their private homes. The Children’s
Learning Center provides childcare for infants
through preschool all through the year.
The newest addition to campus, hybrid
homes, combines the best features of
apartment and cottage living. These homes,
along with the new cottage homes, received a
LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design) Gold certification in 2012.
LANDIS HOMES
1001 East Oregon Road
Lititz, PA 17543
717-381-3550
www.landishomes.org
A community serving one another since 1964
30 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
For the past 41 years when
residents of the greater Lancaster
and Lebanon areas experience
brain or spine conditions they
turn to the physicians of Lancaster
NeuroScience & Spine Associates.
The highly-skilled team of six
neurosurgeons, two physiatrists,
physician assistants, nurse
practitioners, physical therapists,
and staff members are dedicated
to providing personalized and
compassionate care for every
patient.
Lancaster NeuroScience & Spine
Associates provides comprehensive,
integrated non-surgical and
surgical care for disease or injury
affecting the brain, spine, spinal
cord and nerves. They offer world-
class medical services at each
of their facilities including The
NeuroSpine Center, an outpatient
surgery center dedicated to spine;
The Center for Spine Care, a
diagnostic and treatment center
for pain; and a state-of-the art
Physical Therapy Department.
With a continued history of
remarkable outcomes patients
can rest assured they’ll receive
extraordinary care and be treated
like a member of the Lancaster
NeuroScience & Spine family.
in Brain &
Spine Care
LANCASTER NEUROSCIENCE & SPINE ASSOCIATES
MAIN OFFICE
1671 Crooked Oak Drive, Lancaster, PA
(717) 569-5331
www.lancasterneuroscience.com
secure environment — without
ankle bracelets. Everyone uses the
same entrance. Staff carry
walkie-talkies to respond to
situations immediately.
Memory care has different
regulations than assisted living or
skilled nursing care. The director
of residential care services is a
Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN).
Resident Care Aides (RCA) are
trained to administer meds. Every
employee receives training in
dementia care.
Interaction between residents
and staff is warm and friendly.
“I’d better go back to my room
before I forget where it is,” says
a woman asking to be pointed in
the right direction. A caregiver
patiently goes over her room
number. “See you at supper!”
she adds.
A beverage-and-snack cart rolls
by. It is hydration time but also
one of six daily checks on every
resident. “But we see you all day
long,” Waltman asserts.
Wheelchairs are fine here if
the person can self-propel and
not need “two-person assist”
for transfers. Supportive services
including home healthcare and
hospice are brought in as needed.
Upon admission, families
complete a six-page questionnaire
about the resident’s life story.
“The more they can share about
their loved one, the better we can
care for them,” notes Waltman.
Knowing a retired car dealer’s
brand preferences can turn into
a trivia game question: What do
Olds, Chevy, and Mercedes have
in common?
Knowing that someone always
vacationed in the Outer Banks
can prompt a caregiver to ask for
travel advice.
“It’s all about treating people
with dignity and respect, going
to where they are,” Waltman
emphasizes.
One resident, a lifelong
gardener, gravitated to the
flowerbeds. Another woman likes
to tidy up everything in sight and
accompany staff on their rounds.
A World War II veteran always
wears his ballcap with the Air
Force insignia and China-Burma-
India patch.
Waltman facilitates a dementia
support group for families. She
reminds them of three questions
to always keep in mind: How can
I help them have a better day?
How can I connect with them?
and How can I make them smile?
~ Tana Reiff
— continued from page 20
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 31
S
eni r
$ FRPSDQ\
Live Life To
Your Fullest!
We Provide A Cheerful
& Compassionate Environment
120 Rider Avenue (right off Columbia Ave) • Lancaster
717-397-3000 • www.SeniorLivingLancaster.com
Caring Traditions
Provided!
Daily Activities To Include:
• On-Site Library • On-Site Theatre
• Outings and Entertainment
• On-Site Salon • Religious Services
• House Physician & Podiatry Services
• Plans to Accommodate Individual Needs
• Assistance With Activities of Daily Living
• Medication Management
• Nutritious Meals • Laundry Services
• Housekeeping
• Qualified Staff 24 Hours A Day
olumbia Ave) • Lancaster
Ask About Our Veterans Benefit!
Celebrating 45 Years of Service!
333 WHEAT RIDGE DRIVE, EPHRATA, PA 17522 • PHONE: (717) 354-1800 • www.FairmountHomes.org
FAIRMOUNT HOMES…
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Lancaster Surgical Supply
offers one of the largest
inventories in Lancaster County,
including artificial breast forms,
ostomy supplies, and fitting for
elastic stockings and trusses.
They provide items for post-
surgical and home recovery care:
wheelchairs, canes, walkers,
bed pads, washable cushions,
dressings and more. “We service
all equipment,” says Robert
Wertz, owner.
Helping
people
stay safe,
secure and
comfortable
at home
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214 N. Duke St., Lancaster
Hours: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
and Sat. 9 a.m. to noon
Call (717) 397-2763
32 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
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544 N. Penryn Road
Manheim, Pa 17545
www.PleasantViewrc.org
717-665-2445
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LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 33
T
I`m interested in retirement living at Lancashire Terrace!
Name ____________________________________________________Phone _________________________
Address __________________________________________________________________________________
City ______________________________________________________________________________________
State ________________________________________________________Zip _________________________
When you move to our community, you are simply exchanging one
comfortable home for another in our friendly neighborhood.
Take away the drudgery of housekeeping, lawn care, snow removal,
repairs and maintenance . . . and you begin to know some essentials
of the Lancashire Lifestyle.
• Independent Retirement Living
• Cottage Neighborhood
• Transportation, Housekeeping and Complete Meals
• Pets Welcome!
• Entry Fees Begin at $34,582
• Inquire about our LEASE PROGRAM
• Immediate 1 & 2 Bedroom Cottages Available
At Lancashire Terrace Retirement Village, we know a lot about
senior living – after all, we’ve been providing mature lifestyle options since
1976. We offer the area’s best value and would be delighted to share the
details with you - simply fill out the form below.
Mail To:
Lancashire Terrace
6 Terrace Drive
Lancaster, Pa 17601
Ask About Our
Winter
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www.wilmacliving.com
6 Terrace Drive • Lancaster, PA 17601
Call our Welcome Center 1-800-343-9765 or 717-569-3215 for more info.
You’ll Love The You ll Love The
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Most individuals coping with serious illness prefer
to receive hospice care at home. But there may
come a time when another level of care is needed
to manage symptoms. For these patients and their
families, professional, compassionate care is
available at Hospice & Community Care’s Essa Flory
Hospice Center in Lancaster and the Bob Fryer &
Family Inpatient Center in Mount Joy.
Personalized Care
That Feels Just
Like Home
Physicians, RNs, LPNs, aides,
social workers, chaplains,
bereavement counselors and
volunteers provide specialized
care in homes, nursing homes,
senior care facilities, hospitals
and at the two Inpatient
Centers.
A non-profit hospice provider,
Hospice & Community Care
offers care for all individuals
with any life-limiting illness or
declining with age, regardless
of available insurance or
finances.
Bereavement support,
available for anyone, is offered
through the Pathways Center
for Grief & Loss.
The centers
feature large,
brightly-decorated
rooms, private baths
and patios, and
plenty of comfortable
space for family
and friends.
HOSPICE AND COMMUNITY CARE
685 Good Drive, Lancaster, PA
(717) 295-3900
www.hospicecommunity.org
34 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HEALTHCARE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Grateful for Our Heritage
Confident of Our Future
1 9 6 3 – 2 0 1 3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Independent Living
- Cottages & Apartments
Personal Care
with Memory Care Unit
Skilled Nursing Care
with Rehab Services
502 Elizabeth Drive
Lancaster, PA 17601
717.393.0711
www.calvaryhomes.org
mmorris@calvaryhomes.org
The Lancaster County Historical
Society is a community-based, not-
for-profit organization dedicated to
preserving the history of Lancaster
County.
Under the umbrella of
LancasterHistory.org, the Campus
of History includes the Lancaster
County Historical Society’s
museum, archives and educational
materials, as well as the beautifully
restored Wheatland estate, home
to the 15th President of the United
States James Buchanan.
The society has the mission
of acquisition, preservation,
and interpretation of resources
representing the history of
Lancaster County, within the
broader context of state and
national history, including the life
and legacy of President Buchanan
and preserving and maintaining
Wheatland.
Discover all the fascinating
stories of Lancaster County at the
new park-like Campus of History,
now under construction with
its 19,755-sq-ft addition to the
headquarters of Lancaster County’s
Historical Society. Find out more
at www.LancasterHistory.org.
LANCASTER COUNTY’S
HISTORICAL SOCIETY & PRESIDENT
JAMES BUCHANAN’S WHEATLAND
230 North President Avenue
Lancaster, PA
(717) 392-4633
www.LancasterHistory.org
The Campus
of History
At Lancaster Smiles Family &
Cosmetic Dentistry PC, Dr. Michael
E. Funk helps you have the best and
healthiest smile possible. Lancaster
Smiles is focused on, “Making
beautiful, healthy smiles … one smile
at a time,” Dr. Funk says.
They provide exams, cleanings,
digital low radiation x-rays, tooth-
colored fillings, crowns, bridges,
implants, root canals, extractions,
dentures and more. Service is
friendly and personalized.
LANCASTER SMILES
2359 Oregon Pike, Suite 102
Lancaster
(717) 394-3592
www.lancastersmilespc.com
Lancaster Smiles
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HEALTHCARE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 35
M
asonic Village at
Elizabethtown
kicked off 2013
with a new look,
grounded in its same strong
mission. To cap off several
changes incorporated in 2012,
the village launched an updated
logo with a stately tree and
Masonic symbolism.
The new slogan, “Enjoy Life
Your Way,” reflects Masonic
Village’s promise to strive for
excellence by offering a choice of
quality services so individuals can
enjoy the highest quality of life.
Seemingly minute details have
just as much impact on quality of
life as do the community’s culture
and construction. The current
construction of up to 100 new
cottages offers this lifestyle to
more people.
A revision of the monthly
events calendar offers residents
more choices. “We combined two
on-campus calendars to give
residents access to a greater
variety of events,” Jennifer
Stuckey, activities supervisor, said.
“We’ve seen attendance increase,
and we’re constantly tweaking
our programming based on
residents’ feedback.”
The Grand Lodge Hall Dining
Room, which received buffet
stations in 2012, is one of five
restaurants that underwent
renovations to enhance residents’
dining experiences. “The buffet
stations add more fun, variety
and flexibility to the menu. …
They stir up the daily routine
and give residents something to
anticipate and look forward to,”
Daphne Gulick, senior director of
food services, said.
The ongoing renovations to
the Masonic Health Care Center
transform residents’ nursing
suites into household designs
within friendly neighborhoods.
Larger living rooms promote
the gathering of friends,
while less obtrusive care bases
provide staff oversight. “It’s a
beautiful new environment
and a pleasant place to be,” Jo
Hart, nurse manager, said. “I’ve
heard nothing but positives from
residents and their families.”
Country kitchens renew
residents’ dining experiences.
Meal times in the health care
center provide opportunities for
staff to socialize with residents.
Instead of pre-selecting their
meals, residents choose one of
two entrées, prepared when they
order. “Because the residents
are eating so well, the need
for supplements has decreased
significantly,” Ricky Schies, nurse
manager, said.
Masonic Village also has
updated its website and added
a blog so people can learn
about its many in-house and
community services, which are
open to everyone.
“As we help people discover
what it means to enjoy life their
way, we are setting a standard
for the future,” Vicki Gillmore,
executive director, said. “Yet,
as we adapt to stay ahead of
evolving needs, every decision we
make is rooted in our Mission of
Love.”
MASONIC VILLAGE
One Masonic Drive
Elizabethtown, PA
(717) 367-1121
www.masonicvillages.org
John and Kathleen Ross
stand in front of their
brand new cottage.
Setting a
high standard
for the future.
MASONIC VILLAGE
Theda Wagner
enjoys a snack in her
new dining room
with the company
of staff member
Danielle Dempsey.
36 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
E
LANCO Social Services
Network has taken the words of
Mother Teresa to heart as it strives
to meet the humanitarian needs
of people in the eastern Lancaster
County community.
After three years of planning, the pro-active faith-
based non-profit organization officially opened its
doors late January 2012 at 441 S. Kinzer Avenue,
New Holland.
“A social services network has been needed for a
long time in the Elanco area. Our goal is to provide
“how-to” assistance to help people get back on their
feet,” said Jim Cox, ESSN board of directors chair.
Joan Yunginger, ESSN director, agreed stating
the organization seeks to serve as an education and
resource center to help people become self-sufficient,
productive, and accountable.
A key accomplishment in the organization’s first
year was Yunginger’s ability to develop essential
partnerships with social service agencies such as
United Way, Tabor Community Services, and Central
Pennsylvania Food Bank to meet the needs of the
local community.
Being able to assess a community client’s need
and refer them to the appropriate agency to receive
assistance is work Yunginger, a former therapeutic
support staff employee of Philhaven, considers
a calling.
“Never worry about numbers.
Help one person at a time,
and always start with the person
nearest you.”
— Mother Teresa
“I’m thankful for the opportunity
to serve in the community that I call
home. And the best part of my job is
being able to offer support to people
with respect and dignity.”
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 37
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“I’m thankful for the opportunity
to serve in the community that I call
home. And the best part of my job is
being able to offer support to people
with respect and dignity,” she said.
Currently affordable housing and
employment dominate the needs list
followed by transportation. Food
is another necessity and ESSN has
assumed responsibility to oversee
the New Holland Area Food Bank at
the Trinity Lutheran Church, 221 E.
Main St.
One project Cox said the
organization is pleased to be involved
with is the Power Packs Project
that provides weekend food and
nutritional information to families in
the school district. The organization
works with Elanco School District
and Cross Connection Youth
Ministries, New Holland, to identify
student needs.
Funding for ESSN comes from the
generosity of churches, community
organizations, local government,
businesses, and individuals.
“It’s truly amazing how willing
people are to help others in the
community, “ said Cox.
Donations for 2012 totaled close to
$90,000 with operating costs $78,000.
The budget for 2013 is projected to
increase 35 percent to support costs
for Helping Hands/Community
Care. These include assistance for
clients for a variety of needs such
as: prescriptions, rent, auto repair,
counseling, fuel, rent, etc.
More than 60 community
volunteers are part of the ESSN
Ambassador’s Network who serve
on committees and subcommittees of
the organization’s board of directors.
Committees include: finance,
program/services, governance,
development, marketing, prayer and
poverty.
“We believe the powerful, positive
and passionate response from the
community to contribute to ESSN
indicates how the Holy Spirit is
truly working in our faith-based
organization,” said Cox.
The idea for the social services
network originated from the
ELANCO Ministerium consisting
of 18 actively-involved churches in
the Eastern Lancaster County School
District. For years, the Ministerium
coordinated social service needs for
clients in the Elanco community.
“As needs grew, especially after the
economic downfall, we had difficulty
addressing the causes behind the
needs of our clients. That led to
the development of ESSN,” said
Nancie Weaver, former Ministerium
secretary and social coordinator.
Cox credited Garden Spot Village,
owner of the 2,000-square-foot,
two-story stucco farm house, where
the ESSN office is located, for their
generosity in giving the organization
a two-year lease at no cost.
Upward Call Counseling Services
has partnered with ESSN and shares
space at the location.
“It is God’s work we are doing in
our community,” said Cox with a
smile.
~ Carole Deck
38 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
W
alking is great
exercise. It’s
gentle, low-
impact, simple
and is a good
way to ease
into a more
healthy lifestyle and better fitness.
It’s also an easy form of exercise
that’s accessible to everybody, and
nearly everyone can do it. You
don’t have to belong to a gym, you
can get exercise by walking around
your neighborhood, at your office
complex over lunch, or on many of
the walking paths or trails in
local parks.
Information from the Mayo Clinic
indicates that brisk walking on a
regular basis, like other exercise, can
help you achieve a number of health
benefits including improving your
mood, managing your weight, and
lowering blood pressure. It can also
lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)
cholesterol (the “bad” cholesterol)
and raise high-density lipoprotein
(HDL) cholesterol (the “good”
cholesterol). If you have medical
issues, a recent injury or surgery,
you may want to consult with your
doctor before starting a
walking program.
Walking doesn’t require special
gear. However shoes should have
proper arch support, a firm heel
and thick flexible soles to cushion
your feet and absorb shock. Dress in
loose-fitting comfortable clothing.
If you’ll be walking outdoors be
sure to dress for the weather. Layers,
warm gloves and a hat can help on
cold, windy days. If you’re walking
on a sunny, hot, humid day, be sure
to take water with you. If you’re
walking outdoors at night or at
dusk, be sure to wear light colored
or bright clothing or something with
reflective tape so motorists can see
you. Using a flashlight also helps
make you visible to motorists.
If possible, walk on a sidewalk.
If there is no sidewalk, walk facing
traffic. When crossing a street, cross
at a crosswalk or intersection if
possible, and obey traffic signals.
Also be alert for vehicles along the
road or at an intersection.
Walking is great exercise, but it’s
important to use correct posture
and movements. Walk with smooth
movements and with your head held
high and arms swinging in a natural
motion. Start the walking session
by warming up for five minutes by
walking slowly or walking in place,
then stretch your muscles before
starting out.
If you’re new to a walking
program, you may want to start
out easy, going a shorter distance
(perhaps walking for 10 to 15
minutes) a few times a week and
then gradually increasing to 30 to
60 minutes daily. If you’re walking
along a road, you can drive your
route and check your odometer
readings, or you can invest in a
pedometer to tell you how many
steps and how far you’ve walked.
If you can, walk with a partner or
group. It not only helps to pass
the time, but it can help keep you
motivated.
Cool down after walking
by walking slowly for about
five minutes.
Walking trails may be found
in a number of municipal
parks or perhaps in your own
development. The state Department
of Conservation and Natural
Resources (DCNR)’s website www.
ExplorePATrails.com can serve as
a resource to locate some of the
designated walking or hiking trails
throughout the state. There are more
than 30 listed for Lancaster County
and the range from the 0.3-mile
Northwest Corridor Linear Park
between Harrisburg Ave. and Lemon
St. in Lancaster, and the 137.7-mile
Horse-Shoe Trail that spans Berks,
Chester, Dauphin, Lancaster and
Lebanon Counties.
There’s a link for each trail that
provides details such as a map and
description. Some of the trails such
as the 2.9-mile Conoy Canal Trail
include historical features such as
stonework of former bridges and
locks, and some of the trails such
as the 3-mile long Trout Run Trail
System and the 1.3-mile Conestoga
Greenway Trail are beside a stream
or include water. Other trails such
as the 2.3-mile Lancaster Junction
Recreation Trail are converted
sections of rail lines.
Walking can be added to your
daily routine in other ways such as
taking the steps instead of an elevator
or escalator or parking a bit father
away from a store or the mall.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
Walking helps keep you fit
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 39
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Steve Temple of the youth baseball
association said the event was their third
annual tournament to raise money for
people with cancer. Called the Danielle
DeLarso Tournament after the first
recipient of the proceeds, 2012’s event
was to raise money for five-year-old
Michael Landis.
Although the event did not yield the
$9,000 that a previous tournament had,
the young athletes still managed to raise
$5,000 for Landis.
There had been no predictions of
anything but rain for the area, according
to township manager Dennis Groff.
So, he was surprised when township
secretary Sally Riehl called him to say
there was destruction at the municipal
park. Groff appreciated that notice, since
the first official report of the tornado
came eight minutes after it happened.
Groff and his family quickly headed to
the park.
Parent Joe Flaim was putting
equipment away in a shed when the
winds picked up. He crawled under
a tractor for protection. He was later
able to see downed wires and kept an
emergency vehicle from running into
them in the total darkness.
The tournament drew so many teams
that a field in New Holland also had to
be used. That is where organizer Steve
Temple was when he got the call. Like
Groff and many other Paradise Township
residents, he headed for the park.
Temple said a great disaster was
avoided when the roof of a horse tie
shelter, that some mistakenly call a
pavilion, collapsed with players and
parents inside. Fortunately, most of the
roof’s weight was taken by three trucks
parked outside.
Five dads in the horse-tie shelter kept
the kids low to the ground, he said,
and formed a huddle over them for
protection. Some of those dads suffered
broken bones or needed stitches. The
children had less severe injuries, Temple
said, giving credit to the five parents.
Four moms working the concession
stand were relieved their children
happened to be at the stand, Temple said,
and brought them inside the building for
safety.
Groff said he was amazed at how
township residents worked together
when he arrived at the scene. Community
members kept talking to those who were
hurt, reassuring them that help was on
the way. A man arriving in a forklift
was a welcoming sight. He helped move
debris that stood in the way of getting
emergency vehicles to those who were
hurt.
Since the unfinished tournament did
not raise what the players had hoped,
another community youth team pitched
in. A community football program that
had a fundraiser planned the next day
offered to let the baseball players join
in. The team, although shaken the night
before, was able to sell chicken barbecue
and t-shirts to make up some of the funds
for Landis.
“There was a lot of pulling together”
Groff said. “It was inspiring.”
~ Cynthia Hummel
Community pulls together
A tornado that
ripped through
a Paradise
youth baseball
tournament for
cancer brought
the entire
community
together in
October 2012.
Now the baseball
program is
signing up
players for the
2013 season.
40 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
I
t is, quite literally, a
blueprint for for the future.
It’s called “Blueprints: An
Integrated Water Resources
Plan for Lancaster
County,” and it is a new
countywide water resources plan
that is the first of its type
in Pennsylvania.
The plan is unique in that it
is targeted to all kinds of water
users, including sewer authorities,
developers and PennDOT, in an
effort to establish common ground
and collaborate on projects.
A key strategy in the plan is
“green infrastructure,” which
includes extensive plantings of trees
to increase the county’s natural
canopy, which helps to filter water
supplies. Such measures have
multiple benefits, says Mary Gattis-
Schell, senior countywide planner
for the Lancaster County Planning
Commission and the
plan’s author.
Blueprints looks at the
water element of the county’s
comprehensive plan, and promotes
watershed-based integrated
water resources planning and
management. It is designed to
protect, conserve, and improve
water resources in Lancaster
County.
“This plan is intended to change
the way we think about water
resources,” says Gattis-Schell,
adding that the Blueprints plan has
just three strategies and a total of 14
actions within
those strategies.
As she notes, the key strategies
relate to stormwater management,
water and sewer, and quality and
quantity of water resources.The
plan takes a holistic approach
to protecting, conserving, and
improving its water supply, creating
an understanding about the
interrelationship of many factors.
One of the most important
aspects of the Blueprints plan
involves collaboration, said Gattis-
Schell. Within the three strategies,
improving impaired streams,
enhancing the water and sewage
infrastructure, preserving farmland,
accommodating growth, and
focusing on water quality are key
aspects of -– the plan.
“There are more than 824 miles
of impaired streams in Lancaster
County,” says Gattis-Schell.
She emphasizes that the proposed
plan is meant to protect the
future of the county’s sustainable
water supply well into the future.
The Blueprints plan calls for an
increased investment in green
infrastructure for stormwater
management and water quality
improvement, a concept which was
introduced in Greenscapes, the
green infrastructure
element of the county
comprehensive plan.
~ Laura Knowles
“Blueprints envisions
a future in which a
sustainable supply
of clean water is
available to support a
growing population,
a strong economy,
recreational uses,
ecological needs, and
the overall health of
local waterways and
the Chesapeake Bay”
Blueprints
A new
initiative is
focused on
protecting one
of Lancaster
County’s most
precious assets:
its water.
Mary Gattis-Schell
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 41
It just makes sense to get your supermarket & gardening goods
from people with deep roots in local soil.
We’re proud to have celebrated our 80th year in business,
and we will continue to offer quality products at fair prices
along with exceptional, friendly customer service.
Come in and see why we’ve been chosen as the
#1 Supermarket & Garden Center in Lancaster County.
BEST OF
2012
Delighting Shoppers with Huge Selection & Great Value
Lititz
1050 Lititz Pike
(717) 627-7654
Rohrerstown
301 Rohrerstown Rd.
(717) 397-4717
Lancaster
1850 Oregon Pike
(717) 569-2688 www.skh.com
Connect With Us
We are the hometown’s favorite destination
for foodies & gardening lovers!
A Family Tradition Since 1948…
307 W. Main Street, Mount Joy
717-653-5357
Open 7 days week • 24 hours a day
Come to a Place
Where Everybody Knows
Your Name.
Breakfast Served All Day
15 Lunch Specials
(Soup, sandwich & dessert)
(M-F 11am-4pm) $5.75-6.95
10-15 Dinner Specials
served Daily
(includes choice of 1 veggie,
soup or salad)
(M-F 11am-10pm) $6.95
Calvary Fellowship Homes is an
independent Christian continuing-care
retirement community located in Manheim
Township. Home to 370 residents, it is a not-
for-profit charitable organization.
Founded as a retirement home for
missionaries, its campus features 140
cottages and 75 apartments. The campus
is great for walking, biking and getting to
know your neighbors.
Coming soon are the Cottages of
Lammermuir Court: Five new cottage
homes ranging in size from 1,408-2,181 sq.
ft. will be built in the center of the campus.
Completion is planned for late spring
2013. For more information, contact the
marketing office, (717) 393-0711, or email
mmorris@calvaryhomes.org.
Calvary Fellowship Homes, located at 502
Elizabeth Drive, Lancaster, offers numerous
amenities and activities for those seeking a
unique, faith-based, and friendly retirement
setting. Calvary has its own buses and vans
to provide transporation for shopping and
medical appointments.
Its licensed care areas — skilled nursing
(with rehab services) and personal care —
are highly rated by both Federal and state
government reporting agencies.
Founded in 1963, Calvary Fellowship
Homes is proud to serve the Lancaster
Community for 50 years.
CALVARY FELLOWSHIP HOMES
502 Elizabeth Drive, Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 393-0711
www.calvaryhomes.org
A community of faith and fellowship
42 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
For the third
consecutive year,
J.D. Power and
Associates ranked
Northwest Savings
Bank “Highest in
Customer Satisfaction
in the Mid-Atlantic
Region.”
For the second consecutive year,
Keefe, Bruyette and Woods named
Northwest Savings Bank to its “Bank
Honor Roll,” the 40 top-performing
American banks in the last 10 years.
For the second time in four
years, Forbes listed Northwest one
of “America’s Most Trustworthy
Companies” based on the bank’s
transparency in financial reporting
and strong governance practices.
Although Northwest is a fairly
large community bank with $8 billion
in assets and 165 offices, it retains a
“hometown bank” feel through local
officers and staff who hold customer
satisfaction and customer service
as its primary concern and who
are empowered to act quickly and
independently to fill customer needs
and support its home communities.
Northwest gets national
recognition, maintains local ties
NORTHWEST SAVINGS BANK
Visit any of the seven Northwest
offices that serve Lancaster County
and learn why it’s the bank
“where people make the difference.”
www.northwestsavingsbank.com
Oletowne Jewelers
in the Manor
Shopping Center,
1212 Millersville Pike,
Lancaster, specializes in
diamonds, gemstones,
fine watches, and
antique and estate
jewelry. Graduates of
the former Bowman
Technical School in
Lancaster City, owners
John and Kelly Edgar perform expert on-premise repairs. “Business
is great,” says John. “Customers like our personal, family service.”
His mom and dad were jewelers, he said. “We are continuing the
tradition started by my father in 1945.”
OLETOWNE JEWELERS
1212 Millersville Pike, Lancaster
(717) 393-4300
www.oletownejewelry.com
Solid reputation
for credibility and integrity
for more than 22 years
Nine Stauffer’s of Kissel Hill
locations in Central Pennsylvania
offer fresh produce, seafood,
meats and poultry, deli items,
bakery goods and prepared
foods. They have a full selection
of organic foods, gluten-free
foods and special dietary needs
foods, as well as gourmet and
ethnic foods.
The SKH garden center is the
place for all your lawn, garden
and planting needs this spring
and summer.
With 1,000 employees,
Stauffer’s of Kissel Hill is locally
owned and gives back to the
community with benefits and
other fundraisers.
Shoppers
STAUFFERS OF KISSEL HILL
Lancaster
Rohrerstown:
Supermarket: 717.397.4719
Garden Center: 717.397.4718
Lititz: 717.627.7654
Oregon Pike: 717.569.2688
York
East York: 717.840.4026
Dover: 717.308.0330
Harrisburg
Hummelstown: 717.566.6355
Linglestown: 717.657.1760
Mechanicsburg: 717.766.7993
Corporate Offices
Lititz: 717.626.4771
www.skh.com
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 43
MILLERSVILLE
Black Horse Hotel circa 1900
North George Street
A Caring Team of Insurance Professionals Dedicated To
Educating, Serving and Protecting Families and Businesses.
10 Colonial Ave., Millersville, PA
872-7756
www.martininsurance.com
Home • Auto • Business • Life • Health
Liz Martin Owner/Agent
717-872-2266
320 Blue Rock Rd.,
Millersville, PA
www.scheidfuneralhome.com
AndrewT. Scheid Founder / Owner / Funeral Director
“For Peace of Mind....When it matters most”
Exclusive Provider of
“OnBehalf of a Grateful Nation.”
One of Lancaster’s Best Kept Secrets!
B
a
r
n
D
o
o
r
Great Food & Spirits
Quiet, Rustic Atmosphere
14 Blue Rock Rd., Millersville
872-9943
Celebrating Our 42nd Year
SHINE REDEFINED,
WEIGHTLESSLY.
DEEP REPLENISHMENT
BRINGS HAIR BACK
TO LIFE.
250 Manor Ave., Millersville
872-8001
www.salonmillersvillepa.com
AGREAT PLACE
TOSHOP FOR
SAVINGS
ANDQUALITY!
JOHN HERR’S
VILLAGE MARKET, INC.
a family owned supermarket
25 MANOR AVE, MILLERSVILLE
717-872-5457
www.johnherrsvillagemarket.com
SERVING LANCASTER COUNTY QUALITY FOODS SINCE 1919
“WHERE FRIENDS - MEET FRIENDS”

Celebrating
252
Years
of
Progress!
Millersville Normal School
circa 1857
Mill
Millersville Fire Company
First Apparatus
44 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Have your taxes prepared by one of our Tax Professionals
in a private office - we guarantee you’ll be pleasantly surprised at
Our Reasonable Fees & Personal Service.
Call Today For An Appointment (717) 464-1958
271A Peach Bottom Road, Willow Street, PA
Mon-Fri 9am-9pm; Sat 9am-2pm witmerfinancial@comcast.net
WITMER TAX
& FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC
Time For A Better Tax-Filing
Experience In 2013?
• FREE E-Filing
• Individual & Business Tax Returns
• Multi-State Returns
• Refund Loans Available
• Hourly, Fee-Only Financial
Planning Services
Roxanne Witmer, EA, CFP
CASH & CARRY
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY, INC.
306 S. Hess St., Quarryville, PA
(717) 786-2600 • 1-800-451-4273
Monday-Friday 9-5; Saturday 8-12
www.cashncarryelectric.com
Chandeliers, Outdoor,
Bathroom
&All-Purpose Lighting
Quality Lights
for a Bargain

To Southern & Eastern
Lancaster County!
WELCOME
1135 Beaver Valley Pike, Lancaster
464-9299 Call for hours
Herrville Road & Rt. 272 South, Willow Street, PA
(717) 464-3321 or (800) 732-0053
Mon.-Fri. 6:30-8, Sat. 7:30-6, Closed Sunday
We Have What You Need!
• Appliances
• Automotive
• Clothing
• Electrical
• Grills
• Hardware
• Feeds
• Plumbing
• Lawn & Garden
• Heating & Cooling
HOME HELPERS is now
PA HOME CARE
Call 717-464-2006
or email
pahomecare@comcast.net
We have a new name
& number,
but still provide the
same great care!
With added options to
better serve you.
LOCALLY MADE FURNITURE
CustomBuilt ~ Solid Wood
33-A Friendly Drive • Quarryville, PA 17566 • Located at Musser’s Market at the Buck
717.284.0652 • www.dutchselections.com
Bask in the warmth & beauty
of fine crafted furniture!
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 45
939 Georgetown Rd.
Paradise, PA • 786-2304
Proprietor: Tim Kirk
Technician: Spencer Zercher
PA State Inspection
50 Years Combined Experience
In Diagnostic, Repair, and
Maintenance On All Subarus
TIM’S
AUTO REPAIR
“The Subaguru”
Jeffrey L. Putt, D.D.S. Elizabeth Dainesi, D.D.S. Mark G. Nichols, D.M.D.
222 North Decatur Street • Strasburg, PA 17579
(717) 687-6061
www.strasburgdentalgroup.com
Caringabout our
community!
3012 Willow Street Pike North, Willow Street, PA 17584
717-464-9446 • Gros.com
Heating & AC Systems
Plumbing Service & Repair
Electrical Service
BathroomRemodeling
24-Hour Emergency Service
PA1710
Fine Food and Spirits in a Casual Setting
135 East Main Street
Strasburg, PA 17579
717-687-6362
Toll Free:
866-666-6263
Visit www.ironhorsepa.com or Like us on Facebook
Quarryville Showroom
Rt. 222 (1 mile North of Quarryville)
Quarryville, PA • 717-806-7373
W
e
Servic
e
www.classicfurniturepa.com Follow Us
214 Hartman Bridge Rd.
Ronks, PA 17572
(717) 687-7801
2635 Willow Street Pike,
Willow Street, PA 17584
717.464.3374 www.hessbbq.com
Award
Winning
Catering
for your Company
Picnics, Luncheons
Weddings & Private Parties
PA033830
CLOG
FREE
OR WE’LL CLEAN
IT FOR
FREE!!!
Locally Owned Since 1989 • Residential & Commercial
5 Year Workmanship Warranty • 35 Colors In Stock
5” & 6” Seamless Spouting
Seamless 6” 1/2 Round Gutters
Ralph L. Wilhelm, Jr., Inc
717-548-2322 or 1-888-553-2440
wilhelmspouting.com • Insured • Free Estimates
Voted #1
4 Years In A Row 2009-2010-2011-2012
by Lancaster Newspapers Readers’ Choice Awards

To Southern & Eastern
Lancaster County!
WELCOME
46 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 COMMUNITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
New Holland Agriculture sells
and services an innovative line of
agricultural equipment, including
a full line of tractors, hay and
forage equipment, harvesting, crop
production and material handling
equipment. These products are
sold and serviced by New Holland
dealers and distributors throughout
the world.
New Holland traces its roots to
1895 when a two-man machinery
repair shop was founded in New
Holland by master machinist and
inventor Abe Zimmerman. Through
the years, New Holland became
known as the leader in agriculture
technology, pioneering many firsts:
the first PTO-powered baler, the
first mower-conditioner, the first
self-propelled baler, the first bale
thrower, the first self-propelled
forage harvester, the first forage
harvester metal detector. All of these
inventions, and more, came from
New Holland.
That tradition of innovation
continues today. New Holland
Agriculture was recently honored
with six prestigious AE50 Awards by
the American Society of Agricultural
and Biological Engineers (ASABE),
presented for the 50 most innovative
product ideas to enter the market in
2012. They honor new product ideas
that are ranked highest in innovation,
significant engineering advancement,
and impact on the market served.
The 340-acre New Holland
campus along Route 23 includes
a 150-acre test farm and a 700,000
sq. ft. manufacturing facility, and
is home to the headquarters of the
New Holland Agriculture brand,
as well as the global center of
Excellence for Hay and Forage.
At this site, the expertise of state-
of-the-art engineering, research
and development, marketing and
manufacturing operations come
together to produce the world’s
number one haytools. Today,
products built in New Holland are
exported to 45 countries around
the world; the plant produces 30
different models of round balers,
square balers, pull-type forage
harvesters and other haytools.
New Holland Agriculture is a
division of CNH Global N.V., a
majority-owned subsidiary of Fiat
Industrial S.p.A.
NEW HOLLAND AGRICULTURE
500 Diller Avenue, New Holland, PA
(717) 355-1588
www.newholland.com/na
Leader in
Agriculture
technology,
pioneering
many firsts
New Holland Agriculture
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS COMMUNITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 47
Bird-in-Hand
& Intercourse
Family Operated since 1972
A Pretty Special Place
Gibbons Rd., Bird-In-Hand
(717) 656-7947
www.bihbakeshop.com
Breads & Cakes
Whoopie Pies • Cinnamon Rolls
Jams & Jellies
Combining
Old-Fashioned Craftsmanship
and Modern Technology
CCCCCo Co bbb mb mbiiiin iniiiin ingg
and Modern gy
717-768-3214
www.villagesigncrafters.com
at Kitchen Kettle Village, Intercourse, PA
GIFT CERTIFICATES!
717-768-0555
3544 Old Philadelphia Pike, Intercourse, PA 17534
Hrs.: Mon/Tues/Thurs/Sat 8-4; Wed/Fri 9-8
M
assage, Facials, M
anicures
&
Pedicures
State-of-the-Art Food Systems
• 60-bushel forced air, stainless steel apple
dryer that produces dried apple snitz.
• Stainless steel, steam-fired apple butter
kettles; fruit butter can be custom labeled.
• Constant planting of new fruit trees with root/
branch/leaf systems that yield high-quality fruit.
“Bird-in-Hand Brand” Orchard Products Since 1915
Rt. 340, Bird-in-Hand • 717-768-7112 • KauffmansFruitFarm.com
3551 Old Philadelphia Pike ✪Intercourse, PA 17534
Visit us Mon-Sat 8-5 ✪717-768-8926
Browse through our collection of:
✪ Pottery ✪ Braided Rugs ✪ Window Treatments & Linens
✪ Our Own Blended Potpourri with Matching Oils
✪ Upholstered Furniture ✪ Window Lights and Bulbs
✪ And of Course Lots of Deliciously
Scented Candles
fffff:
T & Li T & Li
"Blow Out the Lights and Turn on the Candles"
Stop in and explore our barn that
is just filled to the rafters with
country furnishings that will turn
your house into a home.
The Old
Candle Barn
Ephrata Showroom–
1717West Main St.
Ephrata, PA 17522
(2 miles West of Ephrata on Rt. 322)
Quarryville Showroom-
Rt. 222 (1 mile North of Quarryville)
Quarryville, PA • 717-806-7373
W
e
Service
www.classicfurniturepa.com
Interior
Design
Available
FollowUs
3601 Old Philadelphia Pike
Intercourse, PA 17534
717-768-8291
Groceries • Hardware
Equipment Rental
Delivery of Propane,
Diesel Fuel and
Heating Oil
Welcoming you to
48 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HOME PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Y
ou remember
them, even if
you’ve never
lived in one.
Those mega-
monster homes
of the 1990s
and early 2000s with their carriage
house garages, their 20-foot-high
“great rooms,” their “media rooms”
(to accommodate the 62-inch flat
screen television with stereo surround
sound, naturally), their kitchens with
more bells and whistles than Julia
Child would have ever needed and
bathrooms that would draw hisses of
envy from Cleopatra herself.
Some called such residences
“McMansions,” reflecting a time
when ultra-large homes were
becoming as ubiquitous as fast food
outlets. While there will always be a
demand for luxurious amenities, the
era of the airport-terminal-size house
seems to have given way to a more
practical outlook in today’s economy,
though it depends who you ask.
“Those days are over with, as far
as I can see,” notes Mark Simeral,
CEO of Simeral Construction Co.,
Lititz. “The McMansions … the
demand for that is nil.”
Credit — or blame — an over-
inflated housing market and an
economy which began tanking
around 2008.
Simeral, who founded his
company in 1987 with his wife,
Becky, has seen it all.
The company has built custom
homes as large as 7,500 to 8,700
square feet. In recent years, “6,000
square feet is a fairly large house for
us now,” Mark Simeral says.
What Simeral Construction
has built at The Farm on Quarry
Road, near Lancaster’s Bent Creek
community, is more typical, with
something closer to 3,500 square
feet in the offering. These are still
not small homes, but they are not
boasting living rooms, to paraphrase
the movie classic “Arthur,” big
enough to accommodate a landing
airplane.
In some ways, Simeral sees that
as a good thing. Bigger, he says, isn’t
always better.
“Excesses are not good for the
economy,” Simeral says, citing a story
he’s heard about a 90,000-square-foot
monstrosity that was built not too
long ago in Florida.
It’s sitting empty and unfinished,
creating work for nobody and
providing shelter for no one.
Locally, builders of larger homes
can still rely on the old real estate
mantra: location, location, location.
“Manheim Township is where
we sell the larger homes,” says Tom
Costello, of East Petersburg-based
Costello Builders Inc. which Costello
founded 25 years ago with his
brother, Dave.
“Most of our success is [building]
the home in the right spot,” Tom
Costello says.
A Costello home can average 3,500
to 5,000 square feet. Costello notes
that about half of the company’s
clients are “move-up” buyers looking
for larger quarters and there are signs
of optimism with news of the recent
expansion of The Hershey Company,
which promises to bring more
executive buyers to the area.
Still, “we’ve had to find ways to be
creative,” Costello sums up. When it
comes to meeting client tastes these
days, it’s “not so much the two-story
‘great room’ but [it’s] more the open
floor plan,” that people want, says
Costello. That, along with “nice”
details such as quality trim, hardwood
floors and “curb appeal,” which
makes a home exterior attractive to
the eye.
And there’s an alternative to those
who still seek space, but just not so
much of it. It’s a location usually not
associated with copious residential
square footage: downtown Lancaster.
Marilyn Berger, of Prudential
Berger Real Estate, is a realtor
who specializes in large suburban
properties. But she has a passion for
city living, and her firm is active in
developing and marketing Northgate,
a condominium complex at North
Queen and Lemon streets which
incorporates a renovated warehouse
and several renewed historic
townhouses.
“I think there’s been resurgence
of people who want to come into
the city,” Berger says. Properties at
Northgate range from 2,000 square
feet for a townhouse to a generous
4,400-square-foot unit in the
warehouse.
The latter might prove a happy
medium for those who want space
without waste. Not to mention the
fact there’s no huge yard to maintain.
That alone might be an incentive to
leave the days of the McMansion
behind.
At the end of the day, Berger says,
“you can close the door.”
~ Stephen Kopfinger
HOUSING TRENDS FOR 2013
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HOME FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 49
“Every one of us has
a mess somewhere
in our home. And
people are so busy
they may not have
the time to organize.
That’s where we
come in — we work
with people to sort
through what’s
accumulated and
determine what to
do with it,”
Todd Sweet,
co-founder of Clutter Stoppers
He explained that he and partner
Bob Wilder joined together in 2004 to
create Keystone In-Home Care Inc.,
which provides non-medical daily
living services to seniors and people
with disabilities. Sweet said that it
became apparent that organizing
and managing clutter was a service
that could be utilized by a broader
base of customers, so that part of the
company was spun-off in 2010.
Clutter Stoppers will work with a
specific area or room of the home —
garage, basement, attic, shed, kitchen,
bathroom — or even organizing
closets and assisting with seasonal
wardrobe changes. “Like our in-
home care division, we continue to
help people live a better life; we just
do it differently. Because of the skills
we developed in the other part of our
business, we offer compassionate,
individualized service,” Sweet said.
He said that the company is most
often called in because of an event in
a client’s life — that event could be a
move to another home or downsizing
to another home or retirement
community; the homeowner realizes
that there’s too much clutter for him
or her to sort through; or a family
needs help going through a deceased’s
home or belongings.
“The idea of working through the
accumulated items can sometimes be
overwhelming — sometimes people
don’t have any idea where to start,
but we do,” said Rich Wilson, one of
Clutter Stoppers’ associates.
Sweet said that people are
sometimes a bit apprehensive or
embarrassed, when the company
visits their home. “They’ve
accumulated all of these items and
think that we’ll just automatically
toss every one of them. That’s not
what we do. We’re non-judgmental,
and we work side-by-side with the
client as we go through the items to
determine their final disposition,”
Sweet said.
Unwanted items are sorted into
piles bound for an auction house,
consignment shop, or to be donated
to community organizations. The
company has established a network
of consignment shops and auction
houses. “We try not to throw
anything away and, if possible, we try
to profitably dispose of their items.
Working with a client and sorting
through items can be like a treasure
hunt,” Wilson said.
The Clutter Stoppers staff works
with clients to establish systems to
keep items organized, and clients
are taught basic organization skills.
But sometimes a hectic schedule and
the hustle and bustle of daily living
can interfere with even the best of
intentions, so Clutter Stoppers offers
a monthly service to help maintain
organization.
Clutter Stoppers also offers its
services to businesses. Sweet said that
Clutter Stoppers most often works
with small businesses. The services
focus putting processes in place to
eliminate duplication of work among
staff members, file organization, or
analyzing tasks to determine more
efficient ways of doing things. “We’re
the facilitators of change. We help the
business owner understand how the
company can be more organized.”
Although Clutter Stoppers
currently serves central Pennsylvania,
Sweet is in the process of franchising
the concept. “We’re going to reach
out to surrounding areas, but I want
to ensure that all of our franchises
focus on providing compassionate,
individual attention,” he said.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
Clutter Stoppers helps
o r g a n i z e c l u t t e r
Clutter Stoppers is headquartered in the Lancaster area and may be contacted
at 898-2825 or toll-free at 866-857-4601 www.clutterstoppers.com
50 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HOME PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
FAY LATEk. MUCH LATEk. 0% AFk for ó0 Months*.
*See Haller Enterprises for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers valid on qualifying systems only. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. The Home
Projects® Visa® card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. The special terms APR will continue to apply until all qualifying
purchases are paid in full. The minimum monthly payment will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the special terms period. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99%. The APR will vary
with the market based on the U.S. Prime Rate. The regular APR is given as of 10/1/2012. Ìf you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. The regular APR will apply to certain fees such as a late
payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. Ìf you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 5.0% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00.
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717.625.1500
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Landyshade Mulch
is celebrating 30 years
of providing quality
mulch to residential and
commercial customers.
John Landis, owner of the
family-owned business,
said, “We provide good
service and a quality
product at a reasonable
price.”
Products include bulk
and bagged mulch, screened
topsoil, mushroom soil, and
certified playground mulch — all
priced per cubic yard. Varieties of
mulch include dyed (red, black,
or brown), premium, #2 and
#3 (premium is finer ground).
Delivery is available for bulk
mulch and soils.
Landyshade Mulch
celebrates
30th Anniversary
LANDYSHADE MULCH
1801 Colebrook Road, Lancaster
(717) 898-7689
www.landyshade.com
At the Mount Joy Family
Restaurant and Diner, the
word family means more
than food, it includes the
atmosphere, customers,
and staff.
Nick Liazis, owner,
believes “There is no
substitute for quality”
and says “The customer
is king.” Customers come
from all over Lancaster
County for his Super
Omelets and Slow Roasted
Prime Rib and other menu
items.
Why
Cook?
MOUNT JOY FAMILY RESTAURANT
307 W. Main St., Mount Joy
(717) 653-5357
Open 7 days a week/24 hours
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HOME FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 51
Pests like mice, ants, fleas, spiders
and termites can be a nuisance and/
or health hazard when they invade a
home or business. J.C. Ehrlich can
help control these and other pests.
Founded in 1928 in Reading by Julius
C. Ehrlich, the company, which
became part of the Rentokil family
of brands in 2006, has 45 offices
serving the Mid-Atlantic states. And
it continues to serve its first customer,
a Reading area department store.
(Company representatives said they
are not permitted to divulge names
of customers.)
Ehrlich’s solid reputation is based
on a commitment to providing top-
notch service; its work is guaranteed.
The average experience of technicians
is 8.7 years, and each technician is
individually licensed. Technicians
attend training sessions to keep
them up-to-date. Ehrlich also has its
own lab and most of the products
that are used to control pests are
environmentally-friendly as well as
friendly to kids and pets.
“Safety is our number one priority.
We would not use any product on a
customer’s home that we would not
use on our own homes. After all we
are parents and have pets, too. We also
do some work with schools, and you
have to be really cautious when doing
that — we don’t treat while students
are there,” explained Dennis Geib,
manager of Ehrlich’s Lancaster office.
Geib can speak from experience. He
started his career with Ehrlich as a
technician 27 years ago.
He said that due to information
available online, today’s customers
are more educated about pests. “They
often call and tell us exactly what
type of pest they have. For those who
aren’t sure, we encourage them to
collect a sample and bring it in, and
we’ll help them identify it,” Geib said.
Ehrlich’s Lancaster office recently
relocated and is now at 360 Steel
Way (behind the Red Rose Commons
Shopping Center). To help customers
identify pests, a display case in the
office contains examples of the more
common pests.
One of the pests that the company
has gotten an increasing amount of
calls about are stink bugs which hail
from Asia and are relatively new to
our area. Geib said that calls about
stink bugs are weather-dependent,
and there are two times of the year
when they’re more prevalent — in
the spring when they’re emerging
from the warm places in homes where
they’ve been hibernating (insulated
walls, light fittings and under
floorboards); and as the weather cools
in the fall, when they’re seeking those
warmer places.
“A lot of times they’re in the fields,
and when the fields are harvested in
the fall, they have to find a new home.
Stink bugs are small; they can get in
anywhere, and they’re good flyers,”
Geib said. He added that Ehrlich can
not only treat the outside of a home,
including behind shutters, along eaves
and lighting, but will also work with
property owners to identify entry
points around the home and work
with the owner to eliminate them.
Geib said that while stink bugs
were a big issue in 2010, they were
less so in 2012. Last year, he said that
bed bugs “became a nightmare across
the country.”
“They are easily spread and can be
difficult to treat, so the quicker you
can get on the problem, the better it
is. It’s important to know the signs
that there’s an issue,” he said.
These pests usually enter a
property carried on clothing, luggage
or furniture. Ehrlich’s website
indicates that the most common
source of bed bugs is to stay at a hotel
with an infestation. They have been
know to hitchhike and often their
eggs get into clothing or suitcases
and are then transported home. Bed
bugs may hide in cracks or crevices
in a bedroom or bed frame, behind
furniture surrounding the bed or
where the wall meets the floor during
the day. They are nocturnal and are
lured from their hiding spots at night
by the warmth of our bodies and
carbon dioxide in our breath as we
sleep. Symptoms of their bites vary
between individuals, however, small
droplets of blood on the sheets may
indicate their presence.
He said that Ehrlich has developed
a heat treatment method to effectively
eliminate bed bugs and their eggs.
Additionally the company works
to educate the hospitality industry,
colleges and retirement community
staff about bed bugs.
In addition to providing pest
control by technicians, Ehrlich will
help provide some D-I-Y tips. “If we
can tell a customer how to treat a pest,
we will. We do sell certain products
over-the-counter and will walk people
through using them,” Geib said.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
More information is available at
www.jcehrlich.com
J.C. EHRLICH
Environmentally and people friendly pest control
52 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HOME PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
OLETOWNE
JEWELERS
Manor
Shopping Center
Lancaster, PA
717-393-4300
www.oletownejewelry.com
M, T, W, Th 10-6; F 10-7; Sat 10-3
Uniquely
Serving
Lancaster
for over
25 years
Gala Grand Opening April 27, 2013
lancasterhistory.org or 717.392.4633 for reservations
Lancaster County’s Historical Society & President James Buchanan’s Wheatland
In Celebration of County,
Commonwealth & Country
Visit the Campus of History at the corner of
North President and Marietta Avenues—
your home for history in Lancaster County
• Recipient of a LEED (Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design) commendation at the
Silver level for sustainable architecture and technology
Haller
Enterprises
Haller serves a wide range
of customers from residential
homeowners to business
owners and property managers.
Haller’s services include repair
and installation in the fields of
plumbing, heating, cooling,
electrical and water
conditioning.
A more detailed look into
those trades include services
such as kitchen and bath
remodeling, duct cleaning,
home automation and
solar solutions.
Founded in 1981, Haller Enterprises
started as a one-man shop in Ephrata and
has grown to more than 300 employees in
four locations throughout Central PA.
Haller Enterprises is a licensed, registered
and fully insured contractor with 24/7
emergency service. It services Central and
Southeastern Pennsylvania with locations
in Lititz, York, Mechanicsburg and Palmyra.
www.hallerent.com
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HOME FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 53
Let us help you get into the home of your dreams…
every step of the way!
1768 Oregon Pike, Lancaster • 569-1995
www.GoldStarLowRates.com
Get fast answers at: answers@goldstarfinancial.com
1525 Oregon Pike, Suite 602, Lancaster
394-SAVE (7283) • www.394save.com
“Ask us anything at info@394Save.com
Interest rates & home prices makes owning a house less expensive than renting.
· Purchase or Refinance with our super low rates
· Free mortgage pre-approvals
· Ask how to get GoldStar Lender Credit
“I used Selections to help find my first house, and GoldStar to help me with my mortgage and they helped me get into
my home in about two months. In addition to helping me get into my house on time I also received $4886 in rebates.
Selections Realty got me $1650 at settlement and GoldStar got me $3236, I would definitely recommend them
if you’re looking to buy or refinance a home.” -Taylor Merrill
· Home Seller’s full service listing packages starting at $995
· Home Buyers receive cash back when they buy with us
1768 Oregon Pike Lancaster • 569-1995
Custom-made awnings and
canopies not only accent a
home, but porch and deck
awnings create an outdoor
living area.
“People like to be
outside, and a custom-fit-
ted awning provides shade
to cool decks and shelter
to make the deck more
usable. An awning also can
cool-off the house,”said
Les Kreider, president and
owner of Kreider’s Canvas
Service Inc.
He has been working with
canvas for 47 years, and
established the business,
which has 8 employees, in
1975. Canvas is available in
a wide selection of colors.
It is custom-fitted and sewn
in-house. Framework is also
custom-made and constructed
onsite.
KREIDER’S CANVAS
SERVICE INC.
73 W. Main St., Leola
(717) 656-7387
www.kreiderscanvas.com
Hours: Monday - Friday
8am - 4:30pm (Available after
4:30 & Sat. by Appointment Only)
Expand Outdoor
Living Space with
Canvas Awnings
American Sleep Center’s goal
has never changed in 25 years.
Medical technology has forced
all of us to realize a good
night’s sleep is more important
than ever. In 25 years, ASC has
welcomed new pressure relief
foams, more natural sources
for sleep surfaces, and, ASC has
never strayed from its original
goal in business. It continues to
offer the best sleep options for
the best pricing available.
ASC still believes in “educating”
its customers on what’s best for
them, without pressure to make
that purchase. This has led to
many more satisfied and more
rested customers.
AMERICAN SLEEP CENTER
1957 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster
(717) 560-0660
www.specialtysleepcenter.com
A Good Night’s Sleep Isn’t
a Luxury — It’s a Necessity
54 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HOME PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
FOXSHIRE PLAZA • 1957 FRUITVILLE PIKE • LANCASTER
717-560-0660 • Open 7 Days A Week • www.specialtysleepcenter.com
Family Owned & Operated for over 20 years • Non-commission Sales Team
How did you sleep last night?
Starting At
$
5
9
9
*
$
2
5
0
O
ff
a
P
a
ir of
A
d
ju
sta
ble
B
a
ses
Free Financing* • Free Sleep Trial* • Free Local Delivery*
1801 Colebrook Rd. Lanc. • 898-7689 • 945-9740 • www.landyshade.com
*Ask for your free hat with delivery
4 Grades
Of Mulch
Cured &
Chemical Free
4 Grades
Of Mulch
Cured &
Chemical Free
$5.00
OFF
5 Yards Or
More Of Mulch
1 coupon per purchase. Not valid w/other
offers. Expires 3/31/13
We Have Colored Mulch • Free local Delivery (8 Yards Min) 2 Mile Radius
Starting at
$20.00
scoop(yd)
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$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$2222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222200000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000.......................................................................000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
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sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssscccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp((y (y (y (y (((y (yy (y (y (yyy (y (y (y (y (((yy (y (y (y ((yy (y (y (y ((y (y (yyy (y (y (y (yyyy (y (y (y (yyy (y (yyy (y (y (yy ((y (y (y (yy (y (y (yy (y (y (yy (y (y (y (y (y (y (y (yyyyyyyy (yy (yyy ((y (y ((((((y (((yy (yyyyy (yy (y (y (y (y ((yy ( d) d) ddd) d) d) d) ddd) d) d) d) d) d) d) d) d) )) d) ) d) d) d) d) dd) )) d) d) d) d) d) ) d) d) dd) dd) d) d) ) d) ddd) ddddd) d) d) dd) d) ) d) dddddd) d) d) d) ddd) ddd) d) d) d) d) d) d) dddd) dddd) ddddd) d) ddddd) d) d) d) dd) ))) d) d) ddd) d) d) d) d) d) dd) ) d) dddd) )) d) ddd) d) d) ))))
Starting at
$20.00
scoop(yd)
• Playground Mulch
• Railroad Ties
• Screened Top Soil
• Mushroom Soil
WE ALSO
HAVE
In 2012 Gold Star Mortgage
teamed up with Lancaster’s own
Ron Felpel to bring friendly
customer service and industry
leading low rates to our county.
The first office for the company
in Central Pennsylvania opened at
1768 Oregon Pike almost a year
ago. Gold Star offers a variety of
services and can accommodate
everything from first-time home
buyers to those looking
to refinance.
Felpel said “Generally speaking,
most mortgage companies either
offer low rates and poor customer
service or merely average interest
rates comparatively. I brought
Gold Star to Central PA to offer
our thousands of past customers
the best of all worlds and I believe
we have done that.”
They have also teamed with
Selections Real Estate to offer a
full customer service experience.
Selections offers home sellers full
service listings starting at $995.
Home buyers can take advantage
of their REAP program that
results in huge home buyer
rebates and credits. Selections
opened their doors in September
and have already helped dozens
of Lancaster County families in
their process of getting into a
new home.
With the team of Gold Star
Mortgage and Selections Real
Estate, Lancaster County has
a great new choice dedicated
to quality customer service by
providing the best buying and
selling experience around.
Gold Star Mortgage Helps Get Lancaster Moving
SELECTIONS REAL ESTATE LLC
1525 Oregon Pike Lancaster, PA
(717) 394-7283
www.394save.com
GOLD STAR MORTGAGE
1768 Oregon Pike Lancaster, PA
(717) 735-6274
www.Goldstarlowrates.com
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HOME FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 55
"Your Dollar Buys More at . . . ROOT'S"
OPEN YEAR ROUND
ROOT’S Country Market & Auction
www.rootsmarket.com • (717) 898-7811 • 705 Graystone Road, Manheim
150+ Inside
Stand Holders
(Outside Stand
Holders Too!)
Open Every Tuesday
9am – 8pm
\·rc/o¸ /«o«·/·r 0·oo/¸
«o« ·o¡¡·r//o¸ //· /·«/
··o·¬¸ /·r ·c·r Sc ¸·«r·!
7+(+$-2&$
.,7&+(1%$7+6+2:5220
$1'6833/<+286(
+«+s ȝɃɆȺɅɇȺȽȽȶ ȧȺȼȶ, ȣȲȿȴȲɄɅȶɃ

ȤɀȿȵȲɊ·ȝɃȺȵȲɊ s · «.ºa
ȘɁɁɀȺȿɅȾȶȿɅɄ ȩȶȴɀȾȾȶȿȵȶȵ (ȴȲȽȽ ȣɀɃȺ ɀɃ ȮȲȿȵȲ,
ȪȲɅɆɃȵȲɊ ȟɀɆɃɄ ȳɊ ȘɁɁɀȺȿɅȾȶȿɅ ȦȿȽɊ
proud supplier of local products
proud member of the Lancaster County community
Quality Service
J.B. Hostetter & Sons
is celebrating its 86th
anniversary this year as a
family-owned and operated
business.
The present day J.B.
Hostetter & Sons Inc., run
by brothers Jack and Kent
Hostetter, is a 50,000 sq. ft.
True Value hardware store,
providing a wide variety of
goods and services. It is located at 1225 W. Main St., Mount Joy.
Joseph B. Hostetter, Jack and Kent’s grandfather, started the business
in 1927 upon retiring from a successful farming career in Rapho
Township. At that time, Joseph B. Hostetter purchased Gabe Moyer’s
hardware store on West Donegal Street in Mount Joy. In 1929, J.B.
Hostetter purchased Brown Brother’s Hardware at 35 W. Main St and
moved to that location. In 1970, JB Hostetter & Sons joined the True
Value Wholesale Cooperative. In January of 1972, Hostetter Hardware
Incorporated was formed and acquired H.S. Newcomer Hardware at 93
E Main St..
“Homeowners looking for one-stop shopping for all their
appliance, hardware, lawn and garden, and rental needs, don’t have to
look any further than J.B. Hostetter & Sons, Inc.,” says Jack Hostetter.
Lancaster Newspapers: Connecting You to Your Community.
56 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 HOME PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Enjoy The Outdoors...
Rain or Shine!
• More Durable Than
Retractable Awnings
• 36 Years In Business
• Screen Room Option
• Save Up To 33% In Energy
• Storage Available
Awnings & Canopies
Handcrafted with Pride in Lancaster County
FREE Estimates
KreidersCanvas.com • 717.656.7387
Expand Your Living Area,
Rain or Shine!
Call Today To Reserve
Your Place on the
Summer Install List!
Hours:
Mon-Wed 8-6
Thr-Fri 8-9
Sat 8-5
WE SERVICE
WHAT WE
SELL!
1225 West Mai n St , Mount Joy
653- 1841
Free delivery PLUS
Basic Hook-Up!
On Major Appliances.
Within Our Local Delivery Area!
86 Years of Service
We ser vi ce what we sel l !
Your Hometown Store for:
Hardware, Housewares,
Electrical , Plumbing,
Greenhouse, Paint,
Lawn & Garden, Rental,
Appliances, Electronics,
Lawn & Garden Equipment,
and much, much more!
Whether you are building a new home or remodeling an
existing dwelling, let Hajoca take the stress out of finding just
the right amenities. Their beautiful showroom at 1418 Fruitville
Pike, Lancaster, displays hundreds of kitchen and bath products
for residential and commercial needs and wants. Trained sales
consultants are on hand Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. and by appointment on Saturdays. Call (717) 299-3611.
The company has been located in Lancaster for more than 90
years. Bill McDevitt, branch manager, says, “Hajoca is committed
to the growth of the local economy by offering many plumbing,
heating and water conditioning products manufactured right here
in Lancaster County.”
The name Hajoca is derived from the last names of three 19th
century visionaries — Misters Haines, Jones, and Cadbury — who
foresaw a demand for plumbing supplies. Today, local contractors
can find more than 100,000 residential, commercial, and industrial
plumbing and heating supplies in stock.
HAJOCA Lancaster
1418 Fruitville Pike, Lancaster, PA
(717) 299-3611
www.HajocaLancaster.com
Hours: Monday - Fridays 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS HOME FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 57
L
ocal furniture
shoppers will be
surprised to see what
La-Z-Boy Furniture
Galleries has in store
for its residents. The
iconic furniture store
features a shopping
experience as comfortable as its
famous furniture and truly embodies
the “Live life comfortably
®

tagline!
The Lancaster store boasts a
remarkable selection of great looking
furniture for the entire home and
features a wide-range of furniture
including sofas, sectionals, leather,
loveseats, and ottomans, as well as
the company’s legendary recliners.
Their selection of home accents and
accessories help customers create a
complete look.
“La-Z-Boy furniture is known
for its comfort and quality, and
we’re proud to bring its extensive
selection and stellar reputation to
Lancaster,” said Douglas Plavchak,
Regional Sales Manager. “At our
stores, customers will find an easy,
enjoyable shopping experience and
as much help as they need to get the
perfect furniture for their homes.”
For more than 14 years, the
Lancaster store has offered
several convenient approaches
for shoppers who seek design
direction. Customers looking to
visualize their custom furniture
dreams can use interactive design
tools to render any La-Z-Boy
product in their choice of hundreds
of fabric and leather covers. For
those who need more inspiration
and guidance, La-Z-Boy stores
also offer Design Assistance from
professionals experienced at helping
turn design dreams into reality. La-
Z-Boy design professionals will
visit customer’s homes to help them
with their design project and advise
on styles that will fit comfortably
into their home and budget.
“To be a lasting investment and
add comfort to the home for years
to come, furniture should not only
look well, but be made well,” added
Greg Osborne, Store Manager. “I
can honestly say that I believe that
La-Z-Boy builds the best value in
all the furniture industry.”
For a shopping experience
you won’t forget visit La-Z-Boy
Furniture Galleries of Lancaster at
1484 Harrisburg Pike TODAY!
Free Design Assistance and
Striking Room Displays Help
Shoppers Find Comfortable
and Great Looking Furniture
to Fit Their Lifestyle
58 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 MARKETPLACE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
W
hen you
sit down
to an ice
cream
sundae,
indulge in
a gourmet
chocolate, spread jam on toast, or
even cross a bridge, you might be
surprised to know that some of these
products were made right here in
Lancaster County.
From companies like Alumax
to Turkey Hill, Armstrong World
Industries to Wilbur Chocolate,
Kitchen Kettle Village to High Steel,
R.R. Donelley to Clair Brothers,
Lancaster County makes products
that include aluminum, ice cream,
furniture, flooring, chocolate, jams,
relishes, steel, printing, sound
systems and kitchen cabinetry.
Of course, Lancaster County
may be best known for producing
food, with fields of crops like wheat,
corn, soybeans and more. Dairy
farms with cows and goats are in
abundance, along with farms that
raise animals for food. Farmers
markets like Lancaster’s Central
Market and many other small local
markets offer homegrown products
such as strawberries, tomatoes, corn,
potatoes, apples, peaches, pumpkins
and much more.
One Lancaster County company
that takes full advantage of the
area’s abundance of fresh produce is
Kitchen Kettle Village in Intercourse.
The business was started in 1954,
when Bob and Pat Burnley purchased
a small jelly business and set up
operations in their two-car garage. A
village of shops —now 42 of them —
cropped up, along with production of
more than 80 original recipes of jams,
jellies, and relishes.
These products are shipped all
over the world, and include chow
chow, pickled beets, strawberry jam,
salsa, pickles, grilling sauce, syrups,
apple butter, and mustards. One of
the most popular products is red
pepper jam, which is served at the
local restaurant with cream cheese.
Lancaster’s dairy farms provide
the ideal resource for Turkey Hill’s
full line of dairy products, including
milk, egg nog, ice cream and frozen
desserts. In fact, Turkey Hill Dairy is
the fifth largest-selling premium ice
cream brand and one of the leading
refrigerated iced tea brands in the
United States. A few of the most
popular products include premium
ice cream, frozen yogurt, ice cream
cakes, sundae cones, iced tea, fruit
drinks, egg nog and purified drinking
water.
Turkey Hill Dairy promotes itself
as Lancaster’s homegrown company,
now a third-generation, family-run
dairy selling products nationwide all
along the East Coast from Maine to
Florida and as far west as Oregon,
Washington and Alaska.
In Lititz, Wilbur Chocolate
also utilizes the dairy resources
of Lancaster County to make
chocolate. Wilbur’s products are
used in many of the top premium
confectionary products, including
gourmet chocolates, frozen treats,
baked goods and beverages. Wilbur
is famous for its own Wilbur Bud, a
drop-like chocolate available in milk
or semi-sweet chocolate.
The history of Wilbur Chocolate
dates back to 1884 when Henry
Oscar (H.O.) Wilbur split his
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS MARKETPLACE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 59
wo
kindred
spirits met, married,
and created a
gallery of Native
American items.
Denny and Tammy Calabrese
opened Spirit Hawk Gallery at 119
W. Main St., Leola, 20 years ago.
Items from their store not only are
worn by Lancaster Countians, but
have appeared in movies such as
“Dances With Wolves”.
Denny, from New England,
recalled an uncle by marriage
teaching him Native American craft
skills since he was a young child.
When Denny’s dad made a friend
during World War II, he brought
him home afterward. The guest
ended up marrying into the family.
It was not until after his uncle had
passed away that Denny learned his
uncle had been a Native American
from Canada.
“In those days, you did not talk
about that kind of thing,” Denny
Calabrese said.
Tammy Calabrese is from
Lancaster County. She learned
jewelry-making skills and went to
a “Rendezvous” in New England.
A rendezvous is a re-enactment
of interactions of fur traders and
Native Americans.
The couple met at the
Rendezvous and married within
a year. They remained in New
England for their first six years
together. The couple then moved
here to be closer to Tammy’s
family.
They started the gallery to
feature their own Native American
crafts, art and jewelry as well as
those made by other craftspeople.
Dream catchers are among the most
popular items sold at Spirit Hawk
Gallery.
On display, but not for sale, is
a hand-beaded headdress made of
animal skins that Denny used to
wear in Rendezvous.
Tammy makes her own silver
bracelets and beaded jewelry.
Other items carried include
Native American pottery,
moccasins, instruments, artwork,
beads, jewelry, ornaments and
turquoise estate jewelry. Many
items in the store are made
naturally, including a skin care line
made by Tammy’s sister, Taun.
The Calabreses trade with other
people involved in the Native
American arts, including a man
who supplies items such as Native
American arrows and leather bags
to Hollywood. Denny said he can
watch a movie and sometimes pick
out items he made.
~ Cynthia Hummel
Philadelphia confectionery business
into a hard candy division and a
chocolate manufacturing division.
The chocolate business was eventually
relocated to Lititz around 1900, owing
to the railroad and resources for dairy
products in Lancaster County.
Lancaster County is home to many
manufactured products, including
printing of many of the nation’s
upscale catalogs and other publications
at R.R. Donnelly. At Clair Brothers
in Lititz, work is underway to build
Rock Lititz, a combination of sound,
light and staging for the entertainment
industry. Conestoga Wood Specialties
manufactures cabinetry and cabinet
doors, which might just be in your
kitchen.
Then there is the big stuff, like steel
bridges and interchanges. Lancaster-
based High Steel Structures Inc. is one
of the largest fabricators of structural
steel in the United States. High Steel
fabricates bridge superstructure
components and heavy building girders,
and the company also offers bridge steel
erection and emergency bridge repair
services.
In 1970, High Steel provided the
steel for the Columbia-Wrightsville
bridge on Route 30. High also did
local projects like the Route 324 bridge
over Pequea Creek and the Sherman
Street bridge over I-83, as well as the
Maryland portion of the Woodrow
Wilson Bridge and the Virginia HOT
Lanes, both on the DC Beltway, and
the I-95/I-695 interchange on the east
side of the Baltimore Beltway. High
Steel was recently contracted to supply
the structural steel for the upcoming
Lititz Pike bridge replacement
over the Amtrak rails leading into
Lancaster City. And if you ever travel
to Rochester, N.Y., check out the
The Douglass Anthony bridge that
dramatically lights up Rochester’s
skyline, or the impressive Lake
Champlain Bridge that joins two towns
in New York and Vermont.
When it comes to supporting
Lancaster County’s industry, it might
just take crossing a bridge or having a
chocolate ice cream sundae.
~ Laura Knowles
HAWK
Denny and Tammy Calabrese sell Native American items, including items
with hand-beaded decorations.
A vintage turquoise necklace
A headress once wore in rendevous
(renactments of fur traders meeting with
Native Americans) is on display, but is not
for sale at the Native American store.
60 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 MARKETPLACE PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
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LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS MARKETPLACE FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 61
lthough hummus
has been part of
Egyptian, Greek
and other Middle
Eastern cuisine
for thousands
of years, it was
something not found in many
area grocery stores until the past
decade or so. Hummus, which has
the consistency of a dip, originated
in southwestern Asia and is
traditionally made using mashed
chickpeas.
Lancaster Hummus Company
by FreshaPeel Hummus has been
offering freshly-made gourmet,
artisanal hummus for more than
three years. Deborah Mitchell,
who co-founded the family-owned
business with her husband, Donald
Mitchell, and brother, Richard
LeBoon in 2009, said that it grew
out of another venture — a
catering company.
Lancaster Hummus gradually
expanded its reach. Mitchell said
that although they no longer do
farmer’s markets in the county, the
product can be found in open-air
markets in Carlisle, Harrisburg,
Hershey and the Philadelphia area.
Originally two specialty grocers
— Rhubarb’s Market and Lemon
Street Market — carried the product,
but now it can be found in a number
of local grocery stories including
Darrenkamps’ Food Market, Shady
Maple, and Stauffers of Kissel Hill.
It may also be found at Wegman’s in
King of Prussia, and Webster’s Café
and Bookstore, State College, and at
this year’s Pennsylvania Farm Show.
Mitchell said that the hummus
is produced from chickpeas grown
in Colorado and Washington (she
said that chickpeas are not grown
in Pennsylvania). “What’s different
about our hummus is the type
of oil we use — we work with a
cooperative in Erie that produces
non-GMO (genetically-modified
organism) expeller cold-pressed
canola oil,” she said.
Additionally Lancaster
Hummus Co. does not use artificial
preservatives or tahini, a paste
made from ground sesame seeds,
in its hummus. Mitchell said that
the company foregoes tahini, since
some people have a mild to severe
allergic reaction to it. The hummus
is available in a variety of flavors
created from locally-sourced
ingredients.
The two top-sellers are lemon
kale and Tuscan garlic. Other flavors
include pumpkin delight, chocolate
ganache and cranberry apple. For
those who like a bit of a kick —
there’s blazin’ buffalo and chipotle
black bean; a jalapeno flavor joins the
list for summer.
“We like being at the farmer’s
markets — it allows us to meet our
customers and get feedback on our
products. We introduced pumpkin
delight in fall 2011 as a seasonal
flavor, but people really enjoyed it,
so we decided to make it available
year-round,” Mitchell said.
Her son, Sean Bruce II, is also
involved in the company and came
up with the idea to create the blazin’
buffalo. He says that it’s a vegan
alternative to buffalo wings and is
great as a dip or spread or spread on
a wrap.
Mitchell said that some of the
flavors can be used as a fruit dip —
the pumpkin and cranberry apple
flavors can be paired with apples
— or used in place of jam on bagels
or croissants. Bruce said that the
chocolate ganache, which is dairy-
free and has zero grams of fat, is
great on crepes or waffles. Mitchell
added that it can also be used to frost
cupcakes
Other flavors such as lemon kale
or Tuscan garlic can be used to cook
with. She said that lemon kale, which
has a crisp, mild taste, can be used
like mayo and is great in chicken
salad. Tuscan garlic can be used as
a dip with pita chips or spread on a
crusty bread and baked in the oven
for garlic bread.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
Lancaster Hummus Company by
FreshaPeel Hummus features products
that are gluten-free and nut-free.
Further information is available at www.
lancasterhummus.com or on Lancaster
Hummus’ Facebook page.
Deborah Mitchell and son, Sean Bruce II, with the various hummus flavors created by their family
business, Lancaster Hummus Company, by FreshaPeel Hummus.

Three years ago the
‘Buy Fresh — Buy Local’
movement was in its
infancy, and a number of
our catering customers
were asking us about
hummus. There were some
hummus products on
the market, but nothing
from a local company, so
we decided to fill that
niche and began making
hummus and selling it at
farmer’s markets,”
Mitchell explained. She
added that at first, a
number of people weren’t
that familiar with hummus,
but that’s changed.
Local business focuses on
crafting fresh hummus
62 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 LEISURE ACTIVITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
ason Mundok
and Steve Carlson
see the arts both
as something
that enhances
Lancaster’s quality
of life and as
an economic
engine driving
a renaissance
for the
downtown area.
During the past
couple of years, the two Lancaster
residents have formed a business
partnership with a mission to
promote the arts and bring creative
people together so that more art will
be produced.
Mundok, a musician and
independent software consultant,
and Carlson, a teacher at the New
School of Lancaster, produce a
“multimedia online magazine” and
two experimental theatrical events
under the brand name of Wood
Stove House.
Mundok records and edits a
weekly online podcast, “Around the
Wood Stove,” in which he interviews
local singers, writers, actors,
directors and artists about events
happening in Lancaster, York
and Harrisburg.
One week, he’ll talk to Millersville
University’s Ware Center director,
Harvey Owen, about some of the
center’s planned events, and the
next he’ll interview representatives
of local theater companies about
upcoming productions.
Carlson, 43, and Mundok, 41,
supplement the podcast with a blog
they both write, which might be
about nonprofit fundraising one
day and a new art exhibit at a local
gallery the next.
Wood Stove House “started
officially as a business in 2012,”
Mundok said, “but we have been
doing creative projects since 2009. It
was a hobby.
“My wife (artist Susanne
Mundok) and I started these house
concerts in 2009,” he said, in which
regional musicians and touring bands
performed in a room in the
couple’s house.
They called them Wood Stove
House Concerts, Mundok said,
“because there’s a woodstove in the
place where the bands played,” a
family room added onto the back of
the Mundoks’ house.
The Mundoks have organized
about a dozen such concerts around
the area in the past three years, and
eventually produced other concerts
to raise money for area nonprofits.
Mundok had also begun
podcasting when Carlson asked him
if he’d like to help bring a 15-year-
old experimental theater concept
to Lancaster.
In November 2011, with the help
of the Creative Works of Lancaster
theater troupe, Wood Stove House
produced its first Lancaster’s 24-
Hour Plays event.
Based on a theater concept that
originated in New York in the mid-
1990s, the event showcases several
plays that are written, staged and
performed — all in the space of
24 hours.
Carlson and Mundok produced
24-Hour Plays again this past
November, and plan to make it
an annual event. Dozens of local
actors, writers and directors have
participated.
During Lancaster’s citywide
ArtWalk event last spring, Wood
Stove House also produced Play
Grounds: Theater on Site, in which
three short plays were performed in
three outdoor spaces on Lemon and
Mulberry streets in Lancaster.
Wood Stove House also presented
CreativityCON in October, a
conference during which five
speakers talked to attendees about
how to harness their creativity.
The two men have lots of ideas
for other programs. But now that
they’re business partners and are
figuring out how to build their
brand, Carlson and Mudok have
decided Wood Stove House will
concentrate on projects that will
allow them to promote the arts and
make some money while doing so:
the podcast, blog, 24-Hour Plays and
Play Grounds.
They’re looking for additional
sponsors and advertisers for all these
ventures — and they keep an online
“tip jar” on their Web site through
which fans can support their work
through PayPal.
The important thing to both of
them, they said, is promoting the arts
and bringing creative people from
around the region together.
Mundok calls the arts scene
in Lancaster “the core economic
foundation for revitalizing the
downtown part of the city.”
“I believe that the arts have
been the thing that has boosted this
downtown, that’s gotten the energy
going, the energy that we all feel,”
Mundok said.
Carlson said promoting the arts
helps “draw the kind of people who
this community would like to attract,
and to create a community for
everyone who’s already here.”
~ Mary Ellen Wright
Wood Stove House’s podcast
and blog can be found at
www.woodstovehouse.com.
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS LEISURE ACTIVITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 63
LifeReloaded Specialty Publishing
LLC is more than a local book
publisher. Founder Mike Lovell
said that when it was founded in
2004, the main focus was photo
restoration. “That’s where the name
came from — we started doing
‘memory books’ and family histories
using photos to tell a family’s story,”
he said.
That original premise evolved
from 2005 to 2009 into concierge
publishing. Lovell said that most
often the clients that use this service
are organizations, businesses or
individuals who wish to have a
“keepsake” type book published
with as many as 300 to 500 copies.
“In this area of our work,
people don’t come with a formal
manuscript, instead they turn up at
our door with boxes of photos and
memorabilia and an idea,” Lovell
explained.
Lovell cited “Conestoga Country
Club — First 60 Years” as an
example in this area. “They had a lot
of historical photos that they wanted
to use to tell the history. We worked
closely with them on the project —
restoring some of the photos so they
could be used in print and creating a
cover for the book,” he said.
Another example of their work
in this area is a history of a private
fishing club. Lovell said that the
book was published in two versions.
Both versions feature vintage images
from Orvis Catalogs and were
used by permission from Orvis.
The deluxe edition was published
with a Royal Coachman fly tied
by internationally-recognized
fisherman and fly-tier Dick Talleur
incorporated into the cover. An
additional page was inserted
featuring his signature, a photo and
biographical information about him.
(The Royal Coachman is a type of fly
that is used at the club during certain
times of the year.) “This illustrates
our flexibility and allowed us to
have different price points for our
clients,”
Lovell said.
In 2009, LifeReloaded added
commercial, or royalty, publishing
to its offerings. Lovell said that
this type of publishing is what
most people think about when
they hear the term publishing — an
author creates a manuscript, and
the publisher purchases it, edits
it, creates a book, sells it and pays
the author royalties. “Our authors
are engaged in the publication of
their book. We work to market the
book through author appearances,
websites and social media,” he said.
He added that in publishing the
book, the company works with local
vendors such as illustrators, and
printing for all books is done in
the US.
LifeReloaded has established
several imprints (brands) for
its various focus areas. Studio
Publishing features photographers
and artists such as the late
Constantine Kermes. American
Historical Publishing focuses on
history with books such as the trout
club’s book. American Literary
Publishing focuses on fiction and
novels for young adults (tweens and
teens) and adults, while Squidgy
Press focuses on illustrated
children’s books.
One of American Literary
Publishing’s authors is Faith Reese
Martin. Her JMP history mystery
detective series for young adults
combine history and mystery.
So far there are two books in the
series — “White Doe in the Mist:
The Mystery of the Lost Colony”
and “Ghost Train to Freedom: An
Adventure on the Underground
Railroad.” A third book in the series
will be published in April. (For
further information about the
JMP Mystery series, see page 64
in this publication.)
One of the Squidgy Press
authors is Valerie Lee Veltre. Her
book, “Moo Kitty Finds a Home”
is a Mom’s Choice Awards Gold
recipient. In addition to the story
about a cat who finds himself on his
own and in search of a new home,
the book also includes resources for
families and teachers such as benefits
of adopting adult pets, tips to help
animals settle into a new family and
home, and discussion points to have
with children before heading to the
shelter. For information visit
www.mookittyfindsahome.com.
Late last year, LifeReloaded
launched a new imprint, American
Lifestyles Publishing. “Dining at the
White House”, a book by former
White House chef John Moeller
with Lovell, will be published by
American Lifestyles in the fall.
Moeller founded State of Affairs
Catering, his Lancaster-based
specialty catering business, in 2005
after serving for 13 years as a chef
at the White House serving official
functions and private meals for
the First Families of Presidents H.
W. Bush, President Clinton, and
President G.W. Bush. The book
includes anecdotes, images of White
House memorabilia, recipes and
more. For information visit
www.diningatthewhitehouse.com.
Lovell said that LifeReloaded and
its imprints have been accepted as
vendors by two of the major book
wholesalers — Ingram, Baker &
Taylor. This means that the books
it publishes can be purchased by
individuals on online and in local
bookstores, but they’re also available
to libraries and major bookstores.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
www.lifereloaded.com
64 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 LEISURE ACTIVITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
aith Reese Martin’s
career as an
elementary teacher
is the springboard for
her career as a historical
fiction author. In her
JMP detective series she
combines history and
mystery; the main characters
are time-traveling teens Jinx
MacKenzie and Max Myers and
their talking animals — Petey, a
Jack Russell Terrier, and Poppy,
a ginger-colored cat. “I want
to make history come alive for
kids and help them along the
path to a lifelong enjoyment of
reading,” she said.
Martin grew up in Lancaster County and
taught fourth and fifth grade at Lampeter-
Strasburg for 30 years. She’s always loved
writing and wanted to write a book for
young adult readers. She retired from
teaching eight years ago, but said that she
had an idea for a book four years prior
to retirement.
“I was teaching history to the kids,
and we were focusing on England’s Lost
Colony. I thought it would be great to take
that piece of history and somehow make
it interesting to the kids; if you can make
these people from history be real to the kids
they can make a connection — some of the
best mysteries and adventures are found in
American history,” Martin said.
That desire and premise led her to write
“White Doe in the Mist: The Mystery of
the Lost Colony”, which is set in the Outer
Banks, NC. This book, and her others,
bring together her love for nature and its
creatures, and her enjoyment of mystery
books.
“When I visited the Outer Banks I was
amazed by all the history there including
English colonization and the Wright
brothers, both of which play a role in the
first book,” she explained.
Last year (2012) “Ghost Train
to Freedom: An Adventure on the
Underground Railroad” was published. In
this book Jinx and Max are called back in
time to the 1850s and during their journey
on the Underground Railroad, they meet
historical figures such as Harriet Tubman,
Canadian abolitionist Alex Ross, and Ellen
and William Craft, who escaped slavery
posing as a white gentleman and his servant.
“Blackbeard and the Golden Goblet:
The Mystery of the Sunken Ships” is due
out in April. Martin again uses the Outer
Banks as the setting. Although there are
many legends about Blackbeard, it is known
that one of his favorite anchorages was
at the southern end of Ocracoke Island
in a channel that’s now known as Teach’s
Hole (one of Blackbeard’s pseudonyms was
Edward Teach).
She said that when she’s researching,
she finds things that “just click like puzzle
pieces. I seek out really cool sites and
bring out the human element to make the
characters come alive.”
Real people, real history, real adventure
captures the essence of her books, which
also have a local publishing connection.
“Ghost Train to Freedom: An Adventure
on the Underground Railroad”, “White
Doe in the Mist: The Mystery of the
Lost Colony”, and “Blackbeard and the
Golden Goblet: The Mystery of the Sunken
Treasure Ships” are part of the JMP Mystery
Series, which is published by American
Literary Publishing, an imprint (brand) of
LifeReloaded Specialty Publishing LLC,
Manheim. And Martin can sometimes be
found in the classroom — not as a teacher,
but as a visiting author discussing her
books with intermediate and middle school
students.
~ Rochelle A. Shenk
For further information about Faith Reese
Martin and the JMP history mystery detective
series, visit www.JMPMysterySeries.com.
Author
combines
mystery and
history in
teen books
LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS LEISURE ACTIVITIES FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 65
541 Airport Road, Lititz • www.penncinema.com
Luxury Leather Highback Seats,
all-Digital Projection
and Killer Sound!
With the only IMAX experience in Lancaster,
We are the best place to catch a movie!
Special Tuesday Morning
Shows at 10AM
with FREE coffee!
For seven years Penn Cinema has been the
destination for movie goers in Lancaster County
who wanted the best experience available. Penn
Cinema, located at 541 Airport Road, Lititz is an
independently-owned and operated multiplex.
They offer a safe and enjoyable atmosphere,
state-of-the-art digital projection, comfortable
high-back stadium seating, and Lancaster County’s
only IMAX Theater.
After many years of success and expansion in
Lititz, Penn Cinema extended their reach into
Delaware this past December with the opening of
Penn Cinema Riverfront in Wilmington. Like the
Lititz location this theater boasts 14 digital screens
and a full IMAX theater.
Penn Cinema provides Lancaster County with
the latest Hollywood Blockbusters and also offers
classic movies, inspiring IMAX documentaries,
and live telecasts of performances from around
the globe. They’ve hosted viewings of sporting
events and even election results over the years.
Penn Cinema is available for field trips, private
events and also corporate meetings by calling
(717) 626-7720.
Penn Cinema
Continues
to Entertain
and Grow
PENN CINEMA
541 Airport Road, Lititz, PA
(717) 626-7720
www.penncinema.com
Hours: Fri-Sat: 11:30am-10:45pm,
Sun-Thurs: 11:30am-8:00PM
66 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 LEISURE ACTIVITIES PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
Find a pick-up location
at www.flymagazine.net
or by scanning this code
M A G A Z I N E
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LANCASTER, PA • PROGRESS FEBRUARY 24, 2013 • 67
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68 • FEBRUARY 24, 2013 PROGRESS • LANCASTER, PA
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Residential Living | Personal Care | Health Care

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