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Philips RF Manual

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

3 edition July 2003


rd
http://www.philips.semiconductors.com/markets/mms/products/ discretes/documentation/rf_manual
Document number: 4322 252 06384 Date of release: July 2003

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

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Contents
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. What's new Introduction RF Application-basics RF Design-basics Application diagrams Application notes (see also appendix) Product portfolio 7.1 MMICs 7.2 Wideband transistors 7.3 Varicap diodes 7.4 Bandswitch diodes 7.5 Fets 7.6 Pin diodes X-reference 3-pager Packaging Promotion Materials Contacts & References page: 3 page: 4 page: 5 page: 15 page: 37 page: 40 page: 42 page: 44 page: 47 page: 50 page: 51 page: 55 page: 58 page: 61 page: 62 page: 63

8. 9. 10. 11.

APPENDIX
Appendix A:

(in separate appendix-file):


2.4GHz Generic Front-End demoboard App. page: 3

Application notes:
Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix B: C: D: E: F: BB202, low voltage FM stereo radio RF switch for e.g. Bluetooth application Application of RF Switch BF1107/8 Mosfet Application of Dual-Gate Mosfets WCDMA applications for BGA6589 App. page: 27 App. page: 33 App. page: 40 App. page: 51 App. page: 62

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

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1. Whats New
Application diagrams: 2.4GHz & LNB, Products, chapter 5 chapter 7:

NEW types
- BGA2004: high/low gain mode LNA, - BGA2715, BGA2716, BGA2717: MMIC's
reduced power consumption 50 ohm gain blocks,

Upcoming types in development


General purpose gain blocks
BFG310/XR, BFG310W/XR, BFG325/XR, BFG325W/XR: 4.5 gen. wideband transistors

- BGA6289, BGA6489, BGA6589:


20 dBm 50 ohm gain blocks

Wideband transistors Varicap diodes BB140L,


VCO varicap in SOD882

V(T)CXO & TV tuning low voltage varicaps BF1211 (BF1207) 2 in 1 Mosfet 2 in 1 J-fet for car antenna amplifing More different packages

BF1205, BF1206, BF1211, BF1211R, Field effect BF1211WR, BF1212, BF1212R, transistors BF1212WR: Dual gate mosfets for TV/VCR/SAT Pin diodes BAP51L, BAP64L, BAP69L, BAP55L

2.4GHz Generic Front-End Demoboard, Mosfet application notes,

appendix A appendix E

RF application/design basics have been improved, Updated application notes list, Updated product portfolio, including VCO matrix, X-reference 3-pager, Overview small signal SMD packages,

chapter 3-4 chapter 6 chapter 7 chapter 8 chapter 9

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

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2. Introduction
We are very proud to tell you that our RF Manual has become a leading document in the RF market. Many engineers, developers and purchasers use our RF Manual as their main source of information for building applications and to make the right decisions. A large subscribers database has been built to allow sending all of you our most recent issue. You can also download the RF Manual from many websites. The RF Manual covers a broad range of material and many aspects about RF small signal systems. Starting at the RF basics, it covers many subjects including applications, our product portfolio, crossreferences, packaging, etc. We keep our RF Manual as a dynamic source of information. We have committed to updating the document twice a year to allow you to be informed on important developments for your applications.

YOUR time-to-market is OUR driving force


We are not just happy to take your order. We want to be a part of your application. We want you to challenge us on design-ins. We want to be your partner in RF solutions.

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the prior written consent of the copywrite owner. The information presented in this document does not form part of any quotation or contract, is believed to be accurate and reliable and may be changed without notice. No liability will be accepted by the publisher for any consequence of its use. Publication thereof does not convey nor imply any license under patent- or other industrial or intellectual property rights. Date of release: June 2003

Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. 2003

Henk Roelofs, Director RF Consumer Products

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3. RF Application-Basics
3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 Frequency spectrum RF transmission system RF Front-End Function of an antenna Examples of PCB design 3.5.1 Prototyping 3.5.2 Final PCB Transistor Semiconductor Process 3.6.1 General-Purpose Small-Signal bipolar 3.6.2 Double Polysilicon 3.6.3 RF Bipolar Transistor & MMIC Performance overview

3.1 Frequency spectrum


Radio spectrum and wavelengths Each materials composition creates a unique pattern in the radiation emitted. This can be classified in the frequency and wavelength of the emitted radiation. As electro-magnetic waves travel with the speed of light, one can determine the wavelength for each frequency.

VLF
10 kHz

LF
100 kHz

MF
1 MHz

HF
10 MHz

VHF
100 MHz

UHF
1 GHz

SHF
10 GHz

EHF
100 GHz

Infrared

Visible Light

A survey of the frequency bands and related wavelengths :


Frequency 3kHz to 30kHz 30kHz to 300kHz 300kHz to 1650kHz 3MHz to 30MHz 30MHz to 300MHz 300MHz to 3GHz 3GHz to 30GHz 30GHz to 300GHz Wavelength - 100km to 10km 10km to 1km 1km to 182m 100m to 10m 10m to 1m 1m to 10cm 10cm to 1cm 1cm to 1mm Band VLF LF MF HF VHF UHF SHF EHF Definition Very Low Frequency Low Frequency Medium Frequency High Frequency Very High Frequency Ultra High Frequency Super High Frequency Extremely High Frequency

RF Manual
Microwave Band S C J H X M K KU

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Frequency / [GHz] 1.7 to 5.1 3.9 to 6.1 5.9 to 9.5 7 to 10 5 to 10.5 10 to 15 11 to 35 17 to 18

KA

38 to 45

Examples of applications in different frequency ranges Major segments of the frequency domain are reserved to specific applications, i.e., radio and TV broadcasting, cellular phone bands, two way radio commercial use, and others. The frequency ranges assigned vary with different countries. AM radio - 535 kHz to 1.7 MHz Short wave radio - bands from 5.9 MHz to 26.1 MHz Citizens band (CB) radio - 26.96 MHz to 27.41 MHz Television stations - 54 to 88 MHz for channels 2 through 6 FM radio - 88 MHz to 108 MHz Television stations - 174 to 220 MHz for channels 7 through 13 Garage door openers, alarm systems, etc.: around 40 MHz (Analog) cordless phones: from 40 to 50 MHz Baby monitors: 49 MHz Radio controlled aeroplanes: around 72 MHz Radio controlled cars: around 75 MHz Wildlife tracking collars: 215 to 220 MHz (Digital) cordless phones (CT2): 864 to 868 and 944 to 948 MHz Cell phones (GSM): 824 to 960 MHz Air traffic control radar: 960 to 1,215 MHz Global Positioning System: 1,227 and 1,575 MHz Cell phones (GSM): 1710 to 1990 MHz (Digital Enhanced) Cordless phones (DECT): 1880 to 1900 MHz Personal Handy phone System (PHS): 1895 to 1918 MHz Deep space radio communications: 2290 to 2300 MHz Wireless Data protocols (Bluetooth): 2402 to 2495 MHz

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3.2 RF transmission system

Simplex

Half duplex

Full duplex

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3.3 RF Front-End

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

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3.4 Function of an antenna


In standard application the RF output signal of a transmitter power amplifier is transported via a coaxial cable to a suitable location where the antenna is installed. Typically the coaxial cable has an impedance of 50 (75 for TV/Radio). The ether, that is the room between the antenna and infinite space, also has an impedance value. This ether is the transport medium for the traveling wireless RF waves from the transmitter antenna to the receiver antenna. For optimum power transfer from the end of the coaxial cable (e.g. 50) into the ether (theoretical 120), we need a power matching unit. This matching unit is the antenna. Depending on the frequency and specific application needs there are a lot of antenna configurations and construction variations available. The simplest one is the isotropic ball radiator, which is a theoretical model used as a mathematical reference.

The next simplest configuration and a practical antenna in wide use is the dipole, also called the dipole radiator. It consists of two radiating lengths. Removal of one radiating length leaves us with the vertical monopole antenna, as illustrated in the adjacent picture. The vertical monopole has a donut-shaped field centered on the vertical radiating element.

Higher levels of integration of the circuitry and reductions in cost also influence antenna design. Based on the field radiation patterns from printed circuit boards, a PCB antenna was developed called a Patch-Antenna as illustrated in the adjacent picture.

RF Manual
Low frequency design RF design Microwave design

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3.5 Examples of PCB design


(up to several tens of MHz) (tens of MHz to several hundreds of MHz ) (GHz range)

3.5.1 Prototyping

Standard RF/VHF Receiver Front-End: Top side GND, back side manual wires

Standard RF/VHF: Top side GND, back side manual wires forms a SW-antenna amplifier

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3.5.2 Final PCB

TV-Tuner: PCP and flying parts on the switch (history); some times prototyping technology at RF

Microwave PCB for GHz LNA amplifier

Demoboard: BGA2001 and BGA2022

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3.6 Transistor Semiconductor Process


3.6.1 General-Purpose Small-signal bipolar
NPN Transistor cross section

The transistor is built up from three different layers: Highly doped emitter layer Medium doped base area Low doped collector area.

Die of BC337, BC817

The highly doped substrate serves as carrier and conductor only.

SOT23 standard lead frame


During the assembly process the transistor die is attached on a lead frame by means of gluing or eutectic soldering. The emitter and base contacts are connected to the lead frame (leads) through (e.g. Gold, Aluminium, ) bond wires in e.g. an ultrasonic welding process.

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3.6.2 Double Polysilicon


For the latest Silicon-based bipolar transistors and MMICs Philips has developed a Double Polysilicon process to achieve excellent performance. The mobile communications market and the use of ever-higher frequencies have do need of lowvoltage, high-performance, RF wideband transistors, amplifier modules and MMICs. The double-poly diffusion process makes use of an advanced, transistor technology that is vastly superior to existing bipolar technologies. With double poly, a polysilicon layer is used to diffuse and connect the emitter while another polysilicon layer is used to contact the base region. Via a buried layer, the collector is brought out on the top of the die. As with the standard transistor, the collector is picked up via the backside substrate and attachment to the lead frame.

Existing advanced bipolar transistor

Advantages of double-poly-Si RF process: Higher frequencies (>23GHz) Higher power gain Gmax, e.g., 22dB/2GHz Lower noise operation Higher reverse isolation Simpler matching Lower current consumption Optimized for low supply voltages High efficiency High linearity Better heat dissipation Higher integration for MMICs (SSI= Small-Scale-Integration) Applications Cellular and cordless markets, low-noise amplifiers, mixers and power amplifier circuits operating at 1.8 GHz and higher), high-performance RF front-ends, pagers and satellite TV tuners. Typical vehicles manufactured in double-poly-Si: MMIC Family: BGA20xy, and BGA27xy 5th generation wideband transistors: BFG403W/410W/425W/480W RF power amplifier modules: BGY240S/241/212/280

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3.6.3 RF Bipolar Transistor & MMIC Performance overview

RF Manual
4.1

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4. RF Design-Basics
Fundamentals 4.1.1 Frequency and time domain 4.1.1.1 Frequency domain operations 4.1.1.2 Time domain operations 4.1.2 RF waves 4.1.3 The reflection coefficient 4.1.4 Differences between ideal and practical passive devices 4.1.5 The Smith Chart 4.2 Small Signal RF amplifier parameters 4.2.1 Transistor parameters DC to microwave 4.2.2 Definition of the s-parameters 4.2.2.1 2-Port network definition 4.2.2.2 3-Port network definition References

4.1 RF Fundamentals
4.1.1

Frequency and time domain

4.1.1.1 Frequency domain operations


Typical vehicles-effects and test-equipment: Metallic sound and distortions of a low-cost PC loudspeaker Audio analyzer (measuring the quality of the audio signal, like noise and distortion) F/As ultrasonic microscope (e.g., non destructive material analysis on IC packages) FFT Spectrum analyzer (in the medium frequency range from a few Hertz to several MHz) Modulation analyzer (investigation of RF modulation e.g., AM, FSK, GFSK, et. al.) Spectrum analyzer (display the signals spectral quality, e.g., noise, intermodulation, gain) The mathematical Fourier Transform algorithm analyses the performance of a periodical time depending signal in the frequency domain. For a one-shot signal the Fourier Integral Transformation is used. On the bench, test issues are over-taken by the spectrum analyzer or by an FFT analyzer (Fast Fourier Transformation). With the spectrum analyzer the frequency spectrum of the device under test (DUT) are isolated into bands (e.g., by tuned filters) and measured in a detector (like a periodic tuned radio with displaying of the field strength). The FFT analyzer is essentially a computer capable of performing a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) function. This DSP has a built-in hardwarebased circuit for very fast solution of algorithmic problems like the DFFT (Discrete Fast Fourier Transformation).

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This DFFT algorithmic can calculate the frequency spectrum of an incoming signal. DSP processors are used in todays mobile equipment to provide baseband or IF signal processing, sound cards for computers, industrial machinery, communication receivers, motor control, and other complex signal processing functions. In RF and microwave applications, the frequency domain is very important for measurement techniques, because oscilloscopes cannot display extremely high frequency signals and typically introduce probe impedances which vary significantly with small changes in frequency and make them unsuitable except for very specialized applications. A spectrum analyzer has much better sensitivity and a much larger dynamic range capability. Example: An oscilloscope can simultaneously display signals with a voltage ratio of 10 to 20 between the smallest and largest signals (a dynamic range ~20dB). RF spectrum analyzers can display power signal (levels) with a ratio between the largest signal and the smallest signal of more than 106 at the same time on the display (dynamic range >60dB). Intermediate frequency (IF) amplifiers of typical receivers have gains of 40 to 60dB, meaning the amplifier output signal can be 104 to 106 larger than the input signal. The spectrum analyzer can display both signals simultaneously with good amplitude accuracy on to the monitor (logarithmic display) for both signals. On an oscilloscope (with a linear display) setting the amplitude of the output signal at full-scale allows you to perhaps see what appears to be some noise ripple on the axis for the input signal. Typical modern oscilloscopes support frequency ranges up to few GHz. Modern spectrum analyzers start at several tenths of kHz and go up to several tens of GHz. Special function spectrum analyzers provide signal viewing up to 100GHz.

4.1.1.2 Time domain operations


Typical bench vehicle and applications: Booting beeps in the PC computers loudspeaker The oscilloscope (displays the signals action over the time) The RF generator (generates very clean sine wave test signals with various modulation options) The Time Domain Reflectometry analyzer (TDR) (e.g., analyzing cable discontinuities) Jitter in clock-recovery circuits Eye diagrams In the time domain the variation of the amplitude is displayed versus the time on a screen. Very low speed activities such as temperature drift versus aging of an oscillator or seismic activity are printed by special plotters in real-time on paper. Faster actions are better displayed by oscilloscopes. Signals can be saved on the oscilloscope screen by the use of storage tubes (history), or by the use of built-in digital storage (RAM). In the time domain, phase differences between different sources or timedependent activities can be analyzed, characterized or modified. In RF applications displays show demodulation actions, baseband signals or control functions of a CPU. The advantage of the oscilloscope is the high resistive impedance of the probes. Its disadvantage is the input capacity of several picofarads (pF) causing high frequency AC loading of the circuit, which affects both the measured RF circuit and distorts the measurement data presented.

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Mixers are inherently non-linear devices because their chief function is multiplication of signals. On the input side the RF signal must be treated linearly. Mixer 3rd order intercept point (IP3) performance characterizes the quality of handling the RF signals and the amount non-linearity introduced. Example illustrating an application circuit in the frequency domain and in the time domain: Issue: Receiving the commercial radio broadcasting program SWR3 in the short-wave 49m band from the German transmitter-Mhlacker on 6030 kHz. This transmitter has an output power of 20000W. Design the mixer using a 455 kHz IF amplifier. Reference: http://www.swr.de/frequenzen/kurzwelle.html

System design of the local oscillator: LO = RF + IF = 6030 kHz + 455 kHz = 6485 kHz The image frequency is found at IRF = LO + IF = 6485 kHz + 455 kHz =6913 kHz Optimum mixer operation is medium gain for IF and RF and damping of RF and LO transfer to the IF port (isolation). As an example, we choose the BFR92. This transistor can also be used for much higher frequency mixer applications like FM radios, televisions, ISM433, and other applications. As shown in the formulas above, the Radio Frequency (RF) signal is mixed with the Local Oscillator (LO) to generate the Intermediate Frequency (IF) output products. To improve the mixer gain, several part values were varied. This circuit is a theoretical example for discussion purposes only. Further optimization should be done by investigation on bench. In the example the input signal sources V6 and V7 are series connected. In the reality this can be done by e.g. A transformer. The simulation was done under PSpice with the following setup: Print Step=0.1ns; Final Time=250s; Step Ceiling=1ns. This long simulation length and fine resolution is necessary for useful results in the frequency spectrum down to 400KHz.

RF Manual
R8 455KHz 12515KHz 6k 0.32mV 0.29mV 7k 2.21mV 2mV

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Figure 1: Final mixer circuit without output IF tank Varying of R8 shows the influence of the mixer gain at the 455 kHz output frequency.
8k 3.37mV 2.94mV 9k 3.66mV 3.11mV 10k 3.62mV 2.97mV 15k 2.33mV 1.52mV 20k 1.43mV 0.83mV 25k 1.44mV 0.5mV

From the experiments we chose R8 = 9 k for best output amplitude.

Figure 2: The mixer in the time domain arena

Figure 3: The mixer in the frequency domain arena

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1000.0

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Mixer ouput signals for different tank circuit L and C values


10000

100.0

1000 L1/uH; C3/pF

V/mV

10.0

100

1.0

10

0.1 234

350

509

744

1060

1590

2332

1 3498

Xtank/Ohm V(455KHz)/mV Q (SMD 1812-A) V(6484KHz)/mV Q (Leaded BC) V(12515KHz)/mV L1/uH V(12968KHz)/mV C3/pF

Figure 4: Mixer output voltage versus the tank circuit's characteristic resonance impedance

This must be further investigated to characterize the available IF bandwidth. A narrow IF bandwidth reduces the fidelity of the demodulated signal.

Figure 5: The mixer with an IF tank circuit

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This chapter illustrated a mixer operation in both time and frequency domains. Illustrated was circuit design by trial and error coupled with the use of a CAD program with a lot of simulation time. A better approach would be the use of a design strategy and calculation of the exact required values and then final CAD optimization. The devices must be accurately specified (s-parameters) and models (e.g., 2-port linear model network) must be available for computer simulation. The use of time domain simulators with different algorithms accelerates the simulation. Philips Semiconductors offers sparameters for small signal discrete devices. Because optimum power transfer is important in RF application, we must think about the quality of inter-stage circuit matching, qualified by the reflection coefficient. This will be handled in the next few chapters. Please note that Philips Semiconductors offers a Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) mixer, a BGA2022, with a 50 input impedance. These devices have built-in biasing circuit and offer excellent gain and linearity.

4.1.2 RF waves
RF electro-magnetic (EM) signals travel outward like waves in a pond that has a stone dropped into it. The electromagnetic waves are governed by the same laws that apply to optical signals. In a homogeneous vacuum without external influences EM waves travel at a speed of Co=299792458 m/s. Traveling in substrates, wires, or with a non-air dielectric material adjacent to the path slows the speed of the waves proportional to the root of the dielectric constant:

v=

CO

reff

reff is the substrates dielectric constant. , as: =

With we can calculate the wavelength, or Example1:

v f

Calculate the speed of an electromagnetic wave in a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) manufactured using an FR4 epoxy material and in a metal-dielectric-semiconductor capacitor of an integrated circuit. In a metal-dielectric-semiconductor capacitor the dielectric material can be SiliconDioxide (SiO2) or Silicon-Nitride (Si3N4).

Calculation:

v=
FR4 SiO2 Si3N4

CO

reff

299792458m / s 4.6
reff=4.6 reff=2.7 to 4.2 reff=3.5 to 9

= 139.78 10 6 m / s
v=139.8106m/s v=182.4106m/s to 139.8106m/s v=160.4106m/s to 99.9106m/s

RF Manual
Example2: Calculation:

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What is the wavelength transmitted from the commercial SW radio broadcasting program SWR3 in the 49 meter (m) band on 6030 kHz in air, and with an FR4 PCB? The reff of air is close to vacuum. Wavelength in air: air reff 1 = cO CO 299792458m / s = = = 49.72m f 6030 KHz

From Example 1 we take the FR4 dielectric constant to be reff = 4.6, then =139.8106m/s and calculate the wavelength in the PCB as: FR4 = 23.18 meters A forward-traveling wave is transmitted (or injected) by the source into the traveling medium (whether it be the ether, a substrate, a dielectric, wire, Microstrip, or other medium) and travels to the load at the opposite end of the medium. At junctions between two different dielectric materials, a part of the forward-traveling wave is reflected back towards the source. The remaining part continues traveling towards the load.

Figure 6: Multiple reflections between lines with different impedances In the upper portion of Figure 6 reflections of the forward-traveling main wave (red) are caused by materials with different impedance values (shown as Z1, Z2, Z3). As shown, a backward-reflected wave (green) can be again reflected into a forward-traveling wave in the direction towards the load (shown as violet in Figure 6). In the case of optimum matching between different dielectric mediums, no signal reflection will occur and maximum power is forwarded. The amount of reflection caused by junctions of lines with different impedances, or line discontinuities, is determined by the reflection coefficient. This is explained in the next chapter.

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4.1.3 The Reflection Coefficient


As discussed previously a forward-traveling wave is partially reflected back at junctions with line impedance discontinuities, or mismatches. Only the portion of the forward traveling wave (arriving at the load) will be absorbed and processed by the load. Because of the frequency-dependent speed of the propagating waves in a dielectric medium, there will be a delay in the arrival of the wave at the load point over what a wave traveling in free space would require. Mathematically this behavior is modeled with a vector in complex Gaussian space. At each discontinuity of the medium (or wire), wave-fronts with different amplitude and phase delay are heterodyned. The resulting energy envelope of the waves along the wire appears as ripple with maximum and minimum values. The phase difference between maximums to has the same value as the phase difference between minimums. This distance is termed the half-wavelength, or /2 (also termed the normalized phase shift of 180). Example: A line with mismatched ends driven from a source will have standing waves. These will result in minimum and maximum signal amplitudes at defined locations along the line. Determine the approximate distance between worst-case voltage points for a Bluetooth signal processed in a printed circuit on a FR4 based substrate. Assumed speed in FR4: v=139.8106m/s Wavelength: air

Calculation:

v FR 4 139.78 10 6 m / s = = = 58.24mm f BT 2.4GHz


58.24mm = 14.56mm 4

The distance minimum to maximum is called the quarter wavelength, or /4 (also termed the normalized phase shift of 90). Min-Max distance in FR4:

At the minimum we have minimum voltage, but maximum current. At the maximum we have maximum voltage, but minimum current. The distance between a minimum and a maximum voltage (or current) point is equal to /4. The reflection coefficient is defined by the ratio between the backward-traveling voltage wave and the forward-traveling voltage wave: Reflection coefficient: r( x ) =

U b( x) U f ( x)

Reflection loss or return loss: rdB = 20dB log r( x ) = 20dB log U b ( x ) log U f ( x )

The index (x) indicates different reflection coefficients along the line. This is caused by the distribution of the standing wave along the line. The return loss indicates, in dB, how much of the wave is reflected, compared to the forward-traveling wave.

RF Manual
VSWR: s = SWR = VSWR =

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Often the input reflection performance of a 50 RF device is specified by the Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR), also called the SWR.

U max U min

Matching factor: m =

1 which for practical applications requires s

the VSWR to be greater than ONE. Some typical values of the VSWR: 100% mismatch caused by an open or shorted line: r = 1 and VSWR = Optimum (theoretical) matched line: r = 0 and VSWR = 1 In all practical situations r varies between ZERO and ONE and VSWR varies between ONE and INFINITY ().

SWR 1 SWR + 1 U max 1 U max U min U min Using some mathematical manipulation: r = results in: r = U max U max + U min +1 U min Z ZO Replacing reflection coefficients with impedances leads to: r = Z + ZO
Calculating the reflection factor: r = r( x ) = with Zo = nominal system impedance

As explained, the standing waves cause different amplitudes of voltage and current along the wire. The ratio of these two parameters is the impedance Z ( x ) =

V( x ) I ( x)

at each locations, x. This means a

line with length l and a mismatched load Z(x = l) at the wire end location (x=l) will show at the sources location (x=0) a wire length dependent impedances Example:

Z ( x = 0)

f (l)

V( x =0) I ( x =0 )

There are several special cases (tricks) which can be used in microwave designs. Mathematically it can be shown that a wire with the length of ZL will be a quarter wavelength transformer :
2

and an impedance 4

- impedance transformer: Z ( x = ) =

ZL Z ( x =0 )

This can be used in SPDT based p-i-n diode switches or in DC bias circuits because an RF short (like a large capacitor) is transformed into an infinite impedance with low resistive dc path.

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As indicated in the upper portion of Figure 6, RF traveling-wave basic rules, the performances of matching, reflection and individual wire performances affect bench measurement results, caused by impedance transformation along the wire. Due to this constraint, each measurement set-up must be calibrated by precision references. Examples of RF calibration references are: Open Short Match The set-up calibration tools can undo unintended wire transformations, discontinuities from connectors, and similar measurement intrusion issues. This prevents Device Under Test (DUT) measurement parameters from being affected with mechanical bench set-up configurations. Example: a) Determine the input VSWR of BGA2711 MMIC wideband amplifier for 2GHz, based on data sheet characteristics. b) What kind of resistive impedance(s) can theoretically cause this VSWR? c) What is the input return loss measured on a 50 coaxial cable in a distance of /4? BGA2711 at 2 GHz: rIN = 10dB
rdB 10 dB 1+ r SWR 1 SWR = r SWR + r = SWR 1 r = 10 20 dB = 10 20 dB = 0.3162 1 r SWR + 1 1+ r Z ZO 1 + 0.3162 Z = ZO SWRIN = = 1.92 r = Z r Z = r ZO + ZO 1 r Z + ZO 1 0.3162 1+ r 1+ r Comparison: Z = Z O & SWR = Z = Z O SWR 1 r 1 r

Calculation:

r=

We know only the magnitude of (r) but not its angle. By definition, the VSWR must be larger than 1. We then get two possible solutions:

SWR1 =

Z Z1 and SWR2 = O Z1=1.9250=96.25; Z2=50/1.92=25.97 ZO Z2 96.25 50 25.96 50 = = 0.316 96.25 + 50 25.96 + 50


96.25

We can then examine r: r =


2

The /4 transformer transforms the device impedance to: ZIN1=96.25 Results:

Z Ende

Z 50 2 = 25.97 and for ZIN2=25.97 = O = Z IN 96.25

At 2GHz, the BGA2711 offers an input return loss of 10dB or VSWR=1.92. This reflection can be caused by a 96.25 or a 25.97 impedance. Of course there are infinite results possible if one takes into account all combinations of L and C values. Measuring this impedance at 2GHz with the use of a non-50 cable will cause extremely large errors in /4 distance, because the Zin1 = 96.25 appears as 25.97 and the second solution Zin2=25.97 appears as 96.25!

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As illustrated in the above example, the VSWR (or return loss) quickly associates the quality of devices input matching without any calculations, but does not tell about its real performance (it is missing phase, or angular, information). Detailed mathematical network analysis of RF amplifiers depends on the devices input impedance versus output load. The output device impedance is dependent on sources impedance driving the amplifier. Due to this interdependence, the use of s-parameters in linear small signal networks offers reliable and accurate results. This theory will be presented in the following chapters.

4.1.4 Difference between ideal and practical passive devices


Practical devices have so-called parasitic elements at very high frequencies.

Resistor Inductor Capacitor

Has an inductive parasitic action and acts like a low pass filtering function Has a capacitive and resistive parasitics, causing it to act like a damped parallel resonant tank circuit Has an inductive and resistive parasitics, causing it to act like a damped tank circuit with Series Resonance Frequency (SRF)

The inductor and capacitor parasitic reactances cause self-resonance.

Figure 7: Equivalent models of passive lumped elements

The use of a passive component above its SRF is possible, but must be critically evaluated. A capacitor above its SRF appears as an inductor with DC blocking capabilities.

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 26

4.1.5 The Smith Chart


As indicated in an example in the former chapter, the impedances of semiconductors are a mixture of resistive and reactive parts caused by phase delays. RF is best analyzed in the frequency domain and to do this special mathematical expressions are used:

Object Resistor Inductor Capacitor Frequency Complex designator

into R L C f j

Frequency domain R = R e + j 0
X L = + jL = L e + j 90
XC = j 1 1 = e j 90 C C

= 2 f

+ j = 1 =

1 = e + j 90 j

Some useful basic vector mathematics in RF: Complex impedance:

Im{Z } = Z sin ; Re{Z } = Z cos ;


tan = sin cos

Z = Re{Z } + j Im{Z } = Z e j = Z (cos j sin ) tan = Im{Z } ; with = t Re{Z }

Use of angle Use of sum The same rules are used for other issues, e.g., the reflection coefficient: Special cases: Resistive mismatch: Inductive mismatch: Capacity mismatch:

Polar convention Cartesian convention

r = r e j =

U b e j b U f e
j f

U b j ( b f ) e Uf

(R ) = 0 ( L ) = +90 (C ) = 90

reflection coefficient: (r ) = 0 reflection coefficient: (r ) = +90 reflection coefficient: (r ) = 90

RF Manual
Im ZZ
180

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Page: 27

The Gaussian number area (Polar Diagram) allows charting rectangular two-dimensional vectors:

Re{Z} Im{Z} 0 Re

Dots on the Re-Line are 100% resistive Dots on the Im-Line are 100% reactive Dots some their above the Re-Line are inductive + resistive Dots some their below the Re-Line are capacity + resistive

Resistive-Axis Reactive-Axis
In practical applications RF designers try to remain close to a 50 resistive impedance. The upper polar diagrams origin is 0. In RF circuits very large impedances can occur but we try to remain close to 50 by special network design for maximum power transfer. Using this approach allows the -region to be displayed with only limited accuracy. The Polar diagram cannot accurately show large impedances and the 50 region at the same time, simply because of limited paper size. Using this fact Mr. Phillip Smith, an engineer with Bell Laboratories developed in the 1930s the socalled Smith Chart. The charts origin is at 50. Left and right resistive values along the real axis end in 0 and at . The imaginary reactive (imaginary axis, or Im-Axis) end in 100% reactive (L or C). Close to the 50 origin high resolution is offered. Removed from the center of the chart, the resolution / error increases. The standard Smith Chart only displays positive resistances and has a unit radius (r = 1). Negative resistances generated by instability lay outside the unit circle. In this non-linear scaled diagram, the infinite dot of the Re-Axis is theoretical and bends to the zero point of the Smith Chart. Mathematically it can be shown that this will form the Smith Charts unit circle. All dots laying on this circle represent a reflection coefficient magnitude of ONE (100% mismatch). Any positive L/C combination with a resistor will be mathematically represented by its polar convention reflection coefficient inside the Smith Charts unity circle. Because the Smith Chart is a transformed linear scaled polar diagram we can use 100% of the polar diagram rules. Other diagram rules must be changed.

RF Manual

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Special cases: Dots above the horizontal axis represents impedance with inductive part Dots below the horizontal axis represents impedance with capacitive part Dots laying on the horizontal axis (ordinate) are 100% resistive Dots laying on the vertical axis (abscissa) are 100% reactive

( 0 < < 180 ) ( 180 < < 360 ) ( = 0 ) ( = 90 )

L-Area Scaling rule Magnitude for reflection coefficient

100 Z=0 Z=

25

C-Area

Figure 8: BGA2003 output Smith Chart (S22) Illustrated are the special cases for ZERO and infinitely large impedance. The upper half circle is the inductive region. The lower half of the circle is the capacitive region. The origin is the 50 system reference. To be more flexible, numbers printed in the chart are normalized to the reference impedance. Normalizing impedance procedure: Z norm = Example: Calculation: Result:

Zx ZO = Reference impedance (e.g., 50, 75) Zo

Plot a 100 & 50 resistor into the upper BGA2003s output Smith chart. Znorm1=100/50=2; Znorm2=25/50=0.5 The 100 resistor appears as a dot on the horizontal axis at the location 2. The 25 resistor appears as a dot on the horizontal axis at the location 0.5

RF Manual
Circuit:

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Page: 29

Example1: In the following three circuits, capacitors and inductors are specified by the amount of reactance @ 100MHz design frequency. Determine the value of the parts. Plot their impedance in to the BFG425Ws output (S22) Smith Chart.
Result:

Calculation:

Case A (constant resistance) From the circuit

Z A = 10 + j 25 ; L1 =

Basics:

1 C= XC X L= L = 2 f

Z(A)norm = ZA/50 = 0.2 + j0.5

Drawing into Smith Chart

25 = 39.8nH 2 100 MHz

Case B (constant resistance and variable reactance - variable capacitor) From the circuit Z B = 10 + j (10 to 25)

CB =

1 = 63.7pF to 159.2pF 2 100MHz (10 to 25)


Drawing into Smith Chart

Z(B)norm=ZB/50=0.5-j(0.2 to 0.5)

Case C (constant resistance and variable reactance - variable inductor) From the circuit Z C = (25 to 50) + j 25 ;

LC =

Z(C)norm=ZC/50=(0.5 to 1)+j0.5

(25 to 50) = 39.8nH to 79.6nH 2 100 MHz

Drawing into Smith Chart

RF Manual
Example2: Calculation:

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Page: 30

Determine BFG425Ws outputs reflection coefficient (S22) at 3GHz from the data sheet. Determine the output return loss and output impedance. Compensate for the reactive part of the impedance. From reading the data in the Smith Chart with improved resolution, the vector procedure based on the reflection coefficient is recommended. 1) Mechanically measure the scalar length from the chart origin to the 3GHz. 2) On the charts right side is printed a ruler with the numbers of 0 to 1. Read from it the equivalent scaled scalar length |r| = 0.34 3) Measure the angle (r) = = -50. Write the reflection coefficient in vector polar convention

Procedure:

r = 0.34e j 50
Normalized impedance:

Z 1+ r = = 1.513e j 30.5 ZO 1 r

Because the transistor was characterized in a 50 bench test set-up Zo = 50 Impedance: Z 22 = 75.64e j 30.5 = (65.2 j 38.4)

C=

1 = 1.38 pF 2 3GHz 38.4

The output of BFG425W has an equivalent circuit of 65.2 with 1.38pF series capacitance. Output return loss, not compensated: 20log(|r|)=-9.36dB For compensation of the reactive part of the impedance, we take the complex conjugate of the reactance: Xcon=-Im{Z} = -{-j38.4} = +j38.4

L=

caacitivereactance.

38.4 = 2nH a 2nH series inductor will compensate for the 2 3GHz

The new input reflection coefficient is calculated to: r =

Output return loss, compensated: 20log(0.132)=-17.6dB

65.2 50 = 0.132 65.2 + 50

Please note:

In practical situations the output impedance is a function of the input circuit. The input and output matching circuits are defined by the stability requirements and require gain and noise-matching. Investigation is done by using network analysis based on S-Parameters.

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 31

4.2 Small signal RF amplifier parameters


4.2.1 Transistor parameters, DC to microwave
At low DC currents and voltages, one can assume a transistor acts like a voltage-controlled current source with diode clamping action in the base-emitter input circuit. In this area, the transistors are specified by their large signal DC-parameters, i.e., DC-current gain (B, , hfe), maximum power dissipation, breakdown voltages and so forth. Increasing the frequency to the audio frequency range, the transistors behavior is observed to exhibit frequency-dependent changes of parameters, phase shift and parasitic capacitance effects. For characterization of these effects, small signal h-parameters are used. These hybrid parameters are determined by measuring voltage and current at one terminal and by the use of open or short (standards) at the other port. The h-parameter matrix is shown below. h-Parameter Matrix:

u1 h11 h12 i1 = h i2 21 h22 u2

Increasing the frequency to the HF and VHF ranges, open ports become inaccurate due to stray field radiation. This results in unacceptable errors. Due to this phenomenon y-parameters were developed. They again measure voltage and current, but use of only a short approach. This short approach yields more accurate results in this frequency region. The y-parameter matrix is shown below. y-Parameter Matrix: = i y

i1 y11
2

21

y12 u1 y22 u2

Further increasing the frequency, the parasitic inductance of a short causes problem due to mechanical parasitics. Additionally, measuring voltage, current, and their relative phases represents a daunting measurement problem. The scattering parameters, or s-parameters, were developed based on the measurement of the forward and backward traveling waves to determine the reflection coefficients on a transistors terminals (or ports). The s-parameter matrix is shown below. S-Parameter Matrix:

b1 S11 = b2 S 21

S12 a1 S 22 a2

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 32

4.2.2 Definition of the S-Parameters


Every amplifier has an input port and an output port (a 2-port network). Typically the input port is labeled Port 1 and the output is labeled Port 2.

Matrix:

Equation:

b1 S11 S12 a1 = b S 2 21 S 22 a2 b1 = S11 a 1 + S12 a 2

b 2 = S 21 a 1 + S 22 a 2

Figure 10: Two-port Networks (a) and (b) waves The forward-traveling waves (a) are traveling into the DUTs (input or output) ports. The backward-traveling waves (b) are reflected back from the DUTs ports The expression port ZO terminate means the use of a 50-standard. This is not a complex conjugate power match! In the previous chapter the reflection coefficient was defined as: Reflection coefficient: r =

back running wave forward running wave


b1 a1
a2 = 0

Calculating the input reflection factor on port 1: S11 =

with the output terminated in ZO.

That means the source injects a forward-traveling wave (a1) into port1. No forward-traveling power (a2) injected into port2. The same procedure can be done at port2 with the Output reflection factor: S 22 =

b2 a2

a1 =0

with the input terminated in ZO.

Gain is defined by: gain =

output wave input wave

The forward-traveling wave gain is calculated by the wave (b2) traveling out off port2 divided by the wave (a1) injected into port1.

S 21 =

b2 a1

a2 =0

The backward traveling wave gain is calculated by the wave (b1) traveling out off port1 divided by the wave (a2) injected into port2.

S12 =

b1 a2

a1 = 0

RF Manual
a1 = 1 (V1 + Z O i1 ) 2 ZO
= = = =

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Page: 33

The normalized waves (a) and (b) are defined as: signal into port 1 signal into port 2 signal out of port 1 signal out of port 2

Forward transmission:

FT = 20log (S 21 )dB

1 (V2 + Z O i2 ) a2 = 2 ZO 1 (V1 + Z O i1 ) b1 = 2 ZO b2 = 1 (V1 + Z O i2 ) 2 ZO

Isolation:

S12(dB) = 20log(S12 )dB RL in = 20log(S11 )dB

Input Return Loss:

Output Return Loss:

RL OUT = 20log(S 22 )dB

The normalized waves have units of Wat t and are referenced to the system impedance ZO. It is shown by the following mathematical analyses: The relationship between U, P an ZO can be written as:

Insertion Loss:

IL = 20log(S21 )dB

Rem:

u = P = i ZO ZO a1 =
a1 =

Substituting:

Z0 ZO

= ZO

ZO ZO

ZO ZO ZO ZO

ZO ZO ZO

= ZO

P Z i V1 Z i + O 1 = 1 + O 1 2 2 ZO 2 Z O 2 ZO

P =U I =

U2 R

P=

U =I R R

Z O i1 P P P Volt 1 + = 1 + 1 a1 = P1 ( Unit = Watt = ) 2 2 2 2 Ohm V forward , the normalized waves can be determined by the Because a1 = ZO
measuring the voltage of a forward-traveling wave referenced to the system impedance constant Z O . Directional couplers or VSWR bridges can determine the forward- or backward-traveling voltage wave.
50 VHF-SWR-Meter built from a kit (Nuova Elettronica). It consists of three strip-lines. The middle line passes the main signal from the input to the output. The upper and lower strip-lines select a part of the forward and backward traveling waves by special electrical and magnetic crosscoupling. Diode detectors at each coupled strip-line end rectify the power to a DC voltage, which is passed to an analog circuit for processing and monitoring of the VSWR. Applications: Power antenna match control, PA output power detector, vector Voltmeter, vector network analyzer, AGC, etc. These kinds of circuits are published in amateur radio literature and in several magazines.

IN

OUT

Detector Vforward Vbackward

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Page: 34

4.2.2.1

2-Port Network definition


Input return loss

S11 =

Power reflected from input port Power available from generator at input port

Output return loss

S 22 =

Power reflected from output port Power available from generator at output port

Forward transmission loss (insertion loss)


Figure 11: S-Parameters in the Two-port Network

S 21 = Transducer power gain


Reverse transmission loss (isolation)

S12 = Reverse transducer power gain


Philips data sheet parameter Insertion power gain |S21|2: 10dB log S 21 = 20dB log S 21
2

Example: Calculation:

Calculate the insertion power gain for the BGA2003 at 100MHz, 450MHz, 1800MHz, and 2400MHz for the bias set-up VVS-OUT=2.5V, IVS-OUT=10mA. Download the S-Parameter data file [2_510A3.S2P] from the Philips website page for the Silicon MMIC amplifier BGA2003. This is a section of the file: # MHz S MA R 50 ! Freq. S11 100 0.58765 -9.43 400 0.43912 -28.73 500 0.39966 -32.38 1800 0.21647 -47.97 2400 0.18255 -69.08

S21 21.85015 16.09626 14.27094 4.96451 3.89514

163.96 130.48 123.44 85.877 76.801

S12 0.00555 0.019843 0.023928 0.07832 0.11188

83.961 79.704 79.598 82.488 80.224

0.9525 0.80026 0.75616 0.52249 0.48091

Results:

100MHz 450MHz 1800MHz 2400MHz

20log(21.85015) = 26.8 dB

16.09626e130.48 + 14.27094e123.44 20dB log = 23.6dB 2


20log(4.96451) = 13.9 dB 20log(3.89514) = 11.8 dB

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 35

4.2.2.2

3-Port Network definition

Typical vehicles for 3-port s-parameters are: directional couplers, power splitters, combiners, and phase splitters.
3-Port s-parameter definition: Port reflection coefficient / return loss: Port 1 Port 2 Port 3

S11 =

b1 |( a = 0; a = 0) a1 2 3 b S 22 = 2 |( a1 =0; a 3 =0) a2 b S33 = 3 |( a1 = 0; a 2 = 0) a3

Transmission gain: Port 1=>2 Figure 12: Three-port Network's (a) and (b) waves Port 1=>3 Port 2=>3 Port 2=>1 Port 3=>1 Port 3=>2

S 21 =

b2 |( a = 0) a1 3 b S31 = 3 |( a 2 = 0) a1 b S32 = 3 |( a1 = 0 ) a2 b S12 = 1 |( a 3 = 0) a2 b S31 = 1 |( a 2 = 0) a3 b S 23 = 3 |( a1 = 0) a2

RF Manual
References

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 36

Author: Andreas Fix RF Discrete Small Signal Applications Engineer

1. Philips Semiconductors, RF Wideband Transistors and MMICs, Data Handbook SC14 2000, SParameter Definitions, page 39 2. Philips Semiconductors, Datasheet, 1998 Mar 11, Product Specification, BFG425W, NPN 25GHz wideband transistor 3. Philips Semiconductors, Datasheet, 1999 Jul 23, Product Specification, BGA2003, Silicon MMIC amplifier 4. Philips Semiconductors, Datasheet, 2000 Dec 04, Product Specification, BGA2022, MMIC mixer 5. Philips Semiconductors, Datasheet, 2001 Oct 19, Product Specification, BGA2711, MMIC wideband amplifier 6. Philips Semiconductors, Discrete Semiconductors, FACT SHEET NIJ004, Double Polysilicon the technology behind silicon MMICs, RF transistors & PA modules 7. Philips Semiconductors, Hamburg, Germany, T. Bluhm, Application Note, Breakthrough In Small Signal - Low VCEsat (BISS) Transistors and their Applications, AN10116-02, 2002 8. H.R. Camenzind, Circuit Design for Integrated Electronics, page34, 1968, Addison-Wesley, 9. Prof. Dr.-Ing. K. Schmitt, Telekom Fachhochschule Dieburg, Hochfrequenztechnik 10. C. Bowick, RF Circuit Design, page 10-15, 1982, Newnes 11. Nhrmann, Transistor-Praxis, page 25-30, 1986, Franzis-Verlag 12. U. Tietze, Ch. Schenk, Halbleiter-Schaltungstechnik, page 29, 1993, Springer-Verlag 13. W. Hofacker, TBB1, Transistor-Berechnungs- und Bauanleitungs-Handbuch, Band1, page 281284, 1981, ING. W. HOFACKER 14. MicroSim Corporation, MicroSim Schematics Evaluation Version 8.0, PSpice, July 1998 15. Karl H. Hille, DL1VU, Der Dipol in Theorie und Praxis, Funkamateur-Bibliothek, 1995 16. PUFF, Computer Aided Design for Microwave Integrated Circuits, California Institute of Technology, 1991

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 37

5. Application Diagrams
TV/VCR/DVD Tuning Application Diagram

INPUT FILTER

RF PREAMPLIFIER

BANDPASS FILTER

MIXER

IF AMPLIFIER

IF out

OSCILLATOR

Varicaps SOD323 SOD523 VHF - low BB152 VHF - high BB153 BB157 UHF BB182 BB178 BB187 5V

MOSFET

*
2- in -1.5 V

9V

BB149A BB179

BF904, BF904A BF1100 BF1102 BF909, BF909A BF1109 BF1102R BF1201, BF1201A BF1203 BF1105 BF1204

MSD455

MOSFET include NEW Mosfets: BF1211, BF1211R, BF1211WR BF1212, BF1212R, BF1212WR BF1205, BF1206

* *

IF Amplifier: BGA2717

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 38

5. Application Diagrams
LNB Application Diagram

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 39

5. Application Diagrams
2.4 GHz Front-end Application Diagram

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 40

6. Application notes (Interactive)


Full application notes in appendix of this RF Manual in bold. Online application notes on Philips Semiconductors website: http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/products/all_appnotes.html

Product Family
MMICs

Application Note Title


Demoboard for 900&1800MHz
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/9001800MHZ.pdf

Relevant Types
BGA2001 BGA2001 BGA2003 BGA2003 BGA2003 BGA2011 BGA2012 BGA2022 BGA2022 BGA2031 BGA2030 BGA6589 BFG21W BFG21W BFG403W BFG410W BFG410W BFG410W BFG410W, BFG425W BFG425W BFG425W BFG425W

Demoboard for BGA2001


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/9001800MHZ.pdf

Demoboard 900MHz LNA


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/LNA900MHZ.pdf

Demoboard for W-CDMA


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/WBCDMA.pdf

2GHz high IP3 LNA High IP3 MMIC LNA at 900MHz


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BGA2011_LNA_950MHZ.pdf

High IP3 MMIC LNA at 1.8 - 2.4 GHz


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BGA2012_LNA_18_24GHZ.pdf

Rx mixer for 1800MHz Rx mixer for 2450MHz


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BGA2022_MIXER.pdf

High-linearity wideband driver mobile communication CDMA PCS demoboard WDMA appl. For the BGA6589 wideband amplifier Wideband 1880MHz PA driver transistors http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BFG21W_1880DRV.pdf 800MHz PA driver
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BFG21W_800DRV2.pdf

900MHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/LNA9M403.pdf

2GHz buffer amplifier


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG410W_BUF2_1.pdf

900MHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/B770LNA9M410.pdf

2GHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/RD7B0789.pdf

Ultra LNA's for 900&2000MHz with high IP3


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/KV96157A.pdf

1.5GHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/1U5GHZLN.pdf

2GHz driver-amplifier 900MHz driver-amplifier with enable-switch


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/900MHAP2.pdf

RF Manual
Product Family
1.9GHz LNA

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 41

Application Note Title


900MHz driver amplifier
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/900MHZDR.pdf http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG425W_1.pdf

Relevant Types
BFG425W BFG425W BFG425W BFG425W BFG425W, BFG21W BFG425W, BFG21W BFG425W, BFG410W, BB142 BFG480W BFG480W BFG480W BFG480W BFG480W BFG480W BFG480W BFG505 BFG505/X BFG520, BFR505, BFR520 BFG540/X, BFG10/X, BFG11/X BFG540W/X BB202 BF1107 BF9...., BF110.., BF120.. BF1108 BAP51-02 BAP50-05 BAP51-03

Improved IP3 behavior of the 900MHz LNA 2GHz LNA


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/B773LNA2G425.pdf

Power amplifier for 1.9GHz DECT and PHS


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/DECT.pdf

2.4GHz power amplifier


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG425W_21W_2400M_1.pdf

CDMA cellular VCO


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/VCOB827.pdf

900MHz LNA 2.45GHz power amplifier


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG480W_2450M_1.pdf

2.4GHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG480W_2400M_1.pdf

2GHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG480W_2G_1.pdf

900MHz LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AI_BFG480W_900M_1.pdf

1880MHz PA driver
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BFG480W_1880DRV.pdf

900MHz driver
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/BFG480W_900MDRV.pdf

Low noise, low current preamplifier for 1.9GHz at 3V


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/1P9GHZLC.pdf

1890MHz power own converter with 11MHz IF


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/1890MHZ.pdf

Low noise 900MHz preamplifier at 3V


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/900MHZ.pdf

Power amplifier for 1.9GHz at 3V


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/1P9GHZ3.pdf

400MHz :LNA
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/400MHZUL.pdf

Varicaps FETs

Low voltage FM stereo radio with TEA5767/68 Application for RF switch BF1107 Application note for MOSFET

Application for RF switch BF1108 Pin diodes 2.45 GHz T/R, RF switch for e.g. Bluetooth application
http://www.philips.semiconductors.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AN10173-01.pdf

Low impedance Pin diode


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/acrobat/applicationnotes/AN10174-01.pdf

1.8GHz transmit-receive Pin diode switch

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 42

7.1 Product portfolio: MMICs


* = new product

General Purpose Wideband Amplifiers, 50 Ohm Gain Blocks


Type BGA2711 BGA2748 BGA2771 BGA2776 BGA2709 BGA2712 BGM1011 Package Vs (V) SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 6 4 4 6 6 6 6 4 6 6 6 fu1 Limits @ 1GHz Gain3 (dB) @ 100 2.2 2.6 3.0 Is Ptot @-3dB NF Psat Gain3 P1dB OIP3 (mA) (mW) (GHz) (dB) (dBm) (dB) (dBm) (dBm) MHz GHz GHz GHz 2) 3.6 4.7 2 12.9 -2 10 13 14.1 13.8 12.8 20 200 15 50 34 35 25 35 50 8 25 15 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 1.9 2.4 2.8 2.8 2.8 3.6 3.0 3.6 3.0 1.8
2)

@ Vs Is (V) (mA) 5 3 3 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 5 12 5.7 33 23.8 23.5 12.5 25.5 14.6 2) 4.3 15.9
2)

4.4 4.7 4 3.9 4.7 4.8 2.6 4.9 2.1

-4 2) 12 8 12.4 4.8 13.8 9.7 -5 11 1

21.3 21 22.8
2)

-10 11 5.5 8.3 0 12.2 6 -9 7 -3

-2 22 17 24 12 23 18 14 24 20
2

14.8 20.3 22.2 22.6 20.9 25.0 19.5 14.0 24.0 20.0

17.6 20.4 23.2 22.7 21.9 37.0 20.4 22.0 24.0 23.0

14.2 17.5 20.8 22.0 20.8 32.0 19.9 21 24 23

11.3 15.2 18.7 21.1 18.6 28.0 18.7 19 23 20

22.7 21.3 30 20.1 22 24 23

BGM1012 SOT363 BGA2715 SOT363 BGA2716 SOT363 BGA2717 SOT363

8.0

Notes: 1. Upper -3 db point, to gain at 1 ghz. 2. Optimized parameter. 3. Gain = |S21| Add ==: BGA2715/6/7 are available in Q3 2003. Mentioned data is objective. Highlighted in red are the parameters designed to be optimal for that specific type. Area filled blue are the nicely flat gain-curved types over the entire LNB relevant range. Demo boards of BGA2715/16/17 will be available at CQS.

2 Stage Variable Gain Linear Amplifier


Limits Type Package Vs Is Ptot Frequency Range (V) (mA) (mW) (MHz) 800-2500 BGA2031/1 SOT363 3.3 50 200 24 Notes: 1. Gain = GP, power gain. 2. DG = Gain control range Gain (dB)
1

@ @ 900MHz @1900 MHz 2 2 1 DG P1dB ACPR Gain DG P1dB ACPR Vs Is (V) (mA) (dB) (dBm) (dBc) (dB) (dB) (dBm) (dBc) 62 11 49 23 56 13 49 3 51

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 43

7.1 Product portfolio: MMICs


Wideband Linear Mixer
Limits Type BGA2022 Package SOT363 Vs 4 Is 20 Ptot 40 (V) (mA) (mW) Notes: 1. Gain = GC, Conversion gain RF Input Freq. Range (MHz) 800-2500 IF Output Freq. Range (MHz) 50-500 @ 880MHz NF (dB) 9 Gain (dB) 5
1

@2450 MHz OIP3 NF (dB) 9 Gain (dB) 6


1

@ Vs (V) 3 Is (mA) 51

OIP3 (dBm) 10

(dBm) 4

Low Noise Wideband Amplifiers


Limits Type BGA2001 BGA2003 BGA20044) BGA2011 BGA2012 BGU2003 Package Vs Is 30 30 15 30 15 30 Ptot 135 135 50 135 70 135 1.5 1 193) 23 10 -6 NF (dB) 1.3 1.8 (V) (mA) (mW) SOT343R 4.5 SOT343R 4.5 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 3.3 4.5 4.5 @ 900MHz Gain 221) 24
1)

@1800 MHz IIP3 -7.4 -6.5 NF (dB) 1.3 1.8 1.4 1.7 1.1 Gain (dB) 19.51) 16 18 163) 18
1)

Gain3 (db) @ IIP3 100 MHz 20 26 24 22 25 2.6 Vs 1 3.0 GHz (V) GHz GHz 17.1 18.6 14.8 18.2 19 11.6 11.1 8 11.6 12.3 10.7 10.1 6.5 10.5 11.6 2.5 2.5 2.7 3 3 2.5

@ Is (mA) 4 102) 6 15 7 102)

(dB) (dBm)

(dBm) -4.5 -4.8 -5 10 -5

SOT343R 4.5

Notes : 1. MSG 2. Adjustable bias 3. |S21|2 4. Switched LNA with internal match for 1.8 GHz. Objective Data

General Purpose Medium Power Amplifers, 50 ohm gain blocks


Limits Type BGA6289 BGA6489 BGA6589 Package SOT89 SOT89 SOT89 Vs 6 6 6 Is 120 120 120 Ptot 480 480 480 NF (dB) 3.8 3.1 3 (V) (mA) (mW) @ 900MHz Gain (dB) (dBm) (dBm) 15 20 22 31 33 33 17 20 21
3

@1800 MHz P1dB NF (dB) 4.1 3.3 3.3 Gain (dB) 13 16 17


3

Gain3 2.5 (dBm) GHz 15 17 20 12 15 15 P1dB

fu1 @-3dB (MHz) 4000 4000 4000 Vs (V) 3.8 5.1 4.8

@ Is (mA) 83 83 83

OIP3

NF (dB) 4.1 3.3 3.3

Notes:1 Determined by return Loss(>10dB) 3. Gain = |S21|2

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 44

7.2 Product portfolio: Wideband transistors (1)


Wideband transistors (RF small signal) to 5 Ft GHz
Ft Type Package (GHz) Vceo Ic Ptot Polarity ITO Gum F @ Gum F @ Vo 1) Pl (dB) (dB) (MHz) (dB) (dB) (MHz) (mV) (dBm) (dBm) NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN PNP PNP NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN PNP NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN PNP NPN NPN >6 >6.5 >7 >6 20 20 10 16 18 13.5 15 12.5 16.3 13 18 16 16 13 13 4.5 4.5 5 3.8 2.5 8 8 1.8 2 900 900 900 900 500 100 100 500 200 500 500 500 800 200 500 800 500 800 1000 1000 500 900 900 6.5 10.5 12 11 8 12 7.5 7.5 5 800 800 800 500 800 150 750 2500 1200 26 28 21 45 47 14 100 500 120 240 70 80 10 10 15 15 15 10 5 7 7 5 6 1900 1900 1900 1900 (V) (mA) (mW) @ Ic Vce & (V) (mA) -

Typical Maximum values BFG10(X ) BFG10W/X BFG11(/X) BFG11W/X BLT80 BLT81 BLT50 BLT70 PMBT3640 PMBTH81 PMBHT10 BFS17 BF547 BF747 BFG16A BFQ17 BSR12 BFS17W BFR53 BFT25 BFS17A BFR94A BFG35 BFQ136 BFQ18 BFQ34/01 BFQ68 BFG25A/X BFG25W(/X) BFG31 BFG590(/X) BFG590W/X SOT143 SOT343 SOT143 SOT343 SOT223 SOT223 SOT223 SOT223 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT223 SOT89 SOT23 SOT323 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT122 SOT223 SOT122 SOT89 SOT122 SOT122 SOT143 SOT343 SOT223 SOT143 SOT343 0.5 0.6 0.65 1 1.2 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.6 2 2.3 2.8 3.5 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 8 10 8 8 10 9.5 10 8 12 20 25 15 20 20 25 25 15 15 10 5 15 25 18 18 18 18 18 5 5 15 15 15 250 250 500 500 250 400 400 760

250 2000 500 2000 500 2000 250 2100 80 40 40 25 50 50 350 400 400 300 300 300

150 1000 150 1000 100 50 50 6.5 25 250 300 250 30 300

150 3500 150 1000 600 9000 150 1000 150 2700 300 4500 6.5 32 6.5 200 200 500 400 500 100 1000

1600 1600 2000 800 2000 2000 550 -

RF Manual

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product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 45

7.2 Product portfolio: Wideband transistors (2)


Wideband transistors (RF small signal) 5 - 8 Ft GHz
Ft Type Package (GHz) Vceo Ic Ptot Polarity @ Vo 1) Pl ITO Gum F @ Gum F (dB) (dB) (MHz) (dB) (dB) (MHz) (mV) (dBm) (dBm) NPN PNP NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN PNP PNP PNP PNP NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN 16 12 11.5 18 14 14 14 16.5 13 13 13 15 18 17 16.5 15.5 16 11.5 16 16 13 17 16 13 13 18.5 18 17 14 2 3.75 3.5 2.4 2.1 2 2 1.9 1.5 1.5 1.8 1.8 2.5 2.5 2.4 2.4 3.3 1.7 2.7 1.9 1.3 1.8 1.7 1.7 1000 500 800 500 1000 1000 1000 500 1000 1000 1000 1000 500 500 500 500 500 500 1000 500 500 1000 500 900 500 900 900 500 900 500 1000 1000 11 8 8 8 8 11 10 12 7.5 10 13.5 13.5 12 7.5 7.5 15 10 8 3 3 3 2.1 3 3 2.3 3 3 3.5 2.5 2.7 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1000 1000 800 800 2000 1000 2000 800 800 2000 2000 350 150 150 150 300 700 500 1600 425 1200 850 21.5 34 -18 -20 (V) (mA) (mW) @ Ic Vce & (V) (mA) 50 14 14 14 30 70 45 240 30 120 5 100 120 1 70 9 10 10 10 5 10 10 18 8 18 3 10 18 3 8 -

Typical Maximum values BFG92A(/X) BFQ149 BFR106 BFR92 BFR92A BFR92AT BFR92AW BFR93 BFR93AT BFR93AW BFS25A BFT25A BFT92 BFT92W BFT93 BFT93W BFG97 BFQ19 BFG93A(/X) BFG94 BFQ270 BFR93A BFQ135 BFC520 BFG135 BFG591 BFQ591 BFQ621 BFC505 BFG198 BFG67(/X) BFQ67 SOT143 SOT89 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT416 SOT323 SOT23 SOT416 SOT323 SOT323 SOT23 SOT23 SOT323 SOT23 SOT323 SOT223 SOT89 SOT143 SOT223 SOT172 SOT23 SOT172 SOT353 SOT223 SOT223 SOT89 SOT172 SOT353 SOT223 SOT143 SOT23 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5.5 5.5 6 6 6 6 6.5 7 7 7 7 7 7.3 8 8 8 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 12 12 12 5 5 15 15 12 12 15 15 12 12 19 12 19 8 15 15 15 16 8 10 10 10 25 100 25 25 25 25 35 35 35 6.5 6.5 25 35 35 400 500 300 300 150 300 300 150 300 32 32 300 300 300

100 1000

50 300 100 1000 100 1000 35 300 60 35 700 300 500 #### 150 2700 70 1000 150 1000 200 2000 200 2000 150 18 50 50 800 500 380 300

1200 2000 800 2000 2000 700 -

100 1000

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 46

7.2 Product portfolio: Wideband transistors (3)


Wideband transistors (RF small signal) > 8 Ft GHz
Ft Type Package (GHz) Vceo Ic Ptot Polarity ITO Gum F @ Gum F @ Vo 1) Pl (dB) (dB) (MHz) (dB) (dB) (MHz) (mV) (dBm) (dBm) NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN NPN 13 15 14 16 15 20 19 17 18 16 15 17 15 17 17 15 15 14 17 15 14 16 2 1.4 1.3 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.1 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.4 1.7 1.9 1.6 1.2 1.6 1.6 1.9 1.6 1.6 1.9 1.5 1 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.6 0.6 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 900 1000 900 900 900 900 900 900 8 9.5 8 10 9.2 13 13 11 11 10 9 10 9 10 9 9 7 10 9 8 10 20 20 2.7 2 2 2.1 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.85 2.1 2.1 2.1 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 2.1 1.9 1.9 2.1 1.6 1.8 1.2 1.2 0.9 0.9 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 1900 2000 2000 2000 2000 2000 275 275 500 500 500 500 550 4 17 17 21 21 21 4 17 17 21 4 17 21 5 5 12 10 26 26 34 34 34 10 26 26 34 10 26 34 6 28 15 22 (V) (mA) (mW) @ Ic Vce & (V) (mA) 5 20 20 40 40 40 40 5 20 40 5 20 40 1 80 10 25 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 6 6 8 6 6 8 1 2 2 2 -

Typical Maximum values BFQ67W PBR941 PBR951 PRF947 PRF957 BFE505 BFE520 BFG505(/X) BFG520(/X) BFG540(/X) SOT323 SOT23 SOT23 SOT323 SOT323 SOT353 SOT353 SOT143 SOT143 SOT143 8 8 8 8.5 8.5 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 17 18 21 22 25 45 45 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 15 15 15 15 15 15 8 8 12 15 15 15 15 15 15 10 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 2.5 2.5 50 50 100 50 100 18 70 18 70 70 120 120 120 18 70 18 18 70 70 120 18 70 120 50 3.6 200 250 12 30 15 50 300 360 365 250 270 500 1000 150 300 500 500 500 650 500 1000 150 150 300 150 500 150 300 500 150 16 600 360 54 135 38 125

BFG520W(/X) SOT343 BFG540W(/X) SOT343 SOT223 BFG541 BFM505 BFM520 BFQ540 BFR505 BFR505T BFR520 BFR520T BFR540 BFS505 BFS520 BFS540 PRF949 BFG403W BFG21W BFG480W BFG410W BFG425W BFU510 BFU540 SOT363 SOT363 SOT89 SOT23 SOT416 SOT23 SOT416 SOT23 SOT323 SOT323 SOT323 SOT416 SOT343 SOT343 SOT343 SOT343 SOT343 SOT343 SOT343

120 1200

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 47

7.3 Product portfolio: Varicap diodes


TV & Satellite Varicap Diodes - UHF tuning
TUNING RANGE Type Package min Cd @ Vr (pF) max 2.00 2.10 2.10 2.25 2.22 2.22 2.22 2.25 2.10 2.25 2.00 (V) 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 Cd over voltage range (V) ratio 9.7 10.0 23.0 9.0 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.2 10.0 9.0 8.3 V1 to V2 1 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 0.5 1 1 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 rs MATCHED ()= SETS TV max 0.75 0.75 1.40 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 1.20 % 2.0 0.5 1.6 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X TYPICAL APPLICATIONS VCO SAT. STB

Matched
BB154 BB134 BB146 BB149 BB149A BB149A/TM BB179 BB179B SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD523 SOD523 SOD323 SOD323 SOT23 SOT143 1.90 1.70 1.70 1.90 1.95 1.95 1.95 1.90 1.70 1.90 1.60

Unmatched
BB135 BB159 BBY31 BBY39 BBY62

TV & Satellite Varicap diodes - VHF tuning


TUNING RANGE Type Package min Cd @ Vr (pF) max 2.75 2.75 2.80 2.75 2.89 2.75 2.92 2.92 3.40 2.75 2.89 2.92 1.055 2.75 1.055 6.00 3.00 (V) 28 28 28 28 28 28 25 25 28 28 28 25 28 28 28 25 28 Cd over voltage range (V) ratio 26 16 40 15 >20.6 >13.5 11 11 >19.5 >13.5 >20.6 11 14 15 14 5.5 14 V1 to V2 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 0.5 1 0.5 3 1 28 28 28 28 28 28 25 25 28 28 28 25 28 28 28 25 28 rs MATCHED ()======== SETS TV max 2 0.9 2.8 0.9 1.2 0.8 0.75 0.75 1.4 0.8 1.2 0.75 3 0.9 3 0.7 1 X X X % 1 0.7 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X TYPICAL APPLICATIONS VCO SAT. STB

Matched
BB132 BB133 BB147 BB148 BB152 BB153 BB157 BB157/TM BB164 BB178 BB182 BB187 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD323 SOD323 SOD523 SOT23 SOT23 2.3 2.2 2.4 2.4 2.48 2.36 2.57 2.57 2.9 2.36 2.48 2.57 0.7 2.4 0.7 4.3 2.4

Unmatched
BB131 BB158 BB181 BBY40 BBY42

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 48

7.3 Product portfolio: Varicap diodes


VCO Varicap diodes
Type Package min BB145B-01 BB140-01 BB140L BB141 BB142 BB143 BB145 BB145B BB145C BB202 BB151 BB156 BB155 SOD723 SOD723 SOD882 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD323 SOD323 SOD323 6.4 2.48 2.48 3.9 4 4.75 6.4 6.4 6.4 28.2 15.4 14.4 45.2 Cd @ Vr (pF) max 7.4 2.69 2.69 4.5 4.9 5.75 7.4 7.4 7.2 33.5 17 17.6 49.8 (V) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.2 1 1 0.3 min 2.55 1.27 1.27 2.22 1.85 2.05 2.75 2.55 2.55 Cd @ Vr (pF) max 2.95 1.38 1.38 2.55 2.35 2.55 3.25 2.95 2.85 (V) 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2.3 4 4 2.82 TUNING RANGE Cd over voltage range (V) ratio >2.2 1.88 - 2.04 1.88 - 2.04 1.76 2.2 2.35 2 .2.2 2.39 - 2.53 2.5 1.8 1.86 V1 to V2 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0.2 1 1 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2.3 4 4 0.35 0.4 0.4 0.35 rs ()=== typ. 0.6 1.2 1.2 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6

7.2 11.2 9 typ. 7.6 24.55 9.6 26.70

Radio Varicap diodes FM radio tuning


Type Package min BB804 BB200 BB201 BB202 BB156 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOD523 SOD323 42 65.8 89 28.2 14.4 Cd @ Vr (pF) max 46.5 74.2 102 33.5 17.6 (V) 2 1 1 0.2 1 min Cd @ Vr (pF) max (V) 8 4.5 7.5 2.3 4 TUNING RANGE Cd over voltage range (V) ratio (min) 1.75 5 3.1 2.5 3.3 V1 to V2 2 1 1 0.2 1 8 4.5 7.5 2.3 7.5 rs ()=== typ. 0.2 0.43 0.3 0.35 0.4

26 typ. 12 25.5 7.2 7.6 14.8 29.7 11.2 9.6

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 49

7.3 Product portfolio: Varicap diodes


VCO / VCXO / TCXO Varicap overview

4.0

released in development

Philips VCO Varicaps


BB199

3.5
BB202

3.0

for VCO
BB145B/C BB140 BB143 BB145

for VCXO/TCXO

C1/C4

2.5

BB208-02/-03 BB155 BB156

2.0
over 3.8 GHz

BB142 BB141

1.8 to 3.8 GHz

under 1.8 GHz

1.5

10

100

C1

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 50

7.4 Product portfolio: Bandswitch diodes


Band Switch diodes
MAXIMUM RATINGS Type Package Rd VR (V) IF (mA) 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 CHARACTERISTICS ; maximals @ and (mA) 2 2 2 3 3 3 5 IF f (MHz) 100 100 100 100 100 200 200 (pF) 1.2 1.2 1.2 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.0 Cd @ VR and f (V) 6 6 6 3 3 3 20 (MHz) 1 1 1 1 1 1 to 100 1

BA277-01 BA277 BA278 BA891 BA591 BA792 BAT18

SOD723 SOD523 SOD523 SOD523 SOD323 SOD110 SOT23

35 35 35 35 35 35 35

100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Bandswitching diodes at 100MHz


2.6 2.4 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.1 1.0 IF / [mA] 10.0
BA591 (Philips) BA792 (Philips) BA891 (Philips) BAT18 (Philips) BA277-01 (Philips) BA278 (Philips)

Rd / [Ohm]

100.0

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 51

7.5 Product portfolio: Fets


N-channel Junction Field-effect transistors for switching
VDS Type Package (V) max BSR56 BSR57 BSR58 PMBFJ108 PMBFJ109 PMBFJ110 PMBFJ111 PMBFJ112 PMBFJ113 J108 J109 J110 J111 J112 J113 PMBF4391 PMBF4392 PMBF4393 PN4392 PN4393 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT54 SOT54 40 40 40 25 25 25 40 40 40 25 25 25 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 (mA) max 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 IG IDSS (mA) min max 50 20 8 80 40 10 20 5 2 80 40 10 20 5 2 50 25 5 25 5 100 80 150 75 30 V(p)GS (V) min 4 2 0.8 3 2 0.5 3 1 0.5 3 2 0.5 3 1 0.5 4 2 0.5 2 0.5 max 10 6 4 10 6 4 10 5 3 10 6 4 10 5 3 10 5 3 5 3 CHARACTERISTICS RDSON ( ) max min 25 40 60 8 12 18 30 50 100 8 12 18 30 50 100 30 60 100 60 100 Crs (Pf) max 5 5 5 15 15 15 typ.3 typ.3 typ.3 15 15 15 typ.3 typ.3 typ.3 3.5 3.5 3.5 5 5 typ 4 4 4 13 13 13 4 4 4 13 13 13 ton (ns) max 15 15 15 15 15 toff (ns) typ max 25 6 6 6 35 35 35 6 6 6 35 35 35 20 35 50 35 50 50 100 -

P-channel Junction Field-effect transistors for switching


VDS Type Package (V) max PMBFJ174 PMBFJ175 PMBFJ176 PMBFJ177 J174 J175 J176 J177 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 (mA) max 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 IG IDSS (mA) min max 20 7 2 1.5 20 7 2 1.5 135 70 35 20 135 70 35 20 V(p)GS (V) min 5 3 1 0.8 5 3 1 0.8 max 10 6 4 2.25 10 6 4 2.25 CHARACTERISTICS RDSON ( ) max min 85 125 250 300 85 125 250 300 Crs (Pf) max typ 7 15 35 45 7 15 35 45 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 typ.4 ton (ns) max toff (ns) typ max 15 30 35 45 15 30 35 45 -

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 52

7.5 Product portfolio: Fets


N-channel Junction Field-effect transistors
CHARACTERISTICS Type Package VDS (V) IG (Ma) 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 5 5 5 50 50 50 IDSS (mA) min max 2 6 12 2 6 12 3 6 11 2 6 12 13 0.7 2.5 6 10 4 1 0.2 12 12 24 6.5 15 25 6.5 15 25 7 13 18 6.5 15 25 25 3 7 12 18 10 5 1.5 60 30 60 1 1 2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.5 V(p)GS (V) min <8 <8 <8 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 1.0 1.5 max |Yfs| (mS) min max 3 3 3 3 3 3 4.5 4.5 4.5 12 16 20 35 2.5 4 6 7 1 1.5 >1 >10 >10 >10 4 4.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 Crs (Pf) min 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.8 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.3 max 2.7 2.7 2.7 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.5 2.5 2.5

DC, LF and HF amplifiers


BF245A BF245B BF245C BF545A BF545B BF545C BF556A BF556B BF556C BF861A BF861B BF861C BF862 BF5101) BF5111) BF5121) BF5131) BFR30 BFR31 BFT46 PMBFJ308 PMBFJ309 PMBFJ310 SOT54 SOT54 SOT54 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 SOT23 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 25 25 25 20 20 20 20 20 25 25 25 25 25 25

Preamplifiers for AM tuners in car radios

0.8 2 <20 typ. 0.8 typ. 1.5 typ. 2.2 typ. 3 <5 <2.5 <1.2 6.5 4 6.5

RF stages FM portables, car radios, main radios & mixer stages

Low level general purpose amplifiers

General purpose amplifiers AM input stages UHF/VHF amplifiers

N-channel, single MOS-FETS for switching


CHARACTERISTICS Type Package VDS ID (V) BSD22 BSS83 BF1107 BF11085) BF1108R5) SOT143 SOT143 SOT23 SOT143B SOT143R 20 10 3 3 3 (Ma) 50 50 10 10 10 IDSS (mA) min max 1003) 100
3)

V(p)GS (V) min 0.12) max 2 21) 74) 74) 74)

RDSON ( ) max min 30 45 20 20 20 -

Crs (Pf) max typ typ.0.6 typ.0.6 -

ton (ns) max 1 1 -

toff (ns) typ max 5 5 -

|S21(on)|2 |S21(off)2 (dB) max 2.5 3 3 30 30 30 (dB) min depl. enh. depl. depl. depl. MODE

Silicon RF Switches

1003)

RF Manual
1) Asymmetrical 2) VGS(th) 3) ID 4) VSG

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 53

7.5 Product portfolio: Fets


7) @ 200 mhZ 8) COSS 9) Cig 10) Two equal dual gate MOS-FETs in one package 11) Two low noise gain amplifiers in one package 12) Transistor A: fully internal bias, transistor B: partly internal bias

5) Depletion FET plus diode in one package 6) VGS(th)

N-channel, Dual Gate MOS-FETS


CHARACTERISTICS Type Package VDS ID (V) IDSS V(p)GS (V) min max 0.76) 0.76) 2 2 2 2.5 1.3 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 1.26) 1.2
6)

|Yfs| (mS) min max 25 25 36 36 36 10 20 15 15 21 21 22 25 25 25 24 24 24 -

Cis (pF) typ. 2.35 2.35 3.1 3.1 3.1 2.1 4 2.5 2.3 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.29) 2.29) 2.2 2.2
9)

Cos (pF) typ. 1.4 1.4 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.1 2 1 0.8 1.05 1.05 1.05 1.28) 1.28) 1.2 1.3
8)

F@ 800 MHz (dB) typ. 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.5 0.77) 1.27) 17) 1.8 1 1 1 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.5 1.5 1.5

VHF UHF

(mA) (mA) min max 30 30 40 40 40 20 40 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 2 2 2 8 8 8 8 8 8 18 18 27 27 27 25 20 20 18 18 18 16 16 16 16 16 16

With external bias


BF901 BF901R BF908 BF908R BF908WR BF991 BF992 BF994S BF996S BF998 BF998R BF998WR BF1105 BF1105R BF1105WR BF1109 BF1109R BF1109WR SOT143 SOT143R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143 SOT143 SOT143 SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R 12 12 12 12 12 20 20 20 20 12 12 12 7 7 7 11 11 11 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Fully internal bias

2.29)
9)

1.38)
8)

1.26)

2.29)

1.38)

RF Manual
1) Asymmetrical 2) VGS(th) 3) ID 4) VSG

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 54

7.5 Product portfolio: Fets


7) @ 200 mhZ 8) COSS 9) Cig 10) Two equal dual gate MOS-FETs in one package 11) Two low noise gain amplifiers in one package 12) Transistor A: fully internal bias, transistor B: partly internal bias

5) Depletion FET plus diode in one package 6) VGS(th)

* At the moment of publishing of this RF Manual, these new MOSFET's were close to the end of the development stage. Minor changes to the published parameters are still possible.

N-channel, Dual Gate MOS-FETS


CHARACTERISTICS Type Package VDS ID IDSS V(p)GS (V) min 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 max 16) 16) 1
6) 6) 6) 6) 6)

|Yfs| (mS) min max 22 22 22 36 36 36 24 24 24 25 25 25 36 23 23 23 25 25 25 23 25 26 26 33 29 25 25 25 28 28 28 40 40 45 41 40 40 40 43 43 43

Cis (pF) typ. 2.2 2.2 2.2 3.6 3.6 3.6 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.2 9) 2.8 2.6 2.6 2.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 2.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.6 1.9 2.1 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.7 1.7

Cos (pF) typ. 1.3 1.3 1.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 1.4 1.4 1.4 8) 1.2 1.2 1.2
8) 8) 8)

F@ 800 MHz (dB) typ. 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1.7 1.7 1.7 2 1.9 1.9 1.9 1 1 1 1.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.1

VHF UHF

(V)

(mA) (mA) min max 30 30 30 40 40 40 30 30 30 30 30 30 40 301 301 301 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 8 8 8 12 12 12 8 8 8 8 8 8 12 11 11 11 8 8 8 11 8 8 8 14 9 11 11 11 8 8 8 13 13 13 20 20 20 13 13 13 16 16 16 20 19 19 19 16 16 16 19 16 16 16 23 17 19 19 19 16 16 16

Partly internal bias


BF904(A) BF904(A)R BF904(A)WR BF909(A) BF909(A)R BF909(A)WR BF1100 BF1100R BF1100WR BF1101 BF1101R BF1101WR BF1102(R) BF1201 BF1201R BF1201WR BF1202 BF1202R BF1202WR 11) BF1203 BF120411) BF1205 *
11) 12)

SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT363 SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT143 SOT143R SOT343R SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT363 SOT143 SOT143R SOT343 SOT143 SOT143R SOT343

7 7 7 7 7 7 14 14 14 7 7 7 7 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

X X X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X X X X

1 1 1 1

16) 16) 1
6) 6) 6) 6) 6)

1 1

1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2

1.6

0.9 0.9 0.9 0.85 0.85 0.85 0.9 0.85 0.75 0.85 1.1 0.85 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9

Note 10 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

1.26)
6) 6) 6) 6) 6)

1.26) 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

BF1206 *

11)

BF1211 * BF1211R * BF1211WR * BF1212 * BF1212R * BF1212WR *

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 55

7.6 Product portfolio: Pin diodes


Pin diodes
Type Package Conf Limits RD () typ @ Cd (pF) type @

BAP27-01 BAP50-02 BAP50-03 BAP50-04 BAP50-04W BAP50-05 BAP50-05W BAP51-01 BAP51-02 BAP51-03 BAP51-05W BAP63-01 BAP63-02 BAP63-03 BAP63-05W BAP64-02 BAP64-03 BAP64-04 BAP64-04W BAP64-05 BAP64-05W BAP64-06 BAP64-06W BAP65-01 BAP65-02 BAP65-03 BAP65-05 BAP65-05W BAP70-02 BAP70-03 BAP1321-01 BAP1321-02 BAP1321-03 BAP1321-04

SOD723 SOD523 SOD323 SOT23 SOT323 SOT23 SOT323 SOD723 SOD523 SOD323 SOT323 SOD723 SOD523 SOD323 SOT323 SOD523 SOD323 SOT23 SOT323 SOT23 SOT323 SOT23 SOT323 SOD723 SOD523 SOD323 SOT23 SOT323 SOD523 SOD323 SOD723 SOD523 SOD323 SOT23

S S S SS SS CC CC S S S CC S S S CC S S SS SS CC CC CA S S S S CC CC S S S S S SS

Vr(V) If(mA) 0.5mA 1 mA 10 mA 20 50 1.7 1.3 0.7 50 50 50 50 50 50 60 60 60 60 50 50 50 50 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 100 30 30 30 30 30 70 70 60 60 60 60 50 50 50 50 50 50 60 60 60 60 100 100 100 100 175 175 175 100 175 100 175 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 70 70 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 25 25 25 25 25 25 5.5 5.5 5.5 5.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 14 14 14 14 14 14 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 1.95 1.95 1.95 1.95 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 1 1 1 1 1 27 27 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 3 3 3 3 3 3 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.17 1.17 1.17 1.17 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0.56 0.56 0.56 0.56 0.56 4.5 4.5 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2

0V 0.55 0.4 0.4 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.36 0.36 0.4 0.4 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.52 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.65 0.29 0.29 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

1V 0.45 0.3 0.3 0.35 0.35 0.35 0.35 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.32 0.32 0.35 0.35 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.37 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.2 0.2 0.35 0.35 0.35 0.35

20V 0.37 0.22 @ 5V 0.2 @ 5V 0.3 @ 5V 0.3 @ 5V 0.3 @ 5V 0.3 @ 5V 0.2 @ 5V 0.2 @ 5V 0.2 @ 5V 0.2 @ 5V 0.25 0.25 0.27 0.3 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.23 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.125 0.125 0.25 0.25 0.25 0.25

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 56

7.6 Product portfolio: Pin diodes

Series resistance as a function of forward current.


1000

rD()
100

10

0.1 0.1 freq=100MHz 1 10 IF(mA) 100

BAP50 Family BAP65 Family

BAP51 Family BAP70 Family

BAP63 Family BAP1321 Family

BAP64 Family

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 57

7.6 Product portfolio: Pin diodes

Diode capacitance as a function of reverse voltage.


800 CD(fF) 600

400

200

0 0
freq=1MHz

10

15 VR(V)

20

BAP50 Family BAP65 Family

BAP51 Family BAP70 Family

BAP63 Family BAP1321 Family

BAP64 Family

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 58

8. X-references
Alphabetical order on competitor type column 1: abbr. competitor, column 2: competitor type, column 3: closest Philips type
Competitor abbr.: AG=Agilent, AL=Alpha, HI=Hitachi, IS=Industry Standard, IN=Infineon, MA=Matsushita, MO=Motorola, NE=NEC, RO=Rohm, SA=Sanyo, SO=Sony, TO=Toko, TS=Toshiba, VI=Vishay

= Exact drop in, v Different package


TS 1SS314 RO 1SS356 TS 1SS381 RO 1SS390 TS 1SV172 TS 1SV214 TS 1SV214 TS 1SV215 TS 1SV217 TS 1SV228 TS 1SV229 TS 1SV231 TS 1SV231 TS 1SV232 SA 1SV233 SA 1SV234 TS 1SV239 SA 1SV241 TS 1SV242 SA 1SV246 SA 1SV247 SA 1SV248 SA 1SV249 SA 1SV250 SA 1SV251 TS 1SV252 TS 1SV254 TS 1SV262 SA 1SV263 SA 1SV264 SA 1SV266 SA 1SV267 TS 1SV269 TS 1SV270 TS 1SV271 TS 1SV276 TS 1SV277 TS 1SV278 TS 1SV279 TS 1SV280 TS 1SV281 TS 1SV282 TS 1SV282 TS 1SV283 TS 1SV283 TS 1SV283 BA591 BA591 BA277 BA891 BAP50-04 BB149 BB149A BB153 BB133 BB201 BB190 BB132 BB152 BB148 BAP70-03 v BAP64-04 BB145B 2xBAP64-02 v BB164 BAP64-04W BAP70-02 v BAP50-02 v BAP50-04W BAP50-03 v BAP50-04 BAP50-04W BB179 BB133 BAP50-02 v BAP50-04W BAP50-03 v BAP50-04 BB148 BB156 BAP50-03 BB151 BB142 BB179 BB190 BB145 BB151 BB178 BB187 BB178 BB187 BB187 TS 1SV284 TS 1SV285 TS 1SV288 TS 1SV290 TS 1SV290 TS 1SV293 TS 1SV293 SA 1SV294 TS 1SV305 TS 1SV307 TS 1SV308 TS 1SV314 TS 1SV329 SO 1T362 SO 1T362 A SO 1T363 A SO 1T368 SO 1T368 A SO 1T369 SO 1T369 SO 1T369 SO 1T379 SO 1T397 SO 1T399 SO 1T402 SO 1T403 SO 1T404A SO 1T405 A SO 1T406 SO 1T407 SO 1T408 IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS 2N3330 2N3331 2N4091 2N4092 2N4093 2N4220 2N4391 2N4392 2N4393 2N4416 2N4856 2N4857 2N4858 2N5114 2N5115 BB156 BB142 BB152 BB182 BB182 B BB151 BB190 BAP70-03 v BB202 BAP51-03 BAP51-02 BB143 BB143 BB149 BB149A BB153 BB133 BB148 BB132 BB152 BB164 BB131 BB152 BB148 BB179 B BB178 BB187 BB187 BB182 BB182B BB187 J176 J176 PN4391 PN4392 PN4393 BF245A PN4391 PN4392 PN4393 PMBF4416 BSR56 BSR57 BSR58 J174 J175 IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS 2N5116 2N5432 2N5433 2N5434 2N5457 2N5458 2N5459 2N5484 2N5485 2N5486 2N5638 2N5639 2N5640 2N5653 2N5654 J175 J108 J108 J109 BF245A BF245A BF245B PMBF5484 PMBF5485 PMBF5486 PN4391 PN4392 PN4393 J112 J111 BFG67/XR BFG67/XR BFG520/XR BFG520/XR BFS17W BFS17W BFS17W BFR92AW PRF957 BFQ67W BFS505 BFR92AW BFR92AW BFG520/XR BFG520/XR BFQ67W BFS505 PRF957 BF547W BFQ19 BFR93AW BFG520/XR BFS520 BFQ19 BFS505 BFQ18A BFG540W/XR BFS505 BFG520/XR BFS520 BFQ540 NE 2SC5011 NE 2SC5012 TS 2SC5065 TS 2SC5085 TS 2SC5087 TS 2SC5088 TS 2SC5090 TS 2SC5092 TS 2SC5095 TS 2SC5107 TS 2SC5463 HI HI HI HI HI IS HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI 2SC5593 2SC5594 2SC5623 2SC5624 2SC5631 2SJ105GR 2SK108 2SK147BL 2SK162-K 2SK162-L 2SK162-M 2SK162-N 2SK163-K 2SK163-L 2SK163-M 2SK163-N 2SK170BL 2SK170GR 2SK170V 2SK170Y 2SK197D 2SK197E 2SK2090 2SK209BL 2SK209GR 2SK209Y 2SK210BL 2SK210GR 2SK2110 2SK211GR 2SK211Y 2SK212 2SK217D 2SK217E 2SK223 BFG540W/XR BFG540W/XR PRF957 PRF957 BFG520/XR BFG540W/XR BFS520 BFG520/XR BFS505 BFS505 BFQ67W BFG410W BFG425W BFG410W BFG425W BFQ540 J177 PN4392 PN4393 PN4393 PN4393 PN4393 PN4393 J113 J113 J113 J113 PN4393 PN4393 PN4393 PN4393 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBFJ309 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PN4393 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 PN4393

NE 2SC4092 NE 2SC4093 NE 2SC4094 NE 2SC4095 NE 2SC4182 NE 2SC4184 NE 2SC4185 NE 2SC4186 NE 2SC4226 NE 2SC4227 NE 2SC4228 TS 2SC4247 TS 2SC4248 TS 2SC4315 TS 2SC4320 TS 2SC4321 TS 2SC4325 TS 2SC4394 HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI 2SC4463 2SC4537 2SC4592 2SC4593 2SC4784 2SC4807 2SC4899 2SC4900 2SC4901 2SC4988 NE 2SC4536

NE 2SC4703

TS 2SC4842

RF Manual
HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI IS IS IS IS IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI 2SK242E 2SK242F 2SK370BL 2SK370GR 2SK370V 2SK381 2SK425 2SK426 2SK43 2SK435 2SK508 3SK290 3SK322 40894 40895 40896 40897 BA592 BA592 BA595 BA597 BA885 BA892 BA892 BA895 BAR14-1 BAR15-1 BAR16-1 BAR17 BAR60 BAR61 BAR63 BAR63-02L BAR63-02V BAR63-02W BAR63-03W BAR63-05 BAR63-05W BAR64-02V BAR64-02W BAR64-03W BAR64-04 BAR64-04W BAR64-05 BAR64-05W BAR64-06 BAR64-06W BAR65-02V BAR65-02W BAR65-03W BAR66 BAR67-02L BAR67-02W BAR67-03W BAT18 BB304C BB304M BB305C BB305M BB403M BB501C BB501M BB502C BB502M BB503C PMBF4416 PMBF4416 J109 J109 J109 J113 PMBF4416 PMBF4416 J113 J113 PMBFJ308 BF998WR BF990A BFR30 BFR30 BFR30 BFR30 BA591 BA591 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 v BA891 BA891 BAP70-02 2xBAP70-03 v 2xBAP70-03 v 2xBAP70-03 v BAP50-03 v 3xBAP50-03 v 3xBAP50-03 v BAP63-03 v BAP63-02 v BAP63-02 BAP63-02 v BAP63-03 BAP63-05W v BAP63-05W BAP64-02 BAP64-02 s BAP64-03 BAP64-04 BAP64-04W BAP64-05 BAP64-05W BAP64-06 BAP64-06W BAP65-02 BAP65-02 s BAP65-03 BAP1321-04 BAP1321-01 BAP1321-02 BAP1321-03 BAT18 BF1201WR BF1201R BF1201WR BF1201R BF909R BF1202WR BF1202R BF1202WR BF1202R BF1202WR HI IN IN IN IN IN HI IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IS IS IS VI VI IN

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes


BF1202R BB134 BB149 BB149A BB179B BB179 BF1202 BB133 BB148 BB153 BB132 BB152 BB164 BB132 BB152 BB164 BB155 v BB178 BB178 BB187 BB152 BB201 BB131 BB131 BB131 BB141 BB142 BB143 BB143 BB190 BB202 BB200 BF1105 BF1109 BF1109WR BF1101 BF1101R BF1101WR BF909(A) BF909(A)WR BF245A BF245B BF245C J108 J108 J108 BF245A BF245B BF245C BFR93A PBR951 BFS540 BFG540 BFR92A BFR92A BFR92AW BF747 BF747 BF547W BF861A BF861B BF861C BF994S BF996S BF998 VI VI VI IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN IN BF998 BF998R BF998RW BF998W BFG135A BFG193 BFG194 BFG196 BFG19S BFG235 BFP180 BFP181 BFP182 BFP182R BFP183 BFP183R BFP193 BFP193W BFP196W BFP280 BFP405 BFP420 BFP450 BFP520 BFP540 BFP81 BFP93A BFQ193 BFQ19S BFR106 BFR180 BFR180W BFR181 BFR181W BFR182 BFR182W BFR183 BFR183W BFR193 BFR193W BFR35AP BFR92P BFR92W BFR93A BFR93AW BF998 BF998R BF998WR BF998WR BFG135 BFG198 BFG31 BFG541 BFG97 BFG135 BFG505/X BFG67/X BFG67/X BFG67/XR BFG520/X BFG520/XR BFG540/X BFG540W/XR BFG540W/XR BFG505/X BFG410W BFG425W BFG480W BFU510 BFU540 BFG92A/X BFG93A/X BFQ540 BFQ19 BFR106 BFR505 BFS505 BFR520 BFS520 PBR941 PRF947 PBR951 PRF957 PBR951 PRF957 BFR92A BFR92A BFR92A BFR92AW BFR93A BFR93A BFR93AW BFS17 BFS17 BFS17A BFS17W BFM505 BFM520 BFT92 BFT93 BGU2003 BF1105WR BF1105R BF1105WR BF1105R BF1105 PMBFJ111 PMBFJ112 PMBFJ113 PMBFJ174 IS IS IS IN BSR175 BSR176 BSR177 CMY91

Page: 59
PMBFJ175 PMBFJ176 PMBFJ177 BGA2022 BFG410W BFG425W BFG480W BA277 BAP70-03 v BAP50-04 BAP50-05 BAP50-03 v BAP50-05 BAP50-03 v BAP50-05 v BAP64-05W BAP1321-03 v BAP1321-04 BAP64-03 v BAP64-04 BAP64-06 BAP64-05 BAP50-03 v BAP50-04 BAP50-05 BAP50-02 v BAP50-04W BAP50-05W BAP51-03 v BAP51-03 v BAP64-04 BAP64-05 2xBAP51-02 v BAP51-02 v BAP64-04 v BAP51-05W BA951 BAP50-04W BAP65-02 BAP51-02 BB178 BB187 BB179 BB179B BB182 BB182 BB182 BB182B BB187 BB187 BB145 BB145B BB202 BB178 BB143 BB151 BAP65-01 BAP51-02 BAP63-01 BAP63-01 BAP65-03 BAP51-03 BB133 BB149 BB149A

BB503M BB535 BB535 BB545 BB555 BB565 BB601M BB639 BB639 BB639 BB640 BB640 BB640 BB641 BB641 BB641 BB659 BB659 BB664 BB664 BB669 BB814 BB831 BB833 BB835 BBY51 BBY51-03W BBY53 BBY53-03W BBY55-03W BBY58-02V BBY66-05 BF1005S BF1009S BF1009SW BF2030 BF2030R BF2030W BF2040 BF2040W BF244A BF244B BF244C BF247A BF247B BF247C BF256A BF256B BF256C BF770A BF771 BF771W BF772 BF775 BF775A BF775W BF799 BF799 BF799W BF851A BF851B BF851C BF994S BF996S BF998

AG HBFP0405 AG HBFP0420 AG HBFP0450 HI HSC277 AG HSMP3800 AG HSMP3802 AG HSMP3804 AG HSMP3810 AG HSMP3814 AG HSMP381B AG HSMP381C AG HSMP381F AG HSMP3820 AG HSMP3822 AG HSMP3830 AG HSMP3832 AG HSMP3833 AG HSMP3834 AG HSMP3860 AG HSMP3862 AG HSMP3864 AG HSMP386B AG HSMP386E AG HSMP386L AG HSMP3880 AG HSMP3890 AG HSMP3892 AG HSMP3894 AG HSMP3895 AG HSMP389B AG HSMP389C AG HSMP389F HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HSU277 HVB14S HVC131 HVC132 HVC200A HVC200A HVC202A HVC202B HVC300A HVC300A HVC300B HVC300B HVC306A HVC306B HVC355 HVC355B HVC359 HVC363A HVC369B HVC372B HVD131 HVD132 HVD139 HVD142 HVU131 HVU132 HVU200A HVU202(A) HVU202(A)

MO BFR92AL

MO BFR93AL MO BFS17L MO BFS17L IN IN IN IN IN IN IN HI HI HI HI HI IS IS IS IS BFS17P BFS17W BFS481 BFS483 BFT92 BFT93 BGB540 BIC701C BIC701M BIC702C BIC702M BIC801M BSR111 BSR112 BSR113 BSR174

RF Manual
HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI HI IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS HVU202A HVU300A HVU300A HVU300A HVU306A HVU307 HVU315 HVU316 HVU356 HVU357 HVU363A HVU363A HVU363A HVU363B J201 J202 J203 J204 J270 J308 J309 J310 BB134 BB132 BB152 BB164 BB133 BB148 BB148 BB131 BB155 BB190 BB133 BB148 BB153 BB148 BGA2001 BF410A BF410B BF410C BF410D J177 J108 J109 J110 BAP65-02 BAP65-03 BAP63-01 BAP63-02 BAP50-02 BB200 BB140-01 BA277 BB178 BB187 BB179 BB182 BB153 BB133 BB148 BB131 BB149 BB149A BB164 BB141 BAP65-03 BAP51-03 BAP65-03 BAP65-05 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 BAP1321-03

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes


BAP1321-04 PMBF4391 PMBF4392 PMBF4393 PMBF4416 PMBFJ112 BFR31 PMBFJ113 PMBFJ174 PMBFJ175 PMBFJ176 PMBFJ177 PMBFJ308 PMBFJ309 PMBFJ310 PMBFJ310 BFS17 BFS17A PBR951 BFR92A BFR93A BFR93A BFT25A PBR941 PBR941 PBR951 PBR951 BF245A PN4391 PN4392 PN4393 PN4416 J174 J176 PRF957 BFG93A/X BFQ67W BFS25A BFG520/X BFS520 PRF947 BFG540/X PRF957 BFG410W PRF947 J108 J109 J110 BAP1321-03 BAP1321-02 RO RN731V RO RN739D RO RN739F VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI S503T S503TR S503TRW S504T S504TR S504TRW S505T S505TR S505TRW S595T S595TR S595TRW S949T S949TR S949TRW S974T S974TR S974TRW BAP50-03 BAP50-04 BAP50-04W BF909(A) BF909(A)R BF909(A)WR BF904(A) BF904(A)R BF904(A)WR BF1101 BF1101R BF1101WR BF1105 BF1105R BF1105WR BF1109 BF1109R BF1109WR BF1109 BF1109R BF1109WR BAP50-05 BAP50-04 BAP50-03 BAP50-05W BAP50-04W BAP50-02 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 BAP70-03 BAP65-05 BAP65-03 BAP65-05W BAP1321-03 BAP1321-04 BAP1321-03 BAP1321-04 BAP1321-02 BAP65-05 BAP65-03 BAP65-05W BAP65-02 BAP63-03 BAP63-02 BAP64-03 BAP64-02 BB151 BB143 PMBFJ111 IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS HI IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS IS VI SST112 SST113 SST174 SST175 SST176 SST177 SST201 SST202 SST203 SST308 SST309 SST310 SST4391 SST4392 SST4393 SST4416 SST4856 SST4857 SST4858 SST4859 SST4860 SST4861 TBB1004

Page: 60
PMBFJ112 PMBFJ113 PMBFJ174 PMBFJ175 PMBFJ176 PMBFJ177 BFT46 BFR31 BFR30 PMBFJ308 PMBFJ309 PMBFJ310 PMBF4391 PMBF4392 PMBF4393 PMBF4416 BSR56 BSR57 BSR58 BSR56 BSR57 BSR58 BF1203 PMBF4391 PMBF4392 PMBF4393 PMBF4391 PMBF4392 PMBF4393 BSR56 BSR57 BSR58 PMBFJ111 PMBFJ112 PMBFJ113 PMBFJ174 PMBFJ175 PMBFJ176 PMBFJ177 BF1102 BGA2709 BGA2711 BGA2712 BGA2001 BGA2001 BGA2748 BGA2771 BGA2022

MA MA4P789ST-287 MO MMBF4391 MO MMBF4392 MO MMBF4393 MO MMBF4416 MO MMBF4860 MO MMBF5484 MO MMBFJ113 MO MMBFJ174 MO MMBFJ175 MO MMBFJ176 MO MMBFJ177 MO MMBFJ308 MO MMBFJ309 MO MMBFJ310 MO MMBFU310 MO MMBR5031L MO MMBR5179L MO MMBR571L MO MMBR901L MO MMBR911L MO MMBR920L MO MMBR931L MO MMBR941BL MO MMBR941L MO MMBR951AL MO MMBR951L IS IS IS IS IS IS IS MPF102 MPF4391 MPF4392 MPF4393 MPF4416 MPF970 MPF971

AG INA-51063

AL SMP1302-004 AL SMP1302-005 AL SMP1302-011 AL SMP1302-074 AL SMP1302-075 AL SMP1302-079 AL SMP1304-001 AL SMP1304-011 AL SMP1307-001 AL SMP1307-011 AL SMP1320-004 AL SMP1320-011 AL SMP1320-074 AL SMP1321-001 AL SMP1321-005 AL SMP1321-011 AL SMP1321-075 AL SMP1321-079 AL SMP1322-004 AL SMP1322-011 AL SMP1322-074 AL SMP1322-079 AL SMP1340-011 AL SMP1340-079 AL SMP1352-011 AL SMP1352-079 AL SMV1236-011 AL SMV1263-079 IS SST111

TS JDP2S01E TS JDP2S01U TS JDP2S02S TS JDP2S02T TS JDP2S04E TO KV1470 MA MA27V07 IS MA2S077 MA MA2S357 MA MA2S357 MA MA2S372 MA MA2S374 MA MA357 MA MA366 MA MA366 MA MA368 MA MA372 MA MA372 MA MA374 MA MA377 MA MA4CP101A MA MA4P274-1141 MA MA4P275-1141 MA MA4P275CK-287 MA MA4P277-1141 MA MA4P278-287 MA MA4P789-1141

TMPF4091 TMPF4092 TMPF4093 TMPF4391 TMPF4392 TMPF4393 TMPFB246A TMPFB246B TMPFB246C TMPFJ111 TMPFJ112 TMPFJ113 TMPFJ174 TMPFJ175 TMPFJ176 TMPFJ177 TSDF54040

MO MRF577 MO MRF5811L MO MRF917 MO MRF927 MO MRF9411L MO MRF947 MO MRF947A MO MRF9511L MO MRF957 TS MT4S34U MO PRF947B IS IS IS PZFJ108 PZFJ109 PZFJ110

NE uPC2709 NE uPC2711 NE uPC2712 NE uPC2745 NE uPC2746 NE uPC2748 NE uPC2771 NE uPC8112

RO RN142G RO RN142S

Online X-reference tool:


http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/products/xref/

3rd edition

RF Manual

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 61

9. Packaging
Online package information on Philips Semiconductors website:
http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/package/

Why packaging

Packaging of discrete dies has general two purposes: Protection of the die against hostile environmental influences Making the handling much easier compared to using the small naked die. Instead of sophisticated die- and wirebonding and encapsulation of the naked die, the relatively easy process of pick and place and reflow soldering can be used.

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 62

10. Promotion Materials


For samples or promotion materials below, please contact your Philips Account Manager or contact person in your region, see contacts & references. Ad * = contact Regional Sales Office

Focus
RF General RF General RF General RF General RF General RF General RF General Packaging Packaging Tuning Tuning Tuning Pin diodes Pin diodes Pin diodes MMIC's MMIC's MMIC's Wideband ampifiers Wideband ampifiers Wideband ampifiers Wideband ampifiers Wideband ampifiers Wideband ampifiers Wideband transistors Wideband transistors Wideband transistors

Description

Deliverable
Manual Manual Appendix Brochure Brochure Guide Brochure CDRom Fact sheet Brochure Databook SC18 Sample kit Sample kit Databook SC07 Leaflet Replacement card Sample kit * Leaflet Sample kit * Databook SC14 Demoboard Demoboard Demoboard Demoboard Demoboard Demoboard Linecard Databook SC14 Sample kit *

12NC
4322 252 06384 4322 252 06385 9397 750 04634 9397 750 07019 9397 750 09014 9397 750 07928 9397 750 07536 9397 750 04787 9397 750 05988 9397 750 05011 9397 750 10168 9397 750 10606 9397 750 06017 9397 750 08008 9397 750 08573 9397 750 07299 9397 750 07976 9397 750 09078 9397 750 06311 Contact RSO Contact RSO Contact RSO Contact RSO Contact RSO Contact RSO 9397 750 08634 9397 750 06311 9397 750 08553

Philips RF Manual,
product & design manual for RF small signal discretes, 3rd edition and Appendix, July 2003 Your peRFect discretes partner PeRFectly tuned in to your ideas Standard Products Selection Guide 2002 The peRFect connection Philips Semiconductors comprehensive product portfolio Double polysilicon Discrete Packages 2000 Discrete Semiconductor Packages RF Tuning Sample Kit (English version) RF Tuning Sample Kit (Chinese version) Small-signal Field-effect Transistors and Diodes Pin diodes designed for RF applications up to 3GHz Pin diodes Pin diodes Optimized MMICs Gain Blocks MMICs RF Wideband Transistors and MMICs 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2709 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2711 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2712 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2748 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2771 50 ohm gain block for IF, buffer and driver amplifier: BGA2776 Wideband transistors RF Wideband Transistors and MMICs Wideband transistors

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 63

11. Contacts & References

Asia Pacific:
Wilson Wong
System Marketing Manager (Tuning)

Bennett Hua
System Marketing Manager (WB/MMIC)

Richard Xu
Senior Marketing Manager (China)

+65-6882 3639
wilson.mun.ho.wong@philips.com

+886-2-2382 3224
bennett.hua@philips.com

+86-21-63541088
richard.xu@philips.com

Europe:
Paul Scheepers
Product Manager Discretes

Marten Martens
Product Manager DSC

+31-40-2737673
paul.scheepers@philips.com

+31-40-2737528
marten.martens@philips.com

N. America:
Paul Wilson
Product Marketing Manager

Ercan Sengil
Marketing Application Engineer

+1-508 851-2254
paul.wilson@philips.com

+1-508 851-2236
ercan.sengil@philips.com

Editor:

Ronald Thissen
International Product Marketeer

International Product Marketing


BU Mobile Communications, BL RF Modules Gerstweg 2, 6534 AE Nijmegen, The Netherlands

+31-24-3536195
ronald.thissen@philips.com

RF Manual

3rd edition

product & design manual for RF small signal discretes

Page: 64

APPENDIX
In separate appendix-file !

- download appendix from internet:


http://www.philips.semiconductors.com/markets/mms/products/discretes /documentation/rf_manual

or: - request for appendix by sending mail to:


ronald.thissen@philips.com

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