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The romance of the harem. By Miss Pardoe. v.3
Pardoe, Mss (|ua), 1806-1862.
London : H. Coburn, 1839.
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uiuo.ark:/13960/t71v63h97
Public Domain
http://www.hathitrust.org/access_use#pd
Ths work s n the Pubc Doman, meanng
that t s not sub|ect to copyrght. Users are
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n part or n whoe. lt s possbe that current
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Ll .
TH
U l .5lT
f lLLl l5
23
Par
1833
v-3
/ // /rr.|
// //- / / // //
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|
The person chargng ths matera s re-
sponsbe for rts return to the brary from
whch , |t was wthdrawn on or before
Latest Date stamped beow.
Theft, mutaton, and undernng of books
resurT y and may
resut n dsmssa from the Unversty
f | U T U .CH MP .G
P 2 6 107
P | |
P 01
D C 2 9 1999
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Dgt ed by the lnternet rchve .
n 2009 wth fundng from
Unversty of lnos Urbana-Champagn
http://www.archve.org/detas/romanceofharem03pard
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TH
M C TH H M.
Ml P D ,
UTH TH ClT TH ULT ,
T l D TH D T, C.
Md many thngs most new to ear and eye,
The pgrm rested here hs weary feet.
nd ga ed around on Mosem u ury.
yron,
l TH LUM .
L. lll.
L D :
H C L U , PU Ll H ,
G T M L UGH T T.
1839.
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L D :
P. H L, | ., 51, UP T- T T, H M T.
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3
3
C T T
TH THl D LUM .
P G
Part the rst 1
The ngdom of the Mce 33
Part the econd 121
The Pasha s Daughter 1 8
Part the Thrd 207
The dventures of the arber of assora . . 22
Part the ourth and Last 322
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TH
M C TH H M,
P T l.
C H PT l.
lmmedatey after the md-day prayer,
when the ntense heat tempted a great porton
of the nhabtants of the cty to spend an hour
n seep, Manoopoo, on the morrow of hs vst
to the Therark Tcharch, agan bent hs steps
ththerward, to seek an ntervew wth the
ame.
s he was rch and generous, he met wth no
opposton from the master of the tavern, who
conducted hm wthout comment to the door of
an apartment whch was veed by a screen of
dark-cooured ba e and here, havng caed
L. lll.
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2 TH M C TH H M.
oudy on the name of evreste, he eft Mano-
opoo standng, whe he shuffed back to hs
rug n the pubc room.
shr and peevsh voce was soon heard n
repy and the sppers of a woman, hasty
assumed, sounded upon the foor behnd the
screen, whch was snatched asde, and the young
Greek found hmsef confronted by an aged and
wrnked woman, whose mass of wry har
checkered wth gray had escaped from the con-
fnement of a brght yeow handkerchef,
panted n gaudy masses of coour, and fowed
upon her shouders her dress was of huge-
patterned furnture chnt , grt round her wast
wth a we-worn cachemre, whch had once
been costy enough to cncture the ons of a
Pasha her trowsers were of bue musn, to
whch a few patches of tarnshed fo yet adhered
as f n mockery her egs were bare, and her
whoe appearance so compounded of meretrcous-
ness and squaour, that Manoopoo had some
dffcuty n subdung the sensaton of dsgust
wth whch he ooked on her.
e hey hat s ths she asked sharpy
Had we not enough of your oud brawng ast
nght to brng down the Cad and hs gang upon
us, and to keep us wakng, that you return at
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TH M C TH H M. 6
md-day Go, go, ffendm, the ame seep
and they have need to do so, for they dance to-
nght n the harem of the Tchorbad|.
l do not seek the ame reped Mano-
opoo genty : t was yoursef of whom l
came n search.
The crone aughed : vaah to be sure
so says every young haram adeh whom l fnd
upon my threshod Mother, t s you l
want but l have ved among the mountans,
young sr, and can see beyond the fght of an
arrow.
May your eyes never fa whspered the
Greek, as he pressed a god con aganst her
open pam l come to seek that of you, n
whch, f they be not keen and quck, you w
ack the power tcTserve me.
nd what ws my ord asked evreste
more courteousy, as she twsted her ong har
once more beneath her head -kerchef, and
tghtened the shaw about her wast some
rose-bud of a shetered tree to whch he woud
fan be the sunshne, to be tod of hs passon
or
|ab wonderfu nterposed Mano-
opoo, affectng surprse at her dscernment.
ou have ndeed guessed my meanng,
|b 2
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TH M C TH H M.
mother How say you w you undertake so
sweet a msson
The hag reped by graspng her throat wth
her sknny fngers, and noddng her head sg-
nfcanty.
Mn ah Heaven forbd sad the
Greek you are too keen and quck-wtted to
ncur so drefu a penaty. Lsten to rae v and
he enforced hs request wth a second pece of
god, whch at once secured the attenton of the
od woman l have a sster, a save n the
Pasha s harem
The Pasha s harem broke n evreste n
affrght and who am l that l shoud venture
nto the secret apartments of a atrap, and
carry a bght to hs roses
ay, nay you tak dy sad Mano-
opoo mpatenty do l not te you that l
ony seek to nform my sster of my vcnty
my young and nnocent sster the pay-mate of
my nfancy, the deght of my boyhood, my
bttery-wept and regretted sster my ony
one
Humph there s some reason n that, to
be sure muttered the od crone, whe a shade
of somethng whch amost ooked ke feeng
ftted over her brow, and then as suddeny ds-
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TH M C TH H M. o
appeared and eft t cod and rgd, and stony
as before, ke the marbe across whch a strug-
gng sunbeam has fckered for an nstant l
too had a brother once, an ony one, as you say
but he ded he was cut down by an gyptan
scymtar (may the arm be wthered that weded
t ) and t was years ago, before l had forgotten
how to weep and by the sou of your father, l
shed tears enough but a that s gone by now,
and l am the mother of a troop of ame, wth-
out a home, or a knsman vng among gbes
and bows, and curses, wth a scanty pauf, and
a tattered ve but ey vah mercy on us what
drt am l eatng to tak thus The sea s set
upon every man s forehead at hs brth, and as t
was wrtten, t w be. ana bak ook at me,
young sr do l not seem ke one who can bear
a heavy burthen yet wthout fang under t
nd the btter augh wth whch she drected the
attenton of Manoopoo to her squad wretched-
ness rang panfuy on hs ear, as he attempted
to murmur out some common-pace about better
days and a brghter fate.
Tush, tush nterposed the od woman
wth a wd sme strng no fne sentences
together to hang upon my rags foucarak cha-
numdr poverty s my gory ou young bey-
G
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p
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6 TH M C TH H M.
adehs know nothng of the gay mmunty of
poverty. lt s your great men who are saves
whe we, the refuse of the cty, the wanderers
of the and, the outcasts of socety, we are the
free no codgea-bash fts the atch of our
dwengs to coect trbute no attced and
boted harem fetters our w no saraf ever runs
away wth our hoarded god we come and go
as we st our teskara (passport) needs no sg-
nature but our own and every hedge-sde or
empty tomb s a men khaneh (post-house)
equa to our wants o no more sugared words
to evreste, who s as much beyond the pty of
every stranger wth whom she comes n contact
durng her rovng fe, as she s ndsposed to
accept t. God young sr et your consoa-
ton be offered n god that s an unversa
anguage, never msunderstood. nd now to
busness : what woud you ask of me
My request s smpe : l woud see my ss-
ter, and l seek from you the opportunty of
dong so/ 1
Mashaah s that a ou woud ft
the screen, and tread the carpets of a Pasha s
harem ou are mad, stark mad, the verest
dehbash prnce of madmen, n the provnce.
Have you no desre to wear a gray beard, that
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TH M C TH H M. 7
you gve the measure of your throat so eary
l w not work for your run, you are too young
and too handsome for the bowstrng.
ah erm He s mercfu sad Mano-
opoo : l trust n hm.
ah ah yes, yes reped the od
crone peevshy but et your words and your
actons be ake reasonabe throw the mante
from your head, and see ceary for once and
then l sha hear no more of the Pasha s ha-
rem.
l am resoved sad the young Greek
moody.
nd w you swear to ths story of the sster
l w.
nd her name s
u atnka reped Manoopoo : by brth
a cote, but ong dweng n Crcassa.
hat do you te me e camed evreste
hasty are you ndeed the brother of the
young Greek save of whom l have heard so
much |ab wonderfu They say that she
reads the oran ke a Mouah, wrtes verses
whch woud not dsgrace a Haf , sngs ke a
bubu, and dances ke one of my own ame,
oung r, by the grave of your mother, s a
ths true
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p
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o TH M C TH H M.
sad Manoopoo and she has
moreover the warmest heart and the quckest wt
n a oum and the brghtest eye, and the
ghtest foot. How say you you not
assst me n ookng on her once more
e apaum what can l do l have re-
ceved no summons from the Pasha and how
may l present mysef unbdden at the paace
ay now you augh at my beard sad the
young Greek : have you not n your band one
of the oveest hour out of Paradse and woud
not a hnt to the ga aba
avash, yavash softy, softy, ffendm
nterposed evreste l wsh to draw the eyes
of no ga aba n the country on the beautfu
Mherprwr f she s to me as the purpe y, a
rare and precous thng and l ove her ke a
mother there s no maden n the brght band
so dear to me as Mherprwr.
Dd you ca me, Mother asked a sweet
voce, as the coarse screen was drawn asde, and
a face as fresh and far as a May mornng sud-
deny appeared behnd t l am here.
ay, nay sad the od woman hasty but
not unkndy l want you not, k em my
daughter l caed you not s t ever thus wth
Turkey. f urse of Love.
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 9
you whe the others seep, you watch whe
the others de, you to for a. Go n, Mher-
prwr, go n l have busness wth the ffend,
and sha be wth you presenty .
The far gr bent her head n token of
obedence, but ere she retred, cast one hurred
gance at the stranger ther eyes met, and those
of the young beauty fe before the earnest ook
of the Greek. th the nstnctve tact of a
woman she at once perceved how deepy Man-
oopoo was mpressed by her e ceng ove-
ness, and she may we be pardoned f she n-
gered n her retreat.
The ame was about s teen years of age, n
a the gow and gory of a beauty such as s
sedom ooked upon. Her ong dark har fan-
tastcay braded wth beads and rbbons, and
nterm ed wth brght-cooured rbbons, fe
amost to her feet, and was swept back from a
brow of da ng whteness, surmountng eyes of
ntense ght and ustre. Her fgure was sght
and gracefu, and her e presson soft and some-
what meanchoy. To dscover a ths, one
gance suffced and had Manoopoo been ess
preoccuped, and had the far creature before
hm been other than she was an ame an out-
cast a wanderer among men, to whom her
b 5
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#
p
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10 TH M C TH H M.
beauty was a |est, and her youth a snare he
fet as though he coud have sought a haven n
her ove, and a Paradse n her smes.
The dark screen fe from her hand and as
she dsappeared, t seemed to the young Greek
as though the ght had suddeny faed. or a
moment he stood senty ga ng on the veed
porta through whch she had passed, but ony
for a moment, for the voce of evreste soon
recaed hm from hs revere.
y, ay, ook your f her beauty may we
f the eye of a young gaant, whose heart, ke
the bossom of the rose-tree, opens to the frst sun-
shne that fashes on t but you came not for
ths nor can you nger here a day to set the
tongues of the whoe cty waggng on od e-
vreste and her troop of ame aah ou
have seen her, and do you st tak to me of the
Pasha and hs ga aba
ay, chde me not, mother sad Mano-
opoo deprecatngy the Pasha has a far
young wfe as far as Mherprwr and t s
sad that he oves her as the men of ths and
sedom ove a woman : he w ook upon your
hour ony as a brght shape whose gracefuness
can charm the eye of hs young brde, and w
pour god nto her ap, and forget her.
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 1 1
The aged woman stood for a moment bured
n thought, and then abrupty and steady ft-
ng her eyes to the e cted countenance of her
companon, she sad sowy : a to ne there
t s at ength l have read the dream, and the
truth s n the hoow of my hand. ffendm,
you ove the Pasha s wfe
The address was so sudden and so unooked-
for that Manoopoo was totay unprepared
wth a repy, and hs confuson confrmed the
wy and shrewd od woman n her suspcons.
My son she pursued gravey : l know not
why l fee thus nterested n your fortunes l
thought that my heart had ong been seared, but
now l see that t can yet beat even for a
stranger hat are you about to dare ven
were t the mere de caprce of a young wd
sprt whch prompted you to put your head un-
der the Pasha s foot, you mght we be prepared
never agan to ft t from the earth but f t be
as l suspect and l am one who has read for
years the sabe page of passon that you are
hurred on to run by a vson whch never can
be rea ed, ponder we your purpose for be
assured that cunnngy as you may hope to
weave your web of wes, that run w come at
ast.
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p
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12 TH M C TH H M.
Hps brdr so be t lt w be wecome,
f the prce must be pad sad Manoopoo
amost sterny.
nd yet, you are young and the grove
sheters many brds of soft note and brght pu-
mage, even f the bubu be not there urged
evreste.
The Greek smed bttery.
Pek ah, dostoum t s we, my frend f
reped the od woman, who requred no words
to read hs meanng nd now, te me where-
fore shoud l rsk the same run you are a
stranger : unt ast nght l never ooked upon
you and ast nght, how dd we meet amd
bro, and braw, and ntemperance, and rot :
you w repy that my days are numbered, and
that ther remnant can be of tte vaue, and l
can pardon you the taunt, for you do not, you
cannot know, n your brght years of strength and
prde, how decayng nature cngs to her runed
shrne, and hugs the fragments of her own
beauty as they fa from her. lt s strange that
l waste so many words upon you strange
but et us part now, and f you have parents n
your own and who woud weep over ther ost
son, go n peace, and forget the madness that
has sprung up n your sprt.
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TH M C TH H M. 13
l have none to mourn me none to weep
for me sad the young man.
way then, away and be |ust to yoursef
the brd that has no mate spreads a wder
wng, and takes a boder fght.
ou counse me n van sad Manoopoo :
the de s cast derdunden odum begoud
my torment makes me mad forget your susp-
cons, mother: and remember- that they are but
suspcons reca the days when you had a
brother whom you oved and hep me once more
to ook upon a sster who has been ong ost to
me.
Dehbash e camed evrest mpa-
tenty what woud you ask of me
ven to |on your troop l w wear any
dsguse l w obey any behest l w pay
every effort whch you make for me wth god.
ay, ook not so scared, mother l am young,
and your sk w surey suffce to make an ame
of a saka-s .
The od woman stood ost n thought for a
tme, but at ength she broke forth wth an
earnest : o, no l cannot, l dare not you
know not what you ask are not the ame
traned from chdhood to ther gracefu trade
outh, teray no-beard.
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p
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1 TH M C TH H M.
and woud you cast drt upon my head by be-
trayng your madness to every |ooker-on Dd
you not see Mherprwr but a moment back
oud you stand besde her on the carpet of the
Pasha, and hope to escape
ot so, mother l woud be the massadgh
of your troop gve me a ve and a turban, an
rab drum and a heavy mante dye my hands
wth henna, and ve my shouders wth the fow-
ng tresses of a young beauty and whe the
ame repose between ther dances, l w wn the
ear of the Pasha s harem wth wd taes, and
earn god for you wth a cunnng tongue.
aah bah you sha carry a heavy purse
when you eave the cty. nd here, |agur be-
num my guardan ange here s where-
wtha to provde for me such garments as you
may deem fttng.
avash, yavash softy, softy, young
man sad evreste l am not a over, and
l cannot trave so swfty : but we w see what
can be done and she deposted her new gans
wth the frst offerng of her companon n the
fods of her tattered grde Mherprwr sha
decde f we may venture our necks so near the
grasp of the capd|-bash enter ths room on
Professona tory-teer.
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 15
the rght, and l w come to you n a moment.
l have aready tod you that we go to-nght to
the harem of the Tchorbad| and when the
ame awaken, they w fnd penty of empoy-
ment n preparng for ths vst.
Manoopoo obeyed, and nstanty found hm-
sef n a goomy apartment, overstrown wth the
paraphernaa of the Terpschorean troop. There
were bouquets of artfca fowers, most nartf-
cay wrought, sma cterns and gutars, and a
sort of rude castanet of rosewood gay cooured
ves of gau e, grdes of cachemre, and sppers
of vevet worked wth god and beads. tam-
bourne, fantastcay ornamented wth pendant
rbbons, ay on the dvan near the wndow and
Manoopoo amused hmsef durng the absence
of the od woman wth ths toyke nstrument,
whch was famar to hs hand and, as he dd
so, hs thoughts few back to the happy tme
when, to ts ratte, he had ed the gracefu ro-
maka, and taught the beautfu Carmf to
dream brght dreams of hs ost and regretted
and.
He was st absorbed n hs occupaton, when
an astonshed Mashaah sounded cose be-
sde hm, and he perceved that evreste and
the young beauty had entered the apartment
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p
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16 TH M C TH H M.
unobserved, and were ga ng on hm wth un-
fegned gratfcaton.
hy ths s we, khatoun my darng
sad the od woman u ou hande the tambour-
ne ke a hgh-prest of nran at the brda of
a utana How say you, Mherprwr, my
pear lf the ve and the antery become hm
ke the nstrument, may we not venture some-
thng to peasure hm
The ffend s master sad the ame n
a ow sweet tone lf he seeks my ad l am
ready.
May your beauty never decrease, |anum
my sou e camed Manoopoo for whch
wsh he was recompensed by a deep bush, and
a fant sme under your auspces l am sure
of success ook you shoud you need a mn-
stre to vary the charm of your gracefuness, l
am your save and he se ed one of the gu-
tars, and sang n a sweet subdued voce a we-
known fabe, n the musca words of Haf :
There was a brght and a sunny sky
pread over a aughng and,
ut one sma vapour was foatng by,
here the wd wave kssed the stran
nd as t passed o er the ocean-swe,
ran-drop from the dark coud fe.
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 17
as the mpd mosture sghed,
s t cave the yedng ar
nd must l persh n that sat tde,
nd de unregarded there
Hard s my fate to be thus rven
rom my gorous pace md the bue of Heaven
Down, down t fe but ere the tde
Touched the brght sand of the shore,
n oyster that thrsted, opened wde
lts pear-encrusted door
nd by the soft breathng of the ar,
The mpd drop was wafted there.
Tme passed and then a fsher came,
nd from that oyster drew
precous pr e, whose wondrous fame
Through many a regon few
The ran-drop had become a gem,
To deck a monarch s dadem
r, shoud you not ove the monotony of
ay, say not so nterposed the ame
eagery say not so there s no maden n the
band wth such a voce l w answer for you
wth my head. ls t not so, mother
akaum we sha see: answered e-
vreste quety put your ve upon the bey a-
deh, and et us see f he can teach those dark
eyes of hs as much softness as he has taught hs
tones. Hand hther those ong tresses that Gu-
bede has fung down so heedessy n yonder
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p
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18 TH M C TH H M.
corner and bd Gada end you her robe
she s the taest of the band There, go, and be
speedy n your return. nd you, young sr,
she added, as the gr dsappeared across the
threshod ook towards me, uness you are
an ous to make a mrror of the screen, and thus
deay your purpose by ga ng after a vson that
has vanshed.
th a sent sme Manoopoo obeyed and
on the return of the ame, the ast touch was
gven to hs costume, and the dsguse decared
to be perfect. Mherprwr casped her tte
hands n wonder, and whspered that he was a
sub|ect for the sunny foreground of a enu -
eer but a the sk and patence of the far
gr faed to make the handsome young Greek
move ke an ame, and utmatey the attempt
was abandoned n despar and t was decded that
hs gutar must be hs dependence, couped wth
hs taents as a massad|h, of whch they were
content to accept hs assurance.
The ovey Mherprwr was eaous n her
servces she taught the new pup a thousand
tte coquettsh graces showed hm the e act
shade of the henna whch must decorate hs fn-
gers, and the precse curve that he must gve to
hs eyebrows aughed hearty at the angush-
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 19
merts by whch he endeavoured to subdue the
fashng of hs dark eyes, and the mncng step,
and unaccustomed sde of the embrodered sp-
per but occasonay she checked her mrth to
bestow on hm an encouragng sme, and a mur-
mured word of approbaton.
Mashaah you do credt, ffendm, to
your aftand| ousta ng your ve a tte
more ghty from your brow, and do not en-
tange the frnge of your seeve n the buttons of
your antery. lt woud be we too f you dd not
carry your head qute so hgh remember that
you are but an awa,-f and that you must be
humbe and modest when you tread the carpets
of the great. Look you, mother, how we the
bey adeh comprehends my meanng and how
thoroughy he reads hs esson.
emduah the rsk can be but sght :
reped the od woman f he w promse to
be prudent and he w do we to |on us to-
nght when we vst the ades of the Tchorbad|,
n order that hs task may st more easy when he
has more at stake.
fter a moment s hestaton, Manoopoo con-
sented to ths arrangement and then fngng
off the dsguse n whch he had been enveoped,
Mstress of the ardrobe. f ngng-woman.
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20 TH M C TH H M.
he bade adeu to evreste, and her pretty com-
panon unt twght, and sowy sauntered back
to the enduk, n whch he had estabshed
hmsef.
s he moved aong, he coud not repress the
msgvngs whch ntruded themseves on hs
magnaton, and made hs puses qucken and
hs heart grow sck. He we knew that for the
Greek who nvades the harem of the Mosem,
and who fas n hs dsguse, there s no mercy
and athough he fet that, n hs ntervew wth
hs adored Carmf, the bss of behodng one so
deary oved and so ong ost woud uphod hm,
he dreaded the tra whch awated hm n the
harem of the Tchorbad|. The de was, how-
ever, cast and he resoved to abandon hmsef
to the gudance of hs new frends.
lnn.
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#
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TH M C TH H M. 21
CH PT ll.
The day sowy passed away for to the
an ous, tme ever seems to move wth foded
wngs, and to sumber on hs scythe but at
ength the hours waned, and he returned to the
Therak Tcharch to fuf hs destny.
s he entered, he was met on the threshod
by the od woman, who senty beckoned hm
onward, and conducted hm to an apartment
whence the sounds of aughter, mnged wth the
voce of song, and the rattng of castanets, came
|oyousy to hs ear. The screen was fung asde,
the porta passed, and he stood among the ame,
who were aready adorned for ther evenng s
task. ne far gr occuped the centre of the
foor, her arms were rased above her head.
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p
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22 TH M C TH H M.
and n her rght hand she hed a tambourne,
whence the ong streamng rbbons fe, rs-
tnted, n brght confuson, and mnged wth
the soft tresses of her raven har her tte feet
were bare, and her sght wow-ke fgure ap-
peared to bend beneath the weght of the fary
nstrument, whe her eyes rested fondy on a
young beauty who was treadng a gracefu
measure to the cashng of her castanets.
were dversey empoyed, save one and that one
was Mherprwr, who, recnng on her cushons,
her far cheek powed on her hand, and her
ga e turned an ousy towards the entrance of
the apartment, was aroused from her revere by
the arrva of Manoopoo, whom she wecomed
wth a bush whch dyed her brow to the same
tnt as the gowng roses that rested on t.
ln a moment a was confuson every ame
of the troop nssted on endng her ad towards
the competon of a masquerade so nove and so
e ctng and had Manoopoo been a Mosem,
he mght we have magned that he had been
transported to the Paradse of the Prophet, and
was tended by the hour, wthout the premnary
ceremony of dssouton.
nd by what name sha we ca our new
sster asked Mherprwr, as she gave the ast
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TH M C TH H M. 23
gracefu fod to the cachemre grde of the
young Greek e mght name her am,
but that those dark eyes whch go wanderng
hther and thther ke had|s-f bewdered n the
desart, are not qute sober enough to sut wth
such a tte. y vah who has a head for
names ou, Lebe, who are the best poet of
the troop, have you no suggeston to make
l woud ca hm e dka f| sad the augh-
ng gr who had been thus summoned to the
counc for does he not rsk hs fe to ook
upon hs mstress
Tab we sad e camed the od
woman and Tab Tab was murmured
by a the young beautes by whom she was
surrounded.
t ength the moment came when the far
troop were to transport themseves to the harem
of the Tchorbad| and Manoopoo was soon
shrouded ke the rest n a ong and ampe
ferd|he or mante of dark coth, whe hs face
was conceaed by a shaw and n ths guse he
foowed evreste wth hs nstrument n hs
hand, and a wd beatng at hs heart.
The Tchorbad| resded beyond the was of
the town, n a spacous house on the edge of the
Modest. Pgrms. athfu.
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p
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2 TH M C TH H M.
pan hs gardens were traversed by a brght
rver, and a gded boat danced on the rppe
beneath the eafy screen of od and ma|estc
trees. n avenue of mapes, whose gnared and
twsted branches had ressted the storms of a
century, ed up to the house neary from the
cty gates, and threw a goom around whch fe
heavy on the sprt of the young Greek. ut
the ame were ess mpressbe and as they
moved aong, they gay banded |ests, and ven-
tured nferences and specuatons on the be-
raty of the Tchorbad|, whch e torted an
occasona sme from Manoopoo, an ous as
he was. natches of wd songs, and wder
stores escaped them aso, as t seemed nvoun-
tary : ther wanderng and uncertan fe had
taught them the phosophy of present en|oy-
ment, and the futty of forebodng and they
ved, and |ested, and aughed, as though tme
had no morrow, or that they coud fur hs wngs
at ther own gddy w.
Mherprwr aone was stad and sent she
waked sowy wth bent head, ke one who n-
duges n deep and pensve thought and occa-
sonay her dark eyes fashed out from behnd
ther |eaous screen as she ganced hasty and
an ousy towards Manoopoo. ut ere ong
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 25
her abstracton drew down upon her the aughter
of her companons, and she aroused hersef, and
mnged n the de conversaton of the party, or
hed a whspered and momentary communon
wth evreste, unt they stood before the gate
of the Tchorbad| s harem.
Loud and earnest was ther wecome as they
sprang over the threshod nto a spacous ha
paved wth varous cooured marbes, where the
pashng of water and the song of brds made
the ar voca. rchy gded door at the upper
end was fung back, and through the openng
they caught a decous gmpse n the moonght
of trees, and fowers, and fountans, spreadng
far away nto the dstance. Groupes of saves,
many of them young and beautfu, were hurry-
ng to and fro and each as she passed had a
gay word and a gayer sme for the ame. The
sounds of musc came soothngy from an nner
apartment and a soft stream of moonshne
payed aong the marbe foor, and dyed t wth
the rch tnts whch t pfered as t passed from
the crmson hangngs of the numerous case-
ments. together t was a scene of enchant-
ment and t was not wthout regret that Ma-
noopoo foowed the e ampe of hs compa-
nons, and obeyed the summons of a smng
L. lll. c
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26 TH M C TH H M.
save who wated to conduct them to the presence
of her mstress.
hosh gedn you are wecome, uttered
n a ow sweet voce whch fe softy on the ear
of the young Greek, were the frst sounds that
greeted hm as he found hmsef n an apart-
ment fashng wth god frnge and embrodery,
and mmedatey opposte to a ovey woman
who reposed on a spendd dvan of vevet, sur-
rounded by her attendants, whe two far ch-
dren were sportng on a cushon at her feet and
earnest was the tone n whch he |oned n the
hosh buduk we found of the ame, as
they bent before her n homage.
re ong the Tchorbad| arrved. He was a
man wth whose beard tme had toyed unt t
had wthered n hs grasp hs brow was deepy
nterned, and from the corners of hs keen and
ferce back eyes a puckered mass of mnute
wrnkes spread even to hs tempes. Hs nose
was hgh and saent, and hs upper p was hd-
den by the thck and gr ed mustache whch
adorned t. He was of mdde heght, but of
great muscuar power and Manoopoo at the
frst gance fet douby desrous to preserve hs
dsguse unsuspected.
Two by two the ame moved forward and
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TH M C TH H M. 27
performed ther gracefu evoutons, whch won for
them many a Mashaah r) and fernr from
the Tchorbad|, and a murmur of commendaton
from hs far young wfe but when at ast, and
aone, Mherprwr fung off her ve, and bounded
nto the centre of the foor, where she stood for
an nstant ke a started fawn stenng for a
comng footstep, the Tchorbad| haf rose from
hs sofa, and wthdrew the chbouque from hs
ps to ga e on her. The tapers by whch the
apartment was umnated threw ther fu ba e
upon her as she rested for a moment wthout
strrng ether eye or mb, and then suddeny
sprngng back a pace or two, twred her tam-
bourne above her head, as though the |oyous-
ness of her young sprt coud rng out through
ts sver bes.
lt was now that Manoopoo aroused hmsef
to pay hs part n the pageant and sufferng the
shaw n whch he had been shrouded to fa from
hs head, but wthout rsng from the carpet on
whch he was recnng, he watched the moment
when the far Mherprwr changed the measure
of her movements to a sower and more mean-
choy chaunt and catchng up the cadence
where she had suffered t to de away, accom-
e done.
c2
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p
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28 TH M C TH H M.
paned her angud and e quste performance
wth the wd baad whose acton t was ntended
to portray.
Cobah Cobah where art thou now
e have sought thee n van on the mountan s brow,
e have ooked for thee, ove, where the stream runs cear.
Cobah Cobah thou art not here
The wnd sghs ts gref thro the cypress bough,
Cobah beoved one where art thou
he s gone she s gone but where
Go ask the earth s starry fowers
here the sunbeams of yesterday rest, she s there,
he can never agan be our s
Lfe s sweetest and brghtest thngs,
The |oys we have oved and ost,
st n the and where the sprts wngs
Catch Heaven s brght beam the most
hy dd she pass away,
efore her sweet youth was o er,
Lke the fower whch drnks n the sunbeam to-day,
nd to-morrow e sts no more
he oved, t she ved n that ght aone
That her own pure sou had made
nd she wthered because the chershed one
ho had been to her both breath and sun
Left her to pne and fade
ummer days pass earth s bossoms de
Heaven s stars fa from the a ure sky
ur |oys a wther one by one
Cobah s gone Cobah s gone
Mornng star.
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 29
s he commenced hs task, Manoopoo
breathed qucky, for the keen eye of the Tchor-
bad| was on hm but as the dance proceeded,
he became thraed by the consummate sk of
the dancer, and nvountary fung hs whoe
sou nto hs voce, whe a contnuous murmur
of admraton and appause escaped the spec-
tators. s the song ceased, the ame seemed
to de away wth the stran, her head drooped,
her arms hung stessy at her sde, the tam-
bourne fe from her hand, and she stood the
very pcture of despar,
ln the enthusasm of the moment the wfe of
the Tchorbad| drew a rng from her fnger, and
paced t n the hand of a save, who presented
t to Mherprwr whe the host hmsef fung
a purse nto the ap of Manoopoo, whch he
nstanty transferred to the keepng of evreste.
ever was success more perfect and as the far
grs stood n groupes upon the brght-cooured
carpets, the young Greek thought he had never
behed any spectace so ovey. The gorgeousy
attred beauty on the dvan was radant wth
youth, and brght wth |ewes the gracefu
ame stood before her ke attendant pers the
Tchorbad| was the one shadow whch reeved
the brght ghts of the pcture and the chdren
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p
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30 TH M C TH H M.
who nested n each, other s arms, and ga ed n
wonderng admraton on the strangers wth
ther brght stag-ke eyes, seemed to the e cted
magnaton of the adventurer ke bengs of
another word, where care, and crme, and wther-
ng had never come
Dance succeeded to dance, and song to song
and the Tchorbad| appeared to dvde hs en-
thusasm between Mherprwr and the dsgused
edka, whose arge deep eyes and e quste
voce had made no sght mpresson on the
fancy of the worthy |anssary.
ah buyuk der My sectar aga tod
me, mother, that one of your ame was as
beautfu as a hour, and as gracefu as a fawn
and hs face s whtened, for he sad ony the
truth but he made no menton of the far awa
whose voce s to me as meodous as the ah
hu f of the foowers of the Prophet y the
sou of your father you sha shew your young
beautes to hs hghness the Pasha he w f
ther mouths wth god, and spread the carpets
of beraty under the feet of mert. l have
sad t.
May the words of my ord be wrtten on
the sou of hs save wth the caam | of grat-
word-bearer. f atte cry. eed pen.
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 31
tude sad evreste, as she prostrated hersef,
unt her brow touched the foor before the
Tchorbad| who am l, that my ord shoud
ft my sou nto the akash of fecty hat
can l do to remove from my head the ashes of
un worthness, and from the skrt of my garment
the defement of reproach
e brm what can l say reped
the Tchorbad| courteousy aah bah
l am satsfed. 1
edka, to whose musc my ord has degned
to sten, s no ndfferent massad|he: sad the
od woman he has taes whch may charm
hs ear, and wean hs thoughts for awhe from
the cares of hs e ated staton, f such be hs
good peasure. How says my ord
The statey f end ganced towards hs far
young wfe, and readng n her brght eyes an
ntense an ety whch there was no need of
words to nterpret, he sgnaed hs acquescence
n the suggeston of evreste and the ame
havng grouped themseves on ether sde of
Manoopoo n atttudes whose grace woud
have thraed the sprt of a panter, he took
from the hands of Mherprwr, who recned near
hm, a rchy nad ebec, whence he drew tones
of sweetness that hushed at once the under-cur-
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p
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32 TH M C TH H M.
rent of whspered deght whch came ke ncense
to the ears of the ame and then, ayng asde
the nstrument, he turned the fu beam of hs
dark eyes on the Tchorbad|, and n a voce
at once subdued and musca, thus tod hs
tae.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 33
CH PT lll.
TH l GD M TH MlC .
wse man w never despse a weak enemy.
oos ony scoff at a danger of whch they know
not the probabe e tent and those n power
woud do we to recoect that the deepest ca-
vern of the rock s frequenty betrayed by a
rft scarcey wde enough to admt the hand of a
woman.
l am about to te our Hghness a tae of a
mouse and l pray you to et your fancy trave
wth me, that so we may go on our way together
n good understandng. nd even ke the wse
man to whom l have |ust made auson, my
ord must not despse the tte anma because
of the mnuteness of hs proportons and the
rather that he was the mperor of a the mce
n Turkey, whom he rued n peace, the beoved
c5
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3 TH M C TH H M.
of hs sub|ects, wth every prospect of a ong
and prosperous regn.
The subterranean paace was of vast e tent
and we and warmy furnshed wth the spos of
many a mdnght vst to the upper earth. The
granares were we stored wth corn : peas,
beans, and upns abounded dred grapes, fgs,
and other fruts cacuated for tardy consump-
ton, were neaty and compacty housed for wn-
ter use and, n short, the padshah of the ong-
tas nbbed hs favourte roots n cam and ph-
osophc dgnty never troubng hs head wth
the feuds whch he we knew were contnuay
gong on above t.
ut who can controu fate ho can number
the stars, count the notes of the bubu, or post-
pone the decay of the rose Great was the con-
sternaton throughout the metropos of Mouse-
and, when t was dscovered that an od o ,
we known to many of them as a notorousy
bad character, a marauder, and a common thef,
who swept away enough to suppy ther whoe
communty for a month, at a snge vst to the
over-grown granares of the frghtfu bpeds who
nfested the provnce and of whom the Mce had
never been abe to dscover the utty, uness
ndeed when they were reuctanty compeed to
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 35
admt, that by housng ther corn and roots
and other eatabes, they saved them (the mce)
the troube of coectng ther own suppes l
repeat that great was the consternaton when t
was dscovered that ths unprncped od o
had thought proper, they coud not magne
wherefore, to estabsh hmsef n the mme-
date neghbourhood of ther capta where he
kept up a constant and most unpeasant sensa-
ton, by day and nghty ncursons nto the
surroundng country, and by devourng every
unhappy stragger who chanced to cross hs
path a crcumstance that fed a the ordery
and we conducted ct ens wth a trepdaton,
whch, f t dd not redound to the credt of
ther courage, at east spoke voumes for ther
prncpes.
or was ths a : for f any faut coud be
found wth the domestc egsaton of Mouse-
and, t must be admtted that the error ay n
the same weakness whch has at tmes operated
unpeasanty n other natons. Hs Ma|esty the
mperor had a strong predecton n favour of
persona beauty. Hs Prme Mnster was the
prme dandy of the court, who had won the lm-
pera sme by the gracefu cur of hs e qu-
stey ponted whskers the ecretary of tate
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36 TH M C TH H M.
was remarkabe for the fne fa n hs back, when,
posed on hs hnd egs, he presented to the mo-
narch any of the pubc documents, whch mpor-
tant mssves were neaty scratched by the thorn
of the mmosa pant on the bark of the orange tree
a tabet, whch however unwecome the contents
of the scro mght prove to the padshah, at east
prevented ther ever beng offensve whe the
Commander-n-Chef was equay ceebrated for
the beautfu gossness of hs skn, whch, ucky
for hs fortunes, was fu three shades ghter
than any other n the naton.
ut the pecuar vanty of the monarch ay n
the ength of hs sub|ects tas and ths fact
kept the court, the cty, and the whoe popua-
ton of the under-ground mpre n a perpetua
state of e ctement. Machnes were nvented
for stretchng the |onts pueys were arranged,
by whch the most ambtous suspended them-
seves heads downwards, unt ther eyes became
boodshot, and ther respraton mpeded and
there was not a mouseng throughout the m-
pre who dd not mtate hs natura enemy the
ktten, by runnng round and round n gddy
crces wth hs ta between hs teeth
nd now here was an -favoured and bury
beast, estabshed under ther very noses, whose
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 37
ta was so ong and bushy, that wth one deter-
mned sweep t coud brush away the whoe
paace-guard, and ay bare the prvate apart-
ments of the monarch to the ga e of the entre
cty lt was enough to breed a rebeon and
the court favourte, a seek young mouse of qua-
ty, whose ta was the thrty-s th part of an
nch onger than any other near the person of
hs ma|esty, and who was, moreover, about to
receve the paw of one of the prncesses n mar-
rage, actuay commtted sucde n the frst mo-
ment of despar, by drownng hmsef n the
skn of a gourd fed wth ran water. eng
good ookng, and n favour at court, he was
generay regretted by a those who had any-
thng to hope through hs nterest and the knd
and consderate soveregn, n order to consoe hs
daughter for her une pected oss, bured the de-
ceased wth mtary honours, to whch as he
had aways worn very magnfcent moustachoes
he was undenaby entted.
Ths commoton among the Mce ed, however,
to one resut e tremey dstressng to the pa-
dshah, who had never contempated any dstur-
bance n hs domnons, and whose esure was
now nvaded at a moments, whe hs dgeston
suffered severey from the contnua aarms to
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38 TH M C TH H M.
whch he was sub|ected he found that a con-
vcton of hs ncapacty to protect them from
ther dreaded enemy, was weakenng hs autho-
rty over hs sub|ects.
ne of the most ab|ect and fawnng of hs
counseors, who had never htherto dared to
move eye or mb n the presence of hs lmpera
Master, unt he had receved hs gracous sanc-
ton to do so, had absoutey brushed hs whskers
wthn a foot of the tp of those of hs ma|esty,
wthout profferng the sghtest apoogy whe
severa of hs bravest generas had begged eave
to retre upon ther aures, and to eave the
fed open to younger men whose nterests they
suddeny dscovered to have been greaty n-
|ured by ther own tenacty of offce.
ths was e tremey perpe ng and ve -
atous to a monarch who wshed for nothng be-
yond peace and en|oyment, and who had not the
sghtest taste for dffcuty and danger and he
therefore deemed t e pedent to summon a
counc before these ncpent symptoms broad-
ened nto downrght rebeon |usty consder-
ng, that shoud he fnd t e pedent to do so, he
had as good a rght to abdcate the throne, and to
provde for hs own safety, as hs generas had to
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 39
run away, and eave the army to provde for
tsef.
lt was a soemn sght to wtness the assem-
bng of the gray-bearded mnsters of Mouse-
and each wth hs ta draggng aong the
earth, e tended to ts e tremest ength, and hs
round back eyes cast mournfuy to the ground.
The nhabtants of the cty stood asde to et the
processon pass and they ooked upon t wth
as much nterest as though they thought that
the de words of a score of trembng od Mce
were key to dsodge the offendng o , and to
bansh hm the country nor was t unt the
ast |ont of the ast mnstera ta had sowy
dsappeared through the porta of the paace,
that the crowd dspersed, and the varous avoca-
tons of the ct ens were resumed.
The counc-chamber was crowded. The mo-
narch was seated on a pe of nuts, most u u-
rousy arranged, and covered wth the whte
tufts of the wd cotton tree whe the counc-
ors took ther paces n two nes, one on hs
rght hand, and the other on hs eft, and made
a most mposng appearance each havng as-
sumed hs most dgnfed bearng, as best suted
to the emergency of the crss.
The war of words was ong, and at tmes bt-
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0 TH M C TH H M.
ter for, wth an mmnent danger starng them
n the face, the mnsters were ess cautous than
usua and severa, who had never before e -
changed aught save courteses, now bandyed sar-
casms, and hnts, whch enghtened the monarch
more proftaby than peasanty on many ponts
on whch he had htherto been most comfortaby
gnorant. Pecuaton was brought home to the
eeper of the Prvy Purse the ecretary for
oregn ffars was ta ed wth beng n corre-
spondence wth ther enemes the |erhuahs, or
Leapng Mce, a coony of adventurers from
gypt, who had estabshed themseves, no one
knew from what mpuse, near at hand the
Commander-n-Chef was twtted wth a defeat,
whch, t was nsnuated, had fed hs store-
houses, whe t e hausted hs army and the
Prme Mnster was faty ta ed wth havng re-
canted the prncpes he had professed on accept-
ng offce and mseadng the monarch n a
score of nstances, not one of whch bore the
sghtest anaogy to the sub|ect-matter that they
were assembed to dscuss,
t ength the o was mentoned and then
a ndvdua anmostes were merged n the
common nterest hat was to be done The
answer was smpe The ntruder must be ds-
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 1
odged gnomnousy, wth contempt and
oathng. Ths resouton was adopted wthout
a dssentent voce but when the ne t queston
was propounded, the perpe ty became great.
How was ths very desrabe measure to be ef-
fected ot a Mouse among them coud pont
out the method. the wsdom, or, at east,
a the ongest tas n the mpre (and htherto
that had answered the same purpose,) coected
together n counc were unabe to decde on the
how and, at ength, t was hnted by a shrewd
and ready-wtted Lord Chamberan, that as
there appeared to be some dffcuty n removng
the o , t mght be e pedent for the Mce
themseves to mgrate to some dstant terrtory,
far from the pouton of hs presence carryng
wth them the monarch they revered, the wves
they chershed, and the tte ones who were
growng up about them.
The dea was nstanty se ed by an oratorca
ed- Marsha, who favoured the counc wth
severa we-turned perods and fourshes of sen_
tment taked of ther househod gods, ther
hearths and homes and, fnay, concuded by
secondng the proposton of hs nobe frend,
and strongy recommendng change of ar to the
whoe popuaton.
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2 TH M C TH H M.
The monarch eant hs head upon hs paw,
and remaned bured n deep and panfu thought
when an aged Mouse of reverend aspect who had
not yet spoken, arose, and respectfuy bowng
towards the throne, thus addressed the ustrous
Padshah by whom t was occuped.
Most nobe and most powerfu mperor, n
whose sme the earth fourshes throughout
whose reams the sun shnes not, he beng hm-
sef the ght n whch hs sub|ects ve Lord
of the Long Tas, whose |onts are strength-
ened and made suppe by the o of thy counte-
nance Let the roya gates of attenton be un-
foded, that the charots of my argument may
enter nto thy mnd, and nger there. l have
suffered a these nobe and earned Mce to speak
before me they have fung back the brght
page of the voume of ther wsdom, and l have
read every ne, that l mght see wth ther eyes,
and comprehend wth ther understandng. ut
he who foows the counses of others when hs
heart s not n them, s a trator to hs country,
and unworthy the confdence of hs soveregn
thus then, havng perused the wrtngs of the n-
tegent, and bowed before the argument of the
eoquent, l agan ft my head to decare that
the precptate advce of ths counse s contrary
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 3
to reason, and key to ead to ncacuabe ms-
chef. Great as we are as a peope brave n
war earned n peace uprght n |udgment
and governed by a prnce whose sceptre
sways the destnes of a word, we must not ds-
dan to earn the esson of wsdom, n whatever
tongue t may be taught.
Prudence s the step-sster of vaour po-
cy s the good rght hand of strength and
wt s the master-sprt of fortune. The spder
may be crushed by a touch, yet n ts wness t
weaves a net of subtety by whch t grows nto
a gant, and feeds upon creatures more powerfu
than tsef. The ant, st weaker of ts nature,
buds tsef n wth cay where the fruts are
rchest, and robs the brd that woud devour
both sha we, then e on whom depend
the destnes of Mouseand ha we desert
ourseves n such an hour as ths, when by frm-
ness we may regan our threatened securty
orbd t honour, and courage, and patrotsm.
lf we fy, what ensues ur cty w be ad
waste, our paace prostrated, our possessons be-
come the spo of our enemes whe we sha
be hunted ke robbers from pace to pace
pgrms wthout a shrne wanderers wthout a
home a naton wthout a name
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TH M C TH H M.
ls t for ths that we have toed and fought
eaten the bread of carefuness, and reared aoft
the banner of our ancestors o, no we
must be ess than Mce to fa so tamey ne
effort more must be made, or the bones of our
forefathers w not rest quety n ther dsho-
noured graves.
nd then, havng secured the ear of attenton,
the hoary councor ad before the assemby the
stratagem by whch he hoped to dever the
groanng peope from ther common enemy.
stened an ousy, and one unversa squeak of
approbaton haed the communcaton.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 5
CH PT ll.
TH l GD M TH MlC contnue d.
rght rose the moon, and shed her ve of
sver over the bushng andscape. The odour
of the orange bossom, and the wd thyme,
foated ke a coud of ncense on the ar. The
song of the brd of ove wove a spe about t,
beneath whch the sou dssoved away n sad-
ness and the eaves whspered to the wnds a
tae to whch no morta words mght gve utter-
ance when the great mperor of Mce mus-
tered hs forces on the upper earth and wt-
nessed wth a nobe enthusasm, worthy of hs
e ated staton, the gatherng of hs armed
hordes.
Lke a ake genty agtated by the bree e, he
ed them over an e tensve pan, and wth prompt
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6 TH M C TH H M.
vaour, and an energy ncdent to the great
emergency n whch he was nvoved, headed the
host unt t hated near a we-stored granary,
aready famar to many of the number. The
pace was undefended, and he at once abandoned
t to page whe every ndvdua mouse,
eaous n so good a cause, carred off hs own
porton of the spo, wth whch he made the best
of hs way home and there, havng abandoned
t to the care of the aged and the young, who were
unabe to encounter the fatgue and danger of a
predatory e curson, by whom t was housed,
and secured from the attacks of no ous reptes
returned for a fresh booty, unt tte remaned
n the budng whch had atey groaned be-
neath the weght of gran.
hen thngs had progressed thus far, the
hoary sage who had devsed the stratagem, com-
manded the obedent army to coect the re-
mander of the spo, and strew t pentfuy
aong the path whch ed to the dweng of the
o takng care that not one scattered gran
shoud betray the road to ther own cty and
havng seen hs order scrupuousy fufed, he
|oned the monarch, and they at once returned
n sence to the capta.
The horror of the husbandmen, when on the
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 7
morrow they dscovered that the fruts of ther
ndustry had dsappeared durng the nght, t
woud requre the eoquence of a mouah to
descrbe and wth btter vows of vengeance
they soon traced the track that had been taken
by the supposed thef, for the scattered gran
ay thck upon the ground to the very burrow
of the o . onder succeeded to annoyance,
and they communed among themseves what
dshonest nhabtant had there estabshed hm-
sef a fact whch they resoved to ascertan,
whe they aso satsfed ther vengeance. strong
snare was accordngy prepared and that very
evenng the poor nnocent o , who was return-
ng supperess to bed, after a very unsuccessfu
foray, was caught n the trap that had been ad
for hm.
Many an honest man unwttngy thrusts hs
neck nto the noose meant for a rasca, but what
s wrtten, s wrtten and t s useess to con-
tend wth fate.
ln ess than an hour, the mperor of Mouse-
and earnt the defeat of hs enemy when a
genera re|ocng was procamed throughout the
cty, as for a vctory. nd n ths the wse mo-
narch dscovered to hs ovng peope the pro-
fundty of hs ntegence for t s so rare that
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8 TH M C TH H M.
a soveregn owes success to the wt of hs coun-
cors, that he does we to make the occason
serve as a natona |ubee.
s he rumnated on the gorous news, he
sweed wth prde and mportance, unt he fet
as though the paace coud not hod hm, and
that he must breathe the upper ar, or burst
wth hs own greatness and accordngy, order-
ng hs traveng throne, he caused hmsef to
be carred n state on a dred mape eaf, at the
head of a formdabe army, to trumph over hs
prostrate enemy.
hosh buduk we found, most mghty
o broke forth the e utng Padshah How
do vou propose to cook those of my sub|ects on
whom you sup to-nght
The captve fet the decate rony, but he was
too wy to bandy sentences wth a crowned
head and wth admrabe |udgment he fet that
ths was not e acty the moment to retort : he
therefore bent humby before the monarch, and
wth a pententa demeanour thus addressed
hm :
Most mghty Conqueror whose armes are
countess as the ocusts, and formdabe as the
panther of the desart whose voce s as the
thunders of the tempest, and whose eye mocks
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 9
the ghtnng by whch t s accompaned. l bow
before your resentment, and own that t s |ust.
l mocked at your power, because n your mercy
you had spared me ts e ercse but now, when
by my enormtes l have provoked my punsh-
ment, l am compeed to admt t, because l am
prostrated beneath ts mmensty. l deserve no
forbearance, but l ask t as a boon and f a
fe of devoton to your nterests can atone for a
bref season of foy, l put my head nto your
hand, and devote mysef henceforward to your
servce. Try me, dread soveregn and l w
soon convnce your lmpera reason that my
future e ertons for your wefare sha more
than compensate for my past enormtes. 1
The Padshah, struck by the humbe bearng
of hs atey formdabe enemy, and qute ave
to the addtona consequence whch must accrue
to hm from the possesson of so powerfu and
crafty a sub|ect, hasty caed hs counseors
asde, and desred them to gve ther utmost
attenton to the queston that he was about to
ay before them v . whether the good fath of
the o shoud be trusted, and hs servces se-
cured to the mpre by the strong chan of gra-
ttude or whether, pacng no fath n hs pro-
testatons of amendment, they shoud augh hs
L. lll. D
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50 TH M C TH H M.
promses to scorn, and abandon hm to the n-
evtabe destructon whch awated hm at the
hands of hs captors.
Many opnons were gven for there s no-
thng of whch ether men or mce are so avsh
as of ther advce. lt s ndeed often gven, not
ony unasked but uncared for and n ths n-
stance, the ony sound opnon advanced was by
the same od mouse who had been the cause of
the capture for the young van mousengs of
the lmpera househod were deghted at the
prospect of havng so arge and strong a com-
panon and they aready began twstng ther
whskers wth addtona mportance at the bare
dea. ut the hoary sage was not to be msed
by such chdsh chmeras and he sobery re-
presented n the humbest but most earnest
manner to the Padshah that a natura enemy
coud never be converted nto a sncere and
trustworthy frend for that however he mght
be compeed from dstress, necessty, or ambton,
to hde hs rea neaments under the mask of
good feowshp, the antpathes of hs nature
coud never be entrey conquered or eradcated.
s we mght the tger be tamed whe he pos-
sessed hs caws n short, he strongy advsed
that the snared o shoud mmedatey be put
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 51
to death and the mpre thus devered ato-
gether from any reapse of ts ate danger.
The young and mpetuous voted ths reason-
ng a bore, and the reasoner unseasonaby prosy
whe the eders nssted wth some paus-
bty that t was potc n a weak state to form
powerfu aances and that an admrabe op-
portunty now presented tsef of securng an
ay, who, havng fet the consequences of ther
ndgnaton, woud not agan be tempted to
brave t.
lt woud be we, nevertheess, f a dpo-
matsts who are ncned to start a smar theory,
were to refect, that brngng a dangerous enemy
nto the camp, to earn at once the secret of ts
weakness, and the fact that hs overthrow was
the more fortunate ssue of an adventurous strata-
gem, s a very probabe method of makng ther
own necks the steppng-stones to hs advance-
ment and revenge.
The van monarch, however, at once resoved
to act upon the atter argument the o was
accordngy sworn to aegance wth a due
ceremony, and n proper form and he was then
freed from the snare by the teeth of hs new
aes the Padshah fnay returnng to the cty
n trumph, foowed by the o as far as the
d2
Ll
U l lT lLLl l
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p
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52 TH M C TH H M.
entrance of the capta, where the lmpera sute
was deprved of hs presence by the unpeasant
fact that ether he was too arge for the gates, or
the gates were too sma for hm. To reconce
hm to ths compusatory e cuson, the monarch,
therefore, n the e uberance of hs e utng va-
nty, created hm e r, wth the lmpera per-
msson to resde beyond the was.
lt s dangerous pocy to put authorty nto
the hands of one wth whose power you have
not strength to contend : but as empty badders
foat on the surface of the stream, and gather
ony the scum of the waters, whe sod sub-
stances seek the bottom of the channe, and form
receptaces for the god-dust so van and
thoughtess men, puffed up by ther own mag-
nary consequence, dsregard the sage counses of
the wary and the wse, to poute themseves
wth the frothy vapourngs of the shaow and
the sefsh. nd f such be the case wth men,
tte marve s t that the same weakness shoud
e st among mce.
The o , fond of power, and fndng at the
moment no more egtmate fed for hs ambton,
resoved to nfuse nto the mnd of the mperor
of the Mce some of hs own wd schemes of
aggrandsement and he accordngy began by
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 53
assurng hs ma|esty at the ne t dvan, that, wth
hs lmpera permsson, he woud soon make
hm master of the whoe provnce.
The Padshah was enchanted. very soveregn
oves power, and conquest, and authorty and
t s e traordnary how greedy they mbbe the
prospect of securng them. The e r e paned
hs theores, and they carred convcton wth
them so the new Prme Mnster snapped up
the od counseor on the frst favourabe oppor-
tunty devered a funera oraton over hs man-
ged remans, remarkabe for ts eoquence and
ts no- meanng and then assumed the rens of
government wthout opposton, and commenced
hs potca career.
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5 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l .
TH l GD M TH MlC contnued.
There was a kngdom cose besde that of
Mouseand, whch was pecuary obno ous to
the o for ts nhabtants, athough comey
and specous when a went we for ther nte-
rests, were especay rrtabe and pugnacous n
the event of any opposton : and as they coud
not be prevaed upon to enter nto the vews of
the new e r, he naturay fet the necessty of
ayng the a e to the root of ther e stence.
rave as they were, the Mce had some dff-
cuty n contendng wth the Cats, who hed ther
nocturna assembes under the roof of a dap-
dated dweng not a hundred roods dstant from
the lmpera paace of the Padshah and accom-
paned ther counses wth an outcry and uproar
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 55
very annoyng and unsatsfactory to the mpre
of the Long-tas.
The dssonance was dreadfu and the favorte
wfe of the mperor, a ped mouse of e traord-
nary beauty, and ceebrated (unhappy enough
on ths occason) for the ength of her ears, was
actuay thrown nto convusons on the breakng-
up of one of ther orges a crcumstance whch
deprved the Padshah of an her, and the peope
of a Crown-Prnce a great acquston when
there s no prospect of ether a sege or a famne.
The army, aso, suffered greaty from ther
vcnty, as they threw out detachments from
ther man body, who ad n ambush for the
foragng partes of the o and not ony
destroyed many of hs most effcent troops, but
moreover threatened to occason a famne n hs
camp.
lt s remarkaby unpeasant for a genera to
have hs men pcked off by twos and threes, and
made away wth he knows not how for the Cats
were adepts at the busness, and never eft a
trace of ther vctms, nor a suffcent fragment
of ther remans, to admt of any prete t on the
part of a gratefu naton to erect a monument
over ther ashes.
Thngs were n ths uncomfortabe state, when
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p
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56 TH M C TH H M.
one mornng as the e r of Mouseand was out
reconnotrng, he reached the banks of a rver,
where a fshng-party of torks were busy em-
poyed n the capture of ther fnny prey. The
usua compments passed between them and the
o wth nfnte tact euog ed ther sk, enved
them ther capabtes for so e ctng an amuse-
ment, and fnay accepted a fsh whch was cor-
day offered to hm by one of the party after
whch he dgressed to the beauty of the weather,
the oveness of the andscape, and the nvgo-
ratng freshness of the mornng ar and when he
made hs partng bow, he eft the whoe ong-
necked socety deepy mpressed by hs good
breedng and |udgment.
Ths pont ganed, he trotted esurey aong
unt he reached the head-quarters of the Cats,
when he sat down before the door, as f from
wearness, wth the fsh between hs feet. The
aromatc odour of hs precous charge soon be-
gan to affect the ofactory organs of the fene
communty, who focked from every part of the
budng wth desre n ther eyes, and water n
ther mouths and graduay advancng nearer
and nearer to the o , they began to be very
nqustve about the fsh.
eynard, havng a pont to carry, of course af-
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 57
fected the most supreme ndfference, and turned
the fsh over and over wth hs paw n a manner
at once careess and gracefu, e hbtng t n a
ts beauty to the ongng cats. Ths was natura
enough, for t s what s done every day n the
word the possesson of an ob|ect s tte, uness
that possesson s coveted by others and ts de-
cded en|oyment conssts n the envy whch t
e ctes.
s they contnued to urge hm, even beyond
the mts of poteness, the o at ength conde-
scended to nform the e pectant Cats that ther
curosty was as unavang as t was oppressve
for that fsh coud ony be obtaned by ready wt,
and good pocy, by stratagem, and craft qua-
tes n whch ther peope were pecuary def-
cent and that even were he to te them where
they abounded, they woud never have the ad-
dress to catch them.
Ths announcement occasoned unversa n-
dgnaton among the Cats. To be tod that you
are a rogue s not agreeabe, yet the accusaton s
borne wth phosophy by many a haughty sprt
but to be tod that you have not wt enough
to be a rogue, s enough to try the temper of
any anma and accordngy the whoe fene
popuaton was n a tumut.
d 5
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p
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58 TH M C TH H M.
rder beng at ength restored by the ener-
getc e ertons of a respectabe od tabby, whose
taent for rattng had gven hm great nfuence
over the mnds of the mob, he ost no tme n
e panng to them that resentng a few ght
words, evdenty uttered n mere payfuness by
the o , was not at a the way to come at the
fsh a cogent speces of reasonng whch pene-
trated at once to the stomachs of the assemby
and when he found that he had secured the pub-
c ear, he genty hnted that those fre-eatng
mousers who dd not fee ther honour satsfed
by ths pocy, mght take an eary opportunty
after the fsh were secured, of resentng the n-
sut whch had been offered to them as a naton
a suggeston that proved the profound dpomacy
of the od ratter, and shewed that he knew more
of the word and ts wsdom than the o fet n-
cned to gve hm credt for.
Under the nfuence of ths sound advce, the
Cats drew n ther caws, owered ther backs,
whch had each been arched ke the moon when
her course s but haf run and began to tread
on vevet, and to purr as meodousy as though
the fsh whch they hoped to obtan were aready
n ther possesson. ne or two ndeed turned
away ther heads, and spat upon the ground n
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 59
dsgust but they passed unheeded n the crowd
and qute satsfed wth havng thus magnfcenty
testfed ther dsapprobaton, remaned on the
spot to ascertan whether they were key to
beneft by the pscatora enqury then pendng.
t the urgent entreaty of the ancent tabby,
the o , thnkng he had carred matters far
enough, at ength consented to pont out to the
Cats the pace where the fsh were to be procured
athough he st assured them that the gratfca-
ton of ther curosty was the ony advantage
key to accrue to them from the nformaton.
Pacng hmsef therefore n an easy atttude,
and occasonay whskng away a pertnaceous
fy, whch perssted n bu ng about hs nose,
wth hs handsome ta, he thus addressed
them :
Peope of Catand However useess the
secret may prove to you whch you are an ous
to possess, l w humour your weakness, because
t s common to a natons to seek nformaton
whch can never ava them, or rather, of whch
they sedom earn how to ava themseves. now
then that one day, when l was sufferng from a
anguor whch l trusted mght be dspeed by
the fresh ar, l wandered aong the rver bank,
where l encountered a number of torks feastng
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p
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60 TH M C TH H M.
upon a profuson of the dantest fsh and beng
thoroughy satated wth Mce, l enqured of one
of them where ths desrabe u ury coud be
procured.
or a tme he ressted my mportunty, but
at ength he nformed me that on the other sde
of the rver there was an e hausted ake, n
whch thousands of fsh were e prng and
that, for hs own part, he had become not ony
dffcut and fastdous n hs seecton, but abso-
utey qute tred of them. uch beng the case,
l entered nto an arrangement wth the tork
to e change mce for fsh, whch enabes us to
vary our repasts, and proves perfecty satsfac-
tory to both of us.
The Cats were over|oyed at ths ntegence,
and thanked the o warmy for hs generosty,
at whch he aughed n hs seeve, as s cus-
tomary on such occasons : and then, presentng
the fsh whch had ed to the dscusson, to a
gracefu tte green-eyed vvacous-ookng kt-
ten, neary reated to the roya famy, he took
hs eave, foowed by one unversa purrng of
admraton.
counc of Cats was speedy assembed the
avaabe troops revewed and harangued by a
ferce od back genera, who had ost one eye, two
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 61
nches of ta, and haf an ear n some prevous
engagement and a resouton was formed to at-
tack the camp of the mce that very nght. The
army were n hgh sprts : the ct ens voun-
teered by scores : and the head-quarters were
a commoton. There s nothng whch more
e ctes the vaour of an attackng force than the
known weakness of the enemy.
Lapped n decous and most savoury dreams
ay the august mperor of the Mce. Hs v-
sons had carred hm nto the paace of the
Pasha, and bured hm n the mdst of a pauf
of chcken where he was en|oyng hmsef ds-
creety, when one sharp shr squeek of angush
rang through the cty streets, and penetrated
even to the lmpera apartment. Up sprang the
Padsha the pauf vanshed and n ts pace
he saw scores of -omened Cats pouncng upon
hs defenceess sub|ects, and bearng them off n
ther nsatate |aws.
Hs ma|esty stood for one nstant aghast
but ony one Lke a great personages, he pos-
sessed the most beautfu decson of character
and accordngy, when he had drawn a ong
breath, and taken n at the same tme a perfect
vew of the proceedngs, he prudenty turned
ta, and hed hmsef under the roots of a tree
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62 TH M C TH H M.
near at hand. ln ths he acted, as he ever dd,
on prncpe for, as he |usty argued, whe he
ay snugy ensconced n hs hoe, and the work
of carnage went on above hs head, the fe of
the soveregn was every thng to the sub|ect hs
generas were pad for fghtng, |ust as he was
pad for regnng and he coud not, therefore,
wthout ndecacy, nterfere wth ther prv-
eges.
The o , meanwhe, had not been de he
had an e traordnary taent for dpomacy, ke
most of hs race and he had so thoroughy n-
gratated hmsef wth the torks, who, though
ong-necked, were by no means ong-headed,
that they ready entered nto hs vews. He
obtaned a prvate audence of the chef of the
trbe, n whch he very aby set forth hs own
dsnterestedness for he had not consdered t
necessary to nform hs new aes that he hed
an offca appontment under the mperor of
Mouseand, for whose person and peope he was
we aware that the torks entertaned as much
contempt as they dd for the naton of the frogs
devourng them, whenever they fe n ther way,
n precsey the same unceremonous manner
whe he earnesty and emphatcay represented
that the torks were a mghty and a numerous
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 63
trbe, requrng much sustenance and, ke the
rabs of the bpeds, accustomed to secure t by
ther taents for the chase whe the Cats were
an nsdous, beggary, poachng communty,
e haustng by ther treacherous and wy arts,
the prey whch was the egtmate rght of ther
more generous enemes.
The nference was cear n the e trpaton of
the Cats, the torks were rddng themseves of
an obno ous race whe the o coud derve
no advantage whatever from ther destructon,
save the cam and pacd convcton of havng
done hs duty, and beneftted a most mportant
porton of the creaton.
There s nothng ether so rare or so beautfu
as sef-sacrfce n a good cause. lt s the germ
whence sprng a patrots
hen the generous o had departed, the
ga of the torks marshaed hs forces, and
ad before them the stratagem of ther frendy
counseor, whch met wth unanmous approva,
and was mmedatey resoved upon nor was ts
e ercse ong deayed, for mornng had scarcey
dawned when the Cats were seen enterng ther
terrtory and as the vanguard of the two par-
tes met, the od tabby of whom menton has
been aready made, advanced n front of hs fe-
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p
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6 TH M C TH H M.
ows, and was mmedatey confronted by the
chef of the torks n person.
hen the necessary ceremones had term-
nated, the Cats announced ther pacfc ntentons,
e paned the treaty nto whch they desred to
enter, and proposed the premnares for the de-
beraton of the other party.
The torks stened wth a gravty worthy of
the occason the e ports and mports were cu-
rousy dscussed and many propostons ad-
vanced key to acceerate the contempated
e change when an od tork, renowned for
shrewdness, and that mnute taent for cacu-
aton whch s so essenta to the fnanca n-
terests of a communty, stood up and po ng
hmsef steady on one eg, wth an apomb
strkngy demonstratve of the compete and
nce equbrum of hs arguments, remarked,
that wth a due consderaton and respect for
the taent e hbted by ther vstors, he cons-
dered that n a trbes and natons supportng
themseves by ther own e ertons, tme was pro-
perty, and consequenty not to be ghty or n-
consderatey squandered and that, however
convenent t mght be for one party to awat the
resut of the other s foray, t woud save a great
dea of tme, and be nfntey more advsabe,
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 65
that n the event of the competon of the treaty,
the Cats shoud be ferred across the rver at
once, where they mght reve on fsh, bndng
themseves on ther return to suppy the camp of
the torks wth mce enough for ther mmedate
consumpton.
The Cats, deghted at the suggeston, con-
cuded the treaty at once and ayng the Mce
whch they had brought wth them before the
ga, had the satsfacton of seeng them swa-
owed by the torks after whch ceremony each
commtted hmsef to the care of one of ther new
aes, who nstanty spread ther wngs, and eft
the sordd earth and a ts creepng thngs
far beneath them.
The Cats, unaccustomed to ths mode of tra-
veng, were varousy affected the tmd shut
ther eyes, and twsted ther tas round the
necks of ther obgng frends the more am-
btous sweed wth deght, and amost taught
themseves to beeve that they were fyng on
ther own wngs the bous grew sck and d y
and the more decate absoutey fanted.
ut a deusons ceased as the torks hovered
for an nstant |ust above the centre of the ra-
pd stream and then wth a oud shrek of
trumphant hatred, oosened ther hod, and
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p
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66 TH M C TH H M.
hured ther vctms to a watery grave. ack,
whte, or tabby, not a cat escaped and thus the
o , at the e pense of a score or two of Mce,
freed the mpre for ever from ther dangerous v-
cnage, and provded for the genera safety and
he retred to hs burrow that nght wth the
happy conscousness of superor desert, whch
must ever brghten the dreams of a mnster,
who, whe he s recevng the gratefu acknow-
edgements of hs soveregn, and the paudtory
accamatons of a whoe peope, s deepy m-
pressed by the decous convcton that, ke the
cuckoo whch ays ts egg n the nest of another
brd, he s quety provdng for hs own n-
terests.
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 67
CH PT .
TH l GD M TH MlC contnued.
mbton, unke |eaousy, w not submt to
be deted on trfes and, accordngy, the tte
trumphs of the o merey stmuated hs taste
for power and ed hm to wder and boder
schemes whch were bounded ony by unversa
monarchy.
e are tod that ambton peoped bs, and
that t s the favourte vce of hetan t w,
therefore, be ready beeved that an occason
was soon afforded to the o for the ndugence
of hs pecuar passon.
caravan passng through the provnce, ar-
rved wthn a few stada of the metropos of
Mouseand, and created ntense aarm among the
foragng partes, who came scamperng home-
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p
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68 TH M C TH H M.
ward from a quarters, wth a paucty of prov-
sons e ceedngy unsatsfactory to the seden-
tary porton of the communty and wth tre-
mendous accounts of the monsters who com-
posed t, that punged the whoe cty nto con-
vusons of terror ony aayed by the recoec-
ton of the quantty of good thngs key to be
scattered by the reckess traveers, shoud they
chance to hat suffcenty near to the terrtores
of hs lmpera ma|esty, to enabe hs sub|ects to
secure a part of the spo.
Ther hopes were fufed, and ther fears am-
py compensated for, n ther mmedate vc-
nty, cose on the borders of a thck wood, a
poor Came fe under hs oad, and t was found
mpossbe to rase hm from the earth hs bur-
then was accordngy dvded among the rest of
the strng and as the traveers possessed no
means of transportng the e hausted anma, he
was necessary eft to hs fate.
est, and the means of ndugng hs hunger,
soon restored the sck Came to heath and when
the foragng partes once more ventured forth
from ther subterranean cty, to proft by the hat
of the caravan, the o esped the Came at a ds-
Cames trave n strngs n the ast, and the tran s
usuay ed by a donkey.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 69
tance, camy browsng on the young shoots of a
statey tup-tree. Hs resouton was nstanty
formed, and, wthout the deay of a moment he
turned ta, and pausng at the gate of the cap-
ta, demanded an mmedate audence of the m-
peror. Hs hurred manner and mperous tone
greaty agtated the cty-guard, a party of whom
scampered to the paace and n a few moments
the lmpera processon was seen ssung forth
wth as much haste as decorum woud permt.
Havng made hs obesance, the o entered at
once on the sub|ect of hs an ety, and acquanted
the august Ma|esty of Mouseand wth the fact,
that, an nsoent Came, a mere beast of burthen,
a ve save, bred to to and obedence n
short, t were endess to repeat the opprobrous
epthets avshed upon the ntruder was ra-
vagng the forest at peasure, poutng the foun-
tan at whch the lmpera thrst was often
quenched, and devourng the fruts destned for
the lmpera treasury.
The monarch trembed for hs throne, for he
had once seen a Came, and he had never forgot-
ten hs terror on that occason he was, there-
fore, unprepared wth any sutabe comment on
the aarmng ntegence and the surprse of
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p
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70 TH M C TH H M.
the monarch may be magned, when fndng hm
dumb, the Grand e r thus contnued :
Ths must not be, most pussant Padshah
ha an empre ke that of Mouseand a
free peope, under a free soveregn, whose nked
tas woud encompass Caf, and whose trbes
f the whoe earth, bow before an nsoent ca-
tff whose ony vrtue s obedence ha a na-
ton, accustomed to ve on the abour of others,
yed to a poor sprtess wretch, whose very e -
stence s to orbd t the Ma|esty of Mouse-
and Lord of the Long-Tas, l prostrate my-
sef before you l pray you to be |ust to your-
sef and not to suffer the shadow of your great-
ness to dmnsh. ere not the Cats a mghty
and a warke peope, and have we not destroyed
them re not the torks the natura enemes
of your sub|ects, and have we not sharpened our
wts upon ther duness and made them serve us
by throwng a ve over ther heads The Came
must be sub|ected to the same ustrous sway
he must bow before the carpet of your lmpe-
ra ma|esty, and acknowedge your supremacy :
or he must de the death of a trator, and persh
mseraby for hs presumpton.
genera squeak of enthusastc approbaton
burst from the assembed courters and t was
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . |
wth some dffcuty that the o coud make
hmsef heard, as he approached the cma of
hs speech. foursh of the monarch s ta,
however, at ength commanded attenton, and
the e r hastened to add, that he shoud
strongy counse hs Ma|esty to enforce mme-
date obedence from the baseborn ntruder as
shoud vgorous measures be ong deayed, they
mght prove atogether abortve a crcumstance
whch woud tend to throw a doubt on the
power and greatness of hs Ma|esty, and dm-
nsh the ustre of hs regn. The beard of re-
beon shoud be pucked out by the roots,
before t grew nto strength and dgnty and
he, therefore, caed upon the Lght of the mpre,
and the Gory of the arth, to subdue at once
the nsoence of the Came, and compe hm to hs
aegance.
The Padshah sweed wth conscous great-
ness as he stened to the oraton of hs mnster
and, wth a ook of supreme command, he or-
dered the mmedate attendance of the Came
when t became a queston, how, n the event of
the summons beng dsregarded, obedence coud
be enforced. Graduay, as the dffcutes of
the case presented themseves, the dgnty of the
monarch dwnded away and, at ength, he was
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72 TH M C TH H M.
fary compeed to confess though he dd t
wth a reuctant ma|esty of manner, much com-
mented on by the court that he reay dd not
see how such an event coud be brought to pass.
The o , wth a confdent and peasant ar,
mmedatey vounteered to undertake the em-
bassy, and pedged hs veracty on ts success
and the whoe popuaton of Mouseand, proud
of such an ambassador, embraced the offer wth
avdty. lt s aways agreeabe to fnd a back
wng to bear our burthens, and broad enough
to support them and thus the Mce were de-
ghted to eave a msson, of whch they were to
reap the beneft, n the hands of ther crafty
ay.
The o , thus duy authorsed and empowered
to be mpertnent, |ourneyed on wth the sef-
compacency usua to penpotentares under
such favourabe crcumstances and havng
reached the spot where the Came, weared wth
wanderng through the forest, and satated wth
eaves and fruts, was gravey chewng the cud
under the shadowng branches of an odorferous
cedar he accosted hm n haughty anguage,
at once decared hs msson, and so magnfed
the power and prowess of hs master, that the
Came, who ke many other anmas n the crea-
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . |3
ton who carry ther heads hgh, was ow enough
n heart rose humby from the earth, and as-
surng the mbassador that he had transgressed
gnoranty, besought of hm as an especa favour
to ntercede for hm to the mperor and was
at once gven to understand that he must forth-
wth wat upon the Padshah n person, as no
mnor submsson woud be receved.
The Came, trembng wth an ety and terror,
decared hs readness to compensate by any
means n hs power, for hs nvountary trespass
on the terrtores of so hgh and powerfu a
prnce and he at once vounteered to accom-
pany the o to court when, havng desred hs
tmd companon to hat on the edge of the wood,
about a furong from the cty gates, unt the
mperor shoud consent to gve hm an aud-
ence, the e r of Mouseand hastened to re-
port hs success to hs lmpera master, and to
conduct hm to the presence of ths new ay.
Greatness s merey comparatve and t s
measured by so many dfferent standards, that
t s often very dffcut to determne on ts ac-
tua mts. Thus, as the Came stood bured n
thought, wth hs head droopng, and hs heart
quang, he scarcey heeded the crowd of busy
Mce who were dartng about mmedatey at hs
L. lll. e
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7 TH M C TH H M.
feet nor had he an dea that among them were
some of the hgh offcers of the househod,
and personages of dstncton about the court of
the very naton to whch he had come there to
swear aegance. Had he been asked hs op-
non of the ocaty, tte dreamng that he was
n the cose vcnty of a great cty, he woud
have smpy answered that the spot was coo,
quet, and shady, but terrby nfested wth
vermn
uch s fe. The greatness of one s the scorn
of another the prde whch fs one bosom s
fed by what appears dsgrace to ts neghbour
and thus the word ros on, peoped wth deu-
son, and decepton, and sef-vaue.
t ength the Came was roused from hs
revere by a dsagreeabe chorus of squeakng,
and a great commoton among the Mce whose
numbers contnued to ncrease so rapdy, and to
approach hm so neary, that he was |ust about
to crush a score of the bodest under hs heavy
foot, when the reappearance of the o dverted
hs attenton, and saved the ves of a few nd-
vduas of rank and fashon who woud otherwse
have been vctmsed.
Under these crcumstances the rage of the n-
dgnant Came may be ready magned, when on
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . |5
demandng of the mbassador whether he shoud
succeed n obtanng an audence of the offended
monarch, he was nformed that he was aready
n the presence and that a somewhat spare,
ean-ookng mouse wth gray whskers, seated
upon a morse of red rag, was the mghty sove-
regn, whose nod was to decde hs fate.
or a moment the Came bent down hs ong
neck, and ga ed steady and derdngy on the
wretched tte anma, who sat sweng wth
prde, surrounded by hs court and then, fng-
ng up hs hees, he gave one tremendous kck
whch sent a do en courters fyng nto the ar,
and deberatey trotted back to the forest.
Prde, unsustaned by crcumstance and power
s as untenabe as the wnd and they who en-
deavour to cover ther nsgnfcance by bg
words, abour as dy as boys who throw stones
at the sun, or dogs who bay the moon when t s
at fu.
bashed by the ndgnty whch he had |ust
sustaned under the very was of hs capta,
and n the presence of the pars of the state, the
Padshah sat for awhe wth hs head bured n
hs ta, as though he had yeded up the sprt
but at ength hs great sou asserted tsef even
e 2
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p
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76 TH M C TH H M.
n ths panfu emergency and cang the fo
asde, he thus reproachfuy addressed hm.
e r whom l have ong regarded ess as
my save than as the brother of my adopton
upon whose neck l have fung the rens of power,
and n whose hands l have paced the beard of
wsdom what dsgracefu ashes have not your
bnd councs heaped upon my dshonoured
head The graves of my ancestors are defed
and the faces of my peope are backened. The
wse men have sad that kngs are as compasses
n the mdst of the natons, to sweep the great
crce of wsdom but you have made me the
poe of foy, and the nde of dsgrace. T
measures are we pondered n the mnd, mad-
men aone venture to rsk ther e ercse but
doube s hs deuson who crushes others n hs
own defeat. hen the sun rose to-day above
the earth whch was created for my peasure, my
spear was as a ray of the mornng, my sword a
brght beam fashng death and terror, and my
hemet a star of ght prnces caught the fre
of gory from my gance and my sme made
heroes and now, l am a dshonoured soveregn,
abashed by the ga e of my own sub|ects.
Great sanctuary of the word reped the
o , bowng meeky before the rrtated monarch
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 7|
efuge of the dstressed whose fame s echoed
-o-
from h to h, and wth whose prase the va-
eys of the earth are voca l, the humbest
save of the Ma|esty of Mouseand, beseech
your hghness to be no onger possessed by gref,
but to rase your eyes to gory, and to regd the
crown of courage. l hod to the nostrs of
power the peasng perfume of success and
whe l wear away my forehead on the humbe
sands of prostraton, l promse on the fath of
my aegance, that ere ong, the nsoent save
who has dared to brave your anger sha be
trodden down n hs prde.
omewhat appeased by these assurances, the
monarch once more consented to be guded by
hs wy mnster and then, abrupty dsmssng
hs court, he returned ncog to the cty, much to
the dsappontment of the sght-ovng nhab-
tants, who had promsed themseves a pageant,
of whch the untoward event that had occurred
beyond the was had atogether deprved them
for no monarch can be dsposed to shew hmsef
to hs peope, |ust as he has been kcked.
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p
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78 TH M C TH H M,
CH PT l.
TH l GD M TH MlC contnued.
The o , at one moment swearng vengeance
on the nsoent Came who had dared to thwart
hm n hs wshes 5 and at the ne t, aughng
unt he was obged to wpe the tears from hs
eyes wth hs paw, as he remembered the rd-
cuous overthrow of dandy Lords of the ed-
chamber, and conceted ffcers of tate tra-
veed on unt he reached a sugar pantaton
wth whch he was we acquanted mora ng
as he went n a stran more curous than edfy-
ng and not at a cacuated to have rased hm
n the esteem of the pgmy mperor of Mouse-
and f t had unfortunatey come to hs know-
edge.
Havng entered the pantaton, he seected one
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 7
of the fnest and most uscous sugar-canes he
coud fnd and then sauntered to a grove n
the neghbourhood, the favourte haunt of an
aged Monkey, gray n the arts of mschef.
ffectng not to observe the hoary tenant of
the wood, the o seated hmsef under a tree,
and began fannng hmsef wth hs ta, as
though overcome wth heat and fatgue whe
he eered out at the ends of hs eyes from tme
to tme, and was over|oyed to perceve the Mon-
key ntent upon the sugar cane, ckng hs wsh-
fu |aws, and eapng from branch to branch n
a the restessness of desre. t ength the wa-
ter began to fow from hs parted ps and then
the o , beevng that the proper moment was
come, affected suddeny to perceve hm, and
wth e treme courtesy greeted hm, and begged
to make hs acquantance.
The Monkey grnned and chattered, and
mantaned a respectfu dstance havng an un-
peasant conscousness that o es sometmes de
voured Monkes, and deemng t most prudent to.
keep out of the reach of a paw though he re-
turned the compment of hs new acquantance
wth consderabe urbanty, nfuenced n no
sght degree by the sght of the sugar-cane.
The prospect of advantage aways smooths
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p
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80 TH M C TH H M.
the temper : t s the o of sefshness fung on
the waters of passon.
Graduay, therefore, but wthout essenng
the dstance between them, the two -assorted
companons fe nto conversaton, unt the o
had confded |ust as much of hs ntentons to
the Monkey as he |udged e pedent and had
hnted to hm, that f he woud pedge hmsef to
assst hs desgns, he woud not ony bestow upon
hm the temptng u ury whch he appeared so
much to covet, but woud drect hm where to
fnd a thousand such.
The Monkey frst stened and doubted then
ooked and beeved : and, fnay, requestng
the o to retre a tte apart, promsed hs co-
operaton as soon as he shoud have devoured
the sugar-cane. The crafty desgner smed and
comped and when the Monkey had competed
hs decous repast, he ed the way to the forest,
where the unsuspcous Came was browsng on
the branches of the ta trees.
ever take an ay nto the fed fastng.
Hunger sours the temper, and quenches the en-
thusasm. man never oves hs neghbour so
we as when he has |ust punged hs fngers nto
hs pauf.
Havng ponted out the Came to hs new
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p
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 81
frend, the o sauntered away, and eft the
whoe affar n the hands of the Monkey who
mmedatey scrambed nto the tree on whch
the ntended vctm was feedng, and se ng the
broken hater that had been eft n hs nose, fas-
tened hs head to the branches.
lt s dangerous to eave even a trace of your
former nsgnfcance when you are bent on af-
fectng greatness. Many a proud man s ost by
the broken hater of some ow habt, whch puts
hs beard nto the hand of hs enemy, and de-
fes t wth the unsavoury o of rdcue.
The o , who had kept a watchfu eye on hs
new frend, speedy perceved hs success, and
hastened to congratuate hm on hs de terty
and address and then, when he found that the
vanty of the Monkey was touched, he made
hm ampe promses of reward, f he woud
obge hm by hs vauabe co-operaton n an-
other undertakng whch he had much at heart.
The hoary pug, who had been nked to the
w of the o by the chan of sweet words, d-
recty consented and, eavng the unfortunate
Came ted to the tree, the two confederates |our-
neyed through the forest unt they came to a
pece of tmber whch some woodsman had been
empoyed n sawng asunder.
e 5
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82 TH M C TH H M.
Here the o paused, and pontng to a wegde
whch had been nserted n the wood, nformed
the Monkey, who had not yet ventured to ap-
proach hm too neary, that he had partcuar
occason for the wedge, but that he had strven
n van to possess hmsef of t, and now reed
soey upon the sagacty of the same master-
sprt that had captured the Came.
Pug smed, amost n scorn, at the hepess-
ness of hs companon and forthwth began to
work away wth hs teeth and paws wth an
energy whch greaty dverted the o , who was
aughng hearty n hs own quet pecuar way,
when suddeny a mghter effort than usua ds-
odged the wedge, and the ta of the Monkey
was caught, and hed fast by the cosng tmber.
|ab wonderfu shouted eynard
gvng oose to a pea of merrment that echoed
through the forest Had your beard grown
gray n gnorance that you had yet to earn, oh
Monkey that they who to to gratfy ther sen-
sua appettes, and abour under the mpetus of
de vanty, are fttng toos for crafter sprts,
and ever fa nto a trap of ther own settng
ou have breakfasted hearty at my e pense
and l do not deny that you have earned the
mea but t s ever -pocy to consume the
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 83
wages before the work s done. l owed you the
courtesy of teng you these truths, that you
mght not de as unproftaby as you have ved
but l w not weary you wth words.
nd, so sayng, he fe upon the -fated Mon-
key, and devoured hm wthout mercy.
They who, to prosper themseves, consent to
further the ev desgns of the unworthy, fa not
to reap the reward of ther mean sef-ove.
ln an audence of the Padshah, whch he ob-
taned mmedatey on reachng the cty, the o
at once e paned the stuaton of the Came, at
whch the Monarch and a the court aughed
themseves amost nto convusons and many
wttcsms were ventured, that e tremey de-
ghted the younger members of the court
whe the e r, n a fne magnatve stran of
eoquence, was e panng the stratagem by
whch he had secured the hepess Came
wheren t was remarkabe that the Monkey was
never once mentoned.
The ngrattude of the great was wrtten n
etters of crmson upon the frst scro of know-
edge. lt s easer to number the stars, than to
be remembered by the mghty whom you have
served. favour conferred upon the haughty
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8 TH M C TH H M.
s as a chan about ther necks, of whch they
often break the nks wth a scymtar.
genera re|ocng was ordered throughout
the metropos of Mouseand for former defeat
aways doubes the trumph of subsequent suc-
cess compments were avshed on the e r,
whch he receved wth characterstc modesty.
He was desgnated the avour of the mpre,
and he paced hs paw upon hs heart, and swore
that he had done nothng, absoutey nothng.
He was decared wth accamaton to be the
great hero of the age, the master-sprt of vc-
tory, the Conqueror of the Cats and he ony
smed a gratefu sme, and assured the e cted
popuace that he had but done hs duty.
They who fee ther power can afford to ape
humty t s throwng god dust nto the eyes
whch shoud not be too cear-sghted : and the
great do we at once to da e and to bnd
for t s a compound pocy beyond the reach of
the vugar.
he the ct ens of Mouseand were en|oy-
ng themseves n preparatons for the re|ocng,
the Padshah, an ous to secure hs share of the
genera gratfcaton, and unabe, from hs e -
ated staton, to |on n the amusements of hs
sub|ects, determned on proceedng to the forest
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 85
n order to gratfy hs revenge by e utng over the
arrogant captve and accordngy, commandng
hs retnue to be prepared, he hastened to the
fed of trumph, and cmbng the tree to whch
the Came was attached, he seated hmsef upon
a branch drecty above hs head, and poured
forth upon hm the whoe voume of hs angry
satre.
ecome, thrce wecome, you of the
straght back he sad scoffngy Happy
are you, who can feed upon the young eaves of
the forest, and drnk water from the couds
who can wander hther and thther over the earth
and yet, what say l lt woud seem that you
are ess free than your stature woud mpy for,
had not your neck been onger than your head,
you woud never presumptuousy have dared to
kck up the dust of contempt n the eyes of an
assembed court, and a free peope, unt you had
earned how far t mght be safe to brave ther
resentment. How ke you now the esson
Does t not depend upon my soveregn w whe-
ther you become once more a wanderer over the
green pans, and a quaffer of the brght rvers,
or reman here to de the death whch your van-
gorous sef-apprecaton has drawn down upon
you Truy t does so that your banched
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86 TH M C TH H M.
bones as they gmmer n the moonght may re-
mnd a future upstarts of the danger of over-
ookng through ther own vanty the probabe
power of others and of attemptng to despse
and to subdue anmas emnenty ther supe-
rors.
s he fet that he had here uttered a most
mpressve sentment, the Padshah paused for
appause and the assembed Mce, seeng at once
the snguar apposteness wth whch such a re-
mark fe from hs lmpera ps, were not
nggardy n ther demonstratons of approba-
ton.
There are few thngs so admrabe upon earth
as consstency and as the o stened, the tears
of suppressed merrment trembed n hs eyes.
Meanwhe the Came, conscous that despte
the nsgnfcance of hs enemy, he was never-
theess competey at hs mercy, fet the neces-
sty of conformng to any proposa, and of
submttng to any ndgnty n order to save hs
fe and, accordngy, makng no comment on
the absurdty of the monarch s address, he ad
hs heart on the ashes of humty, and thus re-
ped :
Mrror of mghtness, and un of strength
My crme aganst your greatness has grown out
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TH l GD M TH MlC . |
of my gnorance of ts e tent. l came from a
far and, a hepess stranger, unknowng and
unknown. o dream of your power had faen
upon my sou, nor had the ght of your pre-
sence beamed upon my eyes l snned, because
l deceved mysef, and |udged of your strength
by your s e. l am aready suffcenty punshed
by the knowedge that l have ncurred your
dspeasure. Pardon me, therefore, dread sove-
regn, est l e pre of gref and suffer me, by
a fe of devoton to your lmpera w, to e -
pate my transgresson. Put the rngs of obed-
ence nto my ears, and et me swear eterna ae-
gance, and be counted among those who have
the happness to be your sub|ects.
s the Came ceased speakng the o stepped
forward, and eoquenty and humaney nterceded
for the captve : he represented to the Padshah
how frequenty anmas reay fe nto error un-
conscousy and made a decate auson to hs
own career remnded hs hearers, wth a most
sonorous sgh, of the days when he hmsef not
ony despsed, but fed on Mce and utmatey
asked, wth a nobe conscousness of hgh desert,
whether he had gven the mperor or the m-
pre reason to repent ther mercy.
n unversa and eager squeak of dssent
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88 TH M C TH H M.
rose on a sdes and as the o bowed grace-
fuy n acknowedgment, the Padshah ordered
the oath to be admnstered to the Came, and
the hater gnawed asunder, whch was mmed-
atey done and the emancpated prsoner fo-
owed hs new master from the forest, a good
dea mpressed by the oraton of the o , and
reconced by the presence of a companon n
dsgrace.
The troubes of others aways assst n con-
song us for our own.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 89
CH PT ll.
TH l GD M TH MlC contnued.
The sub|ugaton of the Came caused an m-
mense commoton n the forest, and the myste-
rous prowess of the Mouse was canvassed on a
sdes, unt the most e traordnary and magca
taes became current and anmas of varous
knds, not wshng to brave an nfuence whch
they coud not comprehend, and an ous to con-
tnue a peaceabe e stence, vountary tendered
ther aegance to the mce.
hadows frequenty frghten the crowd and
we aways dread that ev the most of whch we
cannot defne the mts.
The o reveed n power, and ncreased n
popuarty. He was never de an hour for
when the state affars of Mouseand were ar-
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90 TH M C TH H M.
ranged, he was bused n ngratatng hmsef
wth ther new aes, who gady returned cv-
tes by whch they were key to beneft. Pre-
sents poured n upon hm and f occasonay
n ther desre to gratfy hs we known fondness
for poutry, some of the beasts brought hm a
tork or two, he ony smed at the mstake, and
dd not consder t e pedent to nform them
that they were destroyng the savours of the
Mce
ut there was st a thorn n hs heart.
The Lon was unsubdued The kng of the
forest was unconquered nd the o had re-
gstered a vow that every beast of the earth
shoud own the power of hs gue. th ths
resouton he therefore agan presented hmsef
at the carpet of the Padshah, and reported the
contumacty of the Lon but the monarch of
Mouseand appeared an ous to evade the sub-
|ect and even stated to the e cted e r that
he deemed t no dshonour to share the sove-
regnty of the earth wth so nobe an anma
and that ndeed, he woud rather ve on
terms of amty wth hm, than by provokng hs
anger run the rsk of arousng a wrath whch
mght be dangerous.
The o , wth a respect, scouted ths argu-
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 91
ment and represented to the tmd monarch
that whe the Lon contnued to be ord of the
forest, there was no safety for the mpre of the
Mce, whch he coud destroy n one paro ysm
of rage and he begged to be permtted to re-
mnd the Padshah that the anma n queston
was ceebrated for the rrtabty of hs dspos-
ton, and hs tota dsregard of the feengs of
others, when he was ncned to gratfy ether hs
anger or hs appette a fact whch was too no-
torous to need comment.
The mperor stened and at ength weared
by the arguments, and moved by the ntreates of
hs enterprsng e r, he consented to summon
the Lon to hs presence and deputed the o
mbassador traordnary on the occason.
Great was the ndgnaton of the Lon when
the o decared hs msson he ashed the
soundng forest wth hs ta he fung ght-
nngs from hs arge eyes, brsted hs wry mane
ke a coumn of ances, and mostened the dust
of he earth wth the crmson drops whch fe
from hs yawnng |aws : hs roar shook the
young cedars to ther roots and he woud n-
stanty have devoured the mbassador had he
not aready breakfasted, and despsed hm too
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92 TH M C TH H M.
much to run the rsk of a surfet n the ndu-
gence of hs revenge.
ve fe over the heart of the ma|esty of
Mouseand at ths new defeat he had grown
out of hmsef by hs e traordnary successes
and every passenger who pcks up nnety-nne
pastres n hs path, naturay fees aggreved f
he does not fnd the hundredth. nce the o
had urged hm to sub|ugate the Lon, the Lon
had become to hm the hundredth pastre and he
resented the faure accordngy.
e had done better, oh r he sad
sharpy, had we bured our dspeasure n the
hoow of our hearts, and cosed our eyes to an
ev whch was beyond remedy, than thus to
have ad t on our open pam, and fted t to
the ght, on a hand whch had no power to
strke t down. hen a monarch threatens
wthout the means of vengeance, the escape of
hs enemy s hs own defeat and thus, oh,
short-sghted mnster you have scattered the
ashes of confuson on the head of your master v
The o stened respectfuy nor dd he at-
tempt to |ustfy hmsef, nor to remnd the Pa-
dshah of the few trfng servces whch he had
rendered hm though he mght have done so n
the fu assurance of ther beng forgotten, as n
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 93
such cases a benefts are certan to be by the
great but smpy decarng to the rrtated
monarch that the Lon shoud yet be compeed
to wear hs yoke, he hasty qutted the presence.
Huntng wth the Lon s but hungry work,
and fghtng wth hm s especay dangerous
of ths the o was we aware : and he therefore
determned to eschew hs present acquantance
ether as frend or foe, and to fnd some go-be-
tween smpe enough to run a rsks for the
mere honour of beng empoyed.
There are many such braness busy-bodes to
be found everywhere, and the crafty e r was
an adept n the choce of hs toos. He hestated
ony a moment, and hs resouton was taken.
He had remarked n one of hs rambes a negh-
bourng |acka a poor sprtess, cowardy,
crngng anma, who satsfed hmsef wth the
offa of the very game he had run down, for the
weak gratfcaton of keepng company wth a
Lon.
hat a vast number of |ackas there are n
the word
The o cured hs ta n contemptuous sats-
facton as he remembered the narrow- hearted
save, and trotted away to hs ar wthout a
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9 TH M C TH H M.
moment s msgvng as to the resut of hs un-
dertakng.
He w whten my face once more n the
eyes of a Mouseand he murmured to hm-
sef as he went base-sprted beast, who
woud barter hs mother for a comfortabe mea
Creatures of ths descrpton are ready
worked upon so now for my new frend.
The negotaton was short, and the resut per-
fecty satsfactory to both partes. The o
caught two or three rabbts by the sy, and pre-
sented them to the |acka, sufferng hm to de-
vour the whoe of them hmsef a bera and
decate proceedng whch was e tremey agree-
abe to that anma, who was deghted for once
to pay the Lon s part, and who had never e pe-
renced the same attenton before hs great
frend havng a remarkaby fne appette, and
sedom re|ectng anythng but garbage. n
eterna regard was sworn between the new ac-
quantance n consequence and the |acka ck-
ng hs ps after hs savoury repast, whspered
hs regret that the bera, gentemany o , was
not a Lon at whch eynard ony aughed, as-
surng hm that ere ong, f he proved fathfu to
hs pedge, he woud convnce hm that n a war
of wts one o was equa to two Lons.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 95
Havng gven ths very satsfactory assurance,
and dropped a few more hnts for the gudance
of hs groveng and beggary ay, the e r re-
tred quety to hs burrow, and eft the matter
entrey to the e ertons of the |acka who, an
hour or two after ths peasant ntervew rushed
breathessy nto the presence of the contuma-
cous Lon, and fe at hs feet as f n the ast
agony.
How now, haram adeh base-born save |1
roared the monarch of the wood commencng,
as from hs superor strength and staton, he
had every rght to do, by abuse of hs catff-
foower hat drt have you been eatng,
and what ass was your father, that you thus
break n upon the sumber whch has |ust suc-
ceeded to my repast peak, recreant ho has
threatened your -fed carcase wth voence, that
you come to pay the craven n my very den
Dread ord and master l fautered out the
trator forgve me f l trembe, and hear my
tae before you chde my fears. l knew that
my ord must dne and l was roamng the
country n search of prey for the Mghty ne
before whom l bow, when suddeny there came
forth of the thcket a Lon we ngh as ordy as
yoursef, who, seeng me n pursut of game,
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96 TH M C TH H M.
asked me for whom l hunted as l coud
but repy by the truth, and l tod hm humby
but frmy that l served the ord of the forest
e hey what s ths he foamed, as he ground
hs strong teeth wth rage ho s he who
woud be ord where my foot ranges, and my roar
s heard Go, wretch, to the patry anma
whose save you are, and bd hm hde hmsef
n the deepest den of the mountan, or the
thckest underwood of the forest, est l encounter
hm n my wanderngs, and rend hm pece-
mea eed l te the Lght of the arth that l
refused to be the bearer of such a message
th what mtka shoud l have measured out
my ord s bounty, had 1 undertaken an errand
ke ths o l sought rather to remove a
abomnaton from the beard of ma|esty, and an-
swered n as hgh a tone and truy, most pus-
sant Padshah of the forests, l had we ngh
pad the karatch as the penaty of my rashness
for the mperous stranger sprang on me, and
woud have devoured me, had l not rased the
dust of fght, and hastened to appr e my ord
of hs new enemy.
Loud roared the Lon when he ceased to
sten. He had ong dwet n sotary ma|esty,
Captaton-ta eved on ra ahs, or vassas.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 97
the acknowedged monarch of the forest : and
he resoved at once nether to abdcate hs power,
nor to dute t by admttng a rva. ccord-
ngy, wth mane erect, eyebas of fre, and a
heart sweng wth ndgnaton, he bade the
cowerng |acka gude hm nstanty to the spot
where he had encountered hs haughty enemy.
He was obeyed. The fase craven trotted on
before wth aacrty and the mghty Lon fo-
owed, ashng the earth wth hs ta, and
mostenng the brushwood through whch he
made hs way wth the foam that fe n fakes
from hs parted ps. Ther wak termnated
near the mouth of a we, towards whch the
|acka ponted as the den of the usurper and
then, decnng to advance further, crouched
away, eavng the nobe and betrayed Lon to
termnate the adventure.
th a the mpetuosty of rage, ndgnaton,
and |eaousy, the nfurated anma sprang to the
margn of the we where, refected n the cear
water, he behed hs own mage, and thought
that he was face to face wth hs enemy hs
hoarse and appang roar of defance was echoed
by the deep murmurs of the tank and ke
many another hero, he eapt at a shadow, and
L. lll. f
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98 TH M C TH H M.
punged head over ears nto a bath for whch he
had been perfecty unprepared.
way sped the o who had been contem
patng from a dstance the success of hs strata-
gem, wth hs ta erect, and a rogush twnke
n hs eye whch betrayed hs sef-gratuaton
and affectng not to remark the codness of hs
recepton, he forthwth ad hs paw upon hs
head, and nformed the Ma|esty of Mouseand
of the capture of the rebe Lon.
The ntegence acted ke beng on the sprts
of the monarch and hs court, who sprang from
sde to sde of the paace, squeakng wth de-
ght ndeed, the popuar commoton was so
groat that t was not for a consderabe tme that
the e r coud command the roya ear suff-
centy to suggest the e pedency of an eary
vst to the prson of the captve. hen, how-
ever, he had succeeded n so dong, the |ustce
of the hnt was at once admtted and n the
prde of hs tte heart the Padshah of the
Long-tas summoned the vassa-came, who
bendng meeky on hs knees, receved the roya
Mouse upon hs hump, where he enthroned hm-
sef to the great admraton of the whoe cty.
u Thrce-honoured anma sad the e ut-
ng Monarch to the patent beast, who wth
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 99
haf-cosed eyes, and droopng head, stood
quety awatng the sgna to depart : our s
s no common ot : see that you snk not beneath
the responsbty of your offce, but ook we to
your path for remember that you bear the
weght of soveregnty, and the hope of an entre
mpre
Powerfu Padshah reped the stupd
anma, wth a funess of truth, and a want of
tact, whch at once demonstrated to the o the
tte probabty there e sted of hs ever rsng
nto favour at Court My path s easy, and
my burthen s ght. ere t not, ndeed,
that l fet your Ma|esty mount and that as
you ran up my sde, l e perenced the same
tckng sensaton as that caused by those anas-
seny skdam those poor ptfu nsects, the
forest-fes, when they sometmes aght upon
me, l shoud not have been aware that l bore
any burthen at a. e tranqu therefore, oh,
Lord of the Long-tas, for l coud carry you
round Caf wthout feeng your weght.
s the Came ceased speakng, the roya
Mouse was se ed wth a voent ft of snee ng
and the o took the opportunty of ths ft of
sternutaton to wpe away the tears of suppressed
aughter from hs brmmng eyes.
f 2
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100 TH M C TH H M.
hat a beautfu thng s truth How t
aways advances a man s nterests
hen the party reached the we, the pgmy
Monarch descended from hs eevated poston,
and estabshed hmsef on ts margn, whence
he ooked down wth nfnte compacency on
the drenched and despondng Lon.
ouroum, ed ou are wecome he
sad smngy : both to our terrtores and to
our tanks. Had you been more courteous, we
shoud have receved you n a ess nconvenent
ha of audence but as t s, we have deemed
t e pedent to steep the bread of dsobedence
n the waters of defeat, and you must swaow
the meagre mea as you can.
There was admrabe pocy n ths speech of
the Padshah , as your Hghness cannot fa to
remark for, as the Mouse saw no means of de-
verng hs formdabe captve, he resoved to
make necessty appear desgn, and to seem to
abandon hm through dspeasure to a fate, from
whch n pont of fact he had no possbe hope or
prospect of settng hm free.
ut ere the humbed and e hausted Lon coud
repy, the o approached the we, and, se ng
Lon.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 101
the roya ear, whspered to the monarch that
the frendshp of so powerfu and respectabe an
anma woud greaty tend to e at hs gory
and that, f hs ma|esty coud nduce the
prsoner to swear aegance to the throne of
Mouseand, he woud undertake to secure hs
beraton.
ut, e r of quck wt and sound know-
edge, whose head, under the shadows of our
greatness, s rasng tsef to the couds sad
the Padshah, wth that beautfu modesty and
cauton for whch he was deservedy renowned
uppose that when once agan on dry and,
the mghty ed shoud augh at our beards,
how coud we contend aganst hs furous re-
venge
ashustun on my head be t was the
repy of the councor : The Lon s an ho-
nourabe beast he w dsdan a e : brave to
a faut, he w do batte for hs new master
aganst a comers generous and hgh-hearted,
he w never ook back upon the past, for he
knows that what s wrtten s wrtten and we
sha thus secure an ay who w he as a foot-
stoo to the throne, and as an eye to the state.
aah bah t s we sad squeaked
the wng Mouse and then once more address-
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02 TH M C TH H M.
ng the Lon, he e camed ma|estcay : ad
we not we that we woud eave you here to
persh, and to de the death of a dog Have
you aught to urge n dena Does t not depend
on us, and on our peasure, whether you ve or
e pre mseraby amd the suffocatng waters
nd yet we woud fan be mercfu, and not see
your strength wther, and your eye grow dm.
How say you, vanqushed ed, w you become
our wng vassa, our ovng ay, one of the
pars of our state
The Lon opened hs ponderous |aws to ther
e tremest wdth, to gve utterance to the btter con-
tempt he fet for the wretched tte anma who
thus addressed hm but, aas when the words
shoud have come forth, the water rushed down
hs throat, and he was neary choked and fant,
e hausted, and poweress as he was, he fet that
n order to preserve hs wretched e stence, he
had no aternatve but to swaow an oath,
whch, however, at the moment, was even more
suffocatng than the water. hen he had done
so, the Came was once more freghted wth the
oad of royaty and the tran of courters
havng taken the way back to the subterranean
cty, the o at once proceeded to effect the
beraton of hs new assocate.
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 103
ot far dstant from the we whch had
snared the Lon to hs run, was a ake of some
e tent, whence n tmes of drought, the husband-
men of the provnce rrgated ther ands by
means of engnes, whch threw the water nto
sma canas that ntersected the pan, and n-
creased the vgourous vegetaton. ne of these
channes was n the mmedate neghbourhood
and the o ost no tme n breakng down the
cay aqueduct, and sufferng the stream to pour
nto the treacherous tank, unt t overfowed,
and the Lon was enabed to wak forth, shake
hs drppng mane, and warm hs trembng
mbs n the brght sunshne.
hen he had recovered hs breath, the frst
mpuse of the generous beast was to make hs
acknowedgements to hs deverer for so sgna
a pece of servce and the modesty of the o
was so conspcuous n hs repy, that the Lon
franky apoogsed for the contempt n whch he
had htherto hed a hs race, and vowed to hm
an earnest and eterna frendshp.
M Good deeds, oh eynard he sad genty
ever secure ther own reward. e not ds-
gusted by so trte an apothegm, but ever et t
urge you to knd and generous actons ke that
of ths day.
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10 TH M C TH H M.
The o coud have aughed at the Lon s
beard, but he scarcey thought t prudent to do
so and, perhaps, when the snguar nappo-
stveness of the remark s consdered, he had
some cause for mrth but, unconscous of the
feeng wth whch hs words had been receved,
the roya anma, as they pursued ther way to
the paace of the Mouse, reated to hs com-
panon the treachery of the fase and cowardy
|acka and uttered many a btter apostrophe
on hs ngrattude, whch, had the recreant
overheard them, woud have suffced to k hm
wth sheer frght.
lt s perhaps needess to say that the o
|oned hearty n the anathema, and e asperated
st more the anger of the Lon unt havng
wrought hm up to the ast ptch of r|ge, he
bade hm be cam, for that so back a trator
was not ft to ve, and assured hm that de he
shoud. He hnted, however, that t woud be
as we to say nothng en the sub|ect at Court,
as the race of |ackas were under the protecton
of the Padshah of the Long tas, and that
consequenty |ustce must be done senty.
The Lon acquesced at once and the cere-
mony of hs presentaton havng taken pace,
greaty to the deght of Mouseand, and hs
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 105
own dsgust, he was permtted to retre to hs
den an arrangement hghy honourabe and
consderate on the part of the Padshah, who
fet hs nabty to detan hm a moment onger
than he chose to stay for the amusement of hs
new masters.
That very nght the o supped from the
hnd quarter of a very ean |acka and the
Lon never agan encountered the treacherous
save by whom he had been betrayed.
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106 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH l GD M TH MlC contnued.
Dd your Hghness ever e perence the shock
of an earthquake f one of those mysterous
convusons of ature whch defy ake the
power and the pocy of man when the whoe
word appears to be crumbng nto dust, and to
be nsuffcent to f up the yawnng chasm, dark
and nsatate, whch gapes to receve the un-
versa run hen the voce of the human race
s but one common shrek of agony and the great
gobe seems to be one common grave hen not
even the prospect of the sherbets of Paradse can
quench the hot thrst of terror nor the vson
of ts hour destroy the btterness of death
ay, then, f you have not, my ord has been
more favoured than was the Padshah of Mouse-
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 107
and when hs subterranean kngdom was shaken
to ts base hs paace prostrated, hs ctes ad
waste, and hs sub|ects destroyed by thousands,
and cumberng the streets wth ther mamed and
manged bodes
was consternaton among the mserabe
survvors an unversa squeak of mournng rent
the ar and fathers, sons, and overs matrons,
and madens, coected about the vctms to ga e
upon ther dead. ln despar at so frghtfu a
vstaton, the monarch of Mouseand summoned
the o , the Came, and the Lon to hs presence
and they came ony to fnd hm steeped n
sorrow to the very whskers : hat was to be
done The nobe ed offered batte on the
nstant, but aganst whom was he to fght
The Came suggested the erecton of a new
paace, and the foundng of a new cty, but
where were the archtects to pan, and the work-
men to bud t The o ony advsed patence
and promsed to trace the ev to ts orgn, and
to prevent ts recurrence.
s a the popuaton of Mouseand had great
fath n the power of ther e r to fuf hs
pedges, they were n some degree consoed
and many hours were passed n buryng the
dead, and dggng a few underground apart-
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108 TH M C TH H M.
merts for the accommodaton of the wounded
when suddeny another mghty crash at a tte
dstance once more overwhemed them wth
terror and they ran off n every drecton to
avert the new destructon by whch they were
threatened.
ut on ths occason they were sub|ected ony
to aarm for the ev had faen on the coony
of ther enemes the |erhuahs and they were
sowy recoverng from ther panc when the o
appeared at ther runed was, and nformed the
despondng Padshah that he had dscovered the
author of the ev to be a huge ephant, who at
sunset emerged from the woods nto the pan,
and reckessy trod down the roofs of the subter-
ranean ctes.
The Lord of the Long-tas trembe as
he stened but hs e r affected to hod
ther new enemy cheapy, and remnded the
Padshah that he had sub|ugated the mghty
Lon hat, then, coud he fear ay, for the
frst tme snce he had accepted offce, he suggested
that a new envoy shoud be chosen by the
monarch from among hs own naton and so
composedy dd he tak on the sub|ect, that the
weak Mouse began to be once more puffed up
wth prde, and forgetfu of hs own nsgnf-
cance and n ths frame of mnd he ptched
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 109
upon a young, sprghty, smart- whskered ey
of the househod, whom he furnshed wth the
proper credentas, and deputed hs mbassador.
To the fu as van as hs master, the mouse-
ng of quaty retreated to hs hoe, where he
gave hs whskers a more dpomatc and m-
portant twst, smoothed hs sender ta nto more
gracefu gossness, and adorned hmsef n the
most approved manner, ere he departed on hs
embassy, whch he dd wth a brsk run that
promsed a speedy return.
The reappearance of the unfortunate envoy
took pace, however, wth even more dspatch
than had been antcpated : for the ephant,
amused rather than ndgnant at the nsoence of
the spruce-ookng tte repte, had ony an-
swered hs summons by bowng hm many
yards on hs homeward path, wth the wnd
from hs mghty trunk and n sorry pght, as
your Hghness may we magne, dd the poor
dapper dpomatst throw hmsef down before
the carpet of ma|esty, and te hs tae of ds-
grace.
ho can war aganst hs fate, Lght of the
arth he concuded, as the Padshah bent
upon hm an eye of dsappontment and dsgust :
ho can controu the eements hat anma
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1 10 TH M C TH H M.
coud have braved the whrwnd by whch
l was fted from the earth, fung aganst the
couds, and swept aong over an nfnty of
space e brm what can l say The
ashes of defeat are strown upon my head the
defement of dsgrace s on my beard the
anger of the Great ne of the arth, the efuge
of the ord has cutched my heart, and stopped
ts pusatons/
ut the Padshah was not to be appeased
the o was summoned to the conference, re-
quested to become the e ecutoner of the ds-
comfted mbassador, (whom he very subms-
svey snapped up before the words were we
out of the roya mouth ) and socted to tender
hs opnon of the most desrabe step to be
ne t taken n ths very unpeasant affar.
The wy e r asked for an hour to de-
berate athough, feeng convnced that hs
agency woud be requred, he had aready ma-
tured hs pans and at the termnaton of that
perod, he demanded from the kng a strong de-
tachment of Mce, who were to act soey under
hs orders.
th ths party he at once qutted the runed
cty, and advanced to the deep bed of an
e hausted rver, traversed by a wooden brdge,
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TH l GD M TH MlC . l
whch the ephant was compeed to cross
durng hs perodca vsts to the pan. The
channe of the stream cosed suddeny to the
rght and eft of ths brdge, the rocks beng
hgh and |agged, and amost meetng over head,
not many feet above the eve of the water and
n consequence of ths crcumstance, the brdge
had been fung over a wder porton of the
rver, and rested ony upon a deep chaky ven
of so, runnng far nto the vaey, and sud-
deny termnatng n a hoow, not twenty stada
dstant from the capta of Mouseand.
n arrvng at the brdge, the o at once
commenced operatons by nstructng hs troops
to gnaw partay asunder the ropes and pns
whch unted the woodwork, so as to render t
nsecure for any heavy weght and the conse-
quences of ths step are evdent. The ne t
tme the ephant endeavoured to pass, hs
enormous buk proved an over-freght for the
fra fabrc, and he fe headong nto the bed of
most chak, wthout power to move ether to the
rght or eft, where the rocky barrer fenced n
the channe.
ln ths emergency, the sagacty, strength,
and ntegence of the anma, avaed hm
nothng. He was fary n the tos and was
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1 12 TH M C TH H M.
ony another e ampe among many, of a crea-
ture runed by hs own greatness, and destroyed
by the very attrbutes on whch he had been
wont to prde hmsef.
ff ran the o when he saw the resut of hs
stratagem and the destructon of haf Mouse-
and was forgotten n the trumph of such a
capture. Many of the dead were st unbured
but ther fate was overooked n the genera
re|ocng that made the whoe mpre one shr
squeak of proud deght.
These thngs are ake among men and mce,
your Hghness. ho heeds n the pageant and
parade whch ceebrate a vctory, the vctms
who have faen to secure t
The van-gorousness of the ng of the
Long- tas was at ts heght. He ssued a
sorts of contradctory orders commanded and
countermanded and a n order to keep the
dfferent anmas who had become hs vassas, on
the run. Here few a at there rushed a adger
a qurre sprang on one sde, and a Chamos
eapt on the other the whoe pan was n con-
vusons and ever and anon the roar of the
captured ephant came boomng aong the
vaey ke a thunder-pea.
ths was very deghtfu, but every pea-
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 113
sure must have a termnaton and hs Hghness
the Padshah was partay recaed to reason by
a hnt from the o , that athough a captve, the
mghty ephant was not yet a vassa and
that hs sub|ugaton requred nstant attenton.
Unabe to controvert so cogent an argument,
the monarch at once decared hmsef ready to
be guded by the counses of hs e r though
he coud not avod remndng hm that ths was
no sght concesson from a soveregn who was
now ord of the whoe brute creaton, wth the
e cepton of the ephant, who was then n hs
tos.
The o bowed ow, and aughed but the
bow was to the Padshah, and the augh to hm-
sef, and he consequenty avoded gvng any
offence whe he assured the potentate wth a
due respect and reverence, that n the event of
hs nducng the ephant to acknowedge hs
authorty, he woud undertake to reease hm
from hs present thra.
The roya cortege was mmedatey n moton.
rst marched two ferce and shaggy ears,
wedng huge staffs, and growng forth the
many and mghty ttes of the Padshah. Then
foowed a band of femae Monkeys, dancng
fantastc measures to the musc of a score of
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1 1 TH M C TH H M.
bare-backed pes. These were succeeded by a
company of Porcupnes, who shot ther qus
rght and eft upon the crowd, whch threatened
to mpede the ne of march. Then came a
coupe of sses, bravng out wth ungs of ron
the near approach of the efuge of the ord,
and Lord of the arth who foowed, mounted
upon the hump of the Came, havng on hs
rght the merry o , to whom the pageant was
|food for unmeasured mrth and on hs eft the
crest-faen and dsgusted Lon, who staked so-
emny aong, hs heart burnng wth shame as
he remembered how sorry a fgure he shoud
make n the eyes of hs od acquantance the
ephant.
e coud aways support our msfortunes
themseves wth phosophy t s ther effect on
the mnds, and ther nfuence on the opnons
of others, that unman us.
guard of honour, composed of wd Goats,
surrounded the mghty monarch and mme-
datey behnd them came a ta urang-outan,
carryng a pam-eaf, on whch, shaded from the
pubc ga e by fans formed of the beard of the
burush, ay the three favourte wves of the
Padshah two more anmas of the same de-
scrpton, but of ess statey proportons, bore
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 115
the saves of the harem. The ght troops were
represented by a group of Chamos whe the
heavy regments were most appropratey com-
posed of uffaoes and n ths state and fashon
dd the ng of the Mce |ourney towards the
prson-pace of the ephant of whom he no
sooner caught sght than he e camed n a trans -
port of very natura deght :
hy, how s ths, oh, e r of power and
wsdom Have you brought us here ony to
show us one of our own brethren o resem-
bance can be more perfect save that, ndeed,
nature has been unknd to our poor captve, n
vstng hm wth such a mass of fesh, and such
a ength of nose but these are deformtes whch,
beng ourseves happy e empt, we know how to
pty n others : had not ths msfortune attended
hs brth, we shoud have been as ke as two
drops of water. peak, cousn he contnued,
addressng the enormous anma wth a patro-
nsng genteness whch drew tears from hs
wves, and convused the o wth merrment
hat woud you of us
o answer was made, for n truth the e-
phant dd not ether see or hear the Monarch
and was ost n wonder at what ths meetng of
so many dvers anmas n hs mmedate negh-
bourhood mght portend.
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16 TH M C TH H M.
Meanwhe the Padshah moved forward, and
transferrng hmsef from the hump of the Came
to the capacous back of the ephant, began to
wak towards hs head, e amnng hm most
mnutey, and occasonay swtchng hs ta
wth sef-gratuaton and mportance when, un-
fortunatey chancng to pass over a spot where
the huge beast was partcuary susceptbe to
the touch, and deemed that some fy had aghted
wth the ntent to stng hm, he gave a fap
wth hs ong ear, and down fe hs ma|esty
nto the wet cay
The whoe court was n commoton : the
Lady-mce squeaked, and ther saves, as n duty
bound, squeaked st ouder the ears growed,
the sses brayed, the femae Monkeys chattered,
and the pes grnned the Porcupnes roed them-
seves up, the Lon roared, the Came screamed,
the o amost went nto convusons, the wd
Goats shook ther beards, the Chamos eapt from
rock to rock, and the uffaoes ad down, and
began to chew the cud of dstress. nd n the
mean tme, the monarch, after a vast dea of
scrambng and struggng, got safey out of the
mre, and reappeared among hs peope, a chak,
mud, and msery
ut hs was not a sou to be subdued by one
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 11|
downfa and as soon as he coud unfasten hs
|aws, whch were cemented together most un-
peasanty, and recover hs breath, he vowed
vengeance on the ephant, and began to dry hs
whskers.
The o took ths opportunty of comng for-
ward, and assurng hs ma|esty that the crme of
the anma had been nvountary and of remnd-
ng hm that the prvege of the powerfu was to
show mercy, couped wth an ntmaton that
he craved the pardon of the offender n the
name of the whoe court and army.
Thus urged, the heart of the Padshah sof-
tened and the ephant, beng very soon con-
vnced by the representatons of the o , that
hs ony chance of deverance ay n hs swearng
featy to the Lord of the Long- tas, and con-
soed for hs msfortune by the vassaage of the
Lon, at ength consented to the ndgnty when
havng admnstered the oath, the Padshah, yet
shverng from hs mmerson, and consderaby
shaken by hs fa from so prodgous a heght,
wthdrew wth a hs court n the same order as
he had set out whe the o hasty coected
together a numerous army of mners, composed
of beavers, ferrets, rabbts, badgers, mungoshes,
rats, mce, and moes, and set them mmedatey
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1 18 TH M C TH H M.
to work to undermne the chak bank whch n-
tervened between the channe of the rver and
the hoow aready mentoned.
s they were n mmense numbers, aboured
hearty, and were consderaby asssted by the
ephant hmsef, he was enabed by sunrse the
ne t mornng to force hs way through the
crumbng barrer, and to obey the summons of
the Padshah who sat enthroned on an ear of
ma e, surrounded by deputatons from a the
vassa-anmas of the provnce.
hen he had reached the presence, and made
hs obesance, the o respectfuy advanced to
the throne, hodng between hs teeth a rpe
sugar-cane, whch he presented to hs ma|esty
as a decous refecton, and, moreover, an e tra-
ordnary curosty, whch h e humby nvted
hm to nspect. The Padshah, who deghted n
novetes, at once decared hs ntenton to e a-
mne the gft of hs esteemed mnster and frend
and, havng gven permsson to hs wves, and
the Prnce oya hs ony chd, to accompany
hm, whch they ost no tme n dong, he dsap-
peared nto the hoow of the cane, foowed by
hs famy.
tandng cose besde the o was a ong-
armed pe, hs especa save, who had ong
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TH l GD M TH MlC . 119
nursed a btter spte aganst the whoe mpre of
Mouseand and no sooner had the tp of the
ast lmpera ta vanshed, than on recevng an
encouragng wnk from the o , he adroty
bocked up the orfce wth cay, and secured a
the roya famy
ow murmur was rsng on every sde, when
the o , contemptuousy kckng asde the throne
of the Mouse, thus addressed the surroundng
anmas
easts of the chase, and of burthen my
most worthy frends and sub|ects l have coected
you together ths day, through my save the
Mouse, to decare to you how l have earned for
mysef the soveregnty of the brute creaton and
n order to prove to a anmas, from the ordy
Lon to the drudgng Moe, that nether strength
nor nsgnfcance coud secure ther possessors
from my rue, l made my too of a sorry Mouse.
To that weak, pgmy, mserabe repte, have ye
a bowed your haughty heads, to save your
forfet ves. rends and vassas The lm-
pera Mouse has abdcated, the lmpera fa-
famy s e tnct l am your mperor and l
commence my regn by an apophthegm.
hen courage has faed before craft and the
mghty n frame have been bowed beneath the
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120 TH M C TH H M.
mghty n nteect the rngs of obedence can
never be rent from the ears of defeat : and the
arrows of ambton w aways rebound from
the sun of royaty, upon the heads of those who
bend the rebeous bow l
s the sef-eected monarch ceased speakng,
he ga ed around hm wth a ook of proud def-
ance paced hs foot upon the sugar-cane n
whch the unhappy Mce were dyng of suffoca-
ton, as upon a footstoo and seemed to dare a
dssentent murmur. ut none arose for the
assembed anmas, humbed by the conscous-
ness of ther dsgracefu vassaage to a wretched
repte, of whom the more wy o had made
frst a too and then a prey and, started nto
concesson by the sudden and unooked-for as-
sumpton of an anma, under whose gue and
quck-wttedness they had a severay wrthed,
coud not deny the superorty of ther new
master a superorty whch he coud make
them fee at any moment, and n any emergency,
when brute force coud not ava : they therefore
wth one accord offered ther obesance, and ac-
knowedged hm as ther ruer.
ne abe dpomatst can secure more trumphs
than an army of ances.
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TH M C TH H M. 121
P T ll.
CH PT l .
|ab wonderfu murmured the Tchor-
bad| as he fung another purse nto the ap of
the young Greek : l coud sten to her for
ever her voce s ke the sghng of the wnd
through the ght branches of the |asmn. Ma-
shaah she s a wonder hat s wrtten, s
wrtten l w purchase ths far save, mother.
May my ord s w be a-powerfu gasped
out the terrfed evreste, as she agan prostrated
hersef to the earth had t been any ame of
my troop save Mherprwr and edka, woud l
not have gven her to my ord for god ut
these two
hat of these two demanded the Tchor-
bad| wth a owerng brow and a stern ga e
L. lll. G
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122 TH M C TH H M.
hose dog are you to thwart me n my hu-
mour l w purchase the save for seven
purses.
Let not my ord backen the face of hs ser-
vant perssted the od woman the save s
not mne. The Camacan of tambou had heard
of the taent of ths young Massad| from the
ynbash of the troops of Damascus, and he has
aready pad a heavy prce for her to her ate
master. he s even now on her way to lsku-
dar, # where a save wats to conduct her to the
harem of her new ord. How then can l obey
m l not as nothng n ths matter
Tark beware frowned the Tchorbad|
that you deceve me not there are no feet so
swft n a oum but that the cord s swfter.
The save peases me, and l am ready to pay her
prce.
my ord heap ashes upon the head of
hs servant asked evreste Can the fg-
tree bear grapes, or the ove produce dhourra
How then can l gve up a maden who s not
mne
nd what says the Massad| hersef
asked the Tchorbad|, ookng kndy on the
dsgused Greek oud she be content to n-
cutar.
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TH M C TH H M. 123
habt my harem, and to weave the threads of
eoquence nto the web of fcton to pease the
ears whch woud be ever open to sten
The Tchorbad| s ord sad Manoo-
poo, as camy as hs agtaton woud permt
hm to repy u lf the Camacan of tambou
be content to eave hs save unrecamed, then
are her poor servces at hs w. Let the Pasha
(may hs house prosper ) decde n ths matter.
Ths suggeston at once recaed the worthy
|anssary to hs reason, and remnded hm that
he coud not take the beard of the Mnster n
hs hand, as though t were that of an oda-bash
or a nab f and determned therefore to rd hm-
sef of the affar at once, he sad cody :
Mn ah why shoud l troube my ord
the Pasha for ths thng re there not many
Massad|s n the and hat s the spo for
whch l shoud contend vret der -t s a
woman t s bosh nothng.
or a moment there was sence and Mano-
opoo watched wth consderabe an ety the
countenance of the Tchorbad|, who contnued
to smoke wth great energy, and a contracton of
eye-brow by no means ndcatve of nterna
satsfacton whe the ame sowy rsng from
Corpora. f Cad s cerk.
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12 TH M C TH H M.
the foor, at the sgna of evreste, prepared to
renew ther dances. wave of the host s
hand, however, prevented ther purpose and
mutterng somethng of the ateness of the hour,
he gravey descended from the sofa, and wthout
agan gancng towards the dancers, abrupty
qutted the harem.
hen he had fary dsappeared, a was once
more harty and the young beauty on the sofa
smed out her pretty scorn at the sudden whm
of the Tchorbad|, who had poured forth hs
sou on frst sght of an awa, whom she vowed,
by the grave of her mother, had a ght n her
eyes whch was nothng ess than modest.
evreste ventured to remonstrate, and to up-
hod the proprety of her handsome companon
greaty to the amusement of the ady, who caed
the dark-browed awa to the cushon at her feet,
where she payfuy toyed wth the ong tresses
of raven har that fe upon her shouders, and
bade her te how many hearts she had broken
snce her brght back eyes had earned the art
n whch they were such adepts.
Manoopoo, to whom hs poston was rk-
some n the e treme, despte the sma whte
hand, and soft accents of the far wfe of the
Tchorbad|, answered her by a tmd gance, as
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TH M C TH H M. 125
he resumed hs ebec and havng preuded for
a moment n meanchoy cadences, as though sad
recoectons had been awakened by the queston,
at ength murmured out n a subdued voce hs
ow and thrng repy. The ar whch he
seected was wd as the summer wnd t was a
cote meody and t brought wth t a thou-
sand memores of the past, whch heghtened ts
e presson of energy and passon.
TH LM G.
ho oves the me h, mock me not now
th the ght of that eye, and the cam of that brow
or thee, such as thee, were those bessed hours made,
hen sunshne s ooked, and when musc, s sad
ut the me, though brght her young beauty may be,
Can ne er know the bss that s avshed on thee
ho oves the me Her step may be ght,
Her form may be gracefu, her eye may be brght,
Her ear may drnk n the most eoquent words
That e er swept ke a spe o er the young sprt s chords
ut the me s. crushed heart to despondence s vow d
hen her brow s unveed to the ga e of the crowd.
Then ask not the me, proud beauty, to te
The taes of the past n her memory that dwe
ather bd her forget that on earth there can be
beng so oved and so ovey as thee
Lest, wd wth despar such a contrast to meet,
he fng off her garand, and de at thy feet
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126 TH M C TH H M.
stfed sob met the ear of Manoopoo as
he ad asde the nstrument he nvountary
turned n the drecton whence t came, and saw
Mherprwr sowy movng away and hs heart
smote hm that n order the better to sustan hs
dsguse, he had suffered hmsef to be betrayed
nto any e pressons cacuated to wound the far
and gente gr, who had so eaousy embraced
hs cause, and rsked her own safety to conduce
to hs happness. evreste had served hm for
god, and had secured the wages of her conces-
son the other ame had smpy and bndy
fufed the pedge of obedence to whch they
were vowed : but there was somethng at the
heart of the young Greek that tod hm of a
deeper and a more an ous nterest on the part
of Mherprwr. True, she was assstng hm to
ook upon one whom he oved but the e per-
ence of the far dancng-gr had taught her no
tae of constancy on the part of overs. ln the
sky of her destny she had seen ray after ray of
the young heart s brghtness couded by the va-
pours of dstrust and change she had heard
murmurs from the sweetest ps n the word,
and seen tears n the oveest eyes and Mher-
prwr was no ogcan. Manoopoo was a
Greek, a Gaour a despsed one ke hersef.
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TH M C TH H M. 127
He coud worshp the wfe of the Mosem ony
as a brght shape mned on the summer coud
a aughng ght on the sunny wave somethng-
mpapabe and transtory whe, coud she wn
hm ut here the heart of the gr beat pan-
fuy, and a deep bush burned for an nstant on
her brow o, no she woud thnk no more
she dared not.
ome porton of the truth had aready n-
truded tsef on Manoopoo he had known
the ame ony a few hours, but there was a
softened ght and a tmd e presson n her deep
eye when t was turned on hm, that reveaed her
secret.
Hs meanchoy baad had smtten the far
gr wth a panfu convcton whch had never
before so thoroughy forced tsef upon her.
ho was she that she thus had dared to hope
that she mght approprate the heart of one ke
Manoopoo as not the very name of an
ame the bye word of scorn and contumey
ere not a the troop at the beck of every
stranger who spread god upon hs pam, to
dvert hs deness, and to obey hs behests
hat had she to do wth ove, wth ten-
derness, wth passon as nothng Ma-
noopoo had ad bare before her the deso-
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l TH M C TH H M.
aton of her ot she mght weep away her
sprt, and steep her heart n tears there was no
hand to wpe them away, no voce to soothe, no
arm to uphod her: and for a moment as the
dancng-gr moved from the sde of the young
Greek, a cod ch stoe through her vens, and
f she coud at that nstant be sad to fee, t was
the hard, cod, stern rgdty of the marbe
whch bears the mpress of beauty wthout ts
vtaty. ut the death-ke paro ysm, the
strong spasm of despar, endured not ong : the
vctm was too young to be thus emancpated
from sufferng the sprt-thra had more btter
pangs n store and the awakenng from ths
transent mmobty was more crushng than
years of murmured sufferng.
The nght was far advanced when evreste
gave the sgna for departure and the wfe of
the Tchorbad| dsmssed her guests wth
courtesy and gfts far e ceedng ther e pecta-
tons nor dd she nvte ther return, for the
admraton of her ord had been too manfest
towards the dsgused edka to render that
personage a wecome guest : and the troop had
aready passed the threshod of the harem, and
Manoopoo was carefuy gudng the footsteps
of the trembng Mherprwr aong the rude
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TH M C TH H M. 129
pavement of the steep street whch ed to the
Therak Tcharch, whe the od woman fo-
owed cosey behnd them, when they were sud-
deny met by one of the chaoushes of the
Pasha, preceded by a seratchf bearng a paper
antern, who approachng evreste e camed :
e hey hat s ths, mother ou are
abroad at an unseemy hour wth your fock of
pers : l have been to the Tcharch, the dev s
nest, n whch you have housed yoursef (and
aah bah ts no peasant task to thread
that quarter of the cty after nghtfa ), on a
msson from hs Hghness the Pasha (may hs
beard foursh ). He has heard strange taes of
one of your ame, and he honours you by a
summons to hs harem to-morrow evenng at
sunset : so prepare your moon-faced beautes,
and be carefu not to fa at the apponted hour
but se e your good fortune wth the grasp of
securty, and when the rver n the west yonder
runs god, see that you stand before the door of the
Pasha s harem, or the grave of your father w
be defed, and the soes of your feet unftted for
speedy trave.
The od woman bowed her obedence, and
murmured out a thousand assurances of her de-
ffcer of the househod. f ervant of a bey.
g5
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130 TH M C TH H M.
ght at the summons and when the chaoush
and hs attendant had passed on, she moved to
the sde of Manoopoo, and whspered : a-
ah your star s n the ascendant, young sr
your ksmet s proptous 5 but s your heart
strong, and your puse steady en brsen
you know best. or my own part, l w trust
you. l se you my neck for two purses, and
the present of the Pasha take care that l do
not make a bad bargan, and fnd t n the noose
through any foy of your mad passon.
orkma fear not, mother sad the young
Greek or my own sake, and for lter s, l w
ook thrce at my words before l utter them.
hat s wrtten, s wrtten my feech hath
paced me n your hands, and opened the door
of the Pasha s harem to my eager foot. hat
says the proverb hen you fnd water,
drnk t when you fnd a brdge, pass over t.
l found the water of despar, and draned a deep
draught and now l fnd the brdge of hope, l
am resoved, and ready to cross t.
en ektar der you are the master sad
evreste: and l am your save. nd now,
here we are at the Tcharch, where you can
depost your dsguse unt to-morrow ghour
oa Heaven speed you n your purpose for
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TH M C TH H M. 131
you have a bod sprt and a true heart, gaour
though you be.
th ths bessng Manoopoo took eave of
the od woman and havng senty pressed the
sender fngers of Mherprwr wthn hs own, re-
tred to the apartment where he had assumed
hs dsguse and havng ad asde the ve and
antery, and repaced them by the turban and
beensh n whch he was accustomed to traverse
the cty at nght, he hastened from the Therak
Tcharch whch was aready oud wth revery
and rot.
Coak.
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132 TH M C TH H M,
CH PT .
lt was a gorous noon The sun rode hgh
n heaven the bees were busy among the bean-
fowers the butterfes ftted hther and thther,
ke bossoms oosened from ther stems by the
summer-wnd to be the brght companons of hs
sport the goden-armoured fsh eapt hgh above
the sver bosomed fountan, and fe back gt-
terng wth the ght the sky was a vaut of
turquose and the eaves sang a peasant meody
at the bddng of the bree e. or was ths a
for the aughter of chdhood and the ow sweet
voce of woman came softy to the ear, as a fua
Pasha, wth a sow step and a preoccuped sprt,
senty paced to and fro the tree-shadowed ter-
race that stretched aong beneath the wndows of
hs harem. ln one hand he hed hs amber-
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TH M C TH H M. 133
pped chbouque of |asmn wood the other
was bured amd the fods of hs grde hs ps
were sghty compressed hs head decned and
at tmes he drew a ong breath ke one whose
sprt was over-aden wth thought.
Hs sectar-aga and hs chbouque-bashf fo-
owed at a short dstance, but dd not even con-
verse n whspers so bewdered were they by
the sudden restessness of ther master. t
ength the atrap paused, and pontng to a spot
where the shadows fe deep and coo, a save
obeyed the sgna, and spread hs carpet, upon
whch he seated hmsef, whe hs attendants wth
offcous ea arranged hs cushons, prepared
hs ppe, and performed for hm a the tte
offces of attentve ea.
Ma ouk sad the Pasha, when hs se-
ctar-aga aone stood besde hm, a the other
attendants havng respectfuy retred : u there
s a weght upon my sprt the abours of the
dvan have weared me. l hate the contact to
whch l am sub|ected by the supneness of that
dog the Cad, who s not worth the pauf he
destroys Mashaah He s an ass, and the
father of asses
The atrap paused, and threw out a ong thn
word-bearer. -f eeper of the ppe.
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13 TH M C TH H M.
thread of smoke from hs chbouque, whch
cured for a moment about hs brght and |etty
beard and the sectar-aga bowed hs acqu-
escence n the opnon of hs master wth an
uncton whch admtted no doubt of hs sn-
certy.
To see the dvan, pursued the Pasha
one woud magne that the cty was one vast
Tmerha e They are not men whom he
brngs before me for |udgment havan der
they are anmas creatures from whom you may
wrng ther heart s bood more easy than ther
pastres Haf haf shame, shame l have
sat there three hours ths day n the name of the
Prophet, and not a snge purse has passed nto
the treasury.
Mashaah He s a dog, and deserves the
cord sad the attendant cooy.
m l not the shadow of the Padshah
contnued the Pasha n a ow tone of concen-
trated anger nd sha he not have |ustce
Let hm ook to t f thngs do not change. ln-
shaah l wrong no man.
few moments of sence succeeded, and
agan the atrap spoke : nd ths rank, ths
nfde dog, of whom he tod me n fu dvan
Mad-house.
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TH M C TH H M. 135
not a month back, who scattered hs money n
the cty streets, and made an okka of hs
dweng, where a who came were wecome
what has become of hm th whose hatt-
sherffe f has he passed the gates y ah
there has been treason and the Cad has payed
the codgea-basha, and eved trbute for hm-
sef:
ashustun on my head be t My ord
the Pasha has hs foot on the neck of the gho-
rumsak sad the sectar-aga, turnng asde to
spt out hs contempt of the Cad.
Have you heard aught of ths spendthrft
rank asked the Pasha lf t be as the
Cad says, he must be we known n the cty.
our save has heard that the stranger s no
rank was the repy but a rascay Greek
from the lsands, who has been aughng at the
beards of the True eevers, and cang hm-
sef a Gau. ,,
Ha s t so sad the atrap, a geam of
peasure passng over hs swarthy countenance
Then by the sou of hs mother, he sha pay
deary for hs nsoence. Greek here s
the karatch | He sha pay t to the uttermost
Tavern. f rman.
Captaton ta eved on ra ahs.
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136 TH M C TH H M.
para aye, to the uttermost. ou sha tak
wth hm, Ma ouk and you know your duty.
The sectar-aga ad hs hand upon hs heart,
and smed.
ha we have our faces backened by a
raah pursued the atrap : a ve save who
was born under the yoke and whose cunnng
has taught hm to take sheter n the name of a
rank hawa| nd a Gau too ere there
not ussans and ngsh enough between can-
dera and tambou, but he must ca hmsef a
Gau
The save s as keen as a makasa f sad
the sectar-aga, seectng a sme whch was as
professona as t was apt Had he wrtten
hmsef ether uss or rton we mght have
read the cheat, for these Gaours are a as ke
from ama an to ama an, as the pears n my
ord s turban and they who have once known
one of the uncean dogs, can te hm agan even
shoud they meet on the edge of the Great
Desart but the Gau s as changefu as the
shadows of the tempest on the waters of ouac
and there s no swearng to hs beard.
nd how know you ths asked the Pasha,
ama ed at the erudton of hs attendant Have
Merchant. f hort-sword.
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TH M C TH H M. 137
you punged your fngers nto the same pauf
wth the Unbeevers that you can te the sgns
of ther unceanness
May the hand of your save persh f t
hath done ths sad the functonary soemny :
hose dog am l that l shoud defe my own
grave l earned the secret from a had| who
had traveed to the far east and who tod me
that a mghty chah, who knew tte of the n-
fde natons of the west, and who sought to
earn n what the Gaours of those ands of dark-
ness dffered the one from the other, empoyed a
famous panter, who coud cunnngy spread the
tnts of the ranbow over the surface of the pa-
pyrus, and create brght shapes that wanted
ony breath and fe to make them equa to the
hours, to trace for hm a Gaour of every and
wthn the crce of Caf, that so he mght,
shoud any of these restess barbarans trave to
hs court, be abe at once to te to what naton
he beonged. ut l weary my ord
Go on sad the Pasha l sten.
The panter obeyed the lmpera com-
mand pursued the sectar-aga wth encreased
anmaton, encouraged by the unusua attenton
of hs master and he soon ad upon the step
of the throne so many tght-vested and whs-
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138 TH M C TH H M.
kered effges that the chah had neary e -
pred wth mrth but at ength he came to one
where the Gaour stood uncothed, hodng n
hs hand a web of sk and he demanded from
the panter n what and the men thus unbush-
ngy dspensed wth the garments whch they
possessed the means of fashonng. s May my
ord s shadow never decrease sad the panter :
ln no country of the west where the Gaours
have earned to weave the produce of the worm
or the cotton tree, do they thus deprve them-
seves of the fruts of ther ndustry. l have
therefore ad before the eyes of my ord, the
garb of every naton save one, for esewhere the
garment of to-day may be worn to-morrow but
wth the Gau t s not so and had l made for
hm a dress to any gven measure, though at sun-
rse he mght have been dstngushed by t from
a the natons of the earth, at sunset t woud
have borne no more resembance to hs actua
appearance than the otus bears to the ove tree,
or the stork to the bue dove. l have therefore
gven hm the matera unfashoned, n order
that my ord the chah may magne for hm,
each tme that he ooks upon the pcture, a new
and dstnct costume. Thus then, Lght of the
arth contnued the sectar-aga, bowng ow
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TH M C TH H M. 139
before hs master l deem that the Greek
save has caed hmsef a Gau, dreadng that
your penetraton and knowedge woud have
detected the mposture had he decared hmsef
to be the sub|ect of any other and.
Ha, ha true, true sad the atrap wth
a grm sme but hemduah prase be
to ah he w not escape even thus. e
are not to suffer the sand of the desart to be
fung nto our eyes by a wretched raah. rang
domous the ranks are hogs, be they uss or
Gaus and the Greeks are dogs, and the fathers
of dogs. He sha pay the karatch ether wth
hs hands or feet
ashustun on my head be t sad the
sectar-aga and the Pasha smoked on wth
renewed vgour satsfed that the worthy func-
tonary woud keep hs word.
Ma ouk sad the Pasha after a ong
pause your face s whtened you have
charmed the ear of attenton, and turned the
sands of the hour-gass to god. l knew that
your arm was strong, but l have ony earnt to-
day that you can thnk as we as strke. l am
weary of the taes tod n my harem they are
over-rpe pomegranates, and pa me. Have you
no egend of war and strfe, such as may make
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1 0 TH M C TH H M.
me beeve whe l e here upon my cushons
that l see the rovng Tartar wth hs ta cap
and sender ance the hardy cythan wth
hs huge bow grasped ke a toy the rab wth
hs unerrng d|errd or the fase Greek wth
hs ong spear geamng n the sunshne, as he
fes before the ah hu of the conquerng
Mosem l want a tae ke the neghng of a
war-horse, or the bast of a trumpet l ove the
far-off rumbng of warfare and had l not been
a atrap, by the sou of my father l woud
have been a warror l
t the concuson of ths nobe and safe burst
of pugnacous oratory, the Pasha resumed hs
chbouque amost fercey whe he twred hs
moustache, and ooked defance at the sectar-
aga who, havng respectfuy pressed the hem
of the great man s garment to hs ps, stood for
a moment bured n thought and then, obeyng
the gracous gesture of the Pasha, seated hm-
sef on the edge of the carpet, and at once com-
menced hs narratve.
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TH M C TH H M. 1 1
CH PT L
l must transport my ord to the farthest ast,
that l may te hm that whch he may not per-
chance have heard for, shoud l engage hs ear
wth a tae of the wars of oum, and of the
gores of the conquerng armes of the Padshah,
the Descendant of the Prophet, and the efuge
of the ord, shoud l not heap ashes upon my
head, when my ord knows a thngs, and hs
servant s ess than a dog before hm
The Pasha drew n a ong stream of the sweet-
scented gebe, and nodded hs approbaton
whe the sectar-aga, encouraged by the ges-
ture, thus proceeded.
Haf the word had bowed beneath the
strong rght arm of the wonderfu ubuctag
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1 2 TH M C TH H M.
and hs warke son, the brght-eyed Mahmoud,
when hs grandson Musaoud ascended the roya
steps of the throne of Gh n. lt was a moment
of tra, for the brave m chah |och, the
ord of the Toorkomans, had aready subdued
the kngdoms of okhara and amarcand, reap-
ng ther harvest wth the sword, and awakenng
ther echoes wth the cash of stee, and the
thunder of prancng hoofs. He was born for
batte the storm and the tempest rocked hm to
rest n hs nfancy he aughed as the red ght-
nngs danced around hm and chased the thun-
der-bot when t fe run-aden nto the vaey.
He breasted the waves when the wd sea was
chafed nto anger and eaped the precpces
n whose depths death ay coed ke a serpent,
hen hs boyhood was spent, and that hs
upper p was frnged wth the beard of strength,
he became ony more bod and dauntess. The
spear and the sword were dearer to hm than the
ebec or the hookah and the trumpet-bast
sweeter than the voces of the awas. Hs am-
bton was as a fery torch whch spread devasta-
ton before t and hs name was the watchword
of the warrors when they rushed upon the
weapons of the foe.
Musaoud had not yet grded on the scymtar
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TH M C TH H M. 1 3
of soveregnty when the warke m pressed
onward, even wthn the mts of hs empre
and he no sooner became the rght hand of power
than he resoved to stem the torrent of nvason
ere t reached the footstep of hs throne and,
for ths purpose, he caed to hm the nobe -
tasash, the brave vceroy of Charsm, who had
ong panted to cross swords wth the vctorous
Prnce of the Toorkomans.
Gh n was convused wth prde and ad-
mraton, when the eage-browed tasash ga-
oped ke a meteor towards the pan where hs
gaant army was assembed. Hs stee-cad
warrors were counted by thousands and one
unversa shout of wecome, whch seemed to
shake the astounded earth even to ts centre,
haed hm as he bounded forward wth hs son
ousruf by hs sde. He was the do of the
peope and there stood not one among that
cosey-serred host, who woud not have freey
shed hs bood for the brave and hgh-soued
tasash.
Mothers best hm as he passed, and hed
ther nfants hgh above ther heads that they
mght ook upon the hero the aged wept that
ther strength was spent, and they coud not
foow hm to batte whe they who had h-
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1 TH M C TH H M.
therto ressted the temptaton, fung down ther
peacefu toos, or nstruments of sport, and
graspng a ruder weapon, rushed to the ranks of
batte.
nter had aready stretched hs cy hand
over the earth, but the gaant vceroy heeded
not ts pressure the enemy strode on and he
dsdaned to yed before the perseverance of the
conquerng m. s the armed host swept
forward, a was wretchedness before and about
them the trees stretched forth ther eafess
arms towards a murky and eaden sky the
wnds howed through the vaeys ke savage
monsters n search of prey the torrents, swon
wth ran, eapt and roared as they escaped from
ther channe, and bore on ther turbd waves, the
wreck of many a statey tree torn from ts roots,
and hured to run by the tempest fragments
of rock, wrenched away by the storm-gusts, fe
catterng nto the defes of the mountans and,
at ength, amd a ths desoaton the gaunt fend
amne staked through the camp, and shook
hs bony hand above the host. ut the heroes
of Gh n defed hm to the ast the ardent -
tasash met hm as the rock meets the tempest
and the troops, encouraged by hs e ampe,
armed themseves wth resouton, and cred
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TH M C TH H M. 1 5
shame upon the craven who dared to murmur
The mountan-path
Mashaah nterrupted the Pasha, wth a
most unequvoca yawn l have mstaken my
taste l have aready heard enough of ths se-
cond ustum: et hm rest n peace, whether
he ded of want or a keen stee, whch s a fact
that, thanks be to the Prophet, l know nothng
about. The day s wearng, and the shadows
are growng onger we w hasten the evenng
mea, and eave your heavy warrors to ther
mountan-path.
The dsconcerted sword-bearer dd not ven-
ture to repy but senty motonng to the at-
tendants, who were yng haf aseep upon the
turf at a dstance, to approach and do ther duty,
he sowy foowed the Pasha to the paace, wth
a couded brow, and a most unenvabe feeng
of mortfed vanty.
s they passed beneath the wndows of the
harem, the sweet voce of atnka came upon
the wnd and the atrap nvountary stopped
to sten. s the song proceeded, hs eye ght-
ened, and hs p quvered wth peasure and,
when t ceased, he moved on, and wthout deay-
ng a moment n hs own apartment, at once
ceebrated eastern hero.
L. lll. U
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1 6 TH M C TH H M.
beckoned to hm hs ga aba, and entered the
harem.
The pensve Carmf, as she rose to wecome
hm, smed fanty, and then reapsed nto her
usua goom but the young Greek gr turned
on hm a gance of fre that seemed to be re-
fected on hs sou and her ready hand ar-
ranged hs cushons, and her soft voce greeted
hm wth a feeng not to be msunderstood.
Coffee was served, and the gracefu atnka
was seated at the feet of her frend n respectfu
sence, when the Pasha, whose deness requred
amusement, after gracousy mpartng to hs
far steners the recent faure of the sectar-
aga, turned towards her smngy, and bade her
put the sword-bearer to shame, by one of those
taes whch fe from her ps ke wd honey
from the trunk of the fg-tree.
The beautfu save answered by meeky
pressng her hands upon her bosom, and gvng
hersef up to thought and as the Pasha ooked
upon her, he swore by hs beard that she was
more ovey than a hour, but as he dd not put
the vow nto words, none were aware save a-
tnka hersef that she was the sub|ect of hs
revere.
owy rasng her head ke a bossom that
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 1 7
has been bent wth ran, after the apse of a few
moments the Greek gr prepared to speak
and f ng her deep eyes on the Pasha, whe she
casped one of the far hands of hs young wfe
wthn her own, she thus obeyed hs bddng.
h2
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1 8 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lL
TH P H D UGHT .
The Pasha Taat was the atrap of a power-
fu provnce too far removed from the magnf-
cent Cty of the Three eas, the capta of the
Lord of Lfe, to be frequenty convused by the
factons whch must ever rend the metropos of
a great mpre. Hs chaoushes knew no other
ord, save by the voce of rumour they had
never ad ther foreheads n the dust before a
greater than hmsef and they served hm
wth the bnd obedence whch was ther duty.
very karabash and astrooger of the pro-
vnce had predcted for hm a ong fe and a
prosperous fortune. Hs spahs-f were aert and
brave, and threw the d|erd wth a the art of
se man. f Horse soders.
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TH pasha s daughter. 1 9
rabs hs paace was the nobest n the cty,
and hs kasr the strongest n the mountans
hs mr-akhor-f- was |usty proud of hs un-
rvaed stud hs yu bashs| were fathfu and
the strange merchants who from tme to tme
traded n the ba ar, repad wth a wng and
bera hand the protecton and |ustce whch
they ever found n the dvan of Taat Pasha.
ut the atrap possessed one gem whch out-
vaued the damonds of hs treasury, and the
revenue of hs pashak. Hs beard was aready
marbed wth gray when the prayer of hs heart
was answered, and he became the father of a
ovey gr. Pure as the bossoms of the lndan
ga, ovey as the burstng rose when t drnks
n the dew-drop of the eary dawn, and gracefu
as the fawn whch sports by ts .mother s sde
beneath the forest boughs, Matap seemed to
have come on earth to shew the word how far
the pers of Paradse may be. Her mother
oved her as the bubu oves the moonght her
father cung to her as to the prncpe of hs e -
stence and as years went by, and tme ony
rendered her more fautess, the fame of her rare
beauty was nosed abroad and many a poet
Caste. f Head-groom. Captans.
Moonght.
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150 TH M C TH H M.
rhymed the name of the Pasha s daughter to a
thousand e petves of harmony and ove.
athers sued for ther sons, and mothers
vsted the harem of the atrap to satsfy them-
seves that rumour had not outrun reaty but
the proposas of the one, and the scrutny of the
other ake avaed nothng the Pasha oved hs
chd too much to thwart her fancy and the
gorous pear of the provnce ony wept when
they taked to her of quttng her father s roof.
mong the numerous sutors whom her ove-
ness drew around the carpet of the Pasha, was
the dark-eyed oussouf ey, the ony son of a
weathy atrap whose provnce ad|oned that of the
father of Ma tap. The country rang wth hs
prases : he had read the oran thrce through
he had transcrbed the poeses of Haf on the
tabet of hs memory whe yet a youth he had
mortay wounded an rab chek n a skrmsh
whence oder and stronger warrors had fed to
the courage of a man he |oned the softness of a
woman and when the proud Pasha asked for
hm the hand of the atrap Taat s daughter, hs
heart was as free from any mpresson as the
mysterous sea over whch naves have passed
wthout eavng a trace behnd but unke the
mtabe ocean, that heart had never yet been
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TH P H D UGHT . 151
ad bare to any contact and when the far
Ma tap was mentoned to hm as hs future brde,
he stened n sence, and taught hmsef to ove
her n hearkenng to the hyperboca panegyrcs
of the strangers who vsted the paace.
ut hs father s rank and hs own mert
avaed hm nothng. Presents both rare and
costy were sent to the harem of Taat Pasha
hs mother, an ous for hs happness, empoyed
every we n order to ensure success the father
of the young beauty e patated on the advan-
tages of the connecton and every femae tongue
n the cty was oud n hs prase yet he met no
happer fate than hs ess worthy rvas. The
young beauty stened, wept, and fnay refused
to aow the name of oussouf ey to be men-
toned n her presence.
pportuntes had not been wantng when she
mght have satsfed hersef of hs rare persona
advantages, but she had avoded them nor dd
she approach the attces of her apartment unt
she ascertaned that, hopeess of success, he had
qutted the cty.
The faure of the young and gaant ey
acted powerfuy on the sprts of the other
sutors of the ady they fet that where he had
gathered ony ashes, they coud secure no trea-
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152 TH M C TH H M.
sure and one by one, sowy and reuctanty,
they wthdrew ther cams.
Lght was the heart of the far Matap when
the ast hoof-stroke of the over-band resounded
through the court-yard, and the rder gaoped
away n search of a more wng brde and as
she hung upon the neck of her father, and bured
her sweet face n hs bosom, she murmured
gente words of tenderness and trust that drew
tears from the eyes of the Pasha, and bessngs
from hs ps.
Less happy was the son of the atrap arm
no fear of faure had gone wth hm to the
paace of Taat, and hs re|ecton had faen upon
hm ke a stroke of destny. rom the hour
that he ost hope, he fet that to ve wthout the
beautfu Matap woud be mpossbe and as
he sped homeward, he breathed an earnest and a
soemn vow that he woud wn her, or de.
ut how
oussouf ey was young and sangune, fu
of fe and ove, rch, taented, and handsome.
lf ever hope brushed away a dark shadow from
the tabet of despar wth her sunny wng, t
was for such as he
Despte hs ove for hs daughter, Taat Pasha
coud not concea the feeng of dsappontment
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TH pasha s daughter. 153
wth whch he saw the young ey depart. He
coud hope no brghter fortune for her than that
whch she had |ust re|ected and he was mor-
tfed aso that the haughty sutor had not made
a snge effort to change the temper of the ch-
ng beauty but had bowed beneath her decson
wthout a word of remonstrance.
Tme, however, whch softens a thngs, gra-
duay dmnshed the regret of the Pasha, and
he forgot to sgh when the name of the atrap
arm was mentoned n hs presence. or
coud he forbear re|ocng, when the abours of
the dvan were over, that the sweet sme of
Ma tap st wecomed hs arrva n the harem,
and shed a ray of ght over hs e stence and,
eventuay, he amost earned to re|oce that hs
ovey chd was ether coder or more caprcous
than the rest of her se .
The usua quet monotony of the atrap s pa-
ace was one mornng dsturbed by the nte-
gence that a strange merchant had arrved n the
cty, and estabshed hmsef n the prncpa
khan, wth an assortment of stuffs such as had
never before been behed n the provnce. ne of
the househod saves had ngered to see many of
the baes opened, and gave a most e ctng de-
scrpton of ther contents, as we as of the ha-
5
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15 TH M C TH H M.
wa| hmsef and the far Matap, who had
become weared ake of her tusbee, her brds,
and her fowers, amd the anguor of a warm
day of summer, was not sorry to fnd a new
source of amusement n the hyperboca detas
of the voube ade.
Mashaah pursued the save, as she per-
ceved that her beautfu young mstress was
eanng forward upon her cushons to sten l
never saw such sks, nor such eyes ne of
them worked wth god, n the cypher of the
Padshah on a ground of brght orange and
another of cear bue rayed wth sver. nd
then such a beard as back and as gossy as a
brd s wng : and the most decate musns for
yashmacs -f you mght see the very coour of the
ps they covered. nd, waah bah a voce
that goes through and through you, as though
t spoke to your sou rather than your ears.
|ab wonderfu why he has brought nto
the cty the adng of nne cames and he waks
ke a e r.
The far Matap coud not restran her mrth,
and caspng her tte hands, she gave way to a
hearty burst of gracefu aughter. nd how
ca you ths wondrous trader, ade nd
Chapet. f e.
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TH P H D UGHT , 155
whence comes he rom the cora caves of the
deep sea, or the feecy vapours of the bue sky
or such eyes, and beard, and tones as these can
surey not beong to a mere morta.
e brm what can l say reped the
save He seemed to me to be morta, aye, and
to fee ke a man, for when Gada, the aden-
haha, of the Cad s daughter, who was ookng
on whe he was arrangng hs goods, decared
that she shoud fa sck f she coud not persuade
her mstress to purchase for her a caemquer,-f-
whch marveousy struck her fancy, the young
hawa| foded t n an nstant and paced t n
her hand, wth a sme as brght as the coours n
whch t was panted, though the astonshed a-
denhaha tod hm that she had not a para n the
word.
our merchant-prnce s ndeed a marve
smed the young Hanoum but l woud
earn hs name.
They ca hm the hawa| adg, and he
comes from assora. Mashaah what an eye
he has, and a forehead ke a Padshah Ga-
da was n uck to day her ksmet won a gft
urse,
t Handkerchef worn on the head.
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156 TH M C TH H M.
for her from the whtest and the softest hands n
the word. 1
ay, you are mad, ade sad the far
Matap strvng to ca up a frown ne
woud thnk that no strange merchant had ever
before vsted the cty, or rewarded the nsoence
of an de nurse wth a head-dress et me hear
no more of ths t s unseemy .
The rebuked attendant bowed her head n s-
ence, and shorty after qutted the apartment.
n unusua restessness suddeny se ed the
Pasha s daughter she rose from the sofa
thrust her decate feet nto her pear-sprnked
sppers tred a her nstruments one after the
other, and re|ected each n turn companed of
an oppresson n the ar dscovered that the
water n her gobet was heated and scky, and
that the musk-emons whch were scattered over
the room affected her head and fnay quar-
reed wth the e quste cachemre that was
foded about her brow, and decared that, snce
she had ooked nto a mrror, she had never worn
a coour that became her.
The nference was smpe a new cachemre
rust be purchased and she had aready e -
amned and re|ected every shaw n the ba ar of
the cty, save those of the strange merchant.
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TH P H D UGHT . 157
he woud dspatch a save to bd the hawa|
send hs chocest merchandse to the paace and
yet, no how coud he dvne her tastes He
woud probaby retan the very thng she wanted,
and she shoud be weared by ookng over a
heap of unnterestng umber. Truy, ths was
a demma. The ba ar was at the other e tremty
of the cty the streets were hot and cose and
the very wnd seemed to have been fannng the
sun, and to have carred away ts warmth, for t
fe on the brow ke the pressure of a heated
hand but shoud she deay unt the coo hours,
the ght woud fa, and she coud no onger
dstngush the coours of the web esdes,
some mr s wfe mght carry off the very cache-
mre that she coveted and ths refecton was so
aarmng, that the far Ma tap at once capped
her hands, and desred the save who obeyed the
summons, to order her araba, to brng her fe-
rd|he and yashmac, and to prepare her two
prncpa attendants to accompany her to the
ba ar.
Havng made these arrangements, the gente
gr subsded once more nto composure re-
sumed her tusbee, and passed ts perfumed
beads rapdy through her fngers, as she mur-
Coak.
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158 TH M C TH H M.
mured out a ove-baad whch by some e traor-
dnary fataty |ust then recurred to her memory
and smed once or twce as though some pea-
sant thought had grown wth the meody. Her
resouton was a hoday for the two favoured
saves who were to attend her, for curosty had
grown very powerfuy n the harem snce ade
had tod the tae of the good-fortune of the
Cad s adenhaha wth the new hawa| and
whe some of the far saves dreamt of panted
caemquers and embrodered sks, others were
ndugng vsons of dark eyes, ruby ps, and
tones of musc.
The araba was soon ready, for obedah and
hereen, the chosen par who were to proft by
the sudden whm of the young beauty, had urged
the rabad|e and the erud|es-f- to ther great-
est speed and Ma tap was st busy engaged
n arrangng, wth more than her usua e actness,
the transparent fods of the envous ve whch
was to shroud her oveness, when the rchy
gt and sken-curtaned carrage ratted to the
door. our mounted negroes surrounded t
and ere ong t was |otng aong the rude pave-
ment of the cty streets.
Coachman. t Grooms.
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TH P H daughter. 159
CH PT lll.
TH P H D UGHT contnued.
The han of Damascus, as the caravansera
was caed, n whch the Merchant had taken up
hs abode, was stuated near the southern gate
of the cty, many stada from the paace of the
Pasha and more than once durng her drve
the heart of Matap beat more qucky than
usua, as she asked hersef why she thus nduged
a caprce, as e traordnary as t was unaccount-
abe. requenty was she tempted to change
her purpose, and smpy to vst the ba ar but
a resstess mpuse urged her to persevere n her
orgna ntenton and whe ths menta war
was wagng n her heart, the araba drove nto
the yard of the caravansera.
ln the centre of the court a handsome foun-
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160 TH M C TH H M.
tan poured forth ts voume of brght sparkng
water and n one corner rose a sma edfce
dedcated to the sck brds brought by the hunt-
ers and peasants from the mountans. par
of nobe eages, wth ther feathers ruffed by
ness crouched heavy upon the roof a ame
stork was vsbe through one of the casements
and a number of sma brds, of dfferent de-
scrptons, were perched on the eaves of the
budng.
ut Ma tap saw nether fountan nor nfr-
mary her eyes were f ed on a young man,
who stood earnesty conversng wth a spah, and
whose e treme persona beauty e ceeded any
thng whch she had prevousy magned. s
she ay back upon her cushons, wth her feather-
fan before her face, she coud nduge her adm-
raton wthout a fear of hs observng her and
ths feeng of securty betrayed her nto a re-
vere whch was ony termnated by the harsh
voce of the ga aba, who renng up hs
spendd raban cose to her sde, nqured her
further peasure.
avash, yavash softy, softy she sad,
startng at once nto a fu conscousness of the
error nto whch she had been betrayed l
have not yet qute decded whether l sha ven-
Cavary soder.
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TH P H D UGHT . 161
ture to encounter the fatgue of barganng wth
the khawa|s to-day my head aches, and my
eyes are heavy.
e w then return at once to the paace
sad the negro and he had aready gathered up
hs brde, when the ady e camed peevshy.
nd yet when l have submtted to the tedous-
ness of traversng the cty, l may as we proft
by the e erton, or l sha be compeed to re-
peat t. lnqure, therefore, for the store of the
merchant adg.
The ga aba obeyed and the araba sosvy
proceeded to the quarter ndcated, Matap never
once removng her eyes from the fgure of the
stranger, and marveng much whom he coud
be. The saves who sat at her feet detected the
sudden preoccupaton of ther mstress wth the
ntutve penetraton of the se and athough
they uttered no comment, they ganced e pres-
svey at each other, and then nduged them-
seves n ga ng on the same ob|ect, wth an n-
terest and admraton ony nferor to her own.
hen the carrage stopped at the entrance of
the store, great was the satsfacton of the Pasha s
daughter on remarkng that the handsome
stranger hurredy termnated hs conversaton
wth the soder, and turned hs steps n the
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162 TH M C TH H M.
same drecton and the coud whch had ga-
thered upon her brow was dsspated n an n-
stant, when wth a ow and respectfu sautaton,
he foowed her nto the spacous warehouse, and
stood senty wth downcast eyes, awatng her
commands.
Ths then was the Merchant adg
or the frst tme the proud beauty fet at
ease : she had forgotten why she came there,
and what she sought and she remaned ear-
nesty ga ng upon the khawa|, wthout makng
an effort to gve even the sembance of accdent
to her vst.
The stranger was about fve-and-twenty hs
eyes were as back as ebony, and as brght as sun-
beams hs port was haughty and hs brow we
became the prde that sat on hs fney-mouded
ps. He wore a turban of whch the cachemre
was amost above prce hs fowng robe was
of crmson sk, rayed wth orange and n hs
rch and we-ad|usted grde he carred a hand-
|ar sparkng wth one mmense ruby, on whch
was graven the cypher of the Prophet.
The sence became embarrassng and to ds-
pe t, hereen, the favourte attendant of the
ady, took up a gorgeous shaw whch was fung
upon one of the baes, and began to utter
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TH P H D UGHT . 163
Mashaahs f and Pek Gu es n nnume-
rabe, as she e amned ts pattern and te ture.
The mpuse was as successfu as t was nart-
fca, for t wthdrew the eyes of Ma tap from
the Merchant, and broke the spe that had been
suddeny cast over her. nnoyed and mortfed
at her own foy, the Pasha s daughter at once
assumed a haughtness foregn to her natura
character and gancng round her, she sad
cody :
hosh buduk you are we found, kha-
wa| my saves te me that you have cache-
mres of prce among your goods, whch out-
vaue any n the ba ars of the cty. l may per-
chance become a purchaser et me, therefore,
at once see the most costy of your baes, f l
have heard the truth.
hemduah murmured the Merchant :
your hghness does my poor store but too
much honour and l and a that l possess are
at your command. fter whch courteous
decaraton, he capped hs hands, and a coupe
of umdan saves, cad n dark bue tuncs,
wth scaret turbans, nstanty appeared from be-
hnd the screen whch veed an nner apartment.
t a sent sgna from ther empoyer each
ery pretty.
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16 TH M C TH H M.
se ed a corner of the tapestry curtan, and hed
t hgh above hs head, whe the Merchant n a
ow and respectfu voce begged the ady to
favour hm by passng nto the chamber where
he had secured the most costy of hs merchan-
dse from the contact of casua purchasers.
Thraed, and governed by a curosty whch
had now become uncontrouabe, the statey
Ma tap scarcey hestated a moment and fo-
owed by her two attendants, she crossed the
threshod, and the screen fe behnd her.
The apartment n whch she stood was spa-
cous, and ghted by three wndows overookng
a court panted wth mape and acaca trees
these wndows the u urous Merchant had
veed wth curtans of pae pnk sk that gave a
sunset hue to every ob|ect n the chamber but
the surprse of the Pasha s daughter amounted
to wonder, as the gorgeous umdans, after
gancng towards ther master, spread over the
handsome dvan of crmson vevet, a coverng of
decate whte satn wrought wth god : and
heaped upon t cushons of neede-work, such
as even the oved and caprcous Ma tap had
never before behed.
s the young beauty sank upon the gtterng
sofa, the Merchant st stood before her wth
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TH pasha s daughter. 165
bent head, as though he dared not meet the eyes
whch rested on hm then sowy retrng, he
ndcated to hs saves the bae whch was to be
opened for her nspecton whe, n order to
whe away the tme, he spread out before her
severa caskets fed wth gems, whch fashed n
the soft and shaded ght. Tusbees of pears,
each the s e of a pea bodkns of brants
rngs of rose damonds, charms, and amuets,
and gded toys of every descrpton, enough to
turn the head of a score of astern women.
md a her admraton the far daughter of
the Pasha remarked, however, that there was one
casket whch the khawa| had not opened, and
whch, when he had once or twce accdentay
taken t up, he had hasty ad asde. There
needed no more to e cte n her bosom a strong
desre to e amne the contents of the casket
and when the same crcumstance agan occurred,
durng a search whch the Merchant was makng
for a case contanng some vauabe turquoses,
she coud not refran from pontng towards the
mysterous sub|ect of her thoughts, and nqurng
why that aso had not been submtted to her n-
specton.
Lady sad the khawa| : a that l have
s at the bddng of your hghness, and even un-
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166 TH M C TH H M.
worthy of your attenton. f what s mne l
woud hod back nothng. our save ves but
to obey you, and hs face s whtened by your
approbaton but the contents of ths casket are
not mne l hod them ony n trust for one of
my most honoured customers and l woud not
ay before you a |ewe of whch l cannot make
you mstress.
ut l woud see t nevertheess urged
the far Matap, as she e tended her hand to-
wards the Merchant.
adg bowed submssvey, and havng oosened
the casps of the casket, he ad at the feet of hs
vstor a superb hand-mrror, of whch the frame
was of chased god, profusey studded wth
brants. cypher of sma emerads orna-
mented the back of the gass, and a heavy tasse
of god depended from the hande and, ato-
gether, the toy was of so costy a descrpton
that the Pasha s daughter coud not restran an
e camaton of deght.
Can you reay not dspose of ths pretty
ana, f endm she asked eagery.
as l have tod your hghness ony the
truth. lt was wrought n the be ensten of tam-
bou for a young and weathy ey, who s about
to form hs harem and s destned to refect the
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TH P H D UGHT . 16|
beautes of hs far brde. He has aready urged
ts arrva more than once, and l dare not dsap-
pont hm.
ah l t s a pretty toy, and the ey
has taste. How ca you hm, khawa|
oussouf ey, the son of arm Pasha
reped adg.
y the sou of your father, you may then
se me the ana sad Matap, wth a proud
toss of her pretty head for the brde w not
put off her sppers n the harem of the atrap s
son before you have had tme to make a do en
such.
steferaah murmured the Merchant
our hghness must have been msnformed.
The young ey made a |ourney to the provnce
of your nobe father, (may hs years be many )
and abode, as l have been nformed, some days
n the Pasha s paace and t was on hs return
thence that he earnt the happness whch was n
store for hm.
Matap bushed as she stened, unt the
roseate fush coud be dstngushed through the
musn of her yashmac and she suffered the
spendd ana to fa from her hand upon the
cushons. lt was reverenty rased by the kha-
wa|, and repaced n the casket wthout a word
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168 TH M C TH H M.
from the young beauty for a grasp ke ron
was on her heart. Had her prde ndeed won
for her no greater trumph than ths as she
forgotten n a day repaced n a month re-
membered ony wth a sme
The revere woud have asted onger, but
chancng to ook up, and meetng the fne dark
eyes of the Merchant, Matap suddeny resumed
her sef-possesson, and gave fu empoyment
both to hs patence and hs taste, n e amnng
one after the other a the shaws n hs ware-
house.
lt was a pretty scene. The ady recned
upon her cushons of party-cooured satn, wth
one whte arm fuy reveaed as she e tended t
to touch the dfferent shaws whch were spread
out before her by the handsome trader who,
restng upon one knee on the edge of the carpet,
took them from the hands of the umdans who
stood cose behnd hm whe the attendants of
the ovey gr, shrouded n ther dark and ampe
mantes, were seated a tte space apart. The
soft and dreamy ght meowed the atmosphere
about them and the ranbow-ke tnts of the
shaws whch were scattered through the apart-
ment, ent a gorgeous fnsh to the pcture.
The sudden entrance of the ga aba gave a
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TH P H D UGHT . 169
new feature to the aspect of affars. The ady
hed n her hand a magnfcent cachemre of e -
quste te ture, and as the screen was fted, she
sad suddeny :
lt s we, ffendm te me therefore the
owest prce that you w take for ths whch l
hod, and our bargan w soon be termnated.
teen purses : reped adg cody, and
wthout rasng hs eyes and were t not that
l am honoured by the notce of your hghness, l
shoud demand twenty.
nd ths and she ponted to another
of nferor quaty
not count beyond nne though the
wreath of nrgs s woven by the hands of the
pers.
They are mne : sad Ma tap, as she rose to
depart and the hawa| havng foded them n
two separate handkerchefs of cooured musn,
ntended as a present to the attendants, paced
them n the hands of the ga aba, as the mur-
mured ffet oah much peasure attend
you, of hs far vstor fe on hs ear.
ln another moment the araba ratted through
the wde gate of the khan.
The Pasha s daughter never once spoke durng
arcssus.
L. lll. l
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#
p
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170 TH M C TH H M.
her homeward drve, but as she stopped at the
door of the harem, she unfoded the shaws from
ther coverngs, and fngng the panted hand-
kerchefs nto the aps of her attendants, eft the
per-woven shaw whch had been her ast pur-
chase, n the hands of the ga aba when he
asssted her to aght.
The negro ooked up and whe a broad sme
dspayed hs arge and gtterng teeth, and hs
huge eyes were dstended to ther utmost s e, he
bent hs head, and muttered somethng whch
passed for thanks.
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#
p
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TH P H D UGHT . 17 1
CH PT l .
TH P H D UGHT contnued.
hom ths day the nature of the beautfu
Matap underwent a tota change. he was
restess, unhappy, and caprcous. The very
sun dd not shne n the heavens for her as t
had once done her fowers had no fragrance,
her brds no song. he drooped ke a caged
nghtngae she wthered ke a bghted rose.
hen her madens strove to entertan and arouse
her, t was no onger wth ght taes of ove and
aughter to whch she had htherto stened wth
a proud feeng of amused dsdan, but wth
egends of fear, and sorrow, and despar for
then she wept sweet tears over the grefs of
others unt she soothed her own. nce ony
dd she repeat her vst to the khan, and she
2
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#
p
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172 TH M C TH H M.
found a vod. The merchant adg had eft the
cty and there remaned no trace of hm n the
caravansera. Many were the taes tod, how-
ever, of hs beraty, hs charty, hs gracefu-
ness of manner, and hs warmth of heart 5 and
by some e traordnary fataty not one of them
faed to reach the ears of the pensve beauty.
or hours dd she st cang up before her
menta vson every word, and ook, and acton
of the young hawa| true, she had seen hm
but once, and yet, she fet that there was an e -
presson n hs deep eyes whch had entered nto
her sou and then she remembered how soon
and how easy the haughty son of arm Pasha
had forgotten her, and she wondered wthn her-
sef whether she shoud fade as eary from the
memory of the Merchant.
ne day, when she was as usua ndugng
these specuatons, a save entered her apartment,
and presented to her a sma packet whch had
been brought to the cty by the mr-had| of a
caravan that had proceeded on ts way at day-
break. he opened t hasty, and havng torn
away the numerous coverngs n whch t was
enveoped, uncasped a crmson casket, and
started wth surprse on dscoverng the we-
known ana of the merchant adg. Upon the
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#
p
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TH P H D UGHT . 1|3
mrror ay a strp of paper, contanng smpy
these words : or the beautfu and honorabe
ady, her hghness Ma tap Hanoum, from the
most devoted of her saves.
The Pasha s daughter bushed unt brow and
bosom burnt wth the crmson tde that rushed
tumutuousy from her heart. Her frst mpuse
was to concea the paper from the profanng eyes
of her attendants the ne t woud probaby have
been dctated by her prde, and have compeed
the restoraton of the gorgeous gft but she
knew not where to fnd the donor and as she
ga ed nto the |eweed mrror, she thought that
her face had never seemed so far. lnvoun-
tary she sghed, and ganced down upon the
shaw whch cnctured her wast she had ong
ceased to wear any other t was that whch she
had purchased of the handsome stranger t
covered the heart n whch hs mage was en-
shrned.
The proud beauty was subdued. s she hed
the sparkng ana n her hand, she fet that a
those whom she had wounded by her codness
were revenged. he oved nd whom ot
a hgh-born ey, n whose harem she woud
have moved a queen whose rank woud have
satsfed the ambton of her father, and the
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#
p
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17 TH M C TH H M.
hopes of a her famy but a hawa|, a trader
whose sou was n hs baes, and whose thoughts,
nstead of dweng upon her, must be engrossed
by the eager thrst of gan. nd yet, the ana
Had he forgotten her, or had he vaued hs god
above her smes, woud he have thus sought to
wn them ut what avaed the fact, peasant
though t was as they mght never meet
agan and as ths startng contngency forced
tsef upon the reason of the pensve gr, a arge
tear sued the surface of the mrror, and a sgh
heaved the shaw that bound her sght and fary
form.
evera weary months sped by new sut-
ors presented themseves at the carpet of the
Pasha new nstances were made to the droop-
ng Ma tap but a were ake unheeded and
the unhappy atrap began to fear that Monker
and akr were hoverng about hs chd, and
that the goden amp of her young e stence
woud be e tngushed.
very speces of dverson permtted n the
harem was avshy essayed dancng-grs per-
formed ther gracefu feats, and sngng-women
peaed forth ther ove-dttes unheeded the
massad|hs became dstastefu, the guests wear-
nges of Death.
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#
p
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TH P H D UGHT . 1|5
some and, at ength, any further attempt to
arouse the meanchoy Matap from her anguor
was abandoned n despar, and she was eft to
dream and weep n peace.
Taat Pasha had an nordnate taste for |ewes
many a pace was obtaned, many a favour
granted, many a cause, no onger doubtfu, de-
cded n the dvan through the magca agency
of these costy treasures. lt was therefore wth
no sma nterest that he earnt the arrva of an
aged Damond-merchant n the cty, wth |ewes
such as had never before been ooked upon n
the ba ars of the provnce. Hs sectar-aga
taked to hm of the emerad-hted hand|ars, the
goden-scabbarded scymtars nad wth precous
stones, and the sword-bets worked wth pears
hs cafe|h-basha of the arfs, pped wth ru-
bes, and chased wth cunnng workmanshp
and hs prncpa chok-hadarT of a mante of
fne uropean coth, whose coar was a perfect
gaa y of |eweed ght hs codgea-bash had
an audence to decde on the ta whch shoud
be eved on the sae of the goods and hs araf |
to earn whether he shoud rase a new contrbu-
ton n the vages on the produce of the comng
harvest.
The stands n whch the coffee-cups are paced.
f Coak-bearer. | anker.
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#
p
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176 TH M C TH H M.
The curosty of the atrap was e cted and
a summons was sent to the Merchant, who, wth
ready obedence, presented hmsef at the paace
of the Pashac on the gong-down of the sun,
when the gates of the ba ar are cosed, attended
by a coupe of saves bearng the most rare and
costy of hs merchandse.
Hs venerabe appearance nterested every one
n hs favour, and the gfts whch he avshy
dstrbuted to the chaoushes of the househod
tended to deepen the feeng. He was appa-
renty of great age hs eyebrows and beard
were as whte as the snows of Mount rarat
hs ta fgure drooped n the shouders, ke that
of one on whom the weght of years pressed
heavy but hs step was frm though sow, and
hs dark eyes had a ght n them, whch tod
that the sou yeded not to the weakness of the
body.
Many and profound were the prostratons
wth whch he entered the apartment of the
Pasha, who receved hm most gracousy, and
at once motoned hm to dspay hs treasures.
umour had not e aggerated ther vaue or
ther beauty and the audence was proonged
to an unusua ength, wthout any appearance
of wearness on ether part. The atrap n-
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#
p
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TH P H D UGHT . 17/
qured the route of the caravan wth whch the
Merchant had traveed, the appearance of the
ctes that he had passed, the country that he
had traversed, and the trbes whom he had en-
countered whe every nterva was fed up n
e amnng the |ewes and weapons, and n com-
mentng on ther cost and workmanshp.
The Pasha made severa purchases, for the
prces of the trader peased hm as much as hs
merchandse and when, at ength, he receved
permsson to depart, and that he had ad asde
hs cases, and devered them to the care of hs
attendants, a chaoush of the househod conducted
hm wth much courtesy to the door, a poteness
whch he was not caed upon to perform gra-
tutousy and thus hs ghour-oa Heaven
speed you, was very sncere, as the hawa|
stepped across the househod.
The Pasha ost no tme, when the Merchant
had qutted hm, n passng nto the harem, n
order to dspay to hs daughter the |eweed
toys of whch he had |ust made the acquston
and, as she angudy receved those whch were
destned for hersef, and rased the hand of her
fond father to her ps n acknowedgment of hs
ndugence, the atrap, an ous to amuse her
meanchoy, commented on the nobe port, and
5
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#
p
d
1/8 TH M C TH H M.
bera deang of the strange Merchant. or a
tme she stened stessy, but at ength she be-
came nterested n the descrpton of the ha-
wa| and hs merchandse and she senty re-
soved to summon hm on the morrow. he was
weary of the monotony of the harem and the
e amnaton of the gtterng stores of the
stranger promsed at east an hour s amusement.
hen the atrap had retred, the far gr ds-
mssed her saves, for the evenng was spent
and fngng back the attce of a casement whch
opened on the garden of the paace, she eant out
to sten to the song of the nght-brd, to nhae
the perfume of the fowers, and to bend her
sghs wth the fa of the fountan, and the whs-
perng of the wnd among the eaves.
lt was a gorous moonght The shadows ay
ong and dark, whe the nes of sver that were
traced upon the earth, ooked ke fary-pans
for some new and brght creaton : feecy-couds
at tmes foated over the gracefu orb, and
dmmed ts beauty for a moment, as the gossa-
mer ve of a young brde softens the oveness
whch s but heghtened by ts parta ecpse.
around breathed tenderness and peace and
the tears that fe sowy on the cheek of Matap
n that st hour, were devod of btterness. Her
G
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#
p
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TH P H D UGHT . 179
prde sept she dd not ask her heart to ay bare
the mystery of ts enthrament, but she yeded
to the sweet sadness that stoe over her and
agan the sprts that she had strcken were re-
venged
Dayght spread over the eastern heghts,
drapng them n a mante of sober gray, whose
hem soon grew nto a bet of sheeny god gra-
duay the sky brghtened, and the fowers rased
ther heads, and wept ther perfumed dew-tears
on the earth the dstant owng of the catte
came on the wnd the twtterng brds gave
musc to the woods the basn of the paace-gar-
den became a gded mrror n whch the purpe
otus ga ed t she became enamoured of her
own beauty and then, ke a dscordant tone,
|arrng through the sweet harmony of nature,
came the voce of man and once more the
word awoke and fe, wth a ts cares and fears,
ts |eaouses and strfe, renewed ts strugge.
lt was on a terrace, shaded by me-trees,
whose bossoms were voca wth bees, and gay
wth the gracefu rose-aure of urotas, that the
Pasha s daughter receved the Merchant. he
was cosey veed, as were the saves who at-
tended her and the venerabe hawa| was
conducted to her presence by the watchfu ga
aba.
G
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#
p
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180 TH M C TH H M.
The gray beard and reverend appearance of
the stranger were not however cacuated to
aarm the |eaous guardans of the Pasha s ha-
rem and accordngy the ga aba, who had
aready feasted hs eyes on the gtterng mer-
chandse of the stranger, and receved a back-
shsh whch perfecty satsfed a hs deas of
e pedency, soon wandered away among the
trees, eavng the ntervew to the nspecton of
two of hs subordnates : who, n ther turn,
punged deeper nto the shade and contentng
themseves wth remanng wthn sght of the
far groupe, soon bent ther dark brows upon
ther breasts, and sept profoundy.
|ewe after |ewe was ooked upon, and ad
asde toy after toy was e amned, commented
on, and repaced n ts casket unt at ength
the eye of the ady was attracted to a sma case
of crmson vevet embrodered n seed pears
whch, wth a snguarty that at once remnded
her of the young Merchant of the khan, he put
asde as often as t met hs hand.
nd that pretty casket whch you have not
yet opened she sad genty what does t
contan
lt was brought hther by mstake, ffen-
Present.
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TH P H D UGHT . 181
dm reped the venerabe khawa| t s
not a |ewe t hods nothng whch can nterest
your hghness, or l shoud ong ere ths have
ad t before you t s not an artce of mer-
chandse n short, t s bosh nothng. 1
The case, at east, s pretty magned
sad the spoed beauty, who had never earned to
brook opposton and somewhat costy for
such poor contents. ou w at east suffer me
to e amne the embrodery .
The Merchant ooked embarrassed he fted
the casket as f to present t to the ady, but he
made no effort to obey her wshes twce he
appeared about to speak, and then checked hm-
sef as though he feared to gve utterance to hs
thought and a ths tme the hand of the
Pasha s haughty daughter was e tended towards
hm.
e brm what can l say he fautered
at ength The casket s not mne t has
come here by the power of my unucky feech
l am responsbe for ts safe and secret devery
_ ar| d
nd you take me for an ga of the |ans-
sares, ready to see treason n a damond or for
a codgea-bash, eager to evy a ta on your
Consteaton.
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182 TH M C TH H M.
merchandse, s t not so asked Ma tap, haf
amused and haf annoyed at ths unusua oppo-
ston.
The gray bearded hawa| bent ow and de-
precatngy before her.
|anum snndar my sou s your s 1 he
sad humby my fe and a that l possess are
at the bddng of your hghness : but l have ed
a ong fe of probty and scorn of ev and l
have pedged, mysef to the owner of ths casket
that no eye
nough, sr, enough : nterposed the ady
haughty 3 l need no khod|e to read me
essons of proprety and honour. The tme
passes and the road hence to your khan s ong
and wearsome l w not detan you here.
nd she waved her hand wth the ma|esty of a
utana who desres sotude.
Dsmss me not thus, ffendm not thus, by
your sou e camed the Merchant mpo-
rngy : hose dog am l that l shoud dare
to ca a coud to your brght young brow, and
to ght your eye wth anger. ather et me be
forsworn for ever nd as he spoke, he ten-
dered the casket to the Pasha s daughter, wth a
f ed and earnest ga e that drove back the warm
bood to her heart, she knew not wherefore.
Tutor.
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TH pasha s daughter. 183
or a moment she hestated whether she
shoud condescend to ava hersef of the e -
torted permsson of a mere trader to e amne
the mysterous casket : she fet that she ought
to refran, and to re|ect hs tardy concesson
but her curosty was more powerfu than her
prde and avertng her eyes that she mght not
encounter those of the stranger, beneath whch
she was conscous that she quaed, she took the
case from hs hand, and wthout aowng hersef
to deberate for a moment, pressed back the
casps.
s the d few open a fant cry escaped her
and she rvetted her ga e on the contents of the
tte casket wth an eagerness that betrayed her
emoton not ony to her attendants, but to the
Merchant aso. et she cared not for ths : she
gave t no thought she was unconscous that
any eye was on her : she was under the nfu-
ence of a sudden spe and severa moments
passed ere wth a deep bush, and a feeng at
her heart whch was strangey compounded of
happness and angush, she roused hersef suf-
fcenty to ask n a tone whch, whe she n-
tended that t shoud be cod, was ony gen-
te:
lt s a far portrat whose may t be lf
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18 TH M C TH H M.
ndeed the daughter of Taat Pasha may be
permtted such a queston.
Lady sad the hawa| Merhamet
eye bendene have pty on me l am wthered
by your frown. l w ay bare my heart be-
fore you that you may read t at your peasure.
The portrat whch you hod n your hand s
that of oussouf ey, the son of arm Pasha of
the ne t provnce, and t resembes hm as
one
ay, nay you strve useessy to deceve
me e camed Matap sterny the turban s
ndeed that of a ey, and the costume s rch
and costy but the features are those of a
haw-merchant at whose store l chanced to
aght a few months snce. He was caed a-
dg.
l dare not gansay your hghness gravey
reped the hawa| t s possbe that the
face may resembe the man you menton, whose
sou s brghtened by your remembrance but l
have tod ony the truth when l assure you,
ady, that the portrat s that of oussouf ey,
panted by a cunnng rank, and destned for
the young brde, whom the nobe Pasha (may hs
prosperty ncrease ) has |ust chosen for hs
son.
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TH P H daughter. 185
ow, by the grave of your father you
have a fase tongue : e camed the maden
wth a burst of sudden passon for that same
Merchant when he vsted the cty many months
back, tod some of my saves that ths ey was
even then about to take a wfe, for whom he had
purchased some de toys that had attracted ther
notce. How then may your tae be true when
t s so tardy
ether the merchant adg nor mysef have
dared to prophane your ear wth fasehood,
ffendm camy re|oned the hawa| t s
even as we have both stated. The Pasha has
ong been earnest that hs hgh-born son shoud
brng a brde nto hs harem and and
nd what urged Matap mpatenty.
May your save persh f he offend you
sad the Merchant but t was rumoured n
the provnce, where l chanced then to be so-
|ournng, that the young ey had yeded a
wng and eager assent to hs nobe father s
wshes when they ponted towards nd
agan the hawa| paused.
peak murmured Matap wth a sght
accent of scorn.
lt was sad, pursued the stranger that
the Pasha s hopes had f ed themseves on the
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186 TH M C TH H M
ovey daughter of the hgh-born atrap Taat,
the far-famed Ma tap Hanoum
ho cared not to be bartered ke a bae
of coveted merchandse, aganst the prde and
power of an unknown sutor haughty nter-
posed the ady. nd what foowed
The ey returned to hs provnce con-
tnued the Merchant sent, goomy, and
sad He spent hs tme prncpay n rdng over
the country aone, wth a rapdty and perse-
verance whch e hausted hs gaant rab or
among the spahs of hs father, who adored ther
young commander wth a devoton for whch l
have no words he avoded the harem of hs
mother, and the dvan of hs father he grew
dreamy, and msanthropca and he seemed to
endure e stence rather than to en|oy t when
he was suddeny aroused from ths unnatura
stupor by a renewa of the sub|ect of hs mar-
rage. He acquesced, however, wth an ndf-
ference whch proved that hs heart was not n
the compact and the brde w T as chosen, and the
presents made, and the very day was named
when she was to be conducted to hs harem
but then the torpd heart of the ey aroused
tsef, and he fed fed ke a dehbash from
the cty to the mountans and the young cheek
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TH pasha s daughter. 187
of the maden was wet wth tears, and the p of
the mother trembed wth reproach and wonder
but the wretched young man dd not re-appear
for days, and he returned ony to deepen the
regret of hs betrothed, for the worm of sck-
ness was feastng on hs brow, and dmmng the
ustre of hs eye and t was van to tak of
ove to one who seemed to have been strcken by
srae.
ut the rose returned to hs cheek, and the
ght to hs eye, was t not so eagery mur-
mured Ma tap, wth her ga e r vetted on the
pcture.
owy, mperfecty: reped the hawa| :
Lady, t s not easy for the eage who has once
soared towards the sun to ve contented beneath
a esser ght. He s once more n the paace of
hs father once more n the harem of hs mo-
ther stenng to ther arguments, accedng to
ther entreates, and prepared to fuf the con-
tract even at the e pence of hs happness. He
cannot gve hs heart to hs young brde he has
ad t at the feet of one who has re|ected the
offerng and thus he searches the word for
toys and trfes to f the thoughts whch mght
otherwse dwe upon hs codness.
Toys and trfes: echoed the far gr un-
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188 TH M C TH H M.
conscousy, as she grasped the portrat more
cosey : and the narousng hersef, she asked
tmdy fcC nd s ths reay the resembance
of oussouf ey
s ke as the shadow of the bue heaven
on the surface of a ake reped the ha-
wa| : t wants but breath and words to be
hmsef.
nd does he send her ths when he oves her
not asked the maden, rather communng wth
hersef than addressng her companon as
she w become as wretched as the goden gu-
nech-tchchey whch foows the proud sun
through the hot hours of day, regardess of ts
scorchng beam, and unheeded by the ob|ect of
her fond doatry .
The hawa| stened n sence He fet that
he was not requred to comment on the sooquy
of the ady, and he was dscreet enough to oc-
cupy hmsef most assduousy n the rearrange-
ment of hs merchandse. lt was we that he
dd so for n a moment the proud beauty be-
came conscous of her ndscreton, and hasty
and haughty turned her ga e upon the Mer-
chant, as f to note the effect of her unguarded
unfower.
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TH pasha s daughter. 189
e camaton and the feeng of reef was com-
paratvey great wth whch she saw that he too
had been preoccuped, and that her words had
passed unheeded.
gan t was the ga aba who termnated
the ntervew. Hs heavy step was heard upon
the terrace path and wth nervous eagerness
the ady seected a few |ewes, and began to bar-
gan wth the Merchant. The affar was soon
termnated, for the Pasha s daughter made but
a fant shew of resstance to the prce demanded
by the trader and t was not unt he had de-
parted that she perceved that n the hurry and
e ctement of the ast few moments, he had eft
the portrat of the young ey n her possesson,
and had carred away the empty casket.
Her frst mpuse was to forward t to the
khan by one of the negroes of the harem but a
reuctance to part from so strkng a resembance
to the ndvdua who had so ong haunted her
dreams, couped wth the nterest fung over the
pcture tsef by the romantc story of the sutor
whom she had dscarded, perhaps too hasty,
tempted her to retan t for a few hours. The
Merchant woud doubtessy dscover hs oss
when he repaced hs goods n the store at the
caravansera or, shoud he fa to do so, she
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190 TH M C TH H M.
coud restore t eary on the morrow and whe
she mentay dscussed the e pedency of ths
arrangement, she spped the pcture nto her
grde, and powed t aganst her heart.
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TH P H D UGHT . 191
CH PT .
TH P H D UGHT contnued.
hen the young beauty awoke on the fo-
owng mornng, after a bewderng dream n
whch the son of arm Pasha had sod her a
shaw that had the portrat of a grm and
hdeous negro hdden among ts fods and
adg the Merchant had seated a far gr upon
her carpet whom he tod her was hs brde she
began to reproach hersef for a weakness whch
t was no onger tme to subdue and the bush
of prde dred the tears of reuctance wth whch
she enveoped the portrat of oussouf ey n
a panted handkerchef, and dspatched t to the
han of the |ewe-merchant by the hands of
her favourte hereen. ut her resouton was
formed too ate, and her heart s best prayer was
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192 TH M C TH H M.
granted when the confdenta save returned
wth the nformaton that the strange hawa|
had eft the cty at daybreak wth a caravan
whch chanced to be passng.
There was no remedy and the portrat of
the handsome son of arm Pasha remaned n
possesson of the atrap s daughter. or a whe
the far Ma tap appeared to have drank at the
fountan of a new e stence: her voce once
more awoke the echoes of the harem nto musc,
and her gracefu augh peaed through the
gded chambers her step agan became as the
step of the chamos, and her eye as the beam of
the young day when t breaks over the word.
ut ths sprt-|oy endured not ong and
ony a few weeks had passed when the Pasha s
daughter fe nto a deeper and a more hopeess
meanchoy than any beneath whch she had yet
bent. othng aroused her save an auson to
the atrap arm or hs famy and though she
never uttered the name of oussouf ey, her
far cheek fushed, and her du eye ghted up
as her madens dscussed n whspers the sub|ect
of hs ong-protracted marrage.
agery dd she wecome the wanderng p-
grms, dervshes, and other hoy men who
passed through the cty her purse was ever
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TH fasha s daughter. 193
open to ther necesstes and thus the paace of
Tat Pasha was beseged by a the de had|s
who vsted the hoy tomb of the Prophet, ether
n e paton of ther own sns, or of those of
ther weathy empoyers but vany dd the
far gr receve, and assst, these pous and needy
wayfarers, for not one of them brought tdngs
of the Merchant adff.
Desparng, and fadng sowy away ke a sun-
struck bossom, the meanchoy Matap at ength
resgned hersef to the sotary and unhappy
fate whch had been brought upon her by her
own prde, and ony prayed to de and n ths
frame of mnd she sent to ask an ntervew wth
a ceebrated Dervsh, who for the ast few weeks
had estabshed hmsef n a runed tomb beyond
the was of the cty.
Her request was refused, her summons was
unheeded the hoy man had taken up hs
abode n that pace of death because he had
done wth the word, and the word wth hm
the en|oyments and vantes of fe were ake
obno ous to hs ove of sotude and peace and
the refusa was even stern wth whch he an-
swered the entreaty of the snkng gr.
Ths une pected dffcuty augmented the de
Pgrms.
L. lll.
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19 TH M C TH H M.
sre of the maden to converse wth the ascetc
recuse and when a second nvtaton had met
wth a ke repuse to the frst, she tod the tae
of her dsappontment to the Pasha wth many
and btter tears and eary on the morrow the
unyedng Dervsh was commanded to present
hmsef at the paace of the atrap.
s the day broke a coupe of chaoushes
passed the gate of the cty, and bent ther steps
towards the runed tomb n order to compe the
attendance of the Dervsh, shoud he st refuse
obedence: but the cauton was unnecessary,
for as they approached the budng, the ta
fgure of the recuse, ookng dark and soemn n
the cod gray ght, appeared at the porta of
hs nhosptabe dweng, and sowy moved to-
wards them.
courteous hosh buduk ou are we-
found from the functonares of the Pasha was
answered by the cod hosh gedn ou are
wecome of the stranger who staked aong
n the drecton of the cty wthout turnng a
second gance on hs attendants.
The Dervsh was a man of mdde age, whose
dark percng eyes were overshadowed by thck
and hangng brows and whose upper p was
hdden by a mass of coa-back har whch co-
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TH P H D UGHT . 195
vered hs chn, and fe n ong and wavy curs
beow hs grde. Hs khrkheh was of coarse
and heavy coth, and hs head-dress drawn deep
upon hs forehead hs step was frm and
ofty, ke that of one who had decned a
further strugge wth the word rather from ds-
dan than fear and there was an ar of sef-
centered haughtness n hs whoe manner and
appearance whch won for hm an nvountary
respect to whch hs ack of years dd not entte
hm.
He was receved by the Pasha wth ndgnant
codness, for a the father had been aroused
wthn hm by the uncompromsng fanatcsm of
the devotee and yet the nobe bearng of the
Dervsh asserted ts power even over the chafed
temper of the atrap and he soon found hm-
sef, he knew not how, rather seekng to conc-
ate than to reproach. There was a spe aso
n hs rch deep voce, whch, even n the few
words that he reuctanty uttered, had a strange
effect upon the Pasha lt was ke a note of
ong-forgotten musc t awoke peasant but un-
tangbe memores and bewdered the sprt
whe t charmed the ear.
fter a bref ntervew wth hs host, the
Large dark coak.
k2
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198 TH M C TH H M.
Dervsh was conducted by the ga aba to a
garden pavon whence the angud eye of the
far Ma tap oved to wander over the fary won-
ders of the bossom-aden parterres and where
her pae brow was fanned by the perfumed
bree e, whch came to t freghted wth the spos
of the orange-fower and the |asmn. he had
been prepared for hs vst, and had cast over
her head a ong ve of decate whte musn
whch fe ke a coud about her, and made her
beauty amost spectra about her neck hung a
strng of precous pears, from whch was sus-
pended a treasure to her st more precous,
the portrat of oussouf ey or, as to her t
ever seemed, of the young merchant adg,
whch was hdden beneath the fods of her robe,
whose tnt was of the softest bue that ever
spread ts a ure over the vaut of heaven.
s the recuse reached the threshod of
the pavon, he stumbed, and woud have faen,
had not the ready hand of the ga aba grasped
hs arm but recoverng hmsef n an nstant,
he bent before the ady wth sent and deep re-
spect and then tardy, and as t seemed, reuc-
tanty, obeyed her bddng and advanced to
the centre of the foor.
Ho r Dervsh commenced the Pasha s
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TH P H D UGHT . 197
daughter n a ow fant murmur orgve me
f l have dsturbed your sotude : l am unwor-
thy to ntrude upon your thoughts, or to entreat
your prayers and yet, f to soace a breakng
heart, and to gadden the poor remnant of a fe
whch s fast ebbng away, be a work ftted to
your pety, you w not grudge me the few
hours of communon whch l have been eager
to ensure. ah buyuk der the anges of
death are hoverng over me, and the ght of my
amp s we ngh e tngushed you not
speak peace to my sou ere t s caed to the
gddy brdge of rat you not
u hat my poor prayers may effect sha be
freey gven, ady sowy reped the Dervsh :
even now l w ask peace for you. nd
wavno- hs hand as f to deprecate a further
parey, he turned hs face towards Mecca, and
sank upon hs knees.
The maden ooked on hm as he knet wth a
feeng of deep and soemn nterest the saves
wthdrew to a sma nner apartment at a sg-
na from ther mstress and the ga aba, to
whom the scene afforded no amusement, and
whose cupdty was not awakened by the poverty
of a poor Dervsh, whe hs vgance appeared
to be to the fu as unnecessary as hs atten-
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198 TH M C TH H M.
dance, quety waked away to termnate an
unfnshed party of tre trac wth one of the
chaoushes, on whch depended a case of sweat-
meats presented to the attendants of the Pasha
by a departng guest.
The prayer of the Dervsh was probaby fer-
vent, but t was short for the deep stness
amd whch he coud dstncty hear the panfu
breathng of the maden had not endured many
nstants, when he rose from hs humbe posture
ony to assume one equay reverenta at the
feet of the gente gr, the edge of whose ve he
pressed to hs ps wth a the devoton of a
had| at the Prophet s shrne.
u ou are too young to de, ady he whs-
pered, n a tone as ow and gente as her own
The brght word, wth a ts buds and bos-
soms, ts sunshne, and ts bss, was made for
such as you. The grave s for the gray head
and the worn sprt despar s for the wretched
and the desoate you shoud be the chd of
aughter and of hope. Lfe has yet much to
charm one so far as you are.
r chey yok there s nothng : reped
the maden sady : l ask ony for peace for
ackgammon.
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TH P H daughter. 199
forgetfuness and l sha fnd them n the
grave.
orgetfuness echoed the Dervsh nd
what thought can have been traced upon the
y- eaves of a mnd so brght and beautfu as
|our s, so dark as to make memory a bot
ah were every morta sprt but as pure,
the we n of the Prophet had been an de toy.
Matap stened n wonder The austere de-
votee nstead of threatenngs was sheddng sun-
shne over her sou and she woud not nter-
rupt hm by a word.
Had such been possbe pursued the Der-
vsh, n one of those deep whspers whch are the
very voce of passonate tenderness from the ps
that are dear to us, but whch are merey musc
when murmured by a stranger to whom no
chord of our heart responds : Had such been
possbe l shoud have sad that your sckness
was of the sprt 5 that the sosun had a canker
hdden beneath ts eaves but ths cannot be
the beautfu daughter of a powerfu Pasha can
never sgh away her youth n dsappontment 1 1
and he paused, and ooked so earnesty up|n
her, that the crmson fush whch spread over
her brow and bosom was vsbe through her
Ly.
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2G0 TH M C TH H M.
ve. lt cannot be or, aas l shoud have
deemed that your maady was the same as that
of one who s dear to me as a brother, the un-
happy oussouf ey, who oved you, ady, as
he oved the brght heaven above hm as some-
thng haowed somethng hoy who woud
have poured out hs best bood before you, f
so he coud have won one sme one word
from your sweet ps who woud do so st,
even for a ghter boon.
The maden gasped for breath He must
not he dare not he woud break the heart
of hs young brde, who has oved hm, and
trusted n hm.
o brde w ever tread hs harem -foor, f she
come not from beneath the roof of Taat Pasha
sad the Dervsh hasty and earnesty He
has sworn by the sou of hs father, and by the
grave of hs mother, that he w wn no other.
Gh, say not so e camed Ma tap, pas-
sonatey pressng her casped hands upon her
heart, as she remembered the Merchant adg
h, say not so He s vowed to a gente gr
who woud wther beneath hs codness and her
msery woud be my work. d hm wed her,
ove her, cng to her through every change of
fortune, and make for hmsef a happness whch
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TH P H D UGHT . 201
l sha never know on earth. nd as she ut-
tered the ast words n a ow murmur that coud
scarcey be heard at the e tremty of the apart-
ment, her head sank on her breast, and a arge
drop stoe unbdden to her eye.
ou ove another then sad the Dervsh
and oussouf ey s sacrfced et pause,
ady, ere you re|ect a heart that ves n you
or answer me he pursued n a cear whs-
per, as agan he ga ed f edy on the astonshed
gr : te me as you vaue your hope of para-
dse, do you remember adg the haw-mer-
chant whom you once vsted at the han of
Damascus Deceve me not, for your fate s
bound up n your repy Ha t s so nd
he averted hs eyes as the far gr covered her
burnng face wth her hands, and burst nto
tears whe a strange e presson of wd deght
fashed over hs features.
ho are you gasped out the bewdered
Ma tap : ou, who have dared to ca up a
vson before me whch l have amost sacrfced
my fe to bansh peak she repeated pas-
sonatey, as she haf rose from the sofa, and
prepared to reca her attendants.
ne moment, ady, and but one urged
the Dervsh, as he grasped her arm before
k5
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202 TH M C TH H M.
you ca down run upon me. ess voent
revenge s n your power, where you may your-
sef mmoate the vctm the weapon of a hre-
ng woud be useess, absence w k sooner
than stee. l pered my fe to ook on you
once more 5 but l pered t cheerfuy for l am
adg the haw-merchant
adg r echoed the maden as she bent for-
ward, and ga ed wth a her sou s deep tender-
ness n her eyes upon the dsgused hawa|
( adg do l not dream P 1
Ts even l, sweet ady then drve me not
from your presence ony to e pre wth angush
have pty on my ove, on my devoton et
me dedcate to you a fe that woud be worth-
ess wthout the hope of your affecton te me
ony that my bodness s forgven. Let t not
be deemed a crme that l have sought to save
mysef from wretchedness, when even force
was used to compe me to a step aganst whch
my reason and my respect ake revoted.
Have you forgotten, ffendm asked the
Pasha s daughter, n as cod and stern a tone as
her struggng affecton woud permt her to as-
sume Have you forgotten that the step s a
ong one from the khan to the paace lnsha-
ah l am no pr e for the frst pgrm -mer-
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TH P H D UGHT . 203
chant who chances to deem hmsef a fttng
match for the atrap s ony chd.
l am rebuked, ady sad the young man
sady and l w ntrude my memory no
more upon you, l go ony to de and f T dd
not before e pre beneath the ustre of your
eyes, t was because l thought l read a ght n
them that bade me ve. ut n my bnd pre-
sumpton l have deceved mysef and the pe-
naty of my foy sha be pad/
Hod, madman amost shreked the
maden, graspng hs heavy coak as he rose sowy
from hs knee e l have much to ask of you,
and somethng to thank you for. nd frst
how come you n ths garb nd why dd you
dsappear so suddeny from the cty, ony to re-
turn thus
Most gracous ady murmured the deep
rch voce the unhappy adg spread out hs
|ewes before you, and eft n your hands the
portrat of the Pasha arm s son ony a few
months back and he hoped n hs nfatuated
passon, that even despte hs grey beard and hs
bent fgure you mght have recogn ed hm :
but hs presumpton was keeny punshed he
ony drank n a deader poson by ga ng on
you for a moment, and encreased hs despar
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29 TH M C TH H M.
unt he sank beneath t. hat then remaned
to hm othng, save the khrkheh of a
Dervsh, and the hope of ookng on you from a
dstance as you passed aong the cty streets t
was tte for one who oved ke adg, but t
was a for whch he cared to ve and, ady, l
am here.
nd you were then the |ewe-merchant
and you know a my weakness e camed the
maden wth a fresh burst of tears but words
are de, adg the Pasha may break hs
daughter s heart, but he w never gve her to
a hawa|. 1
et w l not compan, Lght of the
ord whspered the young man, as he rose to
hs knee, and possessed hmsef of the hand of the
bewdered gr even athough l am not the
adg whom your pure sprt had enshrned n
ts cam depths, and who has caed forth those
precous drops of tenderness. l am ndeed he
whom you vsted at the han he who dared
to forward to you a toy whch was ntended to
reca hs memory he who cheated you wth
a gray head and a fauterng tongue nto ookng
upon hs keness he, n short, who knees be-
fore you n the garb of honess and sef-dena
and whom you once re|ected as unworthy of
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TH pasha s daughter. 205
your ove l am oussouf, the son of arm
Pasha/
fant shrek escaped the ps of the maden,
and she hasty drew the portrat from her bo-
som, and ganced from the vory to her sutor,
and from hm back upon the pcture and as,
despte hs dsguse, she ndeed recogn ed ts
orgna n the kneeng fgure besde her, she
suffered the portrat to fa from her hand, whch
was nstanty pressed to the ps and brow
of the young ey.
lt s enough he whspered and l am
forgven. The past s nothng, the present s
your presence, the future s the hope of your
affecton. Lght has agan broke upon the sou
of one whose sprt had ong been dark. ne
word, hour of my heart s paradse but one, and
l am your save for ever l 1
e brm what can l say 1 murmured the
far Ma tap, as her head drooped upon the
shouder of her over : sha be even as my
ord ws. l am the gunech-tchchey, and he
s the sun where he moves l foow he s my
fe, and my ght my eyes and my sou are but
hs shadows.
The Dervsh shorty afterwards qutted the
unfower.
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206 TH M C TH H M.
harem of Taat Pasha and wth hm fed a
the goom and tears of the gente Matap nor
dd many weeks eapse ere oussouf ey agan
appeared n the cty as the sutor of the atrap s
daughter, and ths tme he dd not sue n van
whe none save he and hs far brde, (from
whom l had the tae) ever dreamt that the pre-
sence of the pous Dervsh n the garden-pa-
von, had any share n nfuencng a marrage
whch spread |oy and harty throughout two
provnces.
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TH M C TH H M. 207
P T lll.
CH PT |.
Deovetn sat May you encrease n
prosperty sad the Pasha, as the Greek gr
concuded her tae our Ma tap s we wor-
thy of attenton though ah t was un-
seemy n a atrap s daughter to bend her
thoughts on a mere hawa|.
h | say not so tendery e camed the
ovey save: ho can controu the heart
The ocean- waves are not bound even by bands
of ron : the sands of the desart cannot be
steaded when the smoom s abroad, even by
the foundatons of a cty how then can the
affectons be controued or guded The wd
steed upon the mountan spurns the bt, and the
free sprt brooks no controu. nd wthout
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208 TH M C TH H M.
watng a repy, she burst at once nto a gush of
song whose meody swept through the chamber.
h the heart s a free and a fetteress thng,
wave of the ocean a brd on the wng
rderess steed o er the desart-pan boundng,
pea of the storm o er the vaey resoundng
lt spurns at a bonds, and t mocks the decree
f the word and ts proud ones, and dares to be free
h the heart may be tamed by a sme or a tone
rom the p and the eye of a beautfu one
ut the frown and the force wth ts mpuse contendng,
ver fnd t as adamant, cod and unbendng
lt may break, t may burst, but ts tyrants w see
That even n run t dares to be free
evertheess : perssted the Pasha ( no
woman has a rght to say, ma odum, 1 and
to pne away wthout the permsson of her
father. th a man t s otherwse he s the
ord of hmsef, and s accountabe to no one
but a woman s beauty s her best dowry, and
obedence her frst duty.
The far Carmf sghed, and the Greek gr
smed: one mourned the thra of her own
sprt, and the other scoffed at the de sef-
suffcency of the pampered Pasha.
heker ah contnued the atrap
our women sedom thnk for themseves and
thus when they venture 1o do so, they become
l have faen n ove.
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TH M C TH H M. 209
the sub|ect of a tae. ut what s wrtten, s
wrtten and we w tak no more of ths sef-
wed young hour. t sunset the ame w
be here and my frend the Tchorbad| tes me
that they are as far as the daughters of Perstan.
ou w ove to ook on them, |anum my
sou he sad, n a softer tone, turnng towards
the angud Carmf, whe he ganced at the
dark eyed atnka and l am assured that they
have among them a massad|he who s a word s
wonder. akaum we sha see l doubt
much whether she w e ce our own sprghty
Greek.
o, no sad the beautfu Crcassan
there s no tongue whch makes musc ke
that of my beoved atnka she s the bubu
of the harem, the rose of the garden, the da-
mond of the mne she s my eyes, and my fe.
nd l asked the atrap, wth a sght
tone of asperty.
hat sha l say answered Carmf, as
she bowed her far head upon her bosom you
are my ord, and my master. l thnk of you as
the had| thnks of the hoy caba you are
the oran of my fath, but she s the poetry of
my e stence.
The Tempe of Mecca.
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210 TH M C TH H M.
Chok tatecn you are very gracous
smed atnka l ask ony to be the sster of
your sou. nd she ooked e pressvey at
the atrap s brde, whose cheek and brow fushed
wth conscous crmson but these ame
l dread them they w rob me of your smes
and shoud they be ndeed as far as they are
panted, perhaps of your ove aso. nd her
gance wandered from the ady to the atrap.
ah there s tte danger sad the
Pasha, returnng the ga e wth nterest. The
ame what are they y vah are they
not bosh nothng wanderng from house to
house, wth ght smes and uncovered faces
Havan der they are anmas and though
they may be as far as hours, they have eaten
too much drt to be remembered when they have
receved ther backshsh, and passed out of the
harem. 1
hemduah murmured atnka, n a
ow tone, whch reached ony the ear for whch
t was ntended, that of the sententous atrap
Let them come then, for the echoes of the
harem have not of ate been awakened by the
sounds of mrth. l am often sad mysef 1 and
she passed her hand across her brow wth a
pretty affectaton of anguor, whch we became
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TH M C TH H M. 211
the e presson of her nobe features though
perchance l shoud chde my own heart for ts
weakness.
M Ha, ha true, true, you shoud be gay
sad the Pasha, noddng hs head sgnfcanty :
you are surrounded by fowers, and fountans,
and musc, and you shoud be gay.
The Greek gr se ed her ebec, and swept
her hand across t, as though smtten by a
sudden pang : the chords vbrated for an nstant
from the voence of the contact, and then trem-
bed nto sence, as the sweet voce of the
muscan fe softy and sady upon the ears of
her steners.
rght and bue s the summer sky
nd ts sweet neath the custerng boughs to e,
nd to watch the ght vapours as they gance
Lke fary dreams o er the pure e panse
ut oh n those hours of cam deght,
hen the word and ts cares are forgotten qute,
That the charm may be a perfect one,
e must not watch aone
d and stern s the tempest hour,
hen the storm-god rdes n hs car of power,
hen the wnds make voca the ocean caves,
nd death rdes throned on the crested waves
nd oh f we woud defy the shock
f the bowy sea on the caverned rock
nd yed to oar fate wthout a groan,
e must not de aone
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212 TH M C TH H M.
Cam s the sunset s goden spe,
s t steeps n spendour each wood and fe,
ngng wreaths of gems over eaves and Howers.
nd pantng the starry |asmne bowers
ut vany ts gory foods the sky,
lf ony one turn an uprased eye
To mark the brght vson ere ts fown
or fe s oveest thngs
Droop ther fantng wngs,
hen we ook on them aone
The song of atnka saddened the Pasha s
wfe but the Pasha hmsef, for whom t was es-
pecay ntended, was qute unconscous of ts
sentment and merey remarkng that the ar
was du and monotonous, and that sometmes
sotude was preferabe to socety, he ntmated
hs ntenton to return to the saemek, to make
hs evenng mea, and to en|oy hs evenng
sumber before the arrva of the ame a
resouton whch he shorty afterwards carred
nto effect to the great satsfacton of the far
nmates of the harem.
Men s apartments.
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TH M C TH H M. 213
CH PT ll.
t the set of sun evreste and her far band
stood on the threshod of the Pasha s paace.
Manoopoo and the gracefu Mherprwr waked
sde by sde, and both were absorbed n thought.
The dancng- gr nether wept nor sghed, though
she knew that the roof beneath whch she stood
covered the do of a heart that she woud have
ded to secure but she ga ed desparngy on
the young Greek through her ve, as though n
that ong ook she woud have concentrated her
whoe e stence. The emoton of Manoopoo
was of a more m ed and ess devoted cha-
racter hs puses bounded ndeed, as he re-
membered that he shoud ere ong behod hs
gente Carmf : the frst dream of hs manhood,
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21 TH M C TH H M.
the brghtest vson of hs sprt but bent wth
ove for her, came fears for hs own safety fears
whch made hs p quver, and hs bran burn.
lt was perhaps fortunate for hm that hs re-
fectons tended to subdue hs passonate mpa-
tence for the ga aba, who detested every
ncurson on hs master s harem as pousy as any
|eaous Mosem coud desre, turned a searchng,
and by no means ovng eye, upon each of the
ame as they passed hm and assuredy the
uncertan and tmd step of the young Greek
sub|ected hm to no suspcon.
tedous hour was passed by the band n an
ant-room, through whch the negroes of the
househod came and went on ther dfferent ms-
sons whe a few ders grouped themseves
about the strangers, admrng ther dresses,
and askng a thousand questons, whch were
answered by evreste wth a tact that woud
not have dsgraced a dpomatst.
ut at ength the e pected summons arrved,
and the dancng- grs were conducted through a
ong gaery to the nner door of the harem
where, prostratng themseves to the earth, they
awated the order of the ady to advance nto the
apartment. They were a ovey groupe wth
ther fowng ves, ong tresses, and pcturesque
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TH M C TH H M. 215
costumes ther whte arms geamng ke sea-
foam, and ther dark eyes fashng out ke me-
teors and for the frst moment the Pasha s
wfe was sent wth admraton but the tran-
story surprse once over she receved them
genty and gracousy, and bade them approach
wthout fear.
s evreste ed them on n obedence to the
command of the far Crcassan, Manoopoo
ventured for the frst tme to gance n the drec-
ton of the sweet and we-known voce. Carmf
Hanoum was seated on the edge of a gorgeous
sofa, gtterng wth god frnge, and gay wth em-
brodery and at her feet recned hs beautfu
sster powed upon a pe of cushons. The
Pasha was enthroned on the gorgeous dvan
hs chbouque between hs ps, hs |eweed
hand oosey graspng ts sender tube, and hs
haf-cosed eyes gvng assurance of the tranqu-
ty or apathy of hs sprt. ehnd hm stood
two negroes, rchy cad, wth turbans and gr-
des of cachemre of the rchest dyes whe the
femae saves of the harem were custered toge-
ther at the e tremty of the apartment, whch
was brghty ghted up by a number of tapers,
arranged on sma tabes of nad wood n
dfferent parts of the saoon.
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216 TH M C TH H M.
The centre of the foor was vacant and there
the dancng-grs at once took ther stand, and
grouped themseves n the most gracefu and
pcturesque atttudes. Three of the number
knet upon the carpet wth ther s - strnged
ebecs on ther knees the remander stood
around them, some wth ther chapetted heads
fung back, and ther whte arms rased hgh
n ar, whe the sver bes of ther tam-
bournes rang out ke fary-chmes : others
bendng ghty forward, wth one foot barey
touchng the foor, n the atttude of stenng,
ke the nymphs of Dana on the doubtfu track
of some ght- hoofed fawn : and others agan,
angudy supportng each other n a sweet re-
pose, such as the hours en|oy n the rose-
boomng bowers of Paradse.
Mashaah murmured the Pasha beneath
hs breath : ts a vson of Corkam They
are ke the stars of a summer nght, the one
oveer than the other and, a together,
enough to ght up a word. hemduah
Mahomet was a great prophet
Ths revere was nterrupted by the sudden
peang out of the voces and nstruments of the
Paradse.
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TH M C TH H M. 217
dancng-grs, as a do en of the band, ed by the
beautfu Mherprwr, commenced ther ntrcate
and gracefu evoutons. The dance tod a tae of
ove there was the swft pursut, the reuctant
fght, the earnest suppcaton, the tmd dssent,
the mpassoned eagerness, the yedng affecton
and as the ast twr of the tambournes made
the ar voca, a the band were kneeng at the
feet of ther hgh prestess, the gente Mher-
prwr, hodng towards her the otus-wreaths
wth whch they had been crowned.
fern, afern we done, we done l e -
camed the atrap, started out of hs apathy by
the enchantng spectace : u bdoo, f them
each a fe|ane of sherbet for, by the sou of
my father they are pers l have sad t.
The negro obeyed and as each far gr bent
her head to the atrap, and touched the chrsta
gobet wth her ps, the eyes of Manoopoo
and hs sster met n a ong m e whch reveaed
ther secret. or a moment atnka trembed,
but her s was not a sou to shake at shadows
and she recovered hersef before the fush had
faded from her brow, suffcenty to remark that
her brother ooked gorousy handsome n hs
dsguse, and that the attenton of the unsus-
Cup.
L. lll. L
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218 TH M C TH H M.
pectng and ess observant Carmf mght be
safey drawn to hm wthout a rsk of hs ds-
covery a crcumstance whch woud enabe her
to arouse n ther subsequent conversatons a
thousand tender memores that woud bend
most happy wth the vson of the dark-browed
awa of the ame.
Her resouton formed, she ooked up towards
her beautfu frend, who bent over her to catch
the words whch she fet were hoverng on her
ps, and softy whspered : Look at the gr
n the centre of the group she wth the wow
wast, and ga ee eyes by the nstrument n
her hand she must be an awa saw you ever
such a face The rest of the band are as faded
es besde her
The Pasha s wfe ganced towards the ds-
gused edka as she had been desred and by
a strange concdence, at that very moment, so
dd the Pasha aso. The wfe ooked ong and
earnesty, for there was an e presson n the
dark wd eyes of the sngng-gr whch strangey
moved her, though she coud not account for the
emoton that they e cted : and the husband dd
so kewse, from a feeng of admraton as
ntense as t was nvountary.
Manoopoo was attred n a robe of deep
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TH M C TH H M. 219
crmson, over whch foated a ght ve of the
most decate a ure custers of sweet-scented
fowers, among whch the tube-rose and the hya-
cnth were conspcuous, hung oosey n hs har,
and rested upon hs cheeks. Hs ampe schavar,
(or trowsers) of tssue, conceaed hs feet and
on hs knees he supported the gay-nad nstru-
ment wth whch he was accustomed to accom-
pany hs baads. esde hm ay a tambourne,
and n hs grde he carred a tusbee of orange-
wood, and an embrodered handkerchef.
The dffcuty of hs poston rendered hm
cautous and thus hs bent head and downcast
eyes were as gente and femnne as hs cos-
tume.
The Pasha was by no means an amateur of
musc, and he had atey earnt to ove t ony
from the ps of atnka he stened, therefore,
rather from courtesy than ncnaton to the
ove-dtty, whch, at the bddng of evreste,
the dsgused edka murmured out n a ow
and tender tone, that caed tears to the eyes of
the women and when the song ceased, t was
matter of ndfference to the far Carmf how
the e hbton proceeded, for her sprt was n
tumut, and she knew that her over was before
her.
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220 TH M C TH H M.
s he frst prepared to obey hs task-mstress,
Manoopoo, bendng ow over hs ebec, trfed
for a moment among ts strngs and softy com-
menced :
l ve heard of ses beyond the sea,
here summer nether fas nor fa
then suddeny shakng hs head mournfuy, ke
one who dares not reca a ong-forgotten stran,
he struck at once nto a Persan ove-song whch
dverted the attenton of hs steners, and ena-
bed the trembng Crcassan to recover her
sef-possesson.
Pek ah, Pek ah very we, very we, sad
a fua Pasha, as the song ceased lt s not
bad but we have a bubu n our own harem, who
has a sweeter note. Take the ebec, eya
he added, gancng down upon the Greek gr
and we w show ths pensve awa the musc
of our dstant provnce.
atnka took up her nstrument wth affected
reuctance and measured the dancng-grs wth
her proud eye, as f to mpy that she fet
degraded by beng compeed to e hbt her
taent by ther company and then, meeky
bowng her obedence to the atrap, she turned
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TH M C TH H M. 221
a ong ook upon her adventurous brother, and
commenced her song.
here s my oved one h, whsper me where
t the end of the earth l w seek for her there
ls she throned on a gem n some |ewe-t cave
Does she rde on the foam of some snow-crested wave
Does she foat ke a coud through the regons of ar
My sou and my sprt w foow her there
h the gobe s too narrow to hde what we ove
nd the bow beow, and the vapour above
or the heart s a gude that ne er fants on the way,
That cares not to sumber, and asks not to stay
Let the worshpped one dwe n earth, ocean, or ar
The sprt that oves her, w foow her there
Cbok chay, smed the Pasha, as the far
save body ooked towards hm for appause :
( that s much and we enough to sng to a
ebec n an hour of deness but hemduah
t s mere poetry and madness. ow, te me,
mother : he contnued addressng evreste :
have you not a Massad| n your troop The
Tchorbad| ffend taked to me of a maden
whose subte tongue coud enchan the ear of
attenton, and charm the mnd nto forgetfuness.
Let her speak but, ashustun l w have no
more mawksh sentment et there be some
kef n the tae, or t w set me to seep.
Cheerfuness.
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222 TH M C TH H M.
aah bah, your hghness sha be
obeyed sad the od woman peak, e dka
my ord stens/
ha l tak to the nobe atrap of ove,
when he cares not to hear t named sad
anoopoo gravey steferaah heaven
forbd lt s a threadbare sub|ect whch may
we be cast away ke a tattered garment every
one has worn t once, but t sedom sts com-
fortaby and thus t gets fung from one to the
other unt t s known to a, and tte cared for
by any some thnk, ndeed, that they wear t,
when they have foded themseves n a tunc of
qute another fashon but as they sedom ds-
cover the cheat whch they have put upon ther
own shouders, they wak the ba ars as erect n
ther motey, as though t were true coth of
god. l w, however, snce my ord sees ft,
at once change the sub|ect and reate to hm
the dventures of the arber of assora.
lnshaah at ast we sha hear somethng
worth stenng to sad the atrap: l ke
the tte of the tae vasty : t smacks of every-
day fe tchapouk, tchapouk, quck, quck
et the caam of memory move rapdy, and you
sha have no reason to regret your vst to the
harem of a fua Pasha.
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TH M C TH H M. 223
Heaven fuf the promse of your Hgh-
ness sad Manoopoo sgnfcanty and,
amd the most perfect stness, wth the beautfu
and agtated Carmf mmedatey before hm,
and the sad and gente Mherprwr at hs sde,
he thus began hs narraton.
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22 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT lll.
TH D TU TH
.
ln the famous cty of assora, about a hun-
dred years ago, ved a worthy khama, named
Husref, who was remarkabe, frst for hs m-
mense strength of musce, whch enabed hm to
carry upon hs back the oads of two men and
some, ndeed, went so far as to say, the adng of
an ass and for the fact of never havng become
the father of a chd whch had not some na-
tura defect.
There was Med|d the one-eyed ffat the
one-sded Cham the three-fngered Me vr
the bow-egged f the hare-pped and
Moctaeb the eft-handed. These were hs
sons and though hs wfe Mne,-)- who was the
treet-porter. f name.
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TH . 225
ony chd of a sgn-panter, had been one of the
prettest grs n the somewhat obscure street n
whch she resded, he was not one wht more
fortunate wth hs daughters. D|ame was
hump-backed, Haf e was red-hared, Lbabe
was ceebrated for a mp, and enp was stone
deaf. ln short, t coud not be dened that they
were a remarkabe famy.
th ten chdren, and about as many paras
a day, a man cannot be consdered to be per-
fecty ndependant and poor Husref accord-
ngy sometmes ate hs oves wthout bread, and
generay hs bread wthout cavare but, some-
how or other, a the chdren contrved to ve
on, beng occasonay permtted to punge ther
hands nto the pauf of a neghbour, when they
never faed to ava themseves freey of the pr-
vege. Mne grumbed a good dea, t s true
and sedom faed to remnd her husband when
he returned home after hs day s abour, that,
had she marred the oda-bash of the Pasha s
guard, who was ked n an encounter wth a
predatory trbe of rabs, and whose wdow had
been pensoned by the atrap, nstead of a beg-
gary khama, who dared not wag hs beard be-
fore the meanest functonary of the cty, she
Corpora.
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p
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226 TH M C TH H M.
shoud have been as great a person as Habtou-
ah, the wfe of Marsouk the meon-merchant,
whose ferd|he had been twce new-ned snce
her marrage whe her own was droppng nto
such hoes that she shoud not ong be abe to
wak the ba ar for very shame. he had many
other tte compants aso, as unpeasant as they
were useess, wth whch shedurnay regaed hs
ears but the phosophc Husref heeded them
not the heart of Mne was reeved by these
outpourngs of her dscontent and her voce
generay set the weary khama to seep, despte
the nose of the ten chdren, who were a as
spot, as happy, as drty, and as ragged, as any
domestc coony n that remote quarter of the cty.
Thus the famy of Husref the khama,
mght atogether be sad to prosper for when
peope contnue for years to scod to seep, and
to treat fortune ke the sorry |ade that she s,
they cannot be consdered as qute wretched
and, n ths way, constanty scrambng up the
sandh of fe, sometmes bured up to hs neck,
and sometmes obtanng a momentary footng,
the husband of Mne the regretfu, contnued to
to, and bear, and forbear, unt hs ten ch-
oman s coak.
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p
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TH . 227
dren began to grow nto men and women about
hm.
Matters now became serous. hat was to be
done wth them Husref uttered many an
lnshaah but fath aone woud not suppy
them wth empoyment and the deep respra-
tons of the an ous khama, as he bent under
hs oad, were now frequenty engthened nto
sghs.
bout ths tme a herbet|he, whose mother
was the frend and gossp of Mne, demanded
hs daughter Haf e n marrage, and he gave
her as freey as he woud have gven a draught
of water to a thrsty had|. Good fortune s
better than god and a week or two after the
marrage of the red-hared maden, a erud|he of
the neghbourhood offered to engage hs son
Me vr n hs stabes, when the bow-egged youth
at once found hmsef provded wth food, abour,
and a good bed of dhourra-eaves. # ffat the
one-sded, estabshed hmsef as the keeper of a
khan n the neghbourhood of hs father s house,
by dong a the duty of a bent and crpped od
man, who ooked as though he were coeva wth
ts was, unt the day of hs death, when he be-
queathed hs keys, hs wardrobe, hs besom, hs
lndan corn.
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#
p
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228 TH M C TH H M.
fagged shed, and hs ten paras a day, to the
young vounteer who at once decared hmsef
ndependent, and commenced pferng the tra-
veers who frequented the caravansera, and
ceanng the court, on hs own account.
ths was truy gratfyng to the paterna
prde of the khama and he congratuated
hmsef n the contentment of hs heart, that hs
sons were n a far way to rse n the word, and
to become men of mark. ln the e uberance of
hs satsfacton he frequenty forgot that there
were st eght of hs progeny at home but the
fact was soon forced upon hs memory as he
passed hs narrow porta, and bent hs head that
he mght not strke t aganst the door-s, by the
upbradngs of hs wfe, and the uproar and tu-
mut of hs growng famy.
Thngs were n ths state when one day, as
Husref was eanng aganst the trunk of an aca-
ca tree whch overshadowed the wooden terrace
of a coffee-shop near the meat-market, en|oyng
the fumes of a u ury whch he dd not at that
moment possess a para to procure a stranger
descended from a |aded mue, not twenty paces
from hm, and throwng the brde to a serud|he
who attended hm, bade hm take back the
beast, and awat hm at the house of the person
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p
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TH . 229
he had named on ther arrva n the cty whe
at the same tme, he beckoned to Husref to re-
eve the man of a moderatey s ed cypress-
wood bo , whch rested on the neck of hs own
beast.
The khama obeyed wth aacrty and
havng possessed hmsef of the chest, carefuy
deposted t on the ground to awat the further
commands of hs new empoyer.
aah you have a strong arm, hama
sad the stranger, whom, from hs garb, Husref
supposed to be a Persan ou are the very
man l want. Here are ten pastres f and as he
spoke he paced them n the hand of the astonshed
porter, who had not been master of such a sum
for years d the cafe|e here gve you a cup
of coffee, that your heart may be as ght as
your arm s steady and then away wth you to
the southern sde of the Great Mosque, and there
awat me, takng care not to ose sght of the
bo .
The deghted khama ost not a moment n
obeyng ths command. He swaowed the coffee,
sauted the stranger wth a fervent ah es
maradek shoudered the chest, and started
off at a ght trot for the Great Mosque of the
cty.
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#
p
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230 TH M C TH H M.
Ten pastres for traversng a stada ength
of the street he murmured |oyousy as he
moved aong and wth a mere feather-weght
on my shouder why l must surey have faen
n wth aroon hmsef ah my feech s
brght to-day. hat sha l say to Mne lf
l te her that l have earned ten pastres, they
w met ke snow before the sun, for she w
fancy hersef a hama-bash s wfe o, no l
w say two and wth two pastres we sha
sup we.
Havng made ths prudent resouton, the con-
tented Husref |ogged aong, communng wth
hs own thoughts, unt he reached the prncpa
mosque when takng up the poston whch had
been ndcated to hm by the stranger, he paced
the chest on the ground, and squattng hmsef
besde t, removed hs turban from hs head, and
conceaed among ts ragged fods the eght
pastres whch were to be the commencement of
a hoard, amassed from the produce of as many
such proftabe adventures as the present, as t
mght pease ah to provde for hm.
n hour passed away an hour of u ury to
the to-worn Husref, who had never once
changed hs poston save to pck up a con
whch was fung to hm by a rank traveer,
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p
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TH . 231
who seeng hm seated there, covered wth rags,
and deep n thought, threw hm a pece of
money as a matter of course, and passed on.
The lnfde dog s sub|ected by my feech:
murmured Husref, as he possessed hmsef of
the con Ths s to be a whte day. nd
what sha l do wth ths pastre sha l te
Mne that l brng her three or sha l concea
ths aso n my turban or sha l and he
ganced across the narrow street sha l f
my bag wth gebe, and smoke a comfortabe
ppe or two of the strong-savoured Lataka
Chok chay that s much : t sha be so. nd
havng frst ganced n every drecton to ascer-
tan that no person was passng to carry off hs
trust, he shuffed aong at hs best speed to a
shop n the neghbourhood, where he purchased
a modest quantty of the coveted u ury, and
then returned and re estabshed hmsef besde
the chest.
Consteaton.
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p
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232 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l .
TH D TU TH -
contnued.
The chbouque was soon ghted and as the
heavy fumes of the strong and coarse tobacco
cured over hs beard, the happy Husref, wth a
|oyous feeng of secret prosperty, began to
muse on hs famy affars.
Two sons and a daughter respectaby es-
tabshed eght pastres among the fods of my
turban, wth ffteen paras of change from the
gebe n my grde hekur ah Husref
the khama w yet rse n the word. ut my
dear son Moctaeb my favourte son, y the
beard of the Prophet hs fortune s as eft-
handed as hmsef, or hs fne eyes woud ere
ths have fed hs grde wth |eb-kharg
Pocket-money.
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p
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TH . 233
omethng must be done for Moctaeb he de-
sres to be a barber, and nothng coud be bet-
ter but the shop, the soap, the ra ors, the
towes, and the basns, must be pad for and
where s the money P 1
Ths was an uncomfortabe queston, for t
was one to whch the an ous father coud not
satsfactory repy, and he therefore dd the best
thng whch coud be done under such crcum-
stances he determned to eave the matter to
Provdence, and to thnk of somethng ese.
The ne t sub|ect of contempaton that he
seected coud not have been a very entertanng
one, for he was |ust droppng off to seep, when
an acquantance who chanced to be passng wth
a arge basn n hs hand, roused hm once more
nto conscousness by offerng to share wth hm
a copous draught of bo a whch had |ust been
gven to hm n payment of some servce that he
had rendered to a cafe|he.
The khama dd not hestate to accept the
offer: and hs frend, havng frst secured hs
own share, handed the basn to Husref, who
empted t at a draught and the man havng
passed on, he resumed hs revere, whch, bend-
ng wth the nto catng fumes of the bo a, soon
strong beverage, composed of rak, pmento, and mnt.
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p
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23 TH M C TH H M.
competey overpowered hm. Hs head sank
on the chest, hs mbs became rea ed, hs
breathng heavy, and n fve seconds he was dead
aseep.
How ong he had been n the and of dreams
he knew not, when he was suddeny aroused by
the fearfu cry of an guen var and the
harsh stroke of the ron-tpped staff of the fre-
guard on the rude pavement of the street. He
nstnctvey started from the earth, and rubbed
hs eyes as he perceved that he was surrounded
by a ptchy darkness, through whch he ganced
about hm to dscover the drecton of the fre
a fact whch he had no sooner ascertaned, than
n the confuson of the moment, totay for-
gettng the chest, and amost hs own dentty,
he rushed forward to the scene of run, and was
soon busy empoyed n renderng assstance to
the sufferers,
hen, after the apse of an hour, he re-
membered the bo , and hurredy returned to
the spot where he had eft t, t was too ate
the chest was gone
Husref dashed hs turban upon the earth, and
amost yeed n the agony of hs sprt. How
shoud he face hs empoyer he, who had be-
There s a fre.
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p
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TH . 235
trayed hs trust. How shoud he take hs stand
on the accustomed spot He who was no
onger worthy of confdence who had backened
hs own face through hs ntemperate foy and
scattered drt n hs beard
he he thus bttery reproached hmsef, he
heard a step rapdy approachng he ooked
desparngy n the drecton whence t sounded,
and behed the stranger wthn haf a do en
paces of hm, n the gray ght of the dawn.
Hade come aong, khama sad the
we-remembered voce l have made you
keep a ong vg, but t sha not be an unpro-
ftabe one. ut what s ths P he e camed,
hurredy gancng round : here s the
chest
The affrghted Husref sank upon hs knees,
and wth quverng ps reated the whoe hs-
tory of hs msfortune. The stranger stened
an ousy, and at the concuson of the story, he
broke nto a ow and btter augh, as he mur-
mured beneath hs breath |ab the krs
s wecome to hs pr e he knew not hs own
errand, and has saved us some abour. ork-
ma, fear not, my frend you are forgven
but ook we to yoursef n future, and when
Thef.
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#
p
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236 TH M C TH H M.
you have a treasure n charge, beware of bo a.
you promse me ths
ashustun on my head be t sad
Husref emphatcay : l am the save of my
ord for ever. l am ess than a dog before hm
and here and as he spoke, he took off hs
ragged turban whence he drew the hdden
pastres, to whch he added those whch he
carred n hs no ess ragged grde here are
the wages that l have forfeted by my mad
foy. The vaue of the chest l cannot repace
for l am poor, mseraby poor, and l have a wfe
and eght chdren under my squad roof who
ook to me for bread whe l possess but ffteen
paras n the word. Have mercy on me, ffen-
dm, for those ffteen paras are my a.
Put up your money sad the stranger,
turnng asde hs hand Do you take me for
as great a brgand as the pe evenk who has run
off wth our chest of cy press- wood ut your
eght chdren we must tak of ths l w ac-
company you to your house
House f echoed the dsmayed khama t
s a hove my ord cannot pass under such a
roof.
Ge, ge come, come no more of ths
smed the stranger l have taken a kng to
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TH . 237
you, n spte of the strong bo a, and the stoen
bo . l must see these eght chdren and l
have aready fasted many hours here s god
et your wfe prepare for me a pauf of chcken
we spced, and purchase a rug for me to e
down upon, and a prayer-carpet to enabe me to
perform my devotons, unt l estabsh mysef
esewhere. l wsh to avod the pubc khans.
My ord s w s mne sad Husref, be-
wdered by the e traordnary nature of the
proposa, and the contempaton of a chcken-
pauf prepared at hs own manga but l
have a son, a youth of dscreton and honesty,
who s keeper of a khan not ffty paces from my
poor dweng, who woud ay hs forehead n the
dust before the savour of hs father and t s
so ong a tme snce Mne has tred her sk n
the cookng of a chcken
That ths mornng she w prepare two for
us, that the task may be more easy nterrupted
the stranger and now, et us away at once,
for the sun s rsng above the cty was, and
we have both passed a busy nght.
nd so sayng he gathered hs coak about
hm, and turned n the drecton ndcated by the
astonshed Husref.
bra er contanng heated charcoa.
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238 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT .
TH D TU TH -
contnued.
The hama and hs companon proceeded
sowy aong the narrow and goomy streets of
the cty unt they reached the quarter n whch
stood the squad habtaton of the bewdered
Husref. s they made ther way, the stranger
asked a thousand questons reatng to the famy
of the porter, the number of hs chdren mar-
red and unmarred, the age and temper of
hs wfe, and the persona appearance of hs
daughters and he coud not concea hs amuse-
ment when the confdng Husref, warmed nto
good feowshp by the condescenson of hs
statey empoyer, mparted to hm the snguar
uck whch had attended a hs progeny, and
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TH . 239
the sea that had been set upon each at ts
brth.
t Mashaah ts ke an rab tae smed
the stranger they brought a name nto the
word wth them, and you mght have saved
yoursef the troube of gvng them a second.
However, somethng must be done, and l at
once adopt Moctaeb as my own chd for he
has the same defect as mysef, and as l have
never found that t affected my fortunes, nether
ought t to mar those of your favourte son. ,,
6 ah buyuk der apostropnsed the de-
ghted khama what am l that my ord
shoud repay my transgresson of the past nght
by a beneft of whch l am too bnd to see the
mt ut, yavash, ffendmou here s a
kbaub-shop, where l sha do we to turn a
porton of your god nto food. l w make my
bargan, and be wth you n a moment but l
must go aone, or the bash pe evenk w make
me pay wth my eyes for a hs dantes.
The stranger nodded acquescence and the
happy Husref, assumng a consequenta ar,
consequent on the contact of the con whch he
hed cosey pressed aganst hs horny pam,
stept gravey across the swon and unsavoury
Great rogue.
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2 0 TH M C TH H M.
kenne that ntersected the street, to the temptng
counter of the kbaub-merchant.
Here he ga ed for awhe n u urous nde-
cson, covetng every thng, and purchasng no-
thng, unt he was aroused by the remonstrance
of the deaer, who demanded angry why he dd
not pursue hs path, nstead of goatng over hs
edbes, and, perhaps, for aught he knew to the
contrary, nfectng hs food by the nfuence of
the v ye at the very openng of the shutters.
e stersne what do you want an-
swered the khama mpatenty l come here
as a customer Gve me a basn of tchorba,
a dsh of domas,f a ump of keftas,| haf a
do en quas for the pauf, as many kbaub
skewers, haf an oke of tchava, a do en fe-
tyrs, an d a chcken.
|ab ust t s wonderfu sad the mer-
chant, strokng down hs we-trmmed and bushy
beard a khama body orders the repast of
a Pasha but the pastres where are they
The customer reped by sowy openng hs
fngers, and dspayng the pece of god.
u Chokehay that s much sad the kbaub-
oup. f as made of rce and chopped meat.
orce meat. composton of four, hone)-, and o.
Thn cakes eaten warm, wth honey or sugar.
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TH . 2 1
merchant now, we w to busness. nd
wthout further deay he began to pack the
requred dantes nto a sma basket.
hen the artces were safey arranged, the
barganng commenced, and the asseveratons of
the deaer, who swore usty by hs beard that
he was amost gvng away hs property, had
not the sghtest effect upon the khama who,
when he found that the kbaub-merchant was
determned to hod out unt the ast moment,
gravey remarked that there were other shops n
the cty whose owners had the fear of the Pro-
phet before ther eyes, and turned towards the
door. Hs departure was, however, by no means
to be permtted and, accordngy, after a tte
more wrangng, the god con of the stranger
was changed, the basket shoudered by the
khama, and hmsef sturdy on hs way to re-
|on hs empoyer.
ln a short tme after the purchase was made,
Husref stopped at the threshod of hs dweng.
lt was the remnant of what had once been a
substanta and spacous house, but tme and
fre had eft t tte more than a toUerng and
backened wreck. Portons of wa, of a thck-
ness whch mght apparenty have defed des-
tructon, were st vsbe but the prncpe part
L. lll. M
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2 2 TH M C TH H M.
of the structure had been composed of wood,
and a that now remaned, save the rude and
sod bocks of masonry aready auded to, were
rreguary shaped and smoky-ookng spaces,
cumbered wth rubbsh and creepng pants, and
grm wth run. ched among these unnvtng
recs of bygone comfort, and eanng aganst
one of the remanng fragments of wa, rose the
wooden tenement of Husref the khama, ke the
abode of the presdng genus of destructon
and through the -hung door of ths squad
dweng dd he ead the stranger who, how-
ever he mght have prepared hmsef for the
sght of poverty and dscomfort, found that the
reaty far outran hs antcpatons.
The hove conssted of one mmense roughy-
paved apartment, a porton beng screened off
for the harem by a tme-worn curtan of ba e,
attached to the ceng and was by huge skewers
of tough wood. ot an effort at ornament or
even comfort was vsbe a was beak, cheeress,
uncompromsng poverty. The wretched dvan
whch occuped one sde of the outer apartment
was covered wth bue and whte checked cotton,
patched wth peces of stuff of a coours and
quates and the ony ob|ect that reeved the
eye was the branch of a wd fg-tree whch had
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TH . 2 3
rooted tsef among the rubbsh of the run, and
now faunted ts rch arge eaves through the
rude unga ed openng that served as a wndow,
and coud ony be secured from the weather by
a wooden shutter.
ut, as the stranger stepped across the thresh-
od, he saw nothng of a ths, for hs ga e was
rveted on a groupe n the centre of the foor.
neeng upon the stones, her head bent over a
chest, and her face uncovered, he behed the
wfe of the khama, whe besde her stood three
youths, one of whom was ta and handsome
and cose behnd her a younger femae, who had
a tattered shaw fung about her head.
word from Husref, as he foowed cose
behnd hs empoyer, sent the women shrekng
behnd the screen and reveaed fuy to the
stranger a fact whch he had aready suspected
lt was ndeed hs own ost chest whch stood
n the centre of the khama s foor.
s for the astonshed Husref, he darted for-
ward, and fung hmsef upon the bo n an
e tacy of deght caed t hs eyes, and hs
sou and commtted a thousand e travagan-
ces, whch, n so grave a man, were ke the
gambos of a donkey whe the three youths
ooked on n astonshment, and ganced from
m 2
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2 TH M C TH H M.
ther e cted father to hs sent companon n
undsgused ama e.
a to ne, na to ne there t s, there t s
at ength e camed the happy Husref : the
very chest whch my ord gave nto my keepng
ah buyuk der He s great and my face s
whtened. aah bah l may once more
ft up my head n the ba ar, for my feech has
washed away my shame peak, ffendmou
my master, s not ths ndeed the stoen bo .
lt s, ndeed sad the stranger wth a bt-
ter augh and a that t contans s my pro-
perty. 1
fant shrek was heard from behnd the
screen, foowed by an angry whsper and the
stranger started and turned suddeny towards
the taest of the youths, as he demanded sterny:
Has the d of that chest been fted nd how
came t here
u Let not my ord nurse dspeasure aganst
hs save answered the young man depre-
catngy My father eft hs home yesterday at
dawn to py hs trade n the cty, and for many
hours we heeded not an absence whch was fre-
quenty of ong occurrence but when the nght
fe, our mother became restess and unhappy.
ome ev had perchance overtaken her husband
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TH . 2 5
we a fasted, for we had no provson n the
house and as the darkness became more dense,
and our aarm ncreased, l set off to search for
my father n the cty streets. or hours l wan-
dered hther and thther, havng no cue to drect
my steps the nght advanced and there were
few persons strrng save the guard, who, as
they patroed the town, frequenty obged me
to crouch down to avod them, est they shoud
make me prsoner and t was when thus endea-
vourng to escape ther notce n the neghbour-
hood of the Great Mosque, that, as l skuked
nto a corner, l struck my head aganst a hard
substance, whch l at once dscovered to be a
chest. stonshed at such a crcumstance for,
as the soders passed on, l ascertaned that no
vng sou was n the street l at once under-
stood that ths must be an mmedate nterpo-
ston of my feech and l resoved to possess
mysef of the bo unt the return of my father,
who woud be abe to decde on the steps neces-
sary to be taken wth my pr e. Havng come
to ths decson, l sowy eft the Mosque, and
wth the chest on my shouder, turned n the
drecton of our abode but the reappearance of
the cty-guard compeed me to dverge from the
drect path, and to take one much more cr-
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2 6 TH M C TH H M.
cutous for l we knew that whatever mght
be the contents of the bo , my appearance, and
the ncoherent account whch l shoud gve, both
of t and mysef, coud not fa to create sus-
pcon whch mght enta upon me danger, f not
absoute destructon. he l was thus engaged,
a cry of re came on the wnd, and l hasty
ooked about for a secure hdng-pace for my
treasure, that l mght hurry to the assstance of
the unfortunates whom ah had vsted n hs
wrath.
l ready found one for, not a hundred
paces from the spot where l stood, l remem-
bered to have often remarked a sma encosure
contanng a tomb whch must have been that of
some one of note for the ron gratng that en-
cosed t had been rchy wrought and gt, and
there were traces of the chse on the sod ma-
sonry of the monument. ut ts gory had ong
been gone by : the ron baustrade had rusted
and gven way and a rank crop of nettes grew
about the stone-work of the tomb. mong these
weeds l conceaed the chest, and then echong
the thrng cry of an guen var P l sprang
forward n the drecton of the fames, whch were
aready drapng the soemn heavens wth crmson,
and puttng out the stars.
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TH . 2 7
or awhe l forgot the chest for as the
burnng rafters gave way, and n ther fa, fung
showers of goden stars aganst the sky, l heard
a fant cry of angush t was the voce of a
woman and l remember ony that n the ne t
moment l was surrounded by fre, brght, scorch-
ng fre, whch seemed to dry the marrow n my
bones and that l was busy tearng from the
head and face of a young femae a ba ng ve
of musn whch she cutched wth convusve
power Then l was once more n the free ar,
wth the wnd of heaven payng upon my brow
and the young beauty whom l had saved was n
the arms of an aged mr, who was coverng her
wth the shaw from hs own wast, and cang
upon her by every tender name that parenta
fondness ever avshed upon the ob|ect of ts
doatry, to ook up and te her an ous father
that she ved. ut the faded y spoke not
and at ength
6 ou remembered the chest, and returned to
seek t was t not so, my son asked the
khama.
l dd : reped Moctaeb and the dawn
was breakng as l reached the bura-pace, and
once more took possesson of my pr e. l now
dreaded no encounter, and waked body for-
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2 8 TH M C TH H M.
ward wth my burthen, unt l reached the
threshod of my home when endeavourng to
rest the chest aganst a bock of masonry whe
l pushed back the door, t spped from my
hod, and burst open wth the fa.
nd you saw the contents asked the
stranger,
ven so : reped the youth and havng
done so, l determned at once to carry the bo
to some obscure spot, and there eave t to be
found by any passer-by but as l prepared to
do so, l recognsed the cord that was about t to
be that of my father and l nstanty changed
my resouton, and havng cosed the d, l
brought the mysterous chest nto the house.
Mysterous ndeed murmured the stranger
as f unconscousy but nstanty recoverng
hmsef, he sad bandy : nough of ths for
to-day, good youth we are a weary : et us
eat, and drnk, and then endeavour to seep.
Cose the door, and shut out the growng ght
end me a beensh to wrap about me, or a rug to
e down upon, when we have fnshed our repast
and as l have brought terror under your roof by
the contents of that unucky bo , l w to-nght
make you acquanted wth ther hstory. e a
requre rest and whe l am your guest, you
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TH . 2 9
sha have a respte from abour. o now, kha-
ma, to our repast.
fter some deay the mea was served but
frst the three-fngered Cham had to seek coas
to heat the manga, and the one-sded ffat
butter to stew the pauf whe the hump-
backed D|ame, wth a shred of we-mended
musn foded about her face, spread the tray,
and fed the def cups wth water. Mne was
a actvty she hurred the e ertons of the
mpng Lbabe restraned the voubty of the
hump-backed D|ame and shook her cenched
hand at the mschevous e np, whose deafness
rendered her naccessbe to wordy menace.
Thanks to these femnne e ertons, a was at
ength ready and the stranger havng nssted
that Husref and hs sons shoud share hs mea,
they were soon squatted round the tray, feastng
hearty upon such fare as they had never before
tasted save n ther dreams : whe the women,
carefuy veed, wated on them most assduousy,
and de terousy changed the dshes n tme to se-
cure for themseves a suffcent porton of ther
contents.
The mea over, Husref and hs guest ghted
ther chbouques, and estabshed themseves on
the hard, straw-stuffed dvan whe the young
m 5
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250 TH M C TH H M.
men retred to the ower end of the apartment,
to converse n whspers on the e traordnary
events of the nght and the women hudded to-
gether behnd the screen rapdy demoshed the
reques of the feast.
ln another hour a sept under the roof of the
khama and the mue n had procamed the
md-day prayer from the mnaret of every mosque
n the cty ere the weary famy were agan astr.
nother hearty mea commenced the busness of
the day and athough to avod the observaton
of the neghbours, Husref and hs sons bent ther
way to the ba ar and mnged wth the crowd,
they ony purchased provsons, and returned
home as evenng set n, to sten to the promsed
narratve of the stranger.
The apponted hour arrved and the owner
of the chest havng drected Moctaeb to ft t
nto the centre of the foor, seated hmsef upon
a beensh besde t and eanng hs ebow upon
the d, as the khama and hs famy squatted
themseves besde hm, he camy desred the
young man to e pan the nature of ts contents.
Moctaeb turned pae, and nvountary
ganced towards hs father.
ou are an ass, and the father of asses
sad Husref mpatenty there can be nether
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TH . 251
an afrt nor a ghou shut nto the chest hy
then do you not speak
lt contans reped the young man n a
ow voce a human eye, a human ear. a foot,
a heart, a hand, and a dagger
True, as though the lbn aah hmsef
had counted them sad the mperturbabe
stranger : and then regardess of the horror
whch was depcted on every countenance around
hm, he sowy ad hs spread pam on the d of
the chest, and began hs story.
on of prayer.
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252 TH M C TH H M
CH PT l.
TH D TU TH
contnued.
My name s Hussen, and l was born n ths
good cty of assora |ust four and forty years
ago, durng the feast of the aram, amd fes-
tvtes and re|ocngs whch were consdered to
be of good omen both to mother and chd.
How far they fufed the prophecy w appear
hereafter.
My father had been an mr Had|, a man
of good repute, and toerabe fortune who had
more than once conducted a caravan of ranks
across the Desart, and been generousy pad by
the lnfdes for hs gudance and protecton.
ome ev tongues had ndeed nsnuated more
than once that, n the occasona and apparenty
conductor of pgrms.
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TH . 253
not atogether accdenta encounters of hs cara-
vans wth the predatory rabs, traces of a good
understandng mght be dscerned between hm
and hs enemes, whch consderaby mtated
aganst hs ntegrty, whe they ncreased the
contents of hs |eppa but the word s so cen-
sorous that t s ony prudent to shut the ears
of convcton aganst the voce of reproach.
My mother Gunusrf was the daughter of
a apdary who had more scence than pastres,
and whose fortune was to the fu as hard as the
gems he fashoned. l never knew her save as a
wdow for my father e pred of pague n the
Desart before l was a year od caught as we
were tod, bv hs havng rfed the pockets of a
dyng had| who had |oned the caravan about an
hour before, wth the poson n hs vens. My
edest brother took charge of the caravan, and
conducted t safey to ts destnaton but we
suddeny ost sght of hm, and t was not unt
many years afterwards, when my mother was no
more, and l was estabshed n my natve cty,
that we agan heard of hm as an emnent mr
Had|, tradng to and from agdad.
s for me, my mother havng marred
agan, and her husband, a handsome young
Pocket. f ver.
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p
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25 TH M C TH H M.
seke|h, beng to the fu as enamoured of her
pastres as of her person, and fndng me de-
termned aganst foowng hs surfetng trade
under hs very unpromsng auspces, provson
was soon made for me n the shop of an rme-
nan barber, whose sk n beedng and shavng
was notorous through the whoe cty.
The buste and gosspry of the pubc room
deghted me. ot an occurrence coud take
pace n assora but t was whspered n the
house of my master not an event was prog-
nostcated but the prophecy mght be traced to
one of hs customers. ln short, t was the news-
room and scanda-factory of the cty. Many a
worthy Mosem ost hs beard on the very spot
where hs wfe had ost her character not an hour
before and not nfrequenty the cause of the
one asssted at the dsappearance of the other.
cted and amused by the conversaton of
the customers, l soon became an adept n the
busness, and at tweve years od, standng upon
a stoo, l have smoothed the chn of many of
the east proftabe frequenters of the estabsh-
ment. ut ths peasant state of thngs coud
not ast for ever.
s l grew oder l began to twst my turban
weetmeat- maker.
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TH . 255
nto rcher fods, and to gve an e tra turn to
my grde for as l waked through the ba ar
to operate upon some of our weather empoyers
at ther own houses, l not unfrequenty caught
the ow murmur of admraton whch stoe from
beneath the yashmacs of the women as l passed
them and l earnt to understand that my per-
sona advantages far outran my fortunes. t
frst l smed as ths convcton forced tsef upon
me, for my vanty was satsfed, and l dd not
ook beyond ts ndugence but graduay l
began to magne mysef n|ured, and to com-
pare mysef wth every ndvdua who frequented
the house, unt l became convnced that l ndeed
deserved the name whch was frequenty apped
to me of the handsome arber of assora
and to encourage a horde of romantc and foosh
vsons that we ngh turned my bran.
The few spare pastres whch l had for-
mery spent n tchava and mahabe, l now
hoarded unt they woud purchase for me some
artce of fnery and l stened wth avdty to
the taes of the massad|s when they tod the
ove of the great ady of a prncey harem for
some owy one of the and.
My beard and mustachos were as back
and brght as the wng of the raven and l
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256 TH M C TH H M.
never faed when l was about to appy the per-
fumed o to the shaven head of a customer, to
pass my open pam over them as f by accdent
by whch means they became thck and gossy,
and were the envy of many a proud young ey,
who woud have pad every har wth a pastre,
coud he have caed them hs own.
ou may magne what ensued and you
w not be surprsed to hear that l soon stened
n trembng to many a tae of scanda, of whch
l prevousy knew a the detas. Many com-
ments were made upon my dress, whch had
graduay become more and more e pensve
and suspcons of the truth were sometmes
hnted to me by the gay young ey adehs who
passed occasonay under my hand but as my
dscreton was even more powerfu than my
vanty, l affected never to understand ther n-
ferences, and they at ength grew weary of cr-
tcsng ake my garments and my humour.
l ed ths fe for years durng whch my
master ded, and eft me soe her to hs busness,
wth a trfng sum n money, whch l gave n
secret to my mother, whose young husband had
ong ago forgotten that he owed to her hs pre-
sent prosperty, and who fet the stng of poverty
couped wth the btterness of negect. The
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TH . 257
w of ah was, however, soon accompshed
for the tears of regret at her past foy whch she
contnuay shed, brought her to the brnk of the
grave, and she sank genty nto t, wth a bess-
ng upon her ps whch was a for me
l resgned to no one my pace at the head
of her coffn, and l stood and saw the earth
fung upon the remans of my msguded but
gente parent and when l turned away, l re-
membered that my brother s abode was unknown
to me, and that l was aone n the word.
ut ths feeng of sadness dd not ast
ong the path of fe was strown wth fowers
for me, and the death of my mother was a dark
coud whch soon passed away from the sky of
my e stence. l dvded my tme between the
dutes of my professon, whch l ghtened by
pquant anecdotes drawn from secret and au-
thentc sources, whch bewdered and deghted
my steners and by the abours of the toette,
where l worshpped wth a the ardour of va-
nty.
ears passed over me : and a new race of
beautes afforded me new opportuntes of con-
quest l was courted for my persona beauty,
and trusted for my dscreton and l shoud
probaby have ved and ded happy, had not
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258 TH M C TH H M.
my ev stars ed me one day at noon under the
wndows of the harem of a weathy ey, who
was absent on an e pedton n a dstant provnce.
To amuse the sotude of hs oung wfe,
the ey had nvted to hs paace hs ony sster,
who was betrothed to the Pasha of Damascus
and ths far dame, who by no means reshed
the retrement n whch the wfe of her brother
thought proper to spend the months of hs ab-
sence, had aready decded on departng from
assora when on the day n queston, as she sat
payng wth her tusbee on the dvan under the
casement, ga ng through the attces, and wsh-
ng hersef far from the du paace of her kns-
man, she chanced to see me pass aong the street.
Tchapouk, tchapouk quck, quck, e-
ha she e camed to a save who was passng
through the apartment for the frst tme l see
a handsome man n assora km der who
s t
ffendm reped the maden, as she
ganced through the |aouse the sun shnes
on our street to-day that s Hussen the arber.
arber echoed the young beauty ncre-
duousy Mashaah f the barbers of as-
sora carry such brows as that, your ey adehs
must touch the couds
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TH . 259
c evertheess, madam, that s n truth Hus-
sen the barber and f the amparak of the
cty may be depended on, you are not the frst
young beauty whom hs brght eyes have thraed.
s y vah reped the ady you are too
quck-wtted, eha but your barber may we
turn the heads of haf the cty beautes. Does
he vend perfumes and essences
oth, and of the best answered the save
when, recevng no further ntmaton that her
presence was requred, she proceeded on her er-
rand, and the ey s sster was eft aone.
l sha not weary you wth words. re ong
the ady repented her request to qut the cty,
and the very name of the Pasha of Damascus
became dstastefu to her but she was never-
theess compeed to abde by an arrangement
whch she had hersef made and you w not
be surprsed to hear that ere she took eave of
her brother s wfe, l had aready dsposed of my
busness, setted a my affars, and was on my
way to the ancent cty of Damascus.
l had taken care to provde mysef wth
suffcent rament of goody fashon and matera,
to obterate every trace of the barber from my
appearance and as the Pasha had sent a party
canda.
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260 TH M C TH H M.
of hs own peope to escort the ady, and some
of the saves of hs own harem to attend her,
there was tte danger of detecton when l body
presented mysef at the paace of the Pashac,
and announced mysef as the younger son of a
nobe house, an ous to serve under the atrap
of Damascus.
The u bash of the paace-guard was won
by my appearance and when, as we stopped to
take coffee together n the ba ar, l presented to
hm an amber mouth-pece whch he chanced to
admre as we fed our chbouques from my own
tobacco-purse, he vowed an eterna frendshp
wth hs new and bera ay. He was a brave
young man, and much beoved by the Pasha
and he mght have aarmed my vanty, had he
not been dsfgured by a scymtar wound whch
had dstorted hs features, and gven a grm e -
presson to hs countenance.
th such an advocate, l soon found mysef
a member of the atrap s househod and as my
heart was ght, and my humour |oyous, l speedy
became a favourte n the paace but the harem
was a seaed book and despte a my endea-
vours, l coud not even succeed n addressng
one of the saves.
s l had not abandoned my berty at as-
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TH . 261
sora to ead the fe of a dependant at Damascus,
l soon began to repent my precptaton, and to
medtate a return to my natve cty when one
evenng as l was sowy crossng the court-yard
to vst the guards, an aged woman, evdenty
beongng to the Pasha s harem, passed cose be-
sde me and mutterng kh katet there s
somethng: n an under tone, and wth an ar
of mystery, dropped a sma embrodered hand-
kerchef at my feet as f by accdent, and then
shuffed hasty away.
l dd not mmedatey stoop to secure the
pr e but stoppng suddeny as f by an mpuse
of thought, l stood for a mnute or two moton-
ed
ess and then ettng fa my own handkerchef
upon that whch ay on the ground, est l mght
be watched from the paace wndows, l pcked
up both together, and thrust them nto my grde.
hen l had retred to my chamber l ost
no tme n e amnng the mysterous handker-
chef, and, as l had e pected, l found amd ts
fods a sma ro of paper, on whch were wrtten
these words
Hussen you know the pavon of crm-
son sk whch the Pasha has erected n the gar-
den of the harem l w be there at mdnght.
e sent and cautous. The ose to the u-
bu:
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262 TH M C TH H M.
l read the scro thrce over before l coud
beeve that my eyes had not deceved me and
as the convcton sowy forced tsef upon my
mnd that t was ndeed no deuson of the fancy,
but that l was reay summoned to the presence
of the Pasha s brde, my heart became dvded
between |oy and terror. True, l oved the ady
but the ove of a van young man who has been
taught the vaue of hs own attractons, s never
suffcenty dvested of sefshness to mpe hm
to e tremty n the ndugence of hs affectons.
s l fet towards the Pasha s wfe, so had l
aready fet towards severa other beautes the
soe te whch she possessed upon my heart that
was new to ts e perence, was the prde of a
nober conquest than any t had yet made.
th ths dvded and cam sprt of cacu-
aton, the dea of the crmson tent of the harem-
garden brought wth t a heavy feeng of pro-
babe danger. The was were hgh the nghts
cear and moonghted the paace-guard eaous
and aert and l was but too conscous that f l
were surprsed by the negroes of the Pasha, they
woud e tend tte mercy to my crme.
l fung mysef upon my dvan n a tumut
of thought. The very hope of such an adven-
ture had brought me to Damascus, and yet now
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TH . 263
that t presented tsef a forebodng of ev grew
upon me whch woud not be shaken off. There
was, nevertheess, no aternatve my poston n
the Pasha s househod was worse than precarous
shoud l offend hs ast and favourte wfe and
n our ntervews at assora, l had had many
opportuntes of ascertanng that the far Habe
was as uncompromsng n her hate as n her
ove and that she woud probaby not hestate
to sacrfce even me, shoud she beeve me capa-
be of sghtng her affecton.
Thus then l resoved to trust to my feech,
and to obey her summons wth a frm determ-
naton to represent to her durng the ntervew,
a the pers whch beset us both and to mpore
her for her own sake to bd me farewe for ever.
Durng my resdence n the paace, l had heard
frghtfu taes of the Pasha s |eaousy, and ts
effects : and as he was passonatey attached to
the ovey Habe, l coud but apprehend the
worst shoud he dscover that she dd not return
hs attachment.
th ths resouton, l remaned quety n
my chamber unt the dark couds of nght, pow-
dered wth sver drops, draped the pae moon n
her robe of mdnght when steathy passng
Consteaton.
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26 TH M C TH H M.
the paace gates, l crouched aong under the wa
of the garden unt, amd the trees, l saw the
goden crescent of the pavon gtterng n the
moonght, Here l paused, and as l ganced
cautousy around, l traced a dark shadow on
the wa whch e tended from the summt to
wthn a few feet of the ground. l steathy
approached t, and dscovered that t was a
shaw whch l recognsed as beongng to the
ady Habe and l at once understood that t
was ntended to factate my entrance nto the
garden.
or a moment a dread of treachery ganced
through my mnd, but l dsmssed the suspcon
as t rose and havng ascertaned that the
shaw was we secured on the other sde, l at
once swung mysef to the top of the wa, and
sprang nto the ncosure. My feet had scarcey
touched the earth, when my hand was softy
grasped, and l was rapdy ed on through the
darkness of a aure pantaton n the drecton
of the pavon.
l dd not attempt to utter a syabe, for l
was convnced that the casp was that of Habe,
but l deceved mysef for as my gude fted
the crmson curtan of the tent, l dscovered
that l had been conducted thther by a young
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THt . 263
and beautfu save, who, pontng towards a
porton of the pavon whch was fooded wth
moonght, senty wthdrew to a dstance.
To fng mysef at the feet of the ady
Habe, and to ft her far hand to my ps and
brow, was the work of a moment and as l
ga ed upon her n the soft crmson ght fung
over her by the rch curtans of the pavon, l
thought that l had never before behed any
thng so ovey. l forgot my wse resoutons of
the evenng l forgot my per and my perfdy
and l was pourng out before her a the pas-
sonate tenderness of my sprt, when a fant
shrek from the young attendant aroused us from
our dream of ove, as a hdeous negro rased the
screen of the tent, and gared fu upon us wth
hs fashng eyes
y, Hussen, fy and fear not for me
hasty whspered the ady : Geosumn nu-
rssn you are the ght of my eyes and your
death woud destroy me y and ere ong you
sha be convnced that you have nothng to
fear
s she spoke, l sprang to my feet, and
woud have se ed the ntruder, but she hed me
back.
Dehbash Prnce of madmen away wth
L. l
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266 TH M C TH H M.
youP she e camed, as the negro rushed through
the garden n the drecton of the paace : and
eave the rest to me. 1
th the dsappearance of the negro, my
reason returned and watng no further bd-
dng, l soon ceared the wa of the Pasha s
grounds, and as l fed l heard the shreks of the
ady and her attendant rngng upon the ar.
The sound added wngs to my speed and
avang mysef of my knowedge of every avenue
of the paace, l was one of the frst to present
mysef n the great ha to nqure the cause of
the outcry havng moreover taken the precau-
ton to snatch up another turban as l passed
through my apartment, and to grd on my
scymtar. l cacuated on the re-entrance of the
negro through the harem, of whch he must pos-
sess the key, a secure, but crcutous way and
l was aware that ths crcumstance woud enabe
me, f l e erted my best speed, at east to reach
the saemek at the same nstant as hmsef.
My good star was n the ascendant, for the
eyes of the Pasha fe on me as he hasty eft hs
chamber to ascertan the nature of the ds-
turbance.
6 La aha aah there s but one ah P
he sad n a tone of aarm : te me, my good
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TH . 267
Toussun (for such was the name that l bore at
Damascus) te me, what s a ths
May my ord s prosperty ncrease l
reped as camy as l coud l understand
nothng of ths tumut, save that l hear the
voces of women, shrekng out n terror, as
though ther sous were escapng through ther
ps.
6 urther cooquy was prevented by the en-
trance of a negro, who, trembng wth rage,
and breathess wth haste, fung hmsef at the
feet of the atrap, e camng :
|ustce and vengeance, my ord the Pasha
|ustce and vengeance our prvacy has been
nvaded, and your harem pouted by an offcer
of your own househod, by a save of your own
mercy
How say you, wretch thundered out the
atrap, drawng hs hand|ar name the ms-
creant, that l may stab hm wth my own
hand/
lt s Toussun the u bash gasped out
the negro but before he had tme to utter
anoter syabe, l sprang beyond the reach of
the Pasha s weapon, and body confronted my
kneeng accuser.
c Lar and trator l yeed out wth a the
n2
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263 TH M C TH H M.
mpetuosty whch a sense of my danger was
cacuated to nspre, and conscous that my fate
hung upon the events of the ne t few moments:
8 hose dog are you that woud poson the ears
of hs Hghness wth such fth as ths Look
at me, mscreant and dare to say that l have
strred from my post ths nght ,
The negro nstnctvey obeyed and as he
turned hs eyes upon me, he was evdenty struck
by a change n my appearance whch he coud
not e pan to hmsef: and ths momentary
hestaton saved me.
e save shouted the Pasha Coud
you fnd no one on whom to fasten a e save my
fathfu Toussun the frst of my chaoushes
whom l met on enterng the ha hat s
ths mystery ut t sha be unraveed at
once. nd so sayng, he beckoned to hm four
of the negro guard and desrng me to keep
strct watch over the trembng wretch whose
ea had brought hm nothng but btterness, he
passed nto the harem, whence the cres of the
women coud st be dstncty heard for ths
scene, such as l have descrbed t, had scarcey
occuped a moment.
Drecty the atrap dsappeared l gave
orders to a coupe of my pakars to secure the
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TH . 269
arms of the crest-faen guardan of the harem,
who wasted hs strength n revngs on me, on
the women, on fate, and on hs own foy and,
meanwhe, the Pasha was busy nvestgatng
the cause of an uproar so unusua n hs quet
and ordery househod.
The resut dd not transpre unt the fo-
owng mornng. The quang cause of the
rot was camed at my hands by the four negroes
who had accompaned the atrap to the women s
apartments, and carred away no one nqured
whther. The Pasha dd not appear agan and
a remaned sent and tranqu. ut l stood on
the crater of a vocano for at an eary hour,
another negro, undeterred by the dsgrace of hs
companon, or probaby convnced of the truth
of hs statement, and determned to revenge hm,
passed nto the garden of the harem, and vsted
the pavon wth the keen gance of curosty.
Leavng the tent, where he found nothng to
gratfy hs hope, he wandered aong beneath the
wa, and chancng to rase hs eyes, he dscovered
the shaw, whch n the aarm and hurry of the
prevous nght had been forgotten.
ortunatey for me, the negro had a tongue
whch outran hs wt, and suffcent of hs errand
transpred before he was admtted to the presence
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270 TH M C TH H M.
of the Pasha, to mpress upon my mnd the
necessty of an mmedate retreat and l at
once passed nto my chamber to secure upon my
person the |ewes and money whch l had
secreted when l entered the servce of the a-
trap. s l was about to eave the room, l
accdentay turned a ast gance towards the
dvan, where l was surprsed to see a sma
parce foded n a dark handkerchef whch was
famar to me. thout watng to ascertan the
nature of ts contents, l conceaed t beneath my
robe, and mountng my horse, whch was of the
true rab breed, l made my way to the cothes-
ba ar, and purchased the costume of an rab
chek, whch l ad|usted n a negected mosque
and then wthout another nstant s deay, l
hastened to the gate of the cty, and passed t at
foot s pace, as f careess of tme but once upon
the free pan, l bured the edge of my sharp
strrups n the fanks of my generous raban,
and away we few ke the wnd : danger and
death were behnd us and berty and fe be-
fore the choce was easy and l never drew bt
unt l fet the wng horse quver under me as
l urged hm forward.
few mouthfus of fresh grass, and a
deep draught at a coo stream that rpped
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TH . 2|1
through the dense herbage, soon restored the
generous anma whe l refreshed mysef by
avng my mbs n the cear water, and swaow-
ng some wd fgs whch l found n the vcnty
of the rvuet.
s l had purposey avoded a traces of a
frequented path, l deemed mysef toeraby
secure, many hours havng eapsed snce l eft
the cty and pcquetng my doce raban
amd the ta grass, l ad mysef down cose be-
sde hm, and soon fe aseep. hen l awoke
the gray dawn was |ust breakng over the hs,
and l fet the necessty of mmedatey pursung
my |ourney. l accordngy roused my horse,
who was yng supne upon the earth n a the
u ury of repose, and sprngng agan nto the
sadde, ncted hm to hs best speed. gan my
consteaton favoured me, for, after a coupe of
hours of hard rdng, l fe n wth a caravan
that was crossng the Desart, whch l mmed-
atey |oned, greaty to the reef of my e -
hausted horse, and the furtherance of my own
safety.
t the ne t town we reached, l once more
changed my dress, and assumed that whch l
now wear and then for the frst tme, l e -
amned the contents of the handkerchef that l
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272 TH M C TH H M.
had found n my chamber. ou, Moctaeb,
have seen them n ths chest. l know not wth
what tae the wy Habe amused the ear of the
Pasha, but t s certan that hs rage was
crafty turned on the negro and that he ent
too ready an ear to the accusatons of hs beau-
tfu young wfe.
There was a scro foded about the ds-
gustng fragments of mortaty, that partay e -
paned the truth thus t ran :
l tod you to trust to me, and l here gve
you proof that you dd not trust n van. hus-
band whose head s covered wth a napkn, and
whose eyes are dm, has revenged hs wfe upon
her enemy, and you on your betrayer. l send
you the eye that ventured to watch you the ear
that dared to sten to your words the foot that
foowed your path the hand that drew asde
the screen the heart that ventured to betray
and the dagger that was meant for another
breast. l woud not accept peace unt these
trophes were ad upon my carpet and l send
them to you as earnest of my ove.
l crushed the paper convusvey as l fnshed
readng t. Coud l ndeed have oved ths wo-
man-fend l took the handkerchef n my hand,
wth the ntenton of hurng ts contents nto the
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TH . 2|3
ar but a sudden mpuse restraned me, and
fngng them nto the chest whence l had wth-
drawn my garments, l determned to carry them
wth me to assora, and thence, makng some
horrbe addton to the hoard, to forward them
by the ne t caravan to my tger-hearted mstress.
ln order to effect ths savage purpose, l prepared
them wth sat and spces after the gyptan
fashon, by whch means they have been pre-
served. ut l have aready amost repented my
ntenton for the dstance whch now separates
us has eft ony the memory of her beauty and
her ove upon the tabet of my sou, whe a
the horrors of our fna meetng appear but as a
dark vapour, sheddng ts goom over a scene of
brghtness.
The stranger paused for a moment amd a
deep sence after whch he resumed n an
atered tone.
ther memores and feengs have aso
grown upon me snce l entered my natve cty.
l have recogn ed, even amd the dsfgurement
of poverty, my ong-ost pgrm-brother and l
have become conscous that fe has better and
nober |oys than vengeance.
s he spoke, the tearfu Hussen e tended
hs arms to the hama, who fung hmsef nto
5
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27 TH M C TH H M.
them, e camng l earnt the truth from the
very begnnng of your story, my ord and bro-
ther but l woud not darken the sky of your
prosperty by teng you that the wretched
Husref was the once-happy mr Had| as
aas l have aso much to te, but not to-nght.
hemduah be t even as you w
reped Hussen, kssng hs ps and forehead :
l knew you from the frst moment when you
fted the chest from the mue n the pubc
street and t was to test your probty that l
eft t n your charge durng so many hours.
The w of ah s accompshed e have met
agan and we w part no more one roof sha
n future cover the Had|- hama and the ar-
ber of assora.
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the romance of the harem. 275
P T l .
CH PT ll.
Mashaah sad the Pasha, as the story
ended l do not understand why a the mas-
sad|s, et them commence a tae as they w,
aways fnsh wth ove and ntrgue. ne woud
thnk that no other whee set the word n mo-
ton. l had scarcey began to resh the ad-
ventures of the hama and hs empoyer, when
out of a far begnnng grew another hstory of
a woman s foy Haf, haf shame, shame
nd such a tssue of mprobabtes ne
Pasha s as good as another and lnshaah
there s no fear that any dog of a haram adeh
woud venture to enter my harem. hy then
do the fabe-mongers spn ther brans nto sken
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276 TH M C TH H M.
threads, to nvent fctons whch bear no keness
to the reates of fe
Lfe, your Hghness reped the dsgused
Greek, reassured by the obtuse sef-suffcency
of hs host s a mere every-day affar, whch,
wthout the drapery of magnaton, woud be
too crude and bare to be ooked upon wth pea-
sure and thus the massad| s compeed to
seect the ornaments that appear the most key
to embesh t. here can they be found more
ready than n the ove and beauty of woman
re not her smes the promsed ght of Para-
dse, and her care ts contempated recompense
Her weakness s her trumph her tenderness,
the bond that nks her to those by whom she s
beoved, and on whom she pours out a the
treasures of her sou. lt s not that the darng
foot of ether mosem or gaour woud ndeed
venture to prophane the harem of a True
eever, (though some assert that such thngs
reay have been ) but the fabe gves so many
opportuntes to the narrator of weavng sweet
thoughts and fances nto hs web of fcton, that
he turns as trustngy to the concet as the p-
grm to the hoy caba.
ou tak ke a woman : sad the Pasha,
wth an e presson of contempt whch was ony
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TH M C TH H M. 2|7
tempered by hs admraton of the sententous
awa and t s not for me to contend wth you.
lnshaah hat s wrtten, s wrtten. The s-
man do not put ther beards nto the hands of
ther wves they know better. The rank wo-
men, as l have heard, wander up and dow T n
wth bod brows and steady steps, and the Pro-
phet ony can te the dsorder whch must regn
n ther harems, where there are nether bots,
ocks, nor negroes : but, Mashaah the Mos-
ems are not dogs nor ther women had|s,
wanderng from and to and, and crammng
ther brans wth a thousand de and unseemy
fances ashustun had l ved n those nfde
countres, l shoud have
orkma, ffendmou fear not: sad
Carmf Hanoum : no one w dare to suspect
afua Pasha of permttng the dust of dsgrace
to be scattered upon hs head and thus the
taes of an de fabe- monger shoud not chafe
hs humour. The massad| has done her duty,
for she has whed away two weary hours : but
l prefer her ebec to her story, and coud amost
regret that l cannot, ke her, awaken sweet
sounds such as those to whch we have stened
from her rapd fngers.
hemduah when you need musc, t
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278 TH M C TH H M.
can aways be purchased nterposed the atrap
abrupty but the massad| must not go un-
rewarded, snce you have found amusement n
her taent. emember: he added, turnng to
the ga aba when the ame eave the
harem, to et ths maden have a purse.
nd for mysef sad the far Crcassan,
drawng a handsome rng from her fnger that
the awa may not forget her vst to my ord s
harem, l sha reward her wth ths |ewe.
pproach, edka, and receve t from my own
hand.
Manoopoo obeyed wth a |oy whch gave to
hs movements as he traversed the foor, an m-
petuosty amost cacuated to betray hm but
a warnng gance from hs sster recaed hs
cauton, and when he bent hs knee before the
ady, and pressed her hand to hs ps n token
of hs acknowedgment, athough he hed t
onger than perfect good-breedng and respect
atogether warranted when ther reatve stua-
tons were consdered, ths sght devaton from
the rues of etquette was ony attrbuted by the
ookers-on to an e cess of grattude.
The menton of remuneraton mped the
speedy departure of the ame and shorty
afterwards the Pasha, remarkng on the ateness
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TH M C TH H M. 2|9
of the hour, descended from the sofa and
havng taken eave of hs young wfe and her
frend, eft the apartment, foowed by the
negroes.
The screen had scarcey faen behnd them
when Manoopoo once more fung hmsef at
the feet of the Crcassan. My fe my
sou my sutana he murmured, as she hd
her tearfu eyes upon hs shouder : ( do we
ndeed meet agan, after years of mserabe
absence Can t be your brow whch rests
upon my bosom your hand that l casp n
mne m l st dear to you as when we
parted
Manoopoo whspered the agtated Ca-
rmf : though t be sn to te you so, you
are to me more than fe or ght |anum
snndr my sou s your s not a day but
l have thought of you not a nght but you
have been n my dreams not an hour but
l have oved you. The present has been no-
thng to me the past fu of your memory, and
the future one wd hope of ookng upon you
once agan. The hope s accompshed you
are here, and you ove me st and now l ask
ony to de/
Tak not of death, katoun my oved one
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p
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230 TH M C TH H M.
answered Manoopoo : the grave s not for
such as thee or even there happness mght
come. everm sen l ove you: you have
been torn from me and l have suffered hope-
ess msery for years. hen l remember that
your youth has been bghted by the passon of
a despot, my bran burns, and my puses quver
Derdnden odum behoud my torment
makes me mad nd can you et me contnue
thus to suffer Do you condemn me to another
banshment whch can end ony n despar
ou know how l have oved you, how l ove
you st : and you are sent crue Carmf
but the bow s ess btter from your hand than
from that of another uness that other strke
me at your feet, that l may e pre wth your
mage before my eyes.
as sad the trembng beauty -
ah n the name of Heaven, what woud you
ask of me
lf your own heart whsper not my meanng
reped the Greek no words of mne coud
make t wecome. My fe and death are n
your hands, and you must dea wth me as you
deem fttng.
Manoopoo : sobbed the Pasha s wfe
you break my heart. Have you not been the
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TH M C TH H M. 281
one dream of my bghted e stence and do
you now speak cody to me that l may earn to
fear as we as ove you.
staferaah Heaven forbd sad the
young Greek : but thnk you that l can camy
see my bubu caged and prsoned, wthout
seekng to burst the bars of ts captvty, and to
ead t back once more to the wd wood and the
free vaey of ts happness e cannot de-
ceve ourseves, Carmf we must ve for each
other, or persh. To save ourseves we must fy
together why do you trembe thus, gu um, my
eyes Do you eave behnd you one memory
of |oy h, no nor w l thnk so meany
of you as to beeve that your chans have been
ess heavy, because they are of god. l thank
you for that ndgnant bush, and that frm
pressure of my hand l knew t the proud
Pasha and hs gded harem w be remembered
ony wth horror, whe the green pans and
woody mountans of our beoved Crcassa w
be wecomed as never yet they have been by
morta.
oud that we were ndeed there sghed
out the tmd beauty : but we are beset by
dffcutes, surrounded wth dangers, watched
by |eaous eyes How then can we escape
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282 TH M C TH H M.
Carmf, |anum my sou steady re-
ped the Greek : a s possbe to those who
ove
nd your sster
Thnk not of me sad atnka, as she ap-
proached the dvan, after havng carefuy ds-
persed the attendants of the ady n every
drecton, and dverted the attenton of the ame,
who were whsperng among themseves gay
comments on the proonged conference of the
overs : Thnk not of me l shoud but mpede
your fght, whch l woud rather strve to secure.
ut now you must consent to separate, - f
you w not run a by your own mprudence
you, Manoopoo, we can fnd whenever we
may requre your counse and you w do we
to set about your pro|ects wthout deay, f your
bran be suffcenty free from the cobwebs of
passon to enabe you to act ratonay and
you, atoun, have need of repose, est your
strength fa n the hour of tra. evreste and
your sster ame awat you, far edka she
added aughngy and shoud the ga aba
chance to fnd you here on hs return, hs ques-
tons may be dffcut to answer. way, then,
whe you are unsuspected, and st retan your
reason.
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TH M C TH H M. 283
The remonstrance of atnka, unpaatabe as
t was coud not be negected, for even Mano-
opoo hmsef was compeed to admt ts pro-
prety and after another embrace, and another
murmured assurance of eterna constancy, he
tore hmsef from the feet of the beautfu
Carmf, and eft the paace wth the ame.
n arrvng at the Therark Tcharch he
hasty fung off hs dsguse, and bddng a hur-
red farewe to evreste, n whose hand he paced
the purse whch had been bestowed on hm by
the Pasha, he was about to qut the budng
when he remembered that he had not seen
Mherprwr snce he eft the harem. The devo-
ton of the gente gr had touched hs heart
and, even occuped as t was by the mage of Ca-
rmf, he coud not refuse at east the affecton
of a brother to the tmd maden who had brused
her own sprt to contrbute to hs happness.
hen he returned to seek her, the ame had
aready eft the outer room, and had retred to
the nner apartments where they deposted the
most costy of ther ornaments and he was about
to turn away dsapponted, when by the fant
ght of the sotary and untrmmed amp whch
stood n a nche of the dscooured wa, he ds-
covered Mherprwr, crouched down n one
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28 TH M C TH H M.
corner of the saoon, wth her arms crossed upon
her knees, and her head bent over them. Her
otus crown ay on the ground besde her : but
the fever of her bran had wthered the fowers,
and they were faccd and faded. Her ebec
had a broken strng and her ve was fung
besde t, as though n the wretchedness of
the moment she had been reckess and mpa-
tent.
Manoopoo softy advanced : he murmured
her name and at the sound of hs voce the
dancng-gr sprang up, and cast hersef at hs
feet : lt s n van to contend wth destny
she whspered hoarsey l know a that you
woud te me l am an ame my passon s a
|est my ove a mockery l know t l knew
t from the frst and l strove aganst t unt
the nerves of my heart quvered wth agony
ou ove another l know that aso and she
s far pad gente and the word has never yet
breathed wth ts fou fetd breath upon her
name, and posoned her e stence. he s
worthy of your affecton and yet, n nursng t
she becomes even as l am a banned and
bghted thng h, thnk of ths t s a
frghtfu truth and you cose your eyes aganst
t, because you have not courage to ook upon t
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TH M C TH H M. 285
camy. ay, wthdraw not thus your hand.
l am wd wth angush, and l know not what
1 say yet you shoud pardon me. ou, whom
l have oved from the frst moment that l ooked
upon you. l have been the by- word of my com-
panons because my heart was shut aganst the
nroads of passon now l sha be ther scorn,
that l have bowed beneath t where t was worse
than hopeess.
Mherprwr, be cam, be comforted sad
the Greek soothngy : t s but a passng
fancy you are young and beautfu, and .
Do you te me ths asked the gr
amost sterny ou, who have eft your
home, and dared the very btterness of death to
ook upon one whom you oved n your eary
years ut you are rght, ffendm, you are
rght: l am young and, they te me, beau-
tfu and l must earn to suffer patenty, for
the heart does not break at once, and l may
have to nurse ts angush for ong and btter
years. True, the p-deep vows of many an
der may tear the wound asunder, and the
bood-drops may fa one by one ke moten
ead, but l sha earn to bear t. o, eave me,
ffendm, eave me and forget me, uness the
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286 TH M C TH H M.
poor and despsed dancng-gr may hope to be
remembered kndy/
6( Lsten to me, Mherprwr : sad Manoo-
poo, as he rased her from the foor, and threw
hs arm round her trembng form : ou know
a my story l have conceaed nothng from
you, and l ove you as a brother your gente
and ready servces have ghtened my task, and
cheered my sprt and l woud not have you
thnk of me as of an ngrate. ut my heart and
my hope are yonder and he ponted towards
the Pasha s paace : My own safety, even my
fe, are at stake : and l per a on that one
venture. How, then, coud l be worthy of your
ove, when every thought, every care, every
an ety woud be avshed on another
ou are rght murmured the maden,
camy wthdrawng hersef from hs casp we
can be nothng to each other : and mne has been
ndeed an de, and a btter dream. arewe,
ffendm l ove you l sha ove you to the
end of my e stence. Do you remember your
baad at the Tchorbad| s. ou can now |udge
of ts truth you read my fate, and l am pre-
pared to meet t.
e cannot part thus sad Manoopoo,
deepy moved by her emoton.
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TH M C TH H M. 28|
e apaum what can we do asked Mher-
prwr sady : Have you not convnced me that
we can be nothng to each other he to whom
you have gven your heart oves you even as
l do and for yoursef l fee that you return
her tenderness, and to me t w be easer to de
than to be despsed.
That were mpossbe l earnesty e camed
the Greek.
l thank you for the assurance, but l sha
not dare the tra. eek not to see me agan.
My good evreste w bear wth my gref, and
t w work ts own cure. arewe, f endm
merhamet eye bendene have pty on me, and
nger no onger. ah esmaredek may He
take you nto hs hoy keepng and beeve
that one heart w beat for you even n the
death-hour the brused heart of the poor
dancng-gr who dared to ove you l
Manoopoo woud have reped wth more
soothng words, but the ame wated not to hear
them. Lke a young fawn started by a dstant
sound, she bounded from the sde of the Greek,
and ftng the screen whch veed the entrance
of the nner apartment, dsappeared n an nstant
from hs sght. He caed her n hs gentest
tone : Mherprwr, gu um ony a moment
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288 TH M C TH H M.
ony a word ah, n the name of the
Prophet ony a moment. Mherprwr, w
you not repy
The echoes of the apartment were the soe
answer.
ay, then, l w foow you sad the
e cted young man and he had ad hs darng-
hand upon the screen, when t was suddeny
rased, and evreste stood before hm.
rt e var what s ths she asked sterny
Have we put our necks nto the noose of
danger for your sake, young sr, ony that
your s shoud be the hand to stran the cord
hat means ths voence en chok adam
ts a bod deed to frghten haf a score of
women.
Hear me, mother 1 sad the agtated Ma
noopoo : on my sou you wrong me Mher-
prwr oves me, and l
ak see e camed evreste n angry
scorn : an arne no sooner serves a stranger,
than he beeves that she s hs, heart and sprt.
ye on you, young sr Mherprwr has been
wooed by eys and nobes, and she has sghted
a ther vows and protestatons. ye, even
wth the bnd scorn of the word poured out
upon her far young head a word whch |udges
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TH M C TH H M. 289
ony through ts own short-sghtedness and
whch dreams not that the despsed and hred
dancng-gr has sacrfced her prde and her sef-
dgnty to support an aged mother, and a beg-
gared famy even wth ths fou scorn preyng
upon her heart, she has been |ust to hersef
and woud you you, whom she has served, be
among her enemes Leave us n peace : we
cannot now ava you, and to-morrow we de-
part.
Mother sad Manoopoo, deepy affected
by the honest energy of the od woman : l
cannot suffer you to bd me farewe wth such
words as these. thout your tmey and
generous assstance, l shoud now have been
wretched and hopeess, f not reckess and sus-
pected. How, then, can you attrbute to me a
fasehearetdness for whch l shoud deserve to
suffer death
ffendm reped evreste camy l
do not seek to wrong you, but you are a Greek.
e have served you, and you have beray re-
warded our e ertons : there can be no further
te between us. e are never key to meet
agan but shoud we ndeed do so remember
that for your own sake, and for that of Mherpr-
L. lll. o
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290 TH M C TH H M.
wr, we meet as strangers. ghour oa Heaven
speed you. ur conference s ended.
s she ceased speakng, the od woman made
a step backward and when the screen agan fe,
Manoopoo was once more aone.
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TH M C TH H M. 291
CH PT lll.
fter ths very unsatsfactory partng from the
ame, Manoopoo bent hs steps to the fenduk
where he odged and as he swfty and cau-
tousy threaded the streets, he revoved a thou-
sand wd and mpractcabe schemes for the escape
of hs beoved Carmf. ut hs good star for-
sook hm : he coud magne no pausbe method
of effectng hs purpose and he at ength re-
soved to endeavour to obtan some rest, and to
eave to the morrow the decson at whch he
found t mpossbe to arrve n hs present e -
cted state.
ln the mornng he was awoke by the entrance
of hs servant, who presented to hm a sma ro
of papyrus, wth a sea attached to t by a ong
o2
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292 TH M C TH H M.
ock of sky har. He rased hmsef hasty on
hs cushons, and opened the scro the cha-
racter was that of hs sster.
l have arranged a thus was t worded
our weepng and trembng beauty has at ast
consented. ou w see me no more, but l do
not ask you to et ths convcton cast a snge
coud over your fortune. t our ast nght s
meetng, you forgot the poor atnka n a dearer
and more absorbng nterest contnue to do so
st our fates cannot now be bent : our vews
and hopes are dfferent. l sha not te you
wherefore, for l w not occupy your mnd wth
thoughts of me, and my future fe. Make a
your arrangements for sudden fght. emem-
ber the sk of Carmf n gudng her fery
steed over the pans of Crcassa then t was
mere sport whch urged her on now she w
per her happness upon her speed, and t w
not fa. Provde for her the costume of a Ma-
meuke her motons w thus be free, and her
se unguessed at.
To-morrow at day-dawn she w awat you at
the western gate of the cty, near the cemetery
pace the dress whch you desgn for her n the
tomb of Had| Haf n the vaey and receve
the ast greetng of
our ster.
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TH M C TH H M. 293
y the ant Panaga sad Manoopoo
to hmsef, as he refoded the mssve atnka
has ganed no sma share of phosophy by her
resdence among the sman he throws me
off as a sutana casts away her spper -, but she
does not fa me n my need, and her pans are
cear and speedy. et, can l confde n ther
suffcency n ther prudence l must, for
doubt s madness, uness l can suggest a mode
of acton more sure and safe. hy how now,
tancho he contnued aoud, to a Greek ad-
venturer whom he had taken nto hs servce on
hs arrva n the cty ou have a brow as
moody as a papas who has been mucted of hs
second trout on a day of fast. hat news have
you
rste, Tcheebs hat s your peasure,
sr asked Constantne, turnng suddeny to-
wards hs master.
ay, no deay sad Manoopoo l am
n no mood to brook t for l must be up and
n the ba ar wthn an hour.
ou w do we to refect ere you
wak the cty streets agan was the repy
of the domestc for the ectar- ga of
the Pasha has vsted the fenduk ths morn-
rgn.
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29 TH M C TH H M.
ng, and has asked a few questons, havng
you for ther ob|ect, whch are scarcey paat-
abe.
How say you e camed Manoopoo, turn-
ng ashy pae. The ectar- ga Dd you
see hm yoursef re you sure that t was not
the ga aba
The Tcheebs knows best what busness the
chef negro of the Pasha s harem may have to
dscuss wth hm sad tancho dry u but the
worthy functonary of ths mornng was none
other than the word-bearer. The ga aba
may perhaps foow.
ence, foo thundered out the young
man have you no wt save that whch e sts n
deepenng dffcuty peak out what have
you to say
The Tcheebs remnds me f sad the un-
abashed tancho of the fancy of one of our
od authors n the good days when Greece was a
great repubc, and a her sons were heroes : f
l remember rghty, t was that of a man who
heated and cooed hs pauf wth the same
breath and by t. choas the Tcheebs frst
tes me to be sent, and then to speak
and doubtessy e pects to be obeyed n both
cases.
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TH M C TH H M. 295
Do not urge me further sad Manoo-
poo hat dd you hear
That the Pasha desred to know the name
and naton of every stranger n the cty, and
that he had earnt the abode of one n ths fen-
duk, about whom he was most soctous
and, n short, r : added the man, suddeny
droppng hs fppant tone, and e hbtng some
feeng you have been knd and generous to
me snce l entered your servce, and even at
some persona rsk l have deemed t my duty to
apprse you that you are n danger, ether n
your purse or person and, for you know best
where you have spent the many hours durng
whch l have nether seen nor heard of you
perhaps, n both.
ou are an honest feow after a, tan-
cho sad hs master warmy but your ea
has outrun your reason : my persona safety
cannot be endangered, for l have done no-
thng
Manoopoo paused suddeny, for hs con-
scence smote hm and he profted by hs pause
to sprng from hs cushons, and prepare hmsef
for the busness of the day.
Tcheebs sad the domestc gravey as
you seem to persst n your purpose of eavng
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2 6 TH M C TH H M.
the house, l must speak, and you w then act
as you deem best. l have reason to know that
you are a marked person, and l forewarn you
that some ev w happen f you are not cau-
tous. efore you arrved n ths cty l had
suffered poverty and hardshp : l was a Greek
and twce l have undergone the bastnado as a
crmna, n order that the Turksh denquent
mght escape : n my wretchedness l companed
to the Cad, and he recompensed my fath n hs
|ustce wth fresh bows and fresh nvectves. l
ad my head n the dust at the feet of the
Pasha, and l was reved as a raah and a ras-
ca and put forth wth hootng and contempt.
ou are my countryman, and snce you have
taken me nto your servce l have been secured
ake from want and from persecuton but you
have become yoursef a mark for e torton, or t
may be, voence. Confde then n me : et me
foow your fortunes : and there s no rsk l w
not run for you the rope s aready about my
neck, and t can but be tghtened an hour or two
sooner or ater.
re you true or a trator, Constantne
asked Manoopoo n very e cusabe doubt.
The man reped by fngng hmsef upon hs
knees, pressng hs two forefngers and hs thumb
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TH M C TH H M. 297
cosey together, and makng the sgn of the
cross seven tmes wth e traordnary rapdty :
as he caed upon the name of the Panaga and
haf the sants n the caendar to testfy to hs
truth.
tancho sad hs master after the hesta-
ton of a few moments l w trust you, for
l have no aternatve. lf l can escape ths day
from the tyranny of these rascay Turks, (who
w a be d d n the ne t word, whch s
some consoaton ) l sha be beyond the cty
was eary to-morrow mornng, and may augh
at ther beards. nd now, my good tancho
what do you advse for to-day
That you foow me to the terrace reped
the quck-wtted Greek and reman there for
a few moments unt l prepare the famy of
neste, whose court t overooks, to concea you
unt the dusk. They are needy and avarcous
od Dorcas, the mother, woud se you the few
teeth whch st reman n her head for a hand-
fu of paras and her husband e s has been
beaten and kcked unt he has earnt to beeve
that he came nto the word for no other pur-
pose. The rgn hep them they have an-
other msfortune to contend wth n the shape of
a pretty daughter, who entertans a the de
o5
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298 TH M C TH H M.
papas of the parsh wth sweet words and wn-
nng smes: and the papas, whe they ook
at her, drnk the od man s rake, and eat the
od woman s kbaubs, whch makes thngs
worse therefore, l can answer for t that the
prospect of ganng a few pastres w at once
nduce them to concea you unt you thnk
ft to eave the cty. The tte stafana
w prepare your food wth her own hands
and l w take care to procure for you any
dsguse that you may thnk t proper and e -
pedent to adopt.
Te me, Constantne sad Manoopoo,
f ng hs keen eye steady on hs attendant :
how fet you when you were spurned from the
gate of the proud Pasha s paace, and cast forth
ke an nfected anma
Do you ask how l fet demanded tancho
n repy, as he ground hs teeth, and nstnc-
tvey rased hs cenched hand to hs breast, and
grapped dy for a second for the dagger, whch,
had t not been forbdden to a raah, he woud
have worn there : as l not a Greek and
had l not been nsuted, strcken, and reved
l swore an oath he paused a moment,
Greek prests.
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TH M C TH H M. 299
whe a ferce e presson of vndctveness swept
ke a storm-coud across hs features : a deep
and wordess oath, that shoud the hour ever
come when the haughty despot mght be smtten
by my hand, l woud drve the dagger home
home unt ts posoned bade had draned
hs heart
There are wounds deeper than any that a
dagger can nfct, my good tancho sad Ma-
noopoo, as he grasped the arm of hs e cted
attendant : woud st thou assst n smtng the
sou of the atrap, when hs person s beyond thy
reach
teady unshrnkngy to have a fu
and sharp revenge l woud per ake sou and
body.
Then from ths hour we are brothers : sad
Manoopoo : and now sten, and that atten-
tvey: for on the ne t four-and-twenty hours
depend our fate. 11
The attendant seated hmsef on a ow stoo
near the dvan and wth hs ga e r vetted on
hs master, and a btter sme upon hs ps,
drank n the whoe hstory of Manoopoo sove,
despar, and renewed hope. The tae was a
ong one, but t was tod wth the voube
eoquence of a Greek over, and t seemed to
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300 TH M C TH H M.
the deghted tancho to have scarcey occuped
an hour.
nd you have reay trod the harem foor,
and ooked upon the prde of the despot s heart
the hdden pear of hs casket May t.
Constantne watch over your deathbed h,
that t were my happy fate to te hm ths to
watch the fushng of hs brow, the grndng of
hs teeth, the trembng of hs mbs to catch
the gaspng curse that woud fa back upon hs
heart for want of breath to utter t to ye nto
hs ears that he has been duped and fooed
by a Greek a raah and an nfde ut
l stay your utterance, Tcheebs my |oy has
maddened me and now what remans to be
done
The emoton of Constantne was too great to
be fegned and Manoopoo, Greek though he
was, and consequenty prepared for gue and
fasehood n hs countryman, at once perceved
that he mght safey confde n the btter hate
whch tancho nursed aganst the Pasha, and
whch woud be satsfed by the n|ury of whch
he woud become an nstrument, more securey
than by any sentment of a ess revotng nature.
He dd not hestate, therefore, to e pan to hm
the whoe pro|ect of the ady CarmnTs escape
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TH M C TH H M. 301
and when the man eft hm, t was to provde
dsguses for the whoe party, so soon as he had
secured a temporary asyum for hs master n
the house of e s neste.
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302 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l .
hen he was eft to hmsef, Manoopoo
dd not suffer hs thoughts to stray nto the fu-
ture the hurred retrospect by whch he had
mparted to Constantne the ncdents of hs past
fe, had brought before hm, n a ther frst
freshness and beauty, every tte deta con-
nected wth hs eary ove whch had rendered t
the charm and soace of hs e stence. He re-
caed every scene amd whch he and hs beoved
Carmf had wandered together the rver-bank,
green wth short crsp herbage, and sprnked wth
fowers the forest-path overhung wth a dense
foage that cast the sunshne asde, or made t fa
fckerng through the eaves, pantng goden
arabesques upon the earth the rocky heght
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TH M C TH H M. 303
where, beneath a canopy of |agged stone, wth
a torrent rushng and bong not a hundred
paces from them, and fang ke thunder nto
the vaey, they had sat together, wth a peace
of heart and a bessedness of sprt form-
ng a beautfu contrast from the wd and savage
scene around them. He remembered, too, how
they had been parted and the months of an-
gush and despar that had ensued, unt the
etter of hs sster had once more awakened a
brght hope wthn hm, and sent hm forth a
wanderer yet agan over the earth.
nd the pgrm had reached hs Mecca
the worshpper had knet before the shrne of hs
fondest fath and hs heart beat hgh as he
fet the e ctng conscousness of hs metem-
sychoss.
ut hs sster Here a was mystery he
mght have fed wth them her boder temper
woud have sustaned the droopng sprts of the
more tmd Crcassan but she had taked of an
eterna separaton, and had bdden hm forget
her, or remember her ony wth cheerfuness, as
one over whose fate hs own coud no onger
e ercse an nfuence.
Manoopoo was st musng on ths myste-
rous renuncaton of hs ony remanng reatve,
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p
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30 TH M C TH H M.
hs once fondy attached sster, when Constantne
stoe nto the room, and bade hm foow senty
and mmedatey to the terrace, as he had heard
the voce of the ectar- ga n the court-yard
of the nn, and had seen a coupe of the
Pasha s guard oungng n the street, ke men
watng for a summons.
The young man needed no second warnng
the detenton, even of an hour, et t termnate
as t mght, woud be runous to hm at the pre-
sent |uncture and he had, durng the absence
of tancho, secured a hs most vauabe pro-
perty upon hs person. That actve emssary
had aso profted by the past hour to warm the
hearts of od Dorcas and her sprt-bowed hep-
mate, by the most ready and effcent means, to-
wards hs master : and consequenty on ther ar-
rva on the terrace beneath whch stood the
hove of the sordd coupe, they found that every
facty had been afforded for ther descent.
Havng seen hs empoyer safey on hs egs,
and drawn up and repaced the shaw of hs tur-
ban whch had asssted n hs escape, tancho
eft the terrace and on hs return to the cham-
ber of Manoopoo, found that he had ony pre-
ceded by fve mnutes the ectar- ga of the
Pasha, who entered and nqured wth great
courtesy after the heath and we-beng of hs
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 305
master. The wy attendant reped wth a po-
teness even more e aggerated than that of the
atrap s functonary : and n repy to the ne t
queston of hs vster, answered ready that the
ffend was at the hammam, where he had |ust
eft hm to seek for a botte of essence whch he
had forgotten.
l was tod : sad the ectar- ga, wth
consderabe emphass : that he yet sept.
lt must have been that yng lsrae the
Tchbout,f who keeps the door, that so msed
your hghness : reped tancho camy the
dog s for ever bunderng n the smpest mat-
ters, and overturnng the pauf of hs negh-
bours. 1 nd as he spoke, he bused hmsef n
preparng a chbouque for hs unwecome guest,
who took possesson of the dvan wth a gravty
whch shewed that he had no ntenton of mme-
datey vacatng hs poston.
Coffee foowed the ppe, whch was prepared
at a manga |ust wthout the door of the cham-
ber and as the fumes of the tobacco cured
from the nostrs of the doughty word-bearer,
he saw ft to pt hs taents at dpomacy
aganst those of the quck-wtted and wy
Pubc bath. e |ew.
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#
p
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306 TH M C TH H M.
Greek. lt was the combat of the fo and the
buffao.
l have forgotten the name of your mas-
ter he sad wth affected unconcern nor
am l qute certan that l remember whence he
comes. 1
our hghness may we suffer the frst to
escape you : smed tancho, as he stood wth
hs arms foded upon hs breast, n obsequous
attendance upon the man of offce for t has
so strange and unnatura a sound that l at once
abandoned a hope of
ut you are yoursef a Greek your tongue
betrays you : M nterrupted the ectar- ga, wth
what he consdered to be a consummate stroke
of pocy.
66 May the ears of my ord never fa hm
reped the mperturbabe tancho devouty
wshng them naed fast to the wa, besde those
of one of hs ancent empoyers, a certan Greek
baker who was aff ed to hs own door for sup-
pyng bread n more mnute quanttes to hs
customers than was desrabe but l cannot
speak any rank daect.
w nd s the stranger whom you serve reay
a rank demanded the envoy.
s truy as that your save s a Chrstan
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 307
reped tancho, who had some prvate doubts
of the fact when he remembered that he had
twce worn the turban and had made a p-
grmage to Mecca, wth the produce of whch
pous |ourney he had fed to ths dstant provnce,
and ved comfortaby among hs countrymen
unt he had avshed hs -gotten gans s
truy as that your save s a Chrstan. ,
La aha aah there s but one ah
and ycu are an lnfde, and ess than a dog be-
fore the eyes of the bessed Prophet sad the
word-bearer, as he gravey smoothed down hs
beard, and the Greek bowed meeky beneath the
taunt l had heard that the traveer was
your countryman. 1
tancho reped by a second negatve.
l am weary of the quet of ths tranqu
cty : pursued the ectar- ga condescend-
ngy and l ove to tak wth strangers of
the ands through whch they have passed of
the ustems of ther own countres and of the
wonders that they have seen. hen w the
ffend your master return from the hammam
l woud converse wth hm.
He bade me hasten wth the essence re-
Heroes.
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M.
ped tancho : and prepare hs horse for
two hours hence. These ranks, your hgh-
ness, ever rde ke Tatars when they return
from the bath, nstead of quety smokng or
seepng ke good Mosems.
Mashaah they do we : sad the word-
bearer sententousy they can smoke and
seep on ther dvans n ther own countres,
where men run about at md-day wth paper-
anterns, or grope ther way n parta darkness.
hekur ah to Hs name be a prase they
come here to see the sun, and they do we to
take ther f of t whe they can l have sad
t.
|anum snndr my sou s your s : sad
the Greek, n affected admraton of the erudton
of hs companon hat are they but dogs,
and the fathers of dogs nd what ws my
ord that l shoud say to the f end
The ectar- ga hestated for a moment, and
then e camed : aah bah by the Pro-
phet l must know ths rank : he s surey a
hakeem, and l woud ask hs counse but
enough for to-day. Te hm that l w dp
my fngers nto hs pauf to-morrow at the
Doctor.
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 309
evenng mea : to-day l have other pro|ects :
but et hm awat my comng as l have sad, for
l sha be here wthout fa and perchance l may
turn upon hm the ght of the Pasha s counte-
nance.
ah esmaradek murmured the Greek
submssvey : he w surey be on the thresh-
od at the apponted hour.
lt w be we for both of you that t shoud
be so : sad the ectar- ga, as he descended
from the sofa, and thrust hs feet nto hs sppers
to depart and there was somethng snster n
hs manner of utterng the remark whch woud
have satsfed tancho, had he ever entertaned
a doubt of the fact, that the ntentons of the
word-bearer and hs master were anythng but
frendy to Manoopoo.
The sapent Turk s as sow-wtted as a
tortose, he muttered to hmsef as the porty
functonary sowy descended the star, and
mounted hs over-fed horse, whch was hed by
a coupe of fne-ookng serud|es n the court
of the fenduk : we sha be gaopng over
sand before he descends to the cty ant
choas, what a race to govern a and ke
Grooms.
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#
p
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310 TH M C TH H M.
ths, and to bow the neck of the Chrstan ut
the day w come the day w come and
wth ths vague, though apparenty consoatory
e|acuaton, he bowed ow as the grave sman
rode sowy away wthout degnng to acknow-
edge hs sautaton.
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 311
CH PT .
ara shouted the ga aba of a fua
Pasha to one of the negro guard of the harem,
about an hour before dawn the foowng morn-
ng, as they both ay upon ther cushons n an
ant-room off the great gaery, wth ther un-
sheathed scymtars besde them ara ne
var what s that l heard a nose.
The wnd n the cedar-trees outsde the
casement, perhaps or that accursed cat that
the spoed Greek woman chooses to fonde, be-
cause she knows that l oathe the beast was
the suky answer : ye, l knew t he con-
tnued, as a second rustng n the gaery
caused the ga aba to rase hmsef on hs
ebow to sten there t goes over the baus-
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#
p
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312 TH M C TH H M.
trade of the gaery, eapng nto the moonght
ah bea versn may msfortune overtake t
To be awakened from a dream of home and
berty by an accursed cat man, ts too
much nd wth a deep sgh, the negro
turned hs face from the door, and prepared to
seep agan 5 an e ampe whch hs superor,
after stenng for another moment and sufferng
no further nterrupton, very |udcousy fo-
owed.
The momentary dsturbance had, however,
acted so powerfuy on the nerves of the eaous
ga aba, that he sept ony to dream that a
the women of the harem were escapng over the
gaeres, and dancng sarabands n the moon-
ght, where a hundred profane eyes were ook-
ng on them and when at ast hs master s far
and favourte wfe appeared before hm, ed
nto the very crce of the ma y fgure by the
statey Greek save, the dreamer awoke wth a
groan that n an nstant started hm nto a per-
fect conscousness of the cause of ths terrfc
vson and dreadng est t mght not ndeed
have been the cat whch roused hm from hs
frst sumber, he determned to satsfy hmsef
that a was quet n the harem and accordngy
he made the tour of the apartments, tred the
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 313
doors, and started more than one of the far n-
mates, who were not sow n appyng to hm
sundry epthets by no means fatterng to hs
persona vanty.
eassured by the resut of hs survey, the
ga aba once more resgned hmsef to seep
but he mght more safey have trusted to hs
frst suspcon for the favourte cat of atnka
had sumbered peacefuy on a cushon through-
out the whoe nght and nevertheess the
sounds upon the gaery had been no uson of
a haf- a wakened fancy.
hen the ades of the harem came forth one
by one from ther chambers, each asked the
other to account for the non-appearance of the
beautfu Crcassan and her frend and a ong
hour went by before the sma hand of atnka
was seen drawng asde the screen that veed the
apartment whch she shared wth Carmf.
|ests and questons wecomed her but she dd
not return the peasantres of her companons as
she was accustomed to do and pressng her
fnger on her p, she besought quet for her
frend, who was ndsposed and requred rest.
ln an nstant a was an ety and soctude
a thousand maades were enumerated, and as
many remedes suggested but atnka put a
L. lll. p
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#
p
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31 TH M C TH H M.
proffers of servce steady asde and ony en-
|onng quet, returned, as she affrmed, to watch
besde the nvad.
The day wore on : the shadows grew shorter
and shorter -t was noon : agan they fe upon
the earth, and stretched sowy to greater ength,
ke the mbs of a sumberng gant. The far
nmates of the harem had eft the bath had
sept through the hot hours upon ther fower-
sprnked cushons and were wanderng through
the paace-gardens : t was vergng towards sun-
set : and st the Greek gr remaned n the
cosed apartment, whence no sound ssued save
that of her ght foot as she occasonay moved
across the foor.
Twce the ga aba beat upon the door, and
decared hs ntenton to enter but each tme he
was deterred by a proonged H-u-s-h from
the subdued voce of atnka. He grew restess
and unquet, and waked through the harem,
murmurng a few words to hmsef n a ow
tone, of whch hakeem and Pasha were
aone audbe. ccasonay he bent hs ear,
and stened, as he stopped before the em-
brodered screen whch veed the door of the
apartment: but a was st and at ength hs
restessness grew nto suspcon, and wthout any
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 315
premnary warnng, he softy drew back one of
the battants, and entered.
n a pe of satn cushons mmedatey be-
neath one of the wndows ay a ovey form, but
the face was hdden from the offcous ntruder
by a profuson of ong gossy har, and by an
arm of da ng whteness whch was fung
across the face. The couch of the Greek gr
had not been occuped, for the sver-frnged
sheet was smoothy ad back as t had been eft
by the attendant saves on the precedng even-
ng and when the ga- aba ooked round to
nqure from the far atnka the cause of ths
unnecessary vg, he found that, save the seep-
ng beauty on the cushons, he was aone. ln
an nstant the truth fashed upon hm. He had
been duped Mschef had been at work n the
harem, and hs vgance had sumbered He
sprang towards the ow couch : he grasped the
rounded arm: he ga ed nto the eyes that met
hs, wth an e presson haf mockery and haf
apprehenson and hs breath faed, and hs
knees smote together as he behed atnka
nd the ady Carmf the sosun of the
Pasha the wfe of hs hghness he gasped
out u where s she
e brm what do l know asked the
p 2
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p
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316 TH M C TH H M.
wy Greek n repy : l have sept and l
dreamt that she had escaped and
aah bah by the Prophet l beeve
that you are aughng at my beard muttered
the negro from between hs cenched teeth :
but have a care proud save, have a care
there are deep waves, strong cords, and sharp
bades wthn reach of a ready arm. eware
est
ave n your teeth, ve too of a dshonoured
master l 1 e camed the Greek gr sprngng to
her feet, and e tendng her cenched hand n
haughty menace her ong har streamng over
her shouders and fang far beow her wast,
and her sght frame trembng wth passon :
ave n your teeth, fou mscreant who
pressed the pow of sefsh ndugence when
you shoud have ooked to the nterests of your
too trustng master here were you, and
your st more ab|ect foowers, when the
gaour stoe upon the prvacy of the harem, and
wed the dove from her nest here were
you when the eage swooped, that you heard
not hs scream, that you marked not the shadow
of hs wngs ff, to your n|ured ord, and
te hm how doughty you have done your
duty.
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#
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TH M C TH H M. 3 1|
Lahnet be hetau curse on the dev, and
on thee, hs handmaden e camed the ga
aba, undaunted by ths dspay of femnne
energy : Lsten to me, woman Do you know
the prce of ths nght s work and he drew
coser to her, and hssed out n a voce that was
unearthy n ts shrness Can you estmate
the penaty of your treachery. l was her
guardan, and my arm and my weapon were
vowed to her securty you were her com-
panon you were besde her seepng and
wakng our per s equa one of us two must
de.
Maumumdr l know t was the cam
and unshrnkng answer and l can te thee
even more than ths. The contest may seem to
be an unequa one a woman s ptted aganst
an ga aba and yet and she aughed a ow
and btter augh : the case s not so desperate,
when the woman s young, beautfu, and a
Greek. Ths neck and as she spoke, she
grasped t wth her sender fngers was never
meant for the bowstrng.
akaum we sha see growed the en-
raged negro.
e waste tme added the fearess a-
tnka the Pasha s |udge between us: l
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318 TH M C TH H M.
have no words to avsh on a save ke thee.
nd the astonshed functonary found hmsef
urged to the very measure wth whch he hoped
to have brought the trembng Greek gr qua-
ng to hs feet.
M ah kerm he muttered as he turned
away trembng wth dssembed rage ths
tgress must be crushed, or l am a ost man
ut t was far more easy for the sprt-strcken
ga aba to qut the presence of the Medusa-
ke beauty, than to present hmsef n that of
the Pasha. hat account coud he gve of hs
own bndness s he asked hmsef the ques-
ton, he remembered the epsode of the seepy
negro, who had amused hm wth the concet of
the cat eapng nto the moonght and beng
bewdered as to the ne t step whch t was ne-
cessary for hm to take n order to secure hs
own safety, he determned to cam hs bran, and
to coect hs deas by appyng the bastnado to
the unucky subordnate, whose ndoence had
conduced n so emnent a degree to the catastro-
phe of the nght.
nna sena, baba sena l w destroy hs
father and mother he muttered, as he ground
hs teeth unt hs |aws ached wth the voence
of ther contact hen the bowstrng comes to
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 319
my neck, f come t must, l sha at east know
that he has not qute escaped ut that woman
that dev why dd l shrnk before her ga e
when t w so soon be turned on me n suppca-
ton hy dd l qua beneath her voce,
whch w so soon e pre n a smothered shrek
lnshaah l fet as though l wthered beneath
the nfuence of the v ye.
few more moments eapsed, and then a
stfed groan was heard, and a wang cry a few
heavy bows, a fa, and the draggng of panfu
footsteps, whch seemed as though the agony of
a fetme pressed them nto the earth.
The ga aba was soothed for the moment
by ths seasonabe e ercse of hs authorty but
ony for a moment for as the mamed negro
crawed away, the recoecton of hs -starred
poston returned upon hm wth startng ds-
tnctness and he fet as though hs head was
aready rong at the feet of the ncensed and
n|ured Pasha.
hat was to be done Hs errand, though
death-fraught, must be e ecuted at once True,
he was to contend ony aganst a woman but he
coud not concea from hmsef that there was
about her an energy whch woud strugge even
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#
p
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320 TH M C TH H M.
to the death and that she was conscous of her
advantage.
The brute force was on hs sde but the
subtety of sprt, the power of thought, the
ma|esty of mnd were a n arms for her. The
peace-ovng and u urous Pasha, who had been
ong accustomed to her presence, and by no means
nsensbe to her e ceng beauty, bereft as he
was of hs far wfe, and threatened by an
soaton of heart from whch he woud naturay
shrnk wth a very pardonabe sefshness n the
frst moment of hs bereavement, woud probaby
yed to the spe of her mpassoned eoquence
and where woud he then seek the vctm
The head of the ga aba sank upon hs
breast, and hs heart heaved. He coud not put
the answer prompted by hs own reason nto
words.
th these refectons was he accompaned
through the gaery of the harem, to the saem-
ek and no brghter hope had suggested tsef
even when he stood before the veed door of the
atrap s prvate apartment. How he wshed at
that moment that he had been a ess prveged
ntruder, that thus a few more nstants of deay
mght have been hs, whe the ceremones of hs
ntroducton to the presence of the Pasha were
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 321
performed but, aas the wsh was de and
wth the eye of every oterer n the anteroom
upon hm, he was compeed at once to ft the
screen, to pass the porta, and to stand before
hs master.
v 5
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p
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322 TH M C TH H M.
CH PT l.
How now, shref sad the Pasha, as the
trembng ga aba bowed down before hm
e stersn what brngs you here ay,
by my father s beard you trembe you avod
my eye peak, wretch what of my wfe
what of my harem
ln the energy of the moment, the atrap had
rsen from the sofa and as he uttered the ast
eager queston, he stood wthn a few paces of
the shrnkng save.
May my ord ve to see the beard of hs
grandson whte wth years f gasped out the ga
aba wof has stoen nto the fod, or a
amb has strayed ls not the word free for my
ord the Pasha re not a the beautes of
the earth at hs dsposa Can he not
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p
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TH M C TH H M. 323
nough of ths sad the atrap wth a
frghtfu camness whch was more appang
than the fercest burst of passon ay your
errand wthout metaphor or preface words are
de and l am n no humour to be fooed.
The negro sank upon hs knees man,
aman mercy, mercy the ady Carmf has
fed w
ords have no power to pant the transport
of the Pasha the strength of haf a do en men
seemed to have passed nto hs arm he fted
the unresstng negro from the foor, and then
hured hm back, wth a fury that threatened the
dsocaton of every trembng mb he spurned
hm as he groveed n the dust and hs fngers
cutched the ht of hs hand|ar, as though hs
vengeance amost overcame hs prudence, and
that he thrsted to destroy hm wth the reman-
der of hs secret st unsad. ut the frst mo-
ment of phren ed angush over, he mastered the
overwhemng passon he was sure of hs vc-
tm and he had yet much to earn. food
of mnged memores pressed upon hs bran
and when he agan spoke, hs voce was hoow
and husky, ke that of one whose ps have ong
been seaed.
The tae was soon tod nor dd the atrap
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#
p
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22 TH M C TH H M.
nterrupt t by a word or a gesture, unt the
wy shref, n order to dvert hs vengeance
nto another channe, e patated on the treachery
of atnka, who had not ony favoured the fght
of the ost beauty, but cunnngy conceaed t
unt pursut was hopeess.
nd she knew t The fase Greek knew
that she was to fy from me he then burst
forth : May a her dastard naton be wthered
for her sake as t for ths that l suffered her
dark shadow to rest besde the ght of my eyes
and her cunnng words to con|ure me nto tem-
porary forgetfuness of my own sou ut t s
not yet too ate for vengeance oow me, fase
save ou sha not de aone f afua Pasha
ves to cross once more the threshod of hs
harem/ 1
s he spoke, the Pasha strode haughty
through the chamber, and passed out wthout
castng a backward gance upon the fantng
wretch who passvey foowed wth death aready
n hs heart.
hen the Pasha reached the great ha,
whence the apartments of the women opened
rght and eft, he found t deserted. The af-
frghted saves, an ous to escape the frst out-
break of hs vengeance, had hasty conceaed
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#
p
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TH M C TH H M. 325
themseves on hs approach but when he stood
upon the threshod of the chamber where he
had ast behed hs ost Carmf, he met the
proud and unshrnkng eye of the Greek gr
who was standng n the centre of the foor.
btter and a threatfu maedcton rose to
the ps of the Pasha but the cam, assured,
and thrng ga e of those deep wd eyes ar-
rested t n the utterance and he had advanced
a pace or two nto the room n sence, when the
ow sweet voce of the maden broke the spe.
afua Pasha, the ord of a powerfu pro-
vnce, s come to seek from the captured a-
tnka tdngs of hs wfe she sad, n as un-
dsturbed a tone as though she knew not that
the sou of her stener shook wth angush, and
that hs heart bed from a fresh and gapng
wound Let hm rather ask the pampered
save who crouches cose behnd hm, and to
whom he had confded the safety of hs harem,
and hs own honour The eye sumbered that
shoud have watched the ear was seaed that
shoud have stened the hand was nerveess for
whose casp the naked scymtar had been pre-
pared and whe that trator ves, the name of
afua Pasha w be a mark for scorn. hat
has the coward whspered to hs master That
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#
p
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326 TH M C TH H M.
the Greek gr, who was purchased by hs god,
chershed by hs care, consoed n her bondage
by hs genteness, had eagued wth a fase and
unovng wfe to stab hm as he sept ay,
peak not, wretch she e camed haughty, as
the ga aba was about to make another despe-
rate effort at sef-preservaton, whe the Pasha
remaned thraed and overawed by an energy
such as he had never before behed : speak
not, est thy fase tongue be torn from between
thy yng ps, and fung to the dogs who woud
turn away revoted by such fou garbage and
then, as though the nterrupton had faed to
break the chan of her deas, she contnued
ut dd the dastard murmur to hs ord that
the e ed maden who had eaten of hs bread,
and rested beneath hs roof, spurned at the ef-
forts that were made to ead her aso to abandon
her prncey master Dd he te how she wth-
stood the prayers and tears of the fugtve, and
how she mocked at the assurance that she woud
be the vctm of another s crme, and become the
sacrfce of her own devoton lf he tod ths
aso, et hm stand forth, and bear wtness that
hs eye, hs ear, and hs arm were empoyed n
the servce of hs ord : but f he knew nothng
of the strugge between the ost one and her
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TH M C TH H M. 32|
eary frend, then et hm pay the prce of hs
supneness.
Mashaah murmured the bewdered
Pasha, quverng wth mnged rage, angush,
and admraton he s a fase save, and he
sha de the death
way wth hm then at once contnued the
Greek gr hs breath poutes the chamber,
and hs ve body cumbers the earth/ nd
wthout watng the acquescence of the atrap,
she capped her hands, and two negroes n-
stanty obeyed the summons.
few bref words from the Pasha, who was
started nto nstant compance wth the un-
yedng w of the maden and whose weak
nature was overwhemed by the ava-food of
passon that poured from her quverng ps
decded the fate of the wretched ga aba, who
was borne from the apartment, shrekng out hs
despar wth a the shr terror of a woman.
s the screen fe behnd the e ecutoners and
ther vctm, atnka fung hersef wdy upon
her knees before the Pasha every trace of
haughtness had vanshed from her brow her
eyes had ost ther ght, and trembed through a
sea of tears her head was bowed upon her
heavng bosom, and she was a the woman.
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328 TH M C TH H M.
Look on me, my ord she whspered, as
she casped the hem of hs robe wth her sma
far hands: ook on me, and sten to me, ere you
condemn me l do not mean to death l care
not for t l do not fear t but to the hope-
ess angush of your dspeasure. m l to bame
that the ost one oved you not that she had
poured the sherbet of affecton over the fowers
of paradse before she entered your harem and
that she nursed the memory of her frst ove
unt t grew nto dshonour m l to bame 11
she contnued n a yet fanter murmur, as the
Pasha was about to nterrupt her am l to
bame that my heart cung where her s had faed
to fnd a restng-pace that, yedng to a pas-
son l had no onger the power to controu, l
entered mady nto a pot whch was to ensure
the absence of her who hd from me the sun of
my e stence l have done sen ektar der
you are the master l ask for no mercy save
that whch your heart may offer, by payng
back the tenderness of mne.
The astonshed Pasha hestated for a moment,
durng whch he ooked down upon the far
young creature before hm. he was very beau-
tfu, and Carmf was gone : she oved hm
for t never occurred to hm to doubt the fact
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TH M C TH H M. 329
and there s a charm n novety whch deepens
oveness a hundred fod : but afua Pasha
was a rgd Mosem, and the maden was a
Greek and wth characterstc stodty, he
reped to her passonate appea by a stammer-
ng auson to her apostacy.
The p of the gr cured n scorn, but ony
for an nstant the stake on whch she had pe-
red her fe was not to be ghty ost and
rsng from her knees, her dark eyes fashng
once more wth the ntense ght that seemed to
burn nto the sou, she e camed reproachfuy :
nd has afua Pasha yet to earn that a s
easy to those who ove ha not hs fath be
mne hs w be my aw and hs greatness
my gory
lnshaah P sad the atrap, overcome by the
energetc eoquence of hs companon hat
can l say l am aone, and my heart s heavy.
How can l pass my days f my harem s deso-
ate ah kerm lt sha be as you have sad.
l sha offer one sou to the Prophet one con-
vert to the true fath. eya , l w forget the
fasehood of whch l have been the vctm se-
verm sen l ove you but you must
cease to be a Gaour/
ah ah. Mahomet resou ah
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330 TH M C TH H M.
sad atnka n a frm voce, and wthout the
hestaton of a second when the lmaum
cams me, l am ready .
t. stafana be my wtness murmured
the gr to hersef, as the Pasha shorty afterwards
eft the harem : l w hang the chans that have
so ong pressed down my own sprt upon the sou
of that coward-hearted despot, or the bood that
was spt at co sha be on my head Love
ts a madman s dream but power, weath,
and a proud name, are the trpod on whch true
happness s based l have toed for t hum-
bed my haughty sprt to obtan t bent my
neck to the oppressve yoke, and my p to the
ready e and these are my wages and
she aughed bttery as she fung back the d of
an nad casket n whch were contaned the
costy |ewes that the Crcassan had abandoned
n her fght. These and the sefsh pas-
son of the Mosem
TH D.
L D :
. H r., |U ., 51, UP T T T, H M T.
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