.

This compilation © Phoenix E-Books UK

KNITTING WITHOUT "SPECIMENS"

Knitted Hug-Me-Tight or Bolero.

{Frotttispiect)

DUTTON & COMPANY 681 FIFTH AVENUE LL. A. WALSALL NEW YORK E. TANTARRA STREET MIXED SCHOOL. P. CLAYDON SEWING MISTRESS. HEAD MISTRESS OF CHUCKERY COUNCIL SCHOOL. .KNITTING WITHOUT "SPECIMENS" THE MODERN BOOK OF SCHOOL KNITTING AND CROCHET BY P. WALSALL OF " HANDWORK AND NEEDLEWORK " AND ELLEN CLAYDON J AUTHOR C.

. Ltd.Printed by Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons. London .

to serve no useful end. therefore. These occupations are. but proving. for the selection of suitable materials. The revised " Suggestions for the Teaching of Needlework " advances yet another argument in support of Knitting as an occupation. ensures that the girl must think in order The methods suggested in this book aim. and as enjoyable forms of Handwork for girls. have been hitherto made to deal adequately with the teaching of knitting and crochet work as sections of Needlework Teaching. : — ." a square of plain knitting to show chain edge -a specimen of work to show narrowings at the back of a stocking a knitted heel. : — The necessity for the for calculations of quantities to act effectively. With regard to this point the report states proficient in the point being taught. Moreover.. she condemns in no uncertain manner this wastage of effort and " The material on specimens. We may then expect that their education in this direction will become a " self-feeding fire. These examples have been worked by the girls over and over again. as well as the maximum of training in manual dexterity. therefore. etc. is wise. and cost. but among the most attractive subjects to girls in the whole curriculum. in which they are instinctively It interested. educational value with social Many e.g. further. such work as knitting and crochet. which may well be quoted here " Facility in Knitting can only be acquired early. and not only providing delightful and healthy occupations for leisure hours in after-school days. at uniting utility.PREFACE. Many books have been published during the last few years dealing with modern methods in the teaching of sewing. the lack of purpose In the in the work served to kill the child's interest instead of stimulating it. of Pounds been wasted in this manner. to feed the interest of the girls in these useful occupations. should be so taught that the maximum of mental development is obtained from it." carrying them far. however. recently issued report by the Chief Woman Inspector on the teaching of Needlework. is certainly that which is most likely to survive their school days. and to meet their eager demands for help. nevertheless. long after they have become quite — — wool and knitting cotton have Worse still. however. and in old age or ill-health has a value distinct from that of the garments produced. measurement of sizes. Fewer attempts. schools have in times past spent much time on knitting " Specimens. not only very useful branches of Needlework." The subject. of great social service to others.

and will observe every knitted and crocheted hat. This selection and making of things that are vitally interesting to her will stimulate immensely the girl's out-of-school observations. at embracing within its scope those things in her school and home environment that are of living interest to the child. ' ' working of Specimens should be discouraged. The scheme aims. CLAYDON." The scheme of Knitting and Crochet suggested in this book endeavours to meet by providing that girls shall learn all varieties of stitches The selection of such articles for and garments. . bonnet. C. while making useful articles whatever may be their vocations in adult life. therefore. A. The little girl's constructive instinct has its first outlet in making something for Later. she is interested also in making her doll and in decorating her doll's house.. The effect of Specimen work on Needlework teaching has been disastrous. the book aims at producing a spirit of artistic appreciation. each class has been guided by the interests of the child at each successive stage. vi ' ' PREFACE. by encouraging the selection of materials and colours which are suitable and in good taste such training cannot fail to exercise a refining and beneficial influence on girls. coat. E. She will be quick to seize upon new patterns of knitting in shop windows. or wrap in the school playground. in order to plan one to suit her own needs. CLAYDON. P. things for her own use and the use of her relations and friends. the foregoing criticism. Lastly.

. . AND FRINGING WINDING WOOL SEWING TOGETHER PARTS OF GARMENTS SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ABBREVIATIONS WOOLCRAFT BRITISH MANUFACTURERS GERMAN WOOLS ....34 . .. ...... POMPOMS. ........... .. FULL-SIZED SCARF ON BONE NEEDLES.... .... ...... ..... ...... .. TO FIT THE CHILD 3. .. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS... . ................. ... .. PAGE v 13 13 15 18 ....... ........ .... .— Preface A: Knitting METHOD OF HOLDING WOOL MAKING A SLIP LOOP CASTING-ON PLAIN KNITTING PURLING CASTING-OFF COUNTING ROWS AND ROUNDS JOINING WOOL PICKING UP STITCHES DECREASINGS INCREASINGS B.... ... .......... ...... .. Crochet METHOD OF HOLDING WORK MAKING A SLIP LOOP CHAIN STITCH DOUBLE CROCHET TREBLE STITCH DOUBLE TREBLE STITCH SINGLE STITCH JOINING WOOL TASSELS.... .. 34 34 36 36 36 37 38 39 42 42 42 42 43 44 49 AND WOOLS : QUALITIES....... CONTENTS....21 20 24 27 28 30 31 ...... DOLL'S SCARF ON STEEL NEEDLES ..... ....... .... 50 52 52 52 53 vu ... DOLL'S SCARF KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES 2 (b)........... ..... PRICES. . .. . ................ .. .. ....... ............. 2 (A)... DOLL'S MUFF KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES 1.... ....... .. . .... .. .... AND USES .... . ... ... DOLL'S SHAWL KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES 4... ... Standard I and Upper Infants...

... 1. 11 12.. 7. 16. .Vlll 5. . 8.... . 9. . 4. 5.. ROLLED PINCUSHION QUILT FOR DOLL'S BED PURSE WITH NECK-CORD FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR PURSE WITH HANDLES FOR CHILD'S OWN USE KNITTED IRON-HOLDER PINCUSHION COVER WASHING GLOVE DOLL'S MUFF WITH KNITTED NECK SUPPORT DOLL'S WOOLLEN SHOE BABY'S KNITTED SHOE KNITTED TOY REINS „ „ ... 15... . . FULL-SIZED CROCHETED HAT TO FIT CHILD OF TEN CROCHETED PURSE FOR CHILD'S OWN USE ... 13. DOLL'S CROCHETED HAT (b).. 7.. 13 14 14 15 15 16 16 17 DOLL'S SOFA RUG DOLL'S DUTCH BONNET COSY FOR DOLL'S TEAPOT DOLL'S VEST DOLL'S KNITTED HAT DOLL'S JERSEY DOLL'S KILTED WOOLLEN SKIRT DOLL'S KNITTED COAT (jf-LENGTH) DOLL'S KNITTED PETTICOAT DOLL'S SLIPPER WITH LEATHER SOLE (A). . 6. . . III. SMALL BOY'S KNITTED BRACES COLOURED CASE FOR CHILD'S BALL BABY GIRL'S KNITTED STAYS DOLL'S SCARF KNITTED ON THREE NEEDLES MARBLE BAG FOR CHILD'S BROTHER LUNCH BAG FOR CHILD'S OWN USE .. 6... Standard 1. . .. Standard CONTENTS. 12. FULL-SIZED RUG FOR HOUSEHOLD USE (a). DOLL'S MUFF KNITTED CUFFS FOR CHILD'S .. FULL-SIZED CROCHETED SHAWL (A). (ALTERNATIVE SHAPE) II. 3.. .. . 8.. 10. COVER FOR NEEDLE-BOOK ANTIMACASSAR FOR DOLL'S HOUSE (B).. . 8. 2. 10. KNITTED RUG FOR DOLL'S HOUSE (B). 7..... 6. 'KNITTED BOOK MARKER WITH FRINGED ENDS 2. 5. 11. DOLL'S CROCHETED SHAWL (b). 14.. FULL-SIZED ANTIMACASSAR FOR HOUSEHOLD USE (A). . OWN WEAR . 3 3 4.. 9.

14. triangular head-wrap 2. (a). Standard V.... .. 3. . CROCHETED HAIR-BAND FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR .... baby's first vest child's vest striped silk tie. DOLL'S CROCHETED PETTICOAT 16 (B). (b)... or sports tie in club colours baby's belt knitted scarf sleeping sock lady's bedroom slipper 10.. 9.. OR SHAPED NECK-WRAP. 6. woollen bonnet for child's own wear woollen hat knitted on three needles . ... 12. ....... 13.. RULES FOR KNITTING AND TURNING HEELS 6 (b).. 13.... 9 9 10. .... for child's . . 5..... . 2. .. . 12.... ... . . . knitted in strips petticoat.. knitted in strips. 4. 11. knitted hat for child's own wear tie knitted in spider pattern 15 (a).. . doll s petticoat. small girl's crocheted stays crocheted hair-band for girl's own wear crocheted shawl (simple pattern) girl's crocheted hat (simple pattern) girl's crocheted bonnet (simple pattern) .. IN CROCHET 3.. 8.. own wear 1.CONTENTS.. 12. ... 15.. doll's crocheted 'bonnet 15 (b). .. VESTETTE. 10. SHAWL OR WRAP OF SHETLAND WOOL GIRL'S CROCHETED PETTICOAT (SIMPLE PATTERN 8.. FULL-SIZED BONNET FOR CHILD OF EIGHT OR NINE 16 (a). . FULL-SIZED CROCHETED PETTICOAT FOR CHILD OF TEN OR ELEVEN 17. CROCHETED SCARF 9. 11. 14.. CROCHETED CUFFS FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR 18. CHILD'S KNITTED STOLE OR MUFFLER CHILD'S KNITTED MUFF BABY'S KNITTED PETTICOAT 4. CROCHETED SILK NECK-WRAP CROCHETED TIE FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR . 11... knitted tea-cosy doll's jersey on three needles doll's hat . Standard IV. KNITTED HUG-ME-TIGHT OR BOLERO 6 (A). 1... BABY'S GAITER 5.. 7. CHILD'S SOCK 7.

. 180 183 183 186 189 192 194 195 197 197 197 202 202 203 .CONTENTS. CROCHETED EGG-COSY CROCHETED TEA-COSY 6. . WITH BRIM 7. CROCHETED PERAMBULATOR COVER ). stockings of different sizes 1 (c). CROCHETED COT COVER 7 (c).. CROCHETED SOFA RUG CROCHETED HUG-ME-TIGHT 8. CROCHETED SHAWL 157 159 160 162 164 167 170 171 172 174 176 178 Standard VII. . GENTLEMEN'S RIBBED SOCK 3. 5. 6. 8. . .7 7 (b).. FIRST LACE EDGING IN CROCHET 9. Standard VI. 1 (B). 10. GLOVE FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR MITTEN FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR BABY'S KNITTED COAT 2. 10. BABY'S KNITTED GLOVE KNITTED LACE EDGING 5. BABY'S ORNAMENTAL SILK SOCK 4. . .. stocking for child's own wear 1 (b). SECOND LACE EDGING IN CROCHET 11. . THIRD LACE EDGING IN CROCHET 1(A). CHILD'S KNITTED JERSEY 4. BABY'S CROCHETED BONNET CROCHETED WOOLLEN HAT. . . RE. . CROCHETED PETTICOAT 9. CROCHETED CURTAIN HOLDER 1 PAGE (a).welting and re-footing of socks OR STOCKINGS 2. BABY'S BOOTEES 3.

will find little difficulty in adding to the following syllabus. high from head to foot." Each teacher will. Every girl should. therefore. are often too large for them to manipulate and also take too long. will be observed that a very wide range of articles has been suggested each Standard or Class. It is unlikely that any one girl will make all the articles given.. etc. but the syllabus for the class should. The tradition that a child cannot be expected to make more than one garment a year is passing away." THE MODERN BOOK OF SCHOOL KNITTING AND CROCHET. Each girl may then select -those which she requires. when the time is short. after careful measurement by the children. of the size required to fit the child. GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS. . always keep in her I. Moreover. It is advisable. high. be guided also by -the interests and needs of her own particular girls and district. iull-sized garments. say 16 in. or modifying it to suit her own requirements. as a guide for their future work. Even in upper standards the teacher will sometimes find it useful. ifor : —It — — instructions for making the article full size. doll's house. a teacher can more effectively teach a new stitch or method when all the children are working on articles to fit the same doll. The report adds " Variety of work is good both for the teacher and the class. both small size for the Doll or Doll's House. in the case of a very large class. the knitting or crochet will be done. All the doll's garments described in this lbook have been made to fit a doll 16 in. and. It is a good plan to keep at schooi a doll of suitable size. The width across arecord III. In many cases. or even garments to fit the children themselves. — book the detailed -In 11 . ior the majority of children in lower classes to knit or crochet small articles or garments for their dolls. of course. II. however. provided that she has not made such garments or articles before. doll. instructions are given for the knitting or crocheting of the In lower classes. to teach the method of working by means of a small article. Children will soon be able to make a fair -for which the article is being made. every case. as the recent report on Needlework Teaching suggests. to which children They will thus have a standard of comparison shall fit all their doll's garments. estimate of the number of stitches required for articles of given sizes. and full size. Children who show exceptional facility should be encouraged to attempt larger articles.•article.KNITTING WITHOUT "SPECIMENS. provide a choice of garments.

) Count the number of stitches that have produced unstretched knitting 1 in. the number of stitches or chain should be diminished proportionately. Another obvious method is to sketch the necessary diagrams boldly on the blackboard. A very coarse crochet hook and rug wool are also suitable for demonstrating points in crochet work. IV. In teaching all new points in knitting. children should be allowed to bring their own dolls they can then make the same garment a second time. in width. estimating entirely for themselves. the required width in inches has been given as well as the number of stitches or chain to commence with.. a bonnet. e. Adopt the plan described above for estimating the number of stitches necessary. (Use the same size of needles and wool as those to be employed for : ' the garment. in. 8 m After the method of making a garment. or crochet-hook are employed. size round waist 8f in. length of arm 3£ in. such as those shown in Fig. —The teacher should discuss with the girls the selection of suitable colours and materials for their work. coarser than those given — in the directions. as for a knitted tam-o'-shanter. Such a proceeding is sometimes useful in order to lessen or simplify the work in the case of backward children. skirt and measurement round head. If wool. that the same number of stitches may produce pieces of knitting of very different sizes. it is often helpful for This older girls to sew together and decorate garments made in lower classes.12 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Pompoms. from knowledge previously In gained. it is well to encourage the children to introduce variations in pattern from the teacher's type. the number of stitches requisite to fit the respective dolls brought. and should let them calculate the cost of every article made. e. It will be found that the knitting of individual children varies so widely in slackness or tightness.g.. The following plan may be adopted in estimating the exact number of stitches required in the case of individual knitters Work a small piece of knitting of not less than 1 in. — — Tassels. 5. V. directions concerning the fundamental processes of Knitting are collected in pages 13-33 those dealing with Crochet will be found on and pages 39-42 are occupied with instructions on the making of pages 34-8 . Therefore. . the shoulders was 4 5£ . The same variation occurs also in crochet. . and Fringing. the case of the second article made. Multiply this number by the number of inches required for the width of the garment. For convenience.. VII. The dimensions will also be found helpful in cases where teachers have not at their disposal the exact size of needles or wool advised in the instructions. thus giving scope for initiative and originality. — affords good social training. VIII. in the instructions for every garment. This is an educational aspect of the work which should not be neglected.. - length in. VI. needles. and avoiding keeping all the girls at the same level.. the teacher should demonstrate tothe whole class by means of large wooden knitting needles and thick rug wool. in width. and this will give the number of stitches to be cast on. -A certain amount of co-operation is advisable..g. has been grasped.

giving an additional twist round the last finger.A. bring it forward between the first finger and the thumb. 3).) . METHOD OF HOLDING WOOL. Method of Holding Wool in Knitting. (See Figs. (Outside view as seen by an onlooker.) UHHUHUIM^^HBg Fig. right hand as described under " Method of Holding Wool. 3. Pass the wool over the first finger of the right hand. and pull gently on in the right hand. and draw the thread through the loop. round the point of the right-hand needle (Fig. 1. about 6 1 the left-hand 'thread to tighten the stitch.— KNITTING. pass the wool the needle under the loop. 1 and 2. thus making another loop. and pass it once completely round the thumb from left to right. crossing the wool Pass the wool coming from the ball over the fingers of the as shown in Fig. Withdraw the thumb. 13 (See Fig. SLIP LOOP. Catch the wool in the left hand from the end." Pass the point of With the forefinger of the right hand.) MAKING A Take a knitting-needle in. 4. and over the fourth finger. under the second and third fingers.

( Method of Holding Wool in Knitting.14 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. the twisting of the wool round the little finger.) (Step 1. 2. Inside Front. Fig. with the right hand raised as for showing also slipping the wool over the right-hand needle with the first finger.) . View as seen by the worker.

Repeat this process until the required number of stitches has been cast on. and retain it on the needle. . the process until the required number of stitches have been cast on. Make a second. as before. and place the wool in position Insert the point of the rightfor knitting over the right-hand fingers.) slip loop and place it on the needle beside the first one. 4. 6.. One knitting-needle only and the left thumb are employed.) CASTING-ON. 5 r the first (Fig. (a) First hand. or when coarse . when strength is required. and draw a second stitch through forefinger of the right hand (Fig.KNITTING. 5 Step 2). 5 Step 3). IS Fig. [Step 2. Place this stitch on the left-hand needle (Fig. Leave an end of wool a yard or more in length according to the number of stitches to be cast on. hand needle in the stitch. Making a Slip Loop. 3 that this method of casting-on consists in making a series of slip loops. This is the better method to employ needles are employed.Pass the needle to the loop as described above on one needle. Method slip — Knitting-on. It will be seen from Fig. Make a left Take a second needle : : (b) Second Method. pass the wool round the point of this needle with theStep 1). Make a slip loop as described above. in the right hand. Continue (See Fig.

Fig. Casting-on.16 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 5.) . (Steps First Method. 1. 2. and 3. Knitting-on.

) 2— (815 B) . Second Method of Casting-on —a Series of Slip Loops. to draw the first stitch of each needle sufficiently tight to leave no gap between (c) — . 17 Fig. form the twenty-first stitch.KNITTING. Knitting-on. Casting-on on Three Needles. the needles.) Fig. and again keep it on the right-hand needle. form the twenty-first stitch. Casting-on on Three Needles. 19 stitches on the second needle (making 20 in all). pass the right-hand needle it on the right-hand needle Cast on another to the left hand. 7. drop the left-hand needle. (Fig. and leave needles. {Step 1. to form the first stitch of the third Cast on the remaining 19 stitches of the third needle. and pick up a fresh needle with the right hand. Take great care needle. 6. Suppose that 20 stitches are to be cast-on on each of three (1) Cast on 20 stitches on one needle. 7.

Retain this new iStitch on the right-hand needle. 1 and 2). Pass the left lightly along the three needles to see that no stitches have Bring the third needle round to the commencing stitch of the first needle and begin to knit in that stitch.) Take the first needle." described under ' • — PLAIN KNITTING. and be careful. the required number of stitches by making a series of slip loops. Fig. in making the first stitch on this needle. and cast on (2) When the second method is employed. Take up the second needle. and draw the wool through to form another stitch. (Step 2. Proceed in this manner to the end of the row In knitting on two needles the first stitch of each row must always be sliDDed This slipping may be done in two ways (in plain knitting) . 9). " : . Place the hands in position as described under " Method of Holding Work " Insert the point of the right-hand needle in the {Figs. to pass the wool round the thumb as closely as possible to the last stitch on the first needle this will prevent the formation of a gap between the needles.18 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 8. stitch to be iknitted pass the wool round this needle with the forefinger of the ri^ht hand & •(see Fig. 8. drawing the first stitch up very tightly so that no " bar of wool " is left between the needles. Deal similarly with the commencement of the third needle. and join the three needles together as " Knitting-on. (Fig.) hand become twisted. Casting-on on Three Needles.

Chain Edge. —In this method the needle simply inserted knit-wise. 9. and the stitch is slipped off on to the right-hand needle. Fig.KNITTING. Plain Knitting. Fig. (1) 19 is Without chain edge. 10. .

In this method the needle is inserted purl-wise. (Step 2. Fig.20 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.) . 10. Fig.ep 1. Insert the needle from right to left through the front of the stitch to be purled. Fig. (See Fig. 11. 11).) is — PURLING. (S.ng. the wool (2) With chain edge. Fig. 11(a) ). 11(a). and the second stitch knitted in the ordinary manner. keep the wool to the front of the work. Draw the wool through the stitch in a backward direction (Step 2. Purling. Pass the wool round the point of the right-hand needle from right to left (Step 1. Purl. carried round the first stitch from the front to the back of the work. In purling. and allow the loop to be drawn off the left-hand needle.

then. 15). Again knit two together and transfer the stitch.. (b) Casting-off. chain edge is produced by this method of casting-off. pass the second stitch over this. Second Method. 21 CASTING-OFF. first stitch over the second. Third Method To produce a rounded method of closing up an opening. leaving an end about 8 in." It produces an edge which matches the casting-on better than the edge produced by the First Method. Break off the wool. Deal with this remaining stitch as described under First Method. 12). and draw the end of the wool right through the stitch (see Fig. Proceed in this manner until one stitch only remains. and transfer the resulting stitch from the righthand needle to the left (Fig. 12. Deal with this remaining stitch as described under First Method. Continue to remove the stitches in this manner (see Fig. When only one stitch remains.. Repeat this process until only one stitch remains on the needle.KNITTING. Knit a stitch. and fasten off the end by knitting or darning it in. 13). and knit the second . A Fig. 14). break off the wool draw the loop of the remaining stitch through. in length. First Method. Knit the third stitch. Knit two together (Fig. This is known as " Knitting-off. (a) First Method. draw the . Slip the first stitch. (c) — . with the left-hand needle.

at the toe of a stocking. Arrange the stitches on two needles. Turn the work on to the wrong side.22 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.) Fourth Method of — To produce a square closed end. {Step 2. Second Method. one from each needle . one from first resulting stitch over the second. etc. top a baby's glove. in this Deal with this remaining stitch as . 16 and 17). Pass the Again knit two stitches together. Continue way until only one stitch remains. Fig (i) Castiag-off. each needle. and repeat the process of passing the previous stitch over. an equal number on each. Knit two stitches together. described under First Method. knit another two stitches together in the same manner (see Figs.

Method of- Third Method to produce a Rounded Closing up an Opening. : (Step 1. 16.) . Casting-off. : Fig.KNITTING. Fourth Method to produce a Square-closed End. Casting-off. 23 Fig. 15.

Break off the wool.wise into the second stitch (Fig. 17. still letting the second stitch remain on the back knitting-needle. Arrange the stitches on two needles. Thread this into a wool needle which has no point and proceed as follows (1) Insert the wool. stitch (Fig.needle knit. letting the second stitch still remain on the front knitting-needle. it is the neatest. without leaving any evidence of a ridge. Next insert the wool-needle purl. and let this stitch remain on the knitting-needle..— 24 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. and slip Insert the needle knit-wise into the second off the stitch on to the wool-needle. etc. Draw the wool through. Though the most difficult method of casting-off. leaving an end about 14 in. 19). in order correctly to follow instructions. . This is another method of casting-off the toe of a stocking. — — : COUNTING OF ROWS AND ROUNDS. 20 and 21 show the methods of doing this. : {Step 2. Return to the front needle and repeat process (1). an equal number on each. Figs. Continue in this way until only one stitch remains. Fig. and then to the back and repeat process (2). Casting-off. and let this stitch remain on the knitting-needle.wise into the first stitch on the front needle. and slip the stitch from the knitting-needle on to the wool-needle.) (e) Grafting-off. to to count readily the number of " Rows " or " Rounds " which have been be able worked. long. Draw the wool through. It is frequently necessary. 18). (2) Insert the needle purl-wise into the first stitch on the back needle. Fourth Method to produce a Square-closed End. Deal with this last stitch as described under the First Method.

Grafting-off. 18. 25 Fig.v 19. f.) . Grafting off.KNITTING. (Step 2. Fig. (Step 1.

) . (Twelve rows of Plain Knitting. 21. Counting of Rows. indicates two rows. (b) Counting of Rows. Each white mark. two rows of knitting going to form one ridge. Each white mark represents two rows. Twelve rows of plain knitting are shown in Fig. indicates Fig. 20. therefore. 20. Twelve rounds of plain knitting are shown one round. (therefore. in Fig. Each white mark. Counting of Rounds. Fig.26 (a) KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. ! (Twelve rounds of Plain Knitting. Each white mark represents one round. 21.) Counting of Rounds.


KNITTING.
JOINING WOOL.
Under no circumstances should knots be employed to join wool in knitting. a knot occurs in the knitting wool which is being used, it should not be allowed to remain there, but the wool should be broken, and the join carried out in the correct manner. Proceed as follows Use up the wool till an end about 5 in. long remains. Take the end of the new piece to be joined on, and place it alongside the old end, so that the two ends point in opposite directions, the old end to the right, and the new end to the left (see Fig. 22). Hold the end of the new thread steady by placing it between the
If
:

27

Method of Joining Wool

in Knitting.

first

and second fingers of the left hand. Holding the short end of the old wool in the right hand, together with the new wool coming from the ball, knit four or five stitches with the double wool. Then, dropping the end of the old wool, continue to knit with the new wool alone. Both the new and the old ends will thus be left on the side of the work away from the knitter. When knitting the next row or round, be careful not to separate the threads in the double stitches, but to knit the two The presence of the double stitches naturally produces a certain thicktogether. ness in the knitting, which in fine work is better avoided. This can be done by splitting the wool at each end for a few inches, and removing half the strands of each before placing them together. The two ends together then make the thickness This plan, however, should not be attempted with beginners. of one thread.

28

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.
PICKING UP STITCHES.

(a)

In Plain Knitting, loops only.

when the

stitch has been dropped

two or three

Pick up the dropped stitch on to the point of the left-hand needle in front of the bars. With the right-hand needle take' up the lowest strand and place it on the left-hand needle next to the stitch (Fig. 23, Step 1). Take the stitch on the point of the ri°:ht-hand needle, and draw it over the bar and the point of the lefthand needle (Fig. 23, Step 2). Withdraw the point of the right-hand needle. Now take up the next strand above, and place as before -on the left-hand needle. Repeat the process described above. Continue in this manner until the top loop of the ladder has been picked up.

A.
Fig. 23.

Plain Knitting
(A) Step

:

picking up a Dropped Stitch.
1.

(B) Step 2.

(b)

In Purling, ONLY.

when the

stitch has been dropped for

two or three loops

Pick up the dropped stitch on to the point of the left-hand needle behind the With the right-hand needle take up the lowest loop and place it on the left-hand needle in front of the stitch (Fig. 24, Step 1). Insert the point of th
loops.

KNITTING.

29

right-hand needle into the stitch, and draw it forward over the loop and the point of the left-hand needle (Fig. 24, Step 2) Withdraw the point of the right-hand needle. Proceed in exactly the same manner with each ascending loop, until the top rung of the ladder has been picked up.
.

Purling
(A)

:

picking up a Dropped Stitch.
1.

Step

(B) Step 2.

(c)

Picking up the Stitch with a Crochet-hook.

This method is preferable considerable number of loops.
(1)

when

the stitch has been dropped

down

for

a.

Plain Knitting. Insert the point of the crochet-hook in the dropped stitch,, With the hook, draw the loopit behind the lowest loop (Fig. 25, Step 1). forwards and downwards through the stitch (Fig. 25, Step 2). Retaining thestitch on the hook, pass the point behind the next loop above, and draw this through the stitch as before. Repeat this process until the top loop of the ladder has been, picked up.

and pass

To pick up a purled stitch with a crochet-hook, turn to'the back; (2) Purling. of the work, and proceed exactly as in the case of a knitted stitch.


30

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

A.
Fig. 25.

B.

Picking up a Dropped Stitch with a Crochet-hook.
(A)

Step

1.

(B) Step 2.

DECREASINGS.
I.

The number ways
:

of stitches

on the needle

may

be decreased in either of the following

(a)

First Method.

Knitting two stitches together. The method of doing this is clearly shown in the illustration of Casting off, Second Method, Figs. 13 and 14. This method of decreasing produces a slight slope to the right.
(6)

Second Method.

Slip a stitch, knit the next stitch, and with the point of the left needle draw the slipped stitch over the knitted one and the point of the right needle. The process is clearly shown in the illustration of Casting off, First Method (Fig. 12). This method of decreasing produces a slight slope to the left. It is sometimes called the " Pulling-over " method.

The above two ways of decreasing are frequently used in the same piece of work, where it is necessary to make the decreasings slope in pairs, as, for example, on either side of the seam-stitch in the leg of a stocking, or on the sides of the toe of a sock or stocking.

The increasing made by this method is. and then knitting the next stitch as usual. Fig. and then. i. The number ways : 31 of stitches on a needle may be increased in any of the following First Method. 26. Second Method. almost indistinguishable. before removing This is a very satisfactory method of increasing into the back of the same stitch. and does not draw the knitting out of shape in any way. Second and Third Methods of Increasing. A. A. an additional stitch may be made by bringing the wool to the front under the point of the right needle. indeed. Knit twice into the same stitch. INCREASINGS. 26. B.e. When doing plain knitting.. Fig. it. as it produces no hole in the work. into the front. .— KNITTING. for most purposes. taking it over to the back again. shows the new stitch thus made. and the wool being placed round the right-hand needle in readiness to knit the next stitch.

27). and under it to the front again then purl the next stitch. This makes a very small hole which is used in some fancy patterns. Fifth Method — To make a stitch at the commencement of a row. This method produces no hole. in a child's jersey.. Make Fig. To obtain a still larger hole. 27. e. 28).. Such a hole is sometimes employed as a button-hole. Pass it over the needle to the back. This method of increasing causes a hole. This forms an additional stitch or loop at the . B). pass the wool twice or even three times round the needle.g. A seiies of such holes may also be used for inserting ribbon or draw-strings. In the case of purling.32 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. in a Bedroom Slipper. etc. Take up the small bar of thread between the two loops of 1he previous row. Fourth Method. Fourth Method of Increasing. Third Method — Raising a stitch. . e. Place the point of the right-hand needle under the wool before inserting it into the first stitch (see Fig. 26. putting it on to the left needle.g. and is frequently used to produce fancy patterns. and knit into it (see Fig. the stitch in this case by taking a loop from the row below (see Fig. and knitting into it with the right needle. the wool is already at the front.

KNITTING.
beginning of the row. this loop separately.

33

When coming back

along the row, be careful to knit into

Fig. 28.

Fifth Method of Increasing.
stitch at the

(Making a

beginning of a needle.)

3-(8l5B)

B.

— CROCHET.
:

METHOD OF HOLDING WORK.
Pass it over the first the wool in the left hand in the following way two fingers, under the third, and wind it once round the little finger, in order to keep the wool in position and control the tension. Hold the work with the thumb and first finger of the left hand, and stretch out the second finger a short distance to hold the wool clear of the work (see Figs. 29 and 30).

Hold

Fig. 29. Method of Holding Wool in Crochet. (Outside view as seen by an onlooker.)

MAKING A

SLIP LOOP.

Instructions for doing this are given above under Knitting.

CHAIN STITCH.
a slip loop, and place it on the hook. Holding the wool at a tension. across the fingers of the left hand, place the hook under the wool, as shown in Fig. 31, and draw the portion taken up through the loop. Again place the hook under the wool and draw it through. Repeat this until a chain of the requisite34

Make

CROCHET.

35

Fig. 30.
(

Method of Holding Wool

Inside front view as seen by the worker
to

—but with

in Crochet.

the left the

hand raised in order
little finger.)

show

the

method

of twisting the wool

round

Fig. 31.

Chain' Stitch.

36

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

length has been obtained. A chain is always employed in commencing a crocheted article, and chain stitches are also used for turning the rows in double, treble, and double-treble crochet.

DOUBLE CROCHET.
short length of chain as a foundation. Place the hook in the second chain, and draw a loop of wool through it. Now place the hook again under the wool, and draw the wool through the two loops which are upon the hook. This completes the first stitch. Place the hook in the next stitch, as seen in Fig. 32, and proceed as before. Repeat this process to the end of the row.

Make a

.

Fig. 32.

Double Crochet.

TREBLE STITCH.
Again make a short length of chain as a foundation. Pass the hook under the wool, and then place it in the third chain from the end. Draw the wool through, thus making the number of stitches on the hook up to three. Put the hook under the wool {see Fig. 33), and draw a loop through the first two stitches then, again placing the hook under the wool, draw a loop through the last two. This completes
;

one treble

stitch.

DOUBLE TREBLE
This
before
is

STITCH.

it is

similar to treble stitch, but the hook is passed twice under the woo\ placed in the fourth chain. Draw the wool through, thus making thef

Fig. (See Fig. This completes one double treble stitch. then draw a loop through the next two. 35.CROCHET. lastly. Crochet —Double-treble Stitch. SINGLE STITCH. Fig. draw a loop through the first two stitches. Crochet —Treble Stitch. 37 number of stitches on the hook up to four. or as a means of getting from one place It is worked by passing the hook through to another without breaking the thread. 34.) . This is chiefly used as a joining stitch. Put the hook under the wool (Fig. and. 33. 34). draw a loop through the remaining two. and then drawing a loop of wool through both the stitch and the loop which was upon the needle already. a stitch.

When it becomes Fig. whether it be single. 36). Work the next stitch with the thread from the old ball. 36. . Method of Joining Wool in Crochet. one more stitch with the old (see Fig. using the new wool only. Proceed to join on the new wool as follows Leave enough wool from the old ball to make two or three more stitches take up the wool coming from the fresh ball. Crochet JOINING WOOL IN CROCHET. idouble. and work the next stitch with it.38 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. : necessary to join on new wool. the following with the new wool. and then continue the work. it is quite inadmissible to knot the two ends together. or double treble. treble. .

each one having a hole in the centre. Tie these tightly up together at the top with the piece of wool that was laid along the edge of the card. and the lengths employed will be shorter.. may be made from a crocheted chain looped up at equal intervals until sufficient fullness has been obtained. IX. Short descriptions of the methods of making them are given below. and place one over the other. Circular Method of Winding 39 Wool for a Pompom. These are often used as decorations for knitted and crocheted articles. and not a second time as in the case of the tassel. . : A Fig. (b) A Pompom may be made in a similar way to a tassel. and tie securely. but about twice as many loops of wool will be required. . suitable for a thick scarf. 37. (a) A Tassel may be quickly made as follows Take a strip of thick card and let Place along the top of the its width be equal to the length required for the tassel. AND : FRINGING. round and round the card until about twenty or twenty-five loops have been formed which lie evenly side by side. cutting o ff the short ends Level the ends of the tassels with scissors if they are of different lengths. The pompom will require to be tied once only at the top. Now wind the wool card a double or treble piece of wool 3 or 4 in. pompom or ball may also be made as follows Obtain two equal. circular pieces of card of the required size. long.— TASSELS. Now cut through all the loops of wool at the bottom edge of the card the cut edges will form the ends of the tassel. 37 was 4 in. The diameter of the card shown in Fig. A tassel of larger size. POMPOMS. effect. Wind a piece of wool two or three times round the tassel about a quarter of an inch from the top. Trim the ends with scissors to produce a nicely-rounded .

38. leaving the two ends of the strip of wool projecting on the & other side. and cut the wool all round.) . tie securely. 39). such as is used for cutting rug wool. pass them through the loop that was hooked through. Now take these two ends of wool upon the hook (see Fig. Proceed thus along the entire length of the edge to be (c) Steam the A : Fig.E the opening in the centre was 1 £ in." St. 38). Now push a crochet hook through one of the loops of the edge to be fringed. pompom pompom and the diameter o. A gauge. This produced a with a diameter of 2\ in. Fringing. and hold it in the left hand with the ends downwards. 40). take the doubled ! loop of wool from the left hand on to the crochet-hook (see Fig. (Step 1. Wind a separate piece of wool twice round tightly between the cardboard discs. and draw it pjust through the edge.40 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. II. and pull them up tightly with the left hand (Fig. and cutting along one edge of the loops thus formed. Fringe may be made in the following manner Cut a number of strips of wool twice the length required for the depth of the fringe. The dimensions may be varied to produce a of any size desired. This may be done by winding wool evenly round a strip of stiff card or wood. is useful for this purpose. the wool round the two cards from the centre outwards until they are covered and the centre is almost full. Insert the scissors between the cards at the outer circumference. and slip the pompom off. Double one of these strips (See " Knitted Rug. Wind ball in order to make the cut ends of the wool fluffy.) of wool.

) . POMPOMS. 41 Fig. Fringing. AND FRINGING. (Step 3. 40.TASSELS.

and the separate portions.. make (b) tog. Ch. from time to time. ithough such expensive appliances are hardly necessary for school purposes. Knitting-pin shields made of bone may be purchased at about 3Jd. tr. a double or treble loop will be pulled through. double or treble fringe is often desirable in the case of thin wool. crochet the portions of the garments together. K. —Many of the garments referred to in the book are not knitted in one piece. using single stitch for this purpose. A very simple method of shielding them is to insert each in a cork when the work is put away. st. Wind it loosely over three or four Withdraw these fingers carefully fingers of the left hand. Avoid drawing the work so tightly as In the upper classes. . to change the position of the ball. treble. The sharp points of steel knitting-needles and steel crochet-hooks are a source oE danger if carried uncovered. purl. — SEWING TOGETHER OF PARTS OF GARMENTS. drawing a strip of wool through every loop so that no spaces occur. XII. the girls may be taught to to cause dragging at the seams. require sewing together. X. stitch(es) si. making the fringe of greater thickness. All ends of wool left from the knitting or joining together of garments. d. knit.. In some : cases the following abbreviations are employed . In all cases this sewing should be done with the same material as that of which the garment has been knitted... as this makes it thin and poor. — ABBREVIATIONS. SAFETY PRECAUTIONS. In such a case put two or three slips of wool together. m. should toe neatly finished off by darning in on the wrong side of the work. d. avoid stretching it by winding it tightly into a hard ball. double . double crochet .. in the instructions (a) Knitting. . to render the join as imperceptible as possible.c. held outside the ball. This plan will keep the wool soft and elastic. and then double them to form a loop.. tr. or cotton. per pair. When winding wool from a skein. silk. A WINDING OF WOOL. fringed. The joins should be made on the wrong side of the garment. each time.— 42 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.. slip.. together. therefore. chain p. Thus.. XI. treble . Crochet. while winding.

the following distinctions are generally adopted by all firms (a) 2-ply is a term describing wools in which two threads only are twisted together. etc. which are more hairy and less soft in finish. producing wools of the thickness most generally employed for school purposes. Wools known as " Wheeling " are often equal in thickness to 6-ply. wear as long as. The lists of wools described are by no means complete catalogues of the varieties manufactured by these makers . Many retail firms are willing to quote lower prices to schools ordering in considerable quantities. more expensive wools of finer. and comparative thickness. Further information can always be obtained by applying to the firms direct. 5-ply wools are suitable for heavier garments. except Rug Wool. ' (b) 3-ply is descriptive of wools in which three threads 'are twisted together. though frequently four threads only. producing a thicker wool than 4-ply. In purchasing wool. or longer than. 2.). although a smaller number of thicker threads may be employed. They usually have a soft. or " Double Fingerings. fine finish. and are consequently heavier in make than 5-ply. some of the most expensive and highly-finished wools have been omitted for obvious reasons. quality. are the thickest wools usually (/) employed. such as thick winter socks or stockings. The prices quoted below will be found to vary locally (except in the case of " Greenock Wools. N. With regard to the comparative thickness of wools. Similar variations occur also in the thicknesses of the 2-ply. Sometimes the cheaper wools. 5-ply. 6-ply. the " twistedness " of the wool and the softness of the threads employed vary also. together with information with regard to the most useful varieties of wools for school purposes produced by each. as in Shetland wool. according to — : i quality. are employed." manufac- — tured by Fleming. and 8-ply wools. Reid & Co. 3-ply. (e) 6-ply wools are composed of six threads. producing a greater thickness than in the case of 2-ply wools. The names and addresses of four important British manufacturing firms have been given below. wearing quality. 3. but of greater thickness. 8-ply wools. softer." are used largely for knitted or crocheted coats and hats. for the same weight of a thinner wool gives greater length. l--7-So many varieties of knitting wools are now placed upon the market by British manufacturers that it is no easy matter to select the most suitable with regard to price. or to their local agents. though they approximate to the same size. composed of eight threads. however. 5-ply describes wools in which five threads are employed. eider wool. 4. it should be remembered that a thick wool at a low price may be no more economical than a more expensive thinner wool.B. petticoats. - make and (d) — 43 . It must be remembered. Wools known as " Double Knitting " are often equal in thickness to 8-ply. The 2-ply wools are thus the thin nest wools obtainable. (c) 4-ply wools are composed of four threads twisted together. The " Double Knitting " wools. The price of a wool is by no means an index of its Qualities of Wools. so that all 4-ply wools are not of exactly the same thickness. etc. and are suitable for making babies' garments and dainty shawls and wraps.— — WOOLCRAFT. and to fluctuate also with the state of the wool market. that the threads employed to produce a 4-ply wool vary in thickness with different makes .

Col3/8 lb. etc. and soft shawls or wraps. underwear. do. hard-wearing gloves.. and mixtures. 5. Scotch wool shops throughout the United Kingdom.). G r e enock Fingering (3. \ do. brown. etc. For hats. speckled wools. Greenock. Fancy per lb. Do. Greenock Super Fingering 3. cheaper than wools in fancy colours. Name of Wool. An important point in selecting the quality is its suitability to the purpose in hand. do. The plain colours generally include white. coats. do. BRITISH MANUFACTURERS AND WOOLS. green. do. Eider (2 Wool 3- and piy)- . ours. factured by this firm are known as " Greenock Knitting Wools. and smoother varieties. and pink. and 5-ply)." and are sold at uniform prices in the (4-ply). Scotland Fancy ours. For babies' garments.Scotch Fin. The Worsted Mills. while fancy colours include other shades in one colour (such as blue. a soft finish is necessary. do. Plain ours. the more hairy qualities are suitable. do. natural grey. Quality. Reid& The wools manu. 3/- per lb. : Co. (2. red. do. I'Messrs.— 44 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Col- 2/8 Col- per lb. Maker. Col4/— Do. to 6d. a lb. black. Wools in plain colours are usually from 4d.. Colours. 4.Plain gering ours. and per ours. 4. thick hose. Fleming. Use. do. Do. 5-ply).

Maker.WOOLCRAFT. 45 .

This wool is more expensive than those mentioned above. Fancy ours. Rug Cable Wool 2/8 per lb. Son & Co. and Fancy 5-ply). 4/5 per lb. tion Knitting. perambulators. J. per lb. shawls. 3. This Firm for its is noted Beehive Partners. 8d. Maker. highly England. and is therefore suitable for fine underwear. Alloa. York- Knitting Wools " " Beehive Scotch Fingering (2. finished fingering of excellent quality.. Use. do. do. do. coat or Sports Col3/9 This is a thick. as it does not irritate the skin. Baldwin & shire. stockings. etc. it is per lb. but has a smoother. Fancy ours. This is a fine. Fin- Plain ours. and soft underwear. Messrs. Plain ours. and articles where a dainty finish is required. Fancy Knitting Wcols. do. do." per lb. Col5/- This is a soft." Federa- firm are Scotland known " Alloa usually as the (4-ply). (2-ply This is a glossy. etc. for Wool. Col4/9 Col5/3 Worsted (2. as its per lb. Quality. do. It is suitable for socks.. It is suitable for the same purposes as the " Super Fingering Worsted. knitted coats. Do. gloves. suitable. 4.Rose factured by this gering Paton.46 KNITTING -WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Twisted). Colours and Mixtures. per 2-oz. also suitable for making rugs for cots. John The wools manu. petticoats." ours and Mixtures. Super gering Fin- Plain ours. per lb. Do. do. softer finish. scarfs. hardwearing rug wool of excellent quality. is Do. simi- to Andalusian wools. Rose Petti- Plain ours." Do. Halifax. . with a smooth lar finish. and 5-ply). Messrs. do.. do. & J. do. Ltd. soft wool. name Col4/5 implies. packet. Soft Knitting Wool. Col3/11 Col- This is a softer quality than the. and its " White Heather Wools. 3. 5/3 per lb. closelytwisted wool. Being warm and light." and suitable for vests. babies' garments. Ltd. per lb. do. do. 4.

do. less soft in Mixtures. This Firm for its is noted " Beehive Petticoat 3/11 per lb. Do. These are stout wools. 3. 4. do. Beehive Soft Knitting (4-ply) Plain Colours. do. do.. and splendidly. for garments. White Hea. Both per lb. per 2-oz. Col4/3 Do. do. Vest (2. Baldwin & Partners. " Beehive Ltd. wool. Do. do.. Beehive Shetland (2-ply). for dainty shawls and wraps. finish. suitable for purposes where a smooth. Use. and Fancy Fingering. wools suitable babies' generally. Beehive 4/6 per Vest Wool (2. do. 4-ply). fine- Beehive Andalusian (4-ply). per 2-oz. fine- finish is required. do. 9£d. but less highly finished Wool and than. J. ours. Do. Colthe " Beehive Scotch (2. do. Yorkshire. 4/6 per lb. lours. 4/6 These are soft. Maker. This is a useful vest wool. lb. 47' Name of Wool. This is touch. for its high quality and soft finish.. Quality. . Beehive vest wool. specially adapted for warm garments. Ivorine and Ice Wool (2-ply). do. do. do. suitable for purposes similar toper lb. It is a closelytwisted 4-ply wool. the- 4-ply). ours and 5-ply)." Beehive Double Knitting. do. and its " White Heather Wools. These are suitable fine wools. do. Do. articles and dainty Do. 8|d. 3. however. Fancy packet.. Knitting Wools Wool. 5/9 per lb.WOOLCRAFT. Messrs. Col- This wool is well/ known packet.Plain ther Scotch Fingering This is a hard-wearing. England. White Heather 3/11 per lb. 3.. do. & J. Beehive Eider. do. do. articles for sports' purposes. Halifax. do. soft and to thewashes. and." It is.

Yorkshire. packets. do." 4/6 Col4/1 per lb. 3. which combines hard-wearing qualities with softness of finish. varieties are sold in 4-oz. stockings. England. twisted variety) is thicker and more glossy than the Tur- Turkey Rug Wool (6-ply key Rug Wool. do. Ltd. . suitable articles. 5/2 per lb. petticoats. This Firm for its " is noted Beehive Beehive Rug Wool (2-ply 2/4 per lb. This is a finely finished Andalusian wool. do L adyship Andalusian Wool. . It is useful for fine shawls and garbabies' Do. do. and its " White Heather Wools. >'' Baldwin This Firm cially is spe- L adyship Scotch Fingering (2. Ltd. Plain Twist). do. Do. finish. West Croft Mills. for dainty Do. smooth ments. and Fancy ours. and warm light articles. Baldwin & Partners. & J. Wool and This is a soft vest wool with an exceptionally fine finish.. Plain ours. do. do. noted for " Ladyship its Wools. 4-ply). Ladys hip Shetland Wool. 4. Use. Ladyship Vest (2.. 5-ply). Messrs. Price. The Wool Beehive Rug (i. La d y s h p i 4/11 per lb. where hard wear required. per lb. is Do." Cable Twisted). Name of Wool.. do. and is suitable for socks. This is a closely twisted make of Shetland wool. This Fingering (3 and 4- a stouter and wool elastic than the Scotch Finis more piy)- gering. the Cable- Knitting Wools" England. do. This is a high-class Scotch Fingering. Quality. 3. Maker. Col- & Walker. The finer qualities are suitable for shawls. Both 2/2 per lb. do. Halifax. 5/6 per lb. 1 48 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.e. wMessrs.. Cross. etc.per lb. King Halifax. 5/. J. with a fine. do.

Maker.WOOLCRAFT. 49 .

and the total cost ll|d.. 4£d. — — Fig. see under Woolcraft.STANDARD i. Casting-on. per lb. Materials. . I and UPPER INFANTS. Cost of same at 3s. To Teach (1) DOLL'S MUFF KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES. (For cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool and other qualities. 6 Knitting Cotton at 2s. per lb.) If No. 41. 50 . 1 Id. Two Bone Needles size 6. Quantity required for a class of 50 = 5£ oz. (3. be employed. Rather less than i oz. (2) Plain Knitting on Bone Needles. of 4-ply wool. and Casting-off. Doll's Muff Knitted on Bone Needles. the quantity required will be 1\ oz. = Is.

or as many as will produce knitting haying Instructions. (Teach the first method of casting-on described in the General Instructions at the commencement of the book. —Double the strip.) Fig. rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. high.—The above muff. . ' — that the cast-off edge lies over the cast-on Oversew these edges neatly together.) Work a strip of plain knitting 3£ in. long. 51 Cast on ten stitches. (See General Instructions. and in all succeeding (Teach Cast off loosely. doll's garments described in the book. to obviate the difficulty of joining the ends of the ribbon neatly. 42. the first method of casting-off described in the General Instructions. 41.) . using a darning needle.B. without stretching. This may be tied in a bow. a. and all the have been made to fit a doll 16 in. so N. kind of wool as that of which the muff was knitted. Making up. Doll's Scarf Knitted on Bone Needles.width of 2 in. and the same edge.STANDARD I AND UPPER INFANTS. Suspend the muff by narrow ribbon of the required length. Knit every stitch of the first row. as shown in Fig.

of 4-ply wool. Quantity required for a class of 50 wool of J oz. long. = 9d.. be qualities. same at 3s. Cast on 42 stitches. Cost of (For cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool and other 4£d. see under Woolcraft. other Materials. per lb. . the quantity required will be 12 oz. so that they will Scarf.—Two Bone Needles—size 8. Plain Knitting. Doll's Shawl Knitted on Bone Needles. f Further practice in Casting-on. wide without Knit a length of 1J yds. 6 Knitting Cotton at 2s. DOLL'S SCARF KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES. and from longer strips of wool. Plain Knitting on wool of a suitable thickness. • INSTRUCTIONS FOR FULL-SIZED SCARF ON BONE NEEDLES. and Casting-off. a lb. Cost of same = Fig. and Casting-off.52 2(A). of making tassels. in.) employed. lid. of 4-ply wool or lb. Cast off loosely. and in all succeeding rows slip the first remaining stitches. —Two Bone Needles— a suitable thickness. Bone Needles. Work a strip of plain knitting 12 in. or as many as will produce knitting 7 in. and the total cost Is. 3 oz. Quantity required for a class of 50 = 9 J oz. be in proportion to the size of the scarf. per If No. 6d. Knit every stitch and knit the stitch of the first row. = 2s. 43. TO FIT THE CHILD. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. and attach a tassel to each. About A oz. Making up. Gather up the ends of the scarf. Practice in Casting-on. 3. — (For method 2(b).— Cast on eight stitches. DOLL'S SHAWL KNITTED ON BONE NEEDLES. or other 12J oz. in the same manner as. or as many as will produce knitting 1£ wide without stretching. of 4-ply wool required.) Cost at 3s. see General Instructions. Larger number of stitches employed. Make the tassels fuller. Instructions. size 7. lid. described under Doll's stretching. Materials.

If No. at 3s.) required will be 1 lb.. see under Woolcraft. Cast on 24 stitches. 44. and the cost about 2s. — N. or other wool of Quantity required for a class of 50 = 12J oz. 3s. without stretching. Work a strip of plain knitting 7 J in. as described under General Instructions. of 4-ply wool. —Two Steel Needles— a suitable thickness. Instructions for knitting a full-sized shawl in a are given under Standard Syllabus. 53 at 3s.) If No. Cast off loosely. and the cost 2s. per lb. 1 Id. — more difficult pattern V 4. or as many as will give a width of 5 in.STANDARD = I AND UPPER INFANTS. the quantity required will be 16 oz. see under Woolcraft. 6 Knitting Cotton be employed. Doll's Scarf on Steel Needles . long. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. size 14. Cost of same (For cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool and other quali3s. DOLL'S SCARF ON STEEL NEEDLES. = Fig. 43) all round the edge of the shawl. Instructions. Use of Steel Needles introduced. (For cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool and other qualities. 6 Knitting Cotton be employed the quantity ties. Id. Materials.B. J oz. Id. per lb. lid. Knit every stitch in the first row.. Make a single fringe {see Fig. and Chain Edge taught.

Make a fringe at each end of the scarf. 3s. 4£d. Quantity required for class of 50 = \2\ oz. (For cheaper wools.) If No. the quantity required will be 19 oz. 45. —Two Steel or Bone Needles— = Fig. long. per lb. Cost of same at 4s. 6d. in Plain size 10. Cast off. Knit every stitch of the first row. 6Jd. a strip of plain knitting 12 or 13 in. J oz. ROLLED PINCUSHION. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch so as to produce chain edge (see Fig. 4-ply wool. with Chain Edge. Cast on 10 stitches. Rolled Pincushion.54 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.. 6 Knitting Cotton be employed. . Knitting on Steel Needles. 44 and General Instructions). Instructions. or as many as will give a width of 1 or 1J in. = 2s. Second Exercise Materials. see under Woolcraft. and knit the remaining stitches. and the cost of the same at 2s. as described under General Instructions at the beginning of the book. — Work 5. per lb.

STANDARD I AND UPPER INFANTS. — *' = = Fig. from 16 to 20 in. Now roll the strip of knitting round the part of the chain where the join occurs. first row. 46. Quantity of Knitting Cotton for class of 50 Cost of same at 2s. 1 lb. thus affording a double fringe all round the quilt. The Quilt is made from three strips. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch in the manner described to : — produce chain edge and knit the remaining Making up. so as to produce the cylindrical shape shown in Fig. as in Fig. per ball)." No. Sew the loose end of the strip neatly down on to the knitting beneath it. 1J Balls of " Coton Perle D. with Chain Edge." Medium — Size (2d.M. 3s. 45. Third Exercise in Plain Knitting on Steel Needles. Cast on 16 stitches. 6. strips neatly together. of Knitting Cotton. or \ oz. or as many as will give a width of about If in. 46. as described . Put under General Instructions. Quilt for Doll's Bed. 55 Instructions. (Employ second method of casting-on given in General Instructions. per lb. 1 id.) Work 8 or 9 in.. per ball). without Knit every stitch of the stretching. of plain knitting with chain edge. Work a strip of plain knitting 7 in. without stretching. 5 (2d. 1£ Balls of O-So-Silkie. Materials. in length. 9 oz. —Sew the three practice in Oversewing. No. each of which is knitted as Instructions. for suspending the pincushion. and sew the two ends of the chain together to form a circle. — — 6. or as many as will produce a width of 2| in. Cast off. Making up.C. Two Steel Needles size 13. follows Cast on 14 stitches. Make a crocheted chain. stitches. QUILT FOR DOLL'S BED. in length. Cast off.

Cost of same = 2s. and attach the ends of this strongly to the under-edge of the flap. Oversew neatly up the side-seams. 6 Knitting Cotton of any Materials. PURSE WITH NECK-CORD FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. thus producing the pointed shape shown in Fig. and turn the bag inside out. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Make a plait of knitting cotton about 34 in. colour. without stretching. Turn in the top corners of the flap to meet each other. oz.). No. or as many as will give a width of 2\ in. long. deep uncovered at the top.56 7. Instructions. 47. Purse with Neck-cord for Child's own Wear. Turn down the flap to ascertain the position for the button.—Two Steel Needles— size 14. Making up. — . leaving a flap 2 \ in. Make a small loop of plaited knitting cotton. Knit every stitch of the first row. long. An alternative and easier method for fastening the purse is by means of a press-stud (20 a Id. Quantity of Knitting Cotton required for class of 50 = 1 lb. and sew this into its place. Cast on 20 stitches. Cast off loosely. Work a strip of plain knitting 8 in. Wool may be employed if preferred. Fold up the bottom edge of the strip to form a bag. and sew it on to the under-edge of the point of the flap for fastening purposes. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining A — stitches. 47. Fig. for the Cord. Plaiting introduced Fourth Exercise in Plain Knitting on Steel Needles. for suspending the purse round the neck.

8. Thread a large darning needle. J oz.STANDARD Both the loop N. to exercise their choice as to which for fastening the purse. so that a loop of the cord is left at each side to form a handle. or raffia needle with this chain. long. . 7Jd. Instructions. 48) to the right side. Work a strip of plain knitting 7 in. at the top of each side unsewn (see Fig. Turn the purse on neatly. required for class of 50 13 oz. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. PURSE WITH HANDLES FOR CHILD'S OWN USE. Sew the loose ends of the cord neatly together. Purse with Handles for Child's own Use. purse they would like to make. No. Making up. 57 may be made from — and the cord for suspension round the neck. Cast off loosely. This and the following exercise afford practice in the same type of Children may be allowed. I AND UPPER INFANTS. and draw up the top of the purse. Quantity of Knitting Cotton Cost of same at 2s. — — . colour.B. Method of making Fifth Exercise in Plain Knitting on Steel Needles. long. leaving 1 in. or as many as will give a width of 1\ in. Two Steel Needles size 14. 6 Knitting Cotton of any Materials. and run it round the purse at the bottom of the loose flaps left at the top. thus forming a bag. Cast on 20 stitches. — — = = Fig. knitting. Wool may be employed if preferred. Is. bodkin. Take the bottom edge of the strip and fold it upwards until it Oversew the two sides together lies exactly over the top edge. a Crocheted Chain taught. 48. therefore. without stretching. a crocheted chain if preferred. per lb. Knit every stitch of the first row. Make a crocheted chain of knitting cotton 14 in.

and on top of these place a lining of sateen. flannel. a blackboard pad for Teacher. or calico. — on the lining. Turn in the raw edges of . KNITTED IRON-HOLDER. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. 49. Cost of same at 2s. Knit every stitch of the first row. f oz. to form padding for the Holder. Sew the three strips together to form a square (Fig. 6 Knitting Cotton of any Cloth or flannel for padding. colour. Making up.. 4£d. three children knitting a each to form one iron-holder. unstretched. Work a strip of knitting 5J in.58 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. etc. —A . Quantity of Knitting Cotton required for class of 50 = 1 lb. 49) Place this square. per lb. print.B. Sixth Exercise in Plain Knitting. and oversew the folded edges of the lining to the sides of the knitted N. of No. are articles of a similar nature which may be made at this stage. The cover for the Iron-holder is made of three strips. square. is Instructions. = 2s. Cast off. or as many as will give a width of 1J in. Knitted Iron-holder. 3 oz.—Two Steel Needles—sizel4. Fig. 9. or a polishing pad for furniture or metal. dish-cloth for Mother. Materials. long. : — strip This exercise can be done as " Community " work. layers of cloth. and sateen for lining. each of which knitted as follows Cast on 14 stitches.

" Quantity of Knitting Cotton required for class of 50 Is. as shown in Fig. Form the chain into a loop at each corner. Now decorate the pincushion by sewing round the edges a plaited chain. or as many as will produce a width of 3£ in. — — = = Fig. 59 PINCUSHION COVER. Oversew the edges of the two squares together round three sides. Making up. edges of the fourth side together after the insertion of the cushion. Insert the square pincushion. and made from six threads of " O-So-Silkie. or \ ball of " O-So-Silkie. each of which is Cast on 20 stitches. 12J oz. Sewing on of Cord for Decorative Seventh Exercise in Plain Knitting. Work a square of plain knitting knit every stitch of the first row. a ball). 50. Place the second square over the first. 7d. Materials. Cost of same at 2s. —The Pincushion Cover consists of two squares. per lb. 6 Knitting Cotton. Instructions. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. without stretching. knitted as follows — . and then turn the cover on to the right side. J oz. 50. Purposes introduced. Cast off. Pincushion Cover. Oversew the stuffed with any cuttings or frayings from the children's work. : . Two Steel Needles size 12. The cover shown in the illustration is knitted from " O-So-Silkie.STANDARD io." Medium Size (2d. which may consist of a white' calico cover. of No. The chain should be about 23 in. I AND UPPER INFANTS. long." two threads going together to form one strand of the plait.

A 2-oz. Fig. = 3s. see under Woolcraft. lid. (Employ second method of casting-on described under stretching. ball of this cotton may be obtained for 3d.) — = — size 9. WASHING GLOVE. of 4-ply wool.) Work 15 in. while to be Picked up Two Bone Needles Materials. Materials.—Two Bone Needles—size 9. for class of 50 12J oz. J oz. Larger Number of Stitches Employed.. Washing Glove.•60 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 51. same at per lb. Milford's White Knitting Cotton. Wool stitches. No. Id. 6 (three threads). as shown in Fig. 3s. of plain knitting with chain edge. Cast off. J oz. Cost of wool. Fold the strip into halves. to teach the method of knitting with a section of the the Others are Temporarily Passed on to and Knitted Later. Quantity required (For cheaper . General Instructions. will knit eight gloves at a cost of 9d. Instructions. — Making up. Turn the glove on to the right side. 51. wide without Cast on 30 stitches. or as many as will produce knitting 5J in. DOLL'S MUFF WITH KNITTED NECK SUPPORT. — 12. ii. or 6 oz. and oversew neatly up the two side-seams. and three balls..

1 Jd. 61 If No. The diagram in Fig.e. and the total cost of the same. and slip the remaining — Fig. of plain knitting with chain edge.. the amount required for a class of 50 will be 17 oz.STANDARD I AND UPPER INFANTS. and tie the twoends of the wool securely together. and there will be no fear of their dropping. 52. Now slip the stitches- . The stitches will thus be out of the way until they are required. stitches Doll's Muff with Knitted Neck Support. Continue to work plain knitting on the remaining seven stitches. width of 2£ in. without stretching. long has been knitted with chain edge as before. Cast on 14 stitches. Unthread the needle. Now knit seven stitches (i. 6 Knitting Cotton be employed. Draw the needle through gently. Cast off. until a narrow strip 7 in. 53 shows the shape of the knitting laid flat before the muff is made up. or as many as will produce knitting having a Instructions. on to a darning needle threaded with wool. leaving the stitches supported by the wool.. 2s. Work 3£ in. half-way along the needle).

Cast on. long.62 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. D 6° \!< . Knit on these seven stitches a strip 6 in. which were supported on the wool on to a knitting-needle and draw out the wool. also with chain edge.

There will be about 38 or 40 rows. (For method of counting rows.. Doll's Woollen Shoe. knitting the ankle-band. stitches. 55. — Fig. 54. This will leave Knit three-quarters of eight stitches on the needle for knitting the toe of the shoe. cast off 12 stitches.STANDARD I AND UPPER INFANTS. shown in Fig. without' stretching. comes opposite to it. — Sew the short edge CD to the portion Ankle-band. Now flatten the work. 55. of the cast-on edge which so that the narrow portion . Cast off. an inch on these eight stitches. and in all succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. will give a width of 3 in. or as many as will give a width of 2\ in. <- IX"- -~> Fig. along the line AB. that is.e. i. or as many as — Cast on 24 plain Knit about 6 rows Making up. and then cast off. Cast on 20 stitches. see General Instructions^ Knit every stitch of the first row. which illustrates the shape of the shoe opened out before it is made up. for knitting.. Doll's Woollen of Shoe. This will be about 12 rows. 63 Instructions. to EF. producing Now the edge CD.

64

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

of the knitting forms the centre of the toe-piece. Sew together the two edges at the drawing the seam up slightly at the same time, in order to round the corners. Sew up the seam at the heel, making a pleat at the bottom of the seam, in order to shape the shoe to fit the heel. (See Fig. 54.) Sew the centre of the ankle-strap to the centre of the back of the shoe. The ankle-strap may be fastened by means of loop and button, (2) a press-stud, or (3) tying with a crocheted chain. (1) Decorate the toe of the shoe with a bow of ribbon or a woollen pompom.
toe,
:

A

N.B. The sewing together of this shoe is too and should be done for them by the older girls.
14.

difficult for

Standard

I children,

BABY'S KNITTED SHOE.

Eighth Exercise in Plain Knitting. More Advanced Example of Castingoff a Section of the Stitches.
Materials.
will

make one pair. Cost at 2d. per ball = 3 £d. can be made from 1 oz. of No. 6 Knitting Cotton

—Two Steel Needles—

-size 14.

1§ balls of " O-So-Silkie,"
If

Medium

size,

economy

is

important, a pah-

at a cost of l£d.

Fig. 56.

Baby's Knitted Shoe.

Cast on 38 stitches, or as many as will give a width of 4 in. Instructions. J without stretching. (Employ second method described under General Instructions, as this produces a firm edge.) Work 4J in. of plain knitting. Knit every stitch of the first row, and in all the succeeding rows slip the first stitch and knit the remaining stitches. Cast off 20 stitches, leaving 18 on the needle for knitting the top or toe of the shoe. Knit 1 J in. on these 18 stitches and then cast off. Cast on 46 stitches for the ankle-strap, or as many as will give a width of 6 in. Knit eight rows of plain knitting, and cast off.

Making up. The method same as that employed in the
Decorate the toe with a

bow

of making up and fastening the shoe is exactly the Doll's Woollen Shoe, given in the preceding exercise. of ribbon or a silk pompom.

STANDARD
15.

I

AND UPPER INFANTS.

65

KNITTED TOY REINS.

Plain Knitting employed for Article of more Difficult Construction.
Materials. Two Bone Needles size 8. 1 oz. of 4-ply wool or other wool suitable thickness. If wool at 2s. 8d. per lb. be employed, the cost of one set reins will be 2d. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool, see under Woolcraft.) No. 6 Knitting Cotton at 2s. a lb. be employed, the quantity required will be oz., and the cost a little less than 2d.

of of
If

Fig. 57.

Knitted Toy Reins.
12 stitches, or as

Instructions.

— Strip for Waist. —Cast on

many

as will give

without stretching. Work a strip of plain knitting about 22 in. Knit every stitch of the first row, and in all the succeeding rows slip the in length. Cast off. (To determine the exact first stitch and knit the remaining stitches.
a width of 2\
in.

5— (815E)

66

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.
round the waist of the child
for

length required, measure the strip reins are intended.)

whose wear the

Strip for Reins. Cast on eight stitches, or as many as will give a width of Knit a second strip of plain knitting about 36 in. long. Cast off. Making up. Sew little bells on to the front of the strip for the waist, as shown Let the strip of knitting be fastened round the waist by means of a in Fig. 57.
1J
in.

press-stud strongly sewn on. Attach the ends of the from each end of the latter.

Sew

longer strip to the waistband, at points 5 in. these ends on to the waistband very strongly.

I child to undertake she wishes, let several children co-operate in the work, each one knitting a strip of about 6 or 8 in. in length. The strips may then be joined together neatly to form the completed reins.

N.B. As this alone, the teacher

is

a large piece of knitting for a Standard
if

may,

16.

KNITTED TOY REINS (ALTERNATIVE SHAPE).

Further Practice in Casting off a Section of the Stitches.

Two Bone Needles size 8. 1J oz. of 4-ply wool. Cost of same Materials. If No. 6 (For cheaper wools, see under Woolcraft.) 4d. at 3s. lid. per lb. Knitting Cotton at 2s. a lb. be employed, the amount required will be 1J oz., and the cost 2Jd. These reins consist of a broad piece of knitting which fits across Instructions. the chest, two narrower strips to fit round the. arms, and a long strip for the reins.

=

Strip for Chest. Cast on 14 stitches, or as many as will produce knitting having a width of 2\ in. without stretching. Employ the second method of casting on (see General Instructions). Work 10J in. of plain knitting with chain edge. The exact length required must be determined by measuring the child for whose
-wear the reins are intended.

shown in

Strip for First Armhole. Cast off 7 stitches, thus producing the edge AB Continue to work plain knitting with chain edge on the remaining Fig. 59. Cast off. 7 stitches, i.e., along BC, until a length of about 11 in. has been knitted. Strip for Second Armhole. Pick up 7 loops at the end of the chest strap where the stitches were first cast on, i.e., along DE in Fig. 59. Commence to knit on these 7 stitches, knitting along the first row with double wool, except for the first stitch, which will be knitted with single wool. Do plain knitting with chain edge, until 11 in. has been knitted. Cast off. Long Strip for Reins. Cast on 10 stitches, or as many as will give a width Again employ second method of casting on. Work a strip of plain of about If- in. knitting with chain edge about 40 in. long. Making up. Sew FG, the cast-off end of the first armhole strip, to AB, which is the edge of the chest strap where the seven stitches were cast off. This completes one armhole. Similarly sew JH, the cast-off end of the second armhole strip, to KE to form the other armhole. Sew each end of the long strip for the reins to the centre of the outside edge of an armhole strip, as shown in Fig. 58. Do this sewing very strongly, as it will have to withstand great strain.

STANDARD
exercise.
(2)

I

AND UPPER

INFANTS.

67

Note.—(\) For carrying this out as " Community " work, see under previous
Either Exercise 15 or 16 can be shortened and used as a support for a baby

in its first

walking lessons.

Fig. 58.

Knitted Toy Reins.

(Alternative Shape.)

_a 1i
.,,.

>c4

iq^..

__ 7Dt

..„_

~J

Fig. 59.

Knitted Toy Reins.

(Alternative Shape!,

7d. Knit two rows and purl two rows alternately. (Full instructions for purling are given under General Demonstrate to class with large. Cost of same at 2s. Is. long. COVER FOR NEEDLE-BOOK. or as many as will give a width. size. Knitted Book Marker with Fringed Ends. as described under General Instructions. — 68 . 60. 6 Knitting Cotton. II.) Instructions. long has been knitted. of No.. = Instructions. Purl a strip of knitting 12 in. \ Ball of " O-So-Silkie." Medium Materials. Fig. wooden needles and rug wool. After the first row. Second Exercise in Purling. at 2d. slip the first stitch at the commencement of each row. 7d.—Two Steel Needles—size 12. Cast on 16 stitches. of 1J in. Is.STANDARD I. or as many as will give a width of 3 in without stretching. KNITTED BOOK MARKER WITH FRINGED ENDS. per lb. Quantity of Knitting at 2d. Cotton required for class of 50 — — = = Cast on 12 stitches. without stretching. until a strip 9 or 10 in. Purling taught. 6 Knitting Cotton. per ball. Cast off. 12 \ oz. — Put a fringe at each end of the marker. of No. 2. or J oz." Medium size. Purl every stitch of the first row. per lb. or \ oz. per ball. Cost of same at 2s. Quantity of knitting Cotton for class of 50 = 12£ oz. \ ball of " O-So-Silkie. Two Steel Needles size 14. Materials. Instructions.

Sew the top and bottom edges it all the way round. till the two ends almost meet in the centre of the work. may neatly overcast form the cover Join the knitting together as follows to inwards towards the middle. Cover for Needle-book. and can be passed through the back of the cardboard Finish off the needle-book by tying the ribbon in a bow at knitted covers. into which the cardboard knitting. off. Let the flannel on which the needles will be placed measure 2J in. 69 rows slip the first stitch purl-wise and purl the remaining stitches. and is Making — fixed. by 4J in. When the knitted cover has been slipped on. and one on the inside. covers of the needle-book can be slipped in turn. one on the outside of the case. Cast up.. back. Join these two covers together down the back by strips of paper or linen. The stiff case of thick card in which the flannel for the needles be made by Standard IV boys. the flannel may be secured in cover by sewing it in with narrow ribbon.STANDARD and in all succeeding II. Each cover consists of a piece of card measuring 3 in. the the and the . A large darning needle will take ribbon quite easily. by 2\ in. : Fold each end of the strip Fig. 61. of each turned-down flap to the top and bottom edges of the under-part of the Right and left-hand pockets will thus be formed.

— Fig. required. 9d. of No. OJd. Materials. always slip the first stitch at the commencement of each row. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. ANTIMACASSAR FOR DOLL'S HOUSE. Cast off. as described under General Instructions at the beginning of the book. Cost of same at 2s. 62.—About 12 balls of " O-So-Silkie. £ BaU of " O-So-Silkie.70 3(A). = Is. Materials. Antimacassar for Doll's House. Knit one row and purl one row alternately. or as many as will give a width of 2J in. for class of 50 = 8J oz. 6 Knitting Cotton. —Cast on 3(B)." at 2 balls for 3£d. per lb. .—Two Steel Needles size 12. or £ oz. Instructions. long has been knitted. per ball. Knitting One size. After the first row." Medium Quantity of Knitting Cotton at 2d. until a strip 4 in. 16 stitches. unstretched. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FULL-SIZED ANTIMACASSAR FOR HOUSEHOLD USE. Row and Purling One Row introduced. Make a double fringe at each end. Cost = Is.

63. and fringe the ends of the finished Antimacassar. Id. \ oz. per lb. II. Method of Joining Wool taught. = 3s. Two Steel Needles size 12. Neatly join these strips down their length. in length. Doll's Sofa Rug. however. lid. about 26 in. DOLL'S SOFA RUG. of Single — wool of two shades. or as — Berlin Wool or 4-ply see under Woolcraft. each one being. with the many . and other qualities. 3s. 20 stitches. Materials. Cost of same at (For cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool. like — Fig. —Cast on.) Instructions. Total quantity for a class of 50 = 12J oz. 4.STANDARD Instructions. lighter shade of wool. 71 A full-sized Antimacassar can be made by knitting about 6 strips the one described above for a Doll's House.

Instructions. as will give a width of 3 in. Join on with the darker shade in the manner described under General Instructions.) Knit along the 12th row. 10£d. — — of suitable thickness. Doll's Dutch Bonnet. demonstrate to the class the method of joining with large wooden needles and rug wool of two contrasting colours. or other wool Materials.) DOLL'S DUTCH BONNET. 8d. Fringe the ends of the rug. 64. Knit along the 12th row. until five stitches from the end are reached.) Knit 11 rows of plain knitting with the second colour. and the last stitch with single wool of the new colour. . and then join on with the first shade of wool again. (See General Instructions. Cost of same (For other varieties of 4-ply wool. Knit 11 rows of plain knitting. of 4-ply wool.) Quantity required for = 2s. More Difficult Exercise in Knitting and Purling Alternate Rows.72 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. see under class of 50 = Fig. without stretching. at 3s. working four stitches with the double (The teacher must wool. as sho«n in Fig. 63. (See General slipping the first stitch in such a manner as to produce chain edge. per lb. Woolcraft. of knitting has been done. leaving an end about 5 in. 12 \ oz. Two Steel Needles size 12. Break off the wool. until 5 stitches from the end are reached. 5. until about 6 in. \ oz. long. Continue to knit strips of alternate colours in this manner. Cast off. in the manner described above.

Make two lengths of crocheted woollen chain. = 2s.STANDARD II. see at 3s. Making up. Cosy for Doll's Teapot. Knit three more plain rows to make a natural — where the flap turns back. should now appear uppermost. has been knitted to form of the bonnet on the wrong side. 8d. each 16 in. Knit two rows of plain knitting. Use these for making looped rosettes and strings for tying. Now knit one row and purl one row alternately for eight rows. Turn the bonnet on to the right side. Cast off. . Cast on 40 stitches. or as many as will produce a width of 6£ in. \ oz. Cost of same (For other qualities of Double Knitting Wool. 65. The plain sides of both the flap and the bonnet itself. of Double Berlin Wool. COSY FOR DOLL'S TEAPOT. —Sew up the back seam shape it it up slightly. 64. drawing back of the head. 73 Instructions. in order to to the — 6. fold in.) Fig. or Double Fingering. —Two Steel Needles — under Woolcraft. per lb. long. without stretching. Materials. Quantity required for class of 50 = 12J oz. Knit Two Purl Two taught.B. Purl one row and knit one row alternately until 3J the part to fit the head. N. Instructions for knitting a Child's Dutch Bonnet in a more decorative pattern are given under the Standard IV Syllabus. 10£d. and fold back the flap. size 13 or 14. Attach them to the sides of the bonnet as shown in Fig.

cast off. Decorate the front of this gathering with a bow of ribbon.) Instructions.— 74 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. lid. They will slip the first stitch of each row after the first. Two Steel Needles size 13. unstretched. per lb. in length. Now cast off all the stitches except 8 at the end of the row. see under Woolcraft. = 7s. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 4. and to estimate the number of stitches required to fit her own : — — pot. DOLL'S VEST7. 66 may be attached to the ends of the chain. of this plain knitting has been worked. or as many as will give a width of 24. This strip of plain knitting forms the shoulder strap for one side of the vest. This will leave 1J in. When 2\ in. Continue to knit on these 8 stitches. Draw up the Cosy \ in. and the other at the left. Leave £ in. and a crocheted Tea Cosy is described under the work for Standard VII. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 4. Teach children how to change from knitting to purling. a bow of plaited wool. from the bottom. and vice versa. •§ oz. Instructions for knitting a child's vest in a more difficult pattern are given under the Standard IV Syllabus. (For other qualities of 4-ply Vest Wool. A simple chain crochet border may be put round the neck and arms by a girl in a higher standard. starting from the bottom. miss one stitch. each of which is knitted as follows Cast on 20 stitches. Work ribbed knitting of Knit Two Purl Two. has been done. lOd. and the strap from the back to the front. Draw up the neck by running through this chain border a crocheted or plaited chain of wool. and \ in. from the top. * chain four. Materials. and double crochet into the next stitch. Place one half of the vest upon the other half. until a strip of 5 in. and through these spaces the handle and spout of the teapot can be passed. of 4-ply Pink Vest Wool about 2 lb. Encourage every child who possesses a doll's tea-service of her own to bring her own teapot. The edging shown in the illustration is done as follows One double crochet in first stitch. to form part of the armhole. substituting plain knitting for the ribbed pattern. Even smaller pompoms than those shown in Fig. Let them now proceed to work ribbed knitting of Knit Two Purl Two until they have completed a strip 2 \ in. or small pompoms. in. Sew the shoulder — Quantity required for class of 50 = — — : — straps into position. so that one shoulder strap is at the right-hand side of the work. Repeat from * right round the neck and arms of vest. or these may be simply finished with knots. carrying the strap attached to the front half of the work to the back. Cost of same at 3s. Making up. each of which is knitted in the following manner Cast on 36 stitches. After the first row. Now sew up the side seams. : . Making up. in the middle of each side unsewn. from the top. Cast off. Place the two halves of the Cosy together. or as many as will give a width of 2$ in. The vest is made in two halves. and sew up the sideseams for J in. Instructions for knitting a full-sized Tea Cosy for household use are given under the Standard III Syllabus. always slip the first stitch of each row. More Difficult Exercise in Knit Two Purl Two. of ribbed knitting unstretched. of ribbed knitting unsewn at the top of each side-seam. Instructions. exactly as in the case of the strips made entirely of plain knitting or of purling. The Cosy is made up of two separate halves.

66. = 4s. . (Foir Fig.) — — wool'. 8. DOLL'S KNITTED HAT. f oz..STANDARD II. lid. Knit One Purl One taught for Border of Hat. per lb. Quantity for class of 50 = 19 oz. Doll's Knitted Hat. see under Woolcraft. Doll's Vest. Two Steel Needles size 13 or 14. 8d cheaper qualities and other varieties of 4-ply wool. of any 4-ply Materials. 75- Fig. 67. Cost of same at 3s.

— — — Front of Jersey. and fold up the strips of Knit One Purl One to form the rim or border of the hat. or an even number which will give a width of 3J in. \}t oz. This ribbed portion completes the turned up border for the front edge of the hat. Change now to plain knitting. again cast off 9 stitches. They will quickly see that the method employed is the same as for Knit Two Purl Two. Cast off 9 stitches at the commencement of the row. unstretched. —Fold the strip of knitting so that it forms a double square. and over each sew a little full woollen pompom to form a pretty finish.ie. Now commence ribbed knitting again. of 4-ply wool. but that the position of the wool is changed for every stitch instead of for every two stitches. see under Woolcraft.. and then cast off. — and work 6 in. as it involves a large amount of work for a Standard II child. of ribbed knitting.) Only the best knitters should be allowed to attempt a jersey the Instructions. Over- 9. for the neck-band Do about \ in. can be planned without difficulty from the following instructions. The same number of stitches will be found to produce a width of 4£ in. N. size of the one described below. At the commencement of the next row. thus leaving in the centre of the knitting 18 stitches not cast off. If wool at (For other qualities per lb. Sew each point down firmly. of this ribbing. On these 18 stitches work ribbed knitting of Knit One Purl O. Materials. and do eight rows of Knit On i Purl One back edge of the hat. Two Steel Needles size 14. to fit a smaller doll. Instructions. Back of Jersey. of ribbed knitting of Knit One Purl One to form the border of the jersey. still slipping the first stitch of each row. Cast on 36 stitches. Change to plain knitting. 1 p.— Cast on 32 stitches. DOLL'S JERSEY. . (i. the cost of one Jersey will be 2Jd. always slip the commencing stitch for eight rows. 8d. Show children how to do ribbing of Knit One Purl One. A pretty pattern may be produced by casting on an odd number stitches and employing k. about \ in. After the first row always slip the commencing stitch of each row. and continue plain knitting to the end of the needle. of the jersey. of 4-ply wool.76 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. thus producing a square bag.B. 2s. Instructions for knitting a full-sized child's hat in two different patterns are given under the syllabuses for Standards III and IV respectively. A jersey of about half the size. Turn this bag on to the right side. be employed.e. sew up the two sides. Work 1 in. Let them now proceed to work ribbed knitting of Knit One Purl One After the first row. of plain knitting has been done. More Difficult Exercise involving Knit One Purl Oxe. of this. of each row. Now take each top corner of the hat in turn and draw it down to the side on to the rim which has been turned up. without stretching.) to form the turned up border for the Cast off. — of Making up. when the plain knitted part is reached. 1 throughout. or about $ in. or an even number which will give a width of 4 in. Continue until 5 in. — Knit this in the same way as the front.

Cast off loosely.B. and turn the jersey on to the right side. and work 3£ in. 68. and turn the sleeves on to the right side. Sew up the sleeve seams. the neck-band.STANDARD Sleeves. Doll's Jersey. so that the jersey may be easily slipped over the doll's head. knitting. Do \ in. N. Change to plain. : Cast on 24 stitches. commencing at the bottom of each side-seam insertion of the sleeves. Making up. of Knit One Purl One ribbing. which may be purchased at 20 a penny. more. the woollen An alternative and easier method is loops being made of fine crocheted chain. The shoulder and neck seam at the opposite side will be left open. up one shoulder seam and the seam at the top of each side open for the at one side q£ Fig. pearl buttons and woollen loops for the fastening of shoulder and neck. II. to form the turned up cuff at the wrist. Instructions for knitting a child's jersey are given under the Standard — VI Syllabus. Sew the front and back of the jersey together. 77 — Knit each sleeve as follows — . Sew leave 1£ in. Sew the Sew on small sleeves into the armholes. to fasten with press-studs. .

— Knit one row and purl one row alternately. — Purl one row and knit one row alternately. If wool (For other per lb. — — At 2s. thus finishing with a Six Rows. DOLL'S KILTED WOOLLEN SKIRT. Doll's Kilted Woollen Skirt. 8d. Instructions. 1st — purl row. to form the seam down the centre of the back of the kilt.78 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 10. be employed. qualities of 4-ply wool. . or as many as will produce knitting 5J in. the cost of one Kilt will be about 2£d. the ends of which are joined -together part of the way. The kilt is knitted in one long strip. thus finishing with a 2nd Six Rows.) Materials. of any 4-ply wool. Two Steel Needles size 14. see under Woolcraft. wide without stretching. Cast on 46 stitches. :More Difficult Pattern in Knitting and Purling taught. 1^ oz.

has been knitted. see under Woolcraft. Work b\ in. easing it on slightly. Materials. unsewn at the top of each side seam to form the armholes. Do 4J in. has been knitted. Sew the two ends of the strip together. Cast on 6 stitches. of ribbed knitting unstretched. Sleeves. 9d. This completes the pattern. Work ribbed knitting of Knit One Purl One. of ribbed knitting as described under Fronts. — DOLL'S KNITTED COAT (f-LENGTH). of ribbed knitting without stretching. until a length of 12 in. Making up. Knit One Purl One employed. Knit 1\ in. so that when it is turned down. to reach to the hem of the in. N. Sew the collar round this neck opening. Making — side. in. or as many as will give a width of 3| in. Cast off. Repeat these 12 rows 17 times more. (Again let each girl estimate for herself the exact amount to be left unsewn. or as many as will give ribbed knitting having a width of 2f in. or as many as will give a width of about \ in. Back. iV. except for 1£ in. sew along the shoulder seams. This will leave the middle section of the back and fronts not sewn together along the top. and attach the kilt to this bodice. Collar. of Knit One Purl One ribbing. and small pearl buttons to the left-hand side. long. : — — — : — — up. or J in. in depth. or Cast off loosely. In the case of dolls of different sizes. Each of the two fronts is knitted as follows Cast on 28 stitches. the open part forming the neck opening of the coat. to form a circular knitted skirt. to form a cuff. —A full-length coat. Two Steel Needles size 14. B. doll's frock. from each end. This will provide excellent practice in fitting and measuring. of 4-ply wool. and turn the sleeves on to the right Next do up the side seams of the coat by sewing the fronts on to the back. attach loops of crocheted or plaited chain to the right-hand side of the front. as it involves a great deal of work for a Standard II child.) — — Only the best knitters should be allowed to attempt a coat as Instructions. Lastly. or other wool of suitable thickness. 79 knitted row. can be planned without difficulty from the following instructions. for Article of more Difficult Construction. it will lie quite flat. Leave about If in. coat of about half the size. or an even number which will give a width of 2\ in. Now sew in the sleeves on the wrong side of the coat turn back a fold at the wrists | in. may be made by knitting the fronts and back 10J instead of 1\ .) Now. let each girl estimate for herself the number of stitches required to produce the dimensions necessary for her own doll. Cut out and make up a sateen bodice to fit the doll. — A Fronts. Slip the commencing stitch of every row after the first. the cost of one coat will be about 3£d.. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. Cast off. Each of the sleeves is knitted as follows Cast on 30 stitches. unstretched. Sew up the sleeve seams. per lb. If wool at 3s.STANDARD II. thus providing further exercise in fitting and measuring.B. of plain knitting. . 1| oz. and then cast off. starting from the top of each armhole in turn. Cast off. to fit a smaller doll. Turn the coat on to the right side. Cast on 48 stitches. large as the one described below. ii. be employed. until a length of 7 J in. for a distance of 1J in.

.

71. Instructions. for the right side in the photograph of the complete garment (Fig.) Fig. for this petticoat looks well on either side. Two Bone Needles size 9. 8d. If wool at 2s. 81 DOLL'S KNITTED PETTICOAT. 72) of a small section of the reverse side of the knitting. per lb. New of will Pattern. Doll's Petticoat. the cost of one Petticoat — — — be 2Jd. involving Knit Two Purl Two and Plain Knitting. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. 71).STANDARD 12. An illustration is also shown (Fig. see under Woolcraft. Materials. 1£ oz. II. 4-ply wool. Two Steel Needles size 14. is the more ornamental. —The 'pattern employed though the one selected 6— (8i5b) . be employed.

can be planned without difficulty from the following instructions. Knit plain. (The finer needles will produce a much narrower strip of . After the first row. each of Employing the bone needles. Doll's Knitted Petticoat. cast on 40 stitches. 72. and continue the pattern on these inches. or which is knitted as follows : Fig. slip the commencing stitch of each — — divisible by 4. Repeat the first and second rows alternately. Reverse Side of Pattern. without stretching. Repeat from * to the end of the row. Allow only the best knitters to attempt a petticoat as large as the one desA petticribed below. The petticoat is made in two sections. coat of about half the size. The number of stitches as many as will give a width of 6 in. has been knitted. 2nd Row. * Knit Two Purl Two. selected must be Is* Row.82 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. as it involves a great deal of work for a Standard II child. Now for three slip more the stitches on to the steel needles. until 5J in. a front half and a back half. to fit a smaller doll. row.

p. 1. Cast off. k. 7. baby are given under the Standard DOLL'S SLIPPER WITH LEATHER SOLE. 2nd Row. Decorate the neck opening and the armholes of the petticoat by a simple crochet edging similar to that described under " Doll's Vest " (No. —Instructions V 13. An alternative method is to leave the latter strap unsewn. k. Repeat second and third rows alternately. p. 1. 1. of ribbed knitting unsewn at the top of each side seam of the bodice. i. p. oz. Cast on 14 stitches. 83 knitting. to form the lower part of the armhole. . thus forming the edge CF. Quantity Materials. k. Sew the shoulder-straps into position at the back and front respectively. p. St. to has N. k. Sew up the side seams of the skirt and bodice. 1. -J- — — = Instructions. This will provide excellent practice in fitting and measuring. 1. Cost of wool at 3s. 73) shows the shape of the knitting opened out before the shoe is made up. More Difficult Exercise involving Casting-off a Section of the Revision of Knit One Purl One. (For •cheaper varieties of 4-ply wool and other qualities.—Slip 1. now in.employing narrowings. 3rd Row. 1. and then knit plain to the end of row. required for class of 50 = 6 J oz. of the narrower strip has been knitted. attached to the ends. starting from the bottom.STANDARD II. Cast off these eight stitches. 1. Is. Draw up the neck and. 1st Row. Change plain knitting. In the case of dolls of different sizes. has been knitted. and then knit plain to the end of row. lid. Stitches.e. 1. per lb. 1. k. knit the next eight stitches plain.) Sole cut out in thin leather to fit the doll's foot.. 1. carrying the strap attached to the front half of the work to the back. for a full-sized knitted petticoat for a Syllabus. the waist. and continue to knit on these eight stitches until 1\ "been knitted to form a shoulder-strap. of any 4-ply wool. 7d. K. until 4 in. k. p.B. 1. and continue plain knitting on the remainder of the stitches until 1 in. Place one half pf the petticoat upon the other half. see under Woolcraft. or by a chain of wool with the — — pompoms N. Leave J in. so that one shoulder-strap is at the right-hand side of the work and the other at the left. Slip the first stitch. Two Steel Needles size 14.B. thus reducing the width for the bodice section of the petticoat without . or an even number which will give a width of 1J in. and the strap from the back to the front. II). let each girl estimate for herself number of stitches required to produce the dimensions necessary for her own doll.) Cast off all the stitches except eight at the end of the needle. Cast off six stitches at the ribbed end of the row. 1. p. 1. p. and then do — — — p. along AB (see Diagram). The accompanying diagram (Fig. 1. if necessary. 1. by narrow ribbon. This plan gives more room for taking off and on. and to fasten by means of buttons and loops. p. Making up. 1.

the plain part of the first row of the slipper. — bedroom slipper are given under- . where the stitches were cast on. Instructions for knitting a full-sized the Standard IV Syllabus. to DE. r <I" » r ec- iv — > Fig.84 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. BC. and sew the plain knitted edge on to the The point F will thus form the toe of the slipper.B. Doll's Slipper with Leather Sole. the front by means of a woollen pompom or a bow of ribbon. 73. N. Doll's Slipper with Leather Sole. Decorate thin leather sole. Turn down the ribbed edge to fit round the ankle. Sew the inside edge of the narrower strip. Making up. — Fig. 74.

per lb. and knit one row plain. Repeat the second and third rows until a strip about 4 in. Is. so that now both ends of the short length of wool are turned away from the knitter. See that both projecting ends of Berlin wool are of equal length. and place it in the space between the second and third stitches. and sew strongly all the way round to the knitted edges of the rug. will form the " Pile " of the rug. Finish with a row of plain knitting. a layer of wadding on to the wrong side of the rug. Making up. Knit the second stitch. lengths. Two Steel Needles size 14. 4 Knitting Cotton. £ oz. . or round a strip of wood with a slot grooved in one side. Proceed to insert another short length between the third and fourth stitches. per 9£d. as described below under " Full-sized Rug." Cast on 15 stitches with the knitting cotton. long has been knitted. Is. knitted into the texture. and cast off. Fig. and one end towards her. 2d. Cost of wool at 4s. Materials. They must be absolutely equal in length. and project from the other side of the work. so that one end projects away from the knitter. Continue this all along the row. thus fixing the short length into position. Place over the wadding a layer of fine Hurden to form a strong lining. and the wrong side after being padded — — Now — —Gum and lined with Hurden. Method of Inserting Short Lengths of Wool taught. — — Wool. These Instructions. 2nd Row. Knitted Rug for Doll's House. Take the loose end projecting towards the knitter. and may be cut after winding the wool round a doubled piece of card. or an odd number of stitches which will produce a width of 2 in. 85 KNITTED RUG FOR DOLL'S HOUSE. 75. of Double Berlin and 50 = & oz. of of No.STANDARD II. Knit the third stitch. 14 (A). Turn in the other end of the second length and knit the fifth stitch. Knit plain.. 6d. lb. 76 shows the rug on the wrong side unlined. 3rd Row. Cost of Knitting Cotton at 2s. The Berlin wool must be cut into lengths of 1 J in. insert between the first and second stitches a length of Berlin wool. for class = Fig. Turn in raw edges. Knit the fourth stitch. each. Knit one stitch plain.

per lb. (This Knitting Cotton (6-ply plain twist).) Wadding and Hurden for padding and lining. Two Steel Needles size 12.KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. of Rug Cotton (6 Threads). 6 Knitting Cotton previously mentioned. more than a rug of similar Instructions. 12 lb. as the knitting cotton is an expensive item. does not lend itself to " Community " work for children in the same way that a knitted — — — one does. Hltrt»M»»»HMmnltlt»t»t fc. Beehive Turkey Rug Wool Materials. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FULL-SIZED RUG FOR HOUSEHOLD USE. 6d. Fig. Knitted Rug for Doll's House. = 25s. The rug on canvas. Two yards of rug canvas a yard wide may be obtained for 2s. 14(B). long and 1 yd. = 5s. The knitting . wide. Cost of Knitting Cotton at Is. 7£d. and 3f lb. however. Cost of Rug Wool at 2s. The rug described below costs about 3s. per lb. 76. A convenient size for a large rug is 2 yds. which is a much finer 3-ply cotton. Id. should not be confused with the No. size made on canvas. 6d.

87 will be done in strips. qualities of 4-ply wool. and sew the Hurden lining to the knitted edges of the rug with . Cjuantity7required \ oz. of strips for a full-sized rug is a sufficiently hard exercise will take the form of " Community " work. or 2d. taking care that they fit exactly at the ends. Cost of same at 4s. A larger number of stitches may be employed if wider strips are preferred. . Turn in the raw edges. The best way to cut these of uniform length is to wind the wool evenly round a strip of wood with a slot grooved in one side." may be purchased from any wool shop for Id. 6d. lay the rug on a large table with the pile downwards. Materials. 4-ply wool. When this has been done. gum layers of wadding on to the wrong side of the rug. 77. Proceed as described under Doll's Rug. per lb. and. Sew the strips together with knitting cotton. but the number selected must be an odd number. — waxed thread. Coarse Bone Crochet Hook. for class of 50 3s. Double Crochet taught. N. The strips should be knitted for the width of the rug. Making up. DOLL'S CROCHETED SHAWL. in length. — = = Fig. The cuttings of rug wool employed should be about 4 in. to prevent any possibility of their moving when the rug is shaken. and 15(A). A prepared piece of wood for the purpose. Doll's Crocheted Shawl. employing Rug Wool instead of Double Berlin. The making — for Standard III children. known as a " Gauge. These layers should be tacked as well as gummed. 6d. This will produce strips about 4 in. in width.STANDARD II.B. Place a layer of Hurden over the wadding to form a strong lining for the rug. in length. so that each will be 1 yd. to be afterwards sewn firmly together. Knit a sufficient number of strips to produce the length of rug required. or round a double layer of thick card a number of lengths can then be cut at once by slipping the scissors along the slot. Cast on 19 stitches for each strip. (For cheaper 12£ oz. with thin adhesive. see under Woolcraft.

see General Instructions. Repeat the second row until a length of 6 J in. 1st Row. shawl may be made in a similar 16(A).—Fold the length of crochet into halves. however. thus producing a bag.—Work one double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. Commence by making a loose chain of 25. Second Exercise in Double Crochet. or as many will measure 8 in. The shawl is made from a square of double crochet. owing to its size. miss a stitch. SHAWL Materials. 6d. may be substituted for the chain border of the doll's shawl. in length. per lb. miss one. Instructions. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. and turn up a . £ oz. = 3s. 6d. square. Make one chain and turn. Oversew up the two sides. Square for Shawl. 6d. work one double — — as — crochet into each of the following chain stitches all along the row. it is a good plan to let the children count their stitches each row. Repeat from * round each side of the shawl. of 4-ply wool. Do not break off the wool. taking up both the back and the front threads.) 1st Row. Materials.) Make one chain and turn. Cost at 4s. Work one double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. full-sized —f —A lb. Make one chain and turn. Making up.) Repeat the second row.B As it is a rather difficult matter to keep the edges quite level. Bone Crochet Hook of medium size. Commencing with the second chain from the hook. and continue to work until the shawl is about 40 in. manner to the one described above. work one double crochet into each of the following chain stitches all along the row. (N. — 2nd Row. One of the crocheted borders described under the work for that standard. of 4-ply wool.88 Instructions. Commence by making a loose chain of 20. see under Woolcraft. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FULL-SIZED CROCHETED IN SIMILAR PATTERN. has been worked. (For cheaper qualities of 4-ply wool. per lb. to see that the number remains constant. — — — 15 (B). sufficiently difficult for Standard IV children. DOLL'S CROCHETED HAT. This exercise is. Commencing with the second chain from the hook. crochet into the next stitch. and work one double crochet * Chain four. Cost of same at 4s. be about 40 in. (See General Instructions. — 4 in. Border of Shawl. 4£d.) — The hat is made from an oblong worked in double crochet. Make one chain and turn. Chain four. Turn this bag on to the right side. and work a double into the second stitch along the row. until 8 in. = 3s. (For method of making chain. 2nd Row. taking up the back thread only. or as many as will measure Instructions. This produces the ridged effect seen in the illustration. has been worked. Quantity required for class of 50 = 12J oz. Let the commencing chain. in length.

Over each point sew a decorative button finish. or as many as will measure 3£ in. though the purses will be less stout and hard-wearing. (The exact length necessary should be determined by fitting the work to the child's head when a few rows have been done. 6d. Now take each top corner of the hat down on to the brim. T\ oz. —2 oz. Quantity required for class of 50 = 1 lb.) The purse is made up from a crocheted oblong. Doll's Crocheted Hat. Commencing with the second chain from the hook. Make one —Fine Bone Crochet Hook. work one double 1st Row. Begin by making a loose chain of 18. 16(B). = 2s. —Adopt a method of working similar to that described above. The full-sized hat is a sufficiently difficult exercise for Standard IV children. Instructions. . crochet into each of the following chain stitches all along the row. but : Cost at 4s. in length. 6 oz. 4-ply wool. 9d. employ the following dimensions chain measuring about 10£ in. Finer Hook Employed. = 7d. in length. in depth. CROCHETED PURSE FOR CHILD'S OWN USE.) Make the oblong about 17 in. to form a neat and pretty Fig. (The work can be made less expensive by employing a finer knitting cotton. per lb. — chain and turn. INSTRUCTIONS FOR A FULL-SIZED CROCHETED HAT TO FIT A CHILD OF TEN YEARS. about 2 in. long. Third Exercise in Double Crochet. of No.— STANDARD fold all the way in turn and sew it II. 4 Knitting Cotton. 89 round about J in. in depth. Commence with a 17. Materials. Materials. per lb. Cost of same at 2s. 78. Turn up a brim all round.

and sew an end of this strongly to each side of the purse underneath the flap. leaving 1J in. Repeat taking up both the back and front threads. 2nd Row. Crocheted Purse for Child's Own Use. Work a crocheted chain about 36 in. Make one chain and turn. of the length from the bottom edge. Sew up the two side seams. to form the flap of the purse. Work one double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. Making up. 79. Sew on press-studs for fastening the flap down at each side. and turn the purse on to the right side. Turn up 1J in. in length. — Fig.90 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. the second row until 5 in. of the length •from the top uncovered. has been worked. — .

and First Method of Making an Extra Stitch taught. 10 stitches. knit twice into the next stitch (see first method of increasing described in General Instructions). J oz. This may be bought at 3d. slipping the of J in. Total Cost = Id. purl 1. Materials. per pair. commencing stitch of every row after the first. : — 91 . 12 in. ball. Knitted Braces for Small Boy. Knitting Two Together. or as many as will produce in ribbed knitting of knit 1. 80. for a 2-oz. of Milford's White Knitting Cotton. Two Steel Knitting-needles size 14. white Webbing. 6 (3 threads).STANDARD i. No. unstretched. Knit two strips of knitting in the following manner : Cast on Instructions. purl 1 a width Do 2\ in. — — Fig. knit twice into next stitch. SMALL BOY'S KNITTED BRACES. III. Now widen as follows Knit 2. of ribbed knitting of knit 1. knit 1.

Knit 1 row plain. (For illustration of knitting two together. 30th Row. of No. (See first method of increasing. — — . knit 1. In the plain rows. knit 1. knit 2 into next stitch. 4 Knitting Cotton of per lb. knit 1. last stitch. Slip 1. knit 1. 8th Slip 1. Knit 9 rows plain. KNITTED CASE FOR CHILD'S COLOURED BALL. Knit 6 rows plain.— Slip 1. above the ribbed ends.. Knit 4 rows plain.Row. knit 2 tog. The cover is made up of eight similar sections. and knit twice into the next stitch. 5th Row. knit 2 into the next stitch. knit 1. several children is knitting a section each in order to make up one ball.. in Knitting Two Together and Making a Stitch size 14. knit 2 tog. Knit 2 rows plain. described in General Instructions. {See Fig.— 92 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. purl 1. Now narrow for a ribbed strip at the end of the brace as follows Slip the : first stitch. long. —The ball suitable : = Shaped Section. It is a simpler matter to do this than to increase the length of the knitting. 2£d. and four in another. Join the two strips together to form the back of the braces. knit 1. Knit 20 plain rows. 80. knit 2 into the next stitch. of this. producing 12 stitches on the needle. two contrasting Materials. knit 4. in the same manner Cast off. knit 2 again into next stitch. knit 1. Instructions. Making up. and work 2\ in. 13th Row.—Slip 1. knit 1. 20^ . for " Community " work. Row. knit 1. Turn in and hem the raw edges at the ends of each of these.) This reduces the stitches to 10. Sew one end of each strip of webbing firmly and neatly on to the wrong side of the ends of the braces.. — V 2. knit 2 into the next stitch. knit 6. and knit 10 in. Slip 1. (First 1£ oz. producing -1 st. producing 8 Stitches on the needle.) Let the working of the button-holes and the or VI girls. knit twice into next stitch. producing 10 stitches on the needle. Change now to ribbing of knit 1. always slip the first stitch of each row. knit producing 6 stitches on the needle. There will now be 14 stitches on the needle. knit 2 together. knitted forms one half of the braces. see General knit 2 tog. knit 2 into the next stitch.) Cut four strips of webbing each 3 in. four in one shade. Knit 2 rows plain. knit 2 into the next stitch. knit 1. 80. Each strip thus as described for the commencement of the brace. 2nd Row. (See Fig. —Two Steel Needles— Cost of same at Instructions. knit 2. attachment of the webbing be done by Standard The braces can be lengthened as the boy grows by replacing the strips of webbing by new and longer pieces. by sewing their edges firmly together for 1 in. each of which is knitted as follows colours. knit 2 into the next stitch. 2s.) There are now 3 stitches on the needle. Change now to plain knitting with chain edge. — Slip 1. knit 1. and work a button-hole of the required size in each strip. knit 1. Second Exercise Method). knit 2 into the next stitch. — needle. on the Cast on 2 stitches. knit twice into next stitch.

stitch. Knit 6 plain rows... . knit 1. — Slip 1 (purlwise.— STANDARD 5lst III. Knit 9 plain rows. knit 1.. knit 2 tog. 81. thus reducing the number of stitches to 3. knit 2. knit 2 tog. each of which should be knitted as follows : Cast on 3 stitches.. 68th Row. knit 2 tog. — — Circle for Top and Bottom of Ball. Knit 4 plain rows. to thus increasing the number knit 2 again into the next knit 2 into the next Row. stitch. knit 1.. Knit 2 plain rows. knit 2 tog. knit 4. edge). of stitches 1 Slip 1. knit 6. number — — — — Fig. knit 2 tog.. Knit 2 plain rows. knit 2 tog. Slip 1. stitch.. 93 the Slip 1. 3rd Jcnit 1. knit 2 into the next so as to produce chain — Knit plain row. thus reducing of stitches to 10. thus reducing the number of stitches to 4. 79th Row. and cast off. 4. producing 6 stitches on the needle. 76th Row. Knitted Case for Child's Coloured Ball. Slip 1. Knit 1 plain row. thus reducing the number of stitches to 6. knit 2 together. 73rd Row. knit the last stitch. knit 2 together. knit 2 tog. Slip 1. Slip 1. Two circular pieces of knitting are required.. Slip 1. 1st Row. Row. knit 2 tog. Knit 1 plain row. thus reducing the number of stitches to 8. knit 1. thus reducing the stitches back again to 2 with which the work was commenced. knit 1. 61st Row.

knit 1. until the number of stitches : — . in Two Together and Making a Stitch (First 2 oz. Now commence the increasings for the remaining half of the armhole curve as follows Knit plain along the needle until the last two stitches are reached. Now place a light-coloured section alternately with a dark one. Knit twice into the stitch before the last (see First Method of Increasing. knit 1. number of stitches to 6. knit 1. number of stitches to 8. by casting or 6£ in. and oversew Making — seam only up the ball. knit 2 tog. 81.. knit 2 into the next stitch. 7 th Row. knit 4. and continue this until 4 in. has been knitted. . knit 1. 5th Row.. alternately. Cast on 48 stitches. —Commence at the centre of the back of the stays. knit 2 into the next stitch. Slip 1. knit 2 tog. knit 2. threads). thus producing 8 stitches on the needle. as the cotton may be purchased at 3d.. 1st Row. Knit 1 plain row. knit 1. thus bringing the number of stitches 17th Row. and then knit the last stitch. No. Slip 1.— 94 — KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. ball. Cast off. knit 2 into the next stitch. knit 4. knit 2 tog. knit 2 tog. Pull each piece of knitting into — — — — — — a circular shape. Slip 1.. the decreasings for the armhole curve as follows first stitch in : Slip plain. stuff the cover as tightly as possible with cuttings or rovings of wool. —Two (3 — Cotton. The whole of the stays must be knitted with chain edge. leaving open one up. — Knit Repeat the and second rows of the armhole 1st Now work Row.) Begin to work plain knitting. Knitting Third Exercise Method) . thus reducing the 13th Row.. Knit 1 plain row. 3. back again to 3. knit 2 into the next stitch. It will be found that a small hole has been left at the top and bottom of the where the points of the sections meet. Finish the decreasings with a row knitted like the first row. or as many as will produce knitting having a width of 6 (The stays may readily be made deeper if desired. Knit 1 plain row. of Milford's White Knitting Steel Needles size 13. the original number. last seam. Knit 1 plain row. stitches to 4. thus producing 10 stitches on the needle. knit 1. First Half Back. knit two together. — as follows. 6 Instructions. knit 2 tog. reducing the number of 15th Row. 2nd Row. first on the needle has been reduced to 36. Materials. knit 2 tog. Slip 1.. for a 2-oz.. knit 2. The cost of one pair of stays is 3d. Knit 3 plain rows. Oversew together the edges of the sections. Slip 1. unstretched. (N. Cover these holes by neatly sewing (See Fig. Tapes for tying.. BABY GIRL'S KNITTED STAYS. knit 2 tog.B. thus reducing the 11th Row. General Instructions). on more stitches to commence. and then do plain knitting along the remainder of the needle.) over them the small circular pieces of knitting described above. Slip 1. — the the usual manner.) First Armhole.

Second Half Back. Knit as described under the first half'back. Fig. from the edge on the left side. Cast on eight stitches. : Making up. Baby Girl's Knitted Stays. Oversew the shoulder-straps into position. and at a distance of 1 in. Sew the tapes on the edge of the right-hand side of the back. Do plain knitting with chain edge until 7 in. unstretched. long. 82. ^ Cast 1 off. If greater warmth is desired. as shown in Fig. 5£ in. long. — . Second Armhole. or as many as will Knit each shoulder-strap as^follows Knit a strip of plain knitting with chain edge give a width of 1 in. once more 48 stitches on the needle. Knit as described under First Armhole.STANDARD 2nd Row. line the little stays with flannel. III. Fasten by means of six tapes each 8 in. 82. Repeat the above two rows alternately. 95 —Knit plain until there are all along the row. has been knitted past. Front of Stays. the armhole. Shoulder Straps.

(The method of casting on on three — needles is fully described in General Instructions. Casting on and Knitting on Three Needles taught. or & Doll's Scarf Instructions. other fine wool or knitting cotton. 8d. in width. in order to avoid a line . or as many as will produce doubled knitting 1 J in. = 2s. see under Woolcraft. Materials. After their previous practice in casting on. per lb. Cast on 10 stitches on each of three needles. Advise the children always to pull the wool tightly in knitting the first stitch of each needle. DOLL'S SCARF KNITTED ON THREE NEEDLES. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Quantity required for class of 50 = 9£ oz. Cost of same at 4s.—Four Steel Needles—size 15. and let them with their fourth needle commence to work round the stitches on the three needles.) (2-ply). of White Shetland Wool.96 4.) Instruct them how to draw the third needle tightly up to the first. children will find little difficulty in doing this. 9£d. (For other qualities of 2-ply wool. oz.

Boy's Marble Bag. put the wool forward under the point of the right-hand needle. : — 7—(8i 5 b) . 5. These holes will be produced as follows * Knit three stitches. taking especial care that the cotton is drawn up tightly between each pair of needles. see General Instructions. 84. Four Steel Needles size Cost of one bag. through which draw-strings are passed for closing up the bag. Gather up the ends of the scarf firmly. produce doubled knitting 4 in. and over it again to the back. and then cast off. up.— STANDARD of slack knitting between the needles. the knitting cotton being — — 14. thus making a stitch (see General InstrucRepeat from *all the way round. about 11 in. knit two stitches together. in width. 4 Knitting Cotton. of plain knitting. Method of Making a Stitch taught. long. or as many as will Instructions. Materials. has been worked. Now do plain tions). § oz. 2s. of No. = Id. until another J in. Do 4 J in. Making — MARBLE BAG (FOR BROTHER). and suspend a full tassel (For method of making tassels. Cast on 20 stitches on each of three needles. knitting again. Second Second Exercise in Casting on and Knitting on Three Needles. Fig. 97 strip of plain knitting Let them do a circular from each. In the next round the holes are formed. Cast off. per lb.) Instructions for making a full-sized scarf on three needles are given under Standard IV Syllabus. III.

— — size 14. Knit Two and Purl Two on Three Needles introduced for Border of Bag. of No. LUNCH BAG FOR CHILD'S OWN USE. Lunch Bag for Child's Own Use. — Now 6. joining its ends at the oppoTwo plaited handles now project. in an efficient manner. with one of the plaits. in width. the bag closes up bag. Cost of same at 2s. 1 lb. flatten out. = 2s. 6 Knitting Cotton. The number of stitches chosen must be — Fig. or as many as will Instructions. Cast on 20 stitches on each of three needles. one from each side of the site side of the work. Do exactly the same with the second plait. Four Steel Needles Quantity required for class of 50 = Materials. each 14 in. Thread a bodkin plaits or crocheted chains of knitting cotton. Turn the circular piece of knitting on to the wrong side. per lb. thus forming a bag. long.98 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. make two cast on. pass it through all the holes. 9d. . J% oz. produce doubled knitting 4 in. and sew the two bottom edges neatly together where the knitting was first Turn this bag on to the right side. 6 oz. and then join the two ends neatly together. 85. it Making up.. It will be found that when these are pulled simultaneously.

Make q. DOLL'S MUFF. Two Purl Two on Three —Four Steel Needles— = fd. in length to suspend the bag round the. 86. Change to ribbed knittinglof knit 2 This ribbed knitting forms k suitable border for the bag. J oz.) Fig. 2 in. and continue 3 in.) given under the Standard by means of a gathering thread. Needles. Instructions for making a child's muff in a more difficult pattern are given under Syllabus. child's neck. or it may be left unlined. Making up.) in Fig. Do purl 2. and! sew together the two bottom edges where the stitches were first cast on. Place the knitting in a flat position to form a bag. the Standard Instructions. Sew an end of this to each top corner of the bag. 3s. of — — V V . Cast off loosely. as shown (The method of making the tassels is given under General Instructions. lid. Make a plaited or crocheted chain of wool to form a neck cord. that is. 99 by 4. of plain knitting. about 36 in. see under Woolcraft. Draw the ends of the muff up slightly Syllabus. The muff may be padded with cotton wool. and a sateen lining (Directions for padding and lining a muff are :sewn in.. Cast off. Cast on 48 stitches. this for 1J in. Work ribbed knitting of knit 2 purl 2. Cost of (For other qualities of 3-ply wool. 3-ply wool. per lb. Second Exercise in Knit Materials. plaited or crocheted chain. The ends should be attached to the inside of the bag.STANDARD divisible III. 86. 16 on each of three needles. and add tassels at the sides of the muff for decoration. sariie at size 15. Making up. — 7. Doll's Muff.

Exercise in Knit Two Purl Two on Three Needles. and 20 onInstructions.100 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 1 Id. 2s. Knit the secondcuff in the — same manner. each of which is knitted asInstructions. (See General Instructions on Increasings. J oz. of 4-ply wool (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. stitch. Method of Making a Stitch at the Commencement of a Row. 1 Jd. Two per lb. For casting off. of = ljd. of ribbing. Knitted Cuff for Child's Own Wear. see under Woolcraft. REViiior/ will make a pair Materials. knit 2 stitches together. Steel Needles size 16. and 9(A). (For other qualities of — 4-ply wool. putting 16 on each of two needles. employ the second method described under General Instructions. 8d. Bone Needles Cost of same at — size 8. Knit 4 in. one. of cliffs. —Two — any 4-ply wool. Practice- Two Together. KNITTED IN STRIPS.—Four Steel Needles— size 14. 87. KNITTED CUFFS FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. in Knitting Materials. [ Cost of same at 3s. see Aindifir Woolcraft..) : . per lb. J oz. Cast on 9 stitches with the bone needles. This has the result of making a stitch at the commencement of the row. Knit 3 stitches.) = Fig.) The petticoat consists of eight strips. DOLL'S PETTICOAT. or as many as will give a width follows Put the right-hand needle under the wool before placing it in the first of 1J in. and cast off loosely. knit 2 purl 2. Cast on 52 stitches.

Now slip the stitches on to No. Sew together the eight strips. through which a runner may be passed 1 double crochet into a stitch. There will still be 9 stitches on the needle. and then cast off. N. 16 knitting-needles. Slip the first stitch of each row. has been knitted.STANDARD III. 3 treble into next stitch. miss a stitch. and change to plain knitting .B. If it is to be drawn up without a bodice. . The petticoat may be attached to a bodice. This completes the row. or may be drawn up at the waist by a runner. Do 1 in. Pass through the small loops formed. and double crochet into the next stitch. Round the scallops at the bottom of the petticoat work the following edging * 1 double crochet into a stitch. Making up. 88. The change to fine needles will shape the petticoat. 101 knit 4 stitches. Repeat from * all round the scallops. If a chain is employed. attach a woollen pompom to each end. crochet the following chain edge round the top. a runner of ribbon. tape. so that it is less full at the waist. Fig. Repeat this row until 4| in. leaving one seam open for 2 in. miss a stitch. Doll's Petticoat Knitted in Strips. there will be now no making of stitches or knitting two together. or crocheted chain. The crochet borders may be done by a — girl in a higher standard. * chain 1. of this plain knitting on steel needles. Repeat from * right round the waist of the petticoat. miss a : : — stitch. down the centre of the back to form the placket-hole.

) Knit 1J in.102 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Cast on It consists of about 14 strips. Is. without stretching. leaving one seam open for 6 in. per lb. 5d. of knitting on the steel needles and cast off. finishing with — — .B. Materials. Join on the palest shade of wool and knit J in. 5 oz. Instructions.) size 15 steel needles. or as many as will give a width of 8 in. until 1J in. of the pattern. and change to plain knitting. slipping the first stitch at the commencement of each row. ranging from navy to pale blue. knit 10 stitches. according This should be ascertained by measuring Making up. Counting the stitch made at the beginning. 14 oz. Attach the petticoat to a bodice made of flannel or flannelette. Knit 9 stitches. * Knit 2 purl 1. of her waist." io. five shades of blue wool. were employed. As a petticoat of this description wears for a long time. each of which is knitted as follows Cast on 36 stitches in the darkest shade of wool. 2nd Row. Method of Joining Wool taught. in the darkest shade. it is better to have a bodice that can be replaced by a larger one as the child grows than a knitted one which is difficult to replace. has been knitted first. 6d. Work the same crocheted edging round the scallops at the bottom as the one described under " Doll's Petticoat. of 4-ply wool. Do 3 in. About The petticoat here described will fit a child of 9 or 10 years. Work 1J in. Sew together the strips. decreasing or increasing the width or length of the strips. Break off the wool. It may be found that less or to the slimness of the girl to be fitted. as described under " Doll's Petticoat " above. — more than 14 strips are required. Slip the commencing stitch of every row after the Repeat the first and second rows alternately. the petticoat may be altered to fit a child or adult of any build or height. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 3. knit 2 together. 21 stitches with the bone needles. down the centre of the back to form the placket-hole. in a similar manner with each of the next two shades of wool. Repeat this row until a sufficient length has been knitted to reach from the hem of the girl's skirt to within 3 in. Join on now with wool one shade lighter than that first employed. her as the work proceeds. (See General Instructions. there will still be 21 stitches on the needle. Now slip the stitches on to will be an average length for a girl of 9 or 10 years. : — N. Two Bone Needles Materials. 9(b). Break off. Four shades of wool have now been employed. — KNITTED TEA-COSY. By Instructions. Two Bone Needles size 9. Repeat from * all along the row. Double Berlin Wool of five shades. will make two Tea-Cosies. INSTRUCTIONS FOR KNITTING A PETTICOAT IN STRIPS FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. — — = in the illustration. Cost of same at 4s. as before. Knit plain. The cosy is made in two halves. — — size 6. (15 in. Two Steel Needles — size 15. : —For the tea-cosy shown 1st Row. each of which is knitted as follows Make a stitch at the commencement of the row.

a lining of plain knitting may be made for each half of the cosy. General Instructions). leaving the spaces between unjoined. from the top. 89. through which a woollen work : chain will afterwards be passed to draw up the top of the cosy. Sew up the side seams for \\ in. Knitted Tea-Cosy. and continue this till 1J in. miss 2 stitches. Repeat from * to the end of the row. Place the two halves of the cosy facing each other. Make a crocheted woollen chain about 22 in. 1 double crochet into the next stitch. Decorate the top edge of the cosy with the following simple crochet chain 1 double crochet into a stitch. This will produce a row of holes. Change back to the pattern. long (also of the darkest shade of wool). 103 1. pass it through the holes formed for the purpose. has been worked in the palest shade of the wool. Then. sew the knitted lining neatly to each half of the cosy before up. it is If this is done. Employ the darkest shade of wool for this edging. If desired. as it will form a pleasing contrast to the pale shade. knit 2 together. knit 2 together. Cast off loosely. * knit 1. instead of doing plain knitting for the next row. * 5 chain. for the spout and handle of the pot. Repeat from * all round the top. Making — . make 1 (see second method of increasing. make 1. Fis. and draw the cosy up : made up.STANDARD a row of knit 2 purl III. as follows Slip 1. from the bottom and 1 in.

The cosy described above will fit a teapot holding from 1 \ pt=. B. the cosy may be drawn up with ribbon. of ribbed knitting. DOLL'S JERSEY ON THREE NEEDLES. and to cast on the number of stitches necessary — to fit the pot. cast on more stitches. 28 on each of three needles. Cast on 84 stitches. Two Varieties of Ribbed Knitting employed in Making Article of more Difficult Construction. The most satisfactory way is to let the children measure the size of the pot for which the cosy is required. Attach full pompoms to the ends of the chain. This will form the turned-up border at the bottom of the jersey. same at Four Steel Needles size 14. 2£d. — = — Doll's Jersey Knitted on Three Needles. knit 2 purl 2. Instructions. Change now to ribbing of knit 1 purl 1. If a larger size is required. in width unstretched. (For other qualities of wool. of any 4-ply wool. 1J oz. 8d. If preferred. and tie these ends in a bow. and the stitches must be arranged on two needles This compilation © Phoenix E-Books UK . The base of the armholes has now been reached. per lb. Body of Jersey. II. selecting a number which is a multiple of 3. Do about J in.) 2s.— 104 at the top. of this pattern. or as many as will give doubled knitting (ribbed) 3£ in. Cost of Materials. to 1 qt. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 4. that is. see Woolcraft. N. and knit 4 in. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

has been knitted in this way. : and 12 on one. see under Woolcraft. Knit the back of the jersey from the armhole upwards. . The shoulder and neck opening at the opposite side will be left open. Knit each sleeve as follows needles Cast on 28 stitches. If wool per lb. 91. in this pattern. Four Steel Needles size 14. and Knit Two Purl One taught for Pattern of Hat. At the commencement of the next row. and turn the jersey on to the right side. Doll's Hat. lid. 105 instead of three. Leave the 42 stitches on the back needle for a time. After completing the ribbing for the neckband. f oz. Sew on small woollen loops and pearl buttons for the fastening of shoulder and neck. of any 4-ply wool. and the seam at one side of the neckband. DOLL'S HAT. so that the knitting for the front of the jersey may be worked on one needle.. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. so that the jersey may be easily slipped over the doll's head. and cast off loosely. Now join the wool on again at the commencement of the 42 stitches left on the needle for the back. or fasten with press-studs. and then do knit 1 purl 1 to the end of the needle. Do about half-an-inch of knitting on these 20 stitches. and the knitting for the back on the second needle. Fig. 8 on each of two ribbing of knit 2 purl 2 for about £ in. Turn the jersey on to the wrong side. Sew the sleeves into the armholes. exactly as was described for the front. Knit One Purl Two. Now change the pattern to knit 2 purl 2 for the neckband of the jersey. cast off. and sew up one shoulder seam. Change to the knit 1 purl 1 ribbing. again cast off 11 stitches. Do — 12. Sleeves. to form the turned-up cuff at the wrist. or pass them on to a piece of wool. work 3J in. the cost of one hat will be about 2d. be employed.) Materials.STANDARD III. and knit backwards and forwards on the front needle in the knit 1 purl 1 pattern. — — at 3s. Now cast off 1 1 stitches at the commencement of the row. until 1 J in. Place 42 stitches on each. that is. and then cast off. Making up. thus leaving 20 stitches not cast off in the centre of the pin.

and sew it down on to the brim. Turn the — bag on to the right side. is will fit It is knitted in . 1. Materials. of same at per lb. to form a prettv finish to the hat. 92. Knit 4 rounds of plain knitting to form a natural fold. 6d. Brim of Hat. in this pattern.) Fold. round without stretching. according to pattern selected. Now take each top corner of the hat in turn. Knit 10 rounds of ribbing of knit 2 purl 1. has been employed in knitting brim. Fig. Making up. howof knit 1 purl 2. and on Two Needles. Instructions. Same Pattern Employed as in Preceding Exercise. Hat for Child's Own Wear. but on Larger Scale. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 4s. This completes the brim. 1. or as many as will produce knitting measuring 8 in. use it also for crown of hat. Cast on 72 stitches. (If. k. Fix a woollen pompom on each of the sewn-down comers. 1. shape. 1 off loosely. —Two Bone Needles— 4-ply wool. oz.— 106 Instructions. Turn the work on to the wrong side and flatten it to form a bag Sew together the open ends where the casting-off was done. —This hat a child of 9 or 10 years of age. (An alternative and easier pattern is ribbing of k. and work 2\ in. Change to ribbing ever. size 9. Crown of Hat. 24 on each of three needles.) employing the second method described under General Instructions. Cost 1} about 6d. that is. p. The number of stitches chosen must be divisible by 3 or by 2. 13. KNITTED HAT FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. and fold back the brim. Two Pearl Buttons. Cast p.

* Knit 1 purl 2. commencing with the double fold for the front brim. —The hat described above tea difficult . 1st Row. An alternative Knit 2 purl 1. or If in.STANDARD III. This under part should be about 1£ in. Repeat from * to the end of the row. Sew up the two side seams neatly. 2nd Row. Double Fold for Front Brim. has been employed in knitting the brim. If. as may be required. of the hat. and finishing with the double fold for the back brim. or 10 years. * Knit 2 purl 1. The number chosen should be divisible by 3 or 2. and do 18 rows to form the upper part of the brim. has been knitted for the crown Knit 4 plain The last row for the crown should be knit 1 purl 2. — Double Fold for Back Brim. Knit 4 more plain rows. matter for any individual girl to vary the number of stitches and the measurements to suit her own purpose. She may thus make a hat of the same pattern to fit a younger or an older child. use it also for the crown of — the hat. Cast on 66 stitches. Repeat these two rows alternately six times more. rows to form a natural fold between the under and upper part of the brim. Fold the brim into position all round the hat. and do 14 rows. Making up. Commence again to work the first and second rows alternately. Double the strip. The exact width necessary should be determined by measuring round the head of the intended wearer. to form another natural fold between the brim and crown of * — and 2nd Row. 1. 107 a long strip. to form a natural fold between the crown and the back brim. hat. Buttons covered with a small square of plain knitting may be employed if — — — preferred. Repeat from * to the end of the row. in depth. Crown of Hat.. Repeat from * to the end of the row. slipping the commencing stitch of each row. — easier pattern is ribbing of k. 1st Row.. according to pattern selected. * Knit 2 purl 1. N. however. Continue to knit these two rows alternately. * Knit 1 purl 2. 2nd Row. as will produce knitting having a width of without stretching. Now take each top corner of the hat in turn. rows. * Knit 1 purl 2. 1 k. This will make 14 rows in all. to form the under part of the back brim. Repeat from * to the end of the row. and sew it down on to the brim. Cast off loosely. Repeat from * to the end of the row.in. Repeat these two rows alternately until 12 in. second rows alternately. Repeat from * to the end of the row. 1. or as many rows as will measure If. 9. or 1£ in. p. so that the knit 1 purl 2 side of the crown is outermost. 1. 1st Row. in depth. It will not will fit a girl of 8. Fix a large pearl button on to each of the sewn-down corners. or as many 10J in. until 18 rows.B. have been Commence again to work the first and knitted. Knit 4 plain rows for the fold. p. and will complete the under part of Knit 4 plain the front brim.

Long End of Cast on 12 stitches. and then place it round the right-hand needle in the usual manner. 1 Ball of " Coton Perle " D. Insert the needle in 1st Row. Tie Knitted in Spider Pattern. will Instructions. New Ornamental Materials. — size 14.—Two Steel Needles Cost of same = 2d. 93. the second stitch.) This is known as " Spider Stitch. Repeat this all along the needle till the last stitch is reached. and knit the stitch draw the loop through the cotton that was placed round the two needles as well (See Fig. . size 5.108 14. Fig. stitch plain. Knit this last — . TIE KNITTED IN SPIDER PATTERN. Stitch taught.C. —The children Tie. put the cotton once round the points of both needles.M. 94. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS." as through the stitch. Knit the first stitch in the ordinary manner.. enjoy knitting this tie as a present for some friend or relation.

and then knit plain all along the row. and do spider stitch all along the row until the last stitch is reached. 10& Slip the first stitch. 8 in. There will now be 12 stitches on the needle. as at the beginning.STANDARD 2nd Row. 1. 16 short end. —The best dimensions in. Proceed with the pattern as before. Widen for the second end of the tie as follows (by taking a loop from the row below and knitting it . Slip the first stitch. until another 13 in. has been knitted. N. the second end of the tie. knit 2. III. 12. raise a stitch. narrow neck portion. Slip the first as follows for the part to be slipped under the collar This reduces the stitches to eight.. has been knitted for : Short End of Tie. until 11 in. Cast off. in . Narrow Portion for Neck.B. Repeat the second and third rows alternately. raise a stitch. — — Fig. of the narrower strip has been knitted. knit 1. Knit this stitch plain. knit 1. raise a stitch. Method of Working Spider Pattern for Tie. Narrow : stitch. for a man's tie are as follows : Long end. Proceed with the pattern as before. . 94. knit 2 tog. . four times. knit 2. knit Slip 1. knit 2. knit 1. raise a stitch see General Instructions oil Increasings). 3rd Row. until 15 in.

IS (A).. DOLL'S CROCHETED BONNET.. Leave the remaining stitches from B to C untouched. 6d. work 1 treble into Is/ Row. taking up the back thread only. Quantity required for class of 50 = 12J oz. 96.) — ->B 4 l'. Work 1 treble into the top of each of the 9 treble of the previous row. along the row. 95. or as many as in length. Cost of same at 4s. will measure 7 in. has been worked. Doll's Crocheted Bonnet. 1st Row. that is. each of the following chain stitches all along the row. see under Woolcraft. at the point E. (For method of working " Trebles. Join on the wool again at a distance of 2\ in. Make 3 chain and turn. before the bonnet made Portion to Fit round Top and Sides of Head. = 3s 6 jd. Work 1 treble into each stitch of the previous row.110 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Treble Stitch taught. 2nd Row." see General Instructions. taking up the back thread only as before. and turn with 3 chain. Commencing with the third chain from the hook. per lb. in order to produce the ribbed effect seen in Fig. — (G to H. — — . of medium size. (For cheaper qualities of 4-ply wool.) — Back of Bonnet. Bone Crochet Hook Materials. of 4-ply wool. or as many as will measure about 2 in. Break off the wool. and then work 1 treble into each of the next eight stitches. -2\ -> p < 7 i Fig. Instructions. Repeat the first and second rows until 3 in. J oz. —The is accompanying diagram shows the shape of the crochet up. 2nd Row.) Make 3 chain and turn. Make 3 chain to form a treble. Commence by making a loose chain of 30.

and determine the measurements accordingly. 4-ply wool. about 5£ in. about 5£ in.— STANDARD III. and neatly darn in all ends. distance BC. distance FE. 6d. i. per lb. distance BA.e. * 15(B). Break off the wool. . i. : Join on Decorate the front edge of the bonnet with the following border make 4 chain. Instructions. depth of back of bonnet. 2 oz. about 15 in. and sew AB to CB. Turn down the rectangular flap which forms the back of the bonnet. Fold back from the front of the bonnet a flap \ in. . stitch. about 5£ in. . distance EB. about 7 in. of the narrower width has been worked. the wool. Ill Repeat these two rows until 1\ in. miss 1 stitch. GH. Doll's Crocheted Bonnet. —Work in a similar manner . and DE to FE. Making up. to the Doll's Bonnet. about 4 in. The full-sized bonnet is a sufficiently difficult exercise for Standard IV children. but observe the following dimensions width of portion to fit round sides and Length of chain.. Whenever possible. measure the head of the child for whose wear the hat is intended. FULL-SIZED BONNET FOR CHILD OF EIGHT OR NINE YEARS OLD. 96. — Fig.. in depth to form the turned-back fold shown in the illustration. Cost at 4s. and work a double crochet into the next Repeat from * right along the edge. top of head and to form flap. .e. . = 7d. the distance GC. Turn the bonnet on to the right side.

4 stitches — — — . of 4-ply wool. Turn with 3 chain. and work 1 double crochet into each of the first then work 1 treble into each remaining stitch along the row. Second Exercise same at in Treble Stitch. or as —Make a loose chain of many as will measure about 5 in. 97. 16(A).) 3rd Row. 21. and work 1 treble into each of the remaining chain stitches along the row. DOLL'S CROCHETED PETTICOAT. until the last 4 stitches are reached.c. per lb. take up both the back and front threads of the previous row. see under 2s. Instructions. = ljd. Turn with 1 chain. Into each of these work 1 double crochet. Simple Border Pattern taught. work 1 double 1st Row. Change now to treble stitch. Commencing with the second chain from the hook.— Coarse Bone Crochet Hook. Cost of Materials. 3d. f oz. . Woolcraft. crochet in each of the next 4 chain. (For better qualities of 4-ply wool.'s in the last 4 stitches will have the effect of narrowing the work at one end to form the waist.) Fig. in length. (In the case of each treble and double crochet. The working of the d. 2nd Row. Doll's Crocheted Petticoat. and work 1 treble into each stitch of the previous row.112 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

of crochet has been worked Break the wool off. If the 1 border seems too full. when working towards the top of the garment. Cost of same at 2s. or 4 in. extra chain to turn with. double crochet into next stitch. The making of a full-sized petticoat is an exercise sufficiently difficult for . Work 1 d. described under Doll's Petticoat. Third Exercise in Treble Stitch. Materials. if wool at 3s. of 4-ply wool. down instead of for 4 stitches only as described under Doll's Petticoat and. 1st 24 chain. — 16 (B).— — STANDARD III. the length of the end where the double crochet has been worked). * miss a stitch. CROCHETED CUFFS FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. of the previous row. Fold the work in halves. by double crochet for the waistband. Continue the pattern until the waist measure is about 24 in. 4 treble into the next stitch. is employed of 4-ply wool.e. pose of joining the cuff. with the following Let the commencing chain be about 21 in. at the top for the placketTurn the work on to the right side. leaving a sufficient length for the purto go round the wrist. long. per pair. per lb. (Again measure the intended wearer to ascertain the exact size required. lid. children. 1 —Make a chain of 24 loops.) Making up. leaving open 7 in. Instructions. Repeat the above two rows 10 times more. round the bottom Make 1 double crochet in a stitch. and draw the last loop through. per lb. see under Woolcraft. £ oz. or until 6 in. Making up. Work the following simple border hole. —Turn with 3 chain. into each of the . long. medium Bone Crochet Hook. at the top for the Turn the work on to the right side. — Standard V 17. 113 (i.) —A = Instructions. Work 1 treble on each d.) To form the waistband. alterations in dimensions —About 14 —Work as : oz. (The exact length required must be ascertained by measuring the girl for whom the petticoat is intended. Sew the commencing 8— (815B) —Make 2nd Row. and sew together the back seam for a distance of 3 J in.c. from the bottom. Repeat the second and third rows alternately until the waist measurement. Materials. 4d. Row. (For other qualities l£d. 8d. leaving open 1£ in. Work a crocheted border placket-hole. of 4-ply wool for the pair. work double crochet for a distance of 3| in. in length. Cost. is 8 in. = 2s. round the bottom.. as described under Doll's Petticoat. Sew up the back seam.c. Repeat from * all the way round. occasionally miss a stitch between the 4 treble and the double crochet immediately following. finish the last 3^ in. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FULL-SIZED CROCHETED PETTICOAT TO FIT A CHILD OF TEN OR ELEVEN YEARS.

ball of i of a ball of " O-SoO-So-Silkie " costs 2d. Finish off both the commencing and finishof the cuff until the seam is reached. Fig. Instructions. in Harder Revision Exercise Materials. the end of the seam : .c.c. * Work double crochet into each stitch of the chain. size 2. miss the end of the row of trebles. over the top of the girl's —Crochet a loose chain long enough to fit head. Silkie. The number of chain made for the hair-band shown in the photograph was and the length was 1 1 in. and work 1 d. making Border. 18. Crocheted Cuffs for Child's Own Wear. —Coarse Steel Crochet Hook —about One medium size. 98.. CROCHETED HAIR-BAND FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR. of row and the finishing row of the cuff together with the end the join on the wrong side of the work. Cotton. Commence at one end of the joining seam and proceed as follows 1 d. wool left. 60. Repeat from * all round the end into the end of the first row of double crochet.114 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. into * chain 5. or fine Knitting and will make three hair-bands." Double Crochet. ing ends of the wool by darning them neatly down the wrong side of the seam. . Work a similar border round the other end of the cuff.

. and fasten off securely. 115 Turn with 1 chain.STANDARD except the crochet in first. all. draw the end through. and repeat from *. Elastic of the length required to fit under the child's hair should be sewn — to the ends of the hair-band. Decorate each end of the hair-band with a rosette of narrow ribbon. Making up. Fig. 99. III. Crocheted Hair-band for Girl's Own Wear. Work 7 rows of double Cut the thread.

see Woolcraft. 6d. IV. Bone Crochet Hook of medium size. Cost of wool at 4s. Two Bone Needles size 9. Triangular Head-Wrap. TRIANGULAR HEAD-WRAP.) — — Fig. Materials. (For other 2£ oz.STANDARD i. 100. Revision of Spider Stitch in Article of more Difficult Construction. of Andalusian Wool. = 9d. 116 . varieties of Andalusian Wool. per lb.

117 First Half of Shawl. Work 1 double crochet into the stitch between the first double crochet and the first treble of the row of the border which has just been * Miss 2 stitches. omitting the third and fourth rows. full description of this stitch is given under " Knitted Tie in Spider Stitch " in Standard III Syllabus. and decrease more rapidly by repeating the first and second rows Continue to decrease thus only. (See p. put the wool over twice as usual to form a spider stitch. and 5 treble into the stitch at the end of the next row. 1st Row of Border. — IV. the border here described proves too difficult for Standard IV children. 56 stitches on the needle. into the next stitch. and work spider stitch into all the remaining Repeat the first and second rows alternately. and work spider stitch in all the remaining 3rd and 4th Rows. Slip the first stitch. or substitute one of the simpler borders previously given. Repeat from * all the way round. Now commence to narrow Is* Row.) If it worked by Standard — — . (The two stitches knitted together must be at the same end of the needle at which the increasings were made in the first half of the wrap. Second Half of Shawl. of 7 trebles will thus be over the centre of the 5 trebles in the first row of the border. This will have the effect of making the widening more gradual. (The clusters 1 double crochet into next stitch. 108. work spider stitch all along the row. by casting stitch at the commencement of the row. at the end of every other needle. and will ensure Continue to widen at the coma better fit round the front part of the head. In knitting the latter. Repeat from * all round the shawl. by putting the (See Fifth Method of Increasing. — on 3 stitches.) Knit the first stitch. Like the second row. * Work 1 double crochet into a stitch at the end of a row. — Repeat rows 1 to 4 until there are Change now. alternately. Make a point. Make the border rather full round the two points at the ends of the shawl. General needle under the wool before knitting. — Slip the first stitch. Knit two rows without widening or narrowing. instead of 1 row. work 3 rows like the second row between the widening rows.— STANDARD Instructions. have V or VI girls. until there are 56 stitches — on the needle. completed. work 7 tr.) Commence at the Is* Row. and knit the last two stitches together. Instructions. A stitches. Slip the first stitch. mencement of every fourth row. until only three stitches remain on the needle Cast off. 2nd Row of Border. and then work spider stitch into all the remaining stitches. Crocheted Border.) — for the second half of the shawl as follows : 2nd Row. until there are 62 stitches on the needle. miss 2 stitches. Then. stitches. 2nd Row. instead of making a stitch at the commencement of every other row.

In the fifth row make the first increasing for the neck slope thus Slip the first stitch. or as will produce knitting measuring 8 in. 2. Knit plain. 5th and Qth Rows. of Andalusian Wool.e. unstretched. until there are 68 stitches on the needle. in length.. Continue this ribbing throughout the garment. see under Woolcrafi. Increase again in the ninth row. •dthand 10th Rows. 3rd and 4th Rows. etc. Baby's First Vest. 2£ oz. Revision of Increasings and Decreasings for the Shaping of the Neck. is —The work — — commenced until the left front is Right Front.) 1 — — Fig. Materials. completed. (For other suitable wools and their prices. Two Bone Knitting-needles size 11. at the and continued round as many open edge of the right front. 6d. 25th. yd. 101.118 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. per lb. — iQ+i? 17th. = 8d. in the same way as in the fifth row. Instructions. or until the . Ue t0 increase b y making one stitch in every fourth row (i. ^iS 21st.— Plain. Cast on 56' stitches.—Plain. in the : . It will now be seen that knitting two plain rows and two purl rows alternately produces a ribbed effect. 1st and 2nd Rows. make a stitch (First Method. 1th and 8th Rows. Cost. BABY'S FIRST VEST. Purl. ldtn. of narrow Ribbon or Tape. General Instructions) knit the remainder of the row as usual. Purl.). employing wool at 4s.

second method. Decrease in the same way at the beginning of one row in every four. 1 d. using the second method. Attach ribbons or tapes (as shown in the photograph) to secure the fronts in position. Join up each sleeve by means of a seam worked on the wrong side. Work a perfectly straight piece of knitting 7| in. knit the remainder of front. Then insert each sleeve in an armhole.c.c. side. 6 in. and then cast on a corresponding number of stitches to take the place of those removed. and sew it in on the wrong side of the garment. and proceed with the ribbing the ordinary way until the knitting measures 5£ in. 18 double ribs are worked for the front. in length. as there will be no ribs to serve as a guide. at one end of the bottom of the vest and proceed as follows Row. remains unaltered. 1 d. to the next must be judged by the worker. Is* Commence — : . draw it through. * 4 chain. General Cast on 50 stitches. or as many as will proWork a piece of ribbing (knit 2 rows. General Instructions..— STANDARD knitting measures 9 is IV. : Form Back. or consisting of about 20 double ribs. distance from one d. Discontinue the increasings. 101.c. so that the total number of stitches on the needle. in readiness for knitting the back. When the starting-point is reached Work a again.) 2nd Row. The straight piece for the shoulder section now commenced. — . or consisting of about 24 double ribs. Lap the left front over the right to produce a double-breasted effect. and knit the remaining 38 stitches of the row. Crocheted Edging. in width from the com- mencement. Method of Fastening. break off the wool. slip the first stitch. and fasten it off neatly. in. Left Front.c. Cast off by the : in. Each sleeve is knitted as follows duce knitting measuring 7 and purl 2 rows). (In the vest shown in Fig. similar edging round the bottom of each sleeve.. wide. Cast off to form the armhole as before. placing the sleeve seam to the under arm seam. a straight portion equal in width to the straight section of the right Commencing at to decrease for the neck slope as follows the top end of a plain row. Cast off. knit 2 tog. drawing in the sleeve slightly. * 1 ch. 1 d. and then cast on 30 new stitches to take the place of those cast off. Knit back along these stitches. number Sleeves. 119 in in. Work Then commence : the row plain. and join the straight shoulder portion of each front to the corresponding part of the back.) Armhole.) this as follows Cast off 30 stitches (or as many as give a length of 3£ at the top of the vest. along the row. leaving the middle portion of the top of the back to form part of the neck opening. into repeat from * all round the vest until the the end of the next plain knitted rib (In working along the edge of each front the starting-point is reached again. 1 d. . into next chain repeat from * all round the vest. Making up. —Turn the vest to the wrong Instructions. until the of stitches on the needle is the same as that at first cast on. into the first chain of the previous row. wide. while so doing. The right front should now be equal in width to the left front.c. into the end of the first plain knitted rib.

102. employed. Child's Vest. 4-ply wool. . per lb. 3. 6d. of Knitting taught.120 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. New Pattern Materials. Fig. or other suitable Bone Crochet Hook of medium size. CHILD'S VEST. of Is. = OJd. 3£ oz. Larger Number of Stitches on Needle size 9. Vest Wool. —Two Bone Needles— Cost of same at 4s.

— 121 Instructions. Attach small pompoms chain of wool through the holes formed by the border. Knit plain. With the light shade of silk. Instructions. in Four Steel Needles size 14. For a simpler crochet border than the above." Standard III. to form part of the armhole. of stitches chosen must be divisible by 2. see General Instructions. go back and make a double crochet into the first of the 3 chain. Cast on 72 stitches. The casting-off should be very loosely done. and the strap from the back to the front. as the vest is made to slip over the child's head.— — STANDARD IV. Repeat from * to the end of the row. miss a stitch. The vest described here will fit a child of three years. —Work — : N. Cast off. see under " Doll's Crocheted Draw up the neck of the vest by running a crocheted Petticoat. Sew up the side seams. and the other at the left. 12 on each of three The number needles. or as many as will produce knitting measuring 3 in. Repeat from * all round the border. that is. Now cast off all the stitches except 14 at the end of the row. Sew the shoulderstraps into position. Making up.B. * Knit 2 purl 2. * chain 3. so that one shoulderstrap is at the right-hand side of the work. doing trebles with 1 chain between in alternate stitches. This completes one-half of the vest. made — — . Knit 4£ in. 2nd Row. If coarser needles are employed. and the length increased. No. Repeat from * right round the neck and armholes. After the first row. 1st 1 Row. Leave 2 in. OR SPORTS TIE IN CLUB COLOURS. 8. * 1 chain. occasionally miss two stitches instead of one. STRIPED SILK TIE. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 4. 2nd. Ribbon may be employed for this purpose if preferred. of plain knitting on these 14 stitches to form a shoulder-strap for one side of the vest. (For method of counting rows. — 4. Revision Exercise in Joining Thread. Materials. round. of ribbing of knit 1 purl 1 for the border of the vest. The following border may be pat round the neck and armholes to form a decorative finish. 2d. per ball. Place one half of the vest upon the other half. been knitted. Change now to the following pattern 1st.) Knit plain. without stretching. of this pattern has 4th Row. Long End of Tie. 1st Round. 1 treble into the next stitch. The Star Sylko — — is Nearly 2 balls of Star Sylko. two contrasting shades. or as many as will produce knitting having a width of 8 \ in. and to afford a means of drawing the neck up closely after the vest has been slipped on : — : — — — : treble into a stitch. it can be made to fit a much older Each half of the vest is knitted separately. of the ribbed pattern unsewn at the top of each side seam. and 3rd Rows. Repeat rows 1 to 4 until 12 in. and secure picot by a double crochet into the next stitch. miss a stitch. always slip the commencing stitch of each row. Work 1 in. to the ends of the chain. Make picots all round the first border as follows 1 double crochet into a stitch. carrying the strap attached to the front half of the work to the back. cast on 36 stitches. so that one tie can be for a cost of 3fd. starting from the bottom. and in the following manner child. If the border seems too full.

.122 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. in the light shade and \ in. 103. until a length of 12 in. There Knit 16 in. Neck Portion of Tie. Repeat the first and second 2nd Round.) shade. knit 1. Knit 4 stitches of the first needle... break off the thread and join on with the dark (See General Instructions. Continue to knit alternately in this way £ in. alternate light and dark shades as before. knit 2 tog. Now . Striped Silk Tie. has been knitted. knit 2 tog. working about 4 stitches with the double thread. the first needle. knit 1.— Knit 1 purl 1 all the way round. Finish with a knit 1 purl 1 round. in the dark. knit 2 tog. Continue the pattern described above in the dark shade. break off the thread and join on with the light shade. knit 2 tog. of this has Knit 4 stitches of been knitted. until \ in. Fig. knit 1. Finish as before with a knit 1 purl 1 round. rounds alternately until f in. for the neck portion in will now be 8 stitches on each needle. decrease as follows in each needle for the part which goes round the neck : Knit 1. has been knitted.

: — BABY'S BELT. (For other varieties of Andalusian Wool. knit 2 into next stitch. of Andalusian Wool. 6d> per lb. Change to ribbed knitting. IV. knit 2 into the next stitch (see General Instructions on Increasings). see under 4s. Cast on 40 stitches on each of three needles. and increasing the above measurements [in — — proportion. knit 2 into next stitch. Woolcraft. Change to plain knit 1 purl 1. Larger Number of Stitches on Three Needles employed. 1J in. knit 1. for the bottom border of the belt. 123 Now increase as follows in each needle for the short end of the tie Knit 1. Work ribbed knitting. B. or as many as will produce knitting measuring 13 in. for the top border.B. Baby's Belt. knit 1. 104. by casting on more stitches to commence. Knit 8 in. Modify the lengths given to suit the purpose for which the tie is to be used. 3£d. N. N. A body-belt for an adult may be knitted in a similar manner. for 1J in. for the short end of the tie in alternate light and dark shades. employing the second method given.) — = — Fig. Employ second method of casting on. There will now be 12 stitches on each needle once more. and sew the open ends of the tie neatly together. The dimensions given above are suitable for a man's tie. Instructions. 5. Cast off. and knit 4 in. . The number of stitches chosen must be divisible by 2. knit 1 purl 1. round. Cast off. 1 oz. and again knit knitting.STANDARD Short End of Tie. knit 1. Cost of Materials. thus. wool at Four Steel Needles size 12. knit 2 into next stitch.

= Is. wide may be knitted from 4| oz. of wool. Instructions. If this is done. — . 6. OJd. The following exercise may be made much easier by employing wool of a coarser texture than Shetland. see under same at 4s.) Fig. long and 9 in. The scarf may be knitted with two needles instead of four. of 4-ply wool. (For other qualities of 2-ply Woolcraft.—Four Bone Needles—size 9. fewer stitches will be required on each needle. 8d. in which case a scarf 1 J yd. 105.124 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 3£ oz. per lb. New Pattern of Knitting on Three Needles taught. Knitted Scarf. KNITTED SCARF. Shetland Wool. Cost of Materials.

106. End of the Needle. is employed =.STANDARD IV. The number selected should produce knitting measuring about 15 in. of Single Berlin wool or 4-ply wool at 4s. — — — 7. Repeat from * all the way round. the ends may be drawn up and full tassels suspended.) _>D -3"- |4 •V---2. if (For other qualities of 4-ply wool.". 6d. Making up. wool 9d. until a scarf about \\ yds. 125 Cast on 126 stitches. and make a full fringe at each end. Increasing at the Begin>"ng and Decreasing at the taught. Foot of Sleeping Sock. long has been knitted. Rounds 1 to 6. 42 on each of three needles. pair. Cost of one pair. will knit size 8. round without stretching. * Purl 3 knit 3. Sew up the ends of the tubular scarf. as in the case of the doll's scarf. under WooTcraft. Cast off. SLEEPING SOCK. per lb. see —Two Bone Needles— one €<-- 1\ oz. as described under General Instructions. If preferred. that is. Materials. Repeat rounds 1 to 12. •-5SB 7" ---3"- 4* Fig. Repeat from * all the way round. or some suitable number which must be divisible exactly by six. reversing the pattern every six rounds. * Knit 3 purl 3. Rounds 6 to 12. .

without stretching. Continue to do this until there are 56 stitches on the needle. The outward slope is thus continued at one end of the work only. The sock is joined together up the sole of the foot and the back of the leg. There will now be 50 stitches on the needle. always slipping the commencing stitch of every row after the first. BD .. The short slope at the other end. Fig. that is. each end. and then do plain knitting all along the row. knitting into the front and back of the second stitch (see General Instructions on Increasings). and the strip will slope outwards at and AC. forms the shape for the heel.126 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Sleeping Sock. along BD. 107. knitting for the leg is commenced. Repeat this row seven more times. many : Commence immedi1. make a stitch by Fig. along AC. viz. along Now make a stitch at the commencement of alternate rows only. 106 shows the shape of the foot opened out flat. before the Instructions. knit ately to increase at each end of the work as follows Foot of Sock. Commence at the bottom AB : Cast on 42 stitches. — or as as follows of the sole along as will give a width of 7 in.

on to a piece of wool. 1. ribbon about £ in. but. which were slipped on to the piece of wool. 1 SI. Continue to decrease in this manner at the ends of alternate rows. row of each 8th Row. 1st Row. wide without stretching. thus continuing the long slope EF. along MK. (The portion toe. the 16 loops along KJ at the ends of the 32 rows which form the top of the foot. and cast off. Taught. This leaves 32 stitches on the needle.* — — — — . per lb. pair 4 oz. and soles at Is. using wool at 3s. 127 Slip off now. Plain. on the same needle. 2 tog. (See enlarged illustration of stitch in Fig. knit the last These four rows two stitches. Join on the wool. SI. wide. (For other qualities of thick wool.. 2d.. Continue this until there are 42 stitches on the needle. 109. decrease at the end of every row. until three stitches only are left at the end. * pick up the thread between the last and next stitches and repeat from * until the last two stitches are reached . on these 32 stitches to form the top of the foot. 3rd Row..) really complete the pattern . knit 1. Making —Sew together neatly the back of the leg. it . Knit eight rows of plain knitting. and producing the short slope HG. and knit six plain rows. 2nd Row. 24 stitches from the " Heel " end of the needle. 3d.— STANDARD IV. a slight variation is made in the last 4th Row. knit the last stitch. take up the 24 loops along JL where the 24 stitches were cast on. Knit 32 rows of plain knitting. 1. Lastly. before sewing up the seam at the Turn the work on to the right side.e. LADY'S BEDROOM SLIPPER. repeat from — alternate pattern. per pair 2s. Cast off. the great disadvantage in a pattern of this kind. 107). seam up the sole of the foot and the After the point E has been joined to D. pick up * till the last stitch is the thread between the stitches and knit reached. or as many as will produce knitting 5 J in. slipping the first stitch of each row. Cost. see under Woolcraft. from E to D may be gathered up to form a round toe. k. which is square-shaped. until the stitches are reduced to 50. size. of this pattern. Knit eight more rows of plain knitting. This decreasing at one end will give the slope EF. The number of stitches selected must be divisible by 2. Next take up. 1. Knit along this row plain.) up. Take up on the needle the 24 stitches along MK. Then knit 2 together. of light soles. knit it. i. and do three more in hes. and on these the leg is knitted from the foot upwards. New Ornamental Pattern Materials. Two Steel Needles size 12. SI. cast on 24 more stitches along JL. Change to ribbing of knit 1 purl 1. Change again to knit 1 purl 1. about 3 in. 1. There will again be 56 stitches on the needle. that is. 8. lid. and do 3 in. .) —A Bone Crochet Hook—medium — — A = Cast on 36 stitches. This produces 64 stitches altogether. 1£ yds. Knit the next row plain. Double Fingering or Coat Wool. the last stitch. flatten the foot so that the seam is under the centre of it (see Fig. k. k. Instructions. Thus : * k.. in order to avoid producing a sloping edge. repeat from * until the last stitch is reached . Now Now Leg of Sock. if preferred. Purl.

.

A bow may be tied The border thus : left is Finishing the edge. —Like 4th row. have For the Toe Piece. Continue to work the pattern on these 24 stitches 12 times more. when the join has been made. Continue working the pattern on this plan until 14 been knitted. about This portion corresponds with the 1J in. 109. Repeat from * all round. Row. Making BC of the — — turned down as shown in Fig. Sew the inside edge narrow toe-piece to the edge ED at the end of the work where the knitting was commenced. 73..c. of the wider rectangle will be left over. Row. as follows d. (See diagram of Doll's Slipper Fig. 108. * chain 4. stitches Fig.e. \ of the total width. 129 Row. in. Pattern of Bedroom Slipper Enlarged to Show Details. into the edge a few stitches along. or 44 patterns. leaving 24 on the needle.STANDARD 12th 16th 20th IV.. secure the picot by a d. all round the edge of the turn-down border. This pattern produces a series of holes through which ribbon may be passed underneath the turn-down border. i. Drawing wp the slipper. Cast off. 12 stitches cast off on the opposite side of the slipper before knitting the toe-piece. — in front. —Work picots . —Like 8th row. into first stitch of the border.) up. —Like 4th row.c. go back into the first of the 4 chain and make a d. It will be found that. 9— (8l5El .c. Cast off the first 12 stitches of the row.

1st Turning. The same as the 5th row. the same number of stitches may be employed to produce a larger bonnet. The bonnet shown in the illustration has been decorated with the following crochet border 1st Row of Border. General Instructions). 17th Row. = 6£d. knit 26 stitches. Repeat — — : — I . 2 tr. until only 28 stitches remain on the needle. work 3 chain (to form a tr. * miss 2 st. —Turn the knitted portion on to the wrong F will on to the upper Then side of the sole so that the point turn it up into its proper position. * make a stitch (employ Second Method. knitting the last stitch plain.. Pattern taught for Border. ch. Making up.). or as many as will give a width of 15 in. unstretched Knit 4 plain rows. knit stitches. 5th Row. Slip the first stitch on to the right-hand needle. Repeat from * to the end of the row. slipping the first stitch of all rows after the first. and 1 tr..) The bonnet described below will fit a child of about 10 years. and work 2 more tr. Knit about 5i in. it is (If possible fit the bonnet at this stage being made. knit and turn the work completely round without finishing the pin. This completes the turned-back border. A still more ornamental effect may be produced by knitting 1 plain row instead of 3 between the openwork rows. The same as the 5th row. and " Heel Back " introduced as an Exercise' Preparatory to Knitting Socks. (For counting of rows. however. to vary the number of stitches and the dimensions to suit the requirements of individual Instructions. and again turn the work completely round. The same as the 5th row. An easy slipper of the same dimensions may be made by employing the same number of stitches. Knit 3 plain rows. decrease these numbers of Row — 2 together. in order to ascertain the exact length of plain knitting required. 21st Row.) — KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Knit 3 plain rows. Turned Back Border. Knit 3 plain rows. Knit 3 plain rows.) 9th Row. Slip the first stitch. knit 2 together. on the girl for whom of plain knitting. Single Berlin Wool. Work in the same manner as the 5th row. 26 the 2nd row of turning. into a stitch. It will not prove a difficult matter. (If the number of stitches on the needle has been reduced. and substituting plain knitting for the pattern described above. and sew it form the toe of the shoe Simpler Pattern for Slipper. Join on the wool. into the same st. Cast off. per lb. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. Cast on 100 stitches. side. needles are used. Cost of same at 4s. see General Instructions. 130 Securing the sole. into 2nd Row of Turning. 13th Row.B. N. Two Bone Needles size 11. WOOLLEN BONNET FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. or 4-ply Materials. 6d. knit 2 together. 2. New — — see Woolcraft.) Turning for Back. Knit 35 stitches. If coarser — children. 9. — — — — — — Part to Fit round Head. If oz. proportionately . knit 2 together. wool.

go back and make a double crochet into the first of the 3 chain. Make picots all round the first border. If this seems too full into the next stitch. 2. * chain 3. or the border will be too full. and work 2 more tr. ends. Repeat from * all round (If the bonnet has been very tightly knitted. and secure the picot by a double crochet Repeat from * all round the border. Ill). ch. if desired.) Row of Border. such as that described under Doll's Crocheted Petticoat (St.STANDARD IV. 131 next St. advisable to miss three stitches before repeating the trebles. Ribbon may be run through this border and finished with rosettes at the This forms a dainty finish to the bonnet. . A simpler edging. into the same stitch. Woollen Bonnet for Child's Own Wear. miss a stitch. it will be the edge of the bonnet. as shown in Fig. 2nd : — — Fig. as follows 1 double crochet into a stitch. 110. may be substituted. miss two stitches occasionally instead of one.B. N. 110..

4-ply knitting wool. Woollen Hat Knitted on Three Needles. One Button-mould about in diameter. Preparatory to Knitting the Toe of a Stocking. Cost. and finished at the centre of the top of the hat.e. The knitting is commenced at the under part of this fold. Instructions. employing wool at 5s. Materials. This completes the under-fold. Purl all round. six times more. if preferred. 2 repeat from . the ribbing may be continued unbroken. round). Under-fold of Brim. — Knit round. . 1£ oz. 111.132 10. (or as many as will produce knitting measuring 21 in. * all Repeat these two rows 15th 16th all all Repeat the above two rows again. Row.. per lb. * K. Cast on 132 st. 1st Row. see under Woolcraft. Row. (For other qualities of suitable wool. The brim consists of a double fold. — — — round. i. Four Bone Knitting-needles size 9. The four rows just completed form a natural fold between the under and upper parts of the brim. 2nd Row. 6d. Instead of working these four rows. 44 on each of three needles. — Purl round. New Pattern TAUGHT.) — — = 1 J in. Exercise WOOLLEN HAT KNITTED ON THREE NEEDLES. Fig. p. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Use the second method given in General Instructions. 2.

k. 16th. Crown.) Knit 5 rows without further increasings. round. 1st Round. all Decreasings. * k. and then drawing the end of the wool right through. have been noticed that of . * K. k. To Simplify It will is in the above instructions that the chief difficulty keeping the pattern going correctly when stitches are being removed by decreasings. Then cast off as follows Break off the wool leaving an end measuring about 10 in. k. p. ...—* K. the pattern for 14 st. k. and 18th rounds.. 1 repeat from * all round. 1 k. Cast off. — — . 5th Round. 1. Work the same pattern IV. Now begin to decrease by knitting two together at the beginning of every row. General Instructions. k. the button in the centre of the crown to complete the cap.) : Covering for Button. p. Plain. k. 2 tog. 2nd Row. Making and Placing on of Button. . Pass each of the stitches in turn on to this wool by means of knitting each stitch. 2 tog.) 2nd Round. work four more rounds similar to the 15th. remain upon the needle. (See General Instructions on Casting-off from Three Needles. a thin covering of cotton-wool may be Sew placed over the button-mould before covering it with the knitted circle. 1 repeat from * all round. 1. 3rd Round. k. 12. * all round. 7th 8th It Round. k. 1 for 10 st. The second decreasing of each pair may be done by the " Pulling-over " method. k. . and finish it off neatly by means of knitting or darning it in.. k. 1.STANDARD Upper Part of Brim. k. .—Plain. on the needle. Continue to narrow off on the same plan until only 4 stitches remain upon each needle. 17th. —Plain —Plain * 1. 1. Knit 1 row plain. * K. There will be six pairs of decreasings in the round. 2 tog.. p. k. 2 tog.—r-Plaia. repeat from * all — . 5 (to cover the section where the decreasings are being made).. 1. 1 repeat from * all round.. This is done in plain knitting. k. If the teacher wishes to simplify the work. 6th Round. (See Fifth Method of Increasing. Cast on 5 st. 1 repeat from * all round. k. — — . 16. 1st Row. 10. In order to hide the wood completely. .. Make a stitch at the beginning of each succeeding row until there are 16 st. Continue this until only 5 st. k. 1 k. 3rd Row. 1 for 10 st. p. six sections. To form another natural fold between the brim and the crown. — K. K. in length. Repeat these three rows until 40 rounds of the crown have been completed. will be obvious by this time that the cap is being narrowed off in . round. p. (See General Instructions on Decreasings. 2 tog. 2 tog. 133 as for under part for 18 rounds. 1. and that six ribs of plain knitting separate the sections from one another. * K. 2 tog. 1 repeat from Round. Take the end of wool left through to the wrong side of the cap. all round.. 2 tog. k. 2. the cap may be knitted this Hat. 4th Round.

6d. of No. 4 oz. remain on each needle. Round. Fine Bone Crochet Hook.—* K. k. n. Commence at the centre .—* K. 2 tog. 1. stays described below will fit —The little a child of four or five years of age. Increasings and Decreasings taught. k.. k.e. 1. k.. Cast off. repeat from * repeat from all round. Materials.. 1 — 3rd Round. 112. 1. if knitting cotton at 2s. Small Girl's Crocheted Stays. i.) Half of Back. 12. round. k.. — 2nd Round. 2 tog. k. Plain.. st. 2 tog. — Round. as follows repeat from * all round.— 134 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. k. k. in six gradually narrowing sections.—* K. First of the back by making a loose chain about 9 in. Plain. 2 tog.. until only 4 Continue the decreasings in this way. in (The exact depth required should be determined by actual measurement length. per lb. 4th 5th 6th . 1st Round. 4 Knitting Cotton. of Stays. 1 . k. 1 . of the child for whom the article is intended. k. 14. Instructions. 2 tog. 2 tog. k.. is employed — Cost = Fig. * all Plain. Round. 16. k. SMALL GIRL'S CROCHETED STAYS. The decreasings will then be carried out plain after the completion of the brim.

Continue to decrease by repeating the first and second rows alternately. Second Half of Back. and 1 double crochet into each remaining stitch along the row. has been worked from the first armhole. as described under first armhole." Press-studs. wide. Work 1 double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. to see remains constant. and fasten off Shoulder-straps. —Taking up the back thread only. Work Work neatly.. Repeat the first and second rows alternately. — : — Making up. (Again determine the exact size required by measurement. — Repeat is again 9 in. 1st Row. until a distance of about 8£ in. the 2nd Row. (The depth of — — this downward curve may easily be varied to suit individual wearers. 1st Row. Work 1 double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. of the armholes. that is. Make — 1 chain and turn. in Front of Stays. Turn with no chain. as shown tapes for fastening purposes. difficult matter to keep the edges at the top and bottom quite plan to let the children count their stitches each row. until the work has been shortened by 2J in. Make 1 chain and turn. 2nd Row. 1 double chain and turn. Exercise 3. and crochet into each of the remaining chain stitches along the row. or loops and —Sew the shoulder-straps to the tops Sew on if preferred.STANDARD IV. as described under the first half-back. Make 1 chain and turn. work Make 1 stitch of the previous row. Make 3 chain. and work 1 double crochet into each of the remaining chain stitches along the row. buttons may be employed.B. until the work depth. in the illustration.) Increasings for Upward Curve of Armhole. Work each shoulder-strap as follows Make a chain about 7 in. work exactly as described under the first half-back. until the strap is about 1 in. Commence with the second chain from the hook. Cut the thread. in length. as described under Standard III. 2nd Row. from 9 in. 135 1st Row. 2nd Row. " Baby's Knitted Stays. Make 1 chain and turn. Work 1 double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. taking up the back thread only. . and then 1 double crochet into each stitch of the previous row. to 6J in. work 1 double crochet into each of the second and third chains.) Repeat the second row until about 4J in. 1st Row. work 1 double crochet into the second stitch of the previous row. Decreasings for Armhole.) Second Armhole. it is a good that the number has been worked to form one half-back. For the front. —As crochet into each it is a rather level. — work 1 1 Make double chain and turn. (N. first and second rows of the increasings alternately. Commence with the second chain from the hook.

* 1 chain. Work double crochet into every stitch of the chain. miss a stitch. . —Crochet turn. Making up. was 60. The instructions for this are given under No. 15. Instructions. Elastic of the length required to fit under the child's hair should be sewn to the ends of the hair-band. 16 (b) of Standard II Syllabus. or fine Knitting and will make three Hair-bands. 13. draw the end through. Run ribbon through the holes formed by the pattern. . girl's Crocheted Hair-Band for Child's Own Wear. The number of chain made and the length was 1 1 inches. treble head. Use of Double Crochet in Making a Larger Article for Girl's Own Wear. 15 (b) of Standard III Syllabus. 4th Row. CROCHETED HAIR-BAND FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS." Cotton. The same as the third row. Use of Treble Stitch in Making a Larger Article for Girl's Own Wear. 15 (b) of Standard II Syllabus. Repeat from * all along the row. a loose chain long enough to fit over the top of the for the hair-band shown in the illustration stitch of the chain except the first. —Coarse Steel Crochet Hook —about One medium size. The instructions for this are given under No. doing trebles with 1 chain between in alternate stitches. Do 1 chain to turn. and fasten off securely. 14. lstt Row. 3rd Row. Use of Double Crochet in Making Larger Article. Treble Stitch taught. GIRL'S CROCHETED BONNET (SIMPLE PATTERN). and decorate the ends with rosettes. Do 1 —Work double crochet into each — into the second — — — — CROCHETED SHAWL (SIMPLE PATTERN). stitch.136 12.. GIRL'S CROCHETED HAT (SIMPLE PATTERN). 1 treble into the next stitch. The same as the second row. and do 3 chain to 2nd Row. 113. Cut the thread. Silkie. The instructions for this are given under No. Fig. size 2. 5th Row. \ "" Materials. £ of a ball of " O-Soball of " O-So-Silkie " costs 2d.

= 10£d. CHILD'S KNITTED STOLE OR MUFFLER. Materials. 114. 6d.) 4s. of Single Berlin Wool. or 4-ply (For other qualities of 4-ply wool Fig.STANDARD — — V. wool. per lb. Cost of same at seejunder Woolcraft. Child's Knitted Stole. 137 . Method of Making Loops taught. Two Steel Needles size 14. i. 3 oz.

Repeat the process in every stitch along the row. lb. may be made by knitting only a sufficient length to reach round the child's neck. Making up. Attach ribbons to the ends. as in the case of the stole. (See General Instructions. and sew it neatly round the edges of the muff. involving less work than the above. fit the muff on the child for whose wear it is intended. Cast on 24 stitches. until about 30 in. The stole should be fitted on the child for whose wear it is intended. in order to ascertain the exact length required.) in Making Loops. and pass it twice round the needle and the first two fingers then knit the stitch in the ordinary way. Cast off loosely. 3rd. length of knitting of about 14 or 15 in. Pad with cotton -wool. 2nd Row. 3rd. with the loops on the outside. bring the wool forward over the top of the right-hand needle. 114(a). thus forming a tubular padded muffler. Proceed to knit in exactly the same pattern as described under the child's stole in the previous exercise. Fit the muffler on to the neck of the child for whose wear it is intended. oz.) • — N. —A cheaper muffler or ruffle. Knit plain. To determine the exact length required. Turn in the raw edges of the lining. Join the muff into a cylindrical form on the wrong side. — — . — from four to eight Cast on 40 stitches. owing to the method of loop formation employed in the second row. Join the lining into a cylindrical form by a nicely-finished seain. Insert the needle in the first stitch. CHILD'S KNITTED MUFF. Instructions. This produces the loops shown in the illustration. in order to ascertain the exact length required. or as many as will give a width of 8 in. Flatten out the knitting. will be found sufficient. and also the two short edges at the ends. 4th. —Two Steel Needles— same at per wool. 1st Row. Make a crocheted chain of suitable length to suspend the muff from the child's neck. Its finished appearance is shown in Fig. Second Exercise Materials. and line with sateen of the same colour as the muff. The muff described below will fit a child of years. Decorate the two ends of the stole with crocheted chain and pompoms as shown in the illustration.—Knit plain. A 2. B. of Single Berlin Wool or 4-ply (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. 4th. Now fold the two long edges of the stole together. and 5th Rows. — Making up. and 5th rows in order. Repeat the 2nd. If this should not be considered strong enough. or as many as will give a width of 4J inches. of this pattern. 6d. so that the ruffle may be fastened by tying these ribbons in a bow at one side of the chin. and cut a double layer of cotton-wool to fit against the wrong side. = 2\ 9d. Work about 13 in. and cast off very loosely. 4s.138 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. a chain with double — . The stole described below will fit a child of from four to eight years. size 14. Sew this wadding into position at the two ends. Cost of see Woolcraft. The third row will prove rather difficult knitting. Sew neatly together these two long edges. as each stitch is of treble thickness. has been knitted. Instructions.

lid. is a useful pattern for decorative borders round such articles as Bedroom Slippers. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. Fig. at 3s. need to be proportionately increased. see under Woolcraft.B. V.) — = — Instructions. 3| oz. of. The measurements given would. The petticoat described below will fit a baby of from six months If coarser needles are used. 139 Decorate with chain and hanging Child's Knitted Muff. though the one selected for the right side in the photograph of the complete garment is the more ornamental. — The pattern described below looks well on either side. N.STANDARD crochet worked into it will serve the purpose. BABY'S KNITTED PETTICOAT. the petticoat can be made to fit a much older child. New Knitting Pattern taught. pompoms. The looped knitting. — 3. Fancy Mats. etc.4-ply wool. as shown in the illustration. lid. of stitches employed. of course. described in the above two articles. 1 16 shows a small section of the reverse side of the knitting. and for Border. per lb. New Crocheted Edging introduced Two Bone Needles size 9. Cost of same Materials. and the same pattern and number to one year old. .

Now stretching. or as many as will produce knitting 16 in. 115. Repeat the first and second rows alternately. Repeat from * all along the row. vary the number of stitches proportionately. as a firm edge is desirable.) Let the last row of the skirt be a row of plain knitting. — — . Knit plain. In all cases. has been knitted. * Knit 3 purl 2. until about 9 in. Cast on 100 stitches. Fig.140 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Baby's Knitted Petticoat. Employ the second method of casting on described under General Instructions. the number selected should be divisible by five. (To determine the exact length. wide without If a garment of another size is required. Front Half of Petticoat. Slip the commencing stitch of every row after the first. 2nd Row of Skirt. 1st Row of Skirt. however. measure the skirt against the child for whose wear it is intended.

finishing with knit 2. the last stitch. Knit 2. before. In all cases the number of stitches to which the bodice is reduced must be divisible by four with two over. measure the child to ascertain the exact length required. — — As Repeat the 3rd and 4th rows until about 6 in. and over again to the back (see General Instructions on Increasings). * make 1 by — — Fig. There will still be 50 stitches on the needle. 4th Row of Bodice. knitting 2nd Row of Bodice. all 141 narrow for the bodice. bringing the wool forward under the point of the right-hand needle. Slip 1. by knitting two stitches together 1st along the row. knit two together. This row forms holes through which a ribbon can be passed to draw up the waist. Knit plain all along the Row of Bodice. Knit plain all along the row. Finish with . Repeat from * all along the row. has been knitted for the bodice.STANDARD reduces the stitches to 50. Baby's Knitted Petticoat —Reverse Side of Pattern. V. This row. 116. purl 2 all along the row. 3rd Row of Bodice.

The gaiter described below will fit a child of about one or two years of age. Now go back to the one that was passed and knit it . Repeat from * all along row. 29. purl 2. \\ in.—Like rows 28. Now cast off all the stitches except 12 at the end of the needle. of plain knitting on these 12 stitches. commencing stitch of every row after the first. 7d. see Woolcraft. Repeat from * to the end of the row. have been . purl 2 knit 2. Back Half of Petticoat. — With No. Cost of wool at 4s. The rows form one block of the pattern. purl 1 Repeat from * to the end of the row. Keep the casting-off very loose.. Repeat from * all along the row.) 28th Row. miss *. If preferred. : . Different Method of Decreasing and New Pattern taught. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. The neck. shoulder-strap for one side of the petticoat. and draw it right over the stitch that the left needle was passed by. 1st Row. and commence the following pattern Purl 2. : Making — Sew " * 1 Repeat from double crochet into a stitch. 67th Row. 30. 2 oz. Materials. per lb. . however.— 142 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. — 4. Repeat from * till four last four Rows — — stitches remain. Continue to work the 1st and 2nd rows alternately until 27 rows. line. Two Bone Needles size 10. and bottom of the skirt may be decorated by a crocheted edging such as the following up. 8 needles. of the side seams as described under unsewn at the top for armholes. Purl 2 knit 2. * Knit 2. 4 treble into the next stitch." leaving. or as many as will give a width of unstretched. 10 needles cast on 60 stitches. Rows 64. Repeat this block eight more times. the same pattern may be varied to produce gaiters for an older child. 65.ne blocks. 118. of Single Berlin Wool or 4-ply Wool will make one pair. — — knitted in * all.B. N. and 31. the back of the bodice may be divided from the waistIn this case. to form a the child's head. BABY'S GAITER. this makes an ornamental pattern known as a " Twist. employ 52 stitches. the two halves of the petticoat together in the same way Doll's Petticoat. Slip the * Knit 1. * Purl 2 knit 2. The number selected must be divisible by three. taking care to work the shoulder-strap on the correct half to correspond with the front. * purl 2 knit 2 together. a row of plain knitting." (See enlarged illustration of stitch. 26 on each side. 6d. and 66. 2nd Row. — 29. and 30. as the petticoat is made to slip over Knit 4 in. Run ribbon through the neck and waist of the petticoat. thus producing n'.) — — — = Instructions. 7J in. miss 1. 1. Fig. Cast off. and then pass over the next stitch without knitting it or taking it from knit the following stitch. Two Bone Needles size 8. Knit this in exactly the same way as the front half. By increasing the length and using coarser needles. or about 3 in. sleeves. Change to No.

Baby's Gaiter. Repeat from * till the last six stitches are reached.— Purl at the end. — — — . purl 2. Change back now to No. 69th Row. purl 2 71s/ Row. knit 2. 10 needles. 2.STANDARD ' : V. Then knit 2. purl 1 . knit 2. purl 2. * knit 1. 72nd Row. * knit 1. Purl 2/ * knit 2. The same as the 68th row. Then make the twist. repeat from * and knit 2 Purl 2. and repeat from * . — make the twist. and knit 18 plain rows. purl 2. Purl 2. purl 2. 117. knit 2 Fig. . knit 2. repeat from * till the last six stitches are 70th Row. purl 1. at the end. purl 2. * make the twist as described under 28th row. 143 68th Row. reached.

— — Fig. per —Two Bone Needles— 4 of 4-ply wool. Cost of wool = ljd. KNITTED HUG-ME-TIGHT OR BOLERO. INew Knitting Pattern introduced. 3mit 2 together. Is. Now continue plain knitting. —The pattern described below looks well on either though Materials. but decrease as follows in every third row Knit 1. and knit to the end. Then knit 1 plain row. Details of Producing Twist in Baby's Gaiter. Sew up the seam at the back of the gaiter on the wrong side. The . till only 12 stitches remain on the needle. side. lb. knit 1. — 5.) Instructions. size 7. Cast off 12 stitches. Continue to narrow thus in every third row. 91st Row. knit plain along the row till three stitches are left at the end. oz. 118. and more difficult Crochet Border. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. wide should be used and can be obtained at 3d. Like the 91st row. Making up. Elastic about j. Add a strip of elastic of the required length to go under the instep. 92nd Row. at 4s.: 144 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.in. see Woolcraft. and cast off. knit 2 together. 6d. the one selected for the right side in the photograph is the more ornamental. a yard.

Throughout the knitting slip the commencing stitch of every row after the first. Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows alternately.. Knit 1 purl 1. unstretched. 2nd Row. The following is a very simple method of making a Hug-Me-Tight. Knit plain. 145 appearance of the reverse side of the knitting is similar to the reverse side of the " Baby's Knitted Coat " described under Exercise 2. or as many as The number of stitches selected should be will give divisible a width by two. .STANDARD V. 10— (815B) — — AB. at the end Commencing of 8 J in. }B Knitted Hug-Me-Tight. as it is formed from a straight-edged piece of knitting shaped like the letter T. have been knitted. 119. 13-4 42i" 13 i c 8t" At— -8VFig. Standard VII. slipping the first stitch.. until 90 rows. Repeat this all along the row. 1st Row. or a sufficient number to produce a length of 14£ in. First Half Front. cast on 48 stitches.

1 chain. knit the remainder with the exception of the purled. 2nd Row. Cast on 48 additional stitches at the end of a row. Cast off. . will Second Half Front. It will be seen that the long side HA is now curved round to form the back of the neck and the curved fronts {cf. and an even number of stitches on each side of it. : — — 6(A). Thus. 37 stitches should be taken for the heel. * Miss 2 stitches. and then proceed to work 5 trebles into each succeeding hole right round the border. Work 5 trebles into this hole. Cast off 48 stitches along EF. Preliminary Instructions to be used for Purposes of Reference when Knitting any Socks or Stockings subsequently described. 2 trebles into next stitch. and H to E. This should be as nearly as possible half the total number of stitches which were on the needles before commencing the heel. Number of Stitches on the Needle. sew up the resulting under-arm seam on the wrong side. until 84 rows have been knitted. then 1 chain and 2 more treble into the same stitch. or a sufficient number to measure 14J in. Back of Hug-Me-Tight. that is. Similarly fold G to F. work 3 chain (to form a treble) and 1 treble into 1st Row. additional stitches were cast on. Continue the pattern as before. if there were 72 stitches altogether on the three needles of the leg. Turn the knitting round. along CD. Fold down the point B to meet the point C. at the same end of the needle as the 48 Knit 90 more rows on the remaining 48 stitches. a stitch. the one in excess of half the total being used to provide a seam-stitch. and 2 more trebles into the same stitch. This produce 96 stitches on the needle. or a sufficient number to produce a length of 13J in. seam-stitch which as there are stitches on the heel needle. and also round the armholes Join on the wool. There must be a seam stitch. Repeat these two rows alternately throughout the length of the heel. 2nd Row. Row. and sew up the second under-arm seam. Making — . 1st . as in the case of the first half-front. that is. Repeat from *. Number of Rows. Work the following crochet border completely round the edge of the Hug-Me-Tight. RULES FOR KNITTING AND TURNING OF HEELS. Work the same number Method of Knitting.. Frontispiece). and work back along the heel-needle thus Slip the first stitch purl-wise purl the remainder with the exception of the seam-stitch which is knitted. — Slip the first stitch is — : .— 146 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. and A to meet D up. Work single stitch to reach the hole formed by the 1 chain in the centre of the first group of trebles.

. alternately to the end. slip 1. k. 3. purl 20). " Coton Perle" of medium thickness. — — Second Method. s. not slipped. k. 1. The number of stitches remaining will always be three more than the number of stitches on each side of the seam of the heel. Repeat these two rows alternately throughout the working of the heel.. Turn the work completely round. Purl two more stitches than the number each side the seam-stitch. 1. p. It must.. and knit 1 alternately until the seam-stitch is reached . Dutch Heel. 6th Row. s. 3. p. k. the seam-stitch. k. 1st p. 1. 2 tog. 1.. 1. k. s. —Turn purl the seam-stitch. k. be of the same colour as the wool which is being employed. 1. — — 4th Row. is suitable for providing this extra thread. Work the heel in the ordinary manner. 2 tog. k. always be knitted. 2 tog. . s. but knit in with the wool an extra thread of silk or cotton. in the case of the heel above mentioned. purl the seam-stitch. 7. 1st Row. Continue thus. 2 tog. 1 In the case of a large-sized sock or stocking it is advisable to k. —P. " O-So-Silkie. 5. —Turn. — 2 tog. 4 or p. 3. 3 after the seam stitch. Discontinue the seam-stitch. 4 k. k. p. p. 2 tog. k.. Slip 1. 2 tog. First Method. p. p. Repeat the above two rows alternately until all the stitches are removed from the ends of the needle. 1. and then knit 1.. k. 4 past the seam-stitch at every turn. 1. k. Turn the work round again s. There are two methods of knitting heels of greater durability in wear than those already described.. p. —Turn. however. 1.M.C. and work back thus s. V. There will then be 11 stitches left on the needle at the end. Methods of Thickening Heels.wise . k. where the number each side the seam was 18. 2 tog. 8. p. 2nd Row. 6. 5th : .. 2 tog. 147 —Gusset Heel. Turn s. 1. 1. 1. The last stitch of the row must. p. 1. p. k. Slip the first stitch purl. to the seam-stitch. Row. increasing by one every row the number of stitches before taking two together. —Turn. 3.STANDARD Methods of Turning. the seam stitch. 1 — . 3rd Row. 2nd Row. p. 1st Row. 3rd Row. Decrease the total number of stitches on the heel in this way until there are no more stitches to be removed from the ends of the needle. 2nd Row. which is knitted. p. Row. purl the remainder with the exception of the seam-stitch. " or D. (e. of course. There will now be 9 stitches left.g.

. using wool at 3s. CHILD'S SOCKS. 1. Knit 60 rounds or 5 in.) — — Fig. of this. Cast on 60 stitches. see under Woolcraft. lid. and Decreasings for Foot and Toe taught Materials. k. p. Four Steel Needles size 14. of 4-ply Knitting Wool will make one pair. Knitting and Turning of Heel. per pair. round. 1. of ribbing. per lb. = 7£d. Instructions. 2£ oz.148 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Knit 30 rounds or 2 \ in. Cost. — For Welt. The socks described below will fit a child of about four years of age. (For other qualities of suitable wool. Child's Sock. 6(B). The exact width should be determined by measuring round the child's leg. For Leg. or as many as will produce knitting which will measure about 5J in. Use plain knitting with the exception of one purled stitch in every round for the seam stitch. 120.

One side needle. Plain. 2 tog. 149 Place 15 stitches (i. Take this end through to the wrong side of the sock. 3£d. from instep needle. 4 J oz. remaining. First side needle. pick up 15 loops along the other side of the heel. and knit into each loop in turn. k. Second side needle. K. 2nd Round. Break off the wool. K. from heel the heel + 6 st. 2 tog. suitable for Knitting Shawls. till only 3 st..STANDARD For Heel. Arrangement of Stitches for Foot.) If worked in Shetland Wool. and knit into these. Two Bone Needles — — using wool at 4s. 9th Round. Instep needle. 15th Round. size 11.) — . 2 tog.. 1st Round. The 18 st. Repeat the above three rounds once more. per lb. Knit along the stitches left on the front needle. k.e. k. 6d. stitch. from instep needle. SHAWL OR WRAP OF SHETLAND WOOL. Repeat the above two rounds alternately. (In all Cast on 198 stitches. Is.. Plain. Plain. (For other varieties of wool suitable for shawls. remain on the needle. In that case fewer stitches will be needed on the needle than those given in the following instructions. from heel + heel + 5 st. = Open-work Pattern and Border. 8 needles. taught. — — — — — three needles. 3rd. V. pattern produces a very dainty wrap. Repeat this process on each of the remaining needles. Plain.. and finish it off neatly. — + 15 taken up along the side of — Decreasings of Foot. and then k. 2 tog.. plain to the end. 5 st. till only 7 st. remain on the needle. If a thicker wrap is required the same pattern may be carried out in 4-ply wool on No. taken up along the side of the st. wide. In readiness for the foot pick up 15 loops along the side of the heel immediately adjoining the wool coming from this row of 9 stitches. Repeat the above two rounds twice more. 1. cases the number of stitches must be divisible by 7 with 2 over. 28 rounds. Materials. until only 18 st. k. K. Then k. The other side needle. Straight Portion of Foot. 1st Round. Like 1st round of decreasings. k. 2nd. Cost. or as many as will produce knitting 25 in. Like 1st round of decreasings. Repeat the above four rounds once more. (See General Instructions on Casting-off from — . remain on each — — — — side needle. 10th and 11th Rounds. 1. There will be nine stitches left on the heel after turning. k.) 7. and 4th Rounds. or other 2-ply varieties. and the last row worked will be a knitted row. -Plain. Instep needle. 5. There will now be four stitches on each needle. of White Shetland Wool. of plain knitting. First needle. Lastly. the following Instructions.in. see under Woolcraft. or 2J. Cast off by knitting each of the stitches in turn on to the end of the wool left. 5. 4 st. Decreasings for Toe. 16th Round. J of the total number round leg) each side of the seamand knit as described under Dutch Heel. — 15 st.

Fig. 121. 1. knit 1 row. knit 1 row purl 1 row. * k. —Plain. Hth * till —Purl. knit 1 row. Purl. To separate the border from the remainder of the shawl Purl 1 row. A suitable length is 50 in. 2 tog. 2nd Row. k. 3rd Row. Plain. 1. 4th Row. knit the last stitch. 1st Row. k. k. —Plain. Row. . 1. —Purl.150 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. purl 1 row. 1. only one stitch remains on the needle . repeat from 6th Row. 1. k. 3rd Row. 2 tog. For the Remainder of the Shawl. This completes the border. Shawl or Wrap of Shetland Wool. Like 5th row of border.—S. . Border. when finished. 1st Row. m.—PutL : Repeat the last two rows alternately nine times more. Then work rows before the completing border as follows : — — — — Purl 1 row. 4th Row. Repeat the above four rows until the shawl is of the desired length. knit 1 row. m. 2nd Row. Purl.. 1.

the number employed for that shown in Fig. Bone Crochet Hook of medium size. in length. 122). — CROCHETED SCARF. Standard III Syllabus. 3 oz.) Make a chain of the length required for the scarf (200 chain was Instructions. Plain. of Single Berlin in the = — . 9. Repeat the last two rows alternately nine times more. 1st Row. Fig. Revision of Double Crochet. 16 (b). 1 row. Harder Exercise or 4-ply Materials. wool. purl 8. Use of Double Crochet and Trebles. in Larger Article for Girl's Own Wear. '2nd Row. knit Cast off very loosely using the second method. Then purl 1 row. 151 Border.STANDARD V. 1 GIRL'S CROCHETED PETTICOAT (SIMPLE PATTERN). Like 5th row of previous border. The instructions for this are given under No. per lb. 122. and of Treble Stitch. 6d. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. 10£d. Cost of wool at 4s. a scarf 50 in. see under Woolcraft. — — row. knit 1 row. Crocheted Woollen Scarf.

of 4-ply wool. Twenty-seven rows will have been worked in all.) off the ends of the scarf by adding a full fringe. 1st Row. chain between in alternate stitches. per lb. draw the end through. Work double crochet into each stitch of the chain except the first. in Crochet. VESTETTE. or widened by increasing the number of rows worked. Work double crochet into every stitch of the chain.152 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. wide. 3rd Row. — Cost. This will produce a scarf about 9 in. 2nd Row. and do 4 chain to turn. see under Woolcraft. = 4d. Vestette. with 1 into the next stitch. . 1 treble Repeat from * all along the row. Do 1 treble into the second stitch. employing wool at 5s. Do 1 chain to turn. Repeat the 2nd and 3rd rows alternately 13 times. Treble Stitch employed in Article of more Difficult Shape. which may be lengthened by making a longer chain to commence. and fasten off securely. working trebles. 1 oz.) Fig. Materials. Finish (See General Instructions. * 1 chain. OR SHAPED NECK WRAP. Cut the wool. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. 123. miss a stitch. or Shaped Neck Wrap. 3 press-studs. — — — io. A small Bone Crochet Hook. IN CROCHET.

discontinue the slope. until only 4 d. Make a 1st chain 14 Row. . work two more trebles each side the centre than in the first row. — When 4 in. and a correspondingly less number of d.. Again work two more trebles on each side the centre than in the previous row. 153 —The wrap in. By this means the number of stitches in the row will become one less than in the previous row. down the centre of the front. and worked downwards. — : : 13 tr. across the width. Turn with 3 chain.'s along the middle half of this portion then work trebles along the remaining quarter. In this second row. when the vestette will be completed. 123. The part left in between for the working of the chest portion should measure from 8 to 9 in. in order to reach the correct point to commence the working of the front. into the next hole. must be commenced in this way.. and work 1 treble into the hole between the last 2 trebles of the previous row.c. * 1 tr. 17 d. so that there is a decrease of one stitch per row. (In the case of the vestette shown in Fig. .'s to form the centre.STANDARD Instructions. to be left at the other end of the collar. (There should be exactly the same number of trebles in this as in the previous row. Every row for the next 4 in. Therefore the first row was worked thus: 11 tr. In this row the sloping off of the front is commenced by starting thus Work with single stitch into the first hole between trebles. Front or Chest Portion.c. the number of stitches to be worked for the chest portion was found to be 44. Work trebles along the first quarter of the portion allotted for the next work d.c.c. V. — — length.'s are to be worked in each row in order to shape the neck curve. — front . 2nd Row. and less d. wide. Continue in this way until the chest portion measures 1\ in. the second row was worked thus 1st Row. pleted from the bottom of the collar downwards. (In the case of the vestette shown in Fig.) 3rd Row. work the rows entirely in trebles. along the lower edge of the collar. by commencing each row as was done in the case of the collar. Turn with 3 chain. and the front portion is about 5£ in. and work 1 treble into every stitch of the chain. 13 tr. then also allow for 3 in. according to the requirements .c.'s in this way for each succeeding row. Then work 3 chain to serve as the first treble .c. has been comAfter this.) Continue to work rows like the second row until the strip for the collar is from 2 to 2\ in.c. Collar. into the next hole between trebles repeat from * into every hole along the row.c. in is commenced at the top of the collar. 123. in the case of a large neck. then 1 tr. of the intended wearer. or 14£ in. Count how many trebles there are in this middle part. 11 tr.'s remain to be worked in the centre. 22 d. Continue to lessen the number of d. Work with single stitch for 3 in.'s in the centre. It is necessary to know this in order to decide how many d.) 2nd Row.

Repeat these three rows four times more. 1st Row.c.c. Again cut off the white. and work a stripe about three-quarters of an inch wide. Crocheted Silk Neck-wrap. 8. and continue with this until about 40 in. will make a wrap of which the length. Seven balls white Star Sylko or One ball coloured Star Sylko or D. Cut off the coloured Sylko.'s. Turn with 3 chain.C. as it will be less conspicuous than if made in a row of trebles. Turn with 1 chain. ii. Work a stripe about half an inch wide in the coloured Sylko. — — — .M. 4d Fig. Like first row. in all has been worked. CROCHETED SILK NECK. Now join on the coloured Sylko.M. Make 80 chain. and join on the coloured Sylko.C. D. into every stitch of the previous row. 2nd Row.—No.c. Now work coloured stripes to correspond Instructions. Steel Crochet — size 2. still continuing the pattern as at first described. —The quantities given above is exclusive of fringe. 124.) It is always advisable to make the join in a row of d. Cost = Is. join on the white again. into every stitch of the chain. or a length of 74 in. Materials.WRAP.154 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.—No. (The number and width of the coloured stripes may be varied to suit individual tastes. (See General Instructions. and work 1 treble into every stitch of the second row. 3rd Row. and work 1 d. Hook Practice in the Method of Joining Thread in Crochet. —A 8. and work another stripe to correspond in width with the first coloured one. 45 in. working 1 d.) Again commence to work with the white Sylko.

chain 2. N. let each knot of the fringing consist of six strands of Sylko. . Commence with a chain of 20. and finish with a white stripe to match the commencement. Cost of one tie = 4d. deep. Frequent counting is highly advisable to see that the right number of stitches is still being worked on each row. size 5. 125. but Finish the ends of the wrap with a fringe as described in General Instructions. Great care must be taken throughout to keep the rows of exactly equal length. Two balls " Coton Perle " D." medium size.B. Instructions 1st — into the Row. — — Fig. CROCHETED TIE. The finished fringe should be 2 J in. work 2 stitch.M. Materials. — Fringing. or " O-So-Silkie. per ball.— STANDARD V. same — * Miss 3. FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR.C. at 2d. Steel Crochet Hook size 2. Crocheted Tie. Repeat from treble into the fourth stitch. 12. More Difficult Pattern taught involving Trebles. Long End of Tie. or a ragged edge will be produced. 155 with those at the beginning of the wrap. work 1 treble * to the end of the row and turn with 5 chain.

. as there are now only three holes. Now widen for the other end of the tie in the following manner. of the narrower part has been worked. * Work 2 tr. Into the fourth hole work 2 tr. — — — — : . 16 in. holes. Repeat this second row. Work the pattern into each of the four holes. until 13 in. until 15 in. Repeat the pattern three times.B. thus producing four patterns. (Small holes will have been formed by the 2 chain between the trebles. and then turn with 5 chain. 1st Row. 8 in. Work the pattern into each of the three holes. that is. N.) 2nd Row. Repeat this third row (in which there are only three repetitions of the pattern). only. Turn with 5 ch. has been worked. at the end. and also into the 5 ch. Continue to repeat this third row. 2nd Row. at the end. Turn with 5 chain. Work the pattern into each of the five holes. If the rows are turned without 5 chain. Turn with 5 ch. 3rd Row. narrow portion for neck. more has been worked for the second end of the tie. rendering the tie more suitable for a boy. Repeat from * into each of the four remaining holes along the row. (rather less for a boy) short end. Turn with 5 ch. The regulation proportions of a tie for a boy or a man are Long end. to form the narrow part for neck. chain 2. a less picoted edge is formed. into which the pattern of the next row will be worked. 12 in. that is. into each of the first four Into the fifth hole work 2 tr. The tie is now reduced in width as follows. into the first hole. Repeat the pattern three times. 2nd Row. There will thus be five repetitions of the pattern. until 13 in. and also into the 5 ch. into the first three holes. 1st Row. only. — — — Short End of Tie. Repeat the pattern four times. . Fasten off neatly. Turn with 5 chain. thus producing five patterns. and work 1 tr. and turn with 5 ch. into the same hole. 3rd Row. — Narrow Portion for Neck.— 1S6 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.

per lb. . 126. Four Steel Knitting-needles size' 14. STOCKING FOR CHILD'S OWN WEAR. 5d. 6 oz. 9d. see under Woolcraft. = Fig. (A). Black 4-ply wool for Cost. Stocking for Child's 157 Own Wear. Is.STANDARD i VI. Materials. Decreasings in Leg taught. per pair. (For prices of other suitable 4-ply wools. using wool at 3s.) — — one pair.

stitches. taken up along the side of the from instep needle. 6. The aim of working these is to decrease the number of needle to 22. K. Next 6 Rounds. plain till only 8 st. Heel. St. — in General Instructions. 6. 2 tog. stitch. and knit as described under Gusset Heel... Plain.158 Instructions. V. (See 6 (a). 10 st. s.) Arrangement of Stitches for Foot. 10 st.) Next 8 Rounds. k. . from heel + 16 st. or 2 of ribbing. see under 6 (b). 1st side needle. Portion of Leg before Decreasings. 1. 1. 2nd side needle. k. (Retain seam-stitch throughout the leg. taken up at the side of the heel + 7 st. Front needle. Plain. st.) Repeat the above nine rounds three times more. 1. 2 tog. k. this Standard. Repeat the above two rounds alternately until only 22 st. The other side needle. p. —Cast on 84 in. Work 25 rounds. remainder of round. 2nd Round. k. Plain. (For full description of this process. the seam-stitch. — —The 22 remaining st. — heel + 6 Front or instep needle. Repeat the above seven rounds twice more. from instep needle. remain before the seam-stitch. One side needle. Like 1st round. Decreasings of Foot. and 16 from the other side. k. stitch over the k. knit 1 purl 1. plain to the end. K.. see under 1 (b) of Welt. st.. (The total length occupied by the decreasings — — — — is 5 in. k. V. Five inches of plain knitting. draw the s. stitch in every round for Knit 8 in. 37th Round. St. Plain.) Portion between Decreasings and Heel. Straight Portion of Foot.) KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Decrease again in the same way as in 1st round. Place 17 stitches each side the seam-stitch. 1.) There will be 20 st. from heel + 17 st. 3J or 3£ in. remain on each side — — needle. and knit them. stitches on each side 1st Round. k. Knit until 3 1st Round. k. k. Use plain knitting with the exception of one purled the seam-stitch. of plain knitting. remain. In readiness for the foot take up 17 loops from one side of the heel. left on the heel after turning. the same number as for instep needle. 2 tog. (A detailed description of each of these methods of decreasing is given Decreasings of Leg. 58th Round. (For variation of width. of this.

1. may be varied according to the length of the stocking above the knee preferred by the individual wearer.STANDARD Decreasings of Toe. Divide the resulting number by 3 to obtain the number of stitches per needle. The following rules enable the knitter to make a stocking to fit a wearer of any height. Number of stitches after the leg narrowings should be $ of the number at first cast on. Scale of Lengths. Break off the wool. and 15th Rounds. them in turn on to the loose end left. K. in length. First measure the intended wearer's height from the ankle to (1) The Leg. Determination of the Number of Stitches to Produce the Correct Widths for the Various Parts of the Stocking. Like 1st round. 3rd. See General Instructions. 2 tog. Finish the end off neatly on the wrong side of the stocking. was knitted before commencing the decreasings. 22nd Round. 2nd. Plain.) i (B). Repeat the above two rounds twice more. knit till only 3 st. (In the case of the first decreasing on each needle.. Repeat the above three rounds twice more. ADAPTATION OF FOREGOING INSTRUCTIONS TO PRODUCE STOCKINGS OF DIFFERENT SIZES. 1. the Pulling-over method may be used.) The length of the portion before the decreasings of the leg should be about £ of — the total length of the stocking-leg. The portion between the decreasings and the heel will then occupy \ of the total length. (See' Fig. including the welt.) Ascertain -the number of stitches per inch produced by the knitter.) — k. above the knee. t 159 1st Round. k. 23rd Round. There will now be four stitches on Cast off the remaining stitches by knitting each needle. provided that suitable measurements have been taken. and that the portion between the decreasings and the heel was also 5 in.) The decreasings themselves should occupy about £ of the total length. the bend of the knee. however. and this is also the number of stitches required on the needles of the foot after the decreasings following the heel. Multiply this number by the number of inches in the girth measurement. and 4th Rounds. The total length of the leg of the stocking before commencing the heel must be 1 J times this measurement. 1st needle. remain on the needle. and the length knitted before the heel was 20 in. the wearer's leg measurement was 13£ in. VI.. (See General Instructions on 13th 14th — — — Casting-off.) . Repeat the above four rounds twice more. (Thus. in the girl's stocking just described. and drawing it through each one.. Repeat this process on each of the remaining needles. that the decreasings themselves were 5 in. Plain. k. Plain. it will be noticed that 10 in. 1. 127. Measure the girth of the leg at a distance of 5 or 6 in.. Like 1st round. 2. (In the case of the girl's stocking for which the instructions are given. — Round. long. 2 tog. (This distance.

127.WELTING. along the side of the foot to the toe. The length. RE. worn into holes or torn RE. 127.) The decreasings should occupy £ of the same measurement.— 160 (2) KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. (See Fig. The measurement of the foot should be taken from the back (3) the heel. from the line where — — Fig. given by the depth of the heel itself. The remaining J is i(c). the whole welt manner : by use can be replaced in the following . The proportions for heels have already been given in the special on the subject. up to the decreasings for the toe. When the tops of socks or stockings have been of a suspender. article of The Heel. should the side-stitches of the foot were taken be § of this measurement.WELTING AND RE-FOOTING OF SOCKS OR STOCKINGS. 1. {See Standard V Syllabus. or in any other way. Diagram Showing Proportions of Stocking.) The Foot.

161 (a) For Socks or Stockings of Plain Knitting with Ribbed Welts. taking great care to cut in a straight line. and it will be found that ceased. the work will not unravel directly. employing the second method described under General Instructions. follows : Cut off the heel and foot immediately above the worn-out portion. Obtain wool as nearly as possible of the same texture and thickness as that Proceed as of the leg on to which the new heel and foot are to be knitted. of the old wool remains. only one or two rounds need be undone. Pick out the loose bits of wool and unravel the work till a clear row of stitches is obtained. and then cast off loosely. but the wool has to be drawn out a stitch at a time till the work is quite level. and then join on the new wool. Pick out the loose ends until the stitches are quite clear and one end of wool only remains. Then pick them up and proceed to knit round with the end of the unravelled wool. in such a case. off the Owing to the position of the stitches it will be found that it is not possible to continue the ribbed pattern of the leg without the evidence of a slight break It is best. This will be found a more difficult process than in the case of the plain knitting. up the leg. Cut the welt completely off immediately below the point where the ribbing for the welt Pick out all loose bits of wool with a needle. until about 6 in.— STANDARD VI. owing to the ribbing. for the welt. to knit the ribbing for the welt. is to replace completely the old heel and foot by knitting new ones on to the old leg. Another plan is to knit ribbing for the welt. Unravel just so much as is necessary to leave a clear row of stitches for picking up completely round the work. The most economical plan. Then proceed to knit a new heel and foot to match the old heel and foot exactly. VI. II— (815B) . Knit with the long end of the unravelled wool until about 6 in. the plain knitting will unravel quite readily. It is frequently found that the heels and soles of socks and stockings have become very much worn. (See General Instructions. — Cut welt as before. to commence immediately in the continuity of the pattern.) — Work plain knitting for the same number of rounds which it was found necessary to unravel before picking up the stitches then commence to do ribbed knitting Continue this for the required length. as. two or three plain rounds before commencing the Re-footing. Join on the new wool and continue to knit in rounds until the leg has been made up to its original length. and VII. joining on the new wool as soon as the unravelled end has been knitted up. which will frequently be found to extend for 1 or 2 in. 2. while the legs still remain in quite good condition. Instructions for so doing are given under the various socks and stockings described in Standards V. (b) For Ribbed Socks or Stockings. . of this remains. If care was taken to cut in a perfectly straight line when removing the welt. as described under re-welting. therefore. with a Welt of different Ribbing. the ribbing or plain knitting of the leg being continued as the case may require.

= Is. 1. per lb.162 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. p. or 2 J in. for the pair. Mixture wool 6 oz. Four Steel Needles size 13. 6d.. of decreasings. 2. p. k. Change the rib to k. —Cast on 84 . 1. GENTLEMAN'S RIBBED SOCK. Decreasings in Ribbed Knitting taught. of ribbing. stitches. Work 50 rounds. Portion between the Welt and Decreasings. Materials. Cost.) Fig. "Welt.. 3. 128. using wool at 3s. (For other qualities of fancy mixtures. lid. this before commencing . 1 Knit 30 rounds. Instructions. — — — see under Woolcraft. or 4 in. Gentleman's Ribbed Sock.

k. 2nd Round. 1. knit 1. 3. 3. 1. by the decreasing 10th . and 75 st. 11th Round. k. Portion between Decreasings and Heel. 1. p. from heel + 18 st. then k. . — — — . 28th Round. 1. to the end. Round. k. In preparation for the foot. k. K. which now remain upon it. the rib being lessened 1. p. Like 2nd round. remain. 3. k. of ribbing. 3. 1. purl the next stitch. 5. 10 st. k. Instep needle. 1 twice then k.) . This round completes the decreasings. k. the seam-stitch. V. p. . 1. 1st — will — — 2 tog. 2 tog. till only 3 st. which 1 then k. Next 7 Rounds. for 12 st.. 163 — .. k. 2 tog. p. p. p. .. Work the rib until 3 st. on all three needles together. taken up along side of from beginning of instep needle. The other side needle. for the remainder of the round. remain before the seam-stitch k. p.. 1.. In the case of this needle the ribbing be continued right up to the toe. (For full description of this process see under 6 (b). 19th Round. Work the rib in the usual way — — k. remain on each of (In the case of each the side needles. p. k. p. Like 20th round." There will be 21 stitches left on the heel needle after (See 6 (a).. k. 2. p. K. p. 1. decreasing on the first side needle the Pulling-over method may be used. 1. 3. 1. — + 2 — — Decreasings of Foot. 1 . St. — — .) the turning.. k. 2 tog. p. 2 tog.) Arrangement of Stitches for Foot. p. k. 3. k. for 8 stitches then k. Heel.V. 3. 1. p. taken up along side of heel. k. p. the rib is now restored. K. . 3. 3. — . then k. for the remainder of the round.— STANDARD Decreasings of Leg. is now to be treated as the seam-stitch. 2 tog. 1 all round. Like 11th round. side st. On the front needle the rib is continued. k. on each side of the seam-stitch. 1. 11 st. 1 of the round. for the . p. 1. 1. 4. 1st Round. Round. One heel needle. and knit as described under " Gusset Heel.. and knit them. — . until 3 stitches remain before the seam-stitch k. Place 18 st. the method of working is again k. before the seam-stitch k. k. 1. 2 tog. The first and last stitches will be purled. 1. k. 2 tog. then k. Repeat the above two rounds alternately until only 19 st. 1 twice. Next 7 Rounds. then k. 2. for the remainder p. Front or instep needle. 1. 3. for the remainder of the round. 3. the seam-stitch. p. the seam-stitch. Work the rib until 3 st. 1 twice. p. for the remainder of the round. 2 tog. p. 1.) . 2 tog. On the two side needles plain knitting will be worked. for the remainder of the round. for 8 stitches. p. k. remainder of the round. the " Pulling-over " method described in General Instructions may be used before the seam-stitch. take up 17 loops on one side of the heel and 18 loops from the other. VI. for 12 st. k. Next 7 Rounds. k. 3. The 37 st. from heel + 17 st. Knit 25 rounds or 2 in. 1. 2nd Round. First side needle Second side needle k. 20ih Round. St. K. k. and (In all the above decreasings. 1.

on each needle. 3. Five small pearl or bone buttons. 20th Row. 1. 23rd Row. from each end of the instep needle and place them on the side needles. 131. Two Bone Needles size 9. Method of Adapting the above Instructions to fit a Larger or Smaller Foot. per lb. or 84 for the straight portion of the foot. 17 (see space CD in Fig. 130) cast off 32 (see line DE) to form the back of the neck opening . With the thicker needles cast on 66 St. Like last row.. The length may be increased by knitting a larger number of rounds before and after the decreasings in the leg (so that the proper proportion may still be preserved). The work is commenced at the bottom of the back along the line AB in Fig. k. repeat from * all along the row. 4-ply wool.) In the case of a smaller sock than that described being required. the process given above should be reversed. 19th Row. — — Row. Formation of Shoulder Flap. and 78. On these same 10 stitches (line EF) knit the. and 3 st. may be employed at the commencement of the leg. but work the 22nd and 23rd rounds four times over instead of three this will reduce the number of stitches to 5 on (The length of the completed foot should be about 10J in. The method of apportioning the stitches for the heel has already been given in " Rules for Knitting and Turning Heels. If a sock of large size is required. knit 10 (see line EF). 88. . if Instructions. or even 96 st. 92. and the two side needles plain. or a multiple of 3 in the case of the foot. Work the whole of this with the front needle ribbed. or measure 5£ in.. coarser wool and needles are used. 1 . This jersey will fit a child of from one to two years of age. Like 21st row. Thus. Straight Portion of Foot. This portion should consist of 66 rounds. V. and Knitting-in of Button-holes taught. 81. p. but. it will fit a much older child. so that there are now 25 st.) each needle. —Like — — — . Plain. The instructions given are for a man's sock of medium size. last row. Decreasings at Toe. Purl. and also more rounds for the straight portion of the foot.—K. This completes pattern. 3 oz. Stan. CHILD'S KNITTED JERSEY. — — — — Back. or any multiple of 4." (See under 6 (a). slip the first stitch in every row after the first. 21st * 1. 22nd Row. . in the case of the leg. 24th Row.. Plain.) Is. or as many as will produce unin. Cost. = (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. see under Woolcraft. knit 18 rows of ribbing. using wool at 5s. stretched knitting 7J wide . 1 . Carry out the decreasings and casting-off exactly as described in the Stocking which forms the preceding exercise to this. — K. The rib is now discontinued. Repeat the last six rows 15 times more until total length of knitting is 134 in 116th Row. p. the width may be increased by the addition of 4 st.164 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Take 6 st. Materials. This row commences the pattern. 25th Row. and the same number of stitches employed. and leave the remaining stitches unknitted (see space FJ). Three Steel Needles size 12.

and. k. —Like 21st row. Fig. tog. 7. Front. needle. and then cast off. will lap under the buttonholes which will be knitted into the portion opposite. k. Two button-holes have now been formed on the the EFGH before mentioned. twice). Row. 165 pattern for nine rows.. k. 2. fit on to flap {See Fig. —Like 2 2 2 m.. tog.. row. (to . 129. 130. st. —Like 21st row. 2 Row. last 49. (The flap EFGH thus formed will have buttons affixed.STANDARD VI. tog. Child's Knitted Jersey.) Knit the pattern until there are 16 repetitions from the neck. m.. knit plain to the end.) Join on a fresh piece of wool. left 2. k. as indicated by the dotted line. 2 (wool over Row. tog. to front —Purl cast on 42 form on theof shoulder and neck opening) There are again 66 Row. k. 121s* shoulder. With Row. — K. or until the length . and knit the last seven stitches of the 1 16th row. purl the \\8th \\9th \20th last 17 st.

making one after every two picked up. and the line method given in General Instructions. of the front is equal to the length of the back exclusive of the ribbed edge. Hold the right side of the work towards you. KL 44" Fig. Cast off by the second the back. Commence.) The Sleeves. M. and count 20 loops or measure downwards from the centre row of the right shoulder. (Collar not shown. until 4 in. 130. Knit 18 rows of ribbing to correspond with those at the commencement of of the diagram will be reached. .166 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. to pick up and knit stitches. Now knit one purl row and one plain row before the border. at this point. Child's Jersey.

p. or as many as will produce unstretched knitting measuring 4 in. till only 3 st. Continue to knit the pattern without further decreasings until the 61st row is completed. This is a Helpful Exercise Preparatory to the Teaching of Knitted Glove for Girl's Own Wear. Continue picking up stitches until the end of the flap.STANDARD you reach the 20th loop down the in all VI. while carrying out the instructions in the matter of dimensions of glove. see under Woolcraft. k. using wool at 4s. Like 21st row of back. . k. 5th Row. Materials. k. It should be noted that the instructions given below are for a glove knitted in an ornamental stitch.. BABY'S KNITTED GLOVE. k. Cast on 54 stitches. 6th Row. 1. Like the 2nd row to form a third button-hole. just beyond the second button-hole). 6d. remain. remain. etc. . 2. then sew on five buttons to correspond with the button-holes. beginning at the 10th cast-on stitch at the front of the left shoulder (i. p. With the steel needles. 1. the work can be very much simplified for the girls by having the gloves worked in plain knitting. Knit the second sleeve in the same way. or until the sleeve-length is 7 in. White 1 yd. 1. 1 repeat from * all along row. p. tog. pick up and knit stitches along the neck opening. 18th Row. 1. till only 3 st. — — . 2 ribbing. 4th Row. is. 167 the point N. p. * P.. (For other varieties of suitable wool and their prices. Purl. round. repeat from * along the row. and then k. 4. per lb. method of increasing for thumb.. In all. Method of Increasing for Thumb taught. — — — — — — — The Collar. 1. S. narrow ribbon.. Repeat the last eight rows once more. p.. wide. 2. Cast off as before. 1st Row. 1 2nd Row. 1. There are now two button-holes made in the collar. * k. .) Instructions. 2 tog. A third needle is convenient for knitting the first few rows. 2 tog. 1. and the line OP of diagram will be reached cast off as before. p. Work 36 rounds of k. is reached. Take the No. — — — . 1 . p. Next 7 Rows. 1 oz.. 2 tog. point H. = 4Jd. 2nd Row. p. SI. k. Wrist. 1. SI. 3yd Row. 1. or until the sleeve is 5 in. 1. Four Steel Needles size 16. p. k. m.e. Like last row. p. Repeat the last six rows till only 46 stitches remain on the needle. 1. 12 needles and knit 20 rows of ribbing like those at the beginning. 1st Row. Like last row. front. Andalusian Wool for one pair. If the teacher desires. 1. * K. Continue the ribbing. Cost. Next 4 Rows. 1 purl fashion.. there should be 76 st. that There should be 60 stitches. k. 2 tog. Sew up the sleeve and side-seams secure the end of the shoulder-flap in its place . 2 tog. 1. repeat from *. knitting of thumb. 1th Row. The glove described will fit a child of — — — from 1J to 2 years. k. Continue the ribbing.

2 tog. 2 tog. 131. 6th. Baby's Knitted Glove. There should still be 54 st. * P. 1. 11th Round. The above five rounds form the pattern. 2nd Round. The row of holes 3rd Round. made is to be used for running the ribbon through for the wrist. Make a stitch by taking up and knitting the thread between the — — — — . 1st Round. repeat from * all round. 7th. . k. and purl in it . repeat from * until 2 stitches of the round remain tog. 4th Round. Work two more rounds of the pattern before commencing the widenings for the thumb. Hand. . 5th Round. and 8th Rdunds. * K. all round. 2 then m.168 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. — — — Fig. Plain. Plain. * K. k. take up the thread between the last and next stitches. repeat from * all round.. 2 by passing the wool over the needle twice. 2 tog. . Plain. 1. m.

1 . second needle. —P. knit remainder plain. Knit 2 together repeatedly all round. break off the wool. for for of i. 52 in number. 14th 1. ' 1. 1. and then cast off the 1 1 stitches left. both purl stitches. k. — 18 Round. 3rd Round. p. 2 tog. Plain. should be placed on a separate piece of wool while the thumb is knitted. —P. 169 and the first stitch of the new round stitches. 2 tog.) Next 10 Rounds. 1. Before joining into a ring.. Continue to increase in 1. —P. this way in alternate rows until there are 13 stitches between the 2 purl stitches. the round. 16th Round. 2 tog. 1 . i. Next 20 Rounds. 2nd needle 18 st.. and 14 more stitches. Continue the pattern the remainder 12th 13th plain. knit plain for the remainder of the round.e. Round. Repeat from *. before the thumb. 5. Round. m. and finish neatly. m. it. p. 1 . 18th Round. continue as pattern the remainder the round. p. knitting two together continuously. k. 2 tog.e. 15th ound. — — — — — For the Part of the Hand above the Thumb. and arrange these 17 stitches on three needles..) Plain.. 1. 3. — K. p. k. cast on 6 new stitches. 1. 3rd needle 1st — st. from the part inside the thumb. for of the round. Place the stitches as follows 1st needle 2 st. Arrange 27 on 14 on 13 on the the the the stitches as follows front needle. with 1 plain stitch beyond. the 13 stitches between the purl stitches. k. 3. 1. 17th Round. 2nd Round. k. k. k. take up the thread between the stitches. Beginning with the newly cast on stitches. m. Take this end through to the wrong side. —P. third needle. — K. —P. k. knit plain for the remainder of 2. 1st Round of Thumb. * p. and purl it. all round. 1. by passing them on to the loose end of the wool. — For the Thumb. 1. k. 24th Round. Plain. 3rd Round. VI. Without increasing. 1.. 1. then knit the remainder —Plain. Round. : . (The pattern is to be continued except for the part between the purl stitches. knit remainder plain as in pattern. k. Continue without further decreasings until seven patterns have been completed past the thumb. This leaves 54 st. 2 tog.— 2nd Round. 1. 1 . 1 it. k. k. 2... knit remainder plain. knit plain for the remainder of the round. 1. 1 . For Decreasings at Top of Glove.. 1. 2.—— STANDARD last stitch knitted. p. There are now 55 —Make and purl make and purl knit remainder of round. Plain. 2 tog. k. k. 6 — : new st. (All the stitches left for the hand. Take 1 plain stitch before the first purl stitch. m.

k. k. Materials. KNITTED LACE EDGING. Knit plain until only 3 st. Start at the 3rd stitch after the thumb. For the left hand make the following alteration Arrange the stitches for the part above the thumb thus 1st needle. draw it through. 1. 1st Round. 30. 1st needle. remain on the needle. 1. k. 3rd needle.. Put the stitches from the second and third needles all together on one needle. Plain. Cast off as follows Turn the glove wrong side out. k. one from each needle knit another two in the same manner pass the first resulting stitch over the second . k. 1. and fasten it off neatly. Break off the wool. see General Instructions on Grafting. : : — — — 5. then 2 stitches after the thumb. For alternative method of casting-off. 14 stitches. k. 2 tog. . remain on the needle. 3rd needle. K. . 1. and use 18 stitches.. Repeat the above two rounds six times more. knit plain to the end. 2nd needle. 2nd needle. then 6 stitches made along the inside of the thumb.. . . 2 tog. knit plain until 3 st. The decreasings described in the case of the right-hand glove will commence at the newly-made stitches. 2nd Round. continue in this way until only one stitch remains on the needle. —Two Steel Needles — size 17. The next 18 stitches. : — — — — .— 170 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Knit two stitches together. knit two together as before repeat the process of passing the previous stitch over . 2 tog. Knitted Lace Edging. New Knitting Pattern taught for Woollen or Cotton Lace Edgings. No. The glove above described is for the right hand. 2 tog. Crochet Cotton. K.

and 2 three times Row. BABY'S CROCHETED BONNET. 2 Row. k. —Cast 6 1st Row. 1. Single Berlin Wool (For other qualities of Fig. finish will commencing from the 2nd row. Cost of wool at 4s. 1. m. in succession. Repeat needle. m. —The same as 3rd row. . Baby's Crocheted Bonnet. m. Bone Crochet Hook of medium size. and three times Row. 1. Row. m. in succession. see under Woolcraft. 6. off stitches. 1. k. Materials. 1 k. 1. and 2 Row. —Knit slipping the Row. in succession. 1 plain. k. It the pattern.STANDARD Instructions. and the crocheted lace edgings given in succession. 3. 1. 1 k. — K. tog. Knit 1. in succession. 133. knitting along the and Row. m. —The same as 3rd row. k. 1. m. 171 —The following knitted edging. of — or 4-ply wool. — — make and knit 2 together three times make knit 3rd Row. 6. and three times 2 Row. k. — K. as many times as required. tog. = 3£d. 6d. m. be found that again there are 10 stitches to deal with.) lb. tog. 1. m. are useful for trimming underclothing made by the girls in needlework lessons. 1 tog. 7. —The same as 3rd row. and 2 three times m. k. m. More Difficult Variations of Pattern introduced. — K. 1 oz. 2nd Row. 1. 8. k. 1 last stitch.—K. under the Standard VII Syllabus. 1. k. Row. 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 4. and also for trimming fancy and household articles. per 4-ply wool. Cast on 10 stitches.—The same as 3rd row. VI. 1. Plain. three times Row. 1 tog. 5. — K. in succession.

A double row of edging is thus formed. miss 2 stitches between the trebles. this 3rd round ten more times. until the second corner is reached. Repeat from " till one stitch before the corner is reached. one row of which turns up. and not 1 in passing the Repeat — — — . go back and make a d. 1st Round. 6d. Proceed then as before. making 1 1 rounds of the trebles. and not 1 as in preceding rounds. The bonnet described below will fit a baby of six months. missing 2 stitches between the trebles. Cost of hat. Now work the following edging completely round the turned-back border. A little oblong piece is thus formed.c. turn with 3 chain. or as many as will measure 3 in. Work 3 tr. Materials. Repeat from * all round the bonnet.c. The hat described below will fit a child seven or eight years old. 1J ot.B. 133. 16th Row. into each corner stitch. of Single Berlin Wool. It can be quite easily decreased or increased in size by decreasing or increasing the number of rounds. 14th Row. Now. N. miss 1 stitch only twice over. and also place rosettes of ribbon on the ends of the turned-back border. once more putting 2 d. into the 1st stitch. Again miss 2 stitches between the trebles.c. into the first of the 3 ch. WITH BRIM. Work double crochet along these 16 chain.c. Treat this in the same way as — — . Take up the back strands of the stitches in the first two rounds. * miss 2 stitches. this Now 7. in length. miss a stitch. 2nd Round.) Attach ribbon strings to the bonnet. This Proceed now with the completes the part of the bonnet that fits the head. CROCHETED WOOLLEN HAT.) Instructions.— 172 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Bone Crochet Hook medium size. Commence by making a loose chain of 16. see Woolcraft. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. * chain 3. 15th Row. or 4-ply wool. = 5Jd. Double Treble Stitch taught. and work back along the 14th row. and secure this picot by a d. It Instructions. repeat this border of picots a second time round the bonnet. employing wool at 4s. turned-back border. Proceed as in the 3rd round. however. into the next stitch. until two sets of trebles past the second corner have been worked. — — — . {See Fig. Again turn with 3 chain. When rounding the corner. per lb. until two sets of trebles past the corner have been worked in passing the corner this time. and work 3 tr.c. putting 2 stitches then continue to work d. -Repeat the 1st round again. however. corner. and work as described under the 14th row. into the next stitch. Repeat this row three times more. round which succeeding rows are worked. instead of missing 2 stitches between the sets of trebles. can be increased in size by working a longer chain to commence with and increasing the number of rounds before the turned-back border. and one down. and round the bottom of the bonnet where it fits to the neck Work 1 d. putting 2 stitches into the last stitch as before. working time into the opposite strand of the edge. along the other side of into the last or corner stitch the chain. into a stitch. into one strand only of the edge : of the bonnet. instead of working on. working. 3rd Round. — — — the first corner..

1st Crocheted Woollen Hat. with Brim. Round. and darn as shown in Fig. adopt the following plan Mark the beginning : Fig. Commence at form a ring. into each stitch. (For convenience in determining new round. 135 to mark the beginning of each successive row. (Marking beginning of rows.c. VI.) it in . 135. Crocheted Woollen Hat.) of the work with a firmly-fastened cotton of contrasting colour. 173 the centre of the top of the crown with 4 chain . 134. —Work the beginning of each 2 d. and join then to Fig.STANDARD Crown of Hat.

tr. * Work 2 d. 6d. and 14th rounds of crown. tr. tr. 8th and 9th Rounds. into the 1st stitch. into 1st stitch. * miss the next 9 tr. tr. Like the 6th round. by varying the length. into each of the 6th Round. 4th. the number selected to be divisible 1st — by Row.c. and 5th stitches. into the 2nd stitch. Like 7th round of crown. into each stitch. * Work 2 d. Work 1 d. 2nd Round. 0|d.) —A = — The photograph and description are of a petticoat fitting a child Instructions. 2nd. 6th. tr. 1 tr. This enables all the working to be done on the right side of the petticoat. Repeat from * all the way round. 12th Round. into the 1st stitch. in 2nd stitch. — be worked continuously round the petticoat. Like the 7th round. doing 2 d. 2nd Round.. (For other suitable wools and their costs. 1 d. Repeat from * all the way round. in 1st stitch. * Work 2 d. tr.. tr. of about two years. * Work 2 d. per lb. Bone Crochet Hook medium size. 4th. Repeat from * all the way round. 4th Round. Work 1 d. CROCHETED PETTICOAT. 2nd Row. crown of the hat. B. Work 2 tr. Like the 6th round of the crown. into each of the 2nd.e. 11th Round. and 1 d. i.) N. and 1 d. into each of .. — — — — — 8. These three rows finish the Like the 12th round. 1 tr. the same method may be employed in making a petticoat for a child of any size. using wool at 4s. New Pattern taught. tr. Work 2 double tr. 1 tr. tr. 7th Round. into the 1st stitch. into the other stitches. tr. Repeat from * all round. Like the 12th. into each stitch. and 1 d. 4-ply knitting wool. Is. 3rd Round. until the bottom of the placket is reached. 13th and 14th Rounds. 3\ oz. tr. 13th. 3rd Round. into each stitch all the way round. (The back of the stitch is always to be taken up in order to produce a ridged appearance on the right side of the petticoat. see under Woolcraft. Work 120 chain. This completes the brim. 10th Round. repeat from * all along the row. and 1 tr. tr. When the placket has been completed. 5th. in 5th Round. may — 1 tr. and 1th Rounds.174 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. and 1 d. and 5th stitches. but.. into every stitch of the chain. or as many as will measure 30 in. 4th Round. into each of the first 9 tr. into every 3rd stitch and 1 d. tr. Materials. * Work 2 tr. Cost. tr. the rows — 10. as shown in the illustration. Like the 7th round. into each of the 2nd. into every stitch all the way round. 1st Round. 3rd. putting 2 d. which should turn up slightly at the edges all the way round. 3rd. and 1 d. — — — — — — — — — — — Brim of Hat. Break off the wool at the end of this and the next six rows. Repeat from *.. alternately. 3rd. 3rd stitch. and 4th stitches.

.

" O-So-Silkie " and Four balls of Silkateen (standard size) cost of the Silkateen at 2d.. together. * miss 2. Like 10th row. Cut the thread and fasten the end in neatly. Do not break off the wool on completing the . round.c. On reaching the end. At the end of the 5th row. 3 tr.. on each of straight round the petticoat. next 4 st.. make a number of chain that is divisible by 6.c. work 4 tr. 9th Row. 5 tr. Materials. chain for one of the end loops. Chain 1. and work d.. D.. tr.. was the —Make a chain of the required length. 3. * 1 tr. 108 chain. into each of the next 4 st. into each of the next 3 St. Repeat from * to the end of the row. into next stitch. and work st. Repeat from * all round. finishing with a d. securing it at the opposite corner by a d.c. into the middle Repeat from * into each of the next 4 st. Cut the thread. 3 tr. make 30 Repeat the 2nd row three more times. work d. — — last row of the five. miss 2 stitches and secure picot by a d. 2nd Row. join the cotton on again at the end of the second loop of 30 chain.. all round this.c. into the following stitch. Miss of the next 4 St. miss 2 St. miss 2. * 1 tr. If the length is varied. miss 2 st. " Coton Perle " are equally suitable materials at the The same Instructions. on each of The number of trebles in 2 st. been increased to 11. into each of the next 3 st. Now chain 30 for the second loop.c. 1st Row. 5 tr. into next stitch. 1 tr. — — 1 1 st.176 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. New will Pattern taught. Now begin to work picots along the * Ch.. into next stitch. . Now continue the picots down work Lastly.c.. miss each group has now Miss 10th Row. —Fine Bone Crochet Hook. stitch of the group. go back and make a d. miss 2. Holders.. and finish off the work. into next or * 1 tr.. * 1 tr. into each into each of the 9. and carry this chain across the other end of : the holder. into the first stitch. CROCHETED CURTAIN HOLDER. Chain 3 (to count as a treble). giving a length number employed for the curtain holder shown in Fig. Miss 1 st. of 22 in. 3rd Row.C.. Repeat from * all along the first edge of the holder. the second long side of the holder. and fix it at the opposite corner by a d.—In this row bring the two ends of the work Miss 1 st. all round the 30 chain that were made for the 1st loop. Row. make two price. Next 5 Rows. Repeat from * all round. 16th Next 5 Rows.c. 5 tr.M. and d. the next 3 the next 3 St. into the next or middle stitch of the group. all — 1 1 St.. all along the chain. — — 1 d. A further increase is made in this row. length of the first edge of the holder as follows into the first of the 3 ch. per ball will be 8d. carry this chain across the end of the curtain -holder. * 1 tr. into the middle stitch of the group. Like last row.c. repeat from middle stitch of group all along the row..c. 1 d. tr.. miss 2 st. 138.c.

13— (815B) . Crocheted Curtain Holder. 137.Fig.

1 chain. io. (This will produce a shawl about 30 in. 1 chain. 2nd Row. £d.bar of 2 chain left between the first 2 trebles 1 treble. 1st Row. is different. * 2 chain. per = —large 3s. and more Difficult Border introduced. CROCHETED SHAWL.—Work the following group into the . 1 treble. see —Bone Crochet lb. work 3 chain. 138. using wool at 5s. One treble into first stitch of side. of 4-ply wool. 10 oz. Cost. Repeat the above row until a square is formed. 2 chain. 2 treble into next stitch . 2nd Row. into next stitch of chain. 2 treble into the first stitch. 1 treble. Crocheted Shawl. prices. the size 180. . 1 treble. 1 treble into the next stitch . * then miss the 2 and 3 chain. 1 d. —Chain — treble . If select a suitable number of stitches divisible by four. Take 2 treble into the fourth stitch of the chain. 2 treble into next stitch repeat from * all along the row. make 3 chain. — . and work a double crochet on the double crochet in the last row work 3 chain.178 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Instructions. Materials. Fig. Hook 1 New Pattern taught. 140 shows the details of pattern and border on a larger scale. Turn. repeat from * all round the shawl. The Border. * miss 2 stitches. (For other varieties of suitable wool and their under Woolcraft. miss about 3 stitches along the edge of the shawl.) Fig. — : . size. repeat from * all along the row.) 1st Row. square.c.

139. ribbon about £ in. work another group of trebles the one described into the next bar of 2 chain repeat from * all round. The size of the shawl may be increased by commencing with a larger of chain. 1 treble (6 trebles in all). 1 treble.—Work along with single stitch to the 2 chain in the middle of the first group of trebles. 3rd flow. . If it is desired to make the shawl more ornamental. 1 chain. Fig. Repeat this group into the middle bars of all the groups in the previous row. 1 treble. 1 chain. 1 treble. Corner of Shawl Enlarged to show Details of Pattern. 1 treble. 1 treble. 1 chain. When the last group has been worked. 1 chain. 179 Miss the bar of 2 chain between the next 2 trebles. wide 1 treble. Into the 2 chain work the following group 1 treble. 1 treble (8 trebles in all).STANDARD * VI. 1 chain. number . 1 treble. 1 treble. Work along with single stitch to the 2 chain in the middle of the first group of trebles in the previous row. and fasten off the end left. 4th Row. 1 chain. Into the 2 chain work the following group : — chain. 1 treble. 1 treble. Repeat this group into the middle bar of each of the groups of the previous row like . 1 chain. 1 may be run through the open-work portion between the shawl proper and the border. 1 chain. 1 chain. 2 chain. 1 treble. 2 chain. draw the wool through the first treble of the first group in order to finish off the corner. and also by using coarser wool and a larger hook.

Fig. Materials. 16. 4-ply Knitting Wool^ for one pair.STANDARD i (A). see 6d. using wool at 3s. lid. . 140. VII.) = 2 oz. under Woolcraft.— Four needles—size Cost. To Teach the Method of Knitting Fingers. (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. per lb. Glove for Girl's 180 Own Wear. GLOVE FOR GIRL'S OWN WEAR.

p. 39. Round. Plain. Plain. Next 2 Rounds. For the right-hand glove.—Plain. 39. p. 2nd Round. m. 1. 1. stitch). 15th 16th Round. p. 39. For the Wrist. k.STANDARD Instructions. 30.. k. 40th Round. 5. Knit these without increasing. selected divisible by 2.in this way K. 14th Round. while in progress.. (This is the plan to be followed for the left-hand glove. or as many as will produce must be the width required for the individual wearer. 1. The number of rounds desirable should be ascertained by measuring the glove. 39. 30. 39th Round. p. (The st.— K. 17th 18th 19th 1. m. 30. 1. Next. For the Hand. — — — —K. 2 tog. 30. the loose end left. k. 1. knit plain to the end of the round. p. Round.. - . p. k. take up the thread between the last and next stitches and purl it. 40. 5. 30. k. and finish neatly. 1. 3. 1. — K. 40.) . k. — — . 3rd Round. Take 2 plain stitches before the first purled stitch. VII.) K. next Round. For the Thumb. p. the 13 plain stitches in between. 1. 39. k. 2\st 1. m. Beginning with the newly cast-on stitches. 1. 2 tog. k. and pass the remaining stitches on to Plain. 1. 1 (by knitting in the back of the last knitted stitch) repeat from * 9 times. Round. 2. There are now 70 stitches. 6th Round. 1. k. 1. 1. Knit 60 rounds of ribbing. This round commences the increasings for the thumb. k.) Slip the hand stitches on to a piece of wool until the thumb is completed. Take this wool through to the wrong side. k. k. 6. K. — K. 20th Round. p. p. k. — K. 2 tog. 32 Rounds. The knitting should reach just to the tip of the thumb before the — decreasings are made. 1. 1 and purl it. number of cast-on stitches may be reduced in the case of a child with a slender band. 1. p: k. 30. k. 30. In the case of a girl with a small hand less than 12 rounds may be required. 2 tog. p. Break off the wool. K. 1 (by knitting into the front and back of the p. They should brjng the knitr up to the root of the thumb. 3. with 2 plain stitches beyond and arrange these 19 Before joining into a ring cast on 8 new stitches. 1. Plain. k. 2 tog. k. 1st Round. p. 1. k. Next 12 Rounds. 39. m.—K. The number k. 30. purled stitches. k. on three needles. against the hand of the child for — whom it is intended. m. m. both purled stitches. until there are 13 plain stitches between the two — m.. knit plain to the end of the round. 1. 1. Ascertain this by measurement against.. k. — K. m. Continue to increase in alternate rows. 1. 181 —Cast on 60 stitches. Round. ting Next 12 Rounds. Plain. 1.. k. 1. 11 times. p. This — — k. p. 22nd Round. 30. — leaves 23 stitches all round. the thumb of the girl for whom the glove is intended. 1st Round. k. * K. 40. 1. p. 1. 30. m. 1. (More or less than 32 rounds may be required. 39.

2 tog. k. 2 tog. First Finger. the finger. k. 2 tog. cast on 7 new Commence each round with the new stitches. 10. s. pick up a correspondingly smaller number of stitches here. k. and" making the knitting above the thumb measure this length. 7. knit plain to the end. 2 tog. 5. knit plain to the end of the round. 10. 2 tog. 2 tog..- tog. k... s. 1. knit plain to the end. k. Finish as in thumb.. 1. and 8 stitches from the front of the glove on to another piece of wool.. and the next 9 at the front of the glove are used. k. 3.182 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. K. Plain. Plain.. pass the slipped stitch over. K. (Vary this number of rounds to suit the length of Then finish as in thumb. Commencing with the cast-on stitches. k. Arrange them all on three needles. The 19 stitches in the centre are to be used for the first finger. k. Pick up stitches 4th 5th Round. Knit plain. k. Second Finger. pass the slipped stitch over. k 1 k 2 . k.. knit plain to the end. K. knit plain to the — — — end. pass the slipped stitch over . (Vary this number of rounds to fit the finger. k. k. stitches. (If the number of stitches cast on inside the thumb was reduced. and arrange all the on three needles again.. k. Pass these 18 stitches on to a piece of wool.) For the second finger the next 9 stitches at the back. 2nd Round. 2 tog. S... k. regard the round as beginning in the same position as the first round at the wrist. For the fourth finger pass the remaining 12 stitches on to a piece of wool. k. — to fit Arrangement of Stitches for Fingers. 1. K. K. k.. pass the slipped stitch over. 1. 2 tog. 1st Round. (In finding the centre of the round. 11 new stitches from the part inside the thumb. For the Part between the Thumb and Fingers. Arrange the 19 stitches on three needles. k. 11.) — Plain. 1. 1.. 2 tog. — K.. 2 tog. k. 2 tog.. For the third finger pass 9 stitches from the back. k. s. The number should be determined by taking the measurement from the root of the thumb to that of the first finger. 2 tog. k.. but before joining. Next 40 Rounds. 2 — tog. — — — Round. Take up 7 new stitches from the side of the first finger. 2 Next 42 Rounds. then the 9 stitches from the back of the glove next cast on 7 new stitches then take up the 9 stitches from the front of the glove.. 2 tog. k. 11. 1. k. 3rd Round. knit plain to the end of the round.. . 1. knit plain to the end. 1st Round. k. 2 tog.) Commence each round with the new stitches.) . 1st Round. 1. — 2nd Round. 1. — Plain.) Next 20 Rounds. tog. — K. 2nd Round. 2 tog. (Again the number of rounds may be varied a smaller or a larger hand. 3rd Round. k. — 3rd Round. 1.

183 Third Finger. Repeat the 16th and 17th rows alternately until 8 in. slipping the commencing stitch of every row after the first. continue as in the glove until within. Knit as described above under " Glove " with the following variations (1) When half the thumb has been knitted.) (2) In knitting the part between the thumb and fingers. cost. 1. k. 1\ oz. This will produce a row of holes through which ribbon will be run. BABY'S KNITTED COAT.) Fourth Finger. and take up the 8 stitches from the front of the glove. 2 tog. Pick up 7 new stitches from the side of the second finger then the 9 stitches from the back of the glove then cast on 7 new stitches. size 16. Right Half Front. K. as a firm edge is desirable. * m. change to ribbing of k.) 3d. purl 2 ribbing. and finish as in thumb. of this. p. — i(b). (Vary this number of rounds to fit the finger. employing second method. or so. 6 or 7. in ribbing of k. Arrange these and the 12 remaining stitches on three needles. Knit 35 rounds. Then knit this last J in. of the base of the fingers. Employ second method described in General Instructions. The pattern described below looks well on either side. 1. . 1. MITTEN FOR GIRL'S — OWN WEAR. employing wool at see under Woolcraft. plain. until . £ in. Cast on 36 stitches. introduced. 1. though the one selected for the right side in the photograph is the more ornamental. Materials. The appearance of the reverse side of the knitting is seen in the illustration in the small portion of the inside visible at the neck. \5th Row. 1. (Second method. using wool at 3s. Arrange them all on three needles. 1 Id. : — = 1J oz. Instructions. or as many Row. Finish as in thumb. plain. Next 40 Rounds. — Plain. of ribbed knitting without stretching. p. and cast off. Four Steel Needles Cost. 2. 23 stitches remain. Repeat from * to the end of the row. per lb. —Knit — . If coarser needles are employed. of white 4-ply wool. p. a. * K. 4 £d. . Cast off. Narrow off the two sets of 7 stitches in the same way as described for the second finger. Do J in. larger coat may be produced by following the same instructions. repeat from * and knit the last stitch. 1. 1. Tota (For other qualities of 4-ply wool. of knitting has been 16th 17th — Row. — as will give a width of 5J in. 1. of 4-ply wool for one pair. = lid. General Instructions. size New Pattern Materials. —Two Bone Needles— 5s. The coat described below will fit a baby of six months old and over.— STANDARD VII. Pick up 8 new stitches from the inside of the third finger. Knit 14 rows of knit 2. Instructions. per lb.

.

Like 2nd row of armhole. 1. Finish with a k. The stitches are now reduced to 56. k. 3rd Row. p. 2nd Row. 1. Like the 1st row of narrowing. slipping the commencing stitch of every after the first. Cast off. 1.. 2 ribbing to form the little turned-back cuff. 15th Row. 1. Repeat these four rows three times more. Knit 7 rows of k. At the commencement of the next row. 1. 2 for wrist. The 14 rows of ribbing at the bottom be included in the 8 in. until 8 in. 1 all along row. p. Like 1st row of armhole. knit plain all along row till the last two stitches are reached . k. Repeat from * all along the row. —Like Row. 1st p. 1. Repeat from * all along the row. Now narrow for the shaped top of the sleeve in the following manner 1st Row. : Left Half of Front. Now narrow to produce a shaped armhole as follows 1st Row. instead of at the beginning. K. Like 1st row of armhole. 1. * k. knit plain all along the row until last four stitches are reached. 2. K. The left half of the Back of Coat. 2. p. Cast on 64 stitches. (2) The casting-off for the neck is done at the commencement of a plain knitting row. 2. then k. p. The stitches are now reduced to 30. 1. Like the 15th row of front. Now narrow for the armholes as follows 1st Row. 2 tog.— STANDARD done. cast off 16 stitches for the neck. 1 alternating with a row of plain knitting. — 185 Finish with a row of k. p. stitches.. Finish with a row of k. including the k. of knitting has been done. Like the 16th and 17th rows of front. Each sleeve is made as follows Cast on 36 stitches. and k. p. 2 tog. Work eight more rows of the pattern on these 30 stitches. 1 row. Knit 14 more rows of the pattern without further decreasings. * K. 1. — — with 2 3rd Row. p. of ribbed knitting without stretching. which is a k. p. finishing : : 4th 1. 1. 2 tog. p. 1. 2 tog. There should now of narrowing. and then cast off. will — VII. 1. 2 tog. along row. 1 row. p. K.. K. 2nd Row. p. Knit 12 rows of the pattern on these 14 stitches. 2 tog. Sleeves. 3rd Row. 1.. 2 tog. Change now to alternate rows of plain knitting.. 1 row.-. 4th Row. Again employ second method of casting-on. to produce the same pattern as in' fronts and back.. 5th Row. 1 row all . k. p. p. except for the following points (1) The narrowings for the armhole will be done at the end of a plain knitting row. Knit 14 rows of k. instead of at the beginning of a k. and then cast row — — — — — : off. 1. 1. p. — K. or as many as will give a width of 9J in. K. 2 ribbing. leaving 14 for the shoulder. 1. 2 tog. — — — — — : front will be knitted in the same way as the right half. 16th and 11th Rows. 2. has been knitted altogether. a row of k. be 20 stitches on the needle. 2nd Row. p. Continue this pattern until 7 in. Repeat the 16th and 17th rows alternately. Then k. then knit plain all along the row.

and through the holes formed in the crochet edging round the top. into a stitch. plain. (See Fig. Row. the neck —Sew up on the wrong side. 41. per lb. the side seams of the coat. of k. 52nd Row. plain. always slipping the commencing stitch of each row after the first. 46.. see under Woolcraft. same as the 11th row.186 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.. 11/A Row. k. *. 56th Roiv. —Knit —Like 11th —Knit plain. Article of more Difficult will size 14. miss 1. Sew up the shoulders. to the front of the under-arm seam. (For other qualities Instructions. — 12th. plain. 55th Row. and 18th Rows. Rows 18 to 38. —Commence to narrow 43rd Row. 15th 16th. 54th Row. 2 tog. Rows and —Knit 51st Row. into the next stitch. p. and knit the remaining 12. 12. Uth. m. 1 Rows 40. 45. and also the sleeve seams. 12. k. —Knit 53rd Row. and 42. 50. 49. 1 (by bringing wool forward under the point of the right-hand needle and over it again to the back).) —Two Steel Needles— White Andalusian Wool knit one pair. Repeat from *. 1. BABY'S BOOTEES. 2 tog. and Uth Rows. * k. as far as : Repeat from sleeves. 1. p. Knit 10 rows. .c. border may also be worked round the turned-back cuffs of the ribbon through the holes round the waist. or J in. 1 oz. of Andalusian wool. the armhole curves. 5 tr. Row— — 1. The stitches are now : reduced to 51.. The number selected must be divisible by 2. employing wool at 4s. this Run 3. 142 indicate the decorative pattern in holes in the leg portion. for the ankle as follows K. The dotted 13th. —The Bootee described below GH will fit a baby of from four to eight months.— Knit plain. Making up. of Cost. employed in Stitches Already Learned Construction. Sew the sleeves into the armholes. 12. or as many as will produce the width required to fit the individual wearer.) If desired. 39th Like 11th row. —Knit plain.. 44. 2 tog. Knit plain. 1 ribbing. —Like 11th row. —Like 11th row. plain. Commence at the top of the leg along by casting on 54 stitches. 3d. knitting 2 stitches plain at the end of the row. putting the sleeve seam about 1 in. = 3 Jd. 2 tog. 1£ in. k. 48. Materials. of ribbed knitting of k. 1. Crochet the following edging down both front pieces and round * Work 1 d. miss 1. Slip a stitch. Rows and —Knit 47th Row. —Like 1th row. 141. —The — lines in Fig. Leg of Bootee. row. k. k. k.

2 tog. 2 tog. 11. and knit the remaining 11. The K. 11. Commence knitting (a) Instep. 60th Row. knit the remaining 12.r-Narrow again 2 for the ankle as follows K. Knit plain. k. : — — — — Foot of Bootee. 2 tog.) 58th Row. G<Fig.—Like 11th Row. ->H Baby's Bootee. tog. k.... -li"-- VII. Knit plain for \ in. as follows K.. 2 tog. 10. (Leg and Instep only. k. 59th Row. from A to B on to a piece of wool. Gist Row.STANDARD 51th to 48. Narrow the last time.) Knit the : Pass the 15 stitches next 15 stitches plain. 3* LEG. k. k. 11. I tog.. The stitches are now reduced to 45. — for the instep as follows (See Diagram. 142. k. k. k.. . 10. Rows 61 to 67. 11. : 187 Row. stitches are now reduced NSTEP. k. Knit plain.

or 2 in. leaving an end which must be darned in strongly and neatly afterwards. and finally take up the 15 stitches left on the wool from C to D.— 188 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. from B to slip on to the same needle the 15 stitches from to F which were left standing from the instep . Now turn the work round. for the present.. follows On another knitting needle take up the 15 stitches on the wool from to . and work as follows : — A B E . Baby's Now arrange the stitches for the sole of the foot as (6) Lower part of foot. Leave the 15 stitches standing. have been knitted for the instep. and then pass the stitches from C to D on to a second piece of wool. and do plain knitting backwards and forwards on the 15 stitches from C to B until 44 rows. on the instep needle. Break off the wool. next take up the 22 loops or stitches along the right-hand side of the instep. This rather difficult operation will bring 89 stitches all on one needle. E : . Join on the wool at the commencement of this needle. take up the 22 stitches along the left-hand side of the instep from F to C.

Plain. k.. _to 87. k. Knit plain. — — — — — — — — — Sew the little bootee neatly together on the wrong side. 37. k.. k. 2. * P..M. 2 tog. k. s.. 2. 2 tog. k. p. k. 2. 37. 2nd. 6th Row. up.. k. 1. 4.—K. k. Knit plain. The stitches now number 77 16th Row. k. 2 tog. 2 tog. 19th Row. but make two additional stitches at some distance 1st Round.. k. Knit plain. Knit 76 plain. 2 tog. 4. K. Repeat from * all round. 37. 2. 2 tog. 2 tog.. k. Knit plain.—K. 28. Knit plain. k. 38. 2. from each other. 2. k. size 17. k. k. 32. 2 tog. k. ribbons through the holes at the ankle and the holes near the top of the leg. K.. k. to bring the number up to 70. 2. — — — . k.—K.. 30. k. k. 13th Row. 7th Row. 2. 2 tog. 2 tog. Making — Run Tie- BABY'S ORNAMENTAL SILK SOCK.. Knit plain. k. 15th Row. the ribbons with bows in front. 1.- STANDARD VII. pattern must be divisible by 14. to 85. k. k.. 2 tog.—K. 37. 1. and then cast off. 37.. Leg. 1. 30. k. k. Welt. " Coton Perle '' — Cost fits of about one year. k. Two D. k. 1. 2 tog. k. 37. Knit plain...... 1.. 2 tog. 37. 11. 2 tog.. K. pass slip stitch over the knit stitch. k. k. 3rd Round. 37. k. k. 2 tog. k. 2 tog. 28.. 5th Row. k. k. 2 tog. 37.. 2. Knit plain. 37. 17*A Row. 2 tog. k. suitable only for the mostballs Difficult Knitting Pattern introduced... — This reduces the stitches — — — This reduces the stitches This reduces the stitches — Uth Row. k. 20th Row.—K. 3. The stitches will now 12th Row. k. 21st Row. k. 3rd. —This sock Materials. 37. Stitches now number 68. 2 tog.. 22nd Row. 24th Row. 8. number 81. —Four Steel Needles— = 4d. 2. No. The stitches now number 76. Advanced Scholars. 5. The stitches are 79 in number 14th Row.. Knit plain. 2 tog. p. p. m. k. 9. k. 2 tog. 37. 2nd Round. k. p. a child Instructions. Knit plain. 2 tog. k. 189' 1st. Knit 30 rounds of ribbing. k. m. Cast on 68 stitches. Knit plain. k. k. k. 2 tog. k.C. 23rd Row. 7.—K. Stitches now number 64. 1. 1... Stitches now number 72. k. 2 tog. to 83. 10th Row. 18th Row. 1. 2 tog. k. 9th Row.—K. 37. k. as the number of stitches for this. 8th Row. 32. and 4th Rows..

1. 1th Round. 3. 1. 1. — P. k. 1. Baby's Ornamental Silk Sock. 2. p. pass the slip stitch over. 1. 1. 1. Round. k. k. — 1. 1. k. s. 1. 1. m. p. 2. 2. 1. k. * P. 8th Round. 1. k. 2. over the knit stitch. k. p. s. 1. 1. 1. * k. m. k. * P. * all round. 3.—* 1. pass slip stitch * all round. k. 2. . k. m. * all round. p. * P. 1. p. s. m. p. 1. p. p. 5th k. k. k. 1. k. p. 5. s. p. p. 1. s. * k. 1. Repeat from 1. pass the slip stitch over. 1. k. P. 3. 1. 2. p. 1. 2. 6th Round. k. k. Repeat from s. 1. 1. p. 2. 1. Repeat from * all round. Fig. 4th Round. Repeat from pass the slip stitch over. Repeat from * all pass the slip stitch over. 2. p. Repeat from 9th Round. k.-190 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. k. k. — P. 3. 1. k. 1. 1. 1. 1. 2. k. 2. pass the slip stitch over. — — m. 7. 1. 2. k. k. 1. round. k. k. 1. p. 1. 1. 2. * all round. 1. 1. 144. m. 1. 1. k.

— — 1. pass the slip stitch over. 1. round. k. 1. Front or Instep needle. p. k.—* P. 1. V. k. knit a Dutch Heel as described in the rules for knitting and turning heels. Second side needle. 1. 18th Round. St. from * all round. k. 1. k. 2. p. k.. V. been repeated two back needles. 2. — p. p. Repeat — k. Place half of the total number of stitches on the front needle. k. 1. k. 1. 1. k.) Arrangement of Stitches for Foot. The two side needles 2nd Round. 1. pass the slip stitch over. p. Pattern continued. k. 5 of the stitches along the side of the heel. 1. 1. 9. — — Decreasings of Foot. 1. 1. m. 1. Repeat this pattern 1. s. — left on the heel needle +14 stitches taken up The other side needle. Front needle. Arrange the first 29 stitches of the round on one needle for the heel. p. Repeat the above two rounds alternately until only 15 stitches remain upon each of the side needles. 13th Round. 1. k. * P. 1st Round.—* P. k. m. pass the slip stitch over. 3£ more times. 1. p. 39 remaining stitches + 1 stitch at the end of the needle from the 15 taken up along the side of the heel. 1. 2. the pattern. s. * all round. 1. the " Pulling-over " method of decreasing may be employed. k. 1. p. * P. 11th Round. s. p. See General Instructions. 2 tog. k. 1. m. 5. m.) — — Straight Portion of Foot. * all round. 3. k. * P. 1. the pattern continued right up to the decreasings for the toe. k. 1. VII. pass the slip stitch over.1.' in. pass the slip stitch over. 2. 1. p. — Repeat from 1. s. 1. 1.. Repeat from * all round. k. 1. k. 1. K. m. m. k. * P. 191 Jrom 1. 1. 2. 4. k. Repeat from * all round. k. 2 tog. 1. k. 1. 2. k. k. 12th Round. p. pass the 1. s. . k. f until the pattern has foot. lyre pattern. * P. 7. 1. 1. Continue without further decreasings 2J times from the commencement of the Decreasings at Toe. knit plain to the end. k.STANDARD 10th Round. 1. Repeat from * all round. slip stitch over. 1. 1. Repeat The last 16 rounds form the and the heel will be reached. s. p. s. p. 1. k. 1. Repeat from * all 1. p. k. k. One side needle. 2. (In the case of each decreasing on the first side needle. Front needle. St. — — — will be plain.. p. 1. 1. 1. 1. 1. pass the slip stitch over. k. Repeat from * all round. In the case of this needle. k. 1.—* P.—* P. 2. Uth Round. s. k. Repeat from * all round. 2. 1. 1. 15th Round.. p. 3. 5. k. 1. (See under 6 (a). 2. First side needle. 4 stitches from the heel needle + 15 stitches taken up along the other side of the heel. p. 1. p.and half on the Discontinue. 1. On these. k. 1. 1. 1. 1. 2. p. pass the slip stitch over. k. 1. k. 1. m. k. p. 3. p. "The Heel. 1. k. k. 1. Knit till only 3 stitches remain on the needle. 1. 16th Round. 2.) In preparation for the foot take up 15 stitches on each side of the heel. (For full description of this process. 9. pass the slip stitch over. see under 6 (b). 1. 1. p. 3. 17th Round. «. p.

cess as described until only one stitch remains on the needle. Plain. 1. k. . k. k. 145. k. knit plain to the end. Fig. k. Commence with the darkest shade of wool. Cast off as follows : Turn the sock wrong side out. K. draw it through. and join to form a ring. remain. 2 tog. Work 22 chain rather Instructions. 5.) Next 2 Rounds. 2 tog. CROCHETED EGG-COSY. 1st Round. —Bone shades. Instructions. and put the stitches from the two back needles all on to one needle. until 9 stitches remain on the front needle. . of Crochet Hook of medium size. 1 stitch of first back needle. Crocheted Egg-Cosy. and fasten off neatly. Knit 2 stitches together. The cost of three cosies will thus be about 3£d.— 192 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. Single Berlin Wool of two wool will make three cosies. loosely. 2 tog. the " Pulling-over " method may be used. If — . and also on the two — — back needles together. .. in alternate rounds." see General . (In the case of the first decreasing of each pair. K. in length. Knit along second back needle until only 3 st. knit plain until only 3 st. one from the back and one from pass the first knit another 2 together in the same manner the front needle resulting stitch over the second knit 2 together as before. The chain should measure about 7 in... 1. k. For " Grafting Off. Then narrow similarly. 2 tog. 1 oz.. Repeat the above three rounds sevei times more. and continue the proBreak off the wool. Practice in the Choice of Suitable Colours for New Pattern taught Blending. Materials. remain on the front needle. 1.

STANDARD
finer or coarser

VII.

193

the

wool be employed, vary the number of chain accordingly, but let of stitches selected be divisible by 2. 1st Row. Work 3 chain (to count as a treble), and 3 tr. into the first St., take out the hook, insert it in the top of the first tr. [i.e., through the top of the 3 ch. which form the first tr.), and draw the last stitch through it (see Fig. 147 for enlarged illustration of stitch). 1 tr. into the next st., *4 tr. into next st. (as before, drawing the last stitch through the top of the first tr.), 1 tr. into next st. Repeat from * all round the ring. There will be 1 1 sets of 4 tr. and 1 1 single tr. Join the last tr. to the first set of 4 tr. by a single stitch, thus completing the ring. 2nd Row. 3 chain to form a single treble, and 3 tr. into first hole (as before, draw the last st. through the top of the first of the set of 4 tr.), 1 tr. into next hole. * 4 tr. into next hole (again drawing last st. through top of first), 1 tr. into next hole.

number

Repeat from

* all the

way

round.

Fig. 146.

Method of Working

in

Crocheted Egg-Cosy.

three rows in this shade, or a sufficient number to in height. Now close in the top of the egg-cosy as follows Work 1 d.c. into each hole Flatten the cosy, and join all the way round, drawing each stitch rather tightly. together the tops of these d.c.'s by a row of single stitch to form the closed top

of the darker shade. General Instructions.)

Repeat the second row four times more, or for as many rows as are required Break off the wool. Join on with the lighter shade. (See

Work

make the work 3£

in.

:

of the cosy.

Make 12 ch., Before breaking off the wool, make a little handle as follows carry the end of this chain across to the other corner of the closed top, and secure Now thicken this handle by working a d.c. into each st. of it by a single stitch. Secure this end also to the opposite end of the top of the cosy by a the chain. Break off the wool, and darn the end in neatly. single st. The cosy can be worked in one shade of wool only, or in three shades. jV p. If three shades are employed, the bottom three rows should be in the darkest shade, the middle three in the medium, and the top three in the palest shade.
:
§

13— (815E)

194

KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS.
6.

CROCHETED TEA-COSY.

Further Practice
Materials.

in Egg-Cosy Pattern, and in the Choice of Artistic Colours for Blending.

—Coarse
9d.

6 oz. will per lb., is

make two
Is.

cosies.

Bone Crochet Hook. Double Berlin Wool ofj six The cost of two cosies, employing wool at

shades. 4s. 6d.

Fig. 147.

Crocheted Tea Cosy.

loosely,

Commence with the darkest shade of wool. Work 36 chain rather Instructions. and join to form a ring. The chain should measure 18 in. If a cosy of a See note different size is required, let the number of chain selected be divisible by 4.
at the end.
1st Row. Work 3 ch. (to count as a tr.) and 3 tr. into the first st. take out the hook, insert it in the top of the first tr. (i.e., through the top of the 3 ch. which form the first tr.), and draw the last st. through it, 1 tr. into the next St., * 4 tr. into next st. (as before, drawing the last st. through top of first tr.), 1 tr. into next Repeat from * all round the ring. There will be 18 sets of 4 tr., and 18 single st. tr. Join the last tr. to the first set of 4 tr. by a single stitch, thus completing the ring. 2nd Row. 3 ch. to form a single tr., and 3 tr. into first hole (as before, draw the last st. through top of first of the set of 4 tr.), 1 tr. into next hole, * 4 treble into next hole (again drawing the last stitch through the top of first tr.), 1 tr. into

Cutting Out for
By
Diplomee of cialist under
fields ;

Student Teachers
K.

AMY

SMITH

London Institute for the Advancement of Plain Needlework ; Spethe London County Council and at the Day Training College, MoorExaminer in Dressmaking and Needlework to the City and Guilds of London
the

Gabriel's College, Kennington, S.E. 260 pages, Quarto size, and is illustrated with over 360 Diagrams. Price 5s. net. The Schoolmistress says " The book is profusely illustrated, and affords every We can most heartily conceivable help to those for whom it is written.
Institute
;

late of St.

The book contains upwards
:

of

recommend

it."

Needlework
200 illustrations.
It

for
the

Student
Same Author.

Teachers

(FOR ALL TEACHERS By

AND STUDENTS OF THE SUBJECT)

The book contains 260 pages, demy Svo, and
4s. net.

with upwards of is illustrated has recently been revised, rearranged, and repaged. Price
:

The

Schoolmaster says of any work on the subject

"A

most exhaustive manual, the we have hitherto seen."

style being in

advance

Blackboard Diagram Drawing for Teachers of Needlecraft
By ETHEI
Trained Certificated Teacher
the
;

R.

HAMBRIDGE

Certificate ; Diplombe (Gold Seat) of Institute for the Advancement of Plain Needlework. Foolscap 4to, cloth, with 7 full-page coloured plates and nearly 300 black and white illustrations and diagrams, 3s. 6d. net.

Art Teacher's

London

This work is not only a useful collection of diagrams, but contains as many practical hints as to their effective enlargement on the blackboard for class teaching ; and should prove most valuable, not only to the Evening School Teacher in training, but, also, to those who are actually engaged in teaching the various subjects included under the heading of Needlecraft. The diagrams are carefully graded.

Handwork and Needlework
In

demy

By E. P. CLAYDON Mistress Chuckery Council School, Walsall. Svo, cloth, 96 pages, with very many diagrams and patterns, 2s. net.
Head

This book embodies in a practical form the suggestions for the teaching of needlework recently issued by the Board of Education in Circular 730. The educational value of Needlework as a form of Handicraft for girls is specially dealt with. The drafting of patterns is not confined to a few garments for girls in the higher standards, but forty-eight- patterns to scale are given, graded in difficulty for children from
7 to 14 years of age.

London

:

Sir

Isaac

Pitman

&

Sons,

Ltd.,

1

Amen Corner,

E.C.

ch. CROCHETED PERAMBULATOR COVER. Draw up the cosy with ribbon. Work as 4th row. per lb. 5th Row. (this counts as a tr. into second hole.. Join on next shade. using wool at 3s. those Previously Made. * 4 tr. and work exactly as in the first half of the row.B. into next hole. at the end. then 1 tr. and the 4 tr. but. see under Woolcraft. Repeat from * all round the top. Join on next shade. make 3 ch. Commence with 3 ch. after working the 4 tr. The second half of the row is worked in the same way as the first. Work as 5th row. to form a tr. If a larger size is required. 12th Row. into first hole.e. A third row of loops may be worked in a still darker making a triple border. (Notice that in this row the single tr. Work as 3rd row. lid. — — — — — — — the wool. worked as in previous rows. the 3 ch. 1 tr.) — = . and also 4 tr. finishing with a single tr. Break off the wool. Break 4th Row. This is necessary to keep the edges of the cosy straight. At the end of each half-row.STANDARD VII. This starts the opening for the handle. Join on next shade. into each hole all the way round. comes second. A Egg and Teapot Stitches 7(a). in it.. the single tr. 195 next hole. 3rd Row. finishing with 1 tr. just where the 11th row commenced. About 12 oz. into the same hole as previous row. as well as the 4 tr. 6th Row. This commences the border.. — -Join "Work 6 shade if make way round as in desired. d. counting the 3 ch. comes first... into third hole. varying the size and shape as required. Already Learned Applied to Crocheting an Article Larger than Materials.) This row forms a beading for drawing up the cosy. Repeat from * all the way round. but join the end of the 9th row with the beginning by a single stitch into the top of the first tr. into hole in front of set of 4 tr. increase the length of the chain by four. and also increase the number of rows. long for fastening off. (exclusive Cost. Break off the wool to form the opening for the spout. a single tr. must be put into the last hole. on a darker shade. Do not break off the wool. or by any multiple of four. Work as 5th row. Each half of this row and every succeeding one must have 9 sets of 4 tr. of ribbon). 1th Row. means of a crocheted woollen chain with N. 8th Row. Break off the wool. Cream or White large size. must be put into the same hole as the — last 4 tr. and 10 single tr. at the commencement as 1 tr. The Cosy described above will — fit Coffee Pot Cosy may be worked in a similar pattern to the Cosies.). leaving an end about 3 in. 11th Row. 3 ch. A Bone Crochet Hook — Double Knitting Coat Wool. 9th Row. 10th Row. Repeat from * half-way round the ring. * 1 tr.. Break off — off the wool. into next hole. Like the 4th row. to the first (i. a teapot holding 1£ pts. There will be 9 sets of 4 tr. into next hole. Join on the next shade lighter. (For other qualities of double knitting wool. Repeat all the 1 1th row. miss a hole. 4 tr..) Repeat from * along the first half of the row. make 3 ch. 1 d. Join on again in next hole.. 3s. Join the last tr.c. into first hole to count as a tr. or by 1 tassels attached to the ends.c. Join on the next shade lighter. With the same wool * work 6 ch.

chain made. Break off the wool. — Fig. miss 2 st. so that the Crocheted Perambulator Cover... it was 132 chain. leaving an end which is to be neatly finished off on the wrong side of the rug.. end of the .—* 1 tr. into each of the first 9 ch. In the case of the one portion. photographed. miss 2 st. remembering that extra stitches must be allowed for the The number chosen should be divisible by 11.. into each of the next 3 st. Beginning at the same end and on the same side as was done in the previous row. 3 tr. repeat from * to the 1st Row. — . turn-back cover required. into next st. 2nd Row.196 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. 148. This is done at the end of each row in order that all the rows off the wool as before. * 1 tr. and the length measured 36 in.. In every case the back of the stitch is to be taken up. 1 tr. whole rug has a ridged appearance when completed. miss 1 St. Break into each of the next 3 St. Make a sufficient number of chain to extend the length of the Instructions. repeat from * to the end of the row.

To ascertain its exact the sofa for which it is required. Cost. wide.). 2.c. Neatly finish off all ends on the wrong side. lid. 6 oz. 1st Row. — Instructions. wide.. — — 13A— (8l5B) . Materials. of 4-ply wool. 5 oz. for the If yds. 197 started at the same end and on the same side of the rug. ch. 2d. In the case of the one shown in Fig. into next stitch.. To ascertain the exact dimensions required..) Instructions. (to . 2 ch. size. ch. 7(B). Three Pearl (For other qualities of of the back along produce crocheting Back. 2d. 5s. making little bows at the corners. * Miss 4 ch. 2. into next stitch. serve as 1 tr. 1 lb. 2. measure CROCHETED HUG-ME-TIGHT. 1 d. Make the rug about Perambulator Cover. 2 tr. and allow a convenient margin. Join on make 3 ch. 4-ply wool. 72. All the ridges produced then stand out on the right side. 2 tr. 1 tr. and 50 in. of Double Knitting Wool. as there will be no holes to serve as a guide. — = 4d. each consisting of 2 tr. Employ the same pattern as that described above under Perambulator Cover. into the hole between the next two groups repeat from * all round the rug. Buttons. measure the cot for which the cover is intended. per lb. There should be in all 12 groups. Make the cover about 35 in. which will count as 1 tr. lid. CROCHETED SOFA RUG. and another half of the row. into the middle stitch of the next group. 2 tr. Is. of Cost. ch. employing wool at 3s. per lb. 2nd Row. Materials. In working along the ends it will be necessary to judge the spaces between the groups of trebles. Finish off the cover by running ribbon through the rows of holes that go across it. into the first stitch (The 3 chain and the treble will form half a group. see under Woolcraft. . long and 1 yd. The work is commenced Chain at the bottom the line marked AB in the diagram. 2. If lb. Commence in the first stitch of one of the long sides. — 7(c). Continue to work rows like the 2nd row described above until the cover is of the width required. remembering that. = 6s.. = Double Knitting Wool. into the hole left between the first two groups of 9.c. 6 tr. CROCHETED COT COVER. New Pattern taught. * ch.— STANDARD may be VII. 1 d. Instructions. lid. the sides will be reversed. into the fifth or middle stitch of the first group of 9. and the width was 27 in. per lb. A Large Bone Crochet Hook. in the case of the turned-back portion. using wool at 3s. Border. Cost. Large Bone Crochet Hook. or a length to measuring 10 in. — —Again employ the same pattern as 8. Repeat from * all along the row. chain 2. long. Turn with 3 ch. into the first stitch. 6 tr. Large Bone Crochet Hook. the number of rows was 36. and 5 tr. Materials. 148. employing wool at 3s.

2 ch. into the hole formed between the two last groups group row Fig. into the next hole into the same hole. into the same hole. 2 tr. 2 tr. tr.. * 2 tr. Repeat from * all along the . 2 ch. 2 Crocheted Hug-Me-Tight.198 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. will be made at the end of the row. 149. between two groups. of the previous row.. so that the 12 groups which form each shall be completed).

into the hole. in Crochet. 2 ch. on the very last stitch of the row. 150. into the same hole. 19& row. These 2 tr.STANDARD VII. 1 tr. form the Fig.. Hug-Me-Tight or Woollen Waistcoat Front View. 2 tr. There should be 12 complete groups in this row as in the first row. into the same hole * 2 tr. 2 tr. into the next hole. 2 ch. —Work with single stitch until the to serve as a treble. half group previously mentioned. Repeat from * all along the row. Then chain 3 . .. 3rd Row. and then work 2 tr. first hole between groups is reached.

between each group of 3 tr. As in the case of the right front.e. This completes the back. This completes the right front as far as the line DC of diagram. IQth Row. so that there will now be 14 groups in the row. and 2 ch.200 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. The first increasing for the front is made in this row. 1£ in.c. the increasings should near the ends of the rows.c. Row. IQth six trebles this row work an additional group into each of the two groups of in the previous row. Then work 7 rows of 7 groups. In this row work an additional group into the group of 6 trebles. and the border for this size consists of four rows. from the commencement of the shoulder. 32nd Row. by making a cluster into each of the holes formed by 2 chain. twice into the hole at each of the corners. and then turn round and work back along these 5 groups. Increase again in exactly the same way as in the 16th row. by making a group in each of the holes formed by 2 chain.. have been worked.. Continue working these short rows until 15 rows. Work the fifth group in the usual way. Increase again as before. into the hole formed by the 2 chain in the middle of the first group. and for a stout figure as many as six rows. Work 7 rows with 8 groups in each row. when the fourth hole is reached. work into this a usual into all the other holes until the tenth hole is reached Complete the row in the usual similar group to that worked into the third hole. but when the third hole is reached. Repeat the 3 tr. twice in the hole — . —In made Right Shoulder and Front. There will now be 6 groups in the row. Repeat from * round the whole of the jacket as indicated by the dotted line in the diagram.. i. 1st Row. Work 5 groups of the 36th row. Two d. By means For a slim of the border. 2nd Row. — — — — Left Shoulder and Front. then make the groups as between each of the pairs. : — . * 3 chain. nth Row. but. The hug-me-tight shown in the photograph is made to suit a figure with an outside waist measurement of 26 in. 2Ath Row.c. or 12 in. with 2 ch. or as many as will make up a length of 15 in. farthest from the armhole. each consisting of 5 groups. . into each of the holes formed by the 3 ch. Work 6 more rows each consisting of 6 groups. the jacket may be adapted to suit a stout or slim figure figure as few as two rows of the border may be worked. — Repeat the 2 d. repeat the 2nd and 3rd rows alternately until 14 rows have been done Work two groups of 15th Row. work into it 6 tr. Wore 3 groups of trebles in the usual way. In this row an increase is made as follows trebles as usual. Now in all. into the hole in the middle of the next group. Now continue to work these longer rows of 14 groups until 35 rows. have been worked in all. 2 d. Border. work 6 trebles into it as described in the increasings of the back. of previous row. instead of the usual 4 tr. All the other groups in the row will be worked as usual. Three tr. way. Work the line this is on exactly the same principle as the right shoulder and front until FE be made reached.

— — Fig. between each group of 3 tr. Fold the garment so that the point the point J over the point H. placing a group of 3 tr. instead of 2 ch. Back View. and sew up the side seams on the wrong side of the garment. and Making up. — K . draw in the work by making 1 ch.) lies over the point G. Like last row. 2 tr. Turn the garment on to the right side and sew three buttons on the left-hand The holes formed by the pattern of side of the front opening at its lower end. Hug-Me-Tight or Woollen Waistcoat in Crochet. 201 at each of the corners. from * all round the hug-me-tight. In working along the back of the neck. 151. for a sufficient distance to leave convenient openings for the armholes. 4th Row. into the same hole. into a hole. 3rd Row. Repeat * Two tr. into each of the holes formed by the 2 chain. the border may be used as button-holes.STANDARD VII. 2 chain. (Reduced Scale.

* 3 tr. on to the last of the 7 tr. 24. FIRST LACE EDGING IN CROCHET. 3 ch.. 1 tr. 24.c. and a d. into next space. 1 tr. last — Fig. the foundation chain). into space between the two last sets of trebles in the previous row.... make a d. into —Steel Crochet Hook— Crochet Cotton. of the group of 7 tr. and repeat from *.c. (i. of the previous row.) Simple Pattern in Crochet Cotton taught. 3 ch. and 1 tr.. into first stitch of chain.. No. Turn with 6 ch. into the 3rd of the group of chain at the commencement of the previous row. 1 tr.). 2nd Row. Materials. Materials. * 5 ch. No. More Difficult Pattern taught... and a d. 1 tr. (FOR TRIMMING UNDERWEAR. Instructions.. into next ch. make a d. until the desired length has been obtained.202 9. —Turn with 8 chain. tr. IN CROCHET... * make 5 ch. —Commence with 10 chain.c. First Lace Edging in Crochet.. 1 tr. Turn with 6 ch. miss 2. — and 10. of into the into the 7th chain. In attaching the last 5 ch. 152. —Turn with 5 into the 10th — — . Turn with 5 ch.. This results in four sets of 3 tr. Repeat from *. Turn with 5 ch. ch. Crochet Cotton. miss 2 ch. 1 tr. into the last of the foundation chain). 1st 2. — Crochet Hook— —Commence with 7 chain. Row. KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS. into same stitch. This results in four sets of 5 ch... into next tr. into the same st. 3rd Row. 1 tr.e. St. and 1 tr. 3rd Row. (i. work 3 Row. into first hole. 3 ch. SECOND LACE EDGING size 5. on top of last treble but one in previous row. 1 tr. 3 ch. into next miss Steel size 5. into space.. in order to produce a firm and regular edge. 3 ch. Instructions. (thus making a group of 7 tr. AND FANCY ARTICLES. 5 tr. 3 ch. Do this in every row which ends with 5 ch. 2nd Row. miss 2.. on to the first tr. on to the middle of the 7 tr.c. 3 ch. 1 tr....e. Repeat the second and third rows alternately. on next tr. pass the hook through the middle stitch of the 5 ch. 1st ch. 1 tr. 3 ch.

. Row... and work 3 tr. Second Lace Edging in Crochet. 1 tr. This makes four sets of 5 ch. . ch.. into this ch. 1 tr. three times in succession This forms the edge of the pattern. Steel Crochet Hook Materials. 1 tr. into the last into 11th ch. Now make 6 ch. miss 2 ch. Harder Alternative Pattern.. was placed in the 1st row of the pattern. into 12th ch. into each succeeding space.. Work 5 ch. of 6... thus producing four sets of tr.c. into each space of the preceding 5th Row. 154. ii.STANDARD VII. Turn with 5 ch.. 1 —Commence with 12 —Turn with 3 to form a ch.. 1 tr. Repeat from the commencement of the 2nd row. ch. as in the 1st row. until the desired length has been worked. 153. and a d. Turn round. tr. and work 3 tr.. (i. Instructions.. and a d.. 2. 1 tr. into the 7th ch. — THIRD LACE EDGING IN CROCHET. Fig. 1 ch.. row.. — Fig. 1st Third Lace Edging in Crochet.e.c. 1 tr. 1 of the foundation ch. — — size 5. Repeat from *.c. 4th Row. tr. into the hole where the last set of 4 tr. Crochet Cotton. 1 tr. and attach with a d. 1 ch. ch. 1 tr.. into 8th ch.). 24. 1 ch. No.. 203 next hole. miss 2 ch.

.Sons. into 4th ch. Repeat this 5 ch. (This forms three picots and makes an edging to the lace.. to form a tr.. in previous row. 1 tr. 1 d. and 1 d.. 1 tr. 2 ch. twice more. 1 tr. miss next 3 ch. Repeat second and third rows until the desired length has been obtained.. 3 ch. 1 tr. 1 ch. Turn with 3 ch.. 1 tr... into the first of the chain... miss the next 3 ch. of 1st row. 1 tr. miss 2 ch. on each of the next 2 tr. THE END Press o/ Isaac Pitman 6.) Work 1 d.. 1 tr. into next space. England (8I5B) Q— .. in previous row. 3 ch. and 1 d. into hole formed by 3 ch. 1 ch. into each of tne next two spaces. into next hole. 1 tr. 1 tr. into 1st stitch of foundation chain... 1 tr.204 KNITTING WITHOUT SPECIMENS... 1 tr. 1 ch. 1 tr. on each of the 3 tr. 1 tr. 1 tr. 1 ch. 2nd Row...).. of preceding row. 1 ch. on the tr. and work a single crochet (see General Instructions) into the first of these 5 ch.. 1 ch.c.... 1 tr.c.. on next tr. 3rd Row. into the last hole formed — — by 3 ch. and single cr.. 1 ch. into first space in preceding row. into each of the next two spaces (making five sets of 3 ch. 2 ch. Bath.). 1 tr.. Make 5 ch. 3 ch. miss next hole (which comes between two sets of 3 tr. 1 ch. miss next hole.c.c.

Price 2s. 2..... This Manual is intended for the use of teachers of Needlework in Elementary. making. fid. garments. Overall. and mendingof actual garments are a prominent feature of the book there is a wide range of simple and up-to-date patterns cut out by proportion. Secondary. E. cloth.C . are simple and concise. Needlework Manuals for Upper Standards and Evening Schools By FLORENCE Head SHAW Price 3d. Petticoat Drill Knickers the " Magyar Overall " Girl's Nightdress Cooking. Mistress Newgate Council School. and of students preparing for the Needlework Examinations of the Board of Education.A. and may safely be given to young students of 14 or 15. Including drafting of patterns. fitting. Blouse-making. etc. . net.) . Cutting Out and Making a Doll's. 3s. . and making up of various No. 4 and 5. Pontefract. in Cutting Out in the Material. 1. paper. fully illustrated with diagrams in two colours. . Apron Overall Gored Skirt Swimming Costume. . . DiplomSe of the London Institute for the Advancement of Plain Needlework Needlework Instructress in the City of Nottingham Pupil Teachers' Centre. which are written according to the requirements of the Board of Education. It includes Class lessons in Pattern Drafting. It is based on all the latest circulars issued by the Board. .. Under-garments. Foolscap 4to. . By ANNIE B. and Evening Continuation Schools. Notes of Lessons on Pattern Drafting By JOSEPHINE RILEY Needlework Lecturer to the Teachers' Classes under the London County Council. Chemise.. CHAMBERLAIN. No. with full instructions for adapting them to give figure measurements as required in practical work and in therecent examinations of the Board of Education. (Lond. Skirt-making. Cloak a Simple Dress a Child's Pinafore. . e. 3. The directions conApron. Ltd. Princess. Foolscap 4to. each 24 pp. . In Five Books. Directions for the cutting out. . Petticoat Bodice. 212 pp. etc. Nos. net. with 35 full-page diagrams. 1 Amen Corner. not. 128 pp. 6d. in the Making-up of the Garments according to the ability of each class. London : Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons.Practical Plain Needlework B. In this volume the author aims at presenting a recognised system correlated with Art and graduated for standards on educational lines. . cloth. CookingNo. with illustrations in two colours.g. tained in these books. cutting-out.

Drawing for Teachers of Inscribed Author of " Blackboard Diagram Needlecraft. HALE. all patterns being based upon the ordinary plain knitting. Class . Liverpool. net. Is. Liverpool. 2s. DUDLEY. or garter. Knitting for Infants and Juniors Sheil By ETHEL M. Rudyard Kipling.' requiring the added knowledge of how to work a purl stitch. or small articles for a doll's house or for " Mother. because it is generally supposed that so little of any practical use can be accomplished by the tiny fingers. as soon as the simple plain knitting stitch is conquered. The Author has struck a most original note in the production of Girlie Bunting. is likely to remain permanently in the mind. HAMBRIDGE Certificated Teacher. classes of the Junior School. in addition. absorb almost unconsciously a very thorough preliminary instruction in Needlework and Dressmaking. Road Council School." In crown 8vo. Girlie Bunting. In foolscap 4to. "With a Foreword by Miss S. will. certain to prove very fascinating.The Trained Story of Girlie Bunting on the Island of "Never-Mind-Where" By ETHEL R. Lecturer to Teachers. with over 40 illustrations. The young student will also grasp in a most attractive manner the nature and use knowledge gained in this interesting way is of all her workbox implements. the various stages of the work. and of the National Training School of Cookery and other Branches of Domestic Economy in Millinery and Elementary and Advanced Dressmaking." Part I is entirely devoted to the work of Infants and Standard I.. Part II is more advanced. and the reader. lessons in the Infants' School frequently have a tendency to monotony and tediousness.A. in the way of making tiny garments for a doll. for it introduces the child-student of Needlework to her subject on the lines of a Step by step. . 120 pp. Ltd. and is suitable for all The illustrations consist of photographs and drawings. Principal of the Edge Hill Training College. the child is taken through delightful story.C. The book will be greatly valued in both A Elementary and Secondary Schools. This book shows what may be done. as the tale unfolds. L. Diplomee {Gold Seal) of the London Institute for the Advancement of Plain Needlework. cloth. " the photographs in Part I being of actual articles made by children in the " Sixes that is. with by kind permission to Mr.. 1 Amen Corner. E. many quaint illustrations. by children from 5 to 6J years of age. stitch. 64 pp. and even the smallest point has not been omitted.L. J. 3d. cloth. Knitting London : Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons. The little heroine. while enjoying her adventures.

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