Environmental
Ethics
(ENV
170‐301)
 McGowan
South
Room
206
 [TU/TH
4:20pm‐5:50pm]
 Instructor:
Dr.
Anthony
Paul
Smith
(anthonypaul.smith@gmail.

com)
 773‐931‐9570
(cell)
 Office
hours:
By
appointment
only
 
 Course
Description
 Our
age
is
dominated
by
a
contradiction:
on
the
one
hand
we
are
bombarded
every
day
 with
apocalyptic
tales
related
to
global
climate
change,
and
on
the
other
hand
there
 appears
to
be
no
marshalling
of
significant
collective
will
required
to
deal
with
the
 problem.
The
reason
for
this
lack
of
will
may
lie
in
large
part
with
a
failure
on
the
part
of
 our
thinking
and
thus
addressing
our
implicit
ethical
reasoning
concerning
the
 environment
may
aid
at
least
a
little
in
turning
the
tide
of
environmental
degradation.
 For
it
may
be
that
one
aspect
of
the
environment
we
have
damaged
is
our
thinking
itself.

 To
get
to
grips
with
the
challenges
presented
to
philosophy
by
the
ecological
crisis
we
 will
begin
by
looking
at
two
recent
environmental
disasters,
the
2010
gulf
oil
spill
and
 the
2011
Fukushima
nuclear
disaster.

We
will
then
examine
traditional
approaches
 within
ethical
philosophy
geared
towards
thinking
through
environmental
problems
 before
turning
to
subsidiary
issues
within
environmental
ethics.
These
will
include
 animal
ethics,
the
closely
related
ethics
of
food,
and
the
ethical
problems
presented
by
a
 growing
human
population
and
the
continued
urbanization
of
our
species.
We
will
then
 turn
our
attention
to
criticisms
of
these
traditional
forms
of
environmental
ethics
in
the
 hopes
of
seeing
how
a
new,
more
adequate
ethical
theory
could
be
formed.

 The
class
is
a
survey
and
thus
at
the
end
we
as
a
class
will
have
grappled
with
a
number
 of
traditions
of
thought,
the
forms
of
which
you
will
be
able
to
identify
in
public
debates
 surrounding
the
issues
outside
of
the
classroom,
and
then
see
where
these
traditional
 forms
of
thinking
have
failed
us.
You
will
also
see
issues
and
ethical
problems
that
may
 not
have
been
apparent
to
you
prior
to
the
course
and
be
challenged
in
your
own
 personal
practices
as
you
come
to
see
yourself
as
an
ecologically
embedded
subject.
 Finally
we
will
see
some
of
the
latest
attempts
to
rethink
our
very
act
of
thinking
 ecologically
in
order
to
move
past
the
impasse
of
the
traditional
debates.

 Learning
Outcomes

 Upon
completing
the
course
the
student
should
be
able
to:
 • engage
philosophically
with
environmental
problems;
 • identify
and
explain
the
different
ethical
positions
present
in
environmentalism;

 • be
able
to
identify
the
central
themes
and
arguments
of
the
texts
and
state
them
 in
a
clear
and
sympathetic
way
in
class
discussion;
 • be
able
to
formulate
criticisms
in
a
way
that
is
attentive
to
the
original
author’s
 intent
and
argumentation.
 
 Grade
Summary
 There
will
be
two
tests
(comprised
of
short‐answer
questions
and
essay
questions),
 seminar
discussions,
and
a
final
paper
(10‐pages,
double‐spaced).
Each
test
will
count
 for
25%
(for
a
total
of
50%)
of
your
final
grade,
the
final
paper
will
count
for
35%,
and
 finally
15%
for
seminar/
class
participation
(which
includes
attendance).


 


1
 


It
is
important
that
you
do
not
miss
a
class
and
especially
an
exam.
Any
make‐up
for
the
 in‐class
exams
will
only
be
given
due
to
extreme
situations,
and
this
is
done
very
rarely.
 You
must
have
prior
permission
from
the
instructor
to
take
a
make­up.


 
 The
paper
is
due
via
Desire2Learn
(click
the
“Dropbox”
tab)
or
my
email
by
the
end
of
 the
day
(11:59PM)
on
Wednesday,
June
6th.
The
paper
is
to
be
submitted
electronically
 only.
I
prefer
that
the
paper
be
a
PDF.
Details
concerning
the
paper
(its
format
and
 content)
will
be
passed
out
after
the
first
exam.
Late
papers
will
not
be
accepted.
 Cheating/plagiarism
will
be
dealt
with
as
the
serious
infractions
that
they
are,
possibly
 leading
to
failure;
see
the
Student
Handbook
for
details.

 
 Cell
Phone
and
Laptop
Policy
 While
I
understand
the
addiction
to
cell
phones,
especially
smart
phones,
the
material
 we
are
studying
is
very
difficult
and
therefore
requires
your
undivided
attention.
If
you
 are
caught
using
your
phone
during
a
lecture
you
will
be
given
one
warning
(either
 verbally
or
by
email).
If
you
are
caught
a
second
time
or
more
you
will
face
a
reduction
 of
five
points
for
each
offense
from
your
highest
scoring
piece
of
coursework.
Please
turn
 all
cell
phones
off
during
the
lecture.
If
I
can
do
it,
so
can
you.
 Laptops
are
acceptable
in
the
class,
but
for
note
taking
only.
If
you
appear
not
to
be
 paying
attention
because
you’re
distracted
by
something
non‐lecture
related
on
your
 laptop
then
I
will
ask
you
to
read
the
last
line
of
notes
you
have
just
written.
If
you
can’t
 then
you
will
be
given
a
warning
(either
verbally
or
by
email).
If
you
are
caught
a
second
 time
or
more
you
will
face
a
reduction
of
five
points
for
each
offense
from
your
highest
 scoring
piece
of
coursework.
 Desire2Learn
 Please
make
sure
that
you
check
the
email
attached
to
your
Desire2Learn
profile.
I
will
 be
sending
emails
to
that
address.
All
course
documents,
powerpoints,
audio
of
lectures,
 and
other
helpful
links
will
be
available
on
the
Desire2Learn
course
page.

 Remarks
on
Lectures,
Readings,
Films,
and
Classroom
Discussions
 We
are
dealing
with
adult
themes
and
a
range
of
different
belief
systems
in
this
class.
 You
will
be
exposed
to
different
ways
of
thinking
both
in
the
readings,
the
lectures,
and
 discussions
in
class.
At
times
you
may
find
yourself
offended
by
one
or
more
of
the
ideas
 presented
and
when
you
are
not
offended
a
fellow
classmate
may
well
be.
This
is
ok!
 While
of
course
verbal
or
physical
abuse
is
strictly
not
tolerated,
we
have
to
give
each
 other
permission
to
be
offensive
(within
the
bounds
of
respectful
discourse)
and
to
be
 offended.
By
remaining
in
this
course
you
are
agreeing
to
have
respectful
conversations
 about
a
wide
range
of
different
beliefs.

 This
goes
especially
for
the
films
and
clips
we
will
watch
in
class.
At
times
I
have
chosen
 material
that
may
be
offensive
to
some.
Some
films
will
be
rated‐R
and
some
clips
from
 TV
shows
will
be
rated
TV‐MA.
By
remaining
enrolled
in
this
class
after
the
first
session
 you
are
entering
into
a
non‐verbal
agreement
that
you
understand
and
accept
you
will
 be
asked
to
watch
these
films
and
clips.
 Required
Texts

 • Course
reader
(found
on
D2L)
with
selections
from:
 o Murray
Bookchin,
Social
Ecology
and
Communalism
(AK
Press)
 • Gilbert
Simondon,
Two
Lessons
on
Animal
and
Man
(Univocal)
 • Andrew
Light
and
Holmes
Rolston
III
(editors),
Environmental
Ethics:
An
 Anthology
(Blackwell)

 • Aldo
Leopold,
Sand
Country
Almanac
and
Sketches
Here
and
There
(Oxford
UP)


2
 


• Timothy
Morton,
The
Ecological
Thought
(Oxford
UP)
 
 Extra
Credit
 You
may
choose
a
book
or
author
from
the
list
below
and
write
a
book
report
(or
similar
 report
on
the
work
of
an
artist
or
artists).

After
reading
the
book,
which
you
must
never
 have
read
before,
you
will
write
a
book
report
of
approximately
1,000
to
1,250
words
 that
is
illuminated
by
your
understanding
of
the
various
theoretical
perspectives
on
 nature
and
the
environment
that
we
discuss
during
the
quarter.

It
may
add
up
to
20
 points
to
your
final
grade.
 Here
is
a
long
unsystematic,
idiosyncratic,
by
no
means
exhaustive
list
of
books
that
you
 may
consider
for
your
extra‐credit
report;
if
you
wish
to
report
on
a
book
not
from
this
 list,
please
confirm
your
selection
with
me
in
advance:
 Henry
David
Thoreau:
choose
from
any
of
his
numerous
suitable
works,
including
 Walden
and
The
Maine
Woods,
or
from
one
of
the
many
available
anthologies
 Ralph
Waldo
Emerson:
Nature
and
other
relevant
essays,
available
in
various
 anthologies
of
Emerson’s
work
 John
Muir:
choose
from
any
of
the
numerous
works
by
one
of
the
founders
of
the
 preservation
movement,
e.g.,
My
First
Summer
in
the
Sierra,
The
Mountains
of
 California
and
Our
National
Parks,
or
else
select
an
anthology
such
as
Nature
 Writings
 William
Wordsworth:
The
Prelude;
or
the
numerous
anthologies
of
his
poetry
and
 prose,
including
perhaps
his
guide
to
the
Lake
District
of
England
 John
Ruskin:
the
19th‐century
English
art
critic
and
social
theorist
wrote
also
on
 environmental
issues
and
the
effects
of
industrialization
and
urbanization;
I
know
of
 no
work
dedicated
to
these
concerns
alone;
however,
references
to
specific
essays
 by
Ruskin
can
be
found
in
Ruskin
and
Environment:
The
Storm­Cloud
of
the
 Nineteenth
Century,
edited
by
Michael
Wheeler.
 Annie
Dillard:
Pilgrim
at
Tinker
Creek—Pulitzer
Prize‐winning
meditations
on
the
 natural
world
 Terry
Tempest
Williams:
Refuge—memoir
by
a
Mormon
feminist
environmentalist
 peace
activist
 Michael
Pollan:
Second
Nature:
A
Gardener’s
Education—confronting
nature
in
your
 yard;
or
The
Botany
of
Desire—how
plants
(the
apple
tree,
cannabis,
the
potato
and
 the
tulip)
domesticated
humans;
or
The
Omnivore’s
Dilemma:
A
Natural
History
of
 Four
Meals—from
McDonald’s,
Whole
Foods,
a
sustainable
farm
and
the
wild.
 Bill
McKibben:
The
End
of
Nature—present‐day
Adirondack
eco‐sage
 Edward
Abbey:
Desert
Solitaire:
A
Season
in
the
Wilderness—the
reflections
of
an
 eco‐curmudgeon
 Gary
Snyder:
The
Practice
of
the
Wild—a
collection
of
essays
by
the
Pulitzer
Prize‐ winning
poet
and
counter‐culture
hero,
the
guy
who
introduced
Jack
Kerouac
and
 the
Beat
generation
to
Zen
Buddhism
 Barry
Lopez:
Arctic
Dreams:
Imagination
and
Desire
in
a
Northern
Landscape—by
the
 guy
who
wrote
the
wolf
book
 Bill
Bryson:
A
Walk
in
the
Woods—a
humorist
hiking
the
Appalachian
Trail
 Bruce
Chatwin:
The
Songlines—the
result
of
his
travels
among
the
Australian
 Aborigines


3
 


Robert
Tonkinson:
The
Mardu
Aborigines—an
account
of
traditional
life
in
 Australia’s
western
desert
 Eric
Hansen:
Stranger
in
the
Forest:
On
Foot
across
Borneo—an
account
of
his
travels
 with
indigenous
hunter‐gatherers
in
the
fast‐disappearing
rainforest
of
this
island
 off
the
south‐east
corner
of
the
Asian
landmass
 Jon
Krakauer:
Into
Thin
Air—risking
life,
limb
and
your
braincells,
not
to
mention
 maybe
your
nose
and
toes,
on
Mt.
Everest
 Ernest
Callenbach:
Ecotopia—a
novel
envisioning
an
ecologically
sustainable
future
 while
clinging
to
some
dated
social
mores
 Dave
Foreman:
Ecodefense:
A
Field
Guide
to
Monkeywrenching—how
to
engage
in
 ecosabotage
 And
finally,
for
any
those
interested
in
art
and
art
history,
perhaps
an
analysis
of
J.
 M.
W.
Turner’s
landscapes
and
seascapes;
the
paintings
of
the
Hudson
River
School;
 the
photography
of
Ansel
Adams;
or
the
environmental
sculptures
of
Andy
 Goldsworthy.
 If
there
is
some
other
work
on
which
you
would
like
to
write
a
report,
you
are
 welcome
to
suggest
it
to
me;
I
look
forward
to
your
suggestions.
 Outline
of
Course
and
Reading
Schedule

 Readings
listed
are
to
be
read
for
that
class
period.
If
the
reading
is
listed
under
September
 14th,
it
is
to
be
read
prior
to
the
September
14th
session
of
class.
The
schedule
and
 procedures
for
this
course
are
subject
to
change
in
the
event
of
extenuating
circumstances;
 changes
will
be
announced
in
class.

 
 Each
class
will
consist
of
lecture
and
organized
group
discussion
of
the
text.
 March
27th


 
 Introduction
 
 Part
1:
Surveying
the
Field
of
Environmental
Ethics
 March
29th


 
 Palmer,
pp.
15‐35
(Environmental
Ethics
=
EE)
 
 
 
 
 Watch
documentaries
before
class
(links
also
on
D2L).

 http://youtu.be/LUyUqoMH7‐A

 
 
 
 
 http://vimeo.com/24340880
 
 
 
 
 
 April
3rd
 

 
 Leopold,
pp.
1‐47
 
 April
5th

 
 
 Leopold,
pp.
47‐94
 
 
 
 
 April
10th

 
 
 Leopold,
pp.
95‐164
 
 April
12th

 
 
 Leopold,
pp.
165‐226
 
 
 
 
 April
17th

 
 
 Singer,
pp.
55‐64
(EE),
Regan,
p.
65‐73
(EE)
 
 April
19th
 
 
 Taylor,
pp.
74‐84
(EE);
Katz,
pp.
85‐94
(EE)

 
 April
24th


 
 
 Varner,
pp.
95‐113
(EE);
Cahen,
pp.
114‐128
(EE)
 
 April
26th
 
 
 Simondon,
pp.
31‐88
(try
to
read
the
introduction
as
well)
 
 May
1st

 

 
 Rolston,
pp.
143‐153
(EE);
Stone,
pp.
193‐202
(EE);
Callicott,
pp.


4
 


203‐219
(EE)
 

 May
3rd

 
 May
8th
 
 May
10th
 
 May
15th
 
 May
17th
 
 May
22nd

 
 
 May
24th


 
 May
29th

 
 May
31st


 

 

 

 

 
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Light,
pp.
229‐248
(EE);
Fox,
pp.
252‐261
(EE);
Naess,
pp.
262‐ 274
(EE)
 Test
#1
(take
home),
No
Class
 No
Class
 Gaard
and
Gruen,
pp.
276‐293
(EE);
Warran
and
Cheney,
pp.
294‐ 305
(EE);
Bookchin
(pdf
on
D2L)
 Rolston,
pp.
451‐462
(EE);
Hartley,
pp.
478‐486
(EE);
Barry,
pp.
 487‐499
(EE)
 Morton,
pp.
1‐58
 
 Morton,
pp.
59‐97
 Morton,
pp.
98‐135
 Test
#2
 

 


5
 


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