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Cook Leadership Academy
Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University
The Hauenstein Center’s Cook Leadership Academy is a one-year leader development program for 40 Grand Valley undergraduate and graduate students. The program is co-curricular and cross-disciplinary -- this year representing 50 different areas of study -- and provides numerous opportunities for students to expand their horizons and engage their community. Cook Leadership Fellows take part in four core programmatic elements: The Wheelhouse Talks, Leader Lens, Guru, Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University and Muse. They gain access to Hauenstein Center events and receptions, high-profile community events, and professional training from Varnum Consulting and the Center for Community Leadership. They have been face-to-face with four U.S. presidents, two vice presidents, four secretaries of state, six state governors, numerous business and nonprofit executives, multiple Pulitzer Prize winning writers, the world’s

The Hauenstein Center’s Cook Leadership Academy is located on the 5th floor of Grand Valley’s downtown DeVos Center. Call us at (616) 331-2770 or find us online: gvsu.edu/hauenstein/leaders facebook.com/groups/cookleadershipacademy/

most decorated academic, and a Grammy Award winner. Alumni are in the nation’s capitol, our state’s capitol, and are leaders in dozens of communities across Michigan and the United States.

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Academy At a Glance
The Cook Leadership Academy, a premier leader development program at Grand Valley State University, is dedicated to raising a community of authentic leaders for the 21st century.
Cook Leadership Fellows The Wheelhouse Talks Leader Lens Guru Muse

Take the lead. Cross-disciplinary students in the Cook Leadership Academy. Chosen competitively based on: Character Involvement Leadership potential Portfolio of achievements Motivations Aspirations

Build community at the helm. Talks by a distinguished cross-section of leaders where fellows: Engage with local and community leaders Collect perspectives, models, examples, and values of leadership Learn about their community Create a shared vision for their community

Challenge your perspective. Intimate gatherings, where fellows: Explore leader ideals and ethical perspectives with Hauenstein Center Director Gleaves Whitney Tell their stories and test ideas Engage, advise, and coach one another

Consult collective wisdom. Mentor program, where fellows: Access the advice, guidance, and expertise of community mentors Intersect with mentors at live events and in a dynamic, personalized, online environment Tap into -- and contribute to -the program’s collective intelligence

Find your spark. Reflection-based, authentic leadership program, where fellows: Explore their personal narratives and fundamental values, goals, and motives Discover their strengths and weaknesses as leaders Envision their futures and hoped for legacies

All four programs are grounded in (1) culture and resources unique to Grand Rapids, Grand Valley, and the Hauenstein Center; (2) academic research into identity-based, eventsdriven leader development emerging from Harvard University, U.S. Military Academy, University of Nebraska, University of Washington, and University of Michigan; (3) best practices at more than 100 premier and benchmark colleges and universities; and (4) a decade of experience and feedback from advisors, mentors, and Cook Leadership Fellows. 2 Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University

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Participation
Cook Leadership Fellows commit to fully participating in a nine-month slate of events, including orientation and the Academy’s four core programmatic elements: The Wheelhouse Talks, Leader Lens, Guru, and Muse. They benefit from numerous opportunities to engage each other and the community.

2012-13 Cook Leadership Fellow Calendar
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Monday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday August 20 August 28 August 29 September 6 September 12 October 10 October 31 November 7 December 5 January 14 January 16 February 13 March 13 March 27 April 10 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013 7:45 AM 4 PM 6-8 PM 8-10 AM 5:30-7:30 PM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 9-11 AM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 8-11 AM 5:30-7:30 PM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 9-11 AM 11:30 AM-1:30 PM 8-11 AM John Ball Zoo 340 Bicycle Factory 230 Bicycle Factory Goodwill Industries UICA UICA 340 Bicycle Factory UICA 340 Bicycle Factory Varnum UICA UICA 230 Bicycle Factory UICA 340 Bicycle Factory CLA Experience Orientation Option #1 Orientation Option #2 Fall Mixer with Mentors Wheelhouse Talks: Bill Holsinger-Robinson Wheelhouse Talks: Yang Kim Leader Lens with Gleaves Whitney Wheelhouse Talks: Frederick Antczak Muse: Strengths Winter Mixer with Mentors Wheelhouse Talks: Kerri Reinbold Wheelhouse Talks: Troy Evans Leader Lens with Gleaves Whitney Wheelhouse Talks: Leann Arkema Muse: Values

Located in downtown Grand Rapids. Locations: Bicycle Factory (Grand Valley State University, 201 Front Avenue SW), Goodwill Industries (455 Grand Avenue NE #1), John Ball Zoo (1300 Fulton Street West), UICA (2 Fulton Street West), Varnum (333 Bridge Street NW)

Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University

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Fellows At a Glance
2012-13 Cook Leadership Fellows

Diversity
Cook Leadership Fellows -- our students -- are a select group of mostly faculty-nominated students who distinguished themselves from an extremely talented pool of applicants. They are diverse in every sense of the word. This year’s group includes twenty-two women and twenty-three men who are diverse in culture, religion, political viewpoint, age, and experience. It includes forty-five students with majors, minors, and graduate work in fifty different disciplines. It also includes two students from other states and six foreign born students from Canada, China, England, Kenya, and Libya.

served with the Peace Corps in Turkmenistan. Another served with AmeriCorps in New Orleans, Houston, and Denver. A half-dozen others have devoted multiple school breaks to missions and service in multiple regions across the United States. Four of our students were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for their country. All four combat veterans served in Afghanistan, all earned commendations, and one was awarded the Purple Heart.

Six of our students have significant study abroad experience in multiple countries, and twelve speak multiple languages fluently.

Leaders Then & Now
Our students had an auspicious start in high school. The group includes one valedictorian, one salutatorian, four class presidents, two student paper editors, and seven athletic team captains. Cook Leadership Fellows are active on campus. Four have been president or vice president of the Grand Valley Student Senate. Ten are presidents or vice presidents of student organizations, and three have been presidents of fraternal organizations. Three have served as resident assistants in dorms, nine are in the Frederik Meijer Honors College, and fifteen have earned leadership awards on campus.

Experience
Several of our fellows have already had extensive professional experience. Three have founded business enterprises; one directs the Center for Community Leadership; and one is a senior pastor, adjunct professor, published scholar, and winner of multiple national grants for research in chemistry and aquatic biology.

Service
Our students are extremely service-oriented. Almost all 45 regularly serve in their communities and in local service and charitable organizations. One

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2012-13 Roster
Hannah Anderson
Mathematics GVSU, BS ’13

Mohammed Ghannam*
Biomedical Science GVSU, BS ’14

Mohamed Azuz*
Communications, Computer Information Systems GVSU, BS ’14

Danielle Gore*
Business Administration GRCC, BBA ’13

Elizabeth Balboa*
Journalism, Biomedical Science, Writing, Religious Studies GVSU, BA ’14, BS ’14

Justin Gray
Nursing, Management GVSU, BA ’12

Lindy Barnes*
Marketing, Advertising and Public Relations GVSU, ’13

Ann Hartlieb
Psychology, Spanish GVSU, BA ’12

Austin Calloway
Political Science GVSU, BA ’14

Nicole Horne*
Chemistry, Aquatic Biology UM, BS ’94; GVSU, MS ’12

Michelle Clancy
Biology, Nonprofit Management and Leadership GVSU, BS ’10, MPA ’12

John Iott*
Business Economics, Finance GVSU, BBA ’13

Michael Cnossen
International Relations GVSU, BA ’11

Jepkoech Kottutt*
Biomedical Science, Women and Gender Studies GVSU, BS ’15

Max Corning II *
Allied Health Sciences, Speech Language Pathology GVSU, BA ’13

Joshua Lunger
Political Science, Public Administration GVSU, BA ’12

Kristofer Cortez *
Music, College Student Affairs Leadership GVSU, BA ’11, M. Ed. ’13

Jarrett Martus
Finance, Management GVSU, BA ’12

Evan Crain*
Finance, Operations Management, Accounting GVSU, BA ’13

Kelly McCurdy
International Relations, Middle East Studies GVSU, BA ’12

Austin Dean
Business Administration, Finance GVSU, BA ’11, MBA ’13

Heidi McPheeters*
Social Work, Third World Development, Nonprofit Leadership Calvin, BS ’05; GVSU, MPA ’13

Abigail DeHart*
Philosophy, Classics, Business GVSU, BA ’14 *denotes first-year Cook Leadership Fellows

Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University

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Nathaniel Mehmed*
Geography and Planning, Environmental Studies GVSU, BS ’12

Shane Scherer*
Political Science, Public Administration GVSU, MPA ’13

Andrea (Schedlbauer) Miedema
Political Science GVSU, BA ‘13

Alma-Jean Setter*
Business, Public Administration, Nonprofit Leadership Aquinas, BS ’08; GVSU, MPA ’13

Juliana Nahas
Nonprofit Leadership, Psychology, French, Music GVSU, BS ’08, MPA ’12

Lindsay Stoyka
Biomedical Science, Mathematics, Writing GVSU, BA ’12

Jordan O’Neil
Nonprofit Management and Leadership GVSU, MPA ’13

Patrick Tedham*
Management, Real Estate Management Aquinas, MM ’12

Stephanie Ott*
Spanish, East Asian Studies, Nonprofit Leadership MSU, BA ’08; GVSU, MPA ’15

Trevor TenBrink*
Political Science, Business GVSU, BA ’13

Xinyi Ou*
Anthropology, Sociology, Women and Gender Studies GVSU, BS ’15, BS ’15

Noah Thelen*
Business Finance, Philosophy GVSU BS ’15, BA ’15

Jennifer Oza*
Integrated Science, Elementary Ed, College Student Affairs GVSU, BS ’12, M. Ed. ’14

Matthew VanderWindt*
Psychology, Social Work, Nonprofit Leadership Calvin, BA ’12; GVSU, MPA ’13, MSW ’13

Joseph Presutti
Finance, Business Economics GVSU, BA ‘13

Victoria VanDragt*
Liberal Studies, Philosophy GVSU, BA ’12

Nicholas Ryder*
Hospitality/Tourism, Business, Nonprofit Administration GVSU, BA ’12

Brett Wardrop
Nonprofit Leadership, Business Administration Aquinas, BA ’95; GVSU, MPA ’14

Genevieve Sabala*
Sociology, Literature, Social Work, Nonprofit Leadership GVSU, MSW ’11, MPA ‘13

Kristine Wildeboer
Accounting, Instructional Design, Adult and Higher Education GVSU, MA ’08, MA ’09, MA ’12

Darris Sawtelle*
Liberal Studies, Legal Studies, Philosophy GVSU, BA ’13

Marykatherine Woodson*
English Literature, College Student Affairs and Leadership DePaul, BA ’11; GVSU, MEd ’13

Crossing Disciplines
This year’s Cook Leadership Fellows represent 50 different areas of study and all eight colleges at Grand Valley State University. They speak different disciplinary languages, and their career aspirations vary dramatically. What they share is a desire to lead and serve, to be significant in the lives of others, and to be transformational in their communities. They have the opportunity to discover and be inspired by each other’s talents and passions. Where they collaborate, they will spark a powerful and creative intersection of ideas from diverse cultures, disciplines, and industries.

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Ralph Hauenstein: A life of leadership and service
Ralph Hauenstein has lived an extraordinary life that exemplifies the service and leadership Grand Valley State University seeks to inspire in its graduates. Born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in 1912, Mr. Hauenstein moved to Grand Rapids at the age of 12 and has called Michigan home ever since. One of his earliest memories -- he was five or six years old -- is of handing out candy to doughboys leaving their midwestern homes for the battlefields of France. As a twelve year old boy scout, he assisted Civil War veterans from the Grand Army of the Republic meeting in Grand Rapids. They arrived in Grand Rapids by car -- and by horse. His service to our nation began in 1935. That year, at the age of 23, he sensed that war would break out in Europe and inevitably involve the United States.  The next year, Mr. Hauenstein was commissioned in the U.S. Army as a second lieutenant and became commander of an all-African-American Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Michigan. Already as a young commander, he demonstrated a far-sighted commitment to civil rights by expanding the opportunities of the African Americans with whom he served.

Hauenstein Center
Mission
Inspired by Ralph Hauenstein’s life of leadership and service, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies is dedicated to raising a community of ethical, effective leaders for the twenty-first century.

COL Ralph Hauenstein:
“In the 20th century, I saw with my own eyes the worst that leaders are capable of. In the 21st century, I want to encourage the best leadership possible so that the world will be better for my children’s children.”

better international relations and peaceful solutions to conflict. After the war, Mr. Hauenstein saw opportunities to

During the Eisenhower administration, Mr. Hauenstein served as a consultant on the President's Advisory Commission. By his own admission, Mr. Hauenstein has never retired. At the age of 100, he works almost every day and is active in numerous causes. He served as an auditor at the Second Vatican Council in Rome, was part of the team that supervised the first free elections in Russia, and contributes to numerous charitable causes. His philanthropy has benefited a variety of organizations devoted to medical research and to education. At Grand Valley, his generosity made possible the founding of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, whose mission is to raise a community of ethical, effective leaders for the twenty-first century.

After two and one-half years on active duty, Mr. Hauenstein returned to civilian life and became city editor of the Grand Rapids Herald. In December 1940, one year before the attack on Pearl Harbor, he returned to active duty. During the Second World War, he rose to the rank of colonel and served under General Dwight Eisenhower as chief of the Intelligence Branch in the Army's European theater of operations. In 1945 he was among the first Americans into liberated Paris, war-torn Germany, and Nazi concentration camps. The destruction caused by warring dictators and militant ideologues steeled in him the resolve to work for

build bridges between the United States and a Europe devastated by war. He went into international trade and partnered with European enterprises to provide goods and services to consumers in Europe, the Middle East, and elsewhere where democracies were struggling. A risk-taker, he underwrote a modern bakery in Haiti, providing jobs for hundreds of workers and thousands of individual distributors at a difficult time in that nation's history. He also set up a school in Florida that taught people from developing countries how to run a fully-automated bakery and provide good jobs in their local economy.

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On the eve of 100th birthday, Ralph Hauenstein shares his secret that helped win World War II
Ted Roelofs | Grand Rapids Press March 10, 2012
GRAND RAPIDS -- There are so many milestones. Helping win World War II. Backing a young Gerald R. Ford in his first run for Congress. Donating seed money for Grand Valley State University's Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies. Leading donations for the Hauenstein Neuroscience Center at Saint Mary's Health Care. And so how does turning 100 rank for Ralph Hauenstein? "I get around pretty well," quipped Hauenstein, who will reach the century mark March 20. "It's not much different than turning 99." It has been a long and remarkable run for Hauenstein, a Grand Rapids Central High School graduate who built several businesses and left a considerable philanthropic imprint across West Michigan. But he was mum for decades about his role in the Ultra project, a covert Allied operation that cracked the German code and and helped turn the tide of war. Indeed, Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower called Ultra "decisive" in the victory over Nazi Germany. Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, said Hauenstein's name is rightfully familiar to West Michigan residents for his many community contributions. Whitney said his part in World War II is far less well known. "People just don't know all the capacities in which Ralph has led. In World War II, he played such a key role, but it took a while for it to trickle out." After serving in the U.S. Army in the 1930s as commander of a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Michigan, Hauenstein rejoined the Army in 1940 and rose to the rank of colonel and chief of intelligence for the European Theater of Operations. Upon his transfer to London in 1943, Hauenstein found himself at the center of the intelligence operation that helped win the war.

The key to Ultra was a small coding device called an enigma machine, which the German military used to encode messages before transmitting them. Unknown to the Germans, the British had obtained an enigma machine from the Poles in 1939. That helped the Allies design a computer that could imitate the enigma machine and decode intercepted messages. At an estate outside London, teams of code experts deciphered intercepted messages. Once a day, the messages arrived at Hauenstein's London office along with an officer to brief him. Hauenstein combined the Ultra intelligence with information from informants, prisoners of war and other sources to form a picture of what the enemy was planning, then passed that information on to command officers. Hauenstein was a crucial figure in convincing Hitler and his generals the 1944 D-Day invasion of France would be at Calais, not Normandy. Operatives concocted a fictitious army, the First Army Group, complete with plywood airplanes, rubber ships and inflatable tanks. "It was absolutely critical" for the success of D-Day, Hauenstein said. Details about the Ultra project were kept secret until 1974. "We were told, 'Never talk about it.' " Hauenstein said. Hauenstein met Gerald R. Ford in the 1920s as they grew up a half block apart in Grand Rapids and then as football rivals, Ford playing as captain and center of the South High School team and Hauenstein a skinny wingback for Central High. Hauenstein graduated from Central in 1931 and married Grace Byrnes the following year. The couple eventually had three children. Grace died in 2007. After the war, Hauenstein joined a group of veterans backing Ford for his successful 1948 run for Congress. They kept in touch throughout his political rise and after Ford left the White House in 1976.

The Ford family asked that Hauenstein be part of the honor guard for the 2007 funeral procession for Ford in Washington, D.C., a service Hauenstein called a "great honor." Hauenstein went into business and owned several companies, including Werner Lehara Inc., which made equipment for the food industry, and which he sold in 1980 to APV Baker Inc. Decades later, Hauenstein turned his focus to the leadership qualities of the presidency as he helped found the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies with a $1 million gift in 2001. Among its aims is training a new generation of leaders through exposure to examples of presidential courage and local, state or national leadership figures. "We are really training young people to be great leaders. It's phenomenal, these young people," Hauenstein said. At about that time, Hauenstein had a conversation with Saint Mary's CEO Phil McCorkle about the need for improved treatment for Parkinson's disease. Hauenstein's father had died of that disease. "Let's do it, " Hauenstein said. In 2009, thanks to a lead $2 million gift from Hauenstein, the $60 million Hauenstein Neuroscience Center opened. It is focused on neuroscience treatment with clinics for Parkinson's disease, stroke, brain tumors, epilepsy and spine and neuro-trauma management. "The things they are doing there are really quite incredible," Hauenstein said. In 2006, world rock star Bono was featured speaker at the annual dinner for the Economic Club of Grand Rapids. Hauenstein was feted at the event and gave a brief speech himself, thanking those who "put their faith in a simple man from Grand Rapids, Michigan." It left an impression. "What a cool cat," Bono said. "Who's the rock star here tonight?"

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Welcome!
All of us at GVSU’s Hauenstein Center look forward to working with you.

Gleaves Whitney
Director whitneyg@gvsu.edu

Brian Flanagan
Associate Director flanagab@gvsu.edu

Adam Bradway
Communication Design bradwaam@gvsu.edu

Kathy Rent
Office Coordinator rentk@gvsu.edu

Liza Van Buren
Event Planner vanburel@gvsu.edu

Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University

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