Monroe County’s inaugural

search to hire a superintendent
by early next year needn’t cost
a small fortune or take longer
than six months, according to
a Florida expert
who will visit
Key West this
week to offer
his suggestions.
Palm Beach
County, whose
school district
is 20 times the
size of Monroe’s in student
population alone, recently
hired a superintendent after
about five months of search-
ing and about $15,000 in costs,
said Wayne Blanton, executive
director of the Florida School
Boards Association.
“We billed them $7,400 in
time and travel,” said Blanton,
whose nonprofit agency led the
search. “Some private compa-
nies charge a lot more. They do
a good job.”
Blanton is set to appear at
Monday’s special School Board
meeting, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at 241 Trumbo Road in Key
West, where the only agenda
item is the board’s first formal
discussion of the superinten-
dent search.
“I will be there,” said
Superintendent Jesus Jara,
appointed by the governor in
August to hold office until Jan.
7, 2013, and who still wants the
job permanently.
Jara earns $135,000 in salary,
but that number could change
by the time the job is adver-
tised.
Monroe County now joins 25
of the 67 school districts that
hire superintendents rather
February 26, 2012 ◆ Vol. 136 ◆ No. 57 ◆ 44 pages Sunday One Dollar
Key West hosts St. Brendan — Page 1B
In for a
penny, in
for extra
bucks
H
ow is it that we’ll drive
past three gas stations
and make an inconve-
nient left turn to save 2 cents
a gallon on
$10 worth
of gas, only
to drop $74
in CVS or
Walgreens
when we
only need
milk and
cold medicine?
We’ll curse a $37 water bill
that provided a month of
indoor plumbing, hot show-
ers and flush toilets, then shell
out $9 for a new pore-refining
facial cleanser. But it’s OK, we
tell ourselves, because we have
$2 in Extra Bucks in our wallet.
It wouldn’t be so bad if that
apricot scrub was our only
impulse buy, but drugstores
are filled with enticing, non-
essential items that become
irresistible when we find
ourselves wandering among
coconut-scented shampoo,
age-defying makeup and an
adorable, straw beach hat we
swear we’ll wear all the time.
I can approach the check-
out line in a grocery store
with a fairly accurate mental
TAN LINES
The Florida Keys’ Only Daily Newspaper, Est. 1876
Raising county fuel
tax isn’t a good idea
Gasoline prices are ris-
ing as frequently as the
sun along the Overseas
Highway. Page 4A
WEATHER
Dorothy Darden, fourth grade
Mary Immaculate Star of the Sea
Sunrise: 6:53 a.m.
Sunset: 6:28 p.m.
Today: Very cloudy; rain and breeze
High 81
Tonight: Patchy clouds with rain
Low 73
Complete forecast on Page 2A
OPINION
INDEX ◆ BUSINESS – 1C CITIZENS’ VOICE – 2A CLASSIFIED ADS – 3C CRIME REPORT – 2A GAME PAGE – S0LARES HILL KEYS HOMES – 1D OPINION – 4A SCHOOLS – 6A SPORTS – 1B
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIEDS ◆ keysnews.com/classifieds FOR CLASSIFIEDS ◆ 305-292-7777, Option 4
Photo courtesy of Coast Guard/THOMAS M. BLUE
The Coast Guard’s first national security
cutter took to the sea on Friday, operat-
ing in concert with the service’s new
maritime patrol aircraft.
Anchored off the Haitian coast the
night of July 31 under a first-quarter
moon, Key West resident Tad Wootton
heard strange footfalls and murmur-
ings on the deck of the sailboat within
which he slept.
Seconds later there were glistening
machetes and shouts in Haitian Creole
and English, as the 42-foot Morgan,
anchor still being weighed, lurched
toward open sea with the hands of a
pirate on her wheel.
The self-described world traveler,
whose dream trip to the Caribbean
morphed into a nightmare, endured
a humiliating capture and a frightful
escape in waters off the Dominican
Republic.
Friends who followed Wootton’s ini-
tial light-hearted ramblings of the trip
on Facebook read his first mention
of the ordeal Feb. 1, posted after he
was safe in a hospital, with shock and
initial disbelief.
“Ten Haitian PIRATES, armed with
guns, machetes, knives and one jack-
ass with a corkscrew, boarded our ves-
sel last night near Fort Liberte, Haiti,”
Key West man related ordeal off Hispanola to friends via online posts
Tale of piracy unfolds on Facebook
BY JOHN DESANTIS
Citizen Staff
See PIRATES, Page 5A
MIKE HENTZ/The Citizen
Carol Loyet sets up photos Saturday of Panamah Peat Hill in the Chart Room at the Pier House. A memorial will be held at the bar.
COMMENTARY
BY MANDY MILES
Citizen Staff
See TAN LINES, Page 3A
Metal worker, jewelry designer, story-
teller, photographer, museum volunteer
and Key West character, the man most
people know as “Panamah Peat” went
missing for six months after his death
last year.
But perseverance by good friends —
one in particular — resulted in recov-
ery of his cremains, held in bureaucratic
limbo. Today those friends, along with
others who knew and cherished Peter
Hill, will gather at two different island
watering holes to share stories and revel
in his memory.
A celebration of life is scheduled for 4
to 5 p.m. at Grand Vin, 1107 Duval St.,and
then from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Chart Room
bar at the Pier House, 1 Duval. One of the
urns containing Panamah’s ashes will be
buried at an undisclosed location as well.
The remainder of the cremains will be
split between good friends and relatives.
“He was quintessential Key West,” said
Ellie McConnell of Grand Vin. “He was a
character’s character, a terrific guy, tal-
ented artist. How could you miss what
Well-known local’s
ashes come home
Farewell to ‘Panamah Peat’
KEY WEST
BY JOHN DESANTIS
Citizen Staff
See ASHES, Page 3A
Jara
The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter
Mohawk and Cmdr. Mark Fedor made
quick use of the agency’s newest airplane
during their last 51-day Caribbean patrol,
nabbing 158 migrants at sea.
That was just the beginning, as Keys
coasties are preparing for a new wave of
techno-goodies.
The Key West-based 270-foot cutter
returned Thursday after leaving on Jan.
4. In that time her crew coordinated the
movements of several cutters and mul-
tiple aircraft, including the newest surveil-
lance and interdiction airplane, the Ocean
Sentry HC-144A, which replaces the aging
HU-25 Guardian or “Falcon” aircraft that
the Mohawk and other cutters rely on
to spot go-fast boats or other smuggling
activity.
It was the first time Fedor coordinated
operations with the new Ocean Sentry,
which he called a “significant force mul-
tiplier” with a range of more than 2,300
miles. The new planes are based out of
Miami, but are put to use by Coast Guard
sectors throughout South Florida.
“There aircraft can stay on scene for
Guard enjoys new wave of technology
BY ADAM LINHARDT
Citizen Staff
See COAST GUARD, Page 8A
Board learns how to
find a schools chief
Expert
to offer
advice
BY GWEN FILOSA
Citizen Staff
See SEARCH, Page 8A
Contributed photo
Tad Wootton holds up a representation of
the Dominican Republic flag.
Gustavo Galo
DUNCAN
AUTO
SALES
(305) 294-5126
3
1
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FORD F-150
2012 MOTOR TREND
STARTING AT $20,985
KEY WEST — Reports of a
person being thrown off a bal-
cony sent police to a Dennis
Street house Wednesday night
in what turned out to be a quar-
rel between a woman, her old
boyfriend and new boyfriend.
An arrest warrant is out for
Vaughn Luther Key Willis, 24,
on charges of burglary, battery
and resisting without violence.
No one was thrown off the bal-
cony — Willis allegedly jumped
off the balcony and rode away
on his bicycle, according to a
police incident report.
The new boyfriend told offi-
cers he had left the door open
to cool off their second-floor
home when the old boyfriend,
Willis, ran up the stairs at 8:10
p.m. and attacked him, reports
say.
The duo allegedly wrestled
and fought while the woman
jumped on Willis’ back to help
defend her new boyfriend.
She said Willis threw her off
his back and punched her sev-
eral times in the face, reports
say.
The two men reportedly
fought their way out to the bal-
cony, where Willis then jumped
and rode off into the night.
There was no indication Willis
had been arrested as of Friday
on the Sheriff’s Office website.
Information in the Crime
Report is obtained from reports
provided by area law enforce-
ment agencies.
If you have information that
could help solve a crime in the
Keys, call Crime Stoppers, (800)
346-TIPS.
IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST
• Choir performs
The Key West High School Choir will
perform at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the
Key West High School auditorium,
2100 Flagler Ave. For more informa-
tion, call 305-293-1549 or email
james.carter@keysschools.com.
• Operation Smile
A benefit for Operation Smile, which
funds surgeries for indigent children
with severe facial deformities, will
take place at 5 p.m. Thursday at the
Smokin’ Tuna Saloon, 4 Charles St.,
between Duval Street and Telegraph
Lane in Key West. The event, spon-
sored by the bar and Key West
Woman’s Club, will feature hourly
raffles, a silent auction, games,
entertainment and more. For more
information, call 305-304-1809.
• Old Island Days Art Festival
The 47th annual Old Island Days
Art Festival continues today from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. on Whitehead Street,
between Greene and Caroline streets
in Key West. Nearly 100 exhibitors
are selling their artwork. Watercolors,
oils, pastels, acrylics, photography
and more, in styles ranging from con-
temporary to “tropical funky,” are dis-
played. Sculpture includes a mixture
of pieces from wood to semi-pre-
cious stone. Form more information,
call 305-294-1241 or visit www.
KeyWestArtCenter.com.
• Henry’s Bridge Party
Henry’s Bridge Party, a benefit for the
Waterfront Playhouse, will take place
at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Key
West Yacht Club, 2315 N. Roosevelt
Blvd., Key West. Attendees may join
other bridge players, or bring their
own foursome to the yacht club. The
cost is $50 per person. Heavy hors
d’oeuvres will be provided along with
many prizes. Chicago scoring will
be observed. For reservations, call
305-294-7158 or 305-294-7158 or
email rmawest@bellsouth.net.
• Pops holds raffle
The Key West Pops Orchestra is hold-
ing its first ever Big Bucks Raffle as
a fundraiser for the 2012-13 concert
season. The grand prize is $10,000.
Second prize is $3,000, third prize is
$1,000 and there will be five fourth
prizes of $200. Tickets cost $100
each and only 300 will be sold. The
drawing will be held on March 25,
2012. Tickets may be purchased
from Pops Board members or by call-
ing 305-296-6059. For more infor-
mation go to www.keywestpops.org.
• Animal Farm open
The Monroe County Sheriff’s Office
Animal Farm will be open from 1
to 3 p.m. today. The farm is under-
neath the Sheriff’s Office building,
off College Road, on Stock Island.
Animals at the farm include horses,
a cow, pigs, goats, bunnies, alliga-
tors, tropical birds, a kinkajou, sloths,
a lemur, Kramer the emu, a family
of Patagonian cavies, tortoises and
turtles, snakes and many more.
Admission is free, though donations
are welcome. For more information,
call 305-293-7300.
• Stotts to speak
In celebration of Black History
Month, the Cornish Memorial African
Methodist Episcopal Zion Church will
present a 3 p.m. discussion today
by speaker Jeff Stotts on the life
and times of Sandy Cornish, one of
Key West’s iconic African-American
figures, upstairs at Cornish Church,
702 Whitehead St., at the corner of
Angela Street. For more information,
call 305-294-2350.
2A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
PAGE 2
Photo and text compiled by Tom and Lynda Hambright, Monroe County Library.
Visit www.keywestmaritime.org for more rich maritime history of Key West and the Keys.
Citizens’ Voice
“Citizens’ Voice’’ is a
forum for you to
tell us what’s
on your mind.
Call the “Voice’’
at (305) 293-7900
or e-mail to voice@keysnews.com.
Some of the comments will be pub-
lished daily.
TODAY IN KEYS HISTORY
Cruise ship information is provided by the city of Key West. For updated
information, call 305-809-3790.
TODAY
Poesia
Pier B
7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
MONDAY
Ryndam
Mallory Pier
Noon to 6 p.m.
Valor
Pier B
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
MONDAY
Oceana
Marina
Outer Mole
7:45 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
TUESDAY
Imagination
Outer Mole
7:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
Navigator
Pier B
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
“I would like to extend a big
thank you to the two homeless
gentlemen who were picking up
trash from the entrance to the
Keys Overnight Temporary Shelter
center on College Road. Just proof
that homelessness does not equal
uselessness.”
“Hear, hear about our great
library and its staff. I’m taking
advantage of its many services
right now. Key West would be much
smaller without this great asset.”
“I sure love the photos of Terri
Brentnall. I’m not related and don’t
know her.”
“All this talk about genetically
modified mosquitoes but not a
word about this partnership with
the [private] company and how
much it’s costing the taxpayers. It
seems we have an agreement but
no federal permits. How much are
we paying them and why?”
“I find it hard to believe that The
Citizen condones the use of ‘bot-
tom of the barrel’ when referring
to cruise ship passengers. I would
not describe even the homeless as
‘bottom of the barrel.’”
“I will be recovering on 12-21-
2012 because I will celebrate my
birthday on 12-20-2012.”
“On Virginia Street recently, a
man in a wheelchair was head-
ing up the street as children were
heading down. Never mind the
brand-new boulevard-size side-
walks the city installed — much to
the residents’ disgust — all were
traveling in the street.”
“‘Genetically Altered Mosqui-
toes’! I saw the movie and it does
not turn out well.”
“Citizens of the Florida Keys: Do
not volunteer to be the first lab
rats in the United States for geneti-
cally altered mosquitoes so a pri-
vate company can secure a profit
from your tax dollars! The long-
term effects on the environment,
ecosystem, wildlife and human
health are unknown.”
“I love the Key West library.
My only complaint is there isn’t
enough parking. I skipped a lecture
a couple of nights ago because I
couldn’t find a parking spot.”
“I didn’t realize Atlantic
Boulevard was the Autobahn of the
Keys. If the police want to make
more money, why don’t they issue
speeding tickets to people roaring
down it all times of day and night?
It can’t all be blamed on tourists;
it’s locals and taxis as well.”
“Hey, just truck the muck from
the new Horace O’Bryant School
(HOB) to the hole in the ground in
Marathon and kill two birds with
one stone.”
“As a resident who was one of
the first classes at HOB when it
was built, I can say that the School
Board just needs to look at their
records to determine what hap-
pened with the ground. I remember
part of that was salt pond. The
problem with the soil now is the
fault of whoever filled in the prop-
erty way back when. Shortcuts
from the past tend to come back
and haunt us. At least now it is
being done correctly.”
“Remember when everyone was
crying that the Park and Ride
couldn’t possibly be located where
the cop shop is now — too envi-
ronmentally sensitive, poor soil? It
had to go on Caroline Street. Now
they’re surprised at the soil snafu
at HOB.”
“School Board Vice Chairman
Andy Griffiths’ quote in Thursday’s
Citizen, ‘We can’t stop building
buildings,’ kept me laughing all day.”
• Key West
Leon Street is now one-way from
Catherine Street to Flagler Avenue.
• Marathon
One southbound lane at Mile
Marker 48.6 will be closed from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Northbound and southbound lanes
at Mile Marker 49.1 to 54.6 will be
closed from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday. Nightly closures will
take place from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m.
• Lower Matecumbe Key
Lane shifts are planned at Mile Mar-
ker 77 weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Tavernier
One southbound lane at Mile
Marker 92.4 will be closed week-
days from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Key Largo
One northbound lane from Mile
Marker 108 to 109 will be closed
weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
through Feb. 29. Lane shifts will also
take place.
• Information
For real-time traffic information, con-
sult 511 or 305-797-0962 or www.
20 YEARS AGO
The superintendent of schools announced that if the proposal
to appoint the school chief passed, he would not apply for the
job.
A motorcycle that was reported stolen four years earlier from
Key Plaza Apartments was recovered by the Key West Police
Department.
The Keys office of Health and Rehabilitative Services switched
to a computer system that allowed it to share information with
the state.

50 YEARS AGO
John Glenn, the first American to orbit the earth, left for
Washington to meet with President John F. Kennedy after spend-
ing the weekend with his family on the Naval Station. The streets
were lined with well-wishers as he left the Naval Station for the
Air Station.

State Sen. Travis Gresham cut the ribbon to open the Monroe
County Fair on the grounds on North Roosevelt Boulevard.
Vice Adm. Edmond B. Taylor, commander of Antisubmarine
Defense Forces, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, arrived for a five-day visit.
100 YEARS AGO
F.N.C. Parks, the taxidermist at the Long Key Fish Camp, had
mounted a number of fish as decoration of the lodge.
The Key West Citizen corrects all errors of fact. If you find an error in fact
in The Citizen call Tom Tuell at (305) 292-7777, ext. 205. He can also be
reached at ttuell@keysnews.com.
KEY WEST 5-DAY FORECAST
TODAY TONIGHT MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
Pensacola
62/51
Tallahassee
55/51
Jacksonville
59/55
Gainesville
63/55
Daytona Beach
67/62
Orlando
69/60
Tampa
72/63
St. Petersburg
69/64
West Palm Beach
77/71
Ft. Lauderdale
78/73
Miami
80/71
Key Largo
79/74
Marathon
82/74
Key West
81/73
SUN AND MOON
Sunrise today................... 6:53 AM
Sunset today.................... 6:28 PM
Moonrise today ................ 9:24 AM
Moonset today ................. 10:45 PM
MARINE WEATHER FORECAST
Isolated showers throughout Sunday. Northeast to east winds near
20 knots, decreasing to 15 to 20 knots by noon. Seas 5 to 7 feet.
At night, east winds near 20 knots. Seas 5 to 7 feet.
WEEKLY TIDES
KEY WEST MARATHON
Lows Highs Lows Highs
2/26 5:49 AM 12:15 AM 9:06 AM 4:52 AM
6:42 PM 12:10 PM 9:44 PM 4 PMM
2/27 6:18 AM 12:57 AM 9:46 AM 5:30 AM
7:33 PM 12:45 PM 10:35 PM 4:40 PM
2/28 6:49 AM 1:45 AM 10:28 AM 6:56 AM
8:35 PM 1:27 PM 11:29 PM 5:24 PM
2/29 7:27 AM 2:46 AM — — — 6:10 PM
9:49 PM 2:18 PM — — — — — —
3/1 8:20 AM 4:11 AM 1:33 AM — — —
11:04 PM 3:23 PM — — — 7:54 PM
3/2 9:38 AM 5:45 AM 4:06 AM — — —
— — — 4:39 PM — — — 7:54 PM
3/3 12:06 AM 6:49 AM 4:06 AM — — —
10:57 AM 5:53 PM — — — 8:54 PM
Mar. 8 Mar. 16 Mar. 22 Feb. 29
NATIONAL WEATHER
Very cloudy,
storms, breeze
81
Patchy clouds,
storms, breeze
73
Possible
thunderstorms
80/72
A couple of
showers possible
80/73
Mostly sunny
and brillliant
81/71
Mostly sunny
and splendid
80/71
CRIME REPORT
ROADWORK
IN PORT
CORRECTIONS
PAUL A. CLARIN/PUBLISHER
TOM TUELL/EDITOR
RANDY ERICKSON/VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS & PRODUCTION
TOMMY TODD/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
DEPARTMENTS
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS
The Citizen assumes no financial responsibility for
typographical errors in advertisements, but, when
notified promptly will reprint that part of the adver-
tisement in which the typographical error appears.
All advertising in this publication is subject to the
approval of the publisher. The Citizen reserves the
right to correctly edit or delete any objectionable
wording or reject the advertisement in its entirety
at any time prior to scheduled publication in the
event it is determined that the advertisement or
any part thereof is contrary to its general standard
of advertising acceptance.
Phone: (305) 292-7777, Monday though Friday,
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Classified Department open
Saturday 9 a.m. to noon.
HOW TO REACH US
To reach us at The Citizen, come to
our offices at 3420 Northside Drive;
fax us at 294-0768; or e-mail to
editor@keysnews.com. You can also
call (305) 292-7777.
To reach our weekly newspapers:
Islamorada Free Press: (305) 853-7277
Solares Hill: (305) 294-3602
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(USPS 294-240) Postmaster: Send address
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This newspaper is made using renewable wood
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This newspaper is recyclable.
AROUND THE KEYS
Editor’s note: To have your event listed in Around the Keys, e-mail
the who, what, where and when to newsroom@keysnews.com.
The Naval Station Key West on Jan. 6, 1949.
CITIZEN STAFF
Ex-boyfriend allegedly
attacks woman’s beau
Visit The Citizen
online at:
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Interesting
Facts
Brought To You
Daily
By Derek Martin-Vegue,
President
Keys Insurance Services
294-4494
Key West
743-0494
Marathon
453-1445
Key Largo
The United States boasts the largest film industry in the world, followed
by India. But surprisingly, the third isn’t England or France or Australia.
It’s Nigeria, where filmmaking has boomed since the early 1990s.
• • •
And here's another interesting fact; Keys Insurance Services is a full
line insurance agency waiting to service you! Call us today at . . .
looked like Santa Claus in Key
West? Kids would stop him and
ask if he was Santa.”
He was born in Madison,
Ind., the son of a boat builder
who grew up to organize the
first regatta on the Ohio River.
A strapping man with a soft
voice and softer disposition, he
was seen by friends as a gentle
giant who knew how to appre-
ciate the beauty of friends and
the world around him.
He came to Key West from
there around 1985, friends
said, before greed took over the
place, and found his niche as
an artist, artisan and all-around
island man.
Back in Indiana he had
learned how to work with jew-
elry from ex-wife Carolyn, and
found his place in a variety of
pursuits.
One of his activities was serv-
ing as a volunteer at the Mel
Fisher Museum, taking tickets.
Abiligail Houff, who now
works at Grand Vin, remem-
bers buying jewelry from him
when she ran a small shop on
Duval Street.
“He was super laid-back and
always had a story; a very inter-
esting, very seasoned gentle-
man,” she said. “His signature
jewelry style was really beauti-
ful — colorful stones and met-
alwork. He found these incred-
ible stones, and he would set
them so unusually. He made
unusual rings, pendants and
really neat stuff.”
Photography was also a
passion, and Panamah would
regularly photograph the Key
West speedboat races through
a contract with a sponsor.
“He dearly loved Key West,”
said ex-wife Carolyn Seidel,
who now lives in Denver.
They were married from 1977
through 1980 but remained
friends.
A big factor in the split, she
said, was Panamah’s alcohol
use, which continued through
his time in Key West. Friends
here confirm that the drink-
ing was an issue for him, and
was related to his health failing,
ending up in his death last year
from liver disease.
He had quit drinking many
years before that, spurred into
sobriety by Seidel.
“He told me ‘I think I am
going to die, my liver is going to
croak,’” she said. “I said ‘Peter,
do you want to live?’ and he
said yes. I said then stop drink-
ing. He did and he thanked me
many, many times.”
After losing his own home
years ago, friends said,
Panamah moved to a men’s
boarding house in Old Town.
Increasing health problems
resulted in a need for hospital-
ization.
He died June 29, and his cre-
mains, friends said, were held
by the Department of Veterans
Affairs pending a claim by rela-
tives or eventual interment at a
veterans cemetery.
One friend, Carol Loyet, a
retired real estate agent, didn’t
want to see Panamah’s mem-
ory forgotten on the island he
loved so much. Even while she
herself was gravely ill, Loyet
tried to keep track of where his
remains were, and how they
would be handled.
Officials told her there would
be a six month wait before they
could be claimed. She got in
touch with Seidel, and between
the two of them, they were able
to get a confirmation a few
weeks ago that the ashes could
indeed be released.
Seidel was allowed to official-
ly be the recipient, and accord-
ing to her and Loyet, that all
happened in the nick of time.
The ashes would have ended
up, they said, in the custody of
a social services agency, and
might have been lost forever.
But now, with the ashes
divided into three urns, one for
the community, one for friends
and one for Seidel, there will be
somewhat of a happy ending to
an otherwise sad loss.
“I think this is terrific,” Seidel
said of Loyet’s perseverance
and the memorials planned
for today. “That somebody
would take the time and the
interest and the concern to see
that he came back to where he
cared about, which was Key
West.”
jdesantis@keysnews.com
3A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
MILE MARKERS
OBITUARY
KEY WEST
CITIZEN OF THE DAY
Paid obituaries are published once
unless the family or funeral home is
willing to pay for reruns. Obituaries up to
six inches are $65; $75 with a photo.
Those more than six inches will be
charged $10 an inch. Free death notices
list only the name of the person who
died and where services will be held.
Obituaries may be edited to conform
with Citizen style and usage. E-mailed
submissions are preferred. Send them to
newsroom@keysnews.com.
OBITUARY POLICY
FLORIDA KEYS
Dem. Party official visits
Florida Democratic Party Chair Sen.
Rod Smith will visit the Florida Keys on
Saturday to support local efforts to re-
elect or elect Democratic candidates.
Smith will speak at an event from 2 to
4 p.m. that day at the home of former
Monroe County Mayor Shirley Freeman
and Harvey Server, at 724 Eaton St.
He will discuss the 2012 campaign
and also efforts to ensure that redis-
tricting complies with the Fair Districts
Amendments 5 and 6, which passed
overwhelmingly in 2010.
Monroe County supported the
amendments by the largest margin in
the state. For more information, visit
floridakeysdemocrats.com or facebook.
com/floridakeysdemocrats.
TALLAHASSEE
New traffic Twitter feeds
The Florida Department of
Transportation now has a FL511
Southeast Twitter account along with
11 other regional and major roadway
Twitter feeds. The 511 system pro-
vides real-time traffic information on
crashes, congestion and construc-
tion on all of Florida’s interstates, toll
roads and major metropolitan road-
ways. Travelers can also call 511, visit
FL511.com, register for My Florida
511 personalized services or down-
load the 511 app on iTunes.
The FL511 Twitter categories are:
Statewide, Northeast, Panhandle,
Central Florida, Tampa Bay,
Southeast, Southwest, I-4, I-10, I-75,
I-95, and Florida’s Turnpike.
TAVERNIER
Evacuation talk and elections
President of the Tavernier Community
Association (TCA) John Hammerstrom
will discuss the new Statewide Regional
Evacuation Study Program at the group’s
meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday.
Hammerstrom is a member of the Monroe
County Hurricane Evacuation Clearance
Time Working Group. The study program
is the calculation of the county’s “official”
evacuation clearance time, which deter-
mines future development.
Annual elections will also be held. The
meeting, which is open to the public and
includes refreshments, will be held at the
Masonic Lodge, Mile Marker 91.8, bayside,
one block behind Froggy’s gym. For more
information, contact Hammerstrom at 305-
852-8722 or johnhammer@bellsouth.net.
BRIAN SCOTT SHIMP
4/19/1972 - 2/16/2012
Brian passed away at Mt.
Sinai Medical Center while
surrounded by family and
friends.
He was a great spirit, kind-
hearted and witty, and we will
miss him dearly.
Brian most recently man-
aged CP’s Sports Bar and was
previously employed at the
Casa Marina Resort.
He was a graduate of
Vermont Academy, where
he excelled in hockey, and
attended Elmira College and
Penn State University.
He is survived by his par-
ents, Terry and Cathy Shimp;
brother, Jon (Amy) Shimp;
grandparents, Nick and
Pauline Shimp, and Betty
(George) Dulac; and his love,
Catherine Kanagy.
A service will be held at 5:30
p.m. Thursday, March 1, 2012,
at stairway #11, Smathers
Beach, followed by a celebra-
tion of his life at CP’s, where
“Shimp Daddy will be in the
House!”
Photo courtesy of the Pier House
Panamah Peat appeared in this Pier House brochure.
Ashes
Continued from Page 1A
TOP WEB STORIES
1
Targeting city’s bad
rep for bike safety
2
Motorcyclists killed
after being rear-ended
3
Couple in fatal crash
loved to travel
4
Kohl files
to reclaim seat
5
Attorneys want
murder trial moved
6
Mosquito test may
occur without permit
7
Widow sues over
boat crash
8
School audit shows
recurring issues
9
New fire station OK’d
WEB POLL RESULTS
Last week’s poll asked:
How do you feel about the use of
genetically modified mosquitoes in
Key West to eliminate the species
that carries dengue fever?
Total votes: 896
• 36% (319 votes)
It’s a great idea. They should
consider doing the same thing with
pythons in the Everglades.
• 33% (294 votes)
We have to stop it! Who knows what
bizarre and unnatural things could
happen when scientists mess with
Mother Nature!
• 17% (149 votes)
It’s a little creepy, and it should be
closely monitored, but I guess I’m
OK with it.
• 15% (134 votes)
What’s creepy is that anyone would
object to using science to wipe out
a potentially deadly disease.
This week’s poll question:
What do you think about the Key
West Police Department effort to
address bicycle safety in the city?
NOW ON
PREVIOUS EDITORIALS
• This time, county in the right in FEMA tiff
• How long does it take to build a city park?
• Development shouldn’t drive evacuation model
• A golden opportunity to make wise choices
ARCHIVES
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Citizen and for articles that have expired from the website. Non-subscribers can
search our database to 2002 to obtain copies starting at $1.25 per article.
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TERRI BRENTNALL/The Citizen
Dave Clark got tired of Baltimore weather a year ago and
came to the Keys to enjoy the salt ponds and watersports. In
his spare time, Clark can be found in or on the water.
Photo courtesy of Don Nelson
Hog’s Breath managers and Key West Southernmost Runners present
a $1,500 check from the 2011 Hog Trot 5K Run to Key West High
School track team coaches.
estimate of my total, but am constantly
taken aback by how quickly the unneces-
sary Gain-scented Febreze, decorative gift
bags and fancy nail files add up.
I’ll admit, we of the fairer persuasion
are more susceptible to the trappings of
the beauty aisles, and have an uncontrol-
lable need to try a new mascara or lip
gloss. (And if our husbands ever ventured
into those aisles and saw the prices of the
assorted tubes, sticks and tiny bottles, the
divorce rate would skyrocket, especially
since most of them end up under the
bathroom sink with the collection of prior
disappointments.)
But men aren’t immune to those little
extras that result in sticker shock at the
register.
First of all, they buy the good paper
towels, a 12-pack of AA batteries and
something from the As Seen on TV aisle
they’ve been dying to try.
I suppose those stores had to some-
how make up for the revenue lost from
the previous ridiculous price of film
and photo development, although
I would’ve thought this was accom-
plished merely through the price
increase of razors.
Good God, you could go bankrupt buy-
ing any more than four Mach 4 cartridges
at a time, and they’re locked up tighter
than Fort Knox.
But again, it’s all OK because we have
that $2 coupon in our wallet — until
we get home without the milk and cold
medicine.
mmiles@keysnews.com
Tan Lines
Continued from Page 1A
Caroline Street
Art & Design District
First Thursday Walk
MAR. 1 · 6–9pm
3
4
9
7
6
1
ART WALK!
The family of
Ms. Laurette W. Tynes
would like to thank the
numerous family members,
friends, and the
Key West community for
your many contributions
and anything you have done
through our time of grief.
We really appreciate your
friendship and support
during this time. We would
like to say thank you.
The Tynes family
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West Martello
Gardens
March 2-4, 2012
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Roberta Mira, P.A.
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Realty Executives Florida Keys
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G
asoline prices are ris-
ing as frequently as the
sun along the Overseas
Highway.
In fact, gas prices have
surged over 20 cents a gallon
in the past couple of months
to a current national aver-
age of $3.61 a gallon. In the
Florida Keys, prices are even
higher, as a gallon of regular
gas flirts with $4 in the Lower
Keys.
This is highest price at the
pump ever for this time of
year, and it could rise into
record-breaking territory
before the summer driving
season begins.
So it comes as a surprise
that members of the Monroe
County Commission are dis-
cussing possibly raising the
gas tax yet again — just two
years after raising it 4 cents a
gallon.
Motorists currently pay 13
cents per gallon in Monroe
County fuel tax, bringing the
total amount of federal, state
and county fuel taxes levied
in Monroe County to 51.9
cents per gallon.
The county’s tax portion
generates roughly $3.25 mil-
lion annually to maintain 28
county bridges and 389 miles
of county roads. The 2010 4-
cent increase accounts for $1
million of this amount.
Commissioner Kim
Wigington, who favors anoth-
er fuel tax increase, maintains
that road and bridge project
funds are still inadequate.
Wigington cites that roads in
her district on Stock Island
flood so badly that even days
after a rain subsides, stand-
ing water impairs travel.
Commissioner George
Neugent disagrees about
the benefits of raising the
fuel tax. Neugent questions
whether doing so will raise
enough money, since increas-
es in gasoline prices motivate
people to drive less and buy
less gasoline.
Neugent makes a good
point. We believe there are
also other reasons that rais-
ing the tax on gasoline isn’t
the best solution.
The gasoline tax is regres-
sive, impacting people of
moderate, lower and fixed
incomes more than those
with higher incomes.
Residents in the former
groups will have to pay a
greater percentage of their
income on gas, jeopardiz-
ing their ability to pay for
other necessities. Residents
commuting to work in older,
less fuel-efficient vehicles
are doubly burdened by this
regressive tax when public
transportation is not a viable
option.
And families and trades-
men requiring larger vehicles
will find their budgets
squeezed.
We are slowly climbing
out of a recession. Evidence
abounds that raising taxes
at this point could cause
an economic downturn by
withdrawing consumer buy-
ing power — and surging gas
prices will have the same
impact.
A gas tax is especially bur-
densome because it has a
domino effect of impacting
transportation costs, thus
increasing prices on other
consumer goods, including
food.
Wigington suggests that
through a gas tax, tourists
share the expense of county
road repair. While there is
certainly merit to this point
of view, we believe an addi-
tional gas tax will negatively
impact residents more than
tourists.
Modern rental fleets serv-
ing tourists are increasingly
more fuel efficient and can
easily travel to and from
Miami-Dade County without
needing to be refueled here.
Savvy tourists can easily dis-
cover on the Internet that gas
is 25 cents a gallon more in
the Keys, and fill up before
driving here.
History indicates as the
price of gasoline increases,
consumption decreases
through conservation and the
increasing numbers of fuel-
efficient vehicles — includ-
ing hybrids and electric cars.
In fact, trends in current
national energy policy sug-
gest further support of fuel
conservation, including man-
dating higher mileage stan-
dards for the auto industry.
Not surprisingly, forward-
thinking local government
entities are looking into
alternative funding sources
for road and bridge mainte-
nance.
It’s time for Monroe County
to begin thinking out-of–box
when it comes to funding
road and bridge repair, as
trends in future energy use
will certainly demand it.
Innovative solutions while
keeping taxes low — that’s
what we all should expect of
our County Commission.
— The Citizen
N
o, you don’t have to
run away. It’s not going
to be a column like it
sounds. It is more about the
miracle of raising successful
children.
Today’s world for children,
at least from my perspective,
has pretty much been turned
on its head. It is hard for me to
even relate to the challenges of
growing up to be a successful,
well-adjusted adult in today’s
land-mine-strewn environ-
ment.
It is not easy to be a parent
these days. From what used to
be the common circumstance
of a working father and stay-
at-home mother, the world has
changed to two working par-
ents struggling to make ends
meet. The pressure of “keep-
ing up with the Joneses” has
turned into a death struggle of
wondering whether the com-
pany you work for will even be
in business next month.
Against this backdrop of
economic challenges to pay the
mortgage and put food on the
table, parents today are con-
fronted with more
outside stimulation
than ever before
that challenges their
authority and, many
times, compromises
the respect that, for
better or worse, is
duly noted in the Ten
Commandments
and is certainly
deserved by a mother and
father who ultimately, in most
cases, would sacrifice anything
for their children. Children
today are told by total strang-
ers, in no uncertain terms, that
their bodies should look like
Barbie or, as long as they can
make a commensurate amount
of money playing a game or
musical instrument, all other
endeavors of learning are of
little use.
Children watch entitled,
self-important celebrities
flaunt the law and social
mores at will and get away
with it until, as in the cases of
folks like Lindsay Lohan, Tiger
Woods, Paris Hilton,
Kim Kardashian and
too many others to
mention, it catches
up with them. Even
then, at least in this
country, everybody
likes a comeback kid
and as long as they
are duly contrite,
they will again be
rewarded with the riches and
fame they originally squan-
dered. Teaching accountability,
integrity and a meaningful
work ethic has never been
more difficult.
In all fairness it is not easy
being a kid today. Maybe it
never was, but it seems it was
a whole lot simpler. Yes, there
were bullies and unmerciful
teasing of the less fortunate
fat kid with pimples who stut-
tered but usually, after a brief
moment of entertainment
for the “pack,” life moved on.
What used to be in-your-face
taunting or even fistfights has
now taken on a more sinister,
anonymous form that makes it
infinitely easier. Today, cyber-
bullying has driven children to
suicide over the silliest things
because the anonymity of it all
makes it less likely that bullies
will be seen for what they are,
and there is certainly no way
to exact any kind of justice.
Apart from the obvious and
most important lessons and
role models that should be at
home, is the effect teachers
have upon the children. If it
is difficult for parents and dif-
ficult for children, it is practi-
cally impossible for teachers in
our world. They are hamstrung
by ever-decreasing budgets
that compel them, if they want
to actually teach, to buy their
own supplies. Then, in the
classroom they are put in the
position of having to spend
more time as a disciplinarian
than a teacher.
Who has time to be a role
model when you are told at
every turn that it is no longer
proper for you to discipline
your students or even reward
them with an innocent sup-
portive hug? Today, if a teacher
raises his hand to a student, he
or she will be fired. If a teacher
hugs a student, he may well be
held up to ridicule as a child
molester. After all the years
of education to do something
that is obviously not for the
money, they are made to teach
under guidelines that do more
to prepare their students for
a state-mandated test than
to really teach them anything
of significant and long-last-
ing value. They are evaluated
frequently under the guise
of quality but, again, it is by
those who have mandated
the results and are only seek-
ing to see if their format and
results are being achieved,
not so much for the benefit of
the student but for the system
that depends on high marks in
order to receive funding.
With all this being said, it
is amazing to me how we still
continue to witness students
who pass through this meat
grinder called childhood, ado-
lescence and education and
come out the other end with a
semblance of integrity, a shred
of enthusiasm for learning or a
spirit that allows them to pur-
sue something for its own sake
rather than for the financial
reward. Somehow we do, at
least for some. In my own case,
having spent the past couple
of days with my grandchildren
and their parents, I have a
renewed hope that children
can be raised with a positive
attitude, good manners and
enthusiasm for their future.
Chris Belland’s Hindsights &
Insights column appears here
on Sundays. All of his previous
columns are available on his
blog: hindsightsandinsights.
blogspot.com. Contact Chris at
cbelland@keysnews.com.
Letters to the editor
Editorial
Health care issue more
complex than TV ad
I must take issue with David Lipton’s
negativism regarding the Affordable Care
Act. His letter is vitriolic and cliché-rid-
den. “Forcing junk law down our throats”
lacks originality, coming straight from
Mike Huckabee’s ever-present televi-
sion commercial. Mr. Lipton should not
depend on TV advertisements for under-
standing the problems concerning health
care in our country. I would like to invite
him to The Free Clinic in Brevard, N.C.,
where I have been the director for two of
the last 10 years that I have worked there
as a volunteer physician.
Interestingly, I often find that people
who are so adamant about denying
medical care to others often have medi-
cal insurance or, ironically, Medicare, a
system that supports retired, relatively
unproductive people, while working, pro-
ductive citizens with families have no real
access to care. Go figure.
My patients, in order to qualify for my
clinic, must be 200 percent of pover-
ty, without insurance or Medicaid. The
vast majority of poor people do not have
Medicaid — misconception!
Two hundred percent of poverty is
about $35,000 for a family of four. My
patients are acute or chronically ill, and
are often overwhelmed physically, emo-
tionally and financially. Mr. Lipton might
be interested to know that the majority of
my patients work.
Medical care is a complex issue involv-
ing access, ethics, religion, culture and
economics. The present system is broken
and is not working. Presently we are sup-
porting all of those people without access.
They must go to the emergency room as a
last resort. They are the individuals who
have heart attacks and get emergency
“free” coronary bypass. The story goes on
and on.
We do pay for this care, but it is incon-
sistent, chaotic and often as not, poor
care. Going to the ER for primary care is a
band-aid on an open wound.
I agree that everyone should have a
primary care provider. Medicare for all
would be ideal, but if that cannot be
accomplished, then we need a system
of mandatory insurance for our people.
After all, it was a Republican idea to keep
big business and the insurance compa-
nies in the mix.
Gerald T. Kilpatrick, MD
Cudjoe Key and
Brevard, N.C.
Health care at the root
of economic troubles
Warren Buffett says to correct our eco-
nomic woes, we need to increase the taxes
on millionaires and billionaires. My ques-
tion to Mr. Buffet is, what is the root cause
of the problem?
The answer is pretty simple. To para-
phrase former President Bill Clinton, “It’s
health care, stupid.” The cost of health
care is breaking the back of our econo-
my. We spend more on health care than
any other nation in the world. Far more.
The biggest item in the federal budget is
health care, and health care is growing far
faster than our GDP.
Medicare spending has gone from
about $35 billion year in 1980 to about
$519 billion in 2010, and is projected
to cost $929 billion in 2020. What most
people don’t understand is that only a
small percentage of people account for
most of our health care spending. One
percent accounts for nearly 20 percent,
5 percent for about 50 percent, and 10
percent for nearly 67 percent of our health
care spending (http://bit.ly/xVdf22).
Who are these big spenders (health
care recipients)? It’s the chronically ill
(http://bit.ly/wBZABo). While there are
outliers, the reason we have so many
high-cost, chronically ill people is obesity
(http://bit.ly/yWyrBO). We are now the
fattest nation in the developed world, and
with obesity comes diabetes (27 percent
of seniors have diabetes), heart disease,
strokes, arthritis, many types of cancer,
and a whole host of other chronic diseas-
es and conditions. Our adult obesity rate
has doubled since 1985 (http://1.usa.gov/
wTj5nI). The real problem, Mr. Buffet, is
that we eat too much of the wrong food,
lead an increasingly sedentary lifestyle,
and some people smoke — poor lifestyle
choices. Correct these problems and you
solve our budget crisis and revitalize our
nation.
What the individual mandate in the
Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare) does is
sweep many younger, healthy uninsured
people into the health care system. These
are the people who spend the least on
health care.
Rightfully or wrongfully, depending
upon your point of view, the result is that
these healthy young people subsidize the
chronically ill.
Mike Holman
Key West
4A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
LETTERSPOLICY: The KeyWest Citizenwelcomes your letters to the editor, and asks that readers followthese guidelines for letter submission. •Only original letters
addressed to The Citizenwill be published; openletters are not accepted. •Letters must include the writer’s name, address and a daytime telephone number. Pseudonyms are
not knowingly accepted. •Maximumlengthfor letters is 350 words. •We do not publishpoetry, letters anonymously written, third-party letters, political endorsement letters
or letters praising or criticizing a local business. •Letters of thanks to individuals will be considered; but not letters recognizing sponsors or supporters of organizations or their
events. •Writers are limited to one letter every two weeks. •Letters canbe submitted via e-mail at editor@keysnews.com, by fax at 305-295-8005, or by mail addressed to:
Letters to the editor, KeyWest Citizen, P.O. Box 1800, KeyWest, FL 33041. •The publisher has final authority onpublicationof submitted material.
OPINION
EDITORIAL BOARD
PAUL A. CLARIN/PUBLISHER
TOM TUELL/EDITOR
RALPH MORROW/SPORTS EDITOR
ED BLOCK
CHARLIE BRADFORD
KEN DOMANSKI
SHIRLEY FREEMAN
TODD GERMAN
HINDSIGHTS
& INSIGHTS
And then he said, ‘Let me tell you about my grandchildren’
BY CHRIS BELLAND
Citizen Columnist
Raising county fuel
tax is not a good idea
5A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
FROM PAGE 1
he posted from a hospital in
the Dominican Republic. “My
crew and I were tied up on the
top deck. I assume they were
planning to steal the boat to
Cape Haitian and/or keep us
hostage, or maybe kill us.”
Safe in Santiago
Now safe in Santiago, D.R.,
and hoping to return soon to
the Turks and Caicos Islands,
where he had found work that
placed him on the ill-fated sail-
boat, Wootton shared his story
with The Citizen though a series
of interviews via text messages,
emails, Facebook messages
and telephone conversations,
answering detailed questions
about what he said took place.
Most of the elements of his
account could not be indepen-
dently verified, but a spokes-
woman at the U.S. Department
of State, whose staff had con-
tacted Wootton’s family, verified
that the agency is aware of the
report he made to authorities
in the Dominican Republic.
Inspector Calvin Chase of the
Royal Turks and Caicos Islands
Police verified that there is an
investigation that continues,
and that his agency’s marine
patrol was assisted by the U.S.
Coast Guard.
Such an incident is rare for
the region, but not unheard
of, according to experts on
Caribbean crime. Acts of piracy
on small vessels, some said, can
occur but are in no way com-
mensurate to the major pirate
activity seen near Somalia or
Malaysia. The suggestion that
a Haitian immigration official
or someone working for him
was involved did not come as
a surprise to Patrice Morris, a
criminal justice professor at
East Carolina University who
specializes in crime on the
island nations.
“While it is not common,
Haiti is a vulnerable place at
this point in time,” he said after
being told details of Wootton’s
ordeal. “You are going to find
tourists and even Haitians
themselves vulnerable to peo-
ple attacking them or wanting
to get things from them.”
Fact or fiction
When Key West acquaintanc-
es first learned of the incident
on Facebook, they had trouble
determining if it was fact or fic-
tion.
“At first I thought he was kid-
ding,” said Phil Schaeffer, who
has socialized casually with
Wootton and was reading his
Facebook posts. “He had just
embarked on this grand adven-
ture and then there was this
shocking thing about pirates
in the Caribbean. I know they
make movies like that. Then I
thought, this sounds real, like
something that could easily
happen in those waters.”
The Caribbean trek was to
be a milestone for Wootton,
who came to Key West about
three years ago after running
a private business and work-
ing as an efficiency expert for
the state of Arizona, and some
overwhelming personal twists
of fate. He had broken up with
his girlfriend, his mom died and
a week later he learned that he
was losing his job. An offer of
a property manager position
arose in Key West, and Wootton
moved here. He held that posi-
tion briefly, and then worked
at Key West High School as a
substitute teacher and at the
Fixed Gears professional bicycle
repair shop on Simonton Street.
He was drawn to the water, and
became a member of the Key
West Sailing Club.
A life in Key West
Life in Key West was memo-
rialized on Facebook, from the
joy of jumping off the Sugarloaf
Bridge — the water was cold
but the sun was warm — to
the delight he took in eating
frogs’ legs in wine at Santiago’s
Bodega. In January, he sold his
Harley-Davidson and prepared
for a trip to the Turks and Caicos.
He arrived there on Jan. 22. In
less than a week, he was work-
ing for a businessman named
Jeffrey Pinder, he said.
Pinder had purchased the
blue-and-white sailboat, and
Wootton agreed to travel on it
with two Dominican crewmen
to Puerto Plata to pick up sup-
plies and a friend of Pinder’s,
and then return. The trip was
to have taken about a week.
Wootton hoped time on the ves-
sel would help give him experi-
ence and sea time toward his
goal of a captain’s license.
His crew members were Hilo,
24, and Chino, 37; Wootton
doesn’t know their last names.
There were weather and
equipment problems, Wootton
said, and on the morning of Jan.
29 they limped into the Haitian
port of Fort Liberte. Once there,
he said, a Haitian immigration
official took their passports
and would not give them back,
issuing temporary replacement
documents.
On the night of Jan. 31,
anchored outside Fort Liberte,
Wootton prepared for a morn-
ing sail with stops in Puerto
Plata and Manzinilla in the
Dominican Republic. But Hilo
did not return to the vessel from
a Fort Liberte trip ashore.
A bump in the night
About 11:30 p.m., Wootton
heard the thump of another boat
against the sailing yacht, and
presumed it was Hilo, perhaps
returning after hitching a ride
with fishermen or some other
boaters. He heard whispering
in Haitian and called out Hilo’s
name, but no answer came.
“Then I heard footsteps on
the top deck, then more foot-
steps. In a matter of moments
it sounded like a dozen people
were on the top deck. I woke up
Chino (and) started to crawl up
the hatch when Chino, who also
sensed danger, pulled me down.
He then started to crawl up the
hatch himself when I saw sev-
eral sets of arms reach down the
hatch and pull him up and out of
the boat and began to beat him.
I could hear a wrestling match
ensuing. I could see some of
the machetes glistening in the
moonlight. They had apparent-
ly already pulled up the anchor
because the boat was started,
and immediately the boat was
roaring at full throttle,” Wootton
said. “I started to feverishly
search for a weapon. I knew we
had a flare gun ... somewhere,
but had no idea where it was
at. I retreated to my cabin and
locked the door and continued
to search for a weapon. I heard
them like a herd of elephants.
They were pounding on the
cabin above. I knew the immi-
gration officer was involved
because his translator was one
of the hijackers. He was scream-
ing my name and demanding I
come out while the rest of them
were pounding on the top of my
cabin with their feet. I could see
through the top deck window
that they had machetes, knives,
a pistol and one jackass actually
had a corkscrew. They slammed
it full throttle and the boat is in
motion.”
A state of panic
A pirate with a flare gun came
down to Wootton’s cabin and
broke the door in, as Wootton
tried fighting him off with a short
pipe he found near his bunk.
But Wootton was overwhelmed
and forced to the deck.
“I was in a state of panic.”
he said. “I remember shak-
ing, trembling and having that
moment, like, if they kill me I
hope it’s with a gun and not get-
ting hacked up into pieces with
a machete.”
As his wrists were tied, Wootton
turned them at an angle, so that
they were wider. As they tight-
ened the bonds Wootton let out
“this dramatic howl.”
The vessel was heading at a
rapid clip away from land, and
as he sat bound, Wootton said,
the pirates terrorized him with
taunts and feigned violence.
“They were coming at me
with a machete, acting like they
are about to cut me up, holding
knives against my back, partly
entertaining themselves and
partly putting the fear of God
into me,” he said. “I thought,
there is a very real chance I am
going to die.”
Taking the plunge
The ordeal had lasted about
45 minutes when Wootton
began working on loosening the
rope and considering jumping
overboard.
“I thought, will I risk dying
from swimming to land or will I
have a better chance if I stay on
this boat and put myself at their
mercy?” he said, relating how
when his guard was distracted,
he grabbed the bar he was tied
to, unbound himself and made
a run for the side.
“As I was mid-air and about
to dive into the water I could
already hear the hoots, howls
of the pirates. When I jumped
off the boat I made a concerted
effort to dive away from the
direction they were moving,” he
said. “Upon hitting the water, I
dove down and swam as deep
as I could, releasing all of the air
out of my lungs so I could sink.
As I sunk deeper and deeper
in the water, it felt like I was
suspended in time. The deeper
I plummeted beneath the sur-
face the safer I felt. … I am
sinking, I am thinking when I
come up they will be shooting
at me.”
Wootton exploded to the
surface and as he gasped for
air saw that the Morgan was
traveling away from him, esti-
mating the speed at about 10
knots. Wootton dove again, and
when he surfaced the boat was
nowhere in sight.
A long midnight swim
With one potential disaster
seemingly averted, there was
another to face.
Wootton admits that he is
not anything near an Olympic
swimmer, but forced himself
toward land that could be seen
in the distance, estimating the
time at around midnight.
“I realized that getting to land
was not such a victory if I came
into Haitian territory,” Wootton
said, concerned because of the
potential involvement of the
Haitian official in his plight.
“Pleading for mercy from any
Haitian authority would prob-
ably be useless.”
Reckoning his position as
best he cold, Wootton headed
toward lights that he hoped
were those of Manzinilla in the
Dominican Republic, reason-
ing, “I had little choice but to
try or drown. My thoughts were
firing at 100 mph and I could
feel the adrenalin keeping me
motivated even though I felt
some fatigue. I will never forget
the feeling of seeing land in the
dark of night in what seemed
an approachable distance. I felt
encouraged and swam harder
till I finally felt the rocky bot-
tom of land not far from Fort
Liberte, a dilapidated French-
built fort recongnizable even
at night. My feet began to get
cut as I tried to balance myself
on the shards of rocks that led
to land.”
There were thoughts of God,
fate and of regret for abandon-
ing the hapless Chino, who was
still tied up.
Hobbling on cut-up feet over
sharp rocks, Wootton realized he
could not climb the fort’s walls.
The coastline of the fortress
island was littered with thorny
branches. He ripped his shirt in
half and tied the scraps of thin
cloth to his bleeding feet.
In searing pain Wootton hob-
bled around the island, then
crawled to the bay that sepa-
rates Haiti from the Dominican
Republic, hands then bloodied
as well.
Bait for sharks
As the saltwater burned
his wounds, Wootton swam
again, toward the soft glow of
lights that he hoped signaled
Manzanilla.
“I am feverishly flapping
through the water, in the middle
of the night with blood pouring
out of me,” he said. “I could not
have planned to have been bet-
ter shark bait than I was at that
moment.”
Struggling, doubting himself
and his future, Wootton found
himself singing, softly, the Bob
Marley tune “Three Little Birds,”
with its theme of how every little
thing is going to be all right.
He sang it over and over
again, later determining that
“in a sense, Bob Marley saved
my life.”
Floating and swimming,
Wootton finally made it ashore,
while still in darkness, crawl-
ing on through light brush. He
heard a dog and saw lights from
a village, then heard a rooster
crow.
“As I crawled up a bank and
on to the edge of a shallow cliff,
I could see a road. It was paved,
good sign that I might be in the
Dominican Republic,” he said.
“I began to walk upright on land
for the first time in hours. My
arms were throbbing and the
open wounds on my feet stung
with each step. I walked in the
shadows and avoided the main
street. I then saw a street sign.
As I approached I could see it
was written in Spanish.
A Dominican village
He was overjoyed to realize
that he had indeed reached the
Domincan Republic.
Upon reaching the village,
he walked through deserted
streets and then found a man
who regarded him strangely.
Communicating as best he
could, Wootton conveyed his
need for the police and the man
took him to a station.
As they interviewed him
through language difficulties,
the Dominican authorities sup-
plied Wootton with a blanket.
“I was safe. The sun was
coming up and the nightmare
was almost over for me,” said
Wootton, who was brought by
authorities to a Manzanilla hos-
pital where he was treated for
his wounds, dehydration and
exposure.
In the days that followed,
Wootton said, he learned that
the pirates had been appre-
hended and that two of them
had escaped in 2009 from a
Haitian prison where they were
being held for murder.
Hilo, the missing crewman,
had been taken by the pirates
before they reached the sailboat,
and was jailed briefly in Haiti.
A reunion in the Dominican
Republic was joyful, especially
since Hilo had been told that
the American had jumped into
the ocean and drowned.
Chino was rescued, and
spent time briefly in a Turks and
Caicos jail, but was released.
As of Friday, Wootton was
awaiting a boat trip back to
the Turks and Caicos. He had
posted to his Facebook friends
that “for the first time in years,
the idea of working in the USA
in a safe and pleasant office
environment in my own cubicle
sounds strangely appealing,”
he wrote. “Realistically, I think
I’ll be sailing again in another
couple weeks. Lol.”
jdesantis@keysnews.com
Pirates
Continued from Page 1A
Contributed photos
Above, Tad Wootton sets off in a dinghy in the Dominican Republic. Left, Wootton as he left the Turks and
Caicos Islands in January, days before the sailboat he was on allegedly was overrun by pirates, resulting
in a seven-hour ordeal trying to reach shore after escaping.
Birthdays, Thank Yous,
Congratulations, Memorials,
or Anniversary Ads
It’s as easy as 123...
For more information, call or e-mail:
Misty Graves
305-292-7777 x213
mgraves@keysnews.com 318585 318665
You’re invited to the next meeting of Tobacco-Free Florida Keys,
a community-based partnership dedicated to protecting and
improving the health of all Monroe County residents.
For more information, call (305) 809-5653.
Date: Sunday, March 4, 2012
Time: 3:30 p.m.
Location: Monroe County Sheriff’s Office
5525 College Road, Key West
Conference call: 1-888-808-6959 (phone)
8641438# (passcode)
349825
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6A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SCHOOLS
STANLEY SWITLIK ELEMENTARY MARATHON HIGH SCHOOL
Yacht scholarship available
Marathon high school seniors
have until March 28 to apply for
Marathon Yacht Club’s scholarship.
The yacht club has adopted new
guidelines for awarding its scholar-
ship.
Under the new guidelines, prior-
ity is given to those students who
have been involved in vocational
programs at the high school, such
as Culinary, Construction, or Marine
Mechanics, and will attend a voca-
tional program in such an area.
The scholarship money may be
used for tuition, books, or room and
board.
Interested students should check
with their school’s guidance office
for instructions on how to apply.
FLORIDA
Students take FCAT on Tuesday
Statewide on Tuesday, students will take
the writing test of the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test.
Students in grades 4, 8, and 10 will take
the writing test in one 45-minute session,
in which they write essays in response to a
prompt. Each student are given a planning
sheet on which to plan the essay, but the
written test must be recorded in the writing
folder.
Students will receive a score of 1-6.
Students may not have any electronic devic-
es with them during testing, including cell-
phones. Students must leave electronics in
their lockers or at home on the day of testing.
Students must sign a pledge not to receive or
give any help during the test.
More information is on the state education
department’s website, http://fcat.fldoe.org.
KEY WEST HIGH SCHOOL
7 nominated as ‘young leaders’
Seven Key West High School students
have been nominated to attend the National
Young Leaders Conference in Washington,
D.C., held throughout the summer.
From June 10-Aug. 6, the conference will
hold a series of nine-day sessions. Tuition
and financial aid are available. The website
is http://www.cylc.org.
The conference will focus on the concept
of leadership in the context of national
and global issues, covering both long-term
trends and day to day events.
These students were nominated by
their Social Studies teachers as scholars
who have demonstrated academic excel-
lence, maturity, and leadership potential:
Angela Martin, Harley Douvier, Elisabeth
Rockteschel, Queenie Tabag, Ramon Arza-
Sosa, Caleb Hiller, and Sahara Graft.
SCHOOL PAGE
SUBMISSIONS
If you would like to submit your
school’s current news and events,
please e-mail copy and/or photos by
noon Wednesday
to gfilosa@keysnews.com or call Gwen
Filosa at 305-292-7777 x224.
SCHOOL TIMES AND
PHONE NUMBERS
LOWER KEYS AND KEY WEST
Big Pine Neighborhood Charter
7:45 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.
• 305-872-1266
Gerald Adams Elementary
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-293-1609
Glynn Archer Elementary School
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-293-1601
Horace O’Bryant Middle School
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
• 305-296-5628
Key West Collegiate School
5901 College Road
• 305-296-5927 (KWCS)
Key West High School
7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
• 305-293-1549
Key West Preschool Co-op
Call for information
• 305-296-4749
Keys Center Academy
7:50 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.
• 305-293-1400
Mary Immaculate Star of the Sea
7:50 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.
• 305-294-1031
Montessori Elementary Charter
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
• 305-294-4910
Poinciana Elementary School
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-293-1630
Reynolds Elementary School
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-293-1609
Sigsbee Charter School
8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-294-1861
Sugarloaf School, Elementary
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-745-3282
Sugarloaf School, Middle
8:15 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• 305-745-3282
MARATHON AREA
Marathon Middle School
7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
• 305-289-2480
Marathon High School
7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
• 305-289-2480
Stanley Switlik Elementary School
8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
• 305-289-2490
UPPER KEYS
Coral Shores High School
7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
• 305-853-3222
Key Largo School
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
• 305-453-1255
Plantation Key School
8 a.m. to 2:45 p.m.
• 305-853-3281
Treasure Village Montessori Charter
8:45 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
• 305-852-3482
WHAT’S
FOR LUNCH?
Monroe County School District’s
lunch menu for Feb. 27-Mar. 2.
MONDAY
Steamed hot dog with bun
Tater tots
TUESDAY
Salisbury steak
Dinner roll
Mashed potatoes and gravy
WEDNESDAY
Cheese and bean burrito
Corn
THURSDAY
Baked chicken nuggets
Au gratin potatoes
Seasoned carrots and roll
FRIDAY
Cheese pizza
Five-way vegetables
Monroe County schools’ lunch
menus are available on the School
District’s website, www.keyss-
chools.com.
All meals include fruit and a
choice of white, chocolate or straw-
berry milk.
Lunches for students in grades
K-5 are $2.25 each; grades 6-12
are $2.50; adult meals are $3.50.
Reduced lunches are 40 cents
each.
STUDENT OF THE WEEK
Contributed photo
Glynn Archer Elementary School chose Shokirjon Shahobidinov
as the School District’s student of the week. Shokirjon is in Mrs.
Momaly’s kindergarten-first grade class. ‘Shokirjon is enthusias-
tic about learning,’ school administrators said. ‘He likes to learn
about everything at school. He wants to be able to read every
book. Shokirjon is always willing to lend a hand to his classroom
community. He has many responsibilities in the classroom due to
his trustworthy and helpful attitude.’ Many of his fellow students
admire how fast Shokirjon has learned English. Shokirjon has
been chosen as Glynn Archer’s Positive Behavior Support excep-
tional student. His favorite lunch is pizza, and his favorite car-
toon show is ‘Tom and Jerry.’ Shokirjon wants to be a bus driver
when he grows up.
2011-2012
SCHOOL CALENDAR
Mar. 19, Monday
Begin spring break
Mar. 26, Monday
Classes reconvene
Mar. 30, Friday
End of 3rd grading period
Apr. 2, Monday
Early release day
May 28, Monday
Holiday - Memorial Day
June 7, Thursday
Last day for students
June 8, Friday
Last day for teachers -
Professional day
Photo courtesy of Centennial Bank
Stanley Switlik Elementary fifth-grader Lucas Hoffman (front row,
right) won the recent school spelling bee sponsored by Centennial
Bank. First and second place winners were Abby Franck (left)
and Richard Heins (center). The three received cash awards from
Centennial, and Hoffman also received an online subscription to
Encyclopedia Britannica.
SCHOOL PHOTOS
Casey Schlottman and Josephine Gruba
Photos courtesy of Neda Preston
Bob Guieb, Kristen Blanchard, Brandon Evans, and
Kaheem Bowen
Grossman Roth, P.A., of
Key West recently donated
$500 toward the Marquis
Butler Memorial Scholarship
benefiting a Key West High
School student. Pictured left
to right are Sandi Averette,
of Grossman Roth, Fleasher
Hall and Michael Hall —
Marquis’ mother and brother
— and Key West City Commis -
sioner Tony Yaniz.
The Sunrise Rotary Club
recently donated dictionaries
to all third-grade students
at Gerald Adams Elementary
School. It’s an annual event
that truly supports lifelong
learning, school officials
said.
Photo courtesy of Monroe County School District
Students from Marathon High School and Coral Shores recently competed in a mock trial district com-
petition at Plantation Key Courthouse, with Judge Reagan Ptomey presiding. It marked the first year that
a school other than Coral Shores competed. Coral Shores’ team won, and will advance to the state finals
March 8-10 in Orlando. Pictured are: Jennifer Pincus, John Humelsine, Melissa Mirto, attorney coach
Carla Matinata, Monica Camacho, Breeana Prince, Azizur Aziz, David Tetour and Joe Wear.
Key West High School students
in art teacher Shannon Perkins’
classes recently learned to
make masks.
MAKING
FACES
Dinely Mogene and Destiny Johnson
MARQUIS
BUTLER SCHOLARSHIP
Photo courtesy of Sandra Averette
ORDER IN THE COURT
Photo courtesy of Alex Smith
LOOK IT UP

ʁ
Montessori Children’s School
1221 Varela St., Key West, FL 33040
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, March 3 from 10am — 12pm
Come see our exci ting Montessori classrooms
wi th your child, family & friends.
Gain appreciation for Montessori materials
and our hands-on learning environment.
Playground will be open.
As an added bonus, families who enroll during OPEN HOUSE
will recei ve 1/2 off the application fee.
Please call 294-5302 for more information.
Educational Excellence since 1972. Lic #T16MO0048
349653
PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
MIAMI BEACH — Between
all the nightmarish kitchens
and warring cupcakes, the
throwdowns and the innumer-
able quickfires,
is there really
any untrodden
terroir left for
reality food TV?
Gail
Simmons
thinks so, but
admits that
making it fly with viewers
won’t be easy.
Food television has done
so much to bring non-foodies
to the table, said Simmons, a
judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef”
and host of the network’s
spinoff show, “Top Chef: Just
Desserts.” The challenge for
both the food and entertain-
ment industries now is to do
something positive with that.
“Now we’ve got them eat-
ing, we’ve got them talking
about food, we’ve got them
wanting to cook and wanting
to go out more and recogniz-
ing chefs and recognizing how
much great work they do, now
we can sort of educate them
on what they’re actually eat-
ing,” Simmons said Saturday
during an interview at the
South Beach Wine and Food
Festival.
Simmons said the next step
in the evolution of reality food
television will be providing
programing that educates
people about the connections
between food and the many
problems facing the country,
from education to poverty to
hunger.
“I would like to think that
is where we could go with it,”
said Simmons, whose recently
released book, “Talking with
My Mouth Full,” chronicles her
rise in the world of food televi-
sion.
“The problem is, and this
is always the truth, television
is entertainment. It’s about
entertainment. It needs to be
fun. It needs to be an escape.
So how do you make smart
TV about food that is also
really fun and interesting
and that you can get people
excited about? That’s kind of
my dream about what I’d like
to do.”
✬ ✬ ✬ ✬ ✬
MASHANTUCKET, Conn.
— State police say five people
including the rapper Jim
Jones were arrested in a brawl
at a hotel at
the Foxwoods
Resort Casino
in Connecticut.
Police say
the fight broke
out after 2 a.m.
Saturday in
the foyer of the
MGM Grand Hotel following a
party hosted by Sean “Diddy”
Combs.
State police spokesman Lt. J.
Paul Vance said one detective
was treated for minor injuries
at a hospital and released.
Jones was charged with
resisting arrest and breach and
peace and was released on
bond. The 35-year-old hip-hop
artist and actor from New York
said on Twitter that he posted
$40,000 in bond.
An attorney who has rep-
resented Jones in the past did
not immediately respond to
a message Saturday seeking
comment.
✬ ✬ ✬ ✬ ✬
SOMERDALE, N.J. — Taylor
Swift has a date for the
Academy of Country Music
awards.
The country
star asked a fan,
Kevin McGuire
of Somerdale,
N.J., to the
awards show.
McGuire is 18
and has leuke-
mia.
His sister had started a
campaign on Facebook to get
Swift to go with him to his
prom.
Swift writes in a Facebook
post of her own that she can’t
make it to the prom, but
that she’d like for McGuire to
accompany her to the awards
ceremony April 1 in Las Vegas.
She is nominated for three
awards.
A spokesman for Swift con-
firms that she wrote the post.
A post on the Facebook page
for McGuire thanks her for the
invitation. His sister did not
immediately return a message
seeking comment.
✬ ✬ ✬ ✬ ✬
LAS VEGAS — Singer Celine
Dion has canceled several
upcoming concerts in Las
Vegas because of a virus.
Caesars
Palace officials
say her doctor
advised her
to rest for a
week to recover
from the virus,
which caused
an inflamma-
tion of her vocal cords. Shows
scheduled for Friday, Sunday,
Tuesday and Wednesday
were canceled at the resort’s
Colosseum.
Her next scheduled concert
there is March 3.
Dion, in a statement, said
she doesn’t “like to let people
down,” and she feels terrible
about not being able to per-
form at the shows. Refunds
will be given to people who
bought tickets.
Caesars spent $95 million
to build the Colosseum for
Dion in 2003, complete with
a humidifier to protect her
voice.
✬ ✬ ✬ ✬ ✬
CNN founder Ted Turner is
opposing construction of the
Keystone XL oil pipeline, which
would be built close to his buf-
falo ranch in South Dakota.
The pipeline would deliver
oil from Canada’s Alberta prov-
ince to the U.S. Gulf Coast,
running through Montana,
Nebraska and South Dakota in
the Great Plains.
CNN recently broadcast a com -
mentary in which Turner says
the pipeline shouldn’t be built.
The manager of Turner’s
141,000-acre buffalo ranch
southwest of Pierre says the
pipeline would cross the Bad
River about 15 miles upstream
from the ranch. The river flows
through Turner’s property.
Manager Tom LeFaive said
the project should guarantee
a percentage of the Canadian
crude oil is used in the U.S.
Swift
Simmons
7A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
NATION
OAK PARK, ILL.
Hemingway boy home for sale
Ernest Hemingway’s boyhood home
in a Chicago suburb is for sale.
Its current owner, the Ernest
Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park,
put the home on the market for
$525,000 this week. That’s after a plan
to turn the building into a cultural cen-
ter fell through because of financial
challenges.
The slate-blue, three-story stucco
home in Oak Park, Ill., was designed
in part by Hemingway’s mother, Grace.
She was the last Hemingway to live in
the house, leaving in 1936.
Some of the writing Hemingway
composed in the house likely was done
in an area on the third-floor that faces
south. That was Hemingway’s room
until he graduated from high school.
PORT ROYAL, SC
Naked man steals firetruck
A naked man stole a firetruck at a
South Carolina apartment complex
and sped away, killing a pedestri-
an who was walking on a sidewalk,
authorities said Saturday.
The fire engine driver, identified as
26-year-old Kalvin Hunt, drove about
two miles Friday before he hit a man,
careened off the road and crashed into
some trees, authorities said. Hunt,
who was pinned inside the firetruck,
was freed by rescue workers, and then
started assaulting two police officers,
deputy police chief Dale McDorman
told The Beaufort Gazette.
Justin Miller, 28, of Port Royal, was
killed when he was hit as he walked
with his brother, Beaufort County
Coroner Ed Allen said Saturday.
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.
Academy dislikes Oscar auction
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts
and Sciences is not pleased with plans
to auction off 15 Oscar statuettes from
such films as “Citizen Kane,” “Wuthering
Heights” and “Little Women.”
But the academy says its hands are tied
in blocking the Tuesday sale by Nate D.
Sanders Auctions because the statuettes
were awarded prior to 1950, when a “win-
ners agreement” was instituted banning
the sale of Oscars.
“Oscars should be won, not purchased,”
the academy said in a statement, adding
that it had no “legal means of stopping
the commoditization of these particular
statuettes.”
The Sanders Co. expects its total Oscar
inventory, to command more than $1 mil-
lion.
GENEVA, OHIO
Jones Dion
BY MATT SEDENSKY
The Associated Press
BOCA RATON — Two broth-
ers’ unique private museum of
classic cars, rare musical instru-
ments and other collectibles
was emptied Saturday with the
final strike of an auctioneer’s
gavel, bringing in $38.3 million
in sales.
Two days of bidding on 550
lots neared their conclusion
with the biggest sale of them all,
$3.3 million for the only known
surviving 1912 Oldsmobile
Limited, more than double its
pre-auction estimate.
The final tally came in just
below the roughly $40 million
the auction houses estimated
they’d yield.
Most of the automobiles sold
at or above their estimates,
though bids for many of the
rare musical instruments came
in below expected ranges. The
centerpiece of the collection, a
stunning custom-built merry-
go-round, sold for nearly $1.3
million.
“Think of all the friends you
could have over,” said the auc-
tioneer, Max Girardo, as the
carousel went up for sale.
Bob Milhous, 75, and his
brother Paul Milhous, 73, spent
decades building their collec-
tion. The Milhous Collection,
as it has become known, is
housed in a 39,000-square-foot
building. It was never opened
to the public, though it played
host to charity fundraisers and
some small private tours.
The brothers made their for-
tune in the printing business
and a variety of other ventures.
They decided to sell off their
collectibles, though, as they
planned their estates. They
hired two auction houses, RM
Auctions and Sotheby’s, to sell
their prized possessions.
The offerings were eclectic,
to say the least. A vintage bar-
ber chair sold for $28,875, and
a toy Mercedes-Benz car went
for $34,500, both far above
their estimates. Also fetching
higher-than-expected bids
was a grandfather clock that
netted $103,500, a neon sign
from a Chevrolet dealership
that went for $82,800 and a
1941 PT-22 airplane that sold
for $241,500.
All manner of other items
were sold, too: giant toy sol-
diers that once stood at FAO
Schwarz in New York, funhouse
mirrors, Tiffany lamps, vintage
gas pumps, fine furniture and
antique guns.
The real highlights of the
collection, though, were the
antique cars, which sat perfect-
ly shined in the showroom, and
the rare music boxes, player
pianos, organs and orchestri-
ons, which are made to simu-
late the sound of an orchestra
all in one piece.
Many of the instruments are
elaborately decorated with oil
paintings, stained glass, gold
leaf and moving figurines and
are considered among the fin-
est in the world. But bids often
came in low. Of the eight auto-
mated musical instruments
with estimates of $1 million or
more, only three netted bids of
seven figures.
Girardo brought a lightheart-
ed mood as hundreds of bid-
ders from 18 countries crowded
a tent beside the museum and
entered bids over the phone
and online. “Are you ordering
sir, or are you buying a music
box?” he asked once. “Careful, a
round of drinks might cost you
$12,000.”
The final lot to sell was a 1948
tractor that went for $11,500.
ALAN DIAZ/The Associated Press
Lights from a custom-built carousel illuminate an area Jan. 26 at the
Milhous Collection in Boca Raton.
Fla. museum auctions off antique cars, carousel
Visit The Citizen online at
www.keysnews.com
WARREN DILLAWAY/The Associated Press
Emergency workers provide a human barrier Saturday to keep Polar
Bear plungers safe during the Polar Bear Plunge at Geneva State Park
in Geneva, Ohio. The fundraising event was expected to make more than
$90,000 for Ohio Special Olympics.
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350029
NOTICE OF A WORKSHOP
THE UTILITY BOARD OF THE CITY OF KEY WEST, FLORIDA,
WILL HOLD A COST OF SERVICE STUDY WORKSHOP ON
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2012 FROM 10:00 A.M. -12:00 P.M.
IN THE LOUIS CARBONELL BOARD ROOM, LOCATED
IN THE WILLIAM ARNOLD SERVICE BUILDING, AT
1001 JAMES STREET.
THE PUBLIC IS WELCOME AND ENCOURAGED TO
ATTEND.
February 26, 2012 Key West Citizen 349601
DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF MONROE COUNTY
NOTICE OF HEALTH INSURANCE
COMMITTEE MEETING
You are hereby notified that the Health Insurance Committee of the
School Board of Monroe County, Florida will be meeting on
February 27, 2012 beginning at 2:00 p.m. at 241 Trumbo Road, A.J.
Henriquez Administration Bldg., Key West, Florida.
Dr. Jesus F. Jara
Superintendent of Schools
February 19, 2012
349873 Key West Citizen February 26, 2012
8A
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
FROM PAGE 1
a long time and have great
communications,” Fedor
said. “Their radar are greatly
improved and their ability to
stay on scene for seven hours
or more is vital to us.”
The ability of the new air-
planes came into full view for
Fedor as he and the Mohawk
were directing other Coast
Guard vessels and crews while
in the Windward Passage
between Cuba and Haiti on
patrol.
Fedor credited the Ocean
Sentry plane as key in inter-
dicting 158 Haitian migrants
at sea, all of whom were
returned safely to Haiti, Fedor
said.
“The older Falcons were
fast, but they couldn’t stay
overhead very long and they
didn’t have very good com-
munications or radar packag-
es,” Fedor said. “They would
go out and find something,
report it and they had to go
home. So put those initial
eyeballs on a target, but after
that they were gone. The new
planes are a huge improve-
ment. It takes them longer to
get on scene, but they’re fast
enough at 250 knots.”
The Mohawk also performed
counter narcotics smuggling
patrols in the Mona Passage
between Puerto Rico and the
Dominican Republic in her
last patrol.
Coast Guard Keys com-
mander Capt. Pat DeQuattro
said he wasn’t surprised by
the Mohawk’s success on her
recent patrol.
“Once again the crew
showed that they’re ready to
respond to anything in that
essence of being multi-mis-
sion ready, whether it is drug
submarines on their pre-
vious mission or here with
large migrant operations,”
DeQuattro said.
DeQuattro said he was
pleased that the Mohawk crew
put the Ocean Sentry to good
use on its last patrol.
“We have a new layered
system and new technologies
and this aircraft brings that to
the game and it really is leaps
and bounds into the future,”
DeQuattro said.
In that vein, Key West boat-
ers should begin seeing the
new 154-foot Fast Response
cutters arriving in Key West in
the coming months. These are
new vessels that are to replace
the older 110-foot ships. By
this time next year, Sector Key
West and its piers will be full
of the Coast Guard’s newest
weapons in smuggling, or
“counter-illicit trafficking” in
defense-speak.
The Mohawk crew will now
begin damage inspections and
maintenance work while the
vessel is docked, Fedor said.
In August 2013, she is sched-
uled to be overhauled from
bow to stern and upgraded
with newer electronic sys-
tems as part of the Coast
Guard’s Mission Effectiveness
Program.
The Key West-based 270-
foot Thetis is currently under-
going the same program.
Mohawk and the Thetis will
remain based in Key West
with the arrival of the Fast
Response cutters.
The new aircraft and the
new cutters, along with the
Mohawk’s recent successes,
have created an air of excite-
ment at Sector Key West.
“All these things — the tech-
nology and the communica-
tions advancements — are
really promoting our efficien-
cy and effectiveness on the
water,” DeQuattro said.
alinhardt@keysnews.com
Coast Guard
Continued from Page 1A
Photo courtesy of Coast Guard/PAC Tom Sperduto
Cmdr. Mark Fedor credited the Ocean Sentry plane as key in inter-
dicting 158 Haitian migrants at sea, all of whom were returned safely
to Haiti.
MIKE HENTZ/The Citizen
Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Mike Peters poses with a hero
of another type, Hemingway, on Friday in front of the Key West
Museum of Art and History, at the Custom House. Peters, who pens
the Mother Goose & Grimm cartoon strip and political cartoons,
is in Key West to promote a display of his artwork that will run
through May, as well as sign copies of his new book.
SUPER CARTOONIST
than elect them.
“This is historic,” said Andy
Griffiths, the board’s vice
chairman and senior mem-
ber who arranged Monday’s
meeting, having known and
worked with Blanton for 20
years. “We have never hired
a superintendent. This is the
first time.”
Griffiths said that at least
four times in recent history
the election option has gone
to the voters but “it always
failed miserably.”
It took a scandal to change
Monroe County’s approach to
installing a schools chief.
By a 2-1 margin in 2010,
voters entrusted the School
Board to hire a superinten-
dent, in the wake of the crimi-
nal scandal that led to the
removal of Randy Acevedo
from office and the 2010
imprisonment of his wife for
embezzling $413,000 from the
district.
Electing a superintendent
may have its benefits.
“The job becomes more
based upon qualifications
than it is public popular-
ity,” said board Chairman
John Dick. “Public popularity
doesn’t always translate into
a good superintendent. You
can eliminate a lot of political
patronage that goes on.”
Blanton, who performed his
first superintendent search
in 1978, has recently handled
searches in Pinellas, Indian
River, Osceola, and Palm Beach
County, where Jara was among
the 25 applicants for the helm
of that huge school district.
“He’s a good superinten-
dent,” said Blanton, who
didn’t include Jara on his rec-
ommended short list for the
Palm Beach County School
Board.
At issue was that Palm Beach
County required that a super-
intendent have experience
leading a district compris-
ing at least 45,000 students.
Monroe’s daily enrollment
hovers around 8,000.
“The Monroe County School
Board will set their own crite-
ria,” Blanton noted.
Monroe’s desirable location
in the Florida Keys likely will
attract an array of candidates
since it’s a smaller district.
“Of the 15,500 school sys-
tems in the U.S., 80 percent
have less than 5,000 students,”
said Blanton.
Indian River’s School
District drew 45 applications
in its search last year, he said.
The typical modern-
day superintendent search
involves advertising on the
Internet and in publications
such as Education Week mag-
azine.
Districts often print up
brochures to send to various
associations, and have to foot
the bill for hotels and flights if
they decide to bring in appli-
cants for final interviews, said
Blanton.
Griffiths, who served on
the Florida School Board
Association’s board of direc-
tors from 1999 to 2004, invit-
ed Blanton — whose travel,
room and board the district
will pay — as a friend and a
colleague.
Griffiths has promoted
Monday’s meeting as the
start of a historic chapter
in Monroe County schools,
inviting a Keyswide crowd of
leaders from the private and
public sectors.
“I have personally invited
anyone who represents a Keys
constituency, also there is a
blanket public invitation,”
said Griffiths. “I’m hopeful
that the School Board will
see in its collective wisdom
that making the community a
partner in this decision is the
right thing to do.”
It would be ideal to hire
a superintendent before the
start of the 2012-13 school
year, said Griffiths, to allow
the new chief final say on per-
sonnel.
But the School Board will
have the final say on every
last detail, including wheth-
er to handle the search in-
house or hire a consulting
firm, such as the Florida
School Boards Association —
which the local board doesn’t
belong to, due to the annual
fee of $15,000.
“I don’t believe at this point
we will be able to put up a very
high salary in order to draw
too many people,” said Dick.
“I would hope we’ll find some-
body decent in Florida. This
will be a board decision.”
gfilosa@keysnews.com
Search
Continued from Page 1A
BY BILL KACZOR
The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE — William
Dillon was momentarily
overcome with emotion in
the Florida House gallery on
Friday as the chamber passed
a bill that would compensate
him $1.35 million for spend-
ing 27 years in prison for a
murder he did not commit.
The vote came about 10
months after the House failed
to act on a similar measure as
time ran out on the 2011 leg-
islative session. The Senate,
as it did last year, passed the
legislation first and sent it to
the House. This year’s bill (SB
2) now goes back to the Senate
for approval of changes made
by the House, which did not
alter the dollar amount or the
measure’s effect.
“It’s definitely a closure to
a great degree,” Dillon said,
fighting back tears. “They’re
admitting that something
wrong did happen.”
Dillon, now 52, was cleared
by DNA testing in the beating
death of James Dvorak on a
Brevard County beach in 1981.
Dillon was freed in November
2008. A jailhouse informant
also has since recanted his
testimony against Dillon and
authorities reopened the mur-
der investigation.
The Legislature must pass a
claims bill for Dillon to receive
compensation because he
does not qualify for automatic
payment due to a prior drug
conviction when he was 19
years old.
The House applauded
when Dillon was introduced
and after debate by Rep.
Will Weatherford, a Wesley
Chapel Republican who is
in line to become speaker in
November.
“The thought of me living
my entire life, my lifespan, in
a prison for a crime I did not
commit is beyond my com-
prehension,” the 32-year-old
Weatherford said.
“There’s no price tag you
can put on that,” he added.
“There is no dollar amount
that can give this man his 27
years. It will not happen.”
Weatherford said the bill
would give Dillon, his fam-
ily and others harmed by his
wrongful conviction “some-
thing precious, right and
humane.”
The roll call was 107-5.
Opponents said the claims
bill process is flawed because
it rewards those who have the
best lobbyists.
“We are not here to be
judge and jury,” said Rep. John
Wood, R-Winter Haven. “I, for
one, resent having to deter-
mine these kinds of matters
when we should be focusing
on what’s important for the
people of Florida.”
Fla. House passes wrongful
conviction compensation
WE NEED YOUR HELP!
PLEASE DONATE YOUR:
Furniture. Appliances. Household Items.
Electronics. Clothing. Shoes. Books.
Call 305-872-5744
Thank you for your support.
With your help we can continue
Doing The Most Good!
3
4
9
6
5
9
Advertise your business in
Around the Home & Garden
• This seasonal tabloid
will publish 34,000
copies on Wednesday,
March 21.
• It will be inserted in the
Key West Citizen and
the Florida Keys Free
Press.
• The section will also
publish electronically
on www.keysnews.com.
• Deadline is Friday,
March 2 at 5:00 pm.
Contact your advertising representative
305-292-7777
Sales@keysnews.com
349679 349801
Why does this matter to your Key West tourism business? Last year,
nearly 90,000 stopped at our Visitor Center. Half of them were
going to Key West and when it comes to accommodations,
42% had no reservations.
Learn more about this great new marketing tool during a free,
15-minute webinar and see how you can also use this digital kiosk to
reach your tourism prospects even before they leave their homes.
ExploreBoard’s 42-inch, high-def touch screen allows visitors to:
U Learn more about your business through videos, text and images
U Use mobile tags and send-to-email options that put your information
right on their mobile devices
U Get maps and directions to your business
U See your specials
Explore your marketing options
With the new interactive
ExploreBoard, set to
launch March 1 at the
Key Largo Chamber of
Commerce’s Visitor
Center at MM 106.
Webinars:
10 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28
2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28
Space is limited to 15 people per session,
so reserve now by calling 305-451-1414.
Explore what
ExploreBoard
can do for
your business!
C
323874
KEYSNEWS.COM — AND SPORTS TOO
SPORTS
1B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SPORTS SHORTS
KEYS CALENDAR
TODAY ON TV
PREP BASEBALL: ST. BRENDAN 9, KEY WEST 5
AUTO RACING
FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach,
Noon
BOWLING
ESPN — PBA, U.S. Open, at North Brunswick,
N.J., 3 p.m.
GOLF
TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, semifinal
matches, at Marana, Ariz., 9 a.m.
NBC — PGA Tour-WGC, Accenture
Match Play Championship, champion-
ship match, at Marana, Ariz., 2 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Women’s Champions, final
round, at Singapore (same-day tape),
2 p.m.
TGC — PGA Tour, Mayakoba Classic,
final round, at Playa del Carmen, Mexico
(same-day tape), 7 p.m.
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
ESPN — Indiana at Minnesota, 1
p.m.
CBS — Pittsburgh at Louisville, 2
p.m.
CBS — Wisconsin at Ohio St., 4 p.m.
FSN — California at Colorado, 5:30 p.m.
FSN — Oregon at Oregon St., 7:30 p.m.
MOTORSPORTS
SPEED — FIM World Superbike, at Phillip Island,
Australia (same-day tape), 2:30 p.m.
NBA
TNT — All-Star Game, at Orlando,
7:30 p.m.
NHL
NBCSN — Chicago at
Anaheim, 7 p.m.
FSN — Montreal at Florida,
7:330 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
FSN — UCF at Houston, 1 p.m.
ESPN2 — Duke at North Carolina, 3 p.m.
FSN — Washington St. at Washington, 3 p.m.
ESPN2 — LSU at Georgia, 5 p.m.
FLORIDA LOTTERY
See: http://www.flalottery.com
The Hersey brothers of Key
West are continuing their baseball
interests post-college, their father,
Frank, tells me.
Daniel is director
of baseball operations
and field manager
of the Huskies of the
Northwoods League, an
independent team in
Duluth, Minn. He played
collegiate baseball at
Rollins College and
the University of West
Georgia.
Younger brother Gary works at
a sports store in charge of team
sales, while also helping with the
varsity and junior varsity baseball
teams at Newberry High School in
Newberry, S.C., where he pitched
and played the infield for Newberry
College’s baseball team.
• • •
Coral Shores grads
Nick Biondoletti is a
freshman infielder and
Fabian Placencia, a
sophomore shortstop,
on the baseball team
at the University of
Northwestern Ohio. The
team’s roster lists 64
players, mostly freshmen
and sophomores, but
Placencia has started the last three
games, hitting .300. The team is 2-3
as it has scheduled more than 20
straight games on the road, includ-
ing a Florida swing.
• • •
Austin Bynum, another
Hurricane, is a sophomore
lefthanded pitcher at Eckerd
College, but had not been called
upon as the team went 6-4.
• • •
Key West grad Cole Harrison, in
his second season in the outfield at
the University of North Carolina-
Greensboro, was 3-for-8 with a
double and triple and two RBI, as
the team won its first four games.
• • •
At Tallahassee College, Conch
Michael Arencibia’s batting aver-
age was .259 with 11 RBI in 15
games, while Nolan Thomas was
hitting .286 with a home run in 13
games. Thomas also had a 4-0 win-
loss mark with an earned run aver-
age of 1.44 as he led the team with
25 innings pitched over four games
with none fewer than six innings.
• • •
Frankie Ratcliff is continuing
to hit the ball — and steal bases
— at Pensacola State. He went
2-for-3 with three stolen bases
as the Pirates got past Jefferson
Davis Community College, 1-0, on
Monday and improved their record
to 10-5.
Sports Editor Ralph Morrow’s
Armchair Comment appears
exclusively each Sunday in The
Citizen. He can be reached at 305-
292-7777, Ext. 264, at Rmorrow@
keysnews.com and by Fax at 305-
295-8016.
Hersey brothers continuing sports involvement
BY RALPH MORROW
Citizen Sports Editor
ARMCHAIR COMMENT
PREP SOFTBALL: MANATEE 4, KEY WEST 2 (9 INNINGS) PREP BASEBALL:
WARRIORS 15, DOLPHINS 0
KEY WEST — There’ll be a new
way of living for Key West High
baseball come Monday. That coach
Miguel Menendez promises after a
weekend dose of losses. On Saturday
night, it was a District 16-4A defeat
by St. Brendan, 9-5, at Rex Weech
Field. That followed a 11-4 loss to
Westminster Christian on Friday.
Immediately following Saturday’s
game, Menendez gathered his play-
ers and assistant coaches. His voice
was firm, but not angry, as he told the
players that everyone — including
Menendez — needs to work harder.
“We’re better than this,” he said
after he had talked to the players.
“We’ve got to get better. We’re going
to fix it. In every area.”
It better not take long. After eight
games (including the preseason)
at home, Key West (3-3, 1-1) hits
the road to Miami for a 3:30 p.m.
district game at Gulliver Prep on
Wednesday.
It was a strange game Saturday
night, not really indicative of the
final score.
Key West jumped ahead, 2-1, in
the third and hadn’t gotten a hit at
that point.
The Sabres, now unbeaten in
six games and 2-0 in the district,
bounced back ahead in the fourth,
3-2, and made it 4-2 in the fifth.
Then came the next inning. “The
game got away from us in the sixth,”
the coach said. “We walked two bat-
ters to load the bases and had their
No. 9 hitter at bat. We had struck
him out all night. Instead, we walk
him with two outs and the bases
loaded. We caved in after that.”
In that sixth inning, St. Brendan
scored five runs on three hits, three
walks and an error.
The dismantling started while
starter Chris Garcia (1-2) was still
on the mound. After a single and a
sacrifice bunt, Darren Miller took
over the pitching. He immediately
loaded the bases on a pair of inten-
tional walks and got a strikeout for
the second out before that “No.
9 hitter” appeared in the form of
Brian Galvan. He walked, the next
batter singled, the following hitter
reached on an error and another
single drove in the ninth run. Miller
struck out the next batter to end the
carnage.
At that point, the Conchs had
only one hit — a sharp single to left
in the fourth by Hugo Valdes.
Unable to use a pinch runner,
since the Conchs were short three
players who participated in the
junior varsity game earlier in the
day, it was Valdes taking off for sec-
ond on a hit-and-run that was more
trot than run. He was an easy mark
for Sabre catcher Dayan Cubas to
throw to shortstop Miguel Ceballes
for the out.
Finally through almost little fault
of their own, the Conchs scored
three runs in the sixth and, in fact,
had the tying run at the plate.
After five innings, Sabre lefthand-
ed starter Conley Diaz sat down and
Brian Quinn, a righthander, came
on to start the frame. Matt Chelekis
opened the inning with a single that
second baseman Jose Cabrerra was
only able to knock down. Valdes fol-
lowed with his second hit, a single
to right. After a strikeout, Quinn
walked Varella and Austin Cerkleski.
Following a second strikeout, he
walked Mikey Abreu and Tommy
Ruffennach, good for three Conch
runs. That left the bases loaded,
Miller batting and a new pitcher,
MIKE HENTZ/The Citizen
Key West junior varsity base runner Ivan Darce comes home to score for the
Conchs on Saturday in Key West. The JV defeated Coral Shores twice.
Marathon suffers
1st loss of season
BY J.W. COOKE
Citizen Staff Writer
The five-game win streak to open the season
for the Marathon high baseball team came to a
crashing halt on Saturday afternoon at home as
the Dolphins were dismantled by district rival
Westminster Christian, 15-0.
Marathon had only one base runner in the
game, which came on a Carlos O’Farrill single,
but it was fielding errors for the first time this
season that hindered the Dolphins.
“I think the boys just tried too hard,” said
Marathon coach Luis Leal. “They were excited,
coming in on a roll, and I think from them try-
ing so hard to not mess up they forgot to just
play. Instead of being just a normal game they
made it bigger and made just stupid mistakes.”
The Warriors, which beat Key West 11-4 on
Friday night, completed its trip to the Keys with
a 2-0 record. They jumped up 8-0 by the second
inning and, despite Marathon gaining compo-
sure in the middle innings, were able to close out
the game with seven runs in the fifth inning.
See MARATHON, page 3B
Povetkin retains WBA belt
over Huck by just points
STUTTGART, Germany — Alexander Povetkin
did just enough Saturday to earn a points
decision over Marco Huck and retain his WBA
heavyweight title.
Huck, the WBO cruiserweight champion, had
the undefeated 32-year-old Povetkin stagger-
ing back against the ropes in the fourth and
seventh rounds, but the German was unable to
deliver the knockout blow.
Belgian judge Philippe Verbeke called it a
draw, 114-114, but England’s John Coyle and
South Africa’s Stanley Christodoulou awarded
it 116-113 and 116-112 respectively to the
defending champion.
The decision was greeted by a chorus of
boos, with Huck claiming victory over his 20-
pound heavier opponent.
Povetkin improved to 23-0, while the 27-
year-old Huck dropped to 34-2.
OPEN & READY
YOUTH BASEBALL, JEWFISH SOFTBALL, 6B
BY RON COOKE
Citizen Staff
KEY WEST — It took two
extra innings Saturday night
before the outcome could be
decided in game two of the
Key West and Manatee softball
weekend at The Back Yard.
Tied 2-2 at the end of regu-
lation, the Hurricanes erupted
for two runs in the top of the
9th for a 4-2 win over the feisty
Lady Conchs.
It was arguably one of the
best high school softball games
played at The Back Yard the
past 10 years. Unfortunately for
the Conchs, it was the second
weekend sweep dropping them
to 0-4 on the young season.
The ever-positive Coach
Steve Wells is not looking at the
losses as defeats.
“It’s hard to say, but this is a
win for us. There might not be a
lot of wins on the books, but by
us competing with these teams
— these are better teams than
we’re used to playing — by us
being in these games is a win
for us,” said Wells. “Our girls are
leaving it on the field making
diving catches — you saw the
plays made here. Their coach
just told me we’re the scrappi-
est team they’ve ever played.
We’re doing just what I want to
do. It’s not a win-loss thing to
me. My girls are getting better,
our program is getting better
and that’s what I’m here for.”
The Lady Conchs came out
poised on offense scoring a
pair of runs in the bottom of
the first. Lauren Schoneck got
on board thanks to a walk and
stole second and third. With
RON COOKE/The Citizen
Manatee pinch runner Chelsea Sturm is tagged by Key West shortstop
Devin Osterhoudt trying to steal second in the 9th inning.
SARA D. DAVIS /The Associated Press
The Panthers’ Ed Jovanovski (55) knocks
the puck away from the Hurricanes’ Tim
Brent (37) during the second period
Saturday in Raleigh, N.C. Stephen Weiss
scored the winning goal in the third
round of the shootout, lifting the Florida
Panthers to a 3-2 comeback win.
Conchs
swept in
extras
See LADY CONCHS, page 3B
Better days ahead,
Menendez promises
BY RALPH MORROW
Citizen Sports Editor
See CONCHS, page 6B
2B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SPORTS: Scoreboard
ON THE WATER
Marine News:
Weekly Tides:
See the map, Page 2A
Fishing tournaments coming up in the Keys
All Aboard:
If you have an outstanding catch or fishing news to
report:
• Fax: 305-295-8016
• Write: Daily Fishing Report, P.O. Box 1800, Key West,
FL 33041
• Drop it off at The Key West Citizen building
• Email: rmorrow@keysnews.com
No matter what the season,
there’s always something to fish
for in the waters surrounding the
Florida Keys and Key West.
The calendar here lists select
tournament highlights, a compre-
hensive schedule of Keys angling
challenges can be found at www.
fla-keys.com/fishing.
March 1-3: Jimmy Johnson’s
National Billfish Championship:
Quest for the Ring, Key Largo
Hosted by Jimmy Johnson, two-
time Super Bowl winning coach
and former head coach at the
University of Miami, the Florida
Keys Celebrity Fishing Tournament
is to benefit the University’s
Sports Hall of Fame, as well as
other charitable foundations. Entry
fee for the all-release team tour-
nament is $5,000, and includes
gift bags and tickets for all social
functions for up to six team mem-
bers. More information: http://
www.jimmyjohnsonbillfishchampi-
onship.com
March 2-4: Captain
Leon Shell Memorial Sailfish
Tournament. Marathon. Two full
days of sailfishing culminate in a
$25,000 cash purse. The winning
boat team is to receive a grand
prize of $20,000 cash (per 20
registered boats), with cash prizes
also awarded first and second
runners-up. Trophies are awarded
to the top individuals and teams.
Proceeds benefit Hospice of the
Florida Keys. Contact Matt Anthony
at 305-684-9799.
March 12-15: March Merkin
Permit Tournament. Sugarloaf Key.
A charity flats-and-fly-only tourna-
ment with a twist — in addition to
catch and release, anglers earn
extra points for tagging their caught
fish. The event is held at the Key
West Harbour Yacht Club on Stock
Island. Contact Jon Ain at 303-
888-4546, email jonathanain@
aol.com or visit www.marchmerkin.
com.
March 16-18: Key West
Fishing Tournament Kickoff. Key
West. Fifteen target species and
$5,000 in cash prizes highlight this
open-to-the-public event, heralding
the beginning of more than eight
months of exciting Keys fishing.
Cash awards await individual par-
ticipants who catch the heaviest
dolphin, kingfish, cobia, blackfin
tuna, mackerel, mutton snapper,
wahoo, mangrove snapper and
grunt, and for boat teams that
score the most releases of tarpon,
permit, bonefish, barracuda, marlin
and sailfish. Junior anglers under
age 15 also can fish. Entries in
the kickoff also are eligible for
the Key West Fishing Tournament,
which runs through Nov. 30, 2012.
Contact Doris Harris at 305-295-
6601, email kwft@comcast.net or
visit www.keywestfishingtourna-
ment.com.
March 17 – Nov. 30: Key
West Fishing Tournament. Key West.
More than 40 species of fish are
targeted during these eight months,
with divisions for men, women,
junior anglers (ages 10 to 14) and
Pee Wees (under 10 years old).
In a March kick-off event, anglers
target 15 species and $5,000 in
cash prizes is split between the
top anglers. Contact Doris Harris
at 305-295-6601, email kwft@
comcast.net or visit www.keywest-
fishingtournament.com.
April 10-13: Jim Bokor’s
Islamorada All-Tackle Spring
Bonefish Tournament. Islamorada.
The prestigious All-Tackle champi-
onship is to go to the high-point
angler who catches at least one
bonefish in four tackle divisions
and one or more weight fish in
at least two divisions. Limited to
25 invited anglers, with a maxi-
mum of two anglers and guide
per boat, this demanding chal-
lenge features general, fly and
spin-casting divisions. Contact
JABOK@aol.com.
April 17-21: World Sailfish
Championship. Key West. With
a guaranteed first prize of
$100,000, the prestigious chal-
lenge draws top teams and ben-
efits the Don Shula Foundation
for Breast Cancer Research, Camp
Boggy Creek for youngsters with
chronic and life-threatening ill-
nesses, and other national and
local charities. Previous tourna-
ments’ overall cash payout has
topped $1 million. Contact Mike
Weinhofer at 305-395-3474,
Chris King at 727-631-0072,
email cking@csmgroup.net or visit
www.worldsailfish.com.
April 20-22: Redbone @ Large
Sunrise/Sunset Tarpon Tournament.
Islamorada. The challenge is one of
approximately 30 events held each
year whose proceeds benefit the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Contact
Gary or Susan Ellis at 305-664-
2002, email susan@redbone.org or
visit www.redbone.org.
SPREADS
NHL
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 60 39 15 6 84 167 124
Pittsburgh 61 35 21 5 75 194 161
New Jersey 60 35 21 4 74 169 164
Philadelphia 60 33 20 7 73 198 183
N.Y. Islanders 61 26 27 8 60 144 179
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 60 37 20 3 77 200 139
Ottawa 63 32 23 8 72 193 190
Toronto 62 29 26 7 65 184 190
Buffalo 62 27 27 8 62 154 180
Montreal 62 24 28 10 58 161 171
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 60 28 20 12 68 149 167
Winnipeg 64 30 26 8 68 163 181
Washington 62 31 26 5 67 169 176
Tampa Bay 61 27 28 6 60 170 209
Carolina 62 23 26 13 59 162 187
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 63 41 19 3 85 197 149
St. Louis 62 38 17 7 83 158 125
Nashville 61 35 19 7 77 170 158
Chicago 62 33 22 7 73 192 182
Columbus 61 18 36 7 43 142 203
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 62 40 16 6 86 201 151
Colorado 63 32 27 4 68 164 172
Calgary 61 28 23 10 66 146 165
Minnesota 61 27 25 9 63 135 160
Edmonton 61 24 31 6 54 162 181
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Phoenix 62 32 21 9 73 164 155
San Jose 59 32 20 7 71 172 149
Dallas 62 32 26 4 68 162 169
Los Angeles 61 27 22 12 66 129 135
Anaheim 61 26 25 10 62 157 173
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Friday’s Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, SO
Buffalo 2, Boston 1, SO
Vancouver 2, New Jersey 1
Washington 4, Montreal 1
Colorado 5, Columbus 0
Dallas 4, Minnesota 1
Saturday’s Games
St. Louis 3, Winnipeg 2, SO
Florida 3, Carolina 2, SO
Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 1
Phoenix 3, Edmonton 1
Washington 4, Toronto 2
Boston 5, Ottawa 3
N.Y. Rangers 3, Buffalo 2, OT
Colorado 4, Detroit 3
Chicago at Los Angeles, late
San Jose at Nashville, late
Philadelphia at Calgary, late
Today’s Games
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 1 p.m.
Columbus at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Vancouver at Dallas, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Chicago at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Monday’s Games
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 20 14 .588 —
New York 17 18 .486 3
1
⁄ 2
Boston 15 17 .469 4
Toronto 10 23 .303 9
1
⁄ 2
New Jersey 10 25 .286 10
1
⁄ 2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 27 7 .794 —
Orlando 22 13 .629 5
1
⁄ 2
Atlanta 20 14 .588 7
Washington 7 26 .212 19
1
⁄ 2
Charlotte 4 28 .125 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 27 8 .771 —
Indiana 21 12 .636 5
Cleveland 13 18 .419 12
Milwaukee 13 20 .394 13
Detroit 11 24 .314 16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 24 10 .706 —
Dallas 21 13 .618 3
Houston 20 14 .588 4
Memphis 19 15 .559 5
New Orleans 8 25 .242 15
1
⁄ 2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 27 7 .794 —
Portland 18 16 .529 9
Denver 18 17 .514 9
1
⁄ 2
Minnesota 17 17 .500 10
Utah 15 17 .469 11
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 20 11 .645 —
L.A. Lakers 20 14 .588 1
1
⁄ 2
Golden State 13 17 .433 6
1
⁄ 2
Phoenix 14 20 .412 7
1
⁄ 2
Sacramento 11 22 .333 10
Friday
No games scheduled
Saturday
No games scheduled
Tonight’s Game
All-Star Game at Orlando, 7 p.m.
WGC
Accenture Match Play Championship Results
Saturday
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Quarterfinals
Seeds in parentheses
Mark Wilson (40), United States, def. Peter Hanson
(33), Sweden, 4 and 3.
Hunter Mahan (21), United States, def. Matt
Kuchar (13), United States, 6 and 5.
Rory McIlroy (2), Northern Ireland, def. Bae Sang-
moon (42), South Korea 3 and 2.
Lee Westwood (3), England, def. Martin Laird (38),
Scotland, 3 and 2.
Today’s Tee Times
At Dove Mountain, The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club
Marana, Ariz.
Yardage: 7,791; Par: 72
Semifinals
Seeds in parentheses
9:05 a.m. — Mark Wilson (40), United States, vs.
Hunter Mahan (21), United States.
9:20 a.m. — Rory McIlroy (2), Northern Ireland, vs.
Lee Westwood (3), England.
Finals
Consolation: 1:50 p.m.
Final: 2:05 p.m.
HSBC CHAMPIONS
Saturday
At Tenah Marah Country Club
Singapore
Purse: $1.4 million
Yardage: 6,547; Par: 72
Third Round
a-amateur
Katie Futcher 69-67-71 — 207
Jenny Shin 69-67-71 — 207
Angela Stanford 66-70-71 — 207
Shanshan Feng 69-71-69 — 209
Yani Tseng 71-72-67 — 210
Jiyai Shin 70-70-70 — 210
Na Yeon Choi 68-71-71 — 210
I.K. Kim 68-72-71 — 211
So Yeon Ryu 68-73-71 — 212
Ai Miyazato 69-70-73 — 212
Hee Young Park 71-68-73 — 212
Vicky Hurst 69-73-71 — 213
Mika Miyazato 72-70-71 — 213
Ji-Hee Lee 71-69-73 — 213
Sun Young Yoo 70-70-73 — 213
Stacy Lewis 71-75-68 — 214
Sandra Gal 72-71-71 — 214
Anna Nordqvist 71-72-71 — 214
Inbee Park 70-72-72 — 214
Azahara Munoz 70-70-74 — 214
Momoko Ueda 68-75-72 — 215
Brittany Lang 72-70-73 — 215
Maria Hjorth 73-74-69 — 216
Amy Hung 72-74-70 — 216
Catriona Matthew 74-70-72 — 216
Se Ri Pak 72-72-72 — 216
Karen Stupples 72-72-72 — 216
Amy Yang 68-75-73 — 216
Chella Choi 72-70-74 — 216
Jimin Kang 71-75-71 — 217
Morgan Pressel 74-72-71 — 217
Sophie Gustafson 72-72-73 — 217
Kristy McPherson 69-75-73 — 217
Karrie Webb 72-72-73 — 217
Julieta Granada 70-73-74 — 217
Beatriz Recari 74-73-71 — 218
Amanda Blumenherst 73-74-72 — 219
Meena Lee 72-74-73 — 219
Laura Davies 72-72-75 — 219
Natalie Gulbis 78-71-71 — 220
Christel Boeljon 73-75-72 — 220
Candie Kung 74-74-72 — 220
Cristie Kerr 69-74-77 — 220
Suzann Pettersen 73-69-78 — 220
MAYAKOBA CLASSIC
Saturday
At Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon Golf Club
Playa del Carmen, Mexico
Purse: $3.7 million
Yardage: 6,987; Par: 71
Third Round
Daniel Summerhays 69-65-67 — 201
Chris Stroud 69-66-68 — 203
Michael Allen 68-71-66 — 205
Will Claxton 66-68-71 — 205
Marc Turnesa 67-72-67 — 206
Robert Allenby 69-67-70 — 206
Brian Harman 71-71-65 — 207
Colt Knost 69-71-67 — 207
Briny Baird 71-69-67 — 207
Charles Howell III 67-71-69 — 207
Matt Every 67-71-69 — 207
Greg Owen 67-67-73 — 207
Dicky Pride 68-72-68 — 208
Alejandro Canizares 67-72-69 — 208
Billy Mayfair 70-68-70 — 208
John Huh 67-70-71 — 208
Richard S. Johnson 70-66-72 — 208
Kevin Stadler 68-68-72 — 208
J.J. Henry 72-69-68 — 209
Russell Knox 74-67-68 — 209
Stephen Ames 69-70-70 — 209
Tim Petrovic 72-72-66 — 210
Nathan Green 73-69-68 — 210
Rich Beem 70-71-69 — 210
GOLF
GLANTZ-CULVER
NCAA Basketball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG
at South Florida 2 Cincinnati
at Cent. Michigan 9 N. Illinois
at Louisville 8 Pittsburgh
at Denver 9
1
⁄ 2 North Texas
California 2
1
⁄ 2 at Colorado
at Illinois 8 Iowa
at Miami 3 Florida St.
at Oregon St. 4 Oregon
at Marist Pk Niagara
at Siena 9
1
⁄ 2 Canisius
at Iona 22 St. Peter’s
Fairfield 3
1
⁄ 2 at Rider
at Manhattan 2
1
⁄ 2 Loyola (Md.)
at Ohio St. 10
1
⁄ 2 Wisconsin
at Minnesota Pk Indiana
at Ohio 4
1
⁄ 2 Akron
NBA
Sunday
All-Star Game at Orlando
FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG
East 2
1
⁄ 2 (283) West
NHL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
at New Jersey -240 Tampa Bay +200
at Pittsburgh -300 Columbus +240
Vancouver -140 at Dallas +120
at Florida -120 Montreal +100
at Ottawa -160 N.Y. Islanders +140
San Jose -150 at Minnesota +130
at Anaheim -120 Chicago +100
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
TOP 25 FARED
Saturday
1. Kentucky (28-1) beat Vanderbilt 83-74. Next:
vs. Georgia, Thursday.
2. Syracuse (28-1) at UConn. Next: vs. No. 17
Louisville, Saturday.
3. Missouri (25-4) lost to No. 4 Kansas 87-86, OT.
Next: vs. Iowa State, Wednesday.
4. Kansas (24-5) beat No. 3 Missouri 87-86, OT.
Next: at Oklahoma State, Monday.
5. Duke (25-4) beat Virginia Tech 70-65, OT. Next:
at Wake Forest, Tuesday.
6. Michigan State (23-5) vs. Nebraska. Next: at
No. 23 Indiana, Tuesday.
7. North Carolina (25-4) beat No. 25 Virginia 54-
51. Next: vs. Maryland, Wednesday.
8. Ohio State (23-5) did not play. Next: vs. No. 16
Wisconsin, Sunday.
9. Georgetown (21-6) beat Villanova 67-46. Next:
vs. No. 20 Notre Dame, Monday.
LEAGUE LEADERS
THROUGH FEB. 24
Scoring
G FG FT PTS AVG
Bryant, LAL 34 351 217 966 28.4
Durant, OKC 34 343 204 948 27.9
James, MIA 33 326 225 903 27.4
Love, MIN 32 258 234 799 25.0
Westbrook, OKC 34 303 166 799 23.5
Ellis, GOL 29 239 133 651 22.4
Aldridge, POR 32 289 134 713 22.3
D. Williams, NJN 34 253 168 756 22.2
Griffin, LAC 31 272 118 663 21.4
Howard, ORL 35 258 186 702 20.1
Nowitzki, DAL 30 214 134 587 19.6
Parker, SAN 33 241 149 639 19.4
Lee, GOL 29 232 95 559 19.3
Jefferson, UTA 29 242 70 554 19.1
Gay, MEM 34 261 92 642 18.9
Bosh, MIA 34 241 138 627 18.4
Jennings, MIL 33 225 88 606 18.4
Irving, CLE 28 189 96 508 18.1
Granger, IND 31 182 135 558 18.0
Martin, HOU 32 193 124 576 18.0
FG Percentage
FG FGA PCT
Chandler, NYK 137 195 .703
Pekovic, MIN 126 216 .583
Gortat, PHX 230 410 .561
Howard, ORL 258 466 .554
James, MIA 326 596 .547
Bynum, LAL 196 360 .544
Nash, PHX 168 310 .542
Griffin, LAC 272 505 .539
Boozer, CHI 247 459 .538
McGee, WAS 174 327 .532
Rebounds
G OFF DEF TOT AVG
Howard, ORL 35 126 408 534 15.3
Love, MIN 32 132 317 449 14.0
Bynum, LAL 30 103 280 383 12.8
Griffin, LAC 31 102 250 352 11.4
Cousins, SAC 32 145 218 363 11.3
Gasol, LAL 34 106 255 361 10.6
Humphries, NJN 32 123 214 337 10.5
Gortat, PHX 34 90 265 355 10.4
Gasol, MEM 34 73 269 342 10.1
Noah, CHI 34 125 212 337 9.9
Assists
G AST AVG
Nash, PHX 31 339 10.9
Rondo, BOS 22 210 9.5
Calderon, TOR 33 295 8.9
Paul, LAC 26 223 8.6
Rubio, MIN 34 284 8.4
D. Williams, NJN 34 278 8.2
Parker, SAN 33 266 8.1
Rose, CHI 25 192 7.7
Lowry, HOU 32 244 7.6
Wall, WAS 33 251 7.6
2012 ALL-STAR ROSTERS
All-Star Game: Feb. 26 at Orlando
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Years
Player Pos Ht Wt A-S
Carmelo Anthony, NY F 6-8 230 5
Dwight Howard, Orl C 6-11 265 6
LeBron James, Mia F 6-8 250 8
Derrick Rose, Chi G 6-3 190 3
Dwyane Wade, Mia G 6-4 210 8
Reserves
Chris Bosh, Mia F-C 6-10 230 7
Luol Deng, Chi F 6-9 220 1
Roy Hibbert, Ind C 7-2 260 1
Andre Iguodala, Phi F-G 6-6 207 1
x-Joe Johnson, Atl G 6-7 235 6
Paul Pierce, Bos F 6-7 235 10
r-Rajon Rondo, Bos G 6-1 171 3
Deron Williams, NJ G 6-3 209 3
Head Coach: Tom Thibodeau, Chicago
Trainer: Keon Weise, Orlando
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Starters
Years
Player P Ht Wt A-S
Kobe Bryant, LAL G 6-6 205 14
Andrew Bynum, LAL C 7-0 285 1
Kevin Durant, Okl F 6-9 230 3
Blake Griffin, LAC F 6-10 251 2
Chris Paul, LAC G 6-0 175 5
Reserves
LaMarcus Aldridge, Por F 6-11 240 1
Marc Gasol, Mem C 7-1 265 1
SATURDAY’S
BASEBALL
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Rhiner Cruz, RHP Aneury Rodriguez and RHP Kyle
Weiland on one-year contracts.
North American League
MCALLEN THUNDER — Re-signed LHP Frank James
and P Bryan Smith.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Assigned D David
Savard to Springfield (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS — Reassigned RW Michal
Repik to San Antonio (AHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Waived LW Eric Boulton.
Assigned D Peter Harrold to Albany (AHL).
NEW YORK RANGERS — Reassigned D Blake
Parlett from Connecticut (AHL) to Greenville
(ECHL). Traded F Wojtek Wolski to Florida for D
Michael Vernace and a 2013 third-round draft
pick.
Kevin Love, Min F-C 6-10 260 2
Steve Nash, Pho G 6-3 178 8
Dirk Nowitzki, Dal F 7-0 245 11
Tony Parker, SA G 6-2 185 4
Russell Westbrook, Okl G 6-3 211 2
Head Coach: Scott Brooks, Oklahoma City
Trainer: Jay Jensen, Portland
KEY
x-injured will not play
r-injury replacement
Anaheim at Colorado, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m.
SCORING LEADERS
Through Feb. 24
GP G A PTS
Steven Stamkos, TB 60 43 30 73
Evgeni Malkin, Pit 53 33 40 73
Claude Giroux, Phi 56 23 47 70
Jason Spezza, Ott 62 27 39 66
Henrik Sedin, Van 62 13 53 66
Phil Kessel, Tor 61 31 34 65
Daniel Sedin, Van 61 28 35 63
Joffrey Lupul, Tor 61 23 39 62
Jordan Eberle, Edm 56 27 33 60
John Tavares, NYI 61 24 36 60
Erik Karlsson, Ott 61 13 47 60
4 tied with 59 pts.
PANTHERS 3, HURRICANES 2 (SO)
Florida 0 0 2 0 — 3
Carolina 1 1 0 0 — 2
Florida won shootout 2-1
First Period—1, Carolina, Faulk 7 (E.Staal,
Samson), 18:01 (pp).
Second Period—2, Carolina, Jokinen 9 (Skinner),
17:32.
Third Period—3, Florida, Fleischmann 20 (Versteeg,
Ellerby), 13:58. 4, Florida, Wolski 1 (Matthias,
Garrison), 18:13.
Overtime—None.
Shootout—Florida 2 (Samuelsson G, Wolski NG,
Weiss G), Carolina 1 (Jokinen NG, Skinner G,
Tlusty NG).
Shots on Goal—Florida 19-11-12-2—44. Carolina
9-10-8-1—28.
Goalies—Florida, Theodore. Carolina, Peters.
A—18,680 (18,680). T—2:41.
SATURDAY’S SCORES
SOUTH
Bethel, Tenn. 5, Union, Ky. 0
Bryan 19, Pikeville 12
Campbellsville 10-4, Huntington 0-1
Cumberlands 6-1, Rochester 0-6
Duke 10, Canisius 1
Earlham 5, Centre 4
ETSU 3, Saint Joseph’s 2
Florida St. 3, Fla. International 1
Freed-Hardeman 2, Indiana Tech 1
Georgetown, Ky. 18, Lourdes 3
Hampden-Sydney 14, Moravian 13, 10 innings
Jackson St. 10, Morehead St. 0
Kentucky 9, Buffalo 5
King, Tenn. 22, Barton 3
Lee 3-12, Mobile 0-1
Lincoln Memorial 11, Anderson, S.C. 10
Lindsey Wilson 5, Iowa Wesleyan 1
Louisville 10, Oakland, Mich. 7
Maryland 3, W. Carolina 0
Maryville, Tenn. 3, Transylvania 1, 7 innings
Middle Tennessee 2, Ohio 1
Milligan 8-2, Virginia-Wise 2-6
Murray St. 6, S. Dakota St. 1
North Carolina 14, Wright St. 0
Ohio St. 7, Georgia Tech 3
Point Park 3, Cumberland, Tenn. 2
S. Illinois 10, W. Kentucky 3
Tennessee 3, Seton Hall 2
Tenn. Wesleyan 4-4, Indiana-Southeast 2-3
Trevecca Nazarene 9, Indiana Wesleyan 8
Tusculum 11, Carson-Newman 1
UT-Martin 5, Butler 0
Union, Tenn. 6, Taylor 4
Virginia 7, Monmouth, N.J. 1
Virginia Tech 3, Coastal Carolina 1
W. Connecticut 16, Emory & Henry 8
Young Harris 6-4, Montreat 3-2
SOUTHWEST
S. Utah at Texas-Pan American, ppd., unplayable
field
SPRINT CUP
Daytona 500 Lineup
After Thursday qualifying; race today
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 194.738.
2. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 194.087.
3. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 193.607.
4. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 193.245.
5. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 194.028.
6. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 191.063.
7. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 193.999.
8. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 193.449.
9. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 192.777.
10. (33) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 191.27.
11. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 190.99.
12. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 192.868.
13. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 192.914.
14. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 191.873.
15. (22) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 193.121.
16. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 193.803.
17. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 188.229.
TRANSACTIONS
COLLEGE BASEBALL
10. Marquette (24-5) did not play. Next: at
Cincinnati, Wednesday.
11. Michigan (21-8) lost to Purdue 75-61. Next: at
Illinois, Thursday.
12. Florida (22-7) lost to Georgia 76-62. Next: at
Vanderbilt, Tuesday.
13. Baylor (24-5) beat Oklahoma 70-60. Next: vs.
Texas Tech, Monday.
14. Murray State (27-1) at Tennessee Tech. Next:
OVC semifinals, Friday.
15. Florida State (19-8) did not play. Next: at
Miami, Sunday.
16. Wisconsin (20-8) did not play. Next: at No. 8
Ohio State, Sunday.
17. Louisville (21-7) did not play. Next: vs.
Pittsburgh, Sunday.
18. New Mexico (22-5) at TCU. Next: vs. Air Force,
Wednesday.
19. Wichita State (26-4) beat Drake 81-58. Next:
MVC quarterfinals, Friday.
20. Notre Dame (20-9) lost to St. John’s 61-58.
Next: at No. 9 Georgetown, Monday.
21. UNLV (24-6) beat Air Force 68-58. Next: at
Colorado State, Wednesday.
22. Temple (22-5) at Saint Joseph’s. Next: vs.
UMass, Wednesday.
23. Indiana (21-7) did not play. Next: at
Minnesota, Sunday.
24. San Diego State (21-6) vs. Colorado State.
Next: at Boise State, Wednesday.
25. Virginia (21-7) lost to No. 7 North Carolina 54-
51. Next: vs. No. 15 Florida State, Thursday.
GEORGIA 76, NO. 12 FLORIDA 62
FLORIDA (22-7)
Boynton 4-11 0-0 11, Young 4-9 0-0 8, Walker 4-
11 4-4 14, Beal 5-12 9-10 19, Murphy 1-6 0-0 2,
Rosario 3-9 0-1 6, Wilbekin 0-1 0-0 0, Prather 1-1
0-0 2, Larson 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 22-60 13-15 62.
GEORGIA (13-15)
Caldwell-Pope 8-13 0-0 18, Thornton 2-7 0-2 4,
D. Williams 4-6 3-4 11, Robinson 4-11 6-6 15,
Djurisic 5-8 1-2 12, Ware 2-4 5-6 11, V. Williams
0-0 0-0 0, Brantley 1-1 0-0 3, Florveus 1-1 0-1 2.
Totals 27-51 15-21 76.
Halftime—Georgia 36-27. 3-Point Goals—Florida
5-23 (Boynton 3-7, Walker 2-4, Rosario 0-3,
Beal 0-4, Murphy 0-5), Georgia 7-20 (Ware 2-
3, Caldwell-Pope 2-6, Brantley 1-1, Djurisic 1-2,
Robinson 1-5, Thornton 0-3). Fouled Out—None.
Rebounds—Florida 36 (Beal 12), Georgia 30
(Djurisic 7). Assists—Florida 8 (Beal, Boynton 2),
Georgia 16 (Robinson 7). Total Fouls—Florida 19,
Georgia 15. A—10,265.
WOMEN’S TOP 25 FARED
Saturday
1. Baylor (29-0) did not play. Next: at No. 14 Texas
A&M, Monday.
2. Stanford (26-1) beat Utah 69-42. Next: vs.
Seattle, Wednesday.
3. Notre Dame (27-2) beat South Florida 80-68.
Next: at No. 4 UConn, Monday.
4. UConn (26-3) beat Marquette 85-45. Next: vs.
No. 3 Notre Dame, Monday.
5. Miami (24-4) did not play. Next: vs. Boston
College, Sunday.
6. Maryland (24-4) did not play. Next: at N.C.
State, Sunday.
7. Duke (23-4) did not play. Next: at North
Carolina, Sunday.
8. Ohio State (24-4) did not play. Next: at No. 23
Nebraska, Sunday.
9. Delaware (25-1) did not play. Next: vs.
Northeastern, Sunday.
10. Tennessee (20-8) did not play. Next: vs.
Florida, Sunday.
11. Penn State (22-5) did not play. Next: vs.
Minnesota, Sunday.
12. Green Bay (25-1) beat Butler 78-53. Next: at
Loyola of Chicago, Wednesday.
13. Kentucky (23-5) did not play. Next: at
Mississippi State, Sunday.
14. Texas A&M (20-7) beat Texas Tech 79-51.
Next: vs. No. 1 Baylor, Monday.
15. Georgetown (22-6) beat Syracuse 65-62.
Next: vs. No. 20 St. John’s, Monday.
16. Louisville (20-8) beat No. 21 DePaul 75-62.
Next: at Seton Hall, Monday.
17. Georgia Tech (21-7) did not play. Next: vs.
Clemson, Sunday.
18. Georgia (21-7) did not play. Next: vs. LSU,
Sunday.
19. St. Bonaventure (27-2) beat Rhode Island 58-
32. Next: Atlantic 10 tournament, Saturday.
20. St. John’s (20-8) beat Villanova 69-49. Next:
at No. 15 Georgetown, Monday.
21. DePaul (20-9) lost to No. 16 Louisville 75-62.
Next: vs. Cincinnati, Monday.
22. Purdue (20-8) did not play. Next: vs. Indiana,
Sunday.
23. Nebraska (20-7) did not play. Next: vs. No. 8
Ohio State, Sunday.
24. Rutgers (20-8) beat Providence 68-47. Next:
vs. Marquette, Monday.
25. Gonzaga (25-4) beat BYU 77-60. Next: WCC
tournament, Friday or Saturday.
NASCAR
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 193.224.
19. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 191.84.
20. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192.583.
21. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 193.665.
22. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 193.503.
23. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 192.992.
24. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 191.506.
25. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 193.249.
26. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 193.665.
27. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 193.382.
28. (51) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 191.363.
29. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.738.
30. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota.
31. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 191.127.
32. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 190.022.
33. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.046.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 191.16.
35. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 192.6.
36. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 193.844.
37. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 193.374.
38. (93) David Reutimann, Toyota, 189.235.
39. (83) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 190.605.
40. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 193.615.
41. (26) Tony Raines, Ford, 192.534.
42. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 191.963.
43. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, Past Champion.
Failed to Qualify
44. (40) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 191.18.
45. (23) Robert Richardson Jr., Toyota, 188.438.
46. (97) Bill Elliott, Toyota, 189.95.
47. (37) Mike Wallace, Ford, 189.853.
48. (09) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 191.567.
49. (49) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 187.954.
NATIONWIDE
DRIVE4COPD 300 Results
Saturday
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach, Fla.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (15) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 120 laps, 94
rating, 0 points, $114,288.
2. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 120, 109.5, 0,
$81,385.
3. (3) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 120, 105.7, 42,
$79,228.
4. (8) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 120, 81.6, 40,
$71,903.
5. (5) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 120, 88.7, 39,
$65,388.
6. (25) Tayler Malsam, Toyota, 120, 58.4, 38,
$59,513.
7. (29) Timmy Hill, Ford, 120, 63.9, 0, $50,770.
8. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 120, 115.6, 0,
$49,695.
9. (11) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 120, 110.7, 0,
$48,445.
10. (14) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 120, 124.9, 0,
$51,770.
11. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 120, 87.7, 34,
$53,113.
12. (33) Benny Gordon, Toyota, 120, 59.1, 32,
$46,020.
13. (41) Danny Efland, Chevrolet, 120, 49.1, 31,
$52,013.
14. (37) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 120, 64.7, 0,
$45,220.
15. (4) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 120, 110.5,
0, $45,770.
16. (22) Joey Logano, Toyota, 120, 97.9, 0,
$44,845.
17. (31) Blake Koch, Ford, 120, 50.4, 27,
$50,838.
18. (24) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 119, 73.7,
0, $44,445.
19. (10) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, accident, 119,
82.4, 25, $51,588.
20. (6) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 119, 94.9, 25,
$50,963.
21. (21) Johanna Long, Chevrolet, 119, 47.9, 23,
$50,513.
22. (20) Eric McClure, Toyota, 118, 64.2, 22,
$50,213.
23. (27) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, accident, 116,
88.6, 22, $50,038.
24. (39) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, accident, 115, 37.5,
20, $49,913.
25. (36) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 115, 61.4,
19, $50,238.
26. (23) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 113, 50.6,
0, $43,170.
27. (16) Michael Annett, Ford, accident, 113, 77,
17, $49,538.
28. (28) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 112, 84.7, 16,
$49,463.
29. (35) Joey Gase, Ford, 108, 38.9, 15, $49,363.
30. (26) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, accident, 104,
71.8, 15, $49,538.
31. (18) Ryan Truex, Chevrolet, accident, 104,
58.8, 13, $42,595.
32. (17) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, accident, 103,
77.8, 0, $42,520.
33. (12) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, accident, 103,
55.3, 11, $48,938.
34. (42) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, accident, 103,
48.2, 10, $48,888.
35. (34) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, accident,
103, 57.2, 10, $48,728.
36. (32) Casey Roderick, Ford, accident, 103,
45.8, 8, $42,185.
37. (19) Brian Scott, Toyota, 96, 58.5, 7, $48,588.
38. (1) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 72, 69.5, 7,
$52,427.
39. (13) Mike Bliss, Toyota, accident, 59, 67, 6,
$40,960.
40. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, engine, 43, 27, 0,
$40,910.
41. (40) Jason Bowles, Dodge, engine, 28, 35.4,
3, $47,333.
42. (30) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, electrical, 14, 26.9,
0, $40,810.
43. (43) Jeff Green, Toyota, vibration, 3, 25.8, 1,
$40,721.
RACE STATISTICS
Average Speed of Race Winner: 129.636 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 18 minutes, 51 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 8 for 35 laps.
Lead Changes: 38 among 16 drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Patrick 1-2; T.Bayne 3; E.Sadler
4; T.Stewart 5-8; K.Kahne 9-12; D.Hamlin 13;
T.Bayne 14-15; S.Hornish Jr. 16-20; M.Bliss
21-25; D.Earnhardt Jr. 26; M.Bliss 27; Ku.Busch
28-29; D.Earnhardt Jr. 30-32; Ku.Busch 33-36;
T.Stewart 37-43; Ku.Busch 44-48; D.Earnhardt
Jr. 49-50; D.Hamlin 51-53; Ku.Busch 54-64;
E.Sadler 65-66; D.Earnhardt Jr. 67; E.Sadler 68-
72; Ky.Busch 73; Ku.Busch 74-76; R.Richardson
Jr. 77; J.Nemechek 78-79; S.Hornish Jr. 80-81;
Ku.Busch 82; T.Stewart 83-88; Ky.Busch 89;
D.Hamlin 90; D.Earnhardt Jr. 91; T.Stewart 92-
94; T.Hill 95-98; K.Wallace 99; D.Hamlin 100-
101; T.Stewart 102-103; Ku.Busch 104-119;
J.Buescher 120.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
Ku.Busch, 7 times for 42 laps; T.Stewart, 5
times for 22 laps; E.Sadler, 3 times for 8 laps;
D.Earnhardt Jr., 5 times for 8 laps; S.Hornish Jr.,
2 times for 7 laps; D.Hamlin, 4 times for 7 laps;
M.Bliss, 2 times for 6 laps; T.Hill, 1 time for 4 laps;
K.Kahne, 1 time for 4 laps; T.Bayne, 2 times for 3
laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 2 laps; J.Nemechek,
1 time for 2 laps; D.Patrick, 1 time for 2 laps;
J.Buescher, 1 time for 1 lap; K.Wallace, 1 time for
1 lap; R.Richardson Jr., 1 time for 1 lap.
Top 10 in Points: 1. E.Sadler, 42; 2. C.Whitt, 40;
3. A.Dillon, 39; 4. T.Malsam, 38; 5. T.Bayne, 34; 6.
B.Gordon, 32; 7. D.Efland, 31; 8. B.Koch, 27; 9.
R.Stenhouse Jr., 25; 10. S.Hornish Jr., 25.
two outs, Britney Price struck out but
Manatee catcher Molly McDonough
dropped the ball and Price bolted to
first and Schoneck scrambled home for
a 1-0 Key West advantage. Batting in the
number five spot, Devin Osterhoudt
crushed an RBI triple scoring Price
going up 2-0.
The Canes tied the game 2-2 in the
second on a two-run shot by Taylor Bell
pushing pinch runner Chelsea Sturm
home.
Key West had some good scoring
opportunities, but the timely hits were
not there.
Freshman Lindsey Free singled with
two outs for the Conchs in the third,
but was left standing on first. In the
third, Lauren Schoneck hustled down
to first and slid to make it safely atop
the bag. She stole second, but got
greedy trying to stretch it to third. Next
up Kendall Galvan singled with no run-
ners aboard.
Both teams produced potential scor-
ing threats in the sixth and seventh
innings, but strong defensive play on
both sides made it tough to get anything
going.
In the top of the eighth, Manatee’s
Marriah Wise got onboard via Key West’s
only error of the night and Amber Schaad
singled to put both in scoring position.
On a wild pitch by reliever Rachel Quad,
Wise went home and was tagged by
catcher Ashlyn Katz and Schaad boldly
went to third, but was nailed to end the
rally.
Key West struck out five of their last
six outs in the eighth and ninth innings
on the strong performance of reliever
Taylor O’Quinn.
Galvan said they had timely hitting in
their final at bats.
“There was nothing we could do
about it, they were going to score on
those hits either way,” said Galvan as
she chowed down on the black bean,
rice and Mark’s famous steak. “I think
we did pretty well against a 7A school.
We did a lot of good things defensively,
we just need to get a win.”
rcooke@keysnews.com
The Warriors scored their first
eight runs on five hits, six walks,
one hit batter, four errors, a wild
pitch and a passed ball.
“I don’t think we’ve had that all
season long,” Leal said about his
team’s play. “We were going up
there just hacking. Defensively we
calmed down a bit for a couple of
innings but gave it back to them
in the fifth inning.”
Marathon will have to get
back on the right track this week
against district and conference
foes. On Tuesday, the Dolphins
play South Florida Baseball
Conference opponent Miami
Country Day and then get tested
against District 16-3 rival Florida
Christian on Thursday.
“They need to rebound from this
quickly,” Leal said about his players.
“If they don’t get their act together
that’s two more games that will end
up in a mercy-rule. One is con-
ference and one is district so we
definitely need to keep their heads
up and just move on. Everybody
has a bad day and today was ours.
Including preseason we’ve had
seven great games and today was
just one we were all off and hope-
fully we’ll move on and adjust.”
jwcooke@keysnews.com
3B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SPORTS
PREP TRACK & FIELD
X
San Antonio’s Parker
wins Skills Competition
ORLANDO— San Antonio
point guard Tony Parker won
the Skills Competition of the
NBA’s All-Star Saturday night
festivities.
Parker was the only one
of six participants to break
30 seconds in the first round
(29.2) and this time of 32.8
in the final run on the obsta-
cle course was better than
Boston’s Rajon Rondo (34.6)
and New Jersey’s Deron
Williams (41.4).
Williams won the competi-
tion in 2008.
NBA
Stern: Silver worthy
successor as commish
ORLANDO — Whenever
David Stern retires, he’s cer-
tain Adam Silver is ready to be
the next NBA commissioner.
Stern calls Silver, the
deputy commissioner since
2006, a “first-rate, top of the
class executive,” and would
choose him as his succes-
sor if he made the decision.
However, he says that will be
left to owners.
Stern hasn’t said when he
will step down, though he says
it will be before the next round
of collective bargaining.
BOXING
Team New York
wins Shooting Stars
ORLANDO— Team New
York had the touch from out-
side and won the Shooting
Stars event to open the NBA’s
All-Star festivities.
Former Knicks star Allan
Houston nailed his third
attempt at a half-court shot
to give his team consisting of
current Knicks guard Landry
Fields and Cappie Pondexter
of the WNBA’s New York
Liberty the victory.
The winner completed
the shooting course in 37.3
seconds.
TENNIS
Radwanska defeats
Goerges in Dubai final
DUBAI, United Arab
Emirates — Agnieszka
Radwanska won her eighth
career WTA title, defeating
Julia Goerges, 7-5, 6-4, in the
Dubai Tennis Championships
final on Saturday.
Radwanska will rise one
place to a career-best No. 5
when the world rankings are
released Monday.
The fifth-seeded
Radwanska led in both sets
but it took her almost 2 hours
to overcome the unseeded
Goerges.
BY DOUG FERGUSON
The Associated Press
MARANA, Ariz. — Hunter Mahan and Mark
Wilson advanced Saturday to the semfinals of
the Match Play Championship, assuring an
American in the championship match for the
first time since Tiger Woods won in 2008.
Mahan played the shortest quarterfinal match
in the 14-year history of the event, and he didn’t
have to break a sweat. Matt Kuchar went so cold
with the putter that Mahan won five holes sim-
ply by making par.
“Matt just couldn’t find the putter,” Mahan
said. “I got lucky.”
Mahan was 1 up through four holes when
he won the next three holes — all with pars.
He built a 5-up lead at the turn and closed out
Kuchar by making a 3-foot birdie putt on the
par-5 13th to win, 6 and 5.
Previously, the biggest rout in the quarter-
finals was 5 and 4, last achieved a year ago by
Luke Donald over Ryan Moore.
Rory McIlroy was 1 up through 11 holes
against Bae Sang-moon, while Lee Westwood
won four straight in a five-hole stretch to take
a 3-up lead over Martin Laird in the other quar-
terfinal matches.
McIlroy and Westwood each have a chance to
go to No. 1 in the world by winning, though they
would meet in the semifinals.

3 stay tied for lead at
HSBC Women’s Champions
SINGAPORE — Americans Katie Futcher and Angela
Stanford and South Korea’s Jenny Shin shot 1-under 71s
on Saturday to stay tied for the lead after three rounds of
the $1.4 million HSBC Women’s Champions.
Futcher led almost the entire day, jumping ahead with
a birdie on the second hole. But a bogey on 18 — her
second of the tournament — allowed Stanford and Shin
to regain a share of the lead at 9-under 207.
World No. 1 Yani Tseng jumped up the leaderboard
with a 5-under 67 and was three strokes off the lead at
Tanah Merah Country Club.
Mahan, Wilson ease into match
play semifinals; Westwood and
McIlroy face off in next round
GOLF: ROUNDUP
MATT YORK /The
Associated Press
Hunter
Mahan
reaches
for his ball
tossed by
his caddie
while play-
ing in the
quarterfi-
nals against
Matt
Kuchar at
the Match
Play Cham-
pionship on
Saturday
in Marana,
Ariz.
BY J.W. COOKE
Citizen Staff Writer
Despite missing some of
its more experienced athletes
the Key West High track and
field teams were still able to
break four school records on
Saturday in the Conchs’ sec-
ond meet of the season, the
Westminster Academy relays.
Three girls’ relay teams,
entered in events only run at a
relay meets, were able to earn
top spots in the Key West High
record books while one boys
team followed suit. In the meet
the Lady Conchs took 6th out
of 10 teams and the boys fin-
ished in 8th.
“It was a lot tougher competi-
tion than last week,” said Key
West coach Rick Ridenour. “It
was nice to get out and see these
kids give it their best shot. They
are learning what track meets
are all about, so it was good to
get experience for everybody.”
In the distance relay, it
would be the team of Marley
Gill, Liz Czerwinski, Tristan
Milliken and Rachel Deitrich
that cracked the previous
school record with a time of
14:19.83 that was good for 6th
place on Saturday.
The boys distance relay
— made up of Julien Ramirez,
Jecory Sala, Aeschton Tomita
and Brock Guzman — also
broke the school mark in
11:47.07 finishing third in their
race.
In the sprints, the girls team
of Ryann Appleby, Deitrich,
Madison Masser and Patrycja
Paprocka claimed the Conchs’
100-meter shuttle hurdle relay
record in 1:18.67, 4th place
on Saturday, and in the 1600-
sprint medley relay Courtney
Coleman, Gill, Milliken and
Shelisa Page placed themselves
at the top of the record book in
4:44.01 for fourth place.
“This is the only time we’ll run
these races at the relay, so it will
be probably the last time we’ll run
them this year,” said Ridenour.
“So it was pretty nice they were
able to come through.”
The Conchs also had sev-
eral athletes break personal
records on Saturday with
Alexa Dodson clearing 4-foot
6-inches in the high jump and
Lindsay Cowpland tossing the
discus 92-feet 9-inches — the
fourth best in school history.
“We really did have some
good performances beyond
the school records,” said
Ridenour.
Missing for the Conchs
on Saturday were senior
Clive Georges and freshman
Laurence Marius, which are
big parts of the boys squad.
Both teams are back in
action on Saturday for its first
invitational meet of the season
at Archbishop Carroll.
“Hopefully everybody will
be back next week,” said
Ridenour. “I’m happy consid-
ering we were short handed.
We took every kid that’s been
coming to practice just to get
them more experience. It was
events that we get to run but
once or twice a year and to have
them break school records, I
was very impressed.”
jwcooke@keysnews.com
Conchs’ relay teams
break 4 school records
“This is the only time
we’ll run these races
at the relay, so it will
be probably the last
time we’ll run them
this year. So it was
pretty nice they were
able to come through.”
Rick Ridenour
Key West coach on school records
Marathon
Continued from page 1B
Lady Conchs
Continued from page 1B
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
LYNNE SLADKY /The Associated Press
The Heat’s Mario Chalmers shoots during the Three-Point
Shootouton Saturday in Orlando. Minnesota forward Kevin Love
won the 3-point Shootout surviving a tiebreaker in the first round
and sweated out the last few shots from Oklahoma City’s Kevin
Durant to pull out the 17-14 victory in the final. Defending cham-
pion James Jones led all shooters in the opening round with 22.
KEY WEST LITTLE CONCH BASEBALL SCHEDULE
349652
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Mon 2/27/12
8U 6:30 pm White Sox VS. Padres
10U 6:30 pm Rangers VS. Twins
12U 6:30 pm Cubs VS. Phillies
14U 6:30 pm Tigers VS. Giants
Thurs 3/1/12
8U 6:30 pm Braves VS. Nationals
10U 6:30 pm Twins VS. Red Sox
12U 6:30 pm Rays VS. Phillies
14U 6:30 pm Cardinals VS. Giants
Wed 2/29/12
8U 6:30 pm Blue Jays VS. Orioles
10U 6:30 pm Yankees VS. Rangers
12U 6:30 pm Reds VS. Cubs
Sat 3/3/12
6U 9:00 am Sea Dogs VS. MudCats
6U 10:45 am Scrappers VS. River Cats
6U 12:30 pm Rattlers VS. Hooks
T-Ball 9:00 am Sandgnats VS. Express
T-Ball 10:45 am Knights VS. Riverdogs
T-Ball 12:30 pm Thresher Sharks VS. Bandits
T-Ball 2:15 pm Raptors VS. Grasshoppers
Tues 2/28/12
8U 6:30 pm Nationals VS. Astros
10U 6:30 pm Red Sox VS. Angels
12U 6:30 pm Marlins VS. Mariners
14U 6:30 pm Cardinals VS. Mets
Fri 3/2/12
8U 6:30 pm Blue Jays VS. White Socks
8U 8:00 pm Astros VS. Orioles
10U 6:00 pm Angels VS. Yankees
12U pm 6:00 Marlins VS. Cubs
14U 6:00 pm Tigers VS. Mets
4B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SPORTS: Outdoor Living
BY JENNA FRYER
The Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH — James
Buescher was the surprise
winner of the Nationwide
Series opener at Daytona
International Speedway, dodg-
ing a huge 11-car accident that
wiped out the leaders on the
final lap of Saturday’s race.
Buescher was in 11th place
as he rounded the final turn
and weaved his way through
a massive pack of spinning
race cars.
The accident, the third multi-
car wreck in the waning laps,
appeared to start as the tan-
dem of Tony Stewart and Elliott
Sadler charged to the top of
the track to make a three-wide
pack among the leaders.
Kurt Busch was leading on
the bottom of the track with
younger brother, Kyle, push-
ing, and Kurt Busch seemed
to start sliding up the surface
in an attempt to block the
huge run Stewart was making.
It triggered a chain-reaction
crash that had many worried
about the safety of the drivers
involved.
“I don’t even know where to
start. I don’t even know what
happened,” said Kyle Busch,
who took a huge hit.
“I thought we had the race
won. Then those guys were
coming on the top, and I
thought, ‘We’ll see where we
settled in here.’ When they all
crashed up high, I was clear.
I shot as low as I could, and
somebody tagged me in the
back and hooked me dead
right. It was a really, really hard
hit, and there were a few more
after that. It seemed like they
kept coming.
“I swore when they all went
up high. I was the leader for a
second, and I’m like, “I won
this thing. I won this thing.”’
Buescher’s win was his first
in NASCAR and came a day
after unknown John King won
the Truck Series opener in
another wreckfest.
The multiple big wrecks
have prompted concerns
about today’s season-opening
Daytona 500. NASCAR worked
hard during the offseason to
break up the two-car tandem
racing that fans disliked, and
the return of pack racing has
led to many accidents over
SpeedWeeks.
But Brad Keselowski and
Sadler, who finished second
and third, both said they feel
safe going into today’s race.
Keselowski said NASCAR is
in a difficult position of giving
fans what they want in restric-
tor-plate racing and making it
a safe event.
“I feel like we walk a line in
this sport between daredevils
and chess players,” he said.
“When we come to Daytona
and a track like this, we’re
maybe more on the daredev-
il side of the line. And then
we go other places where I’d
say we’re more on the chess-
player side of the line. I think
it’s important to have tracks
like this that maybe average it
back out a little bit.
“Ideally, we’d like to just walk
straight down the line all the
time. But from a standpoint of
the sport and the health of it, I
think not a lot of people watch
chess matches, and I’ve never
seen one televised.”
BY JENNA FRYER
The Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH — As her car hurtled
out of control toward the inside retaining
wall at Daytona International Speedway,
Danica Patrick did a split-second survey
of her situation.
With no chance of avoiding a head-on
collision at nearly 190 mph, Patrick pre-
pared for the impact. She took her hands
off her steering wheel and pulled them
close to her body. In her mind, she had
clenched her arms tight near her shoulder
harnesses.
In reality, the in-car camera showed
her hands were much higher, almost
at her face. And just like that the talk
shifted from her otherwise clean run in
Thursday’s qualifying race to a discussion
about the pretty girl who covered her eyes
right before a big scary accident.
It didn’t matter that it wasn’t true.
“In IndyCars, you learn to take your hands
off the wheel,” Patrick explained Friday. “I
was trained when there is no saving it and
no hope, you let go. That’s what I did.
“No, I wasn’t covering my eyes. But, yes,
I did close them as I got to the wall. I didn’t
want my eyes to pop out of my head.”
Everything Patrick does this season, her
first full year in NASCAR, will be scru-
tinized. She’s one of the most popular
athletes on the planet, but her spotty rac-
ing resume makes her an easy target for
hard-core racing fans who consider her an
overhyped driver unworthy of the atten-
tion she receives.
She’s found often on ESPN, which
broadcasts the bulk of Patrick’s races.
She has dabbled the last two years in the
Nationwide Series and will run the full
schedule this year for JR Motorsports. She
also will make her Sprint Cup Series debut
in today’s season-opening Daytona 500,
the first of 10 scheduled events this season
for Stewart-Haas Racing.
So, it’s easy to understand why the tra-
ditional auto racing fan is concerned that
ESPN might overwhelm fans with its inter-
est in “Danicamania.”
“Our coverage is in balance with what
we believe the audience interest is,” said
Rich Feinberg, ESPN vice president of
motorsports.
Former NASCAR champion turned
ESPN analyst Dale Jarrett understands the
conundrum facing Patrick and her move
to NASCAR, which openly admits it hopes
she drives ratings and attracts new fans.
She’ll be heavily featured in Saturday’s sea-
son-opening Nationwide race at Daytona.
“I think she’s a polarizing figure,” Jarrett
said. “I’ll be quite honest. I was very skep-
tical when she came over. Could she han-
dle these cars, get in and mix it up? I think
she can. Is she going to go out and set the
world on fire? That’s going to be difficult
to do, because she’s up against the best in
the world.
“But she’s good for the sport, and I think
we do a very nice job of balancing that
and giving her enough and giving the fans
enough but not going over the top either.”
BY JENNA FRYER
The Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH — Tony
Stewart has had plenty of
chances to win the Daytona
500, and he’s had his heart bro-
ken every time.
Stewart wound up on his
roof in 2001, and his engine
blew in the opening laps of the
2002 race. He finished second
to Dale Earnhardt Jr. in 2004,
and wrecked while leading in
2007.
The most difficult defeat was
likely 2008, when Ryan Newman
was pushed past Stewart on
the last lap to snatch away the
victory. Last year, Stewart was
second on the final restart but
faded to a 13th-place finish as
rookie Trevor Bayne pulled off
the upset.
The race is such a crapshoot
that one of the Daytona 500
rookies, Danica Patrick, has
said she believes she’s got as
good a chance to win the race
as anyone.
“I felt comfortable. I feel more
than ready for Sunday,” said
Patrick, who walked away from
a violent crash in Thursday’s
qualifying race.
Her car is owned by Stewart,
the defending NASCAR cham-
pion who goes into today’s
season-opening Daytona 500
with a disappointing 0-for-13
record in “The Great American
Race.” Stewart has been
reminded every day since
arriving in Daytona about his
inability to win the big race
here.
“It’s not a good feeling
to not have that tally in the
win column,” Stewart said.
“Everything else we have pret-
ty much accomplished in this
sport that we want to accom-
plish. It’s the biggest race of the
year. Everyone wants to win
that race. I won’t say that it is
not a complete career if you
don’t win it, but there is a lot of
priority on this.”
He has a tremendous oppor-
tunity once again.
Stewart, who closed last sea-
son with five victories in the
final 10 races to win his third
NASCAR title, has given no
indication he’s slowed down
one bit during over the off-
season. He lost the exhibition
Budweiser Shootout last week
when Kyle Busch passed him
at the finish line, but rallied to
dominate his qualifying race
on Thursday.
The victory in the 150-mile
race gave Stewart the third
starting spot in the Daytona
500. And unlike years past,
when he’s hung around the
back of the pack and waited
to make his move, he’s given
every indication he wants to
race hard today.
His performance during
SpeedWeeks, he believes, has
made him the driver everyone
should want to work with on
the race track.
“I want those guys to see that
we’ve got strength,” he said. “I
think it’s an advantage to do
that at this point of the game,
showing that guys around you
are going to hopefully want to
be around you, and know that
you’ve got a car that can stay
up there, so they want to stay
with you.”
W
ell, I’ve done it again. Well,
I’ve done it again. Why did
I say that twice, you might
ask? Because, I’ve done two differ-
ent things again — at the same time.
One, I put myself under pressure
to perform … catching fish that is.
And, two, I left fish to find fish. As
the computer programmers would
say, “These two events are
mutually independent.”
Huh? As you will see, these
two events became indis-
tinguishably intertwined.
My wife Loretta’s Aunt
Ruby has come to visit us
from Virginia. Ruby is one
of the nicest, most sincere
people I have ever met.
Loretta and I have been
looking forward to this visit for quite
awhile. Ruby is not really a boating or
fishing person, so we did not plan to
be doing anything boat related, but,
almost two years ago, Loretta and I
took some fresh yellowtail filets on
a jet airplane and brought them to
Illinois, where Ruby was living at the
time.
Ruby had never eaten fresh yel-
lowtail before. In fact, she had never
eaten much fresh fish at all. So, it
was a bit surprising when she tasted
those delectable “sea treats” and
instantly fell in love with fresh yel-
lowtail. I love when that happens.
Ruby isn’t really much bigger than
a decent-sized wahoo, but she ate
enough yellowtail snapper that it
made Loretta and me laugh.
Ruby moved up to Virginia and
although we have stayed in touch
with letters and email we have not
seen her in person since that time.
When her visit was finalized and
scheduled, Loretta and I decided that
we should have at least one night
when we cooked fresh yellowtail
for Ruby. I immediately agreed and
began lining up a fishing trip that
would coincide with her arrival.
This was when the trouble started. I
have a waypoint that always gives up
yellowtail snappers. Usually, plentiful
yellowtails are small but
legal at this spot. It is rather
shallow, so light fluoro-
carbon leaders, tiny No. 8
hooks and small pieces of
bait camouflaging the hook
are keys to success here.
My first thought was to go
to this spot, catch some 13-
or 14-inch snappers and
fry them up when Ruby
arrived. Those of you who know me,
probably already know that plan was
too simple and predictable for me.
I made a few phone calls and
learned about some bigger yellow-
tails in deeper water. The general
consensus was, the fish are there, but
they were tough to get to the boat
because of sharks and cudas. It was
suggested to use heavier tackle so the
yellowtails could be “horsed” into the
boat ahead of marauding predators. I
love the thoughts of bigger yellowtails
and — I guess — I love the thought of
challenging marauding predators.
I headed out with my buddy, Larry,
to catch some yellowtails. I drove
right past my regular and predictable
small-fish spot and headed to one
of my deeper locations. We threw
the anchor, set out a block of chum,
sprinkled some oats in the water and
prepared to do battle. Before long,
bait showed up in the chum slick.
Remoras showed up in the chum
slick. Filefish showed up in the chum
slick, and flashes of yellow could be
seen way behind the boat and deep
in the water column.
I free-lined a piece of bait into
the chum slick. After a while, line
started to evaporate off the reel and
I slammed the bail closed. Nothing
was there. I reeled the line in and it
was cut clean above the hook. I tried
this several more times and had the
same results. I re-rigged with heavier
tackle. Here was the classic man-
against-nature battle, and I had no
intentions of losing. In the back of
my head, I kept thinking about Aunt
Ruby winging her way from Virginia
in a couple of days and I was sure she
thought of nothing except the yellow-
tail snapper extravaganza Loretta had
promised her. There’s the part about
my feeling pressured to perform.
“I cannot fail,” I admonished
myself. The heavier tackle was not
working. The water was crystal-clear
and the current was next to non-exis-
tent. The yellowtails would not hit
the heavier tackle. I knew there was a
balance point somewhere. So, I tried
heavy leader with little hooks, light
leader with big hooks, jigs, flies, big
pieces of bait, small pieces of bait. I
even tried “chumster diving.” That’s
when you reach into the shmutz at
the bottom of the chum bag and go
digging around looking for likely
looking pieces of bait to put on the
hook. This works, it really does. How
many times have you heard fisher-
persons say, “Match the hatch”? Well,
this time it didn’t work. We both had
appointments for the afternoon and
we fished until we ran out of time. We
returned to the dock with not even
enough yellowtail snapper to feed a
hummingbird. That’s sad, isn’t it?
The day of Ruby’s arrival, Larry and
I left the dock early. We ran directly
to location number one. You know
— the one that gives up fish all the
time? The water was crystal-clear. We
rigged with 12-pound fluorocarbon,
No. 8 hooks and small pieces of bait. I
sprinkled oats. I could see the bottom
clearly. The current was moving lei-
surely. In short order, the yellowtails
balled up behind the boat. We drifted
baits into the chum slick and quickly
limited out with 13- to 14-inch yel-
lowtail. Hallelujah. The pressure was
off. We never left fish to find fish,
although I must admit we did talk
about it twice but convinced each
other to do the right thing and stay
right where we were.
We cleaned the boat and filleted
the fish. Loretta and I jumped in the
car and drove to Key West to pick up
Aunt Ruby. It was wonderful to see
her again. We jibber-jabbered all the
way home, heated up some peanut
oil and cooked a mess of “same day”
yellowtail snapper. Aunt Ruby made
both of us smile when she asked for
more yellowtail. This was just the way
we hoped it would be.
Aunt Ruby, we both love you and
we’re so glad you’re here. And, as
always, life is good in the Florida Keys;
life is very good in the Florida Keys.
C.J. Geotis is a life-long fisherman
who followed his dream to live in the
Florida Keys 11 years ago. His newly
published book, Florida Keys Fish
Stories, is available at Amazon.com. He
lives in Marathon with his wife, Loretta.
His email is fishstoriescj@comcast.net.
Aunt Ruby comes to visit and the pressure is on
BY C.J. GEOTIS
Citizen Fishing Columnist
C.J. GEOTIS/The Citizen
Aunt Ruby is visiting from Virginia and has put the pressure on columnist C.J. Geotis
to keep fresh yellowtail snapper on the menu. Geotis’ wife, Loretta, gets the empty
plate.
NASCAR
James Buescher
dodges wreck to
win Nationwide
Tony Stewart seeks
1st victory in 500
Spotlight shines bright on Danica Patrick
“While I like to think that I have done a good
job at times with my driving and with results,
people just want to know about me and are
curious. It grows, and it snowballs. Do I wish
I could have more wins? Yeah, of course I
do.”
Danica Patrick
Nascar Driver
TERRY RENNA /The Associated Press
Tony Stewart, right, and crew chief Steve Addington, left, pose with
the trophy after winning the first of two Daytona Gatorade Duel 150
qualifying races on Thursday in Daytona Beach.
TERRY RENNA/The Associated Press
James Buescher celebrates in
victory lane after winning the
Nationwide Drive4COPD 300 on
Saturday in Daytona Beach.
5B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
SPORTS
BY BRIAN MAHONEY
The Associated Press
ORLANDO — Orlando waited 20
years to host All-Star weekend again,
and Dwight Howard wants nothing to
spoil the party.
So forget that trade request, Magic
fans. Ignore the rapidly approaching
deadline for deals.
“All the other stuff can wait,” Howard
said Friday. “I just want people to
have fun and enjoy themselves. This
is All-Star weekend. This is a time of
celebration for guys who’ve had great
first halves and guys who have never
even seen this.”
Jeremy Lin has been the NBA’s big-
gest story this month, but the focus
shifted back to Howard, where it began
this season, with the NBA’s midseason
event in the city he insists he loves but
wants to leave.
That meant a wall of reporters and
cameras surrounding him, asking the
same questions Carmelo Anthony
was peppered with last year during
All-Star Friday, just before his trade
request from Denver was granted.
“Thank you, Dwight!” Anthony
yelled when he spotted the swarm.
“It’s your turn!”
Howard has asked for a trade, but
he’s still here and there’s no telling for
how much longer. The Magic could
deal their center before the March 15
trade deadline, or hold onto him all
season and risk losing him while get-
ting nothing back in July.
Howard’s table was between
Anthony and LeBron James, two of
the league’s best-known stars. Yet nei-
ther had anywhere near the attention
of Howard, and Anthony was glad
to yield the spotlight after his status
overshadowed last year’s festivities in
Los Angeles.
“I’m glad it’s not me anymore,”
Anthony said.
James went through the free agency
circus the season before, and acknowl-
edged that it wore on him.
“Yeah, absolutely,” James said. “I
know exactly what he’s going through.
It’s a tough situation but he’s going to
handle it. He’s a man. He’s going to
handle it. He’s going to do what’s best
for him.”
Lin wasn’t forgotten, even after
James and the Heat on Thursday
forced him into the worst game since
he became the Knicks’ starter earlier
this month. Many All-Stars were asked
about Lin, who was playing only in
Friday’s Rising Stars Challenge featur-
ing rookies and second-year players
yet was given his own evening press
conference to accommodate the large
media interest.
Howard said every time he watches
TV, he sees something about Lin, the
NBA’s first American-born player of
Chinese or Taiwanese descent. He
was asked if there was anything that
could stop the undrafted guard from
Harvard.
“Uh, he hasn’t gone up against the
Great Wall of Orlando yet,” Howard
said.
This wall may be moveable.
The Magic have given Howard’s
agent permission to discuss deals with
the Nets, Lakers and Dallas Mavericks,
and there was plenty of speculation he
could be dealt even before the season
began, just as Chris Paul was.
That would have created an awk-
ward All-Star reunion.
Howard literally towers over this
city, his face pictured on billboards
overlooking the interstate and on a
giant Adidas ad high atop the out-
side of the Amway Center. This region
caters to visitors, but didn’t have to
consider how it would have welcomed
Howard.
“I’m here, so it doesn’t matter what
would’ve or should’ve happened,” he
said. “But you know I’m here and we
want to have a great time. I’m looking
forward to all the events and showing
everybody my city.”
With its new arena in just its
second season, Orlando is host-
ing the All-Star game for the
first time since 1992, one of
the NBA’s most memorable.
Magic Johnson won MVP
honors only a few months
following his retirement after
contracting the HIV virus.
Even Shaquille O’Neal, who
has been critical of Howard in the
past, says he hopes the MVP this time
goes to Howard. O’Neal started his
career with the Magic before bolting
as a free agent, and he said recently
it would be a “travesty” if Howard
leaves.
If fans fear Howard following Shaq’s
path, he said they never tell him.
“Whatever you decide to do, we’re
behind you 100 percent,” they say,
according to Howard.
“They’ve been great,” Howard
added. “Despite what people may say
or think, the fans here have always
been great to me. I really appreciate it.
They’ve showed me nothing but love
from Day 1 and I’ve done the same
thing. This city means a lot to me.”
Howard said he was looking for-
ward to playing this weekend with
James, Anthony and Dwyane Wade,
who join league MVP Derrick Rose
in the powerful Eastern Conference
starting lineup.
The West is an L.A. story, with Kobe
Bryant and Andrew Bynum of the
Lakers joining the Clippers’ Paul and
Blake Griffin. Oklahoma City’s Kevin
Durant rounds out the first five.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Freshman Anthony
Davis scored a career-high 28 points on
10-of-11 shooting, and No. 1 Kentucky
beat Vanderbilt 83-74 on Saturday to win
the Southeastern Conference regular sea-
son title for the 45th time.
The Wildcats (28-1, 14-0) have won 51
straight at home and are on a 20-game
winning streak overall. But Kentucky
trailed at halftime and needed a late surge
to put away the scrappy Commodores.
Davis, who had 11 rebounds and five
blocks, hit an 18-foot jumper as the shot
clock expired with 1:06 left. Terrence Jones
added a dunk, and Davis blocked Lance
Goulbourne’s shot with 31 seconds to go
to put the game away.
Jeffery Taylor scored 19 points for
Vanderbilt (20-9, 9-5), and John Jenkins
added 15 of his 18 points in the second
half.
NO. 4 KANSAS 87, NO. 3 MISSOURI 86, OT
LAWRENCE, Kan. — Thomas Robinson made a
three-point play in the closing seconds of regula-
tion, and Tyshawn Taylor’s made two free throws
with 8.3 seconds left in overtime for Kansas in
the final scheduled regular-season matchup with
Missouri.
The Tigers, who blew a 19-point second-half
lead, never got a potential winning shot off in the
final seconds. Michael Dixon was boxed in by
Robinson as he tried to get to the basket, and the
buzzer eventually sounded on the 105-year-old
rivalry.
Robinson finished with 28 points and 12
rebounds for Kansas (24-5, 14-2), which
wrapped up at least a share of its eighth straight
Big 12 title. Taylor added 24 points, seven in
overtime.
Marcus Denmon had 28 points to lead Missouri
(25-4, 12-4), which heads off to the Southeastern
Conference next season. Ricardo Ratliffe finished
with 22 points, Dixon had 17 and Kim English 11.
Robinson took a feed in the post and backed
down Dixon, getting the leaner to go as he was
undercut for the foul. His free throw with 16.1 sec-
onds left tied the game at 75.
The Tigers had the final possession, clearing
the lane for Phil Pressey to drive to the rim. But
Robinson swatted his shot to force overtime.
NO. 5 DUKE 70, VIRGINIA TECH 65, OT
DURHAM, N.C. — Austin Rivers scored 23
points and Seth Curry added 19 for Duke.
Miles Plumlee added 15 rebounds and two free
throws with 9.6 seconds left for the Blue Devils
(25-4, 12-2), who made 6 of 8 foul shots in the
final minute of overtime to win their sixth straight
and remain atop the Atlantic Coast Conference
standings.
Dorenzo Hudson, one of three players with 16
points for the Hokies (15-14, 4-10), pulled them
to 64-63 with a deep jumper with 1:19 left in
overtime.
Mason Plumlee’s free throw with 51.1 seconds
left made it a two-point game, and he had a hand
in Hudson’s face during his jumper that would
have tied it.
After Rivers’ free throw with 19.4 seconds left
made it 66-63, Erick Green missed a layup and
Miles Plumlee’s free throws made it a five-point
game.
Green and Cadarian Raines also scored 16
points for the Hokies, who were just 7 of 16 from
the free throw line.
NO. 7 NORTH CAROLINA 54, NO. 25 VIRGINIA 51
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Tyler Zeller scored 20
points, including a critical dunk with 13.3 seconds
left and the shot clock winding down, as North
Carolina swep5t the season series.
John Henson added 15 points, including 11
in the second half, as the Tar Heels (25-4, 12-2)
kept pace with No. 5 Duke for first place in the
Atlantic Coast Conference.
Jontel Evans had 13 points and Joe Harris
added 12 for Virginia (21-7, 8-6), which played
much of the game with leading scorer and ACC
player of the year candidate Mike Scott in foul
trouble. Scott scored just six points, more than 11
below his average, and missed 10 of 13 shots.
Harrison Barnes had a poor shooting day for
the Tar Heels, missing 12 of 15 shots. He scored
seven points.
NO. 9 GEORGETOWN 67, VILLANOVA 46
WASHINGTON — Freshman Otto Porter had 15
points and six rebounds in his second start of the
season and Jason Clark had 15 points and six
rebounds for Georgetown.
The victory moves the Hoyas (21-6, 11-5) into
sole possession of fourth place in the Big East,
one-half game ahead of Cincinnati and South
Florida, who play Sunday. The top four teams get a
double-bye in the conference tournament
Dominic Cheek scored 19 points to lead
the Wildcats (11-17, 4-12), who have lost four
straight. Maalik Wayns returned for Villanova after
missing three games with a sprained left knee, but
he finished 1 for 10 from the field and had three
points.
Villanova remained without guard James
Bell, who missed his third straight game with a
sprained left ankle.
The Hoyas outrebounded the Wildcats 43-25 to
improve to 14-1 at home, while Villanova is 1-9 in
true road games. Georgetown allowed the Wildcats
to shoot just 28 percent, quite a turnaround from
the 61 percent that Seton Hall shot in its 18-point
win over the Hoyas on Tuesday.
NO. 13 BAYLOR 70, OKLAHOMA 60
WACO, Texas — Pierre Jackson scored 18
points, including the tiebreaking 3-pointer that
started Baylor’s game-deciding spurt.
The game was tied for the 12th time before
Jackson’s 3 put the Bears (24-5, 11-5 Big 12)
up 49-46 with 10:48 left. That started a 13-2 run
that was capped by consecutive 3-pointers by
Brady Heslip, who had 16 points.
Jackson and Heslip both had four 3-pointers.
Quincy Miller had 12 points and nine rebounds
for the Bears, whose 11th Big 12 victory matched
the most in school history.
Steven Pledger had 21 points for Oklahoma
(14-14, 4-12), which led 34-31 at halftime.
Oklahoma went 0 for 12 on 3-pointers, ending
a streak of 510 consecutive games with at least
one 3-pointer. Baylor, the league’s top-shooting
team from beyond the arc, has made a 3-pointer
in 648 consecutive games.
NO. 19 WICHITA ST. 81, DRAKE 58
WICHITA, Kan. — Ben Smith scored 18 points
to lead Wichita State.
Garrett Stutz added 15 points and Toure Murry
chipped in 14 for Wichita State (26-4, 16-2),
which had already clinched the Missouri Valley
regular season championship.
The Shockers avenged their only loss, a 93-86
triple-overtime thriller at Drake on Jan. 28, in their
last 17 games.
Ben Simons scored 21 points, hitting seven 3-
pointers, to lead the Bulldogs (16-14, 9-9).
Drake missed its first eight shots of the game,
as Wichita State took a 12-1 lead. But that van-
ished once Simons hit four 3-pointers to close
Drake within 15-13.
ST. JOHN’S 61, NO. 20 NOTRE DAME 58
NEW YORK — Moe Harkless had 22 points and
nine rebounds to lead St. John’s to its first win
over a ranked team in 11 games this season.
D’Angelo Harrison added 15 points for St.
John’s (13-16, 6-10 Big East), while Amir Garrett
had 11, including the drive that gave the Red
Storm a 61-58 lead with 8.9 seconds to play.
Scott Martin and Jack Cooley both had 18 points
for the Fighting Irish (20-9, 12-4), who had won
a program-record nine straight conference games.
Alex Dragevich missed a 3-point attempt at the
buzzer for Notre Dame, which shot a season-worst
4 for 31 from 3-point range (12.9 percent). The
Fighting Irish could have moved into a tie for sec-
ond place in the Big East with No. 10 Marquette.
Cooley had 11 rebounds, his fifth double-
double in his last six games.
NO. 21 UNLV 68, AIR FORCE 58
LAS VEGAS — Chace Stanback scored 21
points to lead UNLV.
Stanback scored 13 points in the first half
for UNLV (24-6, 8-4 Mountain West), including
his first three 3-point attempts. He had eight
rebounds and finished 5 of 7 from 3-point range.
Michael Lyons scored 18 points and Kyle Green
added 17 for Air Force (13-13, 3-9), which missed
11 of its first 13 shots and scored four points in
the game’s first 10 minutes.
Air Force had an 8-0 run with just over 8 min-
utes left in the first half, but the Rebels responded
with a 17-3 run to go up by 20 points.
BY GEORGE HENRY
The Associated Press
ATHENS, Ga. — Freshman
Kentavious Caldwell-Pope
scored 18 points, Gerald
Robinson added 15 and
Georgia snapped No. 12
Florida’s three-game winning
streak with a 76-62 victory
Saturday.
The Gators, who never
led in the game, trailed by
double digits most of the sec-
ond half. They whittled the
lead to five points on Kenny
Boynton’s 3-pointer with 1:53
remaining.
Georgia (13-15, 4-10
Southeastern Conference)
scored the next six points
as Dustin Ware and Donte’
Williams both made two free
throws and Caldwell-Pope fol-
lowed with a breakaway dunk
to make it 73-62.
Florida (22-7, 10-4) is sec-
ond, one game ahead of
Vanderbilt in the SEC. Bradley
Beal scored 19 points for the
Gators, who close the regular
season next week at Vanderbilt
and at home against No. 1
Kentucky
Florida had won 10 of 12
overall and had taken of 15 of
17 against Georgia, including
three straight.
They held the Bulldogs to
48 points in a 22-point vic-
tory in Gainesville on Jan. 10,
but Georgia got 12 points from
Nemanja Djurisic and 11 each
from Williams and Ware.
With Georgia leading 63-53,
the Gators had three chanc-
es to cut the lead to single
digits, but Boynton missed a
layup, Erving Walker’s 3-point
attempt never touched the rim
and Patric Young committed
a turnover before Robinson’s
free throws made it 65-53 with
2:51 remaining.
The Gators missed 13 of
their first 16 shots from the
field before Boynton’s 3 cut the
lead to 19-11 midway through
the first half. Beal’s layup
brought Florida within three
at the 2:48 mark, but Georgia
went on a 10-2 run to make
it 36-25 in the final minute of
the half.
Walker scored 14 points and
Boynton added 11 for Florida,
which was assessed a techni-
cal foul for dunking in pre-
game warmups and trailed
2-0 on the two free throws by
Robinson before tipoff.
Caldwell-Pope combined
with Robinson to score 21 of
Georgia’s 36 first-half points.
Georgia began the game
ranked last in the SEC in scor-
ing, but finished 15 points
above its average. Florida was
15 points under its SEC-lead-
ing average.
The Gators, who played
their first game without top
reserve Will Yeguette after the
sophomore forward broke
his left foot Tuesday against
Auburn, were just 5 of 23 on
3-point attempts. They began
the game leading the nation
with an average of 10.3 3-
pointers per game.
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION: ALL-STAR GAME (TONIGHT, 7:30 P.M.)
A break from Lin to put focus back on Howard
The Magic’s
Dwight Howard
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL: ROUNDUP
Caldwell-Pope sparks
Georgia past Florida
Freshman’s career high leads Kentucky
ORLIN WAGNER /The Associated Press
Kansas forward Thomas Robinson, left, blocks
a shot by Missouri guard Phil Pressey at the
end of regulation time during on Saturday
in Lawrence, Kan. The blocked shot sent
the game into overtime. Kansas defeated
Missouri, 87-86, in overtime.
ISAAC BREKKEN /The Associated Press
UNLV’s Chace Stanback passes the ball from the floor during the second half against Air
Force on Saturday in Las Vegas.
RICHARD HAMM /The Associated Press
Georgia guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) and forward Marcus
Thornton (2) compete with Florida’s Patric Young (4) for a rebound
on Saturday in Athens, Ga.
righthander Rudy Del Rio, now on the mound. Miller
grounded out to short and almost beat it out. First
base coach Peter Fraga tried to influence the umpire
by making a “safe” sign, but to no avail.
In the seventh, after Garret Pita had set down St.
Brendan in 1-2-3 fashion, the Conchs gave it one more
try. With two outs, Steve Wells got Key West’s fourth hit
and Varella followed with a walk. But, that was it, as
the next batter grounded out to end the game.
JV downs Coral Shores twice
The Key West junior varsity picked up a pair of
victories Saturday, defeating Coral Shores JV, 9-1, in a
game called after six innings on a two-hour time limit,
and 11-1, called after five innings on the “mercy”
rule.
In the first game, Brandon Presley pitched four
perfect innings before giving up a pair of hits and a
run in the sixth. Austin Kimbler closed it out with a
perfect sixth.
Andy Perez, who has seen action as a courtesy run-
ner for the varsity this spring, had a double, single and
a run batted in. Gustavo Galo, also with the varsity
until now, had a pair of singles and three RBI. Anthony
Henriquez picked up a pair of singles and two RBI.
Chris Varela, the third player who had been with the
varsity, had a single and an RBI. Shayne Alongi singled
and stole three bases and Caleb Shockley had a single.
In the second game, the pitching was split among
Jacob Beeman (2 innings, 1 hit, 1 earned run, 3 strike-
outs), Kimbler (2 innings, 2 hits, 2 strikeouts) and Joey
Figueroa (1 inning, 3 strikeouts).
Henriquez had three singles and an RBI, while
Juwan Brown, Galo, Presley and Marcus Brisson each
had a single and an RBI. Jared Bowling, Kimbler and
Jay Feathers each had a single. Varela hit a pair of sac-
rifice flys for two RBI.
The Key West JV is scheduled for another double-
header against the South Dade JV, beginning at 11
a.m., Saturday, at Rex Weech.
rmorrow@keysnews.com
6B
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
LOCAL SPORTS
YOUTH BASEBALL
Photos by RON COOKE/The Citizen
Ray Diaz throws out the ceremonial first pitch Saturday afternoon for the opening of the Little Conch
Baseball League at the Clayton Sterling Baseball Complex. Diaz has meticulously cared for the City of
Key West sports field for 17 years. Games are played six days a week in addition the city has other fields
for Diaz and the city crew which they proudly make game-ready each day.
Johnny Menendez is back in the coaching ranks with his grandson. He was offering a shirt and hat to
some other former coaches.
Those
darn
Yankees
look to
spoil the
Red Sox
season.
Navy petty
officer
Emily
Trollinger
belts
out the
national
anthem
with the
NAS Key
West
Honor
Guard
presenting
the colors.
Ricky Jackson, another former coach who has rejoined the coaching ranks, will have the Aqua Clean
Raptors well balanced.
FULL SWING
Little Conchs Baseball League gets
season started with opening ceremonies
MEN’S OVER-39 SOFTBALL
COMPILED BY RON COOKE
Citizen Staff
KEY WEST — In last week’s men’s over-39
softball, sponsored by the fine folks at JDL’s
Big Ten Pub, “Johnny B” John Baltzell had
the game in his hands and delivered with a
walk-off, two-run single propelling the Jaibas
to a 17-16 win over the power-hitting Roncos
in the latest Jewfish League soiree last Friday
night at DeWitt Roberts Field.
With bases juiced, the always calm “Johnny
B” Baltzell gapped the yellow orb into the
cold dark night — really — scoring two team-
mates and the celebration erupted with the
old fellows in blue.
The real game hero should have been
Roncos Geoff “Llama” Lemos who bashed a
trio of home runs to include a grand slam,
but who’d thunk a single would trump three
dingers.
Nonetheless, in his leadoff at bat in the first
inning, “Llama” Lemos put number one out
of the park. The Jaibas scored three of their
own for a short-lived lead. The hard-hitting
Roncos, even with a depleted lineup, put their
first eight batters onboard scoring eight with
the help of Lemos’ grand salami.
The Jaibas picked up three more for a one-
run ad, but the Roncos scored five on seven
hits and the top of four.
Down but not out, the men in blue battled
back yet again netting a pair in the fourth and
two more in the fifth narrowing their deficit
to one. The Roncos tried to get some separa-
tion in their last at bats but again were held
to one run.
With time running out, the Jaibas loaded
the bases setting the stage for “Johnny B”
Baltzell who stroked the game-winner.
His teammates had a lot to do with setting
up “Johnny B” for his decisive stroke. Nick
Hogen”s Heroes” and “Fearless” Mike Ferrell
each went 3-for-3, Jerry “Saving Private” Ryan
drove in three runs on a triple and base
hit, Mark “Boom Boom” Hoffer, Bobby “They
Call Me Bobby” Lopez and Ronnie “Return
to Sender” Presley each doubled and sin-
gled, Timmy “K.O.” Leonard, Les “Old” Mc
Donald “Had a Farm” and Fat “the Commish”
Yaniz slashed two hits apiece, Marty “McFly”
Gregurich, Brant “Big Daddy” Voss, John
“What Can” Brown “Do for You?”, and Baltzell
each had a hit.
For the Roncos, Javier “Green Card” Ferretti
went 4-for-4, Chris “Turbo Tax” Zuelch
thumped a three-bagger and singled twice
for two RBI, John “Schleppy” Childs ripped a
two-base hit and two base hits, Chris Cassidy
“and the Sundance Kid”, Jimmy “The Big
Tuna” Hake, Ken “Paper Cup” Dispenza and
John “Robocop” Murphy drilled two hits each,
Tommy “The Lapp Dogg” Lapp, “Diamond”
Dave Sweeting, and “Lil’ Dutch” Dave Holland
added one hit apiece.
SNAPPERS 15, MORAYS 11
The home team Snappers scored three in the first
and two more in the second. The Morays bounced
back putting up two runs in the top of the third and
kept the game within reach, but the Snappers offense
was just getting warmed up adding five runs on six
hits in their half of the third. The Morays continued
to chip away at the red fishes lead with three in the
fourth to pull within four.
The Snaps’ “Big D” Dale Bittner put up the only run
in the fourth on a solo shot. The green guys narrowed
the scoring gap even more in the fifth drawing to three
on a shot off the bat of Harry “Did I Miss That Call?”
Milliken.
Once again the Snappers were forced to try and
extend their lead and once again their offense came
through with four more, two from Jerry Wickes’ homer
increasing their lead to seven.
The Morays put two more runs on the board in the
sixth but fizzled at the plate.
Manny “No Hair” Herrera went 4-for-4 with a double
and two RBI, “Lucky” Louie Paez drove in three runs
via a triple and three base hits, Ricky Gonzalez plated
three on three, Francis Jaycocks doubled and singled,
“Cap’n” Eddie Griffiths smashed a two-run triple, Tony
“El Bigote” Mendez doubled, Chris Miller singled as
“Big D” added a double and Wickes stroked a two-
base hit and base hit to go with his dinger.
The Morays’ “The Pride of East Lansing” Joe
Graciak went 3-for-3 with a triple and two RBI, Ben
Blattenberger singled three times, Chuck “The Wall”
Malby stroked a two-base hit and base hit, Jeff “The
Iron Man” Kurkowski, Dave Matea, Don “The Bear”
Andersen, Eric “John” Hancock doubled and singled,
Bob Maun nailed a base hit and “Did I Miss That Call”
Milliken legged out a triple to go with his home run.
rcooke@keysnews.com
Baltzell delivers winner for Jaibas
Conchs
Continued from page 1B
RON COOKE/The Citizen
Bobby ‘They Call Me Bobby’ Lopez follows
through on a pitch on opening night of the
Jewfish League.
BUSINESS
1C THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
& CLASSIFIED
HOW TO GET ALONG WITH
ANYONE: PART II
Mastering
the art of
assertiveness
People
make
a sub-
sconscious
choice
every time
they get
angry.
Two of
the three
options will almost always fail,
and are the ones we know best:
Passive and aggressive behav-
iors.
Why do they fail? Passive
behaviors help you avoid
conflict, but not anger, which
then festers until it’s released
in some unhealthy way. Also,
people take advantage of you
when you are passive.
Aggressive behavior doesn’t
work either. When we attack,
we invite more anger and frus-
tration. If a co-worker puts you
down at a meeting and you
respond with a snide remark,
chances are, the behavior
will just get worse. Aggressive
behavior often escalates.
Assertive behavior is the only
option that will work with peo-
ple – be it your boss, co-worker
or spouse. Unfortunately, most
of us don’t know what it means,
and thus tend to confuse asser-
tive with aggressive behavior.
Assertive behavior means
you take care of your needs,
while also considering the
needs of others. Assertiveness
starts with an intent to take
care of yourself while doing the
least harm in the process.
Let’s say someone is argu-
ing with you and will not
listen. Every time you open
your mouth, he tries to inter-
rupt and overpower you. The
passive response would be
to back down, apologize and
show intimidation. The aggres-
sive response would be to yell
louder and give it right back.
The assertive person, however,
will stand confidently and not
react. He will speak in a normal
BOTTOM LINE
Key Largo company wins national award
Key Largo’s Safe Harbor Design Build recently received
accolades from the construction industry during the World of
Concrete trade show in Las Vegas. Safe Harbor Design Build won
an award in the large residential home category for its insulated
concrete forms, which offer resistance to hurricane winds and
energy efficiency.
Mariners Hospital honors Bell
Mariners Hospital employees nominated nurse
Marti Bell as employee of the quarter.
When Bell learned that a patient who was
traveling through the Florida Keys with his cats
had been involved in an accident requiring an
extended hospital stay, she and her husband,
John, had the patient’s RV towed to their home for the neces-
sary repairs and rescued the cats from the animal shelter. The
patient is recovering at a local convalescent center, and the Bells
frequently bring him to their house to visit his cats.
Bell received a $250 bonus, a plaque and a designated parking
space.
Williams completes post-doctoral course
Ross Williams was awarded a certificate in the practice of func-
tional medicine after completing a post-doctoral course of study
in functional diagnostic medicine.
Williams is a board certified chiropractic physician who pro-
vides natural health care options through traditional chiroprac-
tic, clinical nutrition and functional medicine.
He uses a science-driven functional approach that emphasizes
individualized medicine along with use of advanced laboratory
testing to uncover underlying metabolic disturbance rather than
just treating the symptoms. His practice has been located at
1217 White St. in Key West since 2002.
Gargan, Slavin hit five-year mark
First State Bank of the Florida
Keys congratulates Christina
Gargan, insurance specialist,
and Frank Slavin, mailroom
clerk/courier, on their fifth anni-
versary with the bank.
Gargan joined First State in
2006, and lives in Tavernier with
her husband.
Slavin has lived in Key West for 14 years and volunteers atnu-
merous bank-sponsored community events.
Bell
Slavin Gargan
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIEDS ◆ keysnews.com/classifieds FOR CLASSIFIEDS ◆ 305-292-7777, Option 4
PEOPLE SMARTS
BY ELISA LEVY
Citizen Staff
See ASSERTIVE, Page 2C
Photos by ROB O’NEAL/The Citizen
Key West Seaplanes co-owner Nikali Pontecorvo flies past Little Palm Island off the Saddlebunch Keys in a Cessna 172
Amphibian. The company has become the Florida Keys’ largest air charter business. Left, the Cessna 206 Amphibian is
the company’s newest aircraft.
Passengers regularly see wildlife, such as rays, sharks, dolphins and seabird
flocks, like this one off Sugarloaf Key at low tide. Below, an aerial view of Bahia
Honda Key is among the charter’s spectacular sights.
Two local pilots are altering the
course of seaplanes in the Florida
Keys.
The floating flying machines once
were synonymous only with the
remote islands of the Dry Tortugas,
but Nikali Pontecorvo and Julie Ann
Floyd filed a different flight plan when
they launched Key West Seaplanes.
With the late-2011 addition of a
new custom-built, amphibious
plane, Key West Seaplanes now
boasts the largest air charter fleet in
the Keys — two amphibious and one
land-based seaplane.
With more water than land com-
prising the Keys, the pilots are using
geography to their advantage, provid-
ing quick and convenient air travel
among the islands, to the mainland
and throughout the Caribbean.
“Our company has never done
Tortugas trips,” said Pontecorvo,
who flew for the now-defunct and
similarly named Seaplanes of Key
West, before he and Floyd started
Key West Seaplanes in 2009. “There’s
still confusion about the names, but
Seaplanes of Key West is gone.”
Fortunately for Floyd and
Pontecorvo, their business plan
was not reliant on Tortugas trips, as
changes in the national park’s con-
cession agreements allowed only
one seaplane company to service
the area. That company is based in
Alaska and owned by Florida Keys
developer Pritam Singh, Pontecorvo
said.
Local pilots
prove there’s more
to Keys than Tortugas
Sky’s
the
limit
BY MANDY MILES
Citizen Staff
See SEAPLANE, Page 2C
Key West Seaplanes
305-294-4014
www.keywestseaplanes.com
For $30 you can send your loved ones the
Luck of the Irish this St. Patrick’s Day, March 17.
Deadline is Wednesday, March 14 at 5:00pm
Contact Misty at 305-292-77787 ex. 213
or by e-mail: mgraves@keysnews.com
Lu
ck of the Irish
349719
May good luck
be your friend
In whatever you do
And may trouble be always
Astranger to you.
May you always have walls
for the winds,
A roof for the rain,
Tea beside the fire,
Laughter to cheer you,
Those you love near you
And all your heart might desire.
Happy St. Patrick’s Day
May the luck of the Irish
be on your side!
“People still hear ‘seaplanes’
and assume we go to the
Tortugas,” Floyd said. “But, oh
my god, there’s so many other
things to do out there. We’re
local and have always wanted
to show people the Keys the
way we see them — from the
air.”
Many people don’t realize
that amphibious seaplanes
don’t have to land in the water,
and a water landing doesn’t
mean passengers get wet
wading to shore, Pontecorvo
said. Once the plane touches
down, the pilot becomes a
boat captain and sidles up to
a dock.
Key West Seaplanes offers
transportation to and from
mainland airports, as well as
private, waterfront residences
with appropriate docking facil-
ities.
“As long as it’s safe and legal,
we can land at a private dock
and take people wherever they
want to go,” Floyd said, adding
that the planes need about 18
inches of water to land and
taxi, but it all depends on the
weight of the passengers and
cargo.
Passengers have chartered a
plane to go shopping in Naples,
or fishing in Bimini for a day,
while others have needed last-
minute documents flown to
the mainland after missing the
deadline for overnight ship-
ping, Floyd said.
The company also has done
emergency trips, like meeting a
man at the Key West airport 10
minutes after speaking to him
because his daughter had gone
into labor on the mainland.
“We’re selling convenience
and time,” Pontecorvo said,
adding that prices are listed for
the whole plane, which accom-
modates between two and five
passengers, depending on their
weight and amount of luggage.
Key West Seaplanes offers
day trips to Little Palm Island
for $450 round-trip. Passengers
enjoy a luxurious island lunch
and then take off whenever
they want for a sightseeing trip
back to Key West.
“We’re selling convenience
and time,” Pontecorvo said.
They’re also selling a world-
class view of the island chain
from 500 feet in the air. Low-
altitude flying offers an incom-
parable view of the blue-green
water of the Keys.
“We see turtles, dolphins,
stingrays, the reef and ship-
wrecks,” Floyd said, always
excited about charters to unin-
habited offshore islands that
are outside the Florida Keys
National Marine Sanctuary,
where seaplane landings are
permitted.
The company will pull up
onto a beach and serve a gour-
met picnic lunch, complete
with beach chairs, snorkel gear,
umbrellas and coolers. Both
pilots have performed private
weddings on secluded islands.
Thirty- and 50-minute sight-
seeing tours around Key West
and the Lower Keys are also
popular, and allow for plenty
of photo opportunities, Floyd
said.
“We’re just trying to get peo-
ple to realize that there’s not
just one destination for sea-
planes in Key West,” Floyd said.
“The Keys are a seaplane pilot’s
dream. I fly every day and they
never lose their beauty.”
mmiles@keysnews.com
Seaplane
Continued from Page 1C
TOURISM SNAPSHOT
Lodging occupancy report for the week of Feb. 12-18, 2012
The following is a glimpse of what percentage of hotel rooms were booked in
Key West and the Florida Keys during the previous week based on information
provided by lodging properties throughout Monroe County.
KEY WEST
Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Sat
OCCUPANCY (%) 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
This Year 84.6 92.1 95.3 97.1 99.4 99.4 100.3
Last Year 93.3 96.6 97.4 97.7 98.5 99.7 100.1
% Change -9.3 -4.7 -2.2 -0.6 0.9 -0.3 0.2
FLORIDA KEYS
Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fri Sat
OCCUPANCY (%) 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
This Year 74.8 82.2 86.0 89.5 92.9 93.7 97.5
Last Year 81.7 85.9 84.0 86.7 89.7 94.7 98.2
% Change -8.4 -4.3 2.5 3.2 3.6 -1.1 -0.7
Courtesy of Monroe County Tourist Development Council
Source: Smith Travel Research, Inc./STR Global, Ltd. 2012
2C
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
BUSINESS
FLORIDA KEYS KEY WEST
Aquarium opens stingray exhibit
The Key West Aquarium this month
opened its new, hands-on Stingray Bay
exhibit, featuring eight juvenile cownose
rays that visitors can feed and touch.
In the same family as the spotted eagle
ray, cownose rays are known for being doc-
ile, said Piper Smith, marketing director for
Historic Tours of America, which operates
the aquarium, at 1 Whitehead St.
The rays in Stingray Bay have had the
barbs, which grow from the base of the tail,
trimmed for the safety of guests.
Monroe County residents receive free
admission the first Sunday of every month
for Locals Appreciation Day.
For more information, email ggerwin@
historictours.com, call 305-296-6021 or
visit www.keywestaquarium.com.
FLORIDA KEYS
Wreck divers win prizes
More than 100 divers com-
pleted the first-ever Florida Keys
Wreck Trek Passport Program by
exploring a series of nine ship-
wrecks between Key West and Key
Largo. Ten of those divers were
selected at random as winners of
various prizes, including vacation
packages and dive equipment.
The winners hailed from vari-
ous parts of Florida, Ohio and
California.
The popularity of the con-
test has prompted organizers to
plan a Wreck Trek 2.0 that will
continue through January. For
information, visit www.fla-keys.
com/diving/wrecktrek.
KEY WEST
Tropic Cinema goes 3-D
Key West’s nonprofit Tropic
Cinema began screening 3-D
movies this month with pro-
jectors funded by the Rodel
Foundation and the Monroe
County Tourist Development
Council.
Martin Scorcese’s film,
“Hugo,” is the first 3-D film
to be shown at the nonprofit
theater.
The movie has been nomi-
nated for 11 Academy Awards,
including Best Picture.
The theater is at 416 Eaton
St., Key West.
For tickets and information,
visit www.tropiccinema.com.
tone, remain calm and say
something like, “I realize you’re
upset, but if you continue yell-
ing, I’m going to have to end
the conversation.”
Assertiveness is a learned
skill that requires a great deal of
practice. But it’s worth it if you
want to maintain your sense of
integrity and feel good about
your actions. Here are three
exercises to practice:
1. Acknowledge the other
person. Remember that being
assertive isn’t just about your
own needs. It’s important to
recognize the other person’s
feelings. In an argument, for
example, it’s essential for you
to state the other person’s posi-
tion and make sure she knows
you understand it. That doesn’t
mean you agree or are going to
give her what she wants; it sim-
ply means that you are taking it
into account.
2. Use repetition. When
people are upset they don’t lis-
ten to anyone but themselves.
For that reason it’s important
to state your position several
times. If your boss is asking
you to stay late, and you can’t,
you may have to say it three
or four times before he under-
stands that you are not going to
change your mind.
3. Explain the consequenc-
es. Assertive people know how
important it is to give others a
choice about how they behave.
Instead of closing down and
walking away from someone
who’s acting inappropriately,
give him the option to change
his behavior. You can say, “If
you continue to do that, I’ll
have to leave.” This gives the
person the choice to change.
Remember that consequences
aren’t threats; they are actions
you will take to make sure your
needs are met.
Martin Luther King Jr. once
said, “Never let a man pull
you so low as to hate him.”
When people try to hurt us, our
immediate response is to hurt
back. Although it may feel like
justice, it ultimately perpetu-
ates the problem.
When people attack you,
they want a good fight; they
want you to stoop to their level.
When you give them a fight,
you give them what they want,
and you lose no matter what
the outcome. Assertive behav-
ior is the only way to win the
game, so practice.
Elisa Levy conducts semi-
nars on conflict resolution and
anger management. For more
information, contact her at 305-
296-5437 or visit http://www.
elisalevy.com.
Assertive
Continued from Page 1C
ROB O’NEAL/The Citizen
Nikali Pontecorvo and Julie Floyd prepare a Cessna 182 for a flight at the Key West International Airport.
Photo courtesy of First State Bank of the Florida Keys
First State Bank of the Florida Keys provided a sponsorship donation to Friends of Fort
Taylor for its annual Civil War Heritage Days Festival. The bank’s support allowed local
students to attend the event. From left: Peggy Gilbert, Don Lanman and Tecia Cotton.
I
nvestors may, at times,
feel frustrated, as their
portfolios often are at the
mercy of unpredictable and
volatile financial markets
that are beyond anyone’s
control.
Controlling the quality and
diversification of the invest-
ments you own will improve
your chances of meeting
your long-term financial
goals. One way to do it by
putting as much money as
you can afford, year after
year, into tax-deferred invest-
ments.
When you contribute to a
tax-deferred account, your
money has the potential to
grow faster than it would in
a fully taxable investment
— that is, an investment on
which you paid taxes every
year. Over time, this acceler-
ated growth can add up to a
big difference in your accu-
mulated savings. For exam-
ple, if you put $200 each
month into a taxable invest-
ment that earned a hypothet-
ical 7 percent a year, you’d
end up with about $325,000
after 40 years, assuming you
were in the 25 percent feder-
al tax bracket. If you put that
same $200 per month into a
tax-deferred investment that
earned the same hypotheti-
cal 7 percent a year, you’d
accumulate about $515,000
— or nearly $200,000 more
than you’d have with the
taxable investment. (This
example is for illustrative
purposes only, and does not
reflect a specific investment
or strategy.)
Of course, you’ll eventually
have to pay taxes on the tax-
deferred investment, but you
may be in a lower tax bracket
by the time you retire. Also,
depending on how much you
withdraw each year from a
tax-deferred account, you can
have some control over the
amount of taxes you’ll pay.
Tax deferral can be a smart
choice, but there are several
options available.
One of the most attractive
choices is an employer-spon-
sored retirement plan, such
as a 401(k). Your earnings
have the potential to grow
on a tax-deferred basis, and
since you typically fund your
plan with pre-tax dollars, the
more you put in, the lower
your annual taxable income.
As many employers match
some of your contributions,
it’s almost always a good idea
to put as much as you can
afford into your 401(k), up
to the contribution limits,
and to boost your contribu-
tions every time your salary
increases. In 2012, you’re
allowed to contribute up to
$17,000 to a 401(k), plus an
additional $5,500 if you’re 50
or older.
Even if you participate
in a 401(k) plan, you can
probably also contribute to
a traditional IRA. Your earn-
ings have the potential to
grow tax-deferred and your
contributions may be tax
deductible, depending on
your income level. In 2012,
you can put in up to $5,000
to a traditional IRA, or $6,000
if you’re 50 or older. (If you
meet certain income guide-
lines, you might be eligible
to contribute to a Roth IRA,
which offers tax-free earn-
ings, provided you don’t start
taking withdrawals until
you’re 59
1
⁄2 and you’ve had
your account at least five
years.)
Finally, if you’ve “maxed
out” on both your 401(k) and
your IRA, you may want to
consider a fixed annuity. Your
earnings grow tax-deferred,
contribution limits are high
and you can structure your
annuity to provide you with
an income stream you can’t
outlive.
The more years in which
you invest in tax-deferred
vehicles, the better, so it’s
best to start contributing to
tax-deferred investments as
soon as possible.
This article was written by
representatives from Edward
Jones and submitted by Will
Pena, a financial advisor in
Islamorada. For more infor-
mation, visit www.edward-
jones.com.
COMMENTARY
Financial Focus:
Putting tax deferrals to work
SPECIAL TO THE CITIZEN
Artists of all stripes can now find their
supplies at The Art Box, next to Keys Kritters
at Mile Marker 100.
In the same store, which was opened last
October by a long-time local couple, shop-
pers can also find plenty to entertain young
children on a rainy day.
Jon and Joanna Dreaver (of the Key Largo
Conch House Dreaver family) moved their
arts and crafts store from the Tradewinds
Plaza last fall and dropped the crafts por-
tion to focus on art supplies.
“We are now focusing on art and artists
from beginners to professionals,” said Jon,
35, who says they keep their prices down
to discourage customers from traveling to
Miami in search of bargains.
“We sell everything at the manufacturer’s
suggested retail price, no mark ups,” he
said. “Often we hear that smaller Keys busi-
nesses price themselves out of the market.
It’s difficult to survive but we want to pro-
vide services people can afford. I hate to see
people drive up the [18-Mile] Stretch.”
Joanna, 29, says they have plans to even-
tually bring in local artists to teach art
classes, but the space for classes is now
being used for shipping services. However,
an enclosed backyard awaits sprucing up
for outdoor painting classes.
Their small shop also includes Key Largo
Pack and Ship, a full-service shipping facil-
ity with arrangements with UPS, FedEx and
DHL.
“We are an authorized shipping center
for FedEx and DHL, and we also ship UPS,”
he said. “We ship more than our art sup-
plies and kids’ supplies. We ship freight,
musical instruments, anything you want
to legally ship. We have the ability to ship
animals — legal reptiles and reef fish for
college labs — and we ship key lime pies.”
As he spoke last Friday morning, an
employee was busy cutting cardboard to
ship a guitar.
Besides art supplies and shipping, The Art
Box provides merchandise for children, too.
“People need something for the kids to
do on a rainy day. Almost 50 percent of our
store is devoted to entertaining children,”
he said.
A tall shelf along the wall is filled with
painting by numbers, jigsaw puzzles, stick-
er and construction pads, bead-stringing
kits, watercolor sets, feathers for making
jewelry and kits to decorate horses, houses,
fish and cupcakes. A variety of crayons and
markers are also stocked.
The Art Box, according to the Dreavers, is
striving to be a “multi-tasking” store.
“There’s something in the box for every-
body,” Jon quipped.
sgibbs@keysnews.com
KEY LARGO
Art store sells, ships and entertains
BY STEVE GIBBS
Citizen Staff
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
3C
DEAR ABBY: I'm a
sophomore at
a religious
u ni v e r s i t y
that is well
regarded in
both secular
and religious
circles. I
came here
to become
a doctor
because the
p r e - m e d
program has an outstanding
acceptance rate to medical
school.
However, in my third
quarter I took a religious studies
course and fell in love with the
department. I'd like to pursue
a career in this field, perhaps as
a professor. I have an excellent
GPA and am working three jobs.
My problem is that my
parents are not supportive. They
think I'm being impractical and
will end up working in a fast-
food restaurant for the rest of my
life. I thought they'd be thrilled
I have taken such an interest
in our faith. Becoming a doctor
no longer interests me. How
can I convince them that I can
major in religious studies and
not live in poverty? -- REBEL IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR REBEL: You shouldn't
pursue a career in medicine
unless your heart is in it because
if it isn't, you won't make a very
good doctor. Unless you plan to
take a vow of poverty, a career in
religion doesn't mean you'll end
up living hand-to-mouth. While
money is important, it's more
important that you devote your
life to something that gives you
emotional gratification.
DEAR ABBY: As a divorced
dad, I'm hoping you'll address a
problem I have encountered in
trying to co-parent my children.
My daughters are often invited
to parties and sleepovers, which
sometimes happen during my
parenting time, as well as during
my ex-wife's parenting time.
The invitations to these events,
however, are almost always sent
to my ex-wife's home or email
address.
Aside from the problems
that have occurred because the
information wasn't forwarded
to me in a timely manner, I
think it's sexist for invitations
to be sent only to the mother. It
reinforces the outdated notion
that a woman's role is to raise
children, and a father can't be an
active parent. Would you please
remind your readers that the
most appropriate way of inviting
a child who has two households
is to send the invitation to BOTH
parents? -- MODERN DAD IN
ROSWELL, GA.
DEAR MODERN DAD: I
think you have delivered that
message very clearly. However, if
not every reader takes it to heart,
make a point of discussing with
your ex-wife what activities may
have been scheduled for your
daughters while they're with
you. That way they won't miss
out on anything.
DEAR ABBY: I was recently
diagnosed with a cancerous
tumor on my tongue that has
made it extremely difficult and
painful to talk. The problem
is I don't know how to handle
encounters with strangers in
public places -- i.e., grocery
stores, libraries, etc. I havealways
been polite and courteous, but
now I can do no more than
nod. What would you suggest
in this situation? -- SUDDENLY
SILENCEDINFLORIDA
DEAR SUDDENLY
SILENCED: Make eye contact
with the people you would
normally greet verbally and
give them a smile as you are
already doing. If someone tries
to engage you in conversation,
point to your throat, shake you
head "no," and mouth the words
"can't talk." If you feel further
explanation is necessary, have
cards printed that state, "I am
unable to speak." That way, no
one should take offense.
Write Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
STUDENT HAS SEENTHE LIGHT ANDHOPES PARENTS WILL TOO
HOROSCOPES for today
Sunday, February 26, 2012
In the year ahead, you
might experience some
exciting changes triggered
by outside influences over
which you'll have no con-
trol. Fortunately, they'll work
out as well as if you had
authored them.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Conditions are ripe for
you to do things on a rather
grand scale. If you have any
bright ideas or concepts that
you'd like to expand, don't
be fearful of doing so.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- There is a good chance
that recent events have
been showing you that Lady
Luck is in your corner when
it comes to your financial
involvements. Don't ignore
this opportunity -- make the
most of it.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- It behooves you to be
as self-sufficient as possible,
because you are likely to be
far more fortunate when you
are in control of your own
affairs.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Conditions in gen-
eral look to be exceptionally
promising, making you lucky
in ways you'd least expect.
This will be especially true
concerning all competitive
involvements.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- The possibilities
regarding projects for which
you have high hopes appear
to be as good as you'd like
them to be. Continue to be
optimistic while all the time
thinking, "Win!"
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
There's a chance that you're
not fully aware of all the
ramifications of something
promising in which you're
involved. Take another look
at whatever it is you're doing
in order to make the most of
it.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- If there is something
you'd like to do in order to
influence public opinion, you
couldn't find a better time
than now to get the endeav-
or started and underway.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
- It's quite possible that some
changes could transpire over
which you'll have little or no
control. What occurs could
affect your status and/or
reputation, but the outcome
should please you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Fortunately for you,
an individual whose influ-
ence and authority exceeds
yours views you as an equal.
In fact, this person might
approach you in order to
form some kind of propitious
alliance.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- The chances
for advancing an ambitious
objective that is extremely
important to you are improv-
ing immensely. Take advan-
tage of what occurs to give it
a push.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) -- Friends are likely
to be drawn to you because
they'll sense you'll be fun
to be around. There is an
appealing charisma about
you, enhancing all of your
involvements.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Even if there is no
visible endorsement of that
innate lucky feeling you're
experiencing, it's likely to be
accurate. The fates are bus-
ily working out favorable out-
comes for you.
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
®
010....................................Public Notices
020............................Volunteers Wanted
030...............................................Travel
040.........................................Personals
050....................................Lost & Found
060..........................................Pets Found
110..............................Child/Adult Care
112...................................Money To Lend
120............................Private Instruction
130................................Mortgage Broker
210........................................Jobs Wanted
220...............Help Wanted Lower Keys
230..............Help Wanted Middle Keys
240.................Help Wanted Upper Keys
305......................................................Pets
310..................................Sporting Goods
315...............................................Bicycles
320..............................Household Goods
321...........................................Furniture
325...................................Miscellaneous
327...............................................Jewelry
329.....................................Yard Sale Map
330.......................Yard Sales Lower Keys
331.....................Yard Sales Middle Keys
332.......................Yard Sales Upper Keys
335...........................................Antiques
337....................................................Art
338...............................................Fine Art
340.........................Musical Instruments
345.........................................Appliances
350...............................Office Equipment
351.........................................Electronics
355....................................Wanted to Buy
402.......................................Roommates
404............................Rooms Lower Keys
406..........................Rooms Middle Keys
408............................Rooms Upper Keys
410...............Mobile Homes Lower Keys
412.............Mobile Homes Middle Keys
414...............Mobile Homes Upper Keys
416........Furnished Condos Lower Keys
417....Unfurnished Condos Lower Keys
418........................Condos Middle Keys
420..........................Condos Upper Keys
422............Furnished Apts. Lower Keys
424...........Furnished Apts. Middle Keys
426............Furnished Apts. Upper Keys
428................Unfurn. Apts. Lower Keys
430...............Unfurn. Apts. Middle Keys
432................Unfurn. Apts. Upper Keys
434.................Furn. Houses Lower Keys
436................Furn. Houses Middle Keys
438................Furn.. Houses Upper Keys
440.............Unfurn. Houses Lower Keys
442...........Unfurn. Houses Middle Keys
444.............Unfurn. Houses Upper Keys
446..............Wanted To Rent Lower Keys
448............Wanted To Rent Middle Keys
450..............Wanted To Rent Upper Keys
451.....................Mobile Home/RV Sites
452............Vacation Rentals Lower Keys
454..........Vacation Rentals Middle Keys
456............Vacation Rentals Upper Keys
458..............Vacation Rentals Elsewhere
460..........................Commercial Rentals
462.......................................Office Space
464...............................................Storage
Mobile Homes
502........................................ Lower Keys
504.......................................Middle Keys
506........................................Upper Keys
508................................ Lots Lower Keys
510............................... Lots Middle Keys
512................................ Lots Upper Keys
Homes For Sale
513........................................Timeshares
514..........................Condos Lower Keys
516.........................Condos Middle Keys
518..........................Condos Upper Keys
520...........................Homes Lower Keys
522..........................Homes Middle Keys
524...........................Homes Upper Keys
Commercial
526......................Business Opportunity
528...............................Business Wanted
530.......................................Investments
532................................Income Property
534.......................Commercial Property
Other Real Estate
536...............Lots & Acreage Lower Keys
538.............Lots & Acreage Middle Keys
540...............Lots & Acreage Upper Keys
542...............................Realty Elsewhere
544...................................Realty Wanted
Autos/Trucks
610................................................Trucks
615..................................Auto Financing
620....................................Autos For Sale
622.....................................SUVs For Sale
625.....................................Classic Autos
630....................................Autos Wanted
640..........................................Auto Parts
645.............................Heavy Equipment
Recreation
650.............................................Scooters
652.......................................Motorcycles
654....................................Travel Trailers
656............................................Campers
658...........................RVs/Motor Homes
660....................................Marine Needs
661....................................Marine Parts
662.......................................Powerboats
664............................................Sailboats
665.......................................Houseboats
667.........................................Misc. Boats
669.............................Dockage/Storage
670.............................................Aviation
000
ANNOUNCEMENTS
200
EMPLOYMENT
300
MERCHANDISE
400
RENTALS
600 AUTOS/
TRANSPORTATION
900
LEGALS
100
SERVICES
500
REAL ESTATE
Accepting Applications
OUTSIDE SALES
REPRESENTATIVE
Key West
340718
The Key West Citizen has an opening for an outside
Sales Representative. Must have good organizational
skills like meeting people and be dependable.
No experience is necessary but must have a positive
attitude and want to make money.
Send your resume to:
Tommy Todd,
3420 Northside Drive,
Key West, FL 33040
or e-mail to:
ttodd@keysnews.com
No phone calls please
Ad Designer — Full Time
The Citizen is hiring a creative ad designer for our
Key West office to help our advertisers succeed.
Job duties include:
• Design client ads and in-house promotions
to specifications.
• Prepare overlays for newspaper production.
• Assist with preparing classifieds.
• Proofreading
Successful candidates will be comfortable
using Macintosh publishing applications:
Adobe InDesign, Photoshop and Illustrator.
Excellent organizational and typing skills,
attention to detail, the ability to work on
multiple projects under deadline, and a positive,
professional attitude are the keys to success.
Interested applicants should forward resume to
Danette Baso Silvers at: dbsilvers@keysnews.com
319575
Page Designer — Full Time
The Citizen is hiring an evening editorial page
designer.
The designer will use Adobe InDesign and
Photoshop to create visually effective and
appealing print products that adhere to legal,
ethical and quality standards. The designers will
design newspaper pages for daily and weekly
publications. The page designer is responsible for
creating page designs and graphic elements.
Interested applicants should forward resume to
Editor Tom Tuell at: ttuell@keysnews.com
319574
3
4
9
7
9
1
Line Cooks
Great pay and benefits.
KW’s friendliest staff and working environment.
Apply in person at Zero Duval.
319426
SERVER ASSISTANT
HOUSEKEEPERS
GIFT SHOP ATTENDANT
GREAT PAY, INCENTIVES, BENEFITS, PAID VACATION
Please apply in person at
28500 Overseas Highway, Little Torch Key
3
1
9
4
3
8
MEDICAL BILLING
TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a
Medical Office Assistant!
No experience needed !
Job Training & Local
Placement assistance.
HS Diploma/GED &
PC/Internet needed!
1-888-778-0456
LOT ATTENDANT
FL Drivers License.
Clean cars, bikes &
scooters; general main-
tenance; customer inter-
action. $350/wk
non-smoker.
Tropical Rentals,
1300 Duval
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
Boy’s and Girl’s Club
Due to increase in Club
Members. We need addi-
tional Activity Coordina-
tors. Part-time after
school Key West. Previ-
ous applicants need not
apply. Fax resume to
305-296-4632
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
For Local C.D.L. Class B
Drivers Grapple/Dump
Truck. Apply in person at
Safe Harbor Industries,
7281 Shrimp Rd., North
building KeyWest, Fl.
33040. 305-481-0165.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
Front Desk/Concierge
Position
At Old Town guesthouse.
Must be responsible, reli-
able with ability to multi-
task and an eye for de-
tails. Sense of humor a
plus. Apply in person at
1015 Fleming St.
Exciting Retail
Sales Opportunities
coming available for dy-
namic, experienced sales
people at Key West's
brand new Hammerhead
Surf Shop. Email resume
to: rich@sunsetwatersports.info
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
MECHANIC
Full time position. Highly
experienced only apply.
Email resume with refer-
ences to:
kiworric@bellsouth.net
PLUMBERS AND
HELPER WANTED
Must have valid drivers li-
cense and clean driving
record. Shawn Hudgins
Plumbing, Come by
5607 3rd Ave. 294-6276.
KEY WEST ICE CREAM
FACTORY & CAFE
NOW HIRING
Friendly and outgoing
Counter Help
for daytime shift
Apply at 201 William St.
AC Mechanic Helper
FT M-F Experience and
valid drivers license re-
quired. Please apply in
person at 311 Margaret
St. Previous applicants
need not apply.
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
AND ASSISTANTS
needed for Home Health
Care in the Florida Keys.
Flexible schedule, Please
call 305-213-0390
Painter’s Apprentice
Needed
Will train qualified candi-
date. Must have vehicle
for transportation to job.
Call 305-360-2137
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
EXPERIENCED
PLUMBER
Irrigation Tech or Equip-
ment Operator. Must
have DL, Tools needed.
305-304-2986
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Insurance Agency,
440 License or Exp.
305-294-2829.
help and fill in as needed.
Other duties as assigned.
Requirements: Florida
Class B driver’s license is
required at time of hire
(no permits). Must be
able to work weekends.
Additional Information:
*Must possess strong
customer service skills
and be able to follow writ-
ten/oral instruction. *Ba-
sic math skills are a
must. *Position requires
frequent lifting, loading,
pushing, pulling, bending,
reaching & squatting (up
to100 lbs). *Clean back-
ground (background
check and drug test are
required).
*MUST BE ABLE TO
SPEAK READ & WRITE
ENGLISH FLUENTLY!
5510 McDonald Ave.
Stock Island.
ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS!!
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
REFRESHMENT
SERVICES PEPSI OF
KEY WEST HAS THE
FOLLOWING OPENING
*SWINGMAN*
Full-Time
Duties/Responsibilites:
Deliver and/or sell prod-
uct to customer’s location
and place in customers
storage area and/or retail
locations. Properly track
and/or document receipt
of product by customer,
credits for returned prod-
uct and money received
from customer. Learn all
delivery sales routes,
Mental Health
Technician-Crisis
Stabilization Unit
(Marathon)
Per Diem, Nights and
weekends a must.
PT Housekeeper –
Marathon
All applicants must 1)
provide a resume and
three references, and 2)
undergo background,
fingerprint, and drug
screening prior to any
offer of employment.
Send resumes to
hr-gcc@westcare.com
or via facsimile to
(305) 571-9324.
EEOC/DFWP.
Former applicants need
not reapply
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
Positions
available at
The Guidance/Care
Center, Inc.
Behavioral Health
Therapist
Providing services to
adults and/or children
and families
(we need both).
Adult and children thera-
pist needed in Key West
and a Child Therapist
in Key Largo.
Master’s required;
Licensed preferred.
Full time.
RN’s Crisis
Stabilization Unit
(Marathon)
F/T, P/T, all shifts, varied
benefits packages.
Ability to work a set
schedule required.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
NOTICE TO
ADVERTISERS
In case of errors,
please check your ad
the first day it appears.
In the event of an error,
we are responsible for
the first incorrect inser-
tion of an ad. The Citi-
zen does not assume
responsibility for any
reason beyond the cost
of the ad itself.
CANCELLATIONS
All word ad rates are
placement fees and
non-refundable (for fre-
quency days canceled).
Ads may be removed
from publication with
placement fee remain-
ing.
CHANGES
Once an ad has been
placed only acceptable
minor changes can be
made to the ad.
010 Public Notice
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
4C
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE BY CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, DANNY L.
KOLHAGE, Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Monroe County, Florida,
will, on the 15TH DAY OF
MARCH, 2012, at 11:00 A.M., on
THE FRONT STEPS OF THE
MONROE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 500
WHITEHEAD STREET, in the City
of KEY WEST, Florida, offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for CASH
the following described property
situated in Monroe County,
Florida, to wit:
LOT 11, BLOCK 12, COCO
PLUM BEACH, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 166, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
MONROE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Property address:
1325 AVENUE H,
MARATHON, FL 33050
Pursuant to FINAL JUDGMENT
OF FORECLOSURE entered in a
case in said Court, the style of
which is:
HSBC BANK USA.
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARK A. HUYETT; NELSON
TERZIAN, M.D. PA.; USA
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE;
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants
And the Docket Number of which
is Number 09-CA-000514-M
WITNESS my hand and the
Official Seal of Said Court, this
15th day of February, 2012
DANNY L. KOLHAGE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Monroe County, Florida
By: Tammy Marciel
Deputy Clerk
Florida Statute 45.031: Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
February 26 & March 4, 2012
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE BY CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, DANNY L.
KOLHAGE, Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Monroe County, Florida,
will, on the 15tH DAY OF
MARCH, 2012, at 11:00 A.M., on
THE FRONT STEPS OF THE
MONROE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 500
WHITEHEAD STREET, in the City
of KEY WEST, Florida, offer for
sale and sell at public outcry to the
highest and best bidder for CASH
the following described property
situated in Monroe County,
Florida, to wit:
A PART OF “TRACT 10 OF
EDMOND'S ACREAGE
TRACTS”, AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 100, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
MONROE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
BY METES AND BOUNDS AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 13, BLOCK D, OF “SHERYL
SUBDIVISION NO 2” AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MONROE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEAR
WEST, 239 FEET; THENCE
BEAR SOUTH 805 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE
PARCEL OF LAND
HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED;
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH
80 FEET; THENCE BEAR EAST,
75 FEET TO AN EXISTING
CANAL; THENCE BEAR
NORTH, ALONG SAID CANAL,
80 FEET; THENCE BEAR
WEST, 75 FEET, TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.
Which has the address of:
800 62ND STREET OCEAN,
MARATHON, FLORIDA 33050.
Pursuant to FINAL SUMMARY
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
entered in a case in said Court,
the style of which is:
NEW YORK COMMUNITY BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN M MIRABELLA; ARLENE F
MIRABELLA; WELLS FARGO
BANK NA; JOHN DOE; MARY
DOE
Defendants
And the Docket Number of which
is Number 10-CA-000381-M
WITNESS my hand and the
Official Seal of Said Court, this
15th day of February, 2012
DANNY L. KOLHAGE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Monroe County, Florida
By: Tammy Marciel
Deputy Clerk
LOAN TRUST 2007-22
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2007-22,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN L. KENT, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated
February 3rd, 2012 and entered
in
Case No. 44-2010-CA-000087-M
of the Circuit Court of the
SIXTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and
for MONROE County, Florida
wherein THE BANK OF NEW
YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS,
CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-22
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-22
is the Plaintiff and JOHN L.
KENT; AMANDA J. KENT; are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF MONROE COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, KEY WEST,
FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the
8th day of March, 2012, the
following described property as
set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 1, BLOCK C, WALORISS
SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 113, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MONROE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2201 SOMBRERO BEACH
ROAD, MARATHON, FL 33050
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on February 7th,
2012.
Danny L. Kolhage
Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By: Tammy Marciel
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09126049 COUNTRY-CONV
B/C---Team 6
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact: Ms. Holly Elomina
502 Whitehead Street
Key West, FL 33040
Phone: 305-295-3644
Fax: 305-292-3435
February 19 & 26, 2012
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MONROE COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
44-2010-CA-000087-M
DIVISION:
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON FKA THE BANK OF
NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS,
CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE
and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF MONROE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, KEY
WEST, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on
the 8th day of March, 2012, the
following described property as
set
forth in said Final Judgment:
UNIT 431 OF SOMBRERO
RESORT, A CONDOMINIUM,
ACCORDING TO THE
DECLARATION OF
CONDOMINIUM THEREOF
RECORDED IN O.R. BOOK
1016,
PAGE 243, AS AMENDED IN
O.R. BOOK 1183, PAGE 177;
O.R. BOOK 1300, PAGE 1858;
O.R. BOOK 1346, PAGE 1184;
O.R. BOOK 1346, PAGE 1227;
O.R. BOOK 1347, PAGE 1415;
O.R. BOOK 1394, PAGE 1925;
AND ALL EXHIBITS AND
FURTHER AMENDMENTS
THERETO, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF MONROE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER
WITH ALL APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO APPERTAINING
AND SPECIFIED IN SAID
CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION.
A/K/A 19 SOMBRERO BLVD
#431, MARATHON, FL 33050
Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on February 7th,
2012.
Danny L. Kolhage
Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By: Tammy Marciel
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08115433
WELLSLPS-CONV---Team 6 -
F08115433
**See Americans with
Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
contact: Ms. Holly Elomina
502 Whitehead Street
Key West, FL 33040
Phone: 305-295-3644
Fax: 305-292-3435
February 19 & 26, 2012
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR MONROE COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.:
44-2009-CA-000009-M DIVISION:
US BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR CSAB
MORTGAGE-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY SAMARRON , et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated and
entered in Case No.
44-2009-CA-000009-M of the
Circuit Court of the SIXTEENTH
Judicial Circuit in and for
MONROE County, Florida wherein
US BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR CSAB MORTGAGE-
BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-3
is the Plaintiff and LARRY
SAMARRON; CESLYNN
REGALADO; SOMBRERO
RESORT CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC. - A
DISSOLVED CORPORATION;
are the Defendants, The Clerk of
the Court will sell to the highest
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 1800 NW 49TH
STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or
before March 14, 2012, a date
which is within 30 days after the
first publication of this Notice in
the
Key West Citizen and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3rd day of
February, 2012.
DANNY L. KOLHAGE
As Clerk of the Court
By: Riella Lynn Sims
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs special
accommodation to participate in a
court proceeding or event, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Cheryl Alfonso,
ADA Coordinator, 302 Fleming
Street, Key West, FL 33040, (305)
292-3423, at least seven (7)
working days before your
scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this
notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than
seven (7) days. If you are hearing
or voice impaired, call 711.
February 19 & 26, 2012
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE
SIXTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MONROE COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 44-2011-CA-001191K
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID A BETHUNE, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JACOB BARENDREGT, III
LAST ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property:
A parcel of land on the Island of
Key West, and known on
William A. Whitehead's Map of
said island delineated in
February 1829, as part of tract
Seventeen (17), but known
better described as part of Lot
Ten (10), according to D.T.
Sweeney's Diagram of Lot Five
(5) tract Seventeen (17)
recorded in Deed Book “O”,
Page 327, Monroe County,
Florida, Records, said parcel
described as follows: BEGIN at
the Westerly corner of the said
Lot 10 and run thence
Northeasterly along the
Northwesterly boundary of the
said Lot 10 for a distance of 81
feet; thence Southeasterly and
at right angles for a distance of
40 feet to the Southeasterly
boundary of the said Lot 10;
thence Southwesterly along the
Southeasterly boundary of the
said Lot 10 for a distance of 81
feet to the Southwesterly corner
of the said Lot 10, thence run
Northwesterly along the said
Southwesterly boundary of the
said Lot 10 for a distance of 40
feet, back to the Point of
Beginning.
has been filed against you; and
you are required to serve a copy
of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Marshall C. Watson, P.A.,
NOTICE OF ACTION
FICTITIOUS NAME
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thathe undersigned desiring to
engage in a business under the
fictitious name
KWCrossStitchDesigns located
at 1015 Simonton Street, Key
West, Florida 33040 intends to
register the said name with the
Florida Department of State,
Tallahassee, Florida.
DATED this 23rd day of
February, 2012.
Sole Owner:
Tammy L. Wischmeyer
February 26, 2012
FICTITIOUS NAMES
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
Florida Statute 45.031: Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
February 26 & March 4, 2012
LEGAL NOTICES
There’s always somethin’ cookin’ in the Keys!
Look for the “What’s Cookin’?” Restaurant Guide in the
Key West Citizen for Menu Specials, Brunch, Breakfast,
Dinner, Tapas, Bar Food... Whatever whets your appetite!
305-292-7777 x203
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
at
*WESTIN KEY WEST*
*SUNSET KEY*
*WEATHER STATION*
*AND BANANA BAY*
Westin
*Front Desk Agent
*Garde Manger
*Night Audit
*Reservations Agent
*Cocktail Server
*Production Cook AM
*Line Cook
Sunset Key
*AM Sous Chef
*Latitudes Server
*Busser
+ Previous applicants
need not apply again.
+ Application hours are
from 9am to 3:30pm.
+Can also apply on-line
to:
hr@westinkeywestresort.com
Drug Free Work Place -
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
Apply in Person
245 Front Street,
Key West, FL 33040
Tel: 305-294-4000
Fax: 305-292-4348
FULL/P.T. LABORS
Saturday/Sunday morn-
ings flexible weekdays on
beach. Dependable need
only apply! 305-432-1281
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
HYATT RESIDENCE
CLUB
Looking for highly
motivated & talented
individuals to join the
Hyatt Residence Club
Sales & Marketing team.
Sales Executives
Current Florida Real
Estate License required.
Fantastic sales
opportunity that offers
salary, commission and
company benefits.
Put that license to use;
it will change your life.
OPC/Marketing
Representatives
* Must be able to work
weekends and holidays
* Great benefit package -
Medical, dental, vision,
401K.
Apply online at hyatt.jobs
EOE/AA M/F D/V
EXPERIENCED
MAINTENANCE/
HANDY PERSON
Full-time Condo Mainte-
nance - Must have good
positive attitude be able
to multi-task and be self
motivated. Must be fluent
in English if not no need
to apply. Salary comm.
with exp. Call for appoint-
ment only between the
hours of 9am-3pm M-F.
305-294-9553.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
CROWNE PLAZA
Key West - La Concha
*Chief Engineer
The Crowne Plaza La
Concha has an opportu-
nity for a Chief Engineer.
Candidate must possess
strong leadership skills
and have at least 2 years
experience as a Chief
Engineer or Assistant
Chief Engineer in a
full-service hotel. Candi-
date will be responsible
for repairs and mainte-
nance and must be able
to work a flexible sched-
ule including weekends,
holidays, etc. as needed.
Apply in person at:
430 Duval St.
M-F, 10am-3pm
EOE/M/F/V/D
Drug Free Workplace
Monroe County
B.O.C.C. Staff Assistant
OMB, Key West
$31,394.92 - $37,673.66
40 H.P.W. High School
Diploma or G.E.D. 2-3
years exp., Deadline:
03/09/12. Contact: John
Lewinski 305-292-4557.
Lewinski-john@monro
ecounty-fl.gov.
1100 Simonton Street,
Key West, Fl. 33040
Veterans Preference
available; E.O.E.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
LAS SALINAS
CONDOMINIUM
Is now accepting applica-
tion for a fulltime in
house Security position.
Requirements are a Flor-
ida Drivers License of
Florida Class D Security
License. Excellent com-
munication skills and a
good work ethic. Matur-
ity and experience a plus.
The hours for the position
are Saturday and Sunday
8am-6pm,4pm-10pm dur-
ing the week with 2 days
off. Las Salinas offers a
pleasant working envi-
ronment, good salary and
benefits. If you are the
right candidate for this
position. Please call
305-294-6020 or
305-849-0261 to sched-
ule an appointment.
FINE ART SALES
$10/Hr Plus great com-
mission training plan or
commission, Plus bonus
plan, Plus Co-Pay Hospi-
tization, Plus Vacation
Pay, Plus Great Working
Environment. Plus We
will train. If you have a
desire to learn and a
great work ethic. Please
email resume with con-
tact info to
keywestgallery@bellsouth.net
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
HOUSEKEEPERS FLEX
Flex Custodial Worker-
Housekeeper & Janitorial
positions are available at
Navy Gateway Inns &
Suites, Naval Air Station,
Key West. Scheduled as
needed up to 40 hours
per week. No benefits.
English language is pre-
ferredin order to commu-
nicate with supervisor
and guests. Housekeep-
ing experience is stongly
preferred and the ideal
candidate must be highly
motivated and reliable.
Rate is $11.22 per hour.
Application packets can
be obtained at the Pass
& ID office at Boca Chica
and turned in at same lo-
cation. Applications may
also be faxed to Sarah
Childers, 293-4105.
Immediate openings
for P/T & F/T employees
at 422 Eaton Street,
Key West

(305) 396-7282

3
4
4
9
8
9
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
Mechanics
Tired of working flat-rate?
Looking for secure in-
come with benefits? Old
Town Trolley Tours is
looking for full-time ASE
certified technicians.
Shift will include week-
ends. Pay commensu-
rate with certifications
and experience. Clean
driving record is a must.
Full benefit package
available for all FT posi-
tions, including 401(k),
Med, Den, Life, and 2
wks vacation. Apply in
person at 122 Simonton
St. or fax resume to
292-8939 or email us at:
keyott@historictours.com
EOE & Drug Free
Workplace
PIER HOUSE RESORT
OPENINGS
*F/T PM Line Cook
*F/T Server
Current, strong, stable,
verifiable related exp.
required & must be able
to work a flexible
schedule. Strong cus-
tomer service skills,
detail orientated &
English fluency a must.
Excellent benefits
package, meal & parking
available.
EOE, M/F/D/V.
Drug Free Workplace.
Apply:
H/R Dept. One Duval St.
M-F, 10am to 4pm.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
SEARS
Job Opportunities
If you are interested
in one of the following
positions, please
complete an application
at Sears.com/careers.
• Base plus commission
sales in Hardware depart-
ment.
• Base plus commission
sales and technician posi-
tions also available in our
auto center. Valid driver
license required.
Sears Holding Corporation is
a EO/AA employer
3
4
9
6
7
8
OVERSEAS LUMBER
SUPPLY
is now accepting applica-
tions for employment at
our Big Pine facility for
the following position:
* Paint Specialist/Retail
Sales-applicant must
have extensive knowl-
edge of paint, paint mix-
ing and retail sales expe-
rience.
Position is full time with
competitive pay and
benefits. Please apply in
person at 30251 Over-
seas Highway, Big Pine
Key. EOE
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
Busy Downtown
Guesthouse opening
for following Breakfast
Cook, Bartender, House-
keeper/House Person,
part-time - fulltime possi-
ble. Experience required.
Must be drug free,
friendlly and responsible.
Apply in person at Pearls
Key West, 525 United St.
Preventive
Maintenance
Full time, good communi-
cation skills necessary.
Basic knowledge of
plumbing, A/C, electric,
drywall, maintenance.
Must be team oriented.
Apply in person at South-
ernmost Hotel Collection
1319 Duval St. EOE.
Pharmacy Technicians
CVS/pharmacy Truman
Ave. Now hiring skilled
Pharmacy Technicians.
Preferably PTCB Certi-
fied. Full-time and
part-time positions avail-
able. Apply online at
cvs.com 305-294-2576
LOOKING FOR
UNARMED SECURITY
OFFICER
D License
Starting pay $10.75
(can be negotiate)
depend on experience.
305-552-1162
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
5C
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
6C
ADULT OWNED • CALL 724-513-5635
3
2
3
7
7
7
- - - - -
FEBRUARY 22 − 28, 2012 CALL 292-7777 X3
New Residents Arriving Daily!
Make sure they know your business.
Advertise in the Citizen for just over $2.60 per day.
Authorized Diesel
Sales & Service, Installation
305-292-2300
MARINE DIESEL
of the FLORIDA KEYS INC.
3
2
1
8
3
4
MARINE
•Web Site Design
• Hosting & Maintenance
• Web Promotion
• Web Advertising
305-292-1880
3
1
8
6
4
6
COMPUTER
SERVICES
PRINTING
PAINTING &
DECORATING
Kenneth Wells
& Co.
~ Four Generations ~
Painting • Faux Finishes
Crown & Trim
(305) 296-6985
www.kennethwellspainting.com
S
P
1
2
5
9 3
4
0
3
5
1
Tony’s
Roofing & Sheet Metal
RC0064676 RS0016738
Established 1953
Monroe County’s Oldest
Residential & Commercial
296-5932 3
1
8
6
4
8
ROOFING PAWN SHOPS
S
outhernmost
Pawn Shop
We Pay the Most for
Gold & Silver in Key West
1508 Bertha St.
305-896-6747 3
2
5
9
2
8
- - - - -
Service Directory
Commercial Printing
on Quality Newsprint
Tabloids • Booklets
Newletters • Info Guides
Randy Erickson
Cooke Communications
rerickson@keysnews.com
305-292-7777 Ext. 203
3
2
1
8
3
3
BOOKKEEPING
SERVICES
Need a Bookkeeper?
Try H&R Block.
We’re here for you!
305
294-3525
Lic. 650863087
3
4
5
5
7
4
3
1
9
2
3
3
18’ ROWNG SCULL
with oars, full zip cover,
good condition, $400.
(305)923-6927.
667 MISCELLANEOUS
BOATS
45' PEARSON
COASTAL CRUISER
Twin 318 Chry, 10 kw
Kohler gen, perfect live
aboard. Rebuilt in 2005.
New eng, new gen, new
radar and plotter. Sleeps
6, setup w/ rear state-
room for 1 couple to live
on. Great condition. Must
sell due to health. Asking
$40,000 o.b.o. in Sum-
merland. 815-715-4545.
2007, 21’ BENTLEY
PONTOON BOAT
Exc cond., 95hp Yamaha
1 yr on warr. $12,000.
Call (305)797-1416
662 Power Boats
2 passenger 50cc, new
cond., yellow. List $1650
Sell $895. 434-258-2383
Honda Helix 250 Less
than 10K miles. $2,945
305-923-5093 for info.
650 Scooters
JEEP WRANGLER
LIMITED
2 half seat longer. 18,000
miles, silver, soft top,
automatic, 6 cyl, lots of
chrome, $14,900 same
as new. 410-924-4168.
THINK! ELECTRIC
Cutest street legal elec-
tric in KW! 2002 Ford
Think, 2 seater, custom
paint, sun roof! $5,500
OBO. 305-395-9715.
2009 TOYOTA VENZA
Brand new cond., auto
trans, V-6, only 20K
miles Must sell. $22,500
Call (305)890-9581
2005 HONDA CIVIC
2 door, 98K miles, 38-40
mpg, Good condition.
$6,500 Doug
305-304-0675
2004 Ford F150 Xcab
Lariat
Leather, V8, pwr pkg,
like new.
$9,787
2006 Toyota Matrix
Fuel saver, auto, a/c,.
pwr pkg, super clean.
$10,488
2004 Chevy Avalanche
4 dr, one owner, loaded,
like new
$10,990
2006 GMC Yukon XL
V8, a/c, auto, loaded,
extra clean.
$16,988
Plus tax, tag and doc fee
Niles Sales and Service
3500 N. Roosevelt Blvd
Key West. Ask for
Mr. Clean 305-294-1003
620 Autos For Sale
NILES SALES AND
SERVICE
305-294-1003
Ask for Mr. Clean
*This Week’s Specials*
1997 Ford Contour 4dr
Auto, a/c, runs great
$3,488
2005 Dodge Neon ES
4 dr, loaded, a/c, auto,
very clean.
$4,996
2001 Toyota Camry 4dr
Auto, cold a/c, power
windows & locks
$4,988
2002 Buick LeSabre
Sedan
Low miles, cold a/c, pwr
pkg, like new.
$6,997
2001 Toyota Tundra
Ext. Cab.
Auto, a/c, power
package,, runs great
$6,994
2001 Chevrolet
Silverado Ext. Cab.
Auto, a/c, super clean,
runs great
$7,988
NILES SALES AND
SERVICE
305-294-1003
Ask for Mr. Clean
2006 Kia Sorento LX
Auto, power package,
cold a/c, very clean..
$7,992
2006 Toyota Scion XA
4dr, 4 cyl, fuel saver, a/c
$8,987
2005 Nissan Altima
One owner, all power,
auto, super clean.
$8,989
2005 Toyota Camry LE
Low miles, auto, a/c,
power package.
$9,888
2006 Toyota Sienna LE
Dual power. $15,875
2001 Toyota MR2
Spyder
1700 mi. $10,775
2003 Toyota Sequoia
4x4, $11,875
2011 Toyota Tacoma
A/C, CD. $16,585
2008 Toyota PreRunner
SR5
Full Power, sunroof.
$21,875
2010 Toyota Tacoma
Reg. Cab. Under 10Kmi.
$15,875
Tax, Tag & Doc fees xtra
DUNCAN BIG STORE
Over 130 cars and trucks
to select from 294-5126.
620 Autos For Sale
2009 Ford F150 XLT
$22,875
GMC Sierra 1500
Auto, a/c, p/s,p/w, p/l,
am/fm/cd, alloys.
$23,875
2005 Honda CR-V
Auto, a/c, p/w, p/l, p/s,
am/fm/cd. $9,875
2009 Honda Fit H/B
Sport
Auto, a/c. $13,875
2010 Honda Civic LX-S
4Dr, auto, CD. $16,875
2008 Hyundai Tiburon
Leather, $13,875
2011 Hyundai Sonata
Auto, a/c, full power.
19,875
2009 Jeep Wrangler
Unlimited
A/C, full power. $23,875
2006 Jeep Wrangler S
A/C. $15,875
2010 Jeep Grand
Cherokee Laredo
P/S, loaded, P/S,P/W,
alloy wheels. $21,875
2006 Jeep Wrangler
Rubicon
Auto, a/c. $19,875
2011 Jeep Grand
Cherokee
Auto, a/c, full power,
P/W, P/S, AM/FM/CD
$23,875
2008 Kia Rio
Auto, a/c, p/w, p/s,
am/fm/cd, alloys, running
boards, bedliner. $11,875
2010 Kia Soul Sport
Auto, full power. $15,875
2005 Lincoln Town Car
Signature
Loaded. $12,985
2008 Mazda3
Auto, a/c, fullpower.
$16,995
2010 Mazda5
Auto, a/c, full power.
$14,875
2010 Nissan Versa S
4Dr, auto, a/c. $11,875
2006 Nissan Altima
Auto, a/c. $9,875
2011 Nissan Altima
Leather, loaded. $16,875
2009 Nissan Murano LE
Leather. $22,875
2010 Toyota Yaris 5Dr
H/B Auto, a/c, power.
$11,875
2010 Toyota Prius
Hybrid, with navigation
& backup cam, loaded.
$17,875
2010 Toyota Rav4 4WD
P/W, P/S, AM/FM/CD.
$18,875
2008 Toyota Sienna
XLE $15,775
2008 Toyota Rav4
Full power. $18,775
2008 Toyota Scion XB
$15,875
620 Autos For Sale
2010 Chevrolet Equinox
LT Auto, a/c, power.
Sharp. $20,875
2011 Chevrolet Equinox
LT Auto, a/c, power.
Sharp. $23,875
2010 Chevrolet
Silverado 1500
Auto, a/c, p/s, p/w,
am/fm/cd, leather.
$23,875
2011 Chevrolet
Silverado 1500 LT
Crew cab., auto, a/c, CD.
$23,495
2010 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible
Leather. $16,875
2010 Chrysler 300
Touring
Leather, loaded. $18,785
2010 Dodge Charger
Auto, a/c, alloys. Sharp
$15,875
2011 Dodge Nitro Heat
Auto, loaded, P/W, P/S,
low miles. $20,775
2011 Dodge G/Caravan
Crew. Full power,
dual a/c. $20,775
2007 Dodge Magnum
Leather, alloys, P/W, CD.
$13,875
2005 Dodge Ram Quad
SLT
Auto. full power. $9,875
2008 Dodge Dakota
SLT Xcab
$14,985
2008 Ford Focus 4Dr
$10,875
2010 Ford Mustang
Convertible
P/W, P/S, AM/FM/CD.
$17,875
2009 Ford Focus SE
Auto, a/c, CD. $14,875
2011 Ford Focus
Auto, a/c. $15,875
2010 Ford Mustang GT
Leather, loaded.
$22,875
2011 Ford Fiesta SEL
4Dr, a/c. Sharp. $17,875
2011 Ford Fiesta
Sharp, a/c. $16,785
2006 Ford Fusion SE
Auto, full power. $8,875
2007 Ford Ranger
Reg Cab., auto, a/c.
$8,875
2010 Ford Escape XLT
SUV, AWD, P/W, P/S,
AM/FM/CD.
$17,875
2012 Ford Escape
Auto, a/c, p/s, p/w, p/l,
am/fm/cd, alloys.
$22,875
2008 Ford Explorer
XLT 7 pass. SUV, dual
A/C, P/W, P/S,
AM/FM/CD. $17,875
2011 Ford Escape XLS
SUV, $20,875
2011 Ford Flex
Crossover, loaded.
$24,875
620 Autos For Sale
THINKING OF
A USED CAR?
THINK OF........
DUNCAN
Auto Mall Key West
1618 N. Roosevelt Blvd.
294-5126
2011 Chevrolet Malibu
LT. Auto, a/c, leather,
alloys. am/fm/cd,
$18,875
2011 Chevrolet Express
Cargo Van 2500
Clean. $18,875
2005 Chevrolet
Colorado Crew cab.,
P/W, auto, a/c. $12,875
2004 Pontiac Grand
Prix GT
Auto, a/c, 86K miles
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2005 Kia Sorento LX
Auto, a/c, 71K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2010 Kia Soul!
Auto, a/c, sunroof, 29K
miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2010 Toyota Prius
Auto, a/c.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2008 Mazda3
Hatchback, auto, a/c,
52K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2010 Kia Soul Sport
5 speed, a/c, sunroof
20K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2008 Chevy Tahoe LTZ
Fully loaded, 44K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2007 Mercury Grand
Marquis
Auto, a/c, 81K miles
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2008 Toyota Rav4
Auto, a/c, 28K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2003 Jeep Liberty
Auto, a/c, leather,
sunroof, 86K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2007 Volvo C70 Conv.
Auto. a/c, leather,
44K miles
Call for details
2010 Kia Soul
Auto, a/c,. 37K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2011 Kia Sorento
Auto, a/c, 27K miles.
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2009 Kia Borrego LX
Auto, a/c, 7 passenger,
35K miles
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2006 Chevy Colorado
4 door, auto, a/c, power
locks, power windows,
74K miles
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
2008 Kia Sedona LX
Auto, a/c, 67K miles
$11,995 $14,995
2008 Kia Sedona
Auto, a/c, 53K miles
$12,995 $15,995.
Tax, tag and DOC fee
not included in sale price
(305)295-8646
Call us and
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
620 Autos For Sale
KEY WEST KIA
3424 N. Roosevelt Blvd.
Key West, FL 33040
305-295-8646
*Manager Specials*
2009 Honda CBR
600 cc.
$5,995 $7,999
1998 Hyundai Elantra
Auto, a/c, 66K miles
SAVE, SAVE, SAVE
620 Autos For Sale
WANTED
Used Enclosed Trailer
Preferably single axle,
6'x10' or 6'x8' with folding
down rear door. Will be
used for storage only.
Cash in hand for right
trailer. Call Mick @
786-385-8442
355 Wanted to Buy
14” Dell Laptop
2ghz/4gb RAM Win. 7
ULT. or XPP, MS office
2010 Pro. $321 offer
305-896-2180.
351 Electronics
KEY WEST MOBILE
VENDING LICENSE
Key West Mobile Vend-
ing License for sale
transferred. Best offer
over $40,000. Please
email best offer to
kwmobilevendor@gmail.com
for quick transfer.
325 Miscellaneous
7 PIT BULL PUPPIES
Call for appointment
305-731-1339.
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPPIES
Champion bloodlines,
born Jan 7th, 2012.
$1,500. 305-360-1523
305 Pets
NEWSPAPER
DELIVERY
UPPER KEYS
Successful candidate
must be driven to make
money and able to make
strategic decisions to
optimize newspaper
sales.
Applicants MUST also be
able to work 7 days per
week and early morning
hours to apply.
Applicants must also
possess the following.
* Valid Drivers license
* Valid Auto Insurance
* Clean driving record
* Ability to lift 50 lbs.
* Dependable
* Responsible
* Consistent
*Self motivated
*Organized
Applications are available
at 91731 Overseas Hwy
(MM91.7 Oceanside)
Tavernier, FL.
or email resume to
dalfred@keysnews.com
240 HELP WANTED
UPPER KEYS
non-profit experience are
preferred. Strong writing
skills and strong com-
puter and graphics skills
are required. Experience
in business, marketing,
communications, or thea-
ter administration is pre-
ferred. Please email re-
sume with references to
alicia@marathontheater.org
230 HELP WANTED
MIDDLE KEYS
GENERAL BUSINESS
MANAGER
Marathon Community
Theatre seeks a general
business manager. This
is a 30-35 hour per week
salaried position. The
ideal candidate should be
a business-minded, crea-
tive and self-motivated
individual. The position
reports to the President
of the Board of
Directors. Job responsi-
bilities include advertis-
ing, graphics, audience
development, fundrais-
ing, grant writing and
overseeing daily play-
house operations.
Knowledge of Florida
Keys community and
230 HELP WANTED
MIDDLE KEYS
THE SERVICE
COMPANIES
a national outsourcing
company for housekeep-
ing has the following po-
sitions available immedi-
ately: Housekeepers
$9.00 per hour,
Housepersons $9.00 per
hour, Housekeeping Su-
pervisors $10.00 per
hour, Laundry Attendants
$9.00 per hour. Steady
work and voluntary bene-
fits available after 90
days. Apply on line at:
www.theservicecompanies.com
Go to "Join our Team" or
call (786) 404-1726.
We are a drug-free
workplace and EOE
The Key West Citizen
Part-Time Newspaper
Rack Repair/Substitute
Truck Driver
Applicants primary duty
will be repairing and re-
furbishing newspaper
racks during normal
business hours. This will
require 15-20 hours
weekly. Truck driving du-
ties will be as a backup
driver and on an as
needed basis only. Truck
driving requires late
nights and early morning
hours driving up the
Keys. All Applicants must
be flexible with their
schedules and possess
the following attributes.
*Have valid driver’s
license
*Clean driving record
*Speak and understand
English
*Ability to lift 50lbs.
*Mechanically inclined
*Painting experience
*Experience sanding and
grinding metal
*Troubleshoot/Problem
Solve
*Organized
*Dependable
Applications available at
Key West Citizen, 3420
Northside Dr. Email re-
sume to:
dalfred@keysnews.com
PART-TIME
CASHIERS/STOCKERS
GFS MARKETPLACE
GFS Marketplace is cur-
rently seeking part-time
Sales Associates for their
Key West location.To ap-
ply, please visit our web
site at: www.gfs.com.
Search for "Retail Sales
Associate-Key West, FL".
GFS Marketplace, an
equal opportunity em-
ployer, is proud to be a
drug-free workplace that
drug tests all employees.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
The Inn At Key West
is currently accepting
applications for the
following positions:
* Reservationist/
Acountant
* Room Attendant
* House Person
* Front Desk
* P/T Servers
* P/T Dish Washer
* P/T Station Cook
* Pool Server
Must speak English
Please Apply
in person 3420 N.
Roosevelt Blvd.
EOE
SECURITY OFFICERS
Immediate position avail-
able starting at $10. Mid-
night to 8am shift. Florida
Class D security license
required. Must possess
excellent public relations
and communication
skills. Prior applicants
need not apply.
Call 305-942-6949.
Agency No. B-9700003.
SALUTE
A beautiful place to work.
Is seeking a PM Cook
with experienced and a
passion for making in-
credible food. Pay start at
$15.00 hour. Apply in
person with manage-
ment.
SALES PERSON
Needed for specialty
boutique. P/T weekends
and some mornings.
Most evenings to 11pm.
Hourly, commission, bo-
nus, vacation pay. Apply
at Mad Hatter 335 Duval
St. 305-296-4287
SALES ASSOCIATE
Friendly, outgoing, dedi-
cated team player with
proven track record for
full-time position in Gift
Shop and Gallery sales.
Offering medical, dental,
vision, Aflac, 401K pro-
gram, paid vacations and
personal time off.
KW BUTTERFLY
CONSERVATORY
1316 Duval St.
Apply 9:00am to 5:00pm
Retail Sales Position
Experienced retail sales
person needed, hourly
wage plus commission,
apply in person. Key
West Hammocks, 719
Duval Street.
RETAIL SALES
ASSOCIATE
Sloppy Joe's is currently
seeking a full-time PM
Retail Sales Associate.
The qualified candidate
must possess the follow-
ing prior retail sales exp.;
strong customer service
skills; knowledge of POS
Systems; excellent com-
munication skills; ability
to work night shifts. Po-
sition is hourly + comm.
Please contact Marian
Kershenbaum on 305-
296-2388, x123; fax in-
formation to 305-294
-4085; or e-mail to:
marian@sloppyjoes.com
EOE
Mama's Garden Center
*Office Manager*
Experienced only
Salary based on
experience.
Email resume and cover
letter to:
hr@mamasgardencenter.com
Resumes will not be
excepted without a
cover letter.
220 HELP WANTED
LOWER KEYS
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 1D
F
annie Mae and
Freddie Mac
— remember the
days when you thought
Fannie and Freddie were
1950s screen idols? — have
announced, again, a series of changes to
the Home Affordable Refinance Program
(HARP).
There have been about only 900,000 prop-
erties refinanced under the HARP program
since its initiation in 2009. Compare that to
the 1 million properties that banks seized in
2010.
President BarackObama announced the
expansion in his State of the Union address
on Jan. 24. However, to be precise, Fannie
and Freddie — now known as “the enter-
prises” — had made the changes public on
Oct. 24, 2011.
Here are a few of the bell ringers:
HARP II encourages borrowers to refi-
nance to a shorter term by eliminating some
of the closing costs and offering lower rates
on shorter-term amortizations.
Imagine borrowers owe $200,000, but
their home is worth only $160,000. By reduc-
ing the interest rate by 2 percent, their pay-
ment will go down by $200 per month. Yet
with regular payments, it will take almost 10
years to reduce the loan balance to $160,000.
If, instead, they choose a 20-year amorti-
zation, their payments will be about $25 less
per month, but it will take only about 5½
years to reduce the loan balance to $160,000.
This gives borrowers a chance to decide
which problem they need to solve: smaller
mortgage payments or an equity position
that is in the black.
The new HARP II also eliminated the max-
imum loan to value ceiling of 125 percent.
The Government Sponsored Enterprises say,
“in for a penny, in for a pound; we just don’t
care how upside down you are anymore.”
The new program will be available
through Dec. 31, 2013, for loans sold to
Freddie and Fannie before May 31, 2009.
The president proposed that the program
be offered to include mortgages not sold
to Fannie or Freddie. This is a key element
because so many of the whacky option
ARMs, as they were called, and other weird
specimens were not Fannie/Freddie mer-
chandise. This decision does not rest in the
hands of the president alone, but requires
Congressional approval.
Current loan-to-value ratio must be 80
percent or higher. Borrowers must be cur-
rent on their mortgage with no late pay-
ments in the past six months and no more
than one late payment in the past 12.
Many property owners will heave a sigh
of relief over that one. So many honest,
reliable borrowers trying to meet their com-
mitments were previously forced to make a
decision. Should they throw their hands in
the air and allow their mortgage to become
delinquent or continue to struggle to make
that mortgage payment?
The revised HARP is also targeting rental
properties. Relief for investors was previ-
ously limited.
Although prior to the meltdown, non-
owner-occupied borrowers were able to get
mortgages if they had a mortgage on their
primary residence and had less than four
other mortgages. Thus, each investor could
have at least five mortgages.
The refinance programs that followed pro-
hibited investors with any combination of
more than four mortgages from refinancing.
Whether one or more than one borrower,
& REAL ESTATE
KEYS HOMES
INSIDE:
Open House Map
— See Page 4D
Garden Club Tours
March 3-4
— See Page 6D
A
mong the first artists in
residence at The Studios
of Key West’s two newly
renovated houses is a familiar face
around town: Arizona painter and
former Key West resident Michael
Haykin settled into 607 Ashe St.
for the month of February. At
neighboring 609 Ashe St., print-
maker Katie Argyle from Canada
got to spread out in the shotgun-
style house.
By the time The Studios cel-
ebrates its fifth anniversary on
Saturday — with an open house
for anyone who wants to see the
new residencies — four more of
the 30 visitors selected to be art-
ists in residence during 2012 will
unpack their art supplies.
“We received the houses as a
gift from the Rodel Foundation in
2009,” said Jay Scott, The Studios’
executive director. “Because we
then owned the houses outright,
we had a wonderful opportunity
to create something that has tre-
mendous benefit to the commu-
nity.”
In return for monthlong hous-
ing, visiting artists offer work-
shops and lectures to the Key West
community. And, of course, the
community also benefits from,
and has already been involved
with, the renovation of the houses
built in the early 1900s.
“In three years, we raised
$750,000 through our capital
campaign to complete these
buildings,” said Elena Devers, The
Studios’ deputy director.
Architect and residential
designer Guillermo Orozco
retained the footprints and exte-
rior designs of both houses. The
interiors have been upgraded, and
structural additions in the form
or covered porches were made to
the rears.
“The idea was to keep the low-
rise streetscape in front the same
as always, but tie the rear gardens
into the campus and activities
at the adjoining Studios of Key
West,” Orozco said.
The kitchens at the back of the
houses are the focal points. Both
have been modernized — gran-
ite, stainless steel, track lighting
— and the shift of some windows
to French doors contributes to the
indoor-outdoor flow through the
garden and compound, in general.
The deck, a big covered porch
and the garden at 607 Ashe St.
Saturday open
house shows off
two new artists
residences
BY BARBARA BOWERS
Special to The Citizen
BY REGINA E. CORCORAN
Special to The Citizen
No, really,
I mean
it this time
Photos courtesy of Michael A. Philip
The Ashe Street cottages, built for The Studio of Key West’s artists in residence, feature a roomy deck.
See CORCORAN, Page 2D The front exterior features double dormers.
On display
See TOUR, Page 2D The front porch railing features an Asianlike detail.
Southernmost Homes Inc
Joe Cleghorn
305-304-6627
3
5
0
0
0
1
Concert Sponsored by: Champion Homes Inc., SHP General Contract LC, Southernmost Homes Inc., Suite Dream Inn Key West, Southernmost Cabana Resort and Boondocks
Lazy Lakes RV resort & Howard Livingston Presents
Keystock Concert in the Park
311 Johnson Rd., Sugarloaf Key
2420 Patterson, Key West
Brand New 2/3
Ready To Move in
VA Special
0 down
0 closing costs
Payment $2098.00
(includes taxes & Ins.)
Featuring:
Howard Livingston and the
Mile Marker 24 band
Blood Sweat and Tears
Poco’s Paul Cotton Band
The Bubba System
C.W. Colt, the Doerfels,
Monk Burris &
Special Guests: Rev. Hambone, Dalton
Winfree, and Katie Cleghorn
March 24th 12- 7 pm
Gates Open at 11:00am
Tickets $15.00 in advance/$25.00
day of show
Free beer included.
Limited tickets available.
Call 305-745-1079 for
ticket sales.
All Profits go to
Care Camp Charity
(Sending Kids with Cancer to Summer Camp)
KEYS HOMES & REAL ESTATE
2D
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
L
ast week I had two
encounters of similar
nature. While talk-
ing to my friend, artist Lynn
Sherman, she told me about
the art studio tours to ben-
efit The Studios of Key West.
Five local artists opened their
homes and studios to the pub-
lic. I’m often asked to have my
home on a home and garden
tour, “but” I told her, “I’d be
horrified to see strangers in my
house.”
“I love my home,” Lynn
said. “I’m so proud to share
it. Two hundred people came
through. They were lovely and
asked such interesting ques-
tions. It was fun,” she said.
Lynn’s house is one that I
featured in my
book and it is
a treat to be
there.
Then on
Valentine’s
Day, we went
to a dinner party. With a sense
of Key West imagination,
Patrick McGee decorated his
Truman Annex apartment
from the front door to the trees
surrounding the back deck.
A red and white, pinwheel-
bedecked Statue of Liberty
greeted guests on the front
porch. Heart-shaped cutouts
decorated the glass doors. The
trees were lighted and on the
branches were glittering hearts
of all sizes, lots of funky pink
and red bejeweled sunglasses
and reading glasses perched
askew on palm leaves. The
tables were set with red cloth,
red and white dish towels and
washcloths that served as
napkins and each place held
a small plastic heart-shaped
box filled with “message” heart
candy.
What these two homeown-
ers have in common is that
they love nesting and sharing
their homes with others.
I am fascinated with creative
details that make a house
work better, like good-looking
hinges and doorknobs, fau-
cets and brackets. Replacing
fixtures can be a terrific way to
upgrade a tired-looking envi-
ronment without redoing the
whole room. But beware, the
choices are endless.
I like to think of a house as
having spirit, and how we live
in it or what it does for us is an
integral part of how we func-
tion.
I’ve lived in many tempo-
rary homes, some quite love-
ly, others simply functional.
One February we rented a
wonderful modern house in
the Casa Marina area. Every
room opened onto decks
overlooking the pool sur-
rounded by tropical foliage.
Eating breakfast on the deck
and watching the sun glance
off the pool was a great way
to start the day. My soul was
nourished every day.
In March we rented an
apartment overlooking
Smathers Beach. The setting
was ideal. However, the apart-
ment was more functional
than aesthetically pleasing.
We were working on my
book, “Key West: A Tropical
Lifestyle,” and busy shoot-
ing in people’s homes all day;
therefore, a simple apartment
was a practical choice. Having
the beach within easy access
for a walk at the end of each
day and seeing the water from
our terrace was enriching. But
I appreciate it when a home
is also well designed. Most of
the people I meet here feel this
way about their homes.
As a lifestyle journalist, I
asked the same question of
every person I interviewed for
my book, “What do you like
best about your home?” “I like
the indoor/outdoor living,”
was the most popular answer.
“What does your home do
to nourish your soul?” The
answer was usually, “The
minute I walk into my house
I feel at peace. I love the way
it ...” and the owner would be
off into a world of home and
spirit and downright love. Is
your house doing all that it can
for you?
When I returned from Key
West that year, I decided
to address that question. I
began to look at all the little
problem areas that weren’t
exactly catastrophically bad,
but just slightly annoying. All
added up — the wrong size
outdoor table, the squeaky
door to the pantry, a new
lamp for the living room
— comprised a long list
of annoyances. (It should
be noted that I have many
friends who are oblivious
to the minutiae over which
I often obsess, but I don’t
understand them any more
than they get me — we’re still
friends.) My goal was to make
my home a spiritual haven
where problems did not exist.
(Another note: This will not
happen in my lifetime, but
it’s a goal.) As things get more
complicated out there in the
world, wouldn’t it be heaven-
ly to have the perfect escape
in your own home?
In my opinion, we have too
many options. Rather than
making life easier, the choices
make life more complicated.
While having lunch at the
counter of our local drugstore,
I ordered a simple grilled
cheese sandwich. A barrage
of questions followed: “What
kind of bread? Mayo or mus-
tard? Toasted or not? A Coke
comes in small, medium and
large, with or without lemon.
Diet or regular? Caffeine or
decaffeinated? These ques-
tions are way too many for a
simple meal.
In reality, every second of
the day is fraught with prob-
lems to solve: large, small and
infinitesimal. In this regard,
I think a home should be a
place where things are just
right and where you find
peace, comfort, beauty and
well-being. If only!
Leslie Linsley has written
more than 50 books on crafts,
decorating and home style.
She resides on Nantucket with
her husband, photographer
Jon Aron, and has a store on
the island that specializes in
her one-of-a-kind creations.
Her latest book is “Key West, a
Tropical Lifestyle” (Monacelli
Press), with photos by Terry
Pommett.
Peaceful sanctuaries: Is your house doing all that it can for you?
BY LESLIE LINSLEY
Special to The Citizen
maximum mortgages could
not exceed four.
Currently, some of the
biggest banks, namely Wells
Fargo and others, are re-
evaluating this policy and
allowing exceptions on a case
by case basis.
The bottom line is, if you
thought you couldn’t refi-
nance, now is a good time to
re-examine your situation.
Interest rates are still very
low, between 4 percent and
5 percent. Give serious con-
sideration to these refinance
opportunities.
What do you think?
Regina E. Corcoran, SRA,
is a Florida real estate bro-
ker, state-certified residential
appraiser and residential
contractor. She is president of
AmeriRealty Corp. and vice
president of AmeriMortgage
Corp. She can be reached at
ReginaECorcoran@cs.com.
Corcoran writes her column
exclusively for The Citizen. It
appears every other Sunday.
Corcoran
Continued from Page 1D
primarily affords communal
use for artists and visitors.
This is the largest of the two
houses, and two artists share
its overall 1,400 square feet,
which includes two bedroom
suites, plus a half-bath on the
first floor.
What was probably the
first-floor living room and din-
ing room has been converted
into a private studio and liv-
ing space for one person. Its
roughly 14-by-14 square feet
may be accessed from the
front porch.
Access to the second-
floor studio and living space
— about the same size as
downstairs, but upstairs, fea-
tures a double-front dormer
— is through a room that now
serves as the conference room.
Here, the stairway treads and
railing were rebuilt with Dade
County pine; in fact, much of
the original pine has been left
in place.
“(The home at) 607 was
in fairly good shape,” said
Orozco. “Most of the floors
and windows are original, but
609 went through complete
structural stabilization, which
included new floors and
foundation. We also installed
a handicapped walkway
between the houses to access-
es communal space in back.”
The residency at 609 Ashe
St. houses a single artist. Its
900 square feet contain the
architectural feel of its shotgun
roots. For instance, the front
porch entry is into a long hall-
way where an interior doorway
immediately opens to the front
bedroom. Instead of leading to
the standard second bedroom
in a shotgun house, the hall
explodes into a studio-kitchen
combination. French doors
open from the studio to the
side porch; French doors open
from the kitchen to the back
porch.
Multiple sets of French
doors in both houses — and
lots of windows — are inte-
gral to the bright ambiance
because, well, these were rede-
signed specifically as artists
studios, and because, well, Key
West’s crisp light is known for
more than sunsets.
The airiness and easy
flow from room to garden is
enhanced with the comfort of
rockers on the front porches,
sleigh beds and overstuffed
chairs and ottomans in the
bedrooms.
“All of the furniture was
donated, and JANGEORGe
helped in finding consisten-
cy with pieces,” Scott said of
the local interior designer.
“We tried to use items that
would be comfortable and
uncluttered, with a mini-
malist feel for the incoming
artists.”
Saturday’s open house will
demonstrate how successful
The Studios has been with its
remake of 607 and 609 Ashe
St. Indeed, the stay has been
so positive for some of The
Studios’ visiting artists that
two have made a permanent
move to Key West.
Barbara Bowers is a Key West
writer and host of a radio talk
show about owning and main-
taining property in the Florida
Keys. To suggest a home to be
featured in the Keys Homes sec-
tion, send an email to barba-
ra@bbowers.com. Homes listed
for sale may not be considered.
Tour
Continued from Page 1A
The bright, airy kitchen leads out to a deck.
Terri Spottswood
305-587-3407
terrispottswood.com
1205 Truman Avenue, Key West
411 Elizabeth Street
$1,800,000.
1075 Duval Street C4
$349,000.
3637 Eagle Avenue
$749,500.
812 Fleming Street #5
$299,900.
Elegant 5BR/5.5BA classic Conch
Home beautifully renovated wtih
a detached guest house, pool,
decks and off street parking.
Commercial condominium in desir-
able Duval Square. Perfect location
and plenty of parking just steps
from world famous Duval Street!
Beautiful 4BR/3BA on sprawling
18,000sf corner parcel. Granite
counters, large family room, huge
covered patio, pool and garage.
Charming Old Town condomini-
um with tall ceilings & Dade Pine
walls & floors throughout. 3rd flr,
1BR/1BA, pool, 223sf balcony!
J
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350006
1301
newton st
$699,000
Inviting 3BR, 2BA home
in the historic Meadows
neighborhood. Open floor-
plan, high ceilings, wood
floors, modern kitchen &
huge master suite.
1104
angela st
$619,000
Ideally located Key West
cottage. 2BR, 2BA with
additional sleeping loft,
open floor plan, newer
kitchen, French doors to
pool and yard. Parking.
roger
emmons
305.304.7446
305.292.2244 ext.105
rogeremmons.com
350005
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
350004
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
3D
618 Dey
Street
Open House
1-3
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
HISTORIC SEAPORT BEAUTY
3
1
9
4
4
7
www.rudymolinet.com
Beautifully maintained historic home in the desirable Seaport
neighborhood. Currently confgured as 2 rental apartments and
a wonderful owner’s unit with guest cottage and two car covered
of-street parking. Solar-heated pool, tropical gardens and multiple
porches. A Lovely Historic Treasure Close To Seaport, Restaurants
and Nightlife. $999,000
1075 DUVAL STREET, R13 $549,000
Light and bright 2 BD/2 ½ BA Duval Square townhouse.
Open floor plan, private decks, parking & pool
350003
Doug Mayberry • Sabrina Acevedo • Dean Townsend
Keith Bland • Kent Ducote • Mary Thixton
Bobby Ciulla • Greg James • John Dell
OPEN HOUSE SUN 1- 3 PM OPEN HOUSE SUN 1- 3 PM
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
SEE MAP
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4
540 WHITE STREET $699,000
4 BD/3 BA updated home including studio
guest cottage, great kitchen & open floor plan
Sales & Rentals • Residential & Commercial • (305) 292-6155 • www.DougMayberry.com • 1075 Duval St., Duval Square, Suite C23
718 OLIVIA STREET
Historic 100+ year old home
in the center of Old Town.
5bed/2bath on a 9401 sqft lot.
$679,000.
350008
Backyard is 5525 sq. ft.!
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
John Parce
305-292-7427
OPEN HOUSE FEB. 26, 1-4PM
www.718Olivia.com
Open House 1-3pm
920 Terry Lane, Key West
Million Dollar House with a Million Dollar
view just 2 blocks from Duval. 3/3 with a
pool, Chefs kitchen, Family room and beautiful
wood flooring throughout. Low Maintenance.
Off Street Parking.
Offered at $1,000,000.
350011
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4
J
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www.yourkeyshome.com
cindy@yourkeyshome.com
Member of the Elite Agents
350023
BIG PRICE REDUCTION!
Location, Location, Location! This 3 bdr/2bath Conch Home is in arguably one
of the best neighborhoods on the Island, on a quiet Lane, yet is only blocks away
from Duval Street. Fabulous outdoor living area is what this home is all about.
The covered outdoor deck with wet bar is the perfect place to entertain friends.
The large yard boasts numerous varieties of Tropical fruit trees and has room
for a pool. It’s truly a One of a Kind property. Offered at $695,000.
SEE MAP
PAGE
5
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Real Estate Co.
OPEN HOUSE
726 Poorhouse Lane, Key West
SUNDAY 12PM - 2PM
Cindy Kaye
305-731-5000
Open Sunday 1:00-4:00
Oceanfront Pool Home
Lisa Ferringo, REALTOR
®
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Real Estate Co.
(305)797-1221
Find Your Dream Home!
www.UniqueKeysHomes.com
350021
Newly built 3/3.5 + Den CBS Oceanfront Pool home
boasting nearly 3,000 SF! This property is abundant in
amenities incl: oceanfront pool w/spa, concrete dock &
cut-in boat slip. The well appointed home is highlighted
by picture perfect ocean views from all Living Areas
& features soaring ceilings, granite chef’s kitchen
w/stainless appliances, Anderson Impact Doors &
Windows & more!
Price: $1,849,999
414 Caribbean Drive
Summerland Key (MM 25)
Natalie Johnson
Buyer’s Agent
(305) 481-3317
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
Open Sunday 1:00-4:00
Stunning Open Water Setting!
Lisa Ferringo, REALTOR
®
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Real Estate Co.
(305)797-1221
Find Your Dream Home!
www.UniqueKeysHomes.com
350022
Dazzling sunrises & sunsets over the open water at this
pristine bay front property. This architecturally stunning
home offers 2,000 SF w/4 BR’s, 2 BAs & Study.
Gorgeous bay views are enjoyed from the Kitchen,
Dining & Living Room through 2-story walls of glass.
The 2nd-Story Master w/private porch offers premier
water views from every angle. Relax on 1 of 4 porches
or by bay-side hammock!
Price: $999,000
482 Brown
Ramrod Key (MM 27)
Natalie Johnson
Buyer’s Agent
(305) 481-3317
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
Open House 12:30 - 3:30
64 Front Street
Located in the gated community of Truman
Annex, this 5 Bedroom/5 Bath home is the perfect
Key West retreat. Designed by a local architect
to blend indoor living with the tropical Key West
outdoor life style. Perfectly located for complete
poolside privacy. This home comes with a
transient license for weekly rentals. $2,195,000
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
350020
350019
$619,000
350018
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
Immaculate three bedroom and three bathroom home with over 1600 sq. ft. that has been
renovated into a showpiece. CBS construction with a new roof and hurricane rated
porch and shutters provides low maintenance, worry free living and low insurance
rates. Great floor plan with spacious bedrooms and ensuite bathrooms. Property is
offered furnished and has two deeded parking spaces. A drive by does not do this
property justice!
$399,000 • Jimmy Lane • 305.766.0585
OPEN HOUSE • 1PM-3pm • 3346 Pearl Avenue
6$1'<6:$<
MARQUESA COURT
Located on a quiet cul-de-sac in a
private neighborhood with 9 homes on
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Other homes starting at $745,000
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Featured Home - Open House by Appointment
350014
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4
F E A T U R E D H O M E S
F E A T U R E D H O M E S
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
4D
Key Haven
350028
Address Open Price Bed/Bath Listed by Phone number Ad page
618 Dey St. 1-3pm $999,000 5/5 Rudy Molinet, Marquis Properties 305-240-1090 3D
115 Front St. #204 1-3pm $1,290,000 3/2 Megan Behmke, Compass Realty 305-304-0999 5D
64 Front St. 12:30-3:30pm $2,195,000 5/5 Terri Wilson, Preferred Properties 305-394-4106 3D
540 White St. 1-3pm $699,000 4/3 Doug Mayberry, Doug Mayberry Real Estate 305-292-6155 3D
1 Free School Ln. 11am-3pm $2,495,000 --- Lynn Kaufelt, Truman & Company 305-923-4276 2D
726 Poorhouse Ln. 12-2pm $695,000 3/2 Cindy Kaye, Coldwell Banker Schmitt 305-731-5000 3D
718 Olivia St. 1-4pm $679,000 5/2 John Parce, Coldwell Banker Schmitt 305-292-7427 3D
920 Terry Ln. 1-3pm $1,000,000 3/3 Cory Held, Preferred Properties 305-240-0355 3D
1027 Duval St. R13 1-3pm $549,000 2/2.5 Bobby Ciulla, Doug Mayberry Real Estate 305-292-6155 3D
1716-1718 Von Phister St. 12-3pm $1,200,000 4/3.5 Joanne Allen, Lands End Real Estate LLC 305-923-0239 8D
2309 Patterson Ave. 1-4pm $399,000 3/3 Vic Musmanno, Coldwell Banker Schmitt 305-294-0123 8D
3346 Pearl Ave. 1-3pm $399,000 3/3 Jimmy Lane, Century 21 Schwartz Realty 305-766-0585 3D
414 Caribbean Dr. 1-4pm $1,849,000 3/3.5 Lisa Ferringo, Coldwell Banker Schmitt 305-797-1221 3D
482 Brown Dr. 1-4pm $999,000 4/2 Lisa Ferringo, Coldwell Banker Schmitt 305-797-1221 3D
Open Houses
281 Trumbo Rd. #206 $1,325,000 3/3.5 Nancy Swift, Location 3 Real Estate of Key West 305-849-2455 5D
719 Eisenhower Dr. Unit #3 $1,495,000 5/4 Nancy Swift, Location 3 Real Estate of Key West 305-849-2455 5D
Janice Long, Location 3 Real Estate of Key West 305-304-8024
1601 White St. $850,000 3/2.5 Karem Kramer, Exit Realty Key West 305-797-6948 5D
1028 Sandy’s Way $825,000 4/3 Nancy Swift, Location 3 Real Estate of Key West 305-849-2455 3D
Janice Long, Location 3 Real Estate of Key West 305-304-8024
Birchwood Dr. $175,000 --- Laurie McChesney, Preferred Properties 305-923-6639 5D
Featured Homes
Address Price Bed/Bath Listed by Phone number Ad page
A
B
The Following May Be Viewed By Appointment:
OPEN HOUSES & FEATURED HOMES
1
7
6
2
4
3
8
10
11
D
E
9
12
A
1
5
Summerland Key
13
14
2
3
4
6
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
B
D
E
Ramrod Key
C
14
C
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
5D
Attention Area Home Owners:
Contact your local Realtor today
to put your house in our featured home
section every Sunday in the
Key West Citizen.
NOW is the time
to advertise your property!
Feature your home for just $257.00
in Full Color.
Call Jon Wean
305-292-7777 ext 218
319362
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
350017
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
350013
719 Eisenhower Drive - Unit 3
PARADISE HARBOR
Luxurious 5 bedroom/4 bath home located
in the desirable Meadows neighborhood of Old Town.
Part of a seven home compound, this lovely home
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SULYDWHSRROZLWKJDWHG\DUGDQGWRSRIWKHOLQHÀ[WXUHVDQG
interior details. This is a must see Key West home.
$1,495,000
Other homes starting at $1,295,000
Call Nancy Swift (305)849-2455 or Janice Long (305)304-8024
/RFDWLRQ5HDO(VWDWHRI.H\:HVW,QF‡ZZZ/RFDWLRQ.H\:HVWFRP
2/'72:1‡:$7(5)5217:,7+'2&.
Featured Home - Open House by Appointment
350015
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
(305) 304-0998
SEE MAP
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4
115 Front St, #204, Harbour Place, Truman Annex
Three bedroom, two bath waterfront oasis! Overlooking the Gulf of Mexico,
this wonderful property enjoys a front row seat every day! Harbour Place
Condominium Assoc. is located in the Truman Annex and has plenty to boast
about, including ocean views, a shimmering pool, sun drenched decks, covered
parking, and lovely, lush grounds. The Truman Annex is an award-winning
gated community with 24-hour security and is within walking distance to Fort
Zachary Taylor State Park and Beach & Old Town restaurants, shopping,
and entertainment. This charming property can be rented transiently with
restrictions; please ask the listing agent for further details. This is a short sale
and may be subject to the approval of a third party lender in order to close. Bank
will accept any reasonable offer. Owner/FL Real Estate Broker.
$1,290,000. Megan Behmke 305-304-0999
www.BehmkesBest.com
Open Today
1-3p.m.
350012

Karem Kramer
Licensed Real Estate Broker
Exit Realty Key West
1722 N Roosevelt Blvd.
Key West, FL 33040
Cell 305-797-6978 KaremKramer@gmail.com
Amazing corner lot home located in Casa
Marina Area, just one Block from the ocean,
partial ocean view from house, mature
landscaping, beautiful pool with waterfall,
totally private and plenty of parking. Don’t
wait on this one, Owners want offers.
$850,000
1601 White St
3
5
0
0
2
6
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F E A T U R E D H O M E S
F E A T U R E D H O M E S
Find a Realtor
who doesn’t play games
in
3BR/1BA HOUSE
FOR RENT
$2,000 per month + utili-
ties. 2418 Patterson Ave.
Call Jack 614-946-1416
3/2 ON CANAL ON
ROCKLAND KEY
No pets. For information
Call after 6pm
305-296-8813.
3BR/2BA BIG PINE
W/D, A/C, fenced yard.
$1,500 month.
305-304-2986.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
$2300/month plus utilities
& pool
BIG COPPITT
Beautiful furnished canal
home features pool, cen-
tral air, washer/dryer,
double lot. Pets consid-
ered. Available now.
$3000/mo plus utilities
and pool.
See pictures & more
properties @
www.athomekeywest.com
AT HOME IN
KEY WEST
296-7975
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
$2600/month plus
utilities
NEW TOWN
Condo with 2 master
bedroom suites; balcony,
shared pool, central air,
W/D, available March. No
pets. $1,600/mo plus
utilities
KEY WEST GOLF CLUB
Large townhome with
2 master bedroom suites.
Washer/dryer, central air,
large Screened porch,
private pool. Pets Con-
sidered. Available April.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
Air; Pets considered;
Available April.
$1350/month + utilities.
Lovely 1/1 in Casa
Marina features hard-
wood floors, lanai, pool,
laundry, assigned OSP.
No pets. Available April
1. $1600/mo plus water &
electric.
Beautiful 2/2 with loft
home; high ceilings,
Plantation shutters,
washer/dryer, central air,
Spa, one OSP. Pets con-
sidered. Available April.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
AT HOME KEY WEST
305-296-7975
Pictures and more
properties at
www.athomekeywest.com
OLD TOWN
Furnished 1/1 cottage in
heart of Old Town.
Washer/dryer, Central
air, shared pool. No pets.
Available March 1.
$1700/mo. INCLUDES
ALL UTILITIES
Updated 1/1 apartment
near White Street.
Washer/Dryer, Central
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
New Town Harriet Ave.
2BR/1.5BA Townhouse
bright, airy, appl incl W/D
yard, porches,
$1,750 mo + util, + sec.
Prudential Knight
Gardner Realty
305-294-5155 ext.225
OLD TOWN HIDEAWAY
2/1 plus loft. W/D, $2,000
plus utilities. Cary
786-302-3534.
434 FURNISHED HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
Old Town Southard St.
3BR/3BA
Wonderful renovated
porches, yard + OSP
appl incl W/D
Avail 4/1-1/1
$3,500 mo. + util + sec.
Prudential Knight
Gardner Realty
305-294-5155 ext 225
RAMROD KEY
Open-water, furnished,
3BR home with pool and
screened porches.
$1,800/month w/lease.
Call for information
765-505-2330.
434 FURNISHED HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
CHARMING 1/1
Edge of Old Town, W/D,
2 sundecks, most pets
welcome .$1390/mo. F/L
+ $300sec 305-395-0340
2/2 APARTMENT
IN TRIPLEX ON
PATTERSON AVE.
OSP parking, shared
laundry, $2,000 mo.
includes electric, water
and sewer, F/L/S req.
Avail immediately.
Call 305-393-9303.
2BR/2BA W/ DINING,
living rooms, kitchen,
porch. $1,800/mo. F/L/S.
No pets. 305-292-3024.
ALSO STUDIO $950 mo.
DOWNSTAIRS APT.
Cudjoe Key. 2BR/1|BA
everything included. Mini-
mum 6 mo. lease. $1,200
/mo. 305-393-7437
428 UNFURNISHED
APTS. LOWER KEYS
1 BDRM. 1BATH APT.
Full kitchen, living rm. no
pets, no smoking. $1300.
F/L/D. utilities included
305-923-6672.
HOUSEBOAT
On Stock Island. Sat.
TV- Premier package,
AC, Kids and small pets
welcome. $1250/mo.
$1000 sec. dep + all
Marina fees paid.
305-304-4163
422 FURNISHED APTS.
LOWER KEYS
Canal Front
Rockland Key Duplex
2/2 Available 3/1
$1,800/mo. plus utilities.
F/L/S.
The Taporowski Team
Realty Executives
Florida Keys
305-292-1922
SMATHERS BEACH
1 & 2 bedroom fully fur-
nished condos on 8
acres of gated seclusion,
2 pools & tennis courts.
All you need are clothes
and groceries. Available
for 6 to 9 month leases.
Monthly rates range from
$1,250 to $1,750. Utili-
ties included.
Gale Shepard
305-294-6069
416 FURN CONDOS
LOWER KEYS
ON STOCK ISLAND
1BR/1BA, all utilities
included, no pets.
$850/mo., $500 deposit.
305-296-8569.
410 MOBILE HOMES
LOWER KEYS
716 DUVAL ST.
HEARTBREAK HOTEL
Stay in the heart of Old
Town. Beautifully fur-
nished, immaculately
clean, full kitchens, tile
baths, cable TV &
cold A/C. Starting at
$499/week + tax or
$99/night - 2 night min.
305-296-5558
www.heartbreakhotel.org
Clean OldTown Rooms
$230 to $320 /wk.
Roommate $145 AA/NA
pref. 1 wk dep. 4 wk min.
Own entrance, own bath,
double or single bed,
a/c, cable TV, W/D,
WIFI. Sec. cam, No
drugs, alcohol. Sorry no
pets. 305-395-8731
404 ROOMS
LOWER KEYS
Live on Duval St. above
Kai-Kai Sandals
Avail. 4-1-12. Large 3BR
Seeking healthy, sober
females who have lived
in KW. BR starts at
$1000 + utilities. Email:
kaicostanzo@hotmail.com
or call 401-261-5532
402 Roommates
Announce it in
Keyswide
Classified!
Call 292-7777
Get results now! Advertise here!
Call 292-7777 Ext. 3
KEYS HOMES & REAL ESTATE
6D
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
F
ive delightful small
gardens will be fea-
tured in the Key West
Garden Club Tours this
Saturday and Sunday. All of
them are centrally located
in the
Meadows,
so close
together
that they
are eas-
ily biked or
walked.
The
garden at 1218 Angela St. is
brand-new after being cre-
ated by landscaper Brian
Roy. It is an unusual home
because it once was an old
bakery, La Yndia. The bricks
from the oven were recycled
to be used on the back patio.
Roy and irrigation expert
Jeff Ware are creating a series
of waterfalls. Water creeps
under and around a series
of stepping stones only to
reappear in a fall that ends
in a koi pond. There is a
500-gallon cistern under the
property that supplies all
of the water for the garden.
The water in the koi pond is
backwashed into the cistern
so the cistern water is full
of fish emulsion. The orchid
wall that runs along the back
of the property has a mister
that’s run from this same
system.
Even the stones on this
property are unusual. “We
wanted to make the lime-
stone look aged, so we put
buttermilk, moss and artil-
lery fern into the blender
and soaked the rocks in the
liquid,” Roy said.
This garden will have
the first, large vertical wall
installed in Key West. It
will contain sedum, dwarf
mondo grass, dianthes and
ferns. The wall goes from
shade to sun, as do the
plants. The living vertical
wall has a drip system that
runs several times a day, but
only for a few minutes.
“This was once an
orchard,” Roy said, “so we
have planted fruit trees in
pots.” The flowers on the
Meyers lime provide fra-
grance, beauty and attract
butterflies. A kumquat tree is
in full fruit.
At the end of the koi pond
there is a 3-foot-tall old
man palm surrounded by
orange blooming bulbine,
blue walking iris and a dwarf
strongbark.
A second garden on the
tour is located at 1305-1307
Petronia St. The owners
have turned the double
backyard into a magical
kingdom inspired by homes
in the Rivera section of last
year’s garden tour.
One side that is open to
the neighbors was planted
with 20-foot-tall bamboo
that creates a wall of vegeta-
tion for privacy. Ipe wood
decking that is smooth and
impervious to saltwater
damage surrounds the pool.
Orchids are everywhere,
helping to create their col-
orful, mystical moment in
paradise.
The third garden is at 1400
Olivia St.
“I’ve tried to create a tropi-
cal cottage,” Rosi Ware said
in her very English accent.
The garden is full of ginger,
firespike, golden dewdrop,
giant anthuriums, calathea,
mojito mint, huge acalyphia,
foxtail fern, alocasia, red lea
and a dwarf powderpuff. A
spectacular orchid wall hides
in one corner. The garden
is a cornucopia of colorful
flowering plants from lime
green to deep red. If you
don’t know what all of these
plants look like, there will be
knowledgeable docents who
do, at each garden.
Especially interesting is
the queen’s tear with pale
pink drooping flowers that
could look just like tears
dripping down the face of a
plant. Strategically placed
mirrors mounted on fences
throughout the property
enhance all of this.
Tickets are $20 and avail-
able in advance at the West
Martello Tower, 1100 Atlantic
Blvd., and at each garden on
tour days: 1400 Olivia St.;
1317 Olivia St.; 1305-1307
Petronia St.; 1216 Angela St.;
and 810 Eisenhower Drive.
For more information, call
305-294-3210 or visit www.
keywestgardenclub.com.
Garden notes
• Mark Hedden will talk
about migration prepara-
tion to the Garden Club at
its general meeting at 1:30
p.m. Thursday at the West
Martello Tower.
• The Key West Garden
Club welcomes volunteers to
pull weeds, learn to prop-
agate plants and play in
the sandy soil at the West
Martello Tower from 9 a.m. to
noon on Mondays.
Key West Garden Club
Master Gardener Robin
Robinson was a columnist at
the Chicago Daily News and
syndicated with Princeton
Features. Her books, “Plants
of Paradise” and “Roots,
Rocks and Rain: Native Trees
of the Florida Keys,” can be
found at the Key West Garden
Club and on Amazon.com.
Visit www.sorapublishing.
com for more information.
This column is part of a
series developed by the Key
West Garden Club. Visit www.
keywestgardenclub.com for
more information.
Garden Club Tours feature home with
the first vertical garden in Key West
Peek behind the walls and visit five private gardens in The Meadows
KEY WEST GARDEN CLUB TOUR
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Tickets are $20 and available in advance at the West Martello Tower,
1100 Atlantic Blvd., and at each garden on tour day: 1400 Olivia St.,
1317 Olivia St., 1305-1307 Petronia St., 1216 Angela St. and 810
Eisenhower Drive.
For more information, call 305-294-3210 or visit http://keywestgarden-
club.com.
BY ROBIN ROBINSON
Key West Garden Club
Photo courtesy of Robin Robinson
Bulbine, blue iris and an old man palm hide the waterfall, creating
mystery in the garden.
GOOD DEEDS
Monroe County Property Transfers
Listing Agency Selling Agency Sold List Price Sold Price Built Description Bdrms Seller Wtfrnt
Upper Keys
Century 21 Schwartz Century 21 Schwartz 02/16/12 $799,000 $700,000 16 South Dr Key Largo 1980 Single Family 3 Clifford Morris Yes
Marr Properties Keys Country Realty 02/21/12 $249,000 $237,000 64 Bonefish Ave Key Largo 1974 Single Family 3 William C Sandberg No
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/15/12 $850 $850 103500 Overseas Hwy #C2/16 Key Largo 1979 Timeshare 2 Florida Bay Club Condo Assoc I Yes
Century 21 Schwartz Keys Country Realty 02/14/12 $60,000 $47,000 27 Judy Pl Key Largo 1965 Mobile Home 1 Johnna Mckenzie No
Realty World-Freewheeler Realty World-Freewheeler 02/16/12 $40,000 $37,000 325 Calusa St #Lot 1 Key Largo N/A Lots 0 Margie Iturralde No
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/17/12 $46,500 $25,000 0 Lot 6 Park Key Largo N/A Lots 0 De Pierrefeu Alain Y Tr Ag Dtd No
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Island Equity Real Estate 02/17/12 $460,000 $460,000 300 Buttonwood Cir #1-6 Key Largo 1959 3-4 Units 6 Centennial Bank Yes
Address
q y , , y g
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Outside Of MLS 02/22/12 $699,900 $650,000 218 Aberdeen Ct Key Largo 1988 Single Family 3 Pedro J & Palmira Hernandez Yes
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/16/12 $995,000 $750,000 212 Orange Blossom Dr Key Largo 1975 Single Family 3 Vlieger Robert Ii De Yes
Century 21 Schwartz Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/16/12 $164,000 $157,000 150 Lowe St Key Largo 1988 Single Family 2 Eric M & Stacey L Davis No
Golden Keys Realty Keller Williams Realty 02/17/12 $297,000 $287,500 173 Coral Rd Plantation Key 1957 Single Family 3 Keith T & Danielle M Barcomb No
Century 21 All Keys SBX Commercial 02/17/12 $699,000 $440,000 86000 Overseas Hwy Plantation Key 1978 Commercial RE 0 Fifth Third Bank No
American Caribbean Realty World-Freewheeler 02/22/12 $319,000 $285,000 80450 Overseas Hwy #304 Upper Matecumbe Key 1983 Condo 2 Lyndly F Opitz Yes
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Century 21 Schwartz 02/17/12 $399,000 $330,000 79901 Overseas Hwy #414 Upper Matecumbe Key 1976 Condo 2 Ann Vosburgh Yes
Middle Keys
Hawks Cay Resort Sales Hawks Cay Resort Sales 02/17/12 $345,500 $295,000 5114 Sunset Village Dr Duck Key 2001 Townhouse 2 Barry G & Nedra M Nonemaker Yes
Hawks Cay Resort Sales Hawks Cay Resort Sales 02/17/12 $550,000 $500,000 7207 Simran Ln #10 Duck Key 2003 Single Family 3 Robert S Jr & Kimberly W Bai No
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Exit Realty Florida Keys 02/14/12 $200,000 $162,000 301303 124th St Marathon 1963 Duplex 4 Edgar R Quintana No
RE/MAX Keys To The Key RE/MAX Keys To The Key 02/16/12 $220,000 $125,000 798 27th St Marathon 1960 Mobile Home 2 Robert Eric Hoffman Yes
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Hawks Cay Resort Sales 02/16/12 $259,900 $259,900 47 Tranquility Way #F0 Marathon 2004 Townhouse 2 Bank of America Yes
Lower Keys
Century 21 Schwartz Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/15/12 $52,900 $61,500 0 Enterprise Ave #Lt 30 Big Pine Key N/A Lots 0 Bank Of America Yes
A Key Real Estate A Key Real Estate 02/23/12 $75,000 $75,000 27960 Porgie Path Little Torch Key 1986 Mobile Home 2 Keys Island Properties LLC Yes
Prudential Knight-Gardner Internet Realty 02/17/12 $299,900 $300,000 21650 Overseas Hwy #105 Cudjoe Key 2007 Townhouse 2 Bank Of America Yes
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Exit Realty Florida Keys 02/23/12 $365,000 $335,000 21060 5th Ave #East Cudjoe Key 1965 Single Family 3 Darlyne A Pew Yes
S ll t t I l d P ti P d ti l K i ht G d 02/15/12 $145 000 $150 000 47 1 t St Bi C itt 1948 Si l F il 2 C fid ti l D t F S 119 07 N Sellstate Island Properties Prudential Knight-Gardner 02/15/12 $145,000 $150,000 47 1st St Big Coppitt 1948 Single Family 2 Confidential Data F S 119 07 No
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Coldwell Banker Schmitt 02/22/12 $150,000 $115,000 280 Scorpio Ln Geiger Key 1980 Mobile Home 2 Dorothy A Flister Yes
Coldwell Banker Schmitt Keys Commercial 02/21/12 $299,000 $160,000 300301 Ave B & C #1-4 Big Coppitt 1967 3-4 Units 4 Marx Investment Group Llc No
Prudential Knight-Gardner Prudential Knight-Gardner 02/17/12 $299,000 $299,000 5414 3rd Ave Stock Island 2006 Single Family 3 Jesse S & Laura J Perloff No
Key West
Sellstate Island Properties Sellstate Island Properties 02/16/12 $169,900 $175,000 3930 S Roosevelt Blvd #412N Key West 1991 Condo 2 Hsbc Bk Usa No
Island Group Realty Doug Mayberry Real Estate 02/17/12 $615,000 $611,100 53 S Seaside Ct Key West 2005 Townhouse 4 Colonial Bk No
Century 21 All Keys Location 3 Real Estate 02/17/12 $339,000 $320,000 1006 17th St Key West 1963 Single Family 3 Yanae & Barry L Barroso No
Prudential Knight-Gardner Prudential Knight-Gardner 02/15/12 $5,000 $5,000 5051 Overseas Hwy #D31 Key West 2000 Timeshare 3 Hyatt Vacation Management Co No
C t 21 All K C t 21 All K 02/16/12 $369 000 $330 000 921 C t St #12 K W t 1980 T h 1 V LLC N Century 21 All Keys Century 21 All Keys 02/16/12 $369,000 $330,000 921 Center St #12 Key West 1980 Townhouse 1 Vaca LLC No
Based on information from the KWAR MLS for the period 02/16/12 through 02/23/12
-\SSLYZ0UZ\YHUJL
Iamily owneo 8 operateo.
InsurIng Louer Keys Honeouners
for over 30 years.
305-294-6677
1!32 Kenneoy Dr.
Key West, IL 330!0
Iul l e r s I ns ur anc e. c om
-0 9, ‹ >0 5+ ‹ -366+
344963 350007
3
1
9
4
5
0
Complete
Kitchen
with
New Cabinets
Granite Countertops
Installation
10x10 Kitchen
from
$2,995
00
Cabinet Expo
Create Your Dream Kitchen
305-848-8148 349661
Information provided by the Key West Association of Realtors - www.keywestrealtors.org
To See the List of Sunday’s Open Houses go to www.keywestrealtors.org/open-houses.htm
KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
7D

Monika Just Sold Another One!
Year over year the Average Sales Price in KW has risen 35%!
Total sales volume is up 18% and properties listed dropped
by 10%. Sales volume has increased in 2009, 2010 and
2011! Average days to sell is down 25%, down to 143 days.
Want your home SOLD? Call Monika Today!
319446
J
U
S
T
S
O
L
D
!
Monika Sundstrom
REALTOR
®
305-776-2025
monika@cbschmitt.com
www.bestkeywestagent.com
youtube.com/user/FlKeysHomes
Follow@MonikaSundstrom
507 Frances St.
Key West
SCHMITT
REAL ESTATE CO.
1201 White Street.
Key West, FL
www.DaveWileyProperties.com
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Dave JUST SOLD this Big Pine Key lot!
Whether you are Buying or Selling contact
Dave at the #1 office in the Lower Keys!
J
U
S
T
S
O
L
D
!
Lot 30 Enterprise Ave.
Big Pine Key
(305) 942-6210
Big Pine Key office is open 7 days
a week for your convenience.
Jimmy Olson
Jimmy.d.olson@gmail.com
Cell: 401-439-7021
Office: 305-296-7078
849 Baptist
1br/1ba
renovated
cottage w/huge
covered deck in
Bahama Village
$299,000
Compass Realty
201 Front Street
Suite 101
Key West, FL 33040
611 William St.
5br/5ba (3 lgl
units) w/offst
pkg Old Town.
Many options.
$1,499,000
1401 Tropical
Recently renovated
4br/3.5ba carport
walled estate 9350
s.f. lot w/huge pool
$2,350,000
3
5
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www.keywestjimmy.com
350025
Jimmy Lane is selling Key West real estate everywhere you turn. This home with a
transient license has 5 bedrooms and 5½ baths, almost 3000 sq. ft of living space, and sold
for $1,600,000. Jimmy finds buyers through his creative marketing techniques, internet savvy,
and extensive database and can produce the same results for you, whether buying or selling.
Visit Jimmy’s website to view recent home sales and market statistics or contact today for a
free, no-obligation consultation.
•Now Offering Property Management•
Just Sold! • 806 Truman Ave.
IMMACULATE
KEY HAVEN HOME
FISHERMAN’S DREAM
3/2, pool, 60ft canal front.
Ready to move in.
Easy owner financing.
No banks ,no hassles.
(305)295-0668
KW BRAND NEW
Custom design 3BR/3BA.
Open balconies,
in ground pool. Custom
interior. OSP. $549,900.
Call Steve for details at
(305)879-5800
520 HOMES
LOWER KEYS
STORAGE
Industrial Warehouses
Sizes vary.
Storage Containers
On our site or yours.
Call (305)294-0277
464 Storage
OFFICE SPACE
In historic building avail-
able NOW. 950 sq. ft.;
high ceilings, tile floors,
Internet ready. Great lo-
cation corner of White &
Truman. $1,350/mo Plus
triple net.
AT HOME IN KEY
WEST
296-7975
462 Office Space
1213 TRUMAN AVE.
1030 SF. Office or light
retaiil space w/BA. Large
attic. 1 OSP. $2200/mo.
Call (703)300-4904
462 Office Space
MARINAAREA
1300 s.f. 25’ ceilings,
10x10 garage door, bath-
room, 3 phase electric.
$1,200 mo. Call
305-360-2137.
460 COMMERCIAL
RENTALS
PLANNING YOUR
TRIP TO KEY WEST?
Historic Hideaways has
been providing custom-
ers with Vacation Rentals
for over 20 years. Rent a
private home or condo
w/ pool for the same
price as a hotel. Weekly,
Monthly or longer.
Visit us in person at:
1109 Duval Street or
www.HistoricHideaways.com
or call at 800-654-5131.
Full service property
management.
452 VACATION RENTALS
LOWER KEYS
SEEKING SMALL BR
with utilities in New or
Mid Town. $750/mo.
Clean, no alcohol or ille-
gal drugs. 336-617-5146
kl9861@yahoo.com
446 WANTED TO RENT
LOWER KEYS
BEAUTIFUL 3BR/2BA
New construction 1500
s.f. stilt home in Mara-
thon 74th St. $1,800 per
month. 305-797-5029.
442 UNFURN. HOUSES
MIDDLE KEYS
COMPASS REALTY
305-292-1480
Unfurnished Homes
3b/2b condo near the
beaches, ocean view in
the distance, covered
parking, storage, all new
appliances, $1950, F/L/S,
available immediately.
Private Home Available
Call For Details
Furnished Homes
Several furnished units
available 3/1
Call For Details
Call Compass Realty
for an appt. 292-1480
or 888-884-7368
www.compass-realty.com
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
CASA MARINAAREA
Spacious 3 or 4 bed-
room two bath house
with covered OSP, cen-
tral, laundry room and big
yard. $2,700 plus utilities.
Contact Everett Watkins,
Preferred Properties at
305-304-4269.
3BR/2BA
ON STOCK ISLAND
Available 2/20.
$1,800/mo. F/L/S. Call
Ken 305-393-9263.
All real estate ad-
vertising in this
newspaper is
subject to the Fed-
eral Fair Housing Act of 1968
which makes it illegal to ad-
vertise “any preference, limi-
tation or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex or
national origin, or an intention
to make any such preference
limitation or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in vio-
lation or the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that all
dwellings advertised in this
newspaper are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
318281
SUGARLOAF KEY
3/2 canal home,tile floor,
central air, lg screen
porch fenced yard-pets
welcome $2,000 per
month. Avail. April 1st.
305-923-4396,
305-745-3734.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
A KEY REAL Estate Inc.
305-872-4144
www.akeyrealestate.com
BIG PINE KEY
Gorgeous 3BR/2BA,
Canal Front, CBS Built
Stilt home tile floors,
C/A/C, W/D 2 car gar.,
Deep boating canal
$2250/mo. + Util. F/S
*SE HABLA ESPAÑOL*
SUGARLOAF SHORES
Wonderful 2BR/2BA,
large canal home,
open water view,
tile floors throughout ,
open floor plan, w/porch
all appl incl W/D hookup
$2,200 + util + sec.
Prudential Knight
Gardner Realty
305-304-4287, 294-5155.
SUGARLOAF
OPEN WATER
New cottage on stilts,
sunrise view, 2br/2ba,
c/a/c, tile floors, high
ceiling in living room &
kitchen, large covered
porch, fenced yard. Cats
welcome. $2000/mo.
Avail. March 15th.
305-923-4396,
305-745-3734.
2/2 HOUSE ON
STAPLES AVE.
with pool, $2,500/mo. +
utilities, F/L/S req.
avail immediately.
Call 305-393-9303.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
SHARK KEY 3/2
Pool, garage, workshop.
Avail. now $3,200/mo.
F/S
BIG COPPITT 2/1
Garage, storage, fenced
yard. Avail. 3/1.
$1,800/mo. F/S
The Taporowski Team
Realty Executives
Florida Keys
305-292-1922
Now Available for Rent
2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom
1600 Bertha St.
$1,400 per month
For More information or
An Appointment Call
Jaime Caballero
305-797-4130
EAGLE AVE. 2BR/2BA
Wonderful renovated
gourmet kitchen
all app incl. W/D, DW
large yard, porches,
$2,000 mo. + util + sec.
Prudential Knight
Gardner Realty
305-294-5155 ext 225
CENTURY 21 ALL
KEYS, INC.
305-294-4200-Rob
Meadows, Conch
Cottage, 2BR + loft, 2BA,
W/D, CAC, pool.
$2750/mo. plus utils.
440 UNFURN. HOUSES
LOWER KEYS
8 of 10 U.S. adults took action as a
result of newspaper advertising
in the past 30 days.*
54% clipped a coupon
46% bought something advertised
45% visited a store
39% picked up shopping ideas
37% checked a website to learn more
*Frank N. Magid Associates 2011 / Scarborough Research(release 2) 2010
**How America Shops & Spends 2011
Jon Wean
today to advertise
your home for sale.
292-7777, ext. 218
Did You Know...
More than any other medium, consumers believe in newspaper advertising. Thirty-six
percent of adults surveyed find newspapers are trustworthy or believable, a large gap
when compared to television (8%), or the Internet (15%).**
Shoppers are less willing today to accept advertising that is spooned out to
them. They seek out advertising on their own. Newspapers are the medium
shoppers use most for shopping in an average week. More than half(52%)
use newspapers, exceeding others like television(36%), ads appearing in
search engines(11%) or ads on general interest websites(16%).*
CALL
59%
Scarborough Research 2008 • How America Shops and Spends/MORI Research 2009
If you are
NOT
advertising
in The Citizen
it’s like fishing
without
bait!
how to catch the
attention of
Key West Citizen
readers.
Cal l Ter r y at
292-7777x214
Ask Terry Shimp
Did you know...
of adults rank newspapers
first as the media used to help
plan shopping or make purchasing
decisions in the past 7 days.
80% of newspaper readers report
looking at advertising when reading the paper.
60,000 Copies per quarter,
including a full run in the KW Citizen,
from Key West to Marathon!
3
1
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2
3
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KEYSWIDE CLASSIFIED
THE KEY WEST CITIZEN ◆ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012
8D
350024
Jimmy Lane is selling Key West real estate everywhere you turn.
This beautiful home on Eagle Avenue has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths,
over 1600 sq. ft of living space, and sold for $415,000 in 5 days. Jimmy
finds buyers through his creative marketing techniques, internet
savvy, and extensive database and can produce the same results for
you, whether buying or selling. •Now Offering Property Management•
Just Sold • 3525 Eagle Avenue
J
U
S
T
S
O
L
D
!
I need your listing!
All my properties have sold.
To put your home in this ad,
call Roger and get results today!
Roger Gillis,
Realtor
®
(305) 393-3281
RogerGillis@comcast.net
1201 White St. Ste.101
Key West, FL 33040
YOUR
HOME
HERE
350027

Open House - 2309 Patterson Ave, Key West
319448
Schmitt Real Estate
Vic Musmanno ABR, CRS
2011 Top Selling Residential Realtor In Key West & The Entire Florida Keys
Ph: 305-294-0123 Email: vicmus@aol.com
Start your home search @ keywestliving.com
1-4 p.m. Today
Large mid town Key West home
w/ a 1 BR & 1 BA mother in-law
unit! Totaling 3 BRs & 3 BAs with
1760 Sq. ft. of interior living area,
the home offers a floor plan with
terrific bedroom separation. Fencing
surrounds the home offering a great
sense of privacy and presenting a fine
outdoor living area. Special features
include off street parking for 2 cars,
Mexican tile floors & a fireplace. Visit
www.2309PattersonAve.com for more
info. $399,000
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
KEY WEST. Tropical Elegance. 2 story conch house with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths in the
main house. Large open living area, cathedral ceilings & french doors overlooking
the tropical yard & inviting heated pool with waterfalls. Charming 1 bedroom,
1 bath guest cottage with living area & kitchen adjoined by a breezeway.
Owners are motivated. $1,200,000. 1716VONPHISTERST.com for a virtual tour.
Joanne Allen,
Realtor/Associate
305-923-0239
WWW.SHARKKEYFLORIDA.COM
Lands End Real Estate, LLC
SEE MAP
PAGE
4
350016
1716-1718 Von Phister Street
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 12-3 pm
The Victoria House
806 Truman Ave
Call Rudy Molinet Today To Find Your Dream
Home Or To List Your Key West Home.
Rudy Molinet
Key West Market Leader
305-240-1090
www.rudymolinet.com
J
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3
0
Space
New town or Old Town
From $537/month.
Contact Claude J.
Gardner, Jr.
305-766-3133
Prudential Knight &
Gardner Realty
# 1 in KEY WEST
commercial sales and
lease volume in 2011
and for the last 10 years
combined.
534 COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
Mix-Use Property.
Commercial downstairs/
residential unit up.
Short-sale.
420 Fleming St.
Office Building
1400 SF Perfect Office,
steps from Courthouse
and Duval St. Lobby area
and offices.
BUY or LEASE.
Professional Office
534 COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
Commercial For Sale
Search All Key West and
FL Keys Commercial RE
and Businesses For Sale
at www.KeysRealEstate.com
Toppino Drive
Former Sprint Store-
1,250 SF Ample Parking
and Great Visibility.
Large Retail Bldg.
Former Budde's Office
Supply/ Ashley Furniture.
5,000 -11,000 SF of
space located on busy
Flagler Ave. w/ ample
front & rear parking.
1219 Duval St. Deli
Popular NY Style Deli
with proven success for
sale.
Mini Storage Facility
Fully occupied 61 Unit fa-
cility. 7% Cap Rate. Lit-
tle management or ad-
vertising needed. Apart-
ment and office Included.
1200-1206 White St.
Mixed-use strip center
with adjacent parking lot
on busy KW Street.
3 Commercial/
2 Residential Units
1013 Truman Ave.
534 COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
**Nature’s Treasures**
Business or location for
sale. 201 William St.
Great potential. Teasure
coin store, Watersport’s
bookings, Gifts, Photo
Business, Wedding
Chapel, Trolley stop etc.
Call Prudential RE
305-797-7427.
5 COP LIQUOR
LICENSE NEEDED
Quick close, pay cash.
Call Ralph Sanchez
Century 21 All Keys
304-0090
526 BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
35 Ft. HOUSEBOAT
For Sale
Great Liveaboard on
Stock Island, ocean
view/access. $24,000
lease purchase w/size-
able downpayments
305-304- 4911.
PERFECT OLD TOWN
LOCATION
3Br/2Ba well maintained
furnished home, open
kitchen, D/W, high ceil-
ings, C/A/C, large front
porch, W/D, private rear
deck, outdoor shower.
$479,900 Brokers Pro-
tected 305-509-4110
520 HOMES
LOWER KEYS
FURNISHED HOUSE-
BOAT FOR SALE
Garrison Bight Marina
Key West. Affordable liv-
ing on the water.
$95,000. 305-304-1412.
520 HOMES
LOWER KEYS
Read Paradise Every Thursday In Tne Citizen
Announce it
in Keyswide
Classified!
Call 292-7777
in the news
The Cate Was a Plew
9
Keys Cuisine
Party Themes to Honor
Your Oscar Nominees
4
Soundings
Downton Abbey
8
Front Row at the Movies
Tinsel Town Comes
to the Tropic Cinema
Today
VOL. 33 • NO. 9 THE HIGH POINT IN KEYS LIFE FEBRUARY 26, 2012
solares hill
arts
politics
opinion
books
entertainment
film
3
The World of Art
Roberta Marks on
Giving Life to What
Has Been Lost
14
To Your Pet’s
Health
National
Geographic’s Not So
‘Incredible Dr. Pol’
Singh Moves to Protect Secret Garden in Perpetuity
‘I
t’s complicated,”
admits Pritam Singh
in explaining the
deal he’s struck with Nancy
Forrester to preserve her
20,000-square-foot Secret
Garden at the end of Free
School Lane.
But he is very clear on his
intent in saving the largest
single collection of trees in
Old Town Key West.
“I fell in love with the
place,” he told Solares Hill
last week. “With its unusu-
alness. Its intriguingness.
It would be a tragedy if the
estate was converted to
commercial use.”
So he has come to an
unusual arrangement with
Forrester.
On Monday, through the
auspices of Key West real-
tor Lynn Kaufelt, the Secret
Garden property, including
the garden, its existing one-
bedroom cottage plus one
additional parcel available
for building, is to be put
up for sale — with a deed
restriction that there will
never be any commercial
use or development per-
mitted.
“No hotel, no multi-
house subdivision, ever,”
insisted Pritam. “Just two
residences. The estate can
be sold 50 times over but
this restriction will never
change. It will be registered
with the city, which has the
right to enforce it.”
opinion
PHOTO BY MARK HOWELL
In Nancy’s Secret Garden last week: From right are Pritam Singh and
his wife Ann Johnston with their dog Spike, Nancy Forrester and her
sister DeDe Desmond.
Please turn to page 16
Why Politics and Medicine Make Lousy Bedfellows
By Mark Howell
O
ur polarized political
climate has reached
new heights in hostil-
ity. The shaky economy is
at the center of this discord
but the problems stemming
from the economy have
proven to be difficult to
solve due to an inability to
cut through, or step around,
the bias and self-serving
rhetoric that’s now infused
into public discussions.
Many of the most heated
political debates are spring-
ing from various aspects
of our healthcare system.
As a physician and clinical
researcher who’s spent the
past 40 years diagnosing and
treating pregnant patients
with various problems
involving their fetuses, I
need to offer an opinion on
Please turn to page 10
By Dr. John Hobbins
1818 VENETIA STREET $379,000
Doug Mayberry • Sabrina Acevedo • Dean Townsend • Keith Bland
Kent Ducote • Mary Thixton • Bobby Ciulla • Greg James • John Dell
(305) 292-6155 • Doug@DougMayberry.com • www.DougMayberry.com
Private and tropical 3 BD/ 2 BA CBS pool home in the Mid-Town
area. Newer kitchen, screened veranda, fenced yard & parking.
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solares hill solares hill
Soundings by Mark Howell 4
On the Bookshelf
“Somebody’s Daughter”
Reviewed by C. S. Gilbert 6
Stage Lights
Invitation to a Hair-raising “Dinner” at the Woman’s Club
Reviewed by Mark Howell 6
Musical Notes
Piano Virtuosity From a Great Musical Era
Reviewed by Harry Schroeder 7
Front Row at the Movies
Tinsel Town Comes to the Tropic Cinema Today
by Shirrel Rhoades 8
Keys Cuisine
Party Themes to Honor Your Oscar Nominees
by Joanna Brady Schmida 9
From the Grapevine
From the Farthest Corner: The Charm of Oregon Wines
by David White 11
The Game Page 12
Beyond the Sea
Reef Relief Is 25 Years Young; Come and Party!
by Rudy Bonn 13
To Your Pet’s Health
National Geographic Not so ‘Incredible Dr. Pol’
by Dr. Doug Mader 14
Adopt a Pet 15
Editor
Mark Howell
Associate Editor
Nadja Hansen
Contributors
Margit Bisztray, Rudy
Bonn, C. S. Gilbert, John
Hobbins, Harry Schroeder
Advertising Sales
Tommy Todd
(305) 292-7777, EXT. 204
Publisher
Paul A. Clarin
V. P. of Operations
Randy Erickson
Design Editor
Danette Baso-Silvers
Photo Editor
Mike Hentz
Photo Contributor
Rob O’Neal
Reach Solares Hill
Phone: (305) 294-3602
Fax: (305) 295-8015
Solares Hill
is published weekly by Cooke
Communications, 3420 Northside
Dr., Key West, FL. Second class post-
age paid by The Citizen, Key West
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this week in solares hill
by
Mark
Howell
S
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casting couch
L
ast Week’s Casting
Couch Contest: Whom
would you have cast as
Margaret Thatcher and her
deceased husband Denis
if Meryl Street and Jim
Broadbent had not been
available for “The Iron
Lady”?
Tim Gratz caught our
fancy with this suggestion:
“How about Maggie Smith
to play Margaret Thatcher
(hey, they share the same
first name) and Geoffrey
Rush to play her dead hus-
band? I mean, shouldn’t
Brits play Brits?”
Other casting ideas
included:
Mary Vanden Brook with,
“The obvious: Helen Mirren
and Geoffrey Rush. Less
so: Emma Thompson and
Patrick Stewart.”
Nina Crooks agrees:
“I would choose Sir Ian
McKellen for Denis and for
Margaret Thatcher I would
suggest Helen Miren.”
“Happy Sunday!” chirps
Jackie O’Neil. “I think Tilda
Swinton would make a
good Margaret Thatcher
with Colin Firth as her dead
husband Denis. Cheers!”
All good casting ideas,
but it’s Tim’s week.
This week’s Casting
Couch Contest: “Act of
Valor” is a realistic war
movie with no big-name
stars. But if a studio wanted
to do a remake with A-list
actors in the leads played
by Alex Valdez and Roselyn
Sanchez, whom would you
cast?
Best lineup (my choice)
that I receive by email
today, Feb. 26, wins a free
ticket to Regal Cinema 6.
By Shirrel Rhoades
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the world of art
Roberta Marks on Giving Life to What Has Been Lost
I
n her home, sanctuary
and studio overlook-
ing the ocean, Key West
artist Roberta Marks lives
and works surrounded by
things that most people
have forgotten. Towers of
storage bins are marked
as if for museum archives:
barbed wire, thermometers,
glass negatives, typewriter
parts, piano keys, rag balls.
Shelves display hatpins,
pincushions, hair combs,
jewelry boxes, antique doll
chairs and parasols, as well
as her enormous collection
of books.
“I deal with society’s
wastes,” explains the art-
ist. “Whatever’s no longer
needed, I utilize. I put it in
a different genre, giving it
new life –– renewal. Renewal
is not only change but con-
tinuation. That is what saves
me.”
Her show, “Lettres, Etc.,”
which opens Thursday
at Lucky Street Gallery,
explores the themes of loss,
obsolescence and extinc-
tion. As are all her shows,
“Lettres, Etc.” is as much
about the deeply personal
as it is about the societal.
During the time that the
show was developing,
Marks’ was struck with an
unfathomable loss. Once
again her work became
a vehicle, allowing her to
accept the overwhelming
grief that was present in her
life. This aspect adds poi-
gnancy –– occasionally even
eerie coincidence and dou-
ble entendre ––to the col-
lection. Although the idea of
nostalgia for what has been
lost had already arisen, it
was heightened as the body
of work grew and the events
of her life unfolded.
The work titled “Return
to Sender,” for example,
incorporates an antique
paper and envelope set that
have predominant black
bands. Writing materials
of all kinds –– stationery,
stamps, postcards, pencils
and pens –– are something
Roberta Marks is drawn to,
because they count among
the objects we are “losing.”
Only after the fact of “Return
to Sender” did she learn
that the black-banded set
was intended for funeral
announcements.
Another work features
an arrangement of blank,
white tags hung in an all-
white box. The theme of it
is baggage, or belongings,
that remain, as the title
describes, “Unclaimed.”
“I have this intuitive con-
nection between what’s
happening to me and the
objects I find. It happens to
me all the time,” she says.
Marks finds her materials
during her travels, mostly in
antique markets in France
but also, as on a recent trip
to India, from small vendors,
in temples and on the street.
In Pushkar, India, she
bought a stack of postcards
from an old, crippled man
who said that he’d sold cards
in the exact same spot for
26 years. It was how he sup-
ported his family. Now, he
told her, no one uses these
old tools. They use the
Internet.
“Postcards and letters are
things people look forward
to,” says Marks. “What’s nos-
talgic about email?”
Along with the personal
missive, technology is
replacing human solitude as
well, and the ability to think
and use one’s imagination.
Not only the nature and the
materials of her art but the
way that she produces it,
work counter to this tenden-
cy. As a practicing Buddhist,
Marks describes her process
as a meditation.
“I work in the moment,
with acute concentration.
I focus on every infini-
tesimal mark or object. Each
one has a purpose. Every
object is thoughtfully and
intentionally placed. My
work begins with chaos
but through the practice of
meditation I clear my mind,
my work. There are disrup-
tions and detours but they
bring positive elements into
the work. Even if it’s sad-
ness.”
Despite how deliberate
they are, her works have an
ethereal, temporal qual-
ity ––– as if at any time the
elements might disperse
or rearrange themselves.
“Remnants of India,” for
example, is a small shelf
of compartments (like old
hotels used to keep keys
straight) stuffed full of
remnants of lace and cloth
picked up in India. “If a
breeze comes along, those
fragments would blow away.
This is a tenet of Buddhism:
that transformation occurs.”
On the mixed media work
“Living in the Margins,”
dabs of color, paper scraps
and partially obscured
handwriting float in layers
as in a pool of water, post-
storm. They look like they
could be stirred. They look
like they could drift off past
the edges or disappear. But
they won’t. They will be per-
manent, instead. They will
have been renewed.
“With art, you have the
power to create change,”
says the artist. “And change
creates power.”
“Lettres Etc.” opens
Thursday, March 1, from
6 to 8 p.m. at Lucky Street
Gallery, 540 Greene St.,
and runs through Tuesday,
March 13.
By Margit Bisztray
‘Living in the Margins’ diptych left.
‘Return to Sender.’
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T
he BBC-TV series
“Downton Abbey,”
now a huge hit on
PBS, is about the fictional
Earl of Grantham and his
three daughters, none of
whom, due to Britain’s
obscure “rules of primogeni-
ture” (don’t ask), can inherit
either the fortune or the
estate of their father — or
even the fortune of their
American mother, played by
Elizabeth McGovern (watch
for Shirley MacLaine as the
next U.S. actress to appear
in this series).
Fans of “Downton Abbey”
may be interested to know
that its creator and execu-
tive producer, the Egyptian-
born British actor and writer
Julian Alexander Fellowes
— himself a hilarious hit as
Earl Kilwillie in an earlier
TV series, “Monarch of the
Glen” (2000-2005) and also,
in 2001, winner of an Oscar
for his script for “Gosford
Park” — is in fact Baron
Kitchener-Fellowes of West
Stafford, Lord of the Manor
of Tattershall, a Conservative
member of the House of
Lords and also the romantic
novelist known as Rebecca
Greville.
Julian’s wife, Emma Joy,
Lady Kitchener, would her-
self be in line to inherit the
fortune and the estate of her
own father, the present (but
also the last) Earl Kitchener
of Khartoum, except for
those very same pesky “rules
of primogeniture.”
So you see, he really does
know what he’s writing
about.
• • • • •
The healthcare system in
the United States, reports
Robert Samuelson of The
Washington Post, is the
most expensive in the world
by far — 50 percent more
costly per person than
Norway’s, the next costliest.
Our life expectancy (78.2
years) is just 27th in the
world, behind Chile’s. And
we get fewer doctor visits
than in most developed
countries.
So why is healthcare so
expensive here, devouring
our paychecks, household
budgets and government
resources?
Says Samuelson: “The ‘fee
for services’ system here
encourages doctors to run
up the bill. The more they
do, the more they earn,” And
doctors and hospitals charge
steep prices: A coronary
angioplasty costs $14,000
in the U.S., just $7,000 in
France.
• • • • •
Seen on a bumper sticker:
“Ask your doctor if medical
advice from a TV commer-
cial is right for you.”
• • • • •
Dolphins and whales
are so intelligent that they
should be recognized as
“nonhuman persons” and
granted their own bill of
rights, agreed scientists
at a recent meeting of the
American Association for
the Advancement of Science
in Vancouver, Canada.
“Isolating dolphins and
orcas in tanks at amusement
parks is morally wrong,”
noted Thomas White, an
ethics expert at Loyola
Marymount University in
California. “Killing them is
tantamount to murder.”
Studies show that ceta-
ceans — water-dwelling
mammals — are more
intelligent than chimpan-
zees and communicate in
a similar way to humans.
“Dolphins are even more
socially driven than
humans,” added White.
• • • • •
Coming to Key West for
a concert on March 16 is
Herbert Weissberg, former
principal flutist of the
Vienna Symphony, who
will play at The Studios
of Key West with fellow
Viennese musicians Heinz
Medjimorec on piano and
Peter Siakala on cello.
Born in Vienna in 1939,
Weissberg is a long-time
friend of Key West resident
Peyton Evans — “He mar-
ried an old friend of mine
who was the exchange
student from Austria at my
high school back in the
1950s,” she told us. “Herbert
and Doris and I have often
visited each other, here and
abroad.” When they were
Peyton’s guests in Key West
last year, she suggested he
perform at The Studios. “I
was thrilled when he said,
‘Sure!’”
We interviewed Herbert
by email last week:
“Heinz and Peter and I
have prepared a ‘pasticcio
program’ with a lot of ingre-
dients mixed together,” he
told us. “We want to give the
audience a varied evening,
not only in the program but
also in the sound. There will
be some surprises. The three
Austrian composers we’ll
be playing, Josef Haydn,
Johann Strauss and Franz
Schubert, in their youth
listened to the same folk
music. You might feel the
deep connection to the ‘pop
music’ of their time.
“The other composers
we’re playing, Bach, Poulenc
and Piazzolla, at first glance
do not seem to have too
much in common but even
their compositions are
based on the dance music of
their lifetimes. Bach’s move-
ments are often named after
the dances he heard in the
courts and in the market-
places. Poulenc’s sonata is
hilarious dance music. And
Piazzolla is the world’s most
famous tango composer.”
Playing the flute seems so
impossible to us. How does
he do it? We asked.
“Have you ever tried to get
a sound out by blowing over
the edge of a glass bottle?
Yes? If you succeeded, you
will be able to play the flute.
It is not as difficult as it
might seem. If you start to
study flute at the age of 14
as I did — I started with the
piano when I was five — you
don’t think of anything
being hard to learn if you
love to do it. And my first
teacher, Hans Reznicek, was
a kind man. Leading but not
commanding.”
Who are his favorite com-
posers for the flute?
“It’s a pity but the most
famous composers didn’t
write so much for the
flute. Bach and to some
extent Mozart were the
great exceptions. During
their time and the times of
Beethoven and Brahms,
the instruments technically
were not developed too well,
so flutists lack concerts of
many of the genius compos-
ers. With the development of
the flute in the last decades
of the 19th century, a num-
ber of French composers
wrote interesting music
for it. In our day, many of
the well-known composers
write for the flute. Aaron
Copland wrote a beautiful
duo for flute and piano. I
love it.”
We asked Herbert about
the city in which he lives.
“Vienna is a city of less
than two million people and
hosts five big orchestras,
among them the Vienna
Philharmonic and the
Vienna Symphony, both
famous all over the world.
by
Mark
Howell
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Julian Fellowes, creator of
‘Downton Abbey.’
Herbert Weissberg: ‘I love to
make music.’
Jack Hackett is featured
poet at the Key West
Poetry Guild reading in the
Bordello Gallery at 7 p.m.
on Sunday, March 4, at
Blue Heaven, 729 Thomas
St. Tortuga Jack, poet and
musician, was born and
raised in Chicago as the
7th son of first-generation
Irish-American parents.
Raised in the storytelling
tradition, he hitchhiked
across the country in the
1960s, owned and oper-
ated two bars with his
brothers and first came to
Key West in the 1980s on his way to St. Croix.
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Each day you could visit not
only one but a number of
orchestra or chamber music
concerts in Vienna as well as
concerts of contemporary
or pop music. So you are
surrounded by music if you
want to be and that makes
Vienna a marvellous place
for musicians and music
lovers.”
We then asked him an
impertinent question about
Leonard Bernstein, the
American composer/con-
ductor who was invited
to conduct the Vienna
Philharmonic and got off to
an infamously bad start.
“Bernstein had a rough
time with the Vienna
Philharmonic the first times
he came to Vienna and the
orchestra vice versa with
him. But they respected
each other and finally found
an excellent way to cooper-
ate. I was principal flutist
at the Vienna Symphony
for nearly 40 years — Peter
is still a member of the
cello section of the Vienna
Symphony) — and as you
can imagine you get con-
fronted by all sorts of con-
ductors. You love them or
you do not. In either case
you give everything you are
able, maybe a little bit more
if you play with extra posi-
tive feelings. Regarding my
own experiences as a con-
ductor, I love to make music
and it’s very special to play
on a large, living instrument
like an orchestra.”
We wished Herbert and
his friends the very best on
their visit to Key West.
“When my wife Doris and
I visited Peyton in Key West
a number of years ago, I fell
in love with this wonderful
place. Especially at a time
of the year when Vienna is
cold, windy and sometimes
foggy — you long for a
place with summer all year
round. My impressions of
the United States in the last
few years? Maybe the States
might move a little to meet
European social ideas and
our part of Europe move
more to meet America’s lib-
eral ideas. And both should
not be afraid to rethink their
positions.”
“Vienna in Paradise”
comes to The Studios of
Key West at the Historic
Armory, 600 White St. on
Friday, March 16, at 7 p.m.
The opening performance
is by The Studio’s March art-
ist-in-residence, Catherine
Weinfield, on oboe.
Ticketholders are invited
to a champagne reception
following the event at
JANGEORGe Interior
Design, 600 Frances St.
Tickets at 296-0548 or
online at TSKW.org.
• • • • •
Key West snowbird
Tom Perera, a resident of
Vermont, tells us he went
dumpster diving at Truman
Waterfront last month in
search of material discarded
from the U.S. Coast Guard
Cutter Mohawk before the
vessel leaves Key West on its
final journey.
“I recovered several World
War II life preservers,” Tom
told Soundings, “and cut
them apart to examine
their insides. What I found
confirms the reports of
war-time sailors that their
vests no longer supported
them after a few hours in
the water. The life vests were
filled with kapok, a veg-
etable fiber enclosed within
an easily torn vinyl bag. The
waxy coating that covered
the lightweight kapok fiber
provided the buoyancy
— but the vinyl-sealed pack-
ets of coated kapok could be
easily punctured, causing
the vests to lose their buoy-
ancy.”
• • • • •
Alert reader Cindy
Thompson points out that
in last week’s photo of the
“Dead End” sign on the
fence around the Key West
Cemetery, the “Angela St.”
letters on the power pole are
missing an “a” — so it reads:
“Angel.”
• • • • •
Quote for the Week:
I have pretty much made
up my mind to run for
president. I am going to
enter the field with an open
record. The rumor that I
buried a dead aunt under
my grapevine is correct. The
vine needed fertilizing, my
aunt had to be buried, and
I dedicated her to this high
purpose. Does that unfit
me for the presidency? The
Constitution of our country
does not say. No other citizen
was ever considered unwor-
thy of this office because
he enriched his grapevines
with his dead relatives. Why
should I be?”
— Mark Twain,
“A Presidential
Candidate” (1879)
PHOTO BY MIKE HENTZ
This kapok tree in Key West is a living example of the sacred
tree of the Mayans, who believed that the dead climbed its
branches to reach heaven. The kapok is also the origin of the
World War II life jackets known as Mae Wests, whose fiber
came from the tree’s seed pods.
This kapok life jacket from the Coast Guard Cutter Mohawk is
a flotation device now prohibited from use in the U.S., Canada
and Europe due to the failure of its materials. See item this
page.
Meticulously constructed by Bruce McGarey, son of a Navy
commander, raised in Gloucester, Mass., and a Key West resi-
dent since 1956, this model of the paddlewheeler ‘Key West’ is
on display at Gallery on Greene, 606 Greene St.
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on the bookshelf
‘Somebody’s Daughter’ Should Be Everybody’s Concern
“Somebody’s Daughter”
By Julian Sher
Chicago Review Press, 24.95
‘S
omebody’s
Daughter: The
Hidden Story of
America’s Prostituted
Children and the Battle to
Save Them” by investiga-
tive reporter Julian Sher is a
hard read. It’s not because
the language is difficult
— journalists by experi-
ence tend to be experts at
linguistic precision and
clarity. It’s not the book’s
format, which is a friendly
narrative even when indi-
vidual stories — the girls,
local vice cops, FBI agents,
survivors who return to
the streets as social work-
ers — intertwine. No,
“Somebody’s Daughter”
is difficult, painful even,
because the straightforward
language and narrative tone
weave vivid, unforgettable
tales of the brainwashing
and violent sexploitation of
children.
The book begins and
ends with
Maria. And with
a handful of
concerned and
compassionate
law-enforcement
professionals
including FBI
agent Dan
Garrabrant. In
between are
scores of exploit-
ed children, one as young
as 10.
The girls float in an ocean
of supporting data.
Twenty to 40 percent of
the victims recruited into
prostitution are juveniles.
The vast majority (70 per-
cent) of prostituted children
are runaways, often with
ample cause, almost always
with a history of prior sexu-
al abuse.
There are also enlight-
ened vice units and “res-
cue” organizations run by
survivors. Key Westers first
met Maria and other young
teens when author Sher
keynoted the
“Our Kids Are
Not for Sale”
rally presented
by a new advo-
cacy group, the
Keys Coalition,
last month. (Full
disclosure: I
was drafted to
serve with the
Rev. Gwendolyn
Magby as founding co-chair
of the group.)
Sher’s illustrated lecture
on the sexual trafficking of
children was riveting. But
it did not truly prepare one
for the weight of the entire
story as it unfolds in black
and white on the page.
Sher’s powerpoint images
were easier to absorb than
the battering of bold, bald
facts and wrenching, often
violent stories.
Hard to accept is the
reality that pimp culture is
adulated in this country.
The reality that the sexual
trafficking of children is
the fastest-growing crime
in the nation. The reality
that drug pushers are turn-
ing to trafficking because
drugs once sold are gone
while young bodies are
a renewable resource.
Besides, pimps are rarely
prosecuted. Hardest is the
reality that, even now, most
often it is the victims who
are blamed.
Sher ultimately offers
hope, however. A vicious
pimp is convicted due to
the courage of another cen-
tral character, Felicia, and
passionately determined
legal and law enforcement
professionals.
A number of stories have
happy endings.
But others don’t.
So “Somebody’s
Daughter” is a hard read.
One will be sensitized to
the signs, the ubiquitous
nature of the problem. In
The Key West Citizen last
week was the headline:
“Police find remains of Ohio
teenager missing in 1999.”
The suspect, who “killed
himself in 2002 while await-
ing sentencing for raping a
girl” reportedly “had a link
to human trafficking.” That
chilling fact might have
escaped me before. The
murdered child was 14.
Yes, “Somebody’s
Daughter” is a hard read
but it’s an important one.
The book is available at
Amazon.com. To be part of
the solution, come to the
Keys Coalition’s first official
election meeting and help
to map the road to raising
consciousness among pro-
fessionals, the public and
potential victims as well:
Thursday, March 1, at 7
p.m. at Congregation B’nai
Zion, 750 United St.
For details visit www.
keyscoalition.com or phone
me at 295-9466.
Reviewed by C. S. Gilbert
stage lights
Invitation to a Hair-raising ‘Dinner’ at the Woman’s Club
I
nvited to the dress
rehearsal of “Dinner”
last week, we repaired
to the Woman’s Club on
Duval Street where this deli-
cious new production by
Key West’s Fringe Theater
served up primordial soup,
apocalypse lobster and, for
dessert, frozen waste that
turned out to be scary good.
Fringe is immersion
theater, taking place at the
scene of the action. “We
don’t do proscenium arch,”
explains producer and artis-
tic director, Monnie King.
The group’s previous play,
“Suddenly Last Summer,”
is set in a garden and was
a great success performed
outdoors at The Gardens
Hotel.
Immersion in “Dinner,”
set in a plush home in
England, means that we
visit the Woman’s Club and
spend the main course com-
fortably beneath a chande-
lier and, for the party’s “just
desserts,” retire thrillingly to
the drawing room.
Moira Buffini’s “Dinner”
premiered at the National
Theatre and moved to
London’s West End where
it was nominated for an
Olivier Award for Best
Comedy.
“Everything you represent
thrills me,” purrs Paige (a
wildcat Vanessa McCaffrey)
to the waiter (Tony Konrath
totemic in his tux). She’s
hired him, for $25,000 cash,
to serve at a dinner in cele-
bration of the latest book by
her husband Lars (a tongue-
lashing PJ King).
Paige has not yet read
Lars’ book, “Beyond Belief,”
because she’s waiting for the
paperback. “Is it a thriller?”
asks one of the guests. No,
it’s philosophy. The guests
include Lars’ extramarital
friend, Wynne (the frank and
earnest Tammy Shanley),
academic Hal (the set-to-
explode Wayne Dapser) and
his wife, Sian, a TV “news
babe” (the give-as-good-as-
you get Melody More). Then
there’s the accidental home
invader, Mike (a muscularly
effective Ross Pipkin).
The comedy is wildly high
and low. When the unex-
pected guest claims he’s just
By Mark Howell
PHOTO BY C.S. GILBERT
‘Dinner’: ‘He calls it service, I call it love.’
Continued on next page
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musical notes
Piano Virtuosity From a Great Musical Era
T
he Impromptu
Concert series
presented as its
third concert of the sea-
son the pianist Marina
Lomazov. Her program
was eclectic, including
Haydn and Schubert as
the older entries, Liszt and
Rachmaninoff from the
great period of pianistic
virtuosity, and the modern
composers Nicolai Kapustin
and Carter Pann. She was at
home, playing excellently, in
all three.
This was Lomazov’s
third appearance in the
Impromptu series, after
an absence of more than
a decade. Since then, the
career of the Ukrainian-
born pianist, trained in
Kiev and at Juilliard and
Eastman, has continued its
upward trajectory, with first
prizes in several competi-
tions, recitals in major ven-
ues in New York, Chicago,
Los Angeles and Boston,
recordings and appearances
with major orchestras and
at music festivals world-
wide. Looking over my
reviews of her earlier con-
certs, which were enthusi-
astic, it turns out that every
virtue I cited in her playing
is now there and more.
First of all, she plays with
exceptional authority. She
can play cleanly at a power-
ful triple forte. At the other
end of her technique, she
can also play very fast tem-
pos softly. Both of these
virtues were evident in the
Haydn and Schubert pieces,
which at various points
demanded either strength
or delicacy. Of special note
is her impressive left hand,
which concedes nothing,
either in power or in legato
subtlety.
Of the moderns, Nikolai
Kapustin’s piece showed an
interesting jazz connection,
although the composer’s
claim to have been influ-
enced by Oscar Peterson
was only faintly evident.
Carter Pann’s composition,
“Six Strokes,” has movement
titles on the order of “Pasta
To Go” and “Shrapnel.” As
usual with program music,
I had difficulty making the
connection between the
music and its announced
subject — I even have
trouble with “Peter and the
Wolf” — but, again as usual,
that didn’t matter: the music
speaks for itself, with, in one
movement, rapid, flight-of-
the-bumblebee-ish figures
while, in another, a quiet
tenderness.
The Liszt and
Rachmaninoff pieces
were ... well, Liszt and
Rachmaninoff: displays of
virtuosity that required,
and got, the whole range
of piano technique, often
at very high speeds, which
Lomazov had no trouble
handling. One special virtue
of her playing is that her
technique is always in the
service of the music rather
than being on show for
itself — which is remark-
able, since one of the char-
acteristics of that type of
music is the chance it offers
a pianist to show off. This
quality in her playing was
true even in the third of the
Rachmaninoff selections,
which requires extreme 10-
fingered chops. She played
that without even a hint of
braggadocio.
On a more general note:
it is to take nothing away
from Lomazov’s fine con-
cert, or from the excellence
of the Impromptu Concert
series as a whole, to suggest
that the programs might be
drawn from a larger range
of instrumentalists. A given
year’s series can usually
be counted on to include
a string quartet, a larger
string group and a couple
of pianists; two thirds of
the concerts of the past
five years have been drawn
from those genres. This
year’s roster includes these,
along with another string
group and a piano/strings
trio. With the extraordinary
improvement of instrumen-
tal virtuosity of the latest
decades, there are brilliant
brass and woodwind play-
ers out there, as soloists,
in conventional lineups
like brass quintets and in
unusual combinations.
They do show up occasion-
ally — flute, bassoon and
piano last year, piano and
clarinet the year before last
— but most of the program-
ming tends toward the
conservative. I doubt that
attendance would fall off
if the programs were a bit
more adventurous.
By Harry Schroeder
Marina Lomazov: Exceptional authority.
burgled the art collector’s
house next door, Lars later
asks him: “Did you take her
Klimt?’
Then there’s the whole
class thing. “Did you say a
deprived background or a
depraved one?”
It’s the kind of occasion
where the hostess decks her
hubby while he’s calling the
police. “We need a drink!”
repeats Paige to the waiter.
I’ll say. But it’s disturbing,
too. The individual per-
formances are so compel-
ling I was entertained by
flashbacks all night long.
You can’t help but buy into
these people in full flame
and then they stay with you.
Must be the immersion.
Director is Peter King;
consulting director, Steven
Chambers. Stage manager
is Janeen Gracer. Technical
director is Adam Mac. All
good.
“Dinner” is at 7:30 p.m.
at the Woman’s Club, 319
Duval St. on March 2, 3, 4
and 9, 10, 11. Tickets are $25
from keystix.com.
STAGE LIGHTS
Continued from page 6
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front row at the movies
Tinsel Town Comes to the Tropic Cinema Today!
T
onight’s
the
night,
the 84th
Academy
Award
Ceremony.
Sure, there are
other prestigious awards —
Golden Globes, Cesar, SAG,
New York film Critics, etc.
But winning that golden
statuette nicknamed Oscar
is a recognition that most
actors consider the highest
honor in their profession.
No, Woody Allen doesn’t
show up. And Marlon
Brando sent an American
Indian maiden in his stead.
But this evening the Kodak
Theater will be packed
with Hollywood’s elite:
actors, directors, produc-
ers, screenwriters, musical
scorers, animators, docu-
mentarians and assorted
folks who bring movies to a
theater near you.
And near you is Tropic
Cinema, hosting its annual
Oscar Gala, a tradition since
the theater opened in 2004.
“The Magic of the Movies”
begins at 6 p.m. replete
with a red carpet and local
celebs.
At 6:15 you’ll be treated
to an Oscar concert, a
medley of Oscar-winning
and nominated melodies
from animated films.
“Man or Muppet” from
“The Muppets” and “Real
in Rio” from “Rio” will be
performed by Michael D.
Robinson and Eric Haley.
From 6:45 to 9 p.m. a Star
Treatment Oscar Buffet will
be accompanied by music
from Debra and Patrick of
La-Te-Da. Champagne will
be flowing.
You can even have your
own paparazzi souvenir
photograph made during
the festivities.
At 8 p.m. the 84th Annual
Academy Awards will be
simulcast on the big screen
of the Carper Theater. Billy
Crystal is emceeing the
event in Hollywood, a wel-
come return.
Some 6,000 Academy
members vote for each
year’s Oscar winners.
Tropic’s members get to
“vote,” too. The Tropic is
giving away a whole year
of free movie tickets to the
film buff who gets the Oscar
winners right in 25 major
categories on an official
Tropic ballot. Official bal-
lots are $5 and available at
the Tropic box office.
My predictions: “Hugo”
will take Best Picture.
George Clooney (“The
Descendants”) and
Michelle Williams (“My
Week With Marilyn”) will
take the top acting awards.
From there, moviegoers,
you’re on your own.
“Act of Valor”
Is No Act
Y
ou’d think this was a
U.S. Navy training film
or a documentary like
Frank Capra’s World War II
“Why We Fight” series. And
in a way it is. “Act of Valor”
is a highly realistic action
movie that was filmed using
actual, active-duty U.S.
Navy SEALs.
Back in 2007, directors
Mike McCoy and Scott
Waugh of Bandito Brothers
Production had filmed a
video for the Navy’s Special
Warfare Combatant-craft
crewmen. It played like a
feature film. That gave them
the idea for “Act of Valor,” a
theatrical war movie using
real-life military men and
modern-day military tech-
nology.
Although a handful of
actors have roles, McCoy
and Waugh came to realize
that no actors could physi-
cally fill the roles they’d
written. So actual SEALs
were drafted into the film.
The Navy went along,
turning a blind eye as the
production team used the
SEALs’ training missions
in Cambodia, Mexico, the
Ukraine and other locales
to capture the footage. The
story — a high-stakes res-
cue mission — was built
around the firefights, explo-
sions and hand-to-hand
combat of these practice
exercises.
Nonetheless, the Navy
retained final-cut control
over the movie, deleting
scenes that gave away too
many details of covert SEAL
fighting techniques. The
Navy also retained raw foot-
age to use for training pur-
poses in the future.
Little-known actors Alex
Valdez, Roselyn Sanchez,
Nestor Seranno and Emilio
Rivera have key parts.
However, it’s the real SEALs
you’ll want to see in action.
Still on active duty, none of
their names appear in the
film’s credits.
“Act of Valor,” currently
Trivia Pursued
Last Week’s Movie Trivia Quiz: What movie franchise do the two
male stars of “This Means War” have in common?
No need to pray for the answer. Rev. Randolph Becker gets up
early on Sunday mornings. “From out on the road (well, actually in a
motel room in Naples, Fla., as a consultant to a Unitarian Universalist
Congregation there), I answer the early-morning siren call of movie
trivia,” he reports. “Chris Pine and Tom Hardy share participation in
the Star Trek franchise. Chris Pine was James T. Kirk in the 2009 ‘Star
Trek’ and will again play that role in a yet-to-be-titled 2013 sequel
now being filmed. Tom Hardy was in 2002’s ‘Star Trek: Nemesis’ as
Shinzon.”
Ed Shaw adds that “Pine shared billing with William Shatner in the
documentary ‘The Captains’ (Kirk).”
As for the Bonus Question about the reference by Chris Pine to the
“CHIPs” TV show, Ed notes that it’s “a bit of ironic trivia since Chris
Pines’ father, Robert Pine, played Sgt. Joseph Getraer in CHIPs.”
And Sheldon Davidson points out that “before Chris Pine was even
born he was on his father’s (aka Robert Pine) CHIPs show. He made his
debut in his mother’s (aka Gwynne Gilford) belly on a CHiPs TV episode
in 1979.”
Robin Robinson got the answers right, too. But you have to get up
very early in the morning to beat Rev. Randy.
This Week’s Movie Trivia Question: Who made Nicolas Cage (star of
“Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance”) sell off his comic book collection?
Who made him sell off his motorcycles? Who made him sell off his
castle in France?
Bonus Question: What other names has Ghost Rider been known by
other than Johnny Blaze?
First movie maven to email me the correct answers at 8 a.m. or
thereafter today, Feb. 26, wins a free ticket to the Tropic Cinema.
srhoades@aol.com
By Shirrel Rhoades
Please turn to page 16
Actual Navy SEALS play them-
selves in ‘Act of Valor.’
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keys cuisine
Party Themes to Honor Your Oscar Nominees
F
ull disclosure: No, I
will not be hosting
an Academy Award
party tonight. I might
have been were it not for
Achilles tendon surgery.
(Not mine, my husband’s.)
But I have done so in the
past and they can be fun if
you invite your best movie
buff friends over for TV and
a buffet dinner.
If your friends like
to dress up in
costume — and
in Key West it
seems a lot of
people do — you
could have guests
come as their
favorite movie stars of Best
Movies in the past. Or they
might dress up as some of
the characters in the movies
up for Oscars. Soundtracks
from Oscar-winning movies
for background music help
put people in the mood.
Half the fun of this kind of
party is the suspense, wait-
ing while they’re awarding
all the behind-the-scenes
winners. Use the time to
play an Oscar trivia game
that you make up yourself.
And “awards” — even
joke prizes — add to the
fun. Awarding prizes for
best costume, like perhaps
a couple of tickets to the
Tropic or Regal Cinema 6,
will always get people inter-
ested in participating.
If your friends are high
rollers, you can have a little
pool on the winners and
take bets on Best Picture
and Best and Supporting
Actors and Actresses. Hand
out ballots before the cer-
emonies begin and tally all
the scores at the end. The
one with the most right
answers wins the ante. Or
instead, hand out more joke
awards of your choosing
and donate the
ante to charity.
Popcorn is
de rigueur as
your appetizer.
Start with some
huge bowls of it
set out on cof-
fee tables. As for the main
fare, since you’ll be glued to
the TV set for a while once
the big winners are up, it’s
impractical to try for a sit-
down dinner. Just make
the buffet table look
glamorous.
Sprinkle the
tablecloth with
some glitter. If
you happen to
have movie post-
ers, hang them up.
And, most importantly,
try to serve something
related to the movie you
think is a sure bet to win.
For instance, this year,
the nominated pictures
are: “The Artist,” “The
Descendants,” “Extremely
Loud and Incredibly
Close,” “The Help,” “Hugo,”
“Midnight in Paris,”
“Moneyball,” “The Tree of
Life,” “War Horse.”
If you think “The Help”
is going to win, you could
serve a delicious Paula
Deen-style southern menu
(less Minny’s now-infamous
chocolate pie, of course!).
Jambalaya with rice and
freshly baked biscuits
would be great. Or ham and
red-eye gravy with mashed
potatoes and deep fried
okra. With maybe Kentucky
Bourbon pecan pie or
Mississippi mud pie.
If you’re betting on
“Midnight in Paris,” your
choice would suggest a
flavorful Paris bistro food
buffet, like crudités, salad
Niçoise, boeuf bourgui-
gnon or coq au vin, and
chocolate mousse or tarte
tatin for dessert. Or simply
Parisian onion soup with
a green salad and crème
caramel.
“Moneyball” could be
really simple stadium food
such as hot dogs, hamburg-
ers, pizza and sodas. How
easy is that? Put out some
salads to add to the meal.
And don’t forget the ice
cream.
“Extremely Loud and
Incredibly Close” could
feature all your New York
favorites, starting with egg
creams (spiked with vodka
or a chocolate liqueur?) and
some tasty NYC deli spe-
cialities — a little brisket,
perhaps, or some sliced
cold cuts like pastrami and
corned beef, potato salad
or latkes, some bagels, dill
pickles and your favorite
cheesecake.
Anyway, you get the idea.
My own choice for the
best picture this year is
“The Descendants” and,
no, not just because George
Clooney is in it. I’ve never
been to Hawaii and I was
awed by the achingly beau-
tiful scenery that made me
want to book on the next
flight to Honolulu. Plus,
it was a good story and I
think the cast turned in
truly good performances.
So I’ll offer some delicious
Hawaiian luau recipes here
that you could serve at a
buffet for any kind of party,
not just for the Academy
Awards.
If you go this route your
theme should be fun and
tropical. And since we’re
in the subtropics, finding
things that contribute to
that look isn’t too hard.
Nothing says Hawaii like
exotic leaves off your
banana tree to decorate
your table, although if
you find them too messy
— they do secrete a liquid
that stains — use some
areca fonds or bird-of para-
dise-leaves. A bouquet of
hibiscus also does the trick,
as does a centerpiece of
orchids. Buy some cheap
leis for around people’s
necks. And don’t forget the
little paper umbrellas for
the drinks. I’ve included a
couple of fancy Hawaiian
specialties, but be sure to
offer beer and wine to those
who find that kind of liba-
tion too fussy or sweet.
Have fun. And I hope
your choice wins, whatever
it is. But even if it doesn’t,
at least you’ve had a good
party with some memora-
ble Hawaiian food. Enjoy!
Hawaiian Mai Tai
16 ounces dark rum
8 ounces light rum
8 ounces orange Curaçao
liqueur
32 ounces orange juice
32 ounces pineapple juice
24 ounces sweet-and-sour mix
8 ounces grenadine syrup
Mix all ingredients
together, serve chilled. This
recipe makes one gallon.
Lava Flow
1 ounce light rum
1 ounce coconut rum
2 ounces fresh strawberries
1 small banana
2 ounces unsweetened pine-
apple juice
2 ounces coconut cream
Blend the two rums and
the strawberries in a blend-
er to form a smooth paste.
Pour this mixture into a tall
(Collins or Hurricane) glass.
Blend the banana, the coco-
nut cream and the pine-
apple juice in blender with
crushed ice until smooth.
Pour this mixture into the
glass with the rums very
slowly. If done correctly, you
should see the strawberry
mixture make its way to the
top along the sides of the
glass, creating the flowing
lava effect. Garnish with a
pineapple wedge and paper
umbrella.(If you don’t see
the lava effect, don’t worry
about it — just drink it!)
Oahu Chicken
9 to 12 pounds chicken wings,
thighs and breasts pieces
Sauce:
1/4 cup frozen pineapple juice
concentrate
1/3 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 tsp powdered ginger or a
pinch of fresh ginger
1 to 2 drops Worcestershire
sauce
Wash chicken parts and
pat dry with paper towels.
Mix all sauce ingredients in
By Joanna Brady Schmida
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two of the current hot-but-
ton items: healthcare policy
and stem cell research.
The United States may be
the only country in the world
where private insurance
corporations are allowed
to make huge profits from
peoples’ illnesses. While 40
million people in America
cannot afford today’s jacked-
up insurance premiums,
members of upper manage-
ment of these insurance
companies take home mil-
lions of dollars for simply
being middlemen.
They do not cure dis-
ease. They do not conduct
research. They do not diag-
nose or treat people with
infirmities.
In fact, insurance compa-
nies are simply paper-shift-
ing go-betweens that extract
fees for performing the role
of the middle man.
The actual service part of
patient care is inarguably in
the hands of others.
The Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act
passed by the Senate in
2010, amended by the House
as the Health Care and
Education Reconciliation Act
of 2010, is far from perfect.
But it does represent a move-
ment towards universal cov-
erage, even when individuals
have pre-existing conditions,
and it does extend cover-
age up until age 26 for those
lucky enough to have par-
ents who are insured.
Many of the imperfections
in the plan have resulted
from compromises made to
appease the same politicians
who now want to repeal it.
The detractors say it is too
expensive. Well, if it were
no longer necessary to treat
every previously uninsured
patient in the emergency
room and if there were more
emphasis on preventive care,
billions of dollars would be
saved.
And think of the huge
chunk of money that could
be saved if the insurance
companies were taken out of
the loop completely, making
the system truly nonprofit.
Often I have heard the
statement, “what a mess we
would be in if the govern-
ment ran this program.” This
is often said by those who
are hawkish when it comes
to spending on Defense
— a monetary outlay that
far exceeds that of any other
country. The fact remains,
our military is the govern-
ment, as well as the police
and the fire department and
the library and our national
park service. Medicare,
which few want to eliminate,
is also a government-run
program.
Another criticism I hear
is that the new healthcare
program does not tackle tort
reform. There is no doubt
that the present malpractice
model is flawed. Frivolous
suits have been initiated,
causing physicians to prac-
tice medicine today while
looking over their shoul-
ders. However, like most
humans, physicians can
make mistakes and patients
affected by these mistakes
should be compensated in
some way. Unfortunately,
in order to do this, the pres-
ent system requires that an
often lengthy, painful and
costly legal process gets set
in motion, after which the
plaintiff only gets to keep a
portion of the award or set-
tlement, if there is one. The
present system may need
an overhaul but compared
with other expenditures, its
economic impact is modest.
It represents a separate issue
that needs to be addressed in
a collaborative fashion, and
it should not be used as a
roadblock to real progress in
the other areas.
Any attempt to repeal the
current healthcare bill will
set back the progress that has
been made so far. Hopefully,
there are enough rational
policy makers around to
address the imperfections
and to fix them. To me, a
public option is a Band-Aid
but eventually a single payer
program — a concept that
was jettisoned early because
this is a country that allows
the corporate mentality to
win out — would offer the
greatest benefit to the bulk of
our population.
Stem cell research
W
hen programmed in
special ways, stem cells
have the potential to become
brain tissue, enzyme-pro-
ducing liver cells, cartilage,
heart muscle and even insu-
lin-releasing pancreatic cells.
Certainly, some progress has
been made with bone-mar-
row stem cells and umbili-
cal-cord blood, and there
are other possible sources
for stem cells, such as skin.
However, the cell that is the
most receptive to program-
ming and least vulnerable to
rejection is the embryonic
stem cell.
There are millions of
people in the world affected
with diseases involving
damaged or dysfunctional
tissue. Many of these condi-
tions could be improved
appreciably, or even cured,
with the help of new, nor-
mal tissue spawned from
embryonic stem cells. There
is now hope that a person’s
skin cells might some day
be programmed to replace
diseased tissue in that same
individual without the threat
of rejection. However, to
move forward, embryonic
stem cells represent the gold
standard against which other
stem cell sources should be
compared.
Slowing down this prog-
ress represents a major
deterrent to possible cures
for many common diseases.
Why are we moving so
slowly? The answer chal-
lenges all rational thinking.
Never-to-be-used, three
to five-day old blastocysts,
consisting of tiny formless
clusters of cells, destined to
be stored forever in a frozen
state in fertility clinics, have
been labeled as “human
beings” by supposedly
religious middle men with
enough clout to block federal
funding for research that
could save or improve the
lives of many children and
adults who undeniably have
earned “human” status.
Where did the “blastocyst
is a person” concept come
from? The authors of the
Bible, or any other holy book,
had no idea what stem cells
or blastocysts were and it is
unclear what biblical pas-
sage indicates that uniting
a sperm and egg instantly
makes the product a person.
Why would manipulation
of these live cells into tissue
that would remain alive and,
eventually, even be respon-
sible for sustaining a life, be
put in the same category as
homicide?
Where is there even a tan-
gential suggestion that stem
cell research is actually evil?
Frankly, those protectors of
the blastocyst who object to
this type of research can sim-
ply say “no thank you” if one
day they are offered a stem
cell cure for their strokes.
Hopefully, their type of
thinking is reversible. With
a treatment regimen of fre-
quent exposures to truth,
these folks might see the
light. A possible tack would
be to emphasize repeatedly
how they, specifically, would
benefit. Another would be
to make them think that
change is their idea.
However, if such measures
fail, then we are in for a
tough time. Unfortunately, a
strategy of conciliation and
reason, while being a noble
pathway worth continuing,
could fail.
All the more reason to
push ahead with what is
right for the common good.
John Hobbins is the past
director of Obstetrics at Yale
University and the University
of Colorado, where he is now
professor of ob gyn and direc-
tor of the prenatal diagnosis
center at Children’s Hospital
Colorado. He lives part time
in Key West.
OPINION
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from the grapevine
From the Farthest Corner: The Charm of Oregon’s Wines
T
here’s something spe-
cial about the wines
from Oregon.
The state produces some
of the finest pinot noir in
the world. Its pinot gris,
which generally flies under
the radar, is full of character
and often offers a tremen-
dous value. Oregon’s top
sparkling wines are abso-
lutely stunning. It’s a region
well worth exploring.
The modern Oregon wine
industry traces its roots to
just 50 years ago, to the late
1960s, when a number of
young idealists moved to
the state.
The trailblazer was David
Lett, who purchased a
hillside property in the
Willamette Valley in 1965,
shortly after finishing the
winemaking program at
the University of California,
Davis. Lett’s professors
urged him against moving
so far north, believing it
would be too cold and too
wet for wine grapes. But
other pioneers soon fol-
lowed in Lett’s footsteps,
and within just a few years,
they proved the naysayers
wrong.
One of those pioneers
was another UC-Davis
graduate, Dick Erath.
But most of the others
— vintners like Dick and
Nancy Ponzi, Bill and
Susan Blosser, David and
Ginny Adelsheim — had
little experience farm-
ing and knew only the
basics of wine making. The
Adelsheims, for example,
didn’t even plan on mak-
ing wine when they pur-
chased a 19-acre parcel in
the summer of 1971. They
simply wanted to move to
the country, where David
would build furniture and
Ginny would sculpt.
All had a passion for
wine and being a part of
something new and would
soon dedicate all their time
to Oregon’s burgeoning
wine industry. Their efforts
quickly paid off.
In 1979, one of Lett’s
wines — his Eyrie Vineyards
“Reserve” — shocked the
world at the Wine Olympics
in Paris, where it placed
first among pinot noirs.
Legendary French wine
maker Robert Drouhin
called for a rematch and the
very next year in Burgundy,
Lett’s pinot noir would
place second against an
all-star lineup of Drouhin’s
wines.
Fast-forward to today,
and Oregon is regularly
producing wines that can
compete with the best in
the world. And even though
the industry has grown
dramatically over the past
half-century — there are
now nearly 400 wineries
— Oregon’s wine makers
still see themselves as part
of something new, making
wine together on the edge
of viticulture.
Indeed, it’s a struggle to
get Oregon’s wine makers to
talk about their own wines.
Every vintner I’ve met is
more interested in promot-
ing the industry as a whole
than talking about himself.
While it’s difficult to gen-
eralize, Oregon pinot noirs
are typically more feminine
than their California coun-
terparts — marked by aro-
mas of wild raspberries and
strawberries rather than
candied cherries and black-
berries. If California’s pinot
noirs are bold and easy to
enjoy, Oregon’s are delicate
and demand contempla-
tion.
While Oregon pinot noir
tends to be pricey, there are
a number of great examples
for less than $25. The
Willamette Valley bottlings
from Ponzi, Adelsheim and
Rex Hill are wonderfully
balanced, with delicate
aromas of red fruits, flowers
and slate.
Oregon winemakers love
talking about pinot noir,
but their pinot gris can be
just as seductive. The best
ones are marked by exotic
tropical fruit and are simul-
taneously creamy and crisp.
The Willamette Valley bot-
tlings from Adelsheim and
Chehalem are incredibly
vibrant and widely available
for less than $20.
When it comes to spar-
kling wines, one could
argue that America’s best
examples come from
Oregon — thanks entirely
to the efforts of Rollin Soles
of Argyle Winery.
Like so many other wine
makers, Soles studied
oenology at UC-Davis.
But when he finished his
degree, he held off on
launching his own project,
instead gaining hands-on
experience at wineries
across the world. Once he
moved to the Willamette
Valley in the mid-1980s,
Soles set out to make spar-
kling wines, believing the
climate to be perfect for
such an effort as the grapes
would retain high acidity
while fully ripe.
History has proven Soles
right — he consistently
produces sparklers that are
praised by both critics and
consumers. Argyle’s spar-
klers range in price from
$25 to $60 and they can
easily compete with French
Champagnes that cost two
to three times as much.
David White is the found-
er and editor of terroirist.
com.
By David White
Adelsheim vineyard.
bowl. Brush over chicken
parts. Grill over barbecue
for about 40 minutes. Turn
and baste with sauce until
chicken is done. Serves
10 to 12 people as a main
course.
Hawaiian Pork Ribs
3 pounds pork loin back ribs
3/4 cup ketchup
3/4 cup pineapple preserves
1/2 cup teriyaki marinade and
sauce
2 tbsp packed brown sugar
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tbsp cornstarch
1 can (20 ounces) pineapple
chunks in juice, drained and
1/4 cup juice reserved
1 bag (1 pound) frozen stir-fry
bell peppers and onions
Spray inside of 4 to 5-
quart slow cooker with
cooking spray. Cut ribs into
2- or 3-rib portions; place
in slow cooker. Stir together
ketchup, preserves, teriyaki
marinade, brown sugar and
garlic in small bowl; pour
over ribs.
Cover and cook on low-
heat setting 6 to 7 hours.
Skim fat if necessary.
Remove ribs from cooker
and cover to keep warm.
Mix cornstarch and
reserved 1/4 cup pineapple
juice in small bowl; stir into
liquid in cooker. Increase
heat setting to high. Cover
KEYS CUISINE
Continued from page 9
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Elegance for your most important rooms
3229 Flagler Ave Key West 294-6292
www.southernmostkitchenbath.com
COME SEE WHAT’S NEW
Green Tag Sale
on Selected in Stock Items
Plus 20% Off Retail Prices On
Everything Every Day
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crossword puzzle word scrimmage
sudoku
Scrimmage answers on page 15
Sudoku answers on page 15
Crossword answers on page 15
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beyond the sea
Reef Relief Is 25 Years Young: Come and Party!
O
n April 1, 1987, Reef
Relief was founded
in Key West by Craig and
DeVon Quirolo, a local cou-
ple who realized the impor-
tance of preserving and
protecting the coral reef
ecosystem of the Florida
Keys.
They had begun to notice
a disturbing amount of
physical damage to the
corals of the Keys from
vessels dropping anchors
on the reef — destroying
corals that were perhaps
hundreds, maybe even
thousands of years old. In
order to prevent these often
deadly impacts to the cor-
als, the Quirolos started to
install mooring buoy fields,
using a variety of designs
for both large and small
vessels along the reef tract.
Education and outreach
were also incorporated into
an effort to counsel those
using the reef resource such
as recreational fishermen,
divers and local businesses
involved in water sport
activities. Charter boat
captains, commercial fish-
ermen, recreational boat-
ers and other stakeholders
were also targeted as part
of an effort to emphasize
the importance of conserv-
ing and protecting the reef.
Eventually they reached out
to young people from local
schools through a variety
of educational programs,
onsite visits and presenta-
tions in the classroom.
Through their work, the
Quirolos helped to estab-
lish coral-reef conserva-
tion programs in Jamaica,
Honduras, Mexico, Puerto
Rico, Bahamas and Cuba,
even as they provided sup-
port to grassroots efforts
around the globe.
Today, as Reef Relief
approaches its 25th anni-
versary, the nonprofit
continues to inform and
educate on the need to
conserve and protect coral
reef ecosystems and contin-
ues to reach out to young
people through its summer
Coral Camp for Kids and its
Discovery Schools Program
that visit schools through-
out the Keys and into the
Miami area.
Last summer, Coral Camp
was nationally recognized
by the Marine Educators
Association and Reef Relief
was invited to present the
program at their annual
conference held in Boston.
Staff made the trip and
presented to an audience of
marine educators from all
over the world the impor-
tance of encouraging young
minds to become more
interested in science, tech-
nology, engineering and
mathematics.
Another important mile-
stone was achieved when
the City of Key West agreed
to turn over management
of the Key West Marine
Park to Reef Relief. This is
an opportunity to use the
marine park as an educa-
tion and outreach tool
through interpretation of
the park’s resources, the
threats facing those sys-
tems, mitigation strategies
and the use of restoration
science.
Coral reef ecosystems are
not simply a collection of
corals but actually a system
of interdependent and
delicately balanced connec-
tions between the water,
the animals and their habi-
tat of mangrove forests, sea
grass communities, estua-
rine systems such as Florida
Bay and the reef tract.
Coral reefs are the most
biologically diverse ecosys-
tems on planet Earth and it
is their protection and con-
servation that must become
a global priority if we are
to save them from further
decline.
Reef Relief invites the
community to help cel-
ebrate its 25 years on
Saturday, March 31, at
Salute on Higgs Beach from
6 to 10 p.m. Food will be
provided by Salute, a cash
bar will be available and
Howard Livingston and the
Mile Marker 24 band will
entertain.
Tickets are $15 in
advance, $20 at the door.
For more info, call 294-3100
or visit reefrelief.org. and
click on “25th Anniversary.”
Rudy S. Bonn is director
of marine projects at Reef
Relief.
By Rudy S. Bonn
PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED
From the right, Reef Relief President Peter Anderson, Key West
Mayor Craig Cates, Reef Relief Executive Program Director Mill
McCleary and Reef Relief Director of Marine Projects Rudy Bonn
are at the signing of the new Key West Marine Park Resolution.
Last month, Reef Relief was joined by 11 volunteers for a back-
country shoreline cleanup of Archer Key off Key West. Clearly
Unique Charters helped volunteers remove 519 pounds of marine
debris from the shores of this natural area.
318211
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to your pet’s health
National Geographic’s Not So ‘Incredible Dr. Pol’
Dr. Doug:
I have been watch-
ing “The Incredible Dr.
Pol” on the National
Geographic channel.
While he seems like a
really nice old doc, it seems
that some of his medicine
is a bit outdated. Have you
seen the show? What do you
think? I really value your
opinion.
— Debbie Coonsic
Dear Debbie : Interesting
you should ask. For those
of you who don’t know or
have not heard about this
program, the show is about
a veterinarian in northern
Michigan and his country
practice. When the show
was first announced in the
veterinary profession there
was a lot of excitement.
Naturally, I was very inter-
ested in watching it.
Wow — was I disap-
pointed. It was so bad that
I was actually livid when it
was over. I felt that I should
give it another chance, how-
ever, so I tried to watch the
second episode but ended
up turning it off before it
was over.
Turns out that I am not
alone in my feelings among
the veterinary
profession. While
the show has
actually received
praise from view-
ers (according
to the National
Geographic chan-
nel), most veterinarians are
not so positive.
DVM News, the Magazine
of Veterinary Medicine, has
just published an article
about “The Incredible Dr.
Pol” documenting the con-
cerns of the profession.
“While entertaining in story
line, the program showcases
medical care that is both
dated and substandard,”
concluded one correspon-
dent. For instance, the epi-
sode in which Dr. Pol uses
some old wooden planks to
splint a broken leg on a calf.
In another episode, he does
surgery without anesthesia,
having the owner simply
hold the dog down on the
table.
“The show glorifies sub-
standard medical care — it
sets the veterinary profes-
sion back 30 years,” was
another of the complaints
received by DVM.
Apparently, Dr. Pol’s son
works for the National
Geographic network and
was the impetus behind
the reality show. Despite
the complaints, National
Geographic stands behind
the series, which has now
aired four episodes. “Dr.
Pol has treated thousands
of animals over his 40-
year career,” Rajul Mistry,
the spokesman for the
National Geographic chan-
nel, commented. “He has
had a successful busi-
ness in Michigan for more
than 30 years.” According
to the Michigan Board of
Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Pol
maintains an active license
and is in good standing.
The American Veterinary
Medical Association has
also received complaints
about the program. There
is wide concern about how
the veterinary profession is
portrayed on this “reality”
series. “Owners watch the
show and go on to think
that all surgery can be done
with ‘locals’ [i.e. no anesthe-
sia] and that steroid injec-
tions are the gold standard
for any disease.”
I personally took offense
during one episode in
which Dr. Pol performed
hip surgery on a dog. The
patient was not properly
monitored while under
anesthesia and Dr. Pol was
not wearing appropriate
surgical attire. To me, this
put the patient at unneces-
sary risk for both anesthetic
complications as well as
post-operative infection.
When owners see this
on TV, they could end up
concluding that other vet-
erinarians offering proper
care (diagnostic testing,
anesthesia and established
surgical techniques) are
overservicing or perform-
ing tests/procedures just to
make money.
So, Debbie, I think your
concerns are justified.
Dr. Mader is an ABVP
board certified veterinary
specialist practicing in the
Keys. Send your questions to
drdoug@marathonvet.com.
By Dr. Doug Mader
and cook about 25 minutes
or until thickened.
Mix pineapple chunks
and stir-fry vegetables in
large microwavable bowl.
Microwave uncovered on
high 5 to 7 minutes or until
heated through; drain.
Stir vegetable mixture into
sauce in cooker. Serve veg-
etable mixture over ribs.
Honolulu Style Mahi
Mahi
2 lbs mahi mahi fillets
juice of 1 lemon
dash of garlic salt
dash of pepper
1 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup finely chopped onions
bread crumbs
Preheat oven to 425°.
Rinse fish and put in a bak-
ing dish. Squeeze lemon
juice on fish. Sprinkle with
garlic salt and pepper. Mix
mayonnaise and chopped
onions, then spread mix-
ture on fish. Sprinkle with
bread crumbs. Bake at 425°
for 20 to 25 minutes. Makes
about 6 servings.
Macadamia Crusted
Coconut Shrimp
1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1
pound cleaned and deveined
shrimp
1/2 cup coconut milk
1/4 cup crushed macadamia
nuts
Preheat oven to 400°.
Lightly coat a baking dish
with olive oil. Place flour
in a small bowl. Dredge
shrimp in flour, then dip
into coconut milk and
roll in crushed macada-
mia nuts. Place in baking
dish and bake for 10 to 15
minutes, or until shrimp
is cooked through. Serve
3 shrimp on a bed of rice
topped with orange lime
sauce (recipe follows).
Makes 4 servings.
Orange Lime Sauce
10 ounce jar orange marma-
lade
3 tbsp tangy mustard
KEYS CUISINE
Continued from page 11
Honolulu style mahi mahi.
Please turn to page 15
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349699
home
.
g a r de n
.
g i f t s
Garden Cottage
Key West
Open Every Day 10am to 6pm
526 Southard Street
305.296.9840
Discover the Secret . . .
319445
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crossword puzzle answers
sudoku answers
word scrimmage answers
adopt a pet
Pets Available for Adoption at the SPCA
Buck, male adult, domestic
medium hair. I am a handsome
boy and love to show off my
beautiful, fuzzy tail.
Grandy, female domestic short
hair. I am a loving, gentle,
young adult with a very sweet
disposition.
Catherine, adult female, domes-
tic short hair tiger. I am an
independent young adult with a
loving and playful personality.
Monkey, 1-year-old male
Chihuahua. I can’t swing on a
tree yet, but I’m learning a few
other tricks that will make you
smile.
Gilly, 1-year-old male
Chihuahua. I may look like a
dog but I climb like a cat and
love to perch on high places.
Milo, 11-month-old male beagle.
I like to go for walks and to
explore and sniff interesting
things. Won’t you accompany
me?
The Florida Keys SPCA is located at 5230 College Road, Stock Island. Hours are 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday. For low-cost spay/neuter appoint-
ment, call (305) 292-4600. For more information, call (305) 294-4857 or visit www.fkspca.
org.
Contact information for the Marathon shelter on Aviation Blvd.: 743-4800, fax 743-
4818; Hours: Monday thru Friday, 9:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m.
1 tbsp lime juice
To create orange lime
sauce, combine all sauce
ingredients in a sauce pan
and warm.
Macadamia Nut
Cream Pie
1-1/3 cups milk
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup chopped macadamia
nuts
dash salt
1 tsp vanilla
1 egg
5 tsp cornstarch
2 egg whites
1 9-inch baking pie shell
1 cup heavy cream, sweetened
and whipped, or use Reddi-wip
In a saucepan combine
1 cup of the milk, 1/4 cup
of the sugar, 1/4 cup of the
nuts, the salt and the vanil-
la; scald. Mix the remaining
1/3 cup milk with egg and
cornstarch. Thoroughly
stir some of hot mixture
into egg mixture; return all
to saucepan. Cook 5 more
minutes, stirring constantly,
until mixture thickens. Cool
1 hour. Beat egg whites
until soft peaks form then
fold carefully into cooled
mixture. Pour into pie shell
and chill. Before serving top
with sweetened whipped
cream or Reddi-wip and
the remaining 1/4 cup nuts.
Makes 8 servings.
Fresh Fruit Platter
(dieters will appreciate
this!)
pineapple chunks
papaya slices
Fresh pineapple and
papaya help to aid diges-
tion and are an excellent
side dish. Other fresh fruit
options you can also offer
are fresh strawberries,
grapes, watermelon and
bananas.
KEYS CUISINE
Continued from page 14
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By “a technical arrange-
ment,” Forrester will
continue to reside in her
home adjacent to the gar-
den property, the house at
518 Elizabeth St. that had
reportedly been undergo-
ing a foreclosure crisis that
now appears to have been
settled. Next week’s offer of
the garden for sale consti-
tutes the “first sale” of the
lot in 40 years,” pointed out
Pritam.
He said that he himself
first made an offer on it
back in 1986 but it was not
for sale. “I used to peek in
the gate and I went back to
it many times,” he recalls.
Pritam Singh and his wife
Ann Johnson, who together
are co-founders of the Singh
Company, have been occu-
pying the one-bedroom on
the Secret Garden estate
for the past two years. The
couple’s principal residence
is in Woodstock, Vermont,
but their home on Flagler
Avenue and Reynolds Street
is now under contract for
sale.
Fruition of the arrange-
ment with Forrester is evi-
dently pleasing for Pritam.
“I think both Nancy and I
have been surprised how
well the two of us have
developed such a joyful
relationship.” Confirmed
Nancy: “It was not an arms-
length transaction. I have
grown, grown tremendously
over the last two years,
moving through a lot of
fear, fears of financial mat-
ters or having to leave Key
West.”
Born in 1938, Nancy
Forrester came into pos-
session of the property at
Elizabeth and Simonton
streets, known since the
early 1990s as Nancy’s
Secret Garden, back in 1972.
That was when it was “an
undesignated city dump,”
in her words, filled with
refrigerator parts and other
waste. Indeed it had prob-
ably been used as a dump-
ing ground since the early
settlers, as evidenced by the
china doll heads she found.
“I saved it and held it,”
she says. Over the years
she must have tended
thousands of trees, includ-
ing many champion trees.
Today, from the top of La
Concha, the property is
clearly visible as the green-
est spot in all of downtown
Key West.
At this point, the garden
remains open to the public.
Through March 31, access
will be at the end of Free
School Lane off Simonton
Street; thereafter, visitors
will be diverted to an
entrance at 518 Elizabeth
St. There are two planned
events next month:
Katharyn Howd Machan’s
“Writing in the Garden”
(now in its 16th year), from
March 12 to 16; and at a
date to be announced, Dr.
Doug Mader’s “Healthy Diet
for Companion Parrots”
workshop.
It was in 1993 that
Forrester began her “vision-
ary environment project,”
a collaborative effort that
brought together site-spe-
cific art, installation art with
plants and animals, plus
performance, sustainable
and eco-conceptual art.
“I have American Indian
blood in me,” Forrester told
Solares Hill last week, “so I
don’t own land, I don’t own
parrots....” What she does
have, quipped journalist
Marc Caputo, is “Jurassic
Park sans dinosaurs.”
We asked Pritam his
thinking behind the restric-
tions on the property and
whether they might make it
unsalable.
“It will find a buyer,” he
said. “Absolutely. It’s a spec-
tacular piece. And there’ll
be no requirement that it
be kept open to the public.
I personally am not inter-
ested in living there. The
idea is to make it a single lot
that can’t be broken up. The
highest and best use of this
property is two houses at
the most, because it’s such
a fantastic garden. Just one
house with possibly a guest
house. The native trees will
always be protected by the
tree commission. There are
a half-dozen tremendous
natives in the middle of the
garden that in themselves
restrict development.”
He and Ann still main-
tain a home in South
Woodstock, Vt., where they
run a mindfulness practice
center devoted to the life
work of Thich Nhat Han, a
Vietnamese Zen monk and
world-renowned Buddhist
teacher with whom they
just spent a week in France.
Pritam and Ann are pres-
ently involved in bringing
mindfulness to returning
service personnel through
a process known as tran-
sitional reintegration. The
same program is pres-
ently being developed for
schools. “It’s very hopeful,”
said Pritam. “It’s actually
out of difficulties that solu-
tions are found.”
playing at Regal Cinema 6,
is an adreneline-pumping,
breathtaking, high-energy
adventure that leaves you
impressed with our elite
fighting forces. Y’know,
those guys who got Osama
Bin Laden.
Relativity Media picked
up “Act of Valor” for dis-
tribution, forking out $18
million for the rights, plus
$30 million in promotion.
They are crowing that this
is “the biggest money paid
for a finished film with an
unknown cast.” Maybe,
maybe not. But it’s certainly
the most realistic movie
you’ll ever see short of a
documentary.
“Gone” Seems Like
Return Engagement
A
t first it looks like a
TV late-show rerun
of James Patterson’s “Kiss
the Girls.” A serial killer
who captures pretty girls,
dumps them in a hole in
the woods, and kills them
for his sadistic pleasure. But
then you realize our hero-
ine is bug-eyed Amanda
Seyfried, not Ashley Judd.
And there’s no Morgan
Freeman in sight.
Still, this story about
missing girls and the one
who got away will hook
you. Jill (Seyfried) is deter-
mined to catch the guy
who kidnapped her sister.
Gun in hand, defying police
advice that it’s all in her
head, she vows she’ll sleep
only when she’s dead. You
can’t help but root for this
frail but determined dam-
sel.
As the trailer prom-
ises: No one believes her.
Nothing will stop her.
“Gone” — the title pretty
much sums up the plight
of the kidnapped girls
— is now playing at Regal
Cinema 6.
You’ll probably remember
Amanda Seyfried as the
bride-to-be in “Mama Mia!”
or as the lovelorn romantic
in “Letters to Juliet.” Here
she’s a kick-ass heroine.
“The script was really
fun,” Seyfried explains her
decision to do a thriller. “I
like this genre. This is the
kind of movie that I would
go see. It’s scary, in the best
way, and it’s a smart movie.”
Brazilian director Heitor
Dhalia was another draw
for the young actress. “I
thought if he could bring
that emotional intensity
that he had in ‘Adrift’ to a
really smart psychological
thriller, it would be a very
good collaboration.”
She’s happy with the
results. “It’s like putting
together a puzzle for two
hours. And the pace is right
there. It takes you to the
edge of your seat and then
is very satisfying at the
end.”
How did Amanda Seyfried
handle this change-of-pace
role? “I’ve never had to deal
with a situation where I had
nothing to lose like on this
level, so I channeled Ashley
Judd a little bit.”
Told you.
FRONT ROW
Continued from page 8
SECRET GARDEN
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