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Cornell University

Campus Survey
School name: Cornell University Date submitted: July 30, 2010

ADMINISTRATION

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply. [ ] No [ ] Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below. [X] Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

Description: "Yes, President Rawlings issued a formal Statement on the Environment in 1997. See http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/Nov97/environ.statement.lgk.html More recently in 2004 Cornell President Lehman announed that sustainability was one of the three strategic priorities for the entire university http://www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/getinvolved/lehmanagedevelopment.cfmMore recently Cornell developed an Advancing Sustainability Action Plan which included the commitment to achieve climate neutrality. The ASAP is available at http://www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/docs/RPT_9-12-08_ASAP%20Final.pdf This plan is currently transitioning to a new organization under President Skorton's Sustainable Campus Committee" Additional information: We define a formal sustainability policy as a commitment to environmental stewardship that is signed by the chancellor/president and/or approved by the board of trustees. Examples: University of California System; Dalhousie University. We define a formal sustainability plan as a comprehensive document that outlines specific steps to be taken and initiatives to be implemented to advance sustainability on campus. Examples: Purdue University, College of William & Mary; University of British Columbia
2) Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply. [ ] None [X] American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[ ] Talloires Declaration [ ] Other. Please describe:

3) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply. [ ] No [X] Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below. [X] Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

Description: A commitment to creating a sustainable campus is included in the new 10 year strategic plan http://www.cornell.edu/strategicplan/stewardship.cfm#facilities Sustainability is a core component of the Cornell Master Plan http://www.masterplan.cornell.edu/doc/CMP_PART_1/Vision.pdf
ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

4) Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs? You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes Please provide the number of committees: Three committees


Committee I

5) Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

Committee name: The Presidents Sustainable Campus Committee Number of meetings: 12


6) Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee. When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

Number of representatives Administrators Faculty 3 2

Staff Students Other. Please describe.

6 2

7) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

Name Chair 1 Chair 2 Chair 3 Tim Fahey Kyu Whang

Position Faculty Administrator

8) To whom does the committee report? [X] President/Chancellor [ ] Vice President/Vice Chancellor [ ] Other:

9) Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made. Moderate progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. Significant progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

Addressed Academics Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects Administration Examples: procurement policies, institutionwide sustainability policy, sustainabilityrelated staff positions Climate Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory Endowment Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

Progress

Description

[ ]

[ ]

[X]

completed the Climate Action Plan

[ ]

Energy Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements Food Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens Green Building Examples: design or construction policy

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

Student Involvement Examples: speaker series, peer-to-peer [ ] residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus Transportation Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit Waste Reduction Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption Water Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns Other
Committee II

[ ]

[ ]

[ ] [ ]

5b) Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

Committee name: Faculty Advisory Committee for the Center for a Sustainable Future Number of meetings: 6
6b) Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee. When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

Number of representatives

Administrators Faculty Staff Students Other. Please describe.

4 18

7b) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

Name Chair 1 Chair 2 Chair 3 Prof. David Sahn

Position Faculty

Prof. Natalie Mohowald Faculty

8b) To whom does the committee report? [ ] President/Chancellor [ ] Vice President/Vice Chancellor [X] Other: Provost

9b) Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made. Moderate progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. Significant progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

Addressed

Progress

Description

Academics Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

[X]

Acadmic Venture Fund, completed the annual Iscol Environmental Lecture, and Significant significant progress on sustainability-focused faculty hiring and retention

Administration Examples: procurement policies, [ ] institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions Climate [ ] Examples: draft climate action plan,

greenhouse gas emissions inventory Endowment Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees Energy Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements Food Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens Green Building Examples: design or construction policy [ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

Student Involvement Examples: speaker series, peer-topeer residential sustainability [ ] education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus Transportation Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit Waste Reduction Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption Water Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns Other
Committee III

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

5c) Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

Committee name: Cooperative Extension Committee on Energy and the Environment Number of meetings: 6
6c) Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee. When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

Number of representatives Administrators Faculty Staff Students Other. Please describe.


7c) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

3 8

Name Chair 1 Chair 2 Chair 3 Rod Howe

Position Staff

Deb Grantham Staff

8c) To whom does the committee report? [ ] President/Chancellor [ ] Vice President/Vice Chancellor [X] Other: Director of Cooperative Extension

9c) Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made. Moderate progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. Significant progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

Addressed Academics Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects Administration

Progress

Description

[ ]

[X]

completed and began to

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions Climate Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory Endowment Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

implement staffing in energy and climate related cooperative extension programs [ ] completed and began to implement a state-wide plan to increase investments

[X]

Energy Examples: conservation/behavioral [ ] change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements Food Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens Green Building Examples: design or construction policy Student Involvement Examples: speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus Transportation Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit Waste Reduction Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption Water Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns Other

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT

10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability. Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes
Please provide details below.

Office name: Energy and Sustainability Year created: 2005 Description: created in 2005 orginally as the Office of Environmental Compliance & Sustainbility Number of staff in office (in FTE): 9
SUSTAINABILITY STAFF Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager? Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in fulltime equivalent (FTE).

Yes
Please provide details below.

Title: Sustainability Coordinator Department: Energy and Sustainability Time worked (in FTE): 1 Job description: Oversee development of new initiatives and strategic planning for the E&S Sustainability Office with an emphasis on university-wide and external communications, campus engagement, outreach, partnership development, and leadership development. Develop and supervise student internship program. Work directly with Cornell senior administration, operational units, academic departments, student organizations, and community organizations to coordinate involvement in Cornells sustainability initiatives. Provide expertise in

facilitation, capacity building, educational and outreach program planning, and strategic communications to project managers and consultants across the University.

12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managing sustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager). Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

Title

Department

Time worked (in Job description FTE) provide oversight for implementation of the Climate Action Plan, energy and water utilities, and staff support for the Presidents Sustainable Campus Committee coordinate sustainable energy infrastructure projects coordinate recycling, composting, and reuse programs lead implementation of sustainable land use and green development initiatives detailed in the Campus Master Plan lead implementation of the LEED building policy, building energy modeling process, and lab energy reduction initiatives lead implementation of carsharing, carpooling, bicycling, and vanpooling initiative lead implementation of comprehensive

Director of Energy and Sustainability Sustainable Energy Team Manager Recycling Coordinator University Planner Director of Facilities Engineering Director of Transportation Services

Energy & Sustainability

Energy & Sustainability

Facilities Services 1 Facilities Services.25 Planning Office

Facilities Services .5

Facilities Services .25 1

Director of Space University

Planning Energy Conservation Initiative managers Energy Conservation Student Intern Student Sustainability Intern Graduate Sustainability Fellow

Planning and Budget

space planning process

various

1.5

Energy & Sustainability Energy & Sustainability Energy & Sustainability

.25

engage students in energy initiatives coordinate orientation programs, RA trainings, and student leadership trainings ( engage graduate students in sustainability initiatives

.25

.25

WEBSITE

13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives? If yes, please provide URL

www.cornell.edu/sustainability
GREEN PURCHASING

14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes
If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

Required Appliances [ ]

Encouraged [X]

Cleaning products Computers/electronics Lighting Office supplies Paper products Reduced packaging for purchases Other. Please describe below.

[ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

[X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X]

Other description: In Cornell Policy 3.25 - Environmentally Preferred ProcurementCornell University will promote envrionmentally responsible procurement by identifying sutainabile products and services, practices, processes, and procedures.Language in Bid Requirements to present less packaging as possible. We have an aggressive recycling policy.

15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply. If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

Percentage purchased [X] Appliances [ ] Building products [X] Computers/electronics [ ] Heating and cooling [ ] Lighting and fans [ ] Plumbing 80-100

Description All bidded on appliances must meet the Energy Star-rated requirement. Only older (10+yrs) do not. Most products are EPEAT-certified.

Additional comments: All computer products, AV, Dining applicances and machinery.
16) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent postconsumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes
If yes, please provide details below. For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

Percentage post-consumer recycled content Envelopes Facial tissues Napkins Notepads Office paper Paper towels Other. Please describe. 20-100 50-100 50-100 30-100 30-100 50-100 toilet paper

Percentage Forest Stewardship Council certified NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

Percentage chlorine-free Description processed

100 100 100 100

Additional comments:
17) Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes
If yes, please describe below. Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the Product description column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

Portion EPEAT certified Product 1 Product 2 Product 3


FUNDING MECHANISMS

Percentage EPEAT certified 100

Product description (e.g. computers, printers) computers

All

18) What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

[ ] No specific mechanisms are in place.

Description [X] Alumni green fund We also have a Solar Fund for alumni donations that has funding solar PV installations. We fund sustainable capital projects outof the capital budget. For instance, in Spring 2010 we obtained $5.6M in capital funding for energy conservation projects.

[X]

Capital budget Endowment investment in oncampus sustainability projects

[ ]

[X]

Operating budget

We fund sustainable operations from the operating budget. For example, in Spring 2010 we obtainted over $250K in on-going operating budget for 4 new controls technicians to perform energy conservation preventative maintenance on building HVAC systems.

[ ] [ ] [ ]

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects Student green fee Other. Please describe.

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

Description Departmental [X] sustainability liaisons Green office [ ] certification program staff lead 'Green Teams' in 7 units/departments and one college wide Green Team in the Medical School. http://www.med.cornell.edu/green/

Green office tips posted [X] online or on staff bulletin boards Incorporation of sustainability [ ] issues into new employee orientation [ ] Other
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Green office tips are included on the following website: www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/getinvolved/help.cfm

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY

20) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory? Please check all that apply. The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory. [ ] No [ ] In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date: [X] Yes. Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

Start Date 2009 2009

Emissions Emissions level level (Scopes 1, 2 & (Scopes 1 & 2) 3) 225,000

URL

Notes Central Utilities

only 2008 2008 2007 2007 2006 2006 2005 2005 242,000 238,000 246,000 236,000 Central Utilities only Central Utilities only Central Utilities only Central Utilities only

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year? The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate 50% as the reduction level.

Yes
If yes, please list details below.

Reduction level (percentage): 100% Baseline year: 2008 Baseline emissions level: 242,000 metric tons Target year: 2050 Additional comments: see Cornell's Climate Action Plan http://www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/climate/index.cfm
REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

Yes

If yes, please list details below.

Percentage reduced: 7% Baseline year: 2008 Baseline emissions level: 242,343 Year achieved: 2009 Additional comments: Cornell central utilities only
23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

2009: 0.0153 2008: 0.0167 2007: 0.0167 2006: 0.0178 2005: 0.0171
24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

2009: 10.94 2008: 11.95 2007: 12.00 2006: 12.52 2005: 12.12
ENERGY EFFICIENCY

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes
If yes, please list details below. Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units).

2005 baseline year Building energy consumption: 2,339,766,000 Gross square feet of building space: 13,809,000 Performance year (most recent year for which data are available) Building energy consumption: 2,341,950,000 Gross square feet of building space: 14,714,000

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply. [X] [X] [X] Cogeneration Temperature setbacks Steam trap systems

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

Percentage of building space [X] Back pressure turbines [X] Economizers Energy management system; building automation system, energy [X] information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system [X] Gas-fired hydronic heating systems [X] Heat recovery systems [ ] LED lighting [X] Lighting sensors [X] Meteringchilled water [X] Meteringelectric [X] Meteringsteam [X] Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8) [X] Performing system tune-ups 10 100 100 100 90 65 100 90 95 <1 10

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been [X] commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years) [X] Steam turbines [X] Steam-line insulation [X] Timers for temperature control [X] Variable speed drives [ ] Vending machine sensors [X] Other. Please describe below. Description: occupancy sensor based laboratory air ventilation control

65 100 50 90 95x 60 .

27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[X] Audits or investigations of individual energy use [ ] Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments [X] Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings [X] Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices [X] Fume hoods in science buildings [X] Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management) [X] PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives

[ ] Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators) [ ] Other. Please describe:
RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes
If yes, please provide details below. Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

Renewable energy type

Percent of total energy consumption

Production source description

[ ] Biomass [ ] Concentrated solar power [ ] Geothermal (shallow depth) [X] Low-impact hydropower [X] Photovoltaics [ ] Wind [X] Other. Please specify below. 95 cooling Lake Source Cooling(LSC) 2 1MW run of river hydroplant 17kw

Other description:LSC provide 95% of cooling energy,saving 25 million kwh, about 10% of campus eletric
29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

Yes
If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

Number of systems: 2 Total MBtus generated annually: 100 million (est.)


RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source. If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

Energy source Coal Natural Gas Nuclear Petroleum Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal) Other. Please specify:
large hydro

Percent of total energy purchase 40 24 17 8 1 11

Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid:


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits

(RECs)? RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards.

No
If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase: Length of contract: Average annual quantity (kWh): Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents:

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion: 1,123,000 MMBtu

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source: If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

Energy Source Biomass Coal Geothermal Natural gas Petroleum


cogeneration

Percent of overall BTUs 71 25 4

Other. Please specify: 100

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FOOD & RECYCLING Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey.

WASTE REDUCTION

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user. 2005 baseline year Weighted campus users: 25,716 Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 167,49.88 tons

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available) Weighted campus users: 25,449 Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 9,899.33 tons

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[ ] None [X] Aluminum [X] Cardboard [X] Glass [X] Paper [ ] Plastics (all) [X] Plastics (some) [ ] Other. Please list:
36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal. The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure. The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE

37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes
If yes, please provide details below. Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

For waste generated by

For waste generated by the

students Batteries Cell phones Computers Light bulbs Printer cartridges Other E-waste. Please list items: [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [ ]

institution [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X]

If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

100% destruction; 0% landfill; safe disposal for information contained on equipment


COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)

38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%
39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

No
If yes, please provide details below.

[ ] Academic buildings [ ] Offices [ ] Outdoors [ ] Residence halls


Description:

All material generated by grounds crew is composted/mulched.


SOURCE REDUCTION

40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes
If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

Description [ ] Limited printing Move-in [X waste See Dump and Run; items collected at the end of May are resold to incoming ] reductio students in August. n Dump and Run is a recycling program that collects items students might otherwise throw away when leaving campus in May. all collected items are Movesorted and organized over the summer, then resold at a large sale when students out [X return. All proceeds is donated to four Ithaca-area nonprofit waste ] organizations. Dump and Run is organized and run by Cornell students with reductio support from Cornell's Campus Life n http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/May10/DumpRun.html;http://www.campu slife.cornell.edu/campuslife/dump-and-run.cfm Yearround material [ ] s exchang e program s [X Other ]
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re-use center(furniture)

GREEN BUILDING

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes
If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Cornell University requires that all new construction projects exceeding $5M in total project cost must achieve as a minimum LEED silver level certification. Projects must also achieve a minimum of 30% reduction in energy usage compared to the ASHRAE baseline energy

model. Project teams are given a target of 50% reduction and a BTU/SF energy usage goal based on the building use.
42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings: 3 Combined gross square footage: Certifiedlevel Silver-level Gold-level Platinumlevel
43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Building name(s): Alice Cook House

125,000

283575

Weill Hall, Riley-Robb Biofuels Research Laboratory

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria: 8 Combined gross square footage: Certified-level criteria met, but 582600 not certified Silver-level criteria met, but not certified Gold-level criteria met, but 467300 not certified Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (currently undergoing-LEED application)Physical Sciences Building, Animal health Diagnostic Center, Human Ecology Building, MVR '33 Rennovation, Combined Heat and Power Project Offices, Brian Nevin Plantations Welcome Center, Paul Milstein Hall

Building name(s):

North and West Campus Housing Initiatives

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings: NA Combined gross square footage: Building names:

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other thirdparty green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type: NA Total number of buildings: Combined gross square footage: Building names:

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

>50%
ADAPTIVE REUSE

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000: 2
Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

Project name Riley Robb Biofuels Laboratory Humphreys Service Building

Square footage 20,574

Former use Agrcultural Mechanical Engineering/Storage Wood Shop

Current use Advanced Biofuels Laboratory Offices

Additional details

+/-2000

48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 20002001 academic year.

Student enrollment (FTE): 18,995 Square footage: 14,0005,255

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 20092010 academic year.

Student enrollment (FTE): 20,086 Square footage: 14,810,286

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

No
If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus: Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings: NA Combined gross square footage: Building names:

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: NA Combined gross square footage: Building names:

WATER MANAGEMENT

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline? Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members).

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year Weighted campus users: 25449 Water consumed (gallons): 481652696070

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available) Weighted campus users: 25716 Water consumed (gallons): 494148155809

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed. For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate 100 as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

Percentage of building space [X] Building water metering [X] Dual-flush toilets [ ] Gray water systems 50 80 75 80 [X] Laundry technology [X] Leak detection and reduction [X] Low-flow faucets [X] Low-flow showerheads [ ] [ ] Non-potable water usage Waterless urinals N/A N/A 100 1

[X] Xeriscaping [X] Weather-informed irrigation [ ] Other. Please describe below.

Other description:
55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X] Living or vegetated roofs [ ] Porous pavement [ ] Retention ponds [ ] Stone swales [X] Vegetated swales Other. Please describe: biorentention systems, retention basins, subsurface filters, vegetated filter strips, sediment settling forebays, rain gardens and other green [X] infrastructure. The majority of these practices are slected for implementation as part of a capital improvement project, redevelopment and retrofits.
ENERGY MANAGEMENT Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy). If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.

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STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school. A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-andlearning experience focused on sustainability. Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College.

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

Name of program

Type of community

Number of students involved

Additional details The nearly 100 residents of Eco House have a variety of majors and backgrounds, but all share an interest in preserving and protecting our natural environment. Residents are dedicated to sustainable practices like recycling, composting, organic gardening, and energy conservation, and organize environmental-education outreach programs such as the annual Mission: Wolf event.

Ecology House

Building

96

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes
If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all firstyear students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the [X] Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue. [ ] Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a [X] productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden). [X] Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

Other. Please describe: Sustainability at Cornell: The Big Red is Going Green!- Presentation which is open to all first year students, though not a required event. It includes an overview of the Climate Action Plan, presented by Mike Hoffmann, Director of the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station, as well as presentations by student leaders of sustainability-related organizations about how new students can make a difference on campus. Participating student groups include the Sustainability Hub, Lights Off [X] Cornell, KyotoNOW, Engineers for a Sustainable World, Society for Natural Resources Conservation, and Roots and Shoots. Active Sustainability Pre-Orientation Programs:Environmental Career Skills (ECS)- A Pre-Orientation Program at Cornells Arnot Teaching and Research Forest from August 1720, where we guarantee that you will make strong and lasting connections with peers and faculty who share an interest in the environment. This is an excellent way to have fun while learning methods and principles of conservation ecology, forestry, and stream ecology. Throughout the four days, you will be directly involved in hands-on experiences with modern field sampling

methods to study plants, invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. In addition, during the famous Woodland Olympiad and other skill and team-building activities, you will learn outdoor skills that will be invaluable, whether you are planning a career in an environmental field or just enjoy spending time outdoors.Outdoor Odysseyhttp://wild.coe.cornell.eduThrough the outdoor experience of your choice, including climbing, mountain biking, canoeing, backpacking, or day hikes from a base camp, Outdoor Odyssey offers a pre-orientation trip that will serve as a fun and meaningful transition to life at Cornell. Meet new Cornellians, hang out with upperclass Guides in beautiful natural settings, and get the inside scoop on life at Cornell. No experience necessary!Active Sustainability Orientation Programs:1:00pm 3:00pm: Cornell Plantations Welcomes You Starting at the Sampson Trail Head (acrossfrom Appel Commons and next to Helen Newman Hall) E3 Tours depart at 1:00pm, 1:15pm,1:30pm, and 1:45pmEveryone says that Cornell is a beautiful place. Join us for a relaxing and informative walk and see just how gorgeous Cornell really is! Well begin with a guided walk though the Beebe Lake Natural Area. Your guide will then escort you to the Botanical Garden; there you can explore on your own and interact with our volunteer Garden Docents, wholl be on hand to introduce you to our spectacular botanical collections, including the Robison Herb Garden, Martha Young Decorative Flower Garden,Groundcover Collection, Class of 53 Container Garden, and more. Please dress for the weather and wear comfortable walking shoes. Some steep stair and slope climbing is required.12:30pm: Visit Bird Mecca Lewis Auditorium, Goldwin Smith C4Cornell Lab of Ornithology staff will take you on a virtual expedition around the world to see and hear examples from the worlds largest archive of animal sounds and video. Find out why Hollywood producers love us including the people who made Harry Potter. During your Cornell career you can visit us for a nature hike, take a field science course in Kenya, do your DNA analysis in our Lab, or bring your parents to Bird Mecca. Well serve pizza and drinks after a short multimedia experience.1:00pm: Beebe Lake Clean Up Meet at Beebe Lake behind Noyes Lodge D3Come join Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed service organization on campus, as we clean up our adopted section of Beebe Lake! Take the opportunity to learn from the members of our chapter about our organization and one of the defining features of Cornells campus, the gorges. We have adopted an area around Beebe Lake as part of the Adopt-a-Gorge Program. This is a great opportunity to get to know new people and help keep Cornell beautiful by removing litter from the paths around the lake.Gloves and trash bags will be provided.9:00am: The Gardens of Cornell Meet at Day Hall C5Cornell has rightfully gained a reputation for its beautiful campus with rich natural beauty and exquisite campus gardens. Join us for an exploration of some of the best gardens on campus and find your own favorite spot to retreat to during your time on campus. The tour begins at 9:00am at Day Hall and finishes at the Botanical Gardens with a reception where you can meet faculty and students who are part of the

Department of Horticulture.12:00pm5:00pm: Cornell Outdoor Education Open House Arts Quad C4Cornell Outdoor Education instructors will help you climb into the big trees on the Arts Quad and send you back to the ground on a zipline! While youre there interact with upper-level students, enjoy an ice cream social, and additional seminars and demonstrations of outdoor skills with members of Outdoor Odyssey (OO) and Cornell Outdoor Education (COE). Learn about COEs physical education courses and OOs pre-orientation program.12:00pm6:00pm: Beebe Lake Canoeing Beebe Lake D3See the Fall Creek gorge from a new perspective! Take out a Cornell Outdoor Education canoe for a serene paddle from Beebe Lake up into Hemlock Gorge. Space is limited. Call 607.255.6183 to reserve a boat for a specific hour. All equipment is provided for free. Walk-ins welcome.1:00pm4:00pm: Explore Green Ithaca Rawlings Green E2Ithaca prides itself on being a center for locally-grown food, family-owned businesses, and sustainability. Come out to Rawlings Green to visit local vendors from the renowned Ithaca Farmers Market and Cornell sponsored organizations. Feast on a wide variety of scrumptious foods while learning about Cornells role in sustainable energy efforts all while enjoying the music of a great local band!1:00pm: Find Out Why Ithaca is Gorges Meet in front of the Tatkon Center D2Love the outdoors? Want to get to know beautiful places just steps from North Campus? Join us for a hike around Beebe Lake and enjoy beautiful vistas, intriguing wildlife, and learn some Cornell lore. We will be exploring some of the natural areas closest to North Campus, so be prepared to discover your new favorite running route, place for quiet contemplation, and secret study spots.7:00pm: FREE screening of No Impact Man (2009) Willard Straight Hall, Theatre B5This is an entertaining ecodocumentary chronicling writer Colin Beavans year-long experiment to discover how far his family could go to reduce their carbon footprint, while still living in the middle of New York City. Members of the student organization consortium, Sustainability Hub, will talk about their activities. For more information visit cinema.cornell.edu or call 607.255.3522 .Cornell Dining works to ensure that all large scale events, such as the Annual North Campus Block Party for new students have composting.
INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes
If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

Number of

Average hours worked weekly per student:

students: Paid positions 6 Unpaid positions


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

10 hrs/wk during school year; 3 of them full-time during summer

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select no.

No
Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

Number of students: Paid positions. Positions that award academic credit. Uncompensated positions.
SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

Average hours worked weekly per student:

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, three or more competitions.


For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

First Competition:

Competition Overview

Competition Name: North Campus Resource Battle Year Initiated: 2008 Website: http://www.vicky707.com/esw/2009_ncrb.html

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators [X] Other, please describe. Engineers for a Sustainable World

Participants in the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators [X] Other, please describe: Residence Halls

Incentives for participation:

Describe: [ ] [X] [ ] Cash Non-monetary prizes Other The winning dorm receives a party with raffle drawings and prizes.

Goals of competition:

Describe: [X] [ ] [ ] [ ] Energy conservation Waste reduction Water conservation Other

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: 8% Lasting effects of competition: Students gain an added sense of awareness about the environment and how changing small parts of their lifestyle can help. Additional Information:

Second Competition:

Competition Overview

Competition Name: Drive Not to Drive Year Initiated: 2005 Website: http://www.vicky707.com/esw/dntd_2009.html
Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators Other, please describe. [X] Engineers for a Sustainable World, Ithaca CarShare, TCAT (local transportation programs)
Participants in the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators [ ] Other, describe:


Incentives for participation:

Describe: [ ] [ ] Cash Raffle drawing. Other [X] Non-monetary prizes

Goals of competition:

Describe: [X] Energy conservation [X] Waste reduction [X] Water conservation [X] Other Increased support for sustainable transportation.

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:

Lasting effects of competition: Students gain an added sense of awareness about the environment and how changing small parts of their lifestyle can help.

Additional Information:

Third Competition:

Competition Overview

Competition Name: Collegetown ART (Art, Recycling, and Trashcans) Contest Year Initiated: 2010 Website: http://sites.google.com/site/collegetownart/the-art-conte
Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators [ ] Other, please describe.

Participants in the competition:

[X] Students [ ] Faculty [ ] Staff [ ] Administrators [X] Other, describe: Ithaca Residents

Incentives for participation:

Describe: [X] Cash [ ] Other $40 per piece of artwork [X] Non-monetary prizes Gift certificates to local businesses.

Goals of competition:

Describe: [ ] Energy conservation To obtain 20 individual pieces of artwork with which to decorate new trash and recycling cans on the streets of Collegetown.

[X] Waste reduction [ ] [ ] Water conservation Other

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:

Lasting effects of competition: Artwork will hopefully minimize vandalism of the new cans in addition to beautifying the neighborhood. Many of the pieces are also have environmental themes and will serve as a constant reminder of sustainability. Since the cans have not yet been purchased and the artwork is not yet on display, there has been limited impact so far.

Additional Information:

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes
If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations websites, if available:

Name Sustain ability Hub (includi ng Take Back the Tap, College town ART)

Description

URL

The Cornell Sustainability Hub is a student-run organization dedicated to promoting and furthering the sustainability of our campus. The Hub is a coordinating body for a number https://sites.google.com/site/cornellsustainab of students and pre-existing ilityhub/ (Page under construction) organizations which seeks to aid them in the development of their goals and campaigns. It serves as a meeting place for various efforts, and an outreach committee focuses on

publicizing their achievements to the Cornell community. Through the framework of the Hub, students have a chance to realize their visions of what Cornell could do to make itself more sustainable. The Hub is an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to collaborate to make our university a better place. Take Back the Tap is an initiative of the Sustainability Hub at Cornell to reduce the supply and demand of bottled water on campus. The "Take Back the Tap" Campaign recognizes that the access to clean water is a fundamental human right and that water is a vital natural resource which should not be commodified and sold for exorbitant profits. As such, we are committed to illuminating the fallacies of bottled water's superior quality over tap water and to highlighting the environmental Take implications associated with the https://sites.google.com/site/takebackthetapat Back reliance upon petroleum-based cornell/ (Page under construction) the Tap products, the fossil fuels needed to transport water, the inefficiencies of recycling, and overall, the systemic problem of a cradle-to-grave mentality. "Take Back the Tap" is also committed to illuminating the challenges that the bottled water industry poses for sustainability in terms of the environmental implications of pumping groundwater beyond a sustainable rate. Moreover, we are opposed to the subsequent erosion in citizens' faith in municipal water supplies that results from the

reliance upon bottled water. Therefore, we are focused on continuing dialogue to reconsider the sale of bottled water at Cornell, as a part of the university's commitment to sustainability and climate justice. In addition, we support the increased availability of tap water on campus, and ultimately, call for a ban in the sale of bottled water at Cornell University. Collegetown ART (Art, Recycling, and Trash cans) is a project of the Sustainability Hub, a student group devoted to projects for a more College sustainable campus and community. town By replacing the trash and recycling http://sites.google.com/site/collegetownart/ ART cans in Collegetown and holding an art contest to decorate them, we hope to: reduce the amount of litter on the streets by providing conspicuous disposal locations Kyoto NOW! hopes to educate students on campus about renewable energy and global warming, moving them towards action to make our campus a more energy sustainable KyotoN place. Kyoto NOW! was http://rso.cornell.edu/kyotonow/ OW! instrumental in the recent decision to move Cornell towards climate neutrality, and will continue to be engaged in the process of reaching these goals. Farm to Cornell (F2C) was Farm to established by students actively http://sao.cornell.edu/SO/org/09-10/1113 Cornell seeking to promote and strengthen sustainable food systems - from farm

to fork. The group began working with Cornell Dining in Fall 2005 to increase procurement of locally grown food in campus dining halls. Since then, Dining's supply of NYS produce has increased significantly, and Farm to Cornell has continued meeting regularly with Dining and its produce supplier, Ithaca Produce. Other F2C projects include facilitating the creation of an on-campus food venue specializing in sustainable options, and educating the Cornell community about related issues through community potlucks, events, and informational materials. The group is now looking to expand by soliciting broader representation from stakeholders across campus. By building a more diverse social network, F2C hopes to realize our shared vision for a healthy, equitable, and delicious food system. The purpose of Roots & Shoots is to foster an understanding and appreciation of our natural environment, and to work towards positive change. We raise awareness of environmental issues through Roots educational campaigns and encourage http://sites.google.com/site/rootsandshootsco and people to act to address these rnell/ Shoots problems. We also work to conserve the natural world by fundraising for organizations that conserve the forests and maintain environmental integrity. Our goal is to encourage an understanding of how people and nature can live harmoniously. Roots

& Shoots also maintains a strong focus on the connection between the environment and our society, valuing education, particularly experiential learning, as one of the most powerful tools to make constructive change. The Cornell Organization for Labor Action is a non-hierarchical organization of students committed to the struggle for economic justice. They contribute their energies not only to the labor movement within Ithaca, but also across the United States, and around the world. They http://www.colanet.org/ have been involved with campaigns to unionize and secure contracts for workers in several different organizations, and were instrumental in moving Cornell toward the adoption of a socially responsible purchasing policy. The Society for Natural Resources Conservation is dedicated to protecting and preserving the natural world all around us from a wide variety of threats, in desperate hope of passing a better world onto the children of this global village. They http://www.rso.cornell.edu/snrc/ recognize that our environment faces perils on almost every front but particularly concentrate their efforts on forest issues such as recycled paper, paper use reduction, FSC wood certification.

Cornell Organiz ation for Labor Action (COLA )

Society for Natural Resourc es Conser vation (SNRC)

Cornell The Mission of the club is to facilitate Global dialogue and engagement among http://rso.cornell.edu/glodevclub/ Develo faculty, graduate and undergraduate

pment Club

students across the Cornell Community about Global Development. As the world becomes increasingly interdependent, boundaries dissolve as technology spreads, and cultural exchanges become commonplace, we hope to encourage informed and compassionate attitudes and actions in a rapidly changing context. The club will host dinners on campus where students can connect with faculty and other students; collaborate with Cornell Cinema to present International Films; publish a journal where students can share experiences and ideas about global development; host a Summit on Women's Issues on Global Health and Development in the spring of 2009; discuss the possible roles the Cornell community can play in global development; partner with existing groups on campus; and hold general body meetings during the semester to update club members and work toward achieving these, and creating new goals. Join us to learn about global development from one another and through unique opportunities! Big Red Bikes is a collaborative effort of undergraduate students to establish a bike share program on Cornell's campus that is accessible, convenient, and affordable for all students.

Big Red Bikes

http://sao.cornell.edu/SO/org/09-10/579

Greeks The Greek community at Cornell Go represents over 30% of the

http://dos.cornell.edu/dos/greek/info_for_stu dents/greeksgogreen/index.cfm

Green

undergraduate population and represents one of the strongest and most viable routes to help the university achieve its sustainability goals. To help with this initiative, the Interfraternity Council (IFC), Multicultural Greek Letter Council (MGLC), and Panhellenic Association have started the Greeks Go Green campaign. This initiative organizes the chapters into three different groups, and each group works on collectively on one environmental goal (but applies it to their specific house). This initiative provides resources and programs that collaborate with the Ithaca community and help educate chapter members about sustainability.

GPSA Sustain ability Commit tee

Graduate and Professional Student Assembly committed to advancing sustainability within student government.

Johnson Sustain able Global Enterpri se

To provide the Cornell community with opportunities to become aware of and get involved with Base of the Pyramid initiatives including http://sao.cornell.edu/SO/org/09-10/822 microfinance, social entrepreneurship, and sustainable global enterprise through speakers, events and special projects The Sustainable Enterprise Association inspires, enables, and http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/sge/program supports students from all disciplines s/studentorgs/sea.html to explore the theories and applications of sustainable enterprise

Sustain able Enterpri se Associa

tion

through discussion groups, business planning, consulting projects, lecturers, internships, and conferences. SEA brings together students interested in exploring the intersection of non-profit, business, and government. They engage students in thinking about a double or triple bottom-line that creates social and environmental value, and provide hands-on opportunities for students who want to be socially responsible members of their communities.

Design, Enginee ring, Educati on and Develo pment (DEED )

An interdisciplinary group dedicated to social design and engineering. We work with developing communities http://cudeed.wordpress.com/ towards social equity and sustainability.

Dilmun Hill exists to provide experiential learning opportunities and educational facilities for Cornell students, faculty, staff and the local community in the exploration of sustainable food and agricultural Dilmun systems. They explore sustainable Hill agricultural systems through the http://www.cuaes.cornell.edu/cals/cuaes/agStudent production of fruit, vegetables and operations/dilmun-hill/ Organic ornamental crops using ecologically Farm sensitive and economically viable practices. The two student managers also run an on-campus farm stand, in order to promote the consumption of local foods and encourage a healthful, well-balanced diet.

Lights Off Cornell is an energy conservation initiative which aims to reduce wasted electricity at Cornell by engaging student volunteers in turning off lights after hours. The way the program works is: our organization uses a website (http://www.sustainablecampus.corne ll.edu/lightsoff/index.cfm) to schedule and assign pairs of volunteers to turn off lights in designated buildings. Volunteers are provided with building Lights floor plans labeled with light switch http://www.sustainablecampus.cornell.edu/li Off locations. They record which light ghtsoff/index.cfm Cornell switches they turn off, and then input the recorded data back onto our website when they are finished with their volunteer assignment. Because we have taken the time to count how many lights each switch turns of and how many watts each bulb uses, the inputted data from our volunteers tells us approximately how much money, kilograms of CO2, and watts of energy we are helping the university save. The purpose of the Cornell University Student Organization of the U.S. U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) Green shall be: To foster scientific study and Buildin research in the field of g environmentally sustainable building http://sao.cornell.edu/SO/org/09-10/552 Council and design; To develop and disseminate knowledge in sustainable (USGB building research and design to all C) interested Cornell University students to create a student network of knowledge and expertise; To improve

the methods and design of sustainable buildings; To develop better public understanding and appreciation of the challenges and solutions posed by improved sustainable building practices by undertaking relevant projects and conducting educational workshops for the Cornell community; and To promote understanding, adoption and use of sustainable building practices across the Cornell University community The Cornell Computer Reuse Club aims to use the university's computer Comput resources to their fullest by taking er computers from the various labs once Reuse they are no longer in use and giving http://rso.cornell.edu/ccra/ Associa them to the community so that other tion students in Ithaca and the surrounding area can have access to the same benefits of computer technology. The Solar Decathlon is an international, interdisciplinary designbuild competition hosted biennially by the U.S. Department of Energy for three weeks in October. Twenty college and university teams compete to design, build and operate the most attractive, effective and energyefficient solar-powered house. The http://www.cusd.cornell.edu/index.php public is also invited to observe the powerful combination of solar energy, energy efficiency, and the best in home design. The final judging competition will take place October 9-13 & 15-18, 2009, on the National Mall in Washington D.C. The Solar Decathlon brings

CUSD: CU Sustain able Design (former ly Solar Decathl on)

attention to one of the biggest challenges we facean everincreasing need for energy. As an internationally recognized event, it offers powerful solutionsusing energy more efficiently and using energy from renewable sources.
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TRANSPORTATION

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet? The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles. 1,002

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

Number of vehicles [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ] 100 percent electric Diesel-electric hybrid Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year Gasoline-electric hybrid Hydrogen fueled Plug-in hybrid

Other. Please describe: [X] we currently have a variations of these alternative-fuel types in our fleet but we are not currently tracking how many of each.

COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

91%
If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

Percentage Bicycle Carpool/vanpool Public transit Single-occupancy vehicle Walking 26% 9% 59% 2%

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

45%
If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

Percentage Bicycle Carpool/vanpool Public transit Single-occupancy vehicle Walking 3% 17% 14% 55% 9%

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below. [ ] No [X] Yes, to faculty and staff [ ] Yes, to students

Description: "For Faculty and Staff:Carpool Matching: Online Ride-matching ServiceFinancial Remuneration: Staff and faculty participants of the RideShare carpool program are eligible for reduced fee parking permits/no-fee parking permits permits/cash

rebates dependent on the number of participants and parking area.Preferential Parking: Prime location reserved parking spaces are offered at no charge as part of the ""RideShare"" carpool program. Not all RideShare groups are eligible for a reserved space as reserved parking is part of a tiered package of incentives which vary depending on how many people are in the RideShare group, and varies on parking location. Other: Additional incentives include an emergency ride home program, a limited number of one-day parking permits for days when participants need their own vehicle, weekday bus privileges on regional transit for use on the campus and in our downtown area, and no-fee or reduced fee membership (dependent on level of membership the customer chooses) for our regional carshare organization.For Students:Carpool Matching: Online Ride-matching Service"
Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff. Check all that apply.

Description [X] Carpool matching [X] Financial remuneration [X] Preferential parking [X] Other
Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students. Check all that apply.

online ridematching program

Description [X] Carpool matching [ ] [ ] [ ] Financial remuneration Preferential parking Other online ridematching program

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

"Cornell University is a partner with the regional transit provider for bus service both around the campus, around town, and throughout the surrounding county. Staff are provided unlimited transit at no cost, Monday through Friday, when boarding buses on the campus and near to other University work locations in the Ithaca area. Additionally, staff who choose not to obtain a parking permit may join our OmniRide program which provides unlimited transit at no cost to employees within the county, and subsidized out-of-county transit for those commuting from a surrounding county. All New-to-Cornell students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost during their first academic year as a Cornell student. All returning students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost after 6 PM on weekdays, and all day on weekends. Returning students may choose to purchase unlimited transit privileges at a

heavily subsidized rate.

Eligible community members: Size of the discount (as a percent of full price) [X] Faculty [X] Staff [X] Students 100 100 varies between 45 & 100

[X ] Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

Cornell Univesity operates a small shuttle to supplement regional transit between the main campus and a small east campus group of facilities. Additionally Cornell University is a partner with the regional transit provider for bus service both around the campus, around town, and throughout the surrounding county. Staff are provided unlimited transit at no cost, Monday through Friday, when boarding buses on the campus and near to other University work locations in the Ithaca area. Additionally, staff who choose not to obtain a parking permit may join our OmniRide prograom which provides unlimited transit at no cost to employees within the county, and subsidized out-of-county transit for those commuting from a surrounding county. All New-to-Cornell students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost during their first academic year as a Cornell student. All returning students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost after 6 PM on weekdays, and all day on weekends. Returning students may choose to purchase unlimited transit privileges at a heavily subsidized rate.

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

If not applicable, please explain: Cornell University is a partner with the regional transit provider for bus service both around the campus, around town, and throughout the surrounding county. Staff are provided unlimited transit at no cost, Monday through Friday, when boarding buses on the campus and near to other University work locations in the Ithaca area. Additionally, staff who choose not to obtain a parking permit may join our OmniRide prograom which provides unlimited transit at no cost to employees within the county, and subsidized out-of-county transit for those commuting from a surrounding county. All New-toCornell students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost during their first academic year

as a Cornell student. All returning students are provided with unlimited transit at no cost after 6 PM on weekdays, and all day on weekends. Returning students may choose to purchase unlimited transit privileges at a heavily subsidized rate.
BICYCLE PROGRAM

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

No
If yes, please provide details below.

Year created: Number of bikes available: Usage fee per hour: Usage fee per day:

Annual membership fee for students: Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators: Other annual membership fee:

Description:
71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

No
If yes, please provide details below:

Year created: Service fee: Description:

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes
If yes, please provide details below.

Year created: 2008 Total number of vehicles: 13

Number of hybrid vehicles: 0 Usage fee per hour: $2.50 - $7.95 Usage fee per day: $49.50 - $79.50

Annual membership fee for students: $0 - $105 Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators: $35 - $140 Other annual membership fee:

Description: Cornell University supports the local private not-for-profit carshare organization by subsidizing faculty, staff, and student annual membership fees, providing nofee prime parking for the carshare vehicles, and through marketing. Carshare membership subsidies are offered to all faculty, staff, and students with higher subsidies offered to all students, as well as to all faculty and staff who participate in transportation demand management programs.
PLANNING

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

Cornell University has adopted both a Master Plan for the campus, as well as Transportation Implementation Mitigation Stratagies (TIMS) stemming from a Transportation Generic Environmental Impact Statement. These documents provide a framework for supporting pedestrian-friendly and bike-friendly facilities both on the campus as well as in adjacent communities. The University has committed that all future buildings will be, at minimum, LEED silver and as such will strive to incorporate bicycle-friendly facilities in new construction. The University has a Transportation Planner and a Bike Pedestrian Safety Committee who all work in conjunction with multiple University departments and local communities to support pedestrian-friendly and bike-friendly infrastructure.
74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of fulltime employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

Employees eligible

Description: Requests are submitted to department management to determine if the request can be granted. Currently, usage is more common with employees in exempt roles, although some non-exempt employees do telecommute.

Any employee whose [X] Telecommuting responsibilities allow for remote work

[X]

Condensed work week

Employee whose responsibilities allow for a condensed schedule. Requests are submitted to department management to determine if the request can be granted.

Currently, this arrangement is being used in both exempt and nonexempt positions across campus. It works well in service roles, allowing for extended hours of service.

Additional comments:
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STATISTICS

75) Campus setting:

Rural
76) Total number of buildings on campus:

584
77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus:

14,810,286(this is 08/09 academic data )


78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year):

20,086
79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year):

NA
80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus:

56%

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

Description

(optional) [X] [ ] [X] Campus garden or farm Disposable water bottle ban Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level) Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level) Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level) Graduate-level sustainability studies program Outdoors club Participation in Recyclemania Single-stream recycling Student trustee position Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduatelevel)

[X]

[X] [X] [X] [ ] [ ] [X]

[X]