our C ier

Claremont

Wednesday 02-06-13 u One dollar

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The city’s in a jam with the state over the Strawberry Patch
Story on page 4

Gotta dance!
Story on page 12

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Teacher Michele Allen demonstrates the Jitterbug with the assistance of Tanner Atherton recently during an evening couplesʼ dance class at El Roble Intermediate School. Ms. Allen comes up with a new theme for each week of the class with dances that were popular during a specific era.

IN THIS EDITION

Boys varsity soccer is on pace for CIF
CHS took Chino Hills, 3-1, on Friday and are tied with Damien for first place.
Story on page 10 Claremont High School goalkeeper Kyle Del Campo stretches to block a shot by Chino Hills on Friday at CHS. Del Campo had a stellar night in the net. This was the one and only shot that got by him.

We give you news and photos online, too.
Visit www.claremont-courier.com

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Claremont Mom & Pop: J. Brown Violin Maker

Story on page 5

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

Snow caps the mountains Clouds often hide it from view Sun may melt it soon
— Nancy Arce

READERS’ COMMENTS
Council gets it right
Dear Editor: We applaud our City Counciil’s continuing pursuit of acquiring the water system that serves Claremont. As residents since 1957, including owning a home for more than a decade, we have been customers of Golden State Water Company. Golden State provides a fine example of why distribution of natural resources should not be part of profit-controlled business in private ownership. As we all experience the cataclysmic proportions of climate change, it has become a worldwide concern. Let Claremont be a leader and continue the quest for public control.
Aimee and Langdon Elsbree Claremont

Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

to help our emissions problem, but most of it winds up in the general fund to be used to help with the shortfall in retirement money for government employees. This bill would extend the taxes until 2023 and help postpone the drastic reduction of state spending that is long overdue. Please urge your assemblymembers to vote against this bill and introduce their own cost-cutting measures instead.
Hayden Lening Claremont

Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Wednesday, February 6 Community and Human Services Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Thursday, February 7 CUSD Board of Education Kirkendall Center, 6:30 p.m. Police Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.
READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com; fax to 621-4072; or by mail or hand delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The deadline for submission for the Wednesday edition is Monday at 3 p.m.; the deadline for the Saturday edition is Thursday at 3 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not a reflection of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters for both space and content. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

GOVERNING OURSELVES

Education Reporter/Obituaries Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont and the Niners
Dear Editor: As one of the millions of sports fans across the country who tuned into Sunday’s game, I want to note that your article, “A Claremont connection to the Super Bowl” by Terry Hodges, caught my attention. As a fan of the author, I found the family connection and Claremont history interesting and written in that wonderful story-telling manner Terry has achieved so well.
Rodge Fradella Claremont

Sports Reporter Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Vehicle tax is short-sighted
Dear Editor: Obviously high on the agenda for legislature’s new session is Assembly Bill 8 to extend additional vehicle taxes that we foolishly voted in back in 2007. The original tax is set to expire in 2014 and would deprive the moneyhungry legislature of $2.3 billion additional revenue. This revenue is supposedly designed

Reporter At Large Pat Yarborough Calendar Editor
Jenelle Rensch calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

READERSʼ COMMENTS continue on page 7

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Advertising
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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published twice weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Annual online subscription: $47. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013. Claremont Courier

One hundred and fifth year, number 10

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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Familiar faces vie for Claremont City Council seats in March

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ust 3 months after voting in the United States’ general election, Claremont residents are preparing to return to the ballot boxes again next month, this time for an election a little closer to home.
COURIER photos/ Steven Felschundneff Larry Schroeder, Claremontʼs mayor and incumbant for the March 5 election.

On Tuesday, March 5, Claremonters will cast their votes in the city’s latest biennial municipal election. This year’s race features 3 candidates vying for 2 open seats, each with a 4year term, on the city’s 5-member council. Democrat Michael Keenan faces off against 2 incumbents: fellow Democrat Larry Schroeder, current mayor of Claremont, and Republican Corey Calaycay, the longest-sitting member of Claremont’s current city council. Mr. Keenan heads down the Claremont campaign trail for his fourth time, eager to aid in Claremont’s bid for to a sustainable future while vowing to stand by the council majority approval of water acquisition. Mr. Keenan would also like to steer Claremont in the direction of becoming a charter city, governed by its own laws rather than by state mandates. “I do not think we can depend, as we may have in the past, on state or federal government to protect us from international holding companies since the repeal of the Public Utility Holding Company Act,” Mr. Keenan said. “I can as a councilperson.” City involvement is nothing new to the Claremonter, whose political activism in recent years has included the Claremont City General Plan Citizens Committee, the Open Space, Conservation and Hillside subcommittee and membership with Active Claremont and Sustainable Claremont, on which his platform is based. “My greatest task as a council member will be to work at reversing

Corey Calaycay, councilman and incumbant. Candidate Michael Keenan

that skewed carbon-cycle back into those proportions that sustainable Claremont or any city stands to lose in the short term,” Mr. Keenan said. “My vision and platform is a large order, but I have confidence that Claremont has the nature and capacity to meet this energy/climate challenge.” Mr. Schroeder, selected as mayor by his fellow council members last March, completes his first term on council after being elected to his post in March 2009. He previously served on the Claremont Community Services Commission, to which he was appointed in 2007. If elected to a second term on council, Mr. Schroeder pledges to continue to keep Claremont on track. “We must continue the fight to control excessive water rates, sustain balanced budgets, maintain public safety and support our police department,” said Mr. Schroeder, who also mentioned controlling public retirement costs, negotiating fair and sustainable labor contracts, maintaining city streets and open space and developing appropriate retail. Over his 4-year term, the former municipal finance director and public administration PhD has used his background to help aid his cause by rein-

CANDIDATES’ CORNER
Sunday, February 10 Campaign Kick-Off with Michael Keenan You can help Michael Keenan kick off his city council campaign this Friday from 5 to 8 p.m. Guests will enjoy food and healthy juice drinks while making signs. Music will be provided by the High Strung Band. Tuesday, February 12 Candidates Forum Meet the candidates for Claremont City Council at a breakfast event sponsored by the Claremont Chamber of Commerce. The event begins at 7:30 a.m. at the DoubleTree Hotel, 555 W. Foothill Blvd. Members $15 with RSVP, $17 on day of event. Potential members $20. RSVP by Friday, February 8 by calling 624-1681 marlene@ emailing by or claremontchamber.org with “February Breakfast” in the subject line. Saturday, February 23 Candidates Forum The public is invited to a candidates forum hosted by Active Claremont and the League of Women Voters. The event begins at 11 a.m. and takes place in the Padua Room at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd.

stituting the city’s annual review of Claremont’s investment policy. He also led the campaign to add a drop box for outdated prescription drugs to the lobby of the Claremont Police Station and hopes his home energy retrofit will serve as an example to the community. He feels a second term would allow him to continue to move Claremont forward in a positive direction. “I hope my record over the past 4 years speaks for itself,” Mr. Schroeder said. “I truly love Claremont and I appreciate being able to give back to the community.” Mr. Calaycay is no novice to city government, having already served 2 terms on council including a year as Claremont’s mayor in 2009. Mr. Calaycay hopes to continue to serve Claremont constituents in his third term on the local city council. “I extend my pledge to continue to apply my basic principles of honesty, integrity, transparency in government, fiscal prudence and citizen-driven policy as I consider and decide all matters that come before the city council,” Mr. Calaycay said. His track record includes upgrades to the Old Schoolhouse, expansions to the Claremont Village, improvements to bike and pedestrian safety and the acquisition of Johnson’s Pasture and Gale Ranch properties for incorporation into the Wilderness Park. Serving as mayor when economic crisis hit the nation, Mr. Calaycay has helped aid the council in weathering economic challenges and is proud of this last year’s $1.8 million surplus in the city’s budget. He plans to help the council in delivering more positive

outcomes in Claremont while remaining an advocate for the community. “I recognize that I work for the voters. They hire me to represent them. No employee is perfect, but I believe that I continue to demonstrate to my residents that I am diligent, fair and trustworthy in serving them,” Mr. Calaycay said. “I love Claremont and I want to continue working for our community. Therefore, I humbly ask the voters for the opportunity to continue serving them.” Claremont voters will get the opportunity to meet the candidates and hear more about their campaigns at a breakfast held by the Claremont Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, February 12 at 7 a.m. at the Doubletree Hotel, 555 W. Foothill Blvd. A second candidates forum will be held on Saturday, February 23 at 11 a.m. in the Padua Room of the Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Rd. Find out more information in our sidebar. Those Claremont residents who would like to participate in the upcoming general election must be registered to vote at least 15 days prior to the March 5 election. Registration forms may be obtained at Claremont City Hall, the Claremont Public Library and the Claremont Post Office. For more information about elections and voter registration, visit the website of the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk at www.lavote.net or call the county clerk’s Voter Information Division at (562) 466-1323.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Find out more about the candidates by visiting their websites:
Michael Keenan: https://sites.google.com/site/keenanforclaremont/ or check out his “Keenan for Claremont City Council” Facebook page. Larry Schroeder: www.Larry4Claremont.com or on the “Re-elect Larry Schroeder to City Council” Facebook page. Corey Calaycay: http://mysite.verizon.net/resq0kky/calaycay2013 or on the “Corey Calaycay for Claremont City Council on March 5, 2013” Facebook page.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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Council, state have different ideas on property ownership

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espite navigating a curveball thrown by the state finance department last August, Claremont officials remain optimistic that plans for the city’s latest housing development will continue to move forward as planned.
Claremont representatives—including Claremont City Manager Tony Ramos, Finance Director Adam Pirrie, Director of Community Development Brian Desatnik and Successor Agency Counsel Tom Clark—traveled to Sacramento late last month to dispute the department’s ruling that the proposed Towne Avenue and Baseline Road development be turned over to the state. Though the final decision based on the meeting will not be announced for at least another week, city administrators feel confident about the results. “We presented a strong case and the 2 representatives from the Department of Finance [we met with] were fairly receptive to what we had to say,” Mr. Pirrie said. “We are optimistic that it will work out in our favor.” Last July, the Claremont Planning Commission conducted a preliminary review of the proposed 6.2-acre development, whose scope includes the city’s strawberry patch on the southeast corner of Base Line and Towne. City Ventures LLC proposed the mixed-use residential community, which would consist of a total of 98 townhomes and 3 live-work townhomes, a portion of which would be offered as affordable housing. A month after the commission’s positive review, the state’s Department of Finance offered a different take. As prescribed by rules outlined after the dissolution of California’s Redevelopment Agencies (RDAs), finance department officials believed the property should be turned over to Los Angeles County for distribution to taxing entities.  

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff City staff is currently defending Claremontʼs ownership of the Strawberry Patch located at Towne Avenue and Base Line Road. The property was sold to City Ventures LLC, which plans to build a townhome development on the 6.2 acre site.

Assembly Bill 26—which effectively eradicated the RDA—and Assembly Bill 1484 put into place a series of measures governing the RDA’s wind down and the distribution of tax increment revenues relating to former RDA projects. One such action prescribed in that legislation included allowing a city to retain former RDA housing assets in performing low- and moderate-income housing functions should the city choose to serve as the successor agency to its former RDA. The city of Claremont

chose to do so in January 2012. AB 1484 further required the city to send the finance department a listing of those housing assets that the former RDA had transferred to the city. The city did so last July. However, in a letter sent the following month, the department of finance asserted that the Base Line Road project did not comply for a variety of reasons city officials found to be invalid and inconsistent, according to Mr. Pirrie. For one, he said the finance department’s main argument was that

the property was not restricted by a covenance, or agreement, to provide housing assets, but Mr. Pirrie pointed out that the part in the code that the finance department was speaking of made no reference to the need for such an agreement.   “[The property] doesn’t have to be encumbered by a covenance to provide affordable housing,” he explained. “What they were claiming for reason to deny the city was irrelevant.” The real reasoning behind the finance department’s decision to attempt to strip the property from the city was simple to Mr. Pirrie. “The state wants more money,” Mr. Pirrie put it plainly. “And they want that property to be sold, for redistribution. I think the Department of Finance basically received directive to get as much money as they can out of this dissolution of redevelopment and making some determinations that aren’t fully supported by the law.” Mr. Pirrie and other city officials immediately set up a meet-and-confer with department representatives. Though the end result of that meeting is not yet known, Mr. Pirrie remains hopeful the results will come back in their favor and doesn’t believe the unexpected delay will be detrimental to the development of the housing project as it moves forward with escrow. “We are confident that our argument was sound and based on law and are expecting them to reverse the determination,” Mr. Pirrie said. “We are optimistic that it will work out in our favor.” The city reports it is prepared to sue the state finance department should a ruling in Claremont’s favor not be reached. The city expects a decision on the matter within the next couple weeks. The resulting decision will be published in an upcoming edition of the COURIER.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Charter school petition, district accolades make board agenda
EDUCATION

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busy agenda is on tap for the next meeting of the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education, set for Thursday, February 7 at 6:30 p.m.

The school board will be presented with a revised petition for a proposed charter school within the district, the Embracing the Whole Child Arts and Technology Academy. The first petition for the academy was presented, and accepted by the school board, on April 19, 2012. At a subsequent hearing, the fol-

lowing petition was denied. Should the revised petition be accepted, as recomSCHOOL mended by CUSD BOARD Superintendent Jim Elsasser, the board will have 60 days plus a potential 30-day extension to approve or deny the charter school’s second petition. The board will recognize the contributions of third-grade Sumner student Axel Garcia Jr., who led Sumner/Danbury in a successful Toys for Tots drive this past holiday season, as well as the efforts of the Claremont Chamber of Commerce’s Best Business & Education Together (BET) Committee in support of programs promoting

self-esteem, learning and motivation. Each year, the committee awards minigrants of a maximum of $250 for workshops proposed by teachers and administrators at local schools. Last year alone, 35 mini-grants, ranging from “Read About Math Learning Centers” at Chaparral to “Getting to Know Our Biomes” at Oakmont to “Writing Across the Curriculum” at Our Lady of the Assumption School, were distributed throughout Claremont, for a total of $18,505. The board will also be asked to approve a number of items, including a new job description for the positional of Educationally Related Mental Health Therapist and some field trips

Claremont students hope to embark on, including: a whale watching trip at Newport Beach (Danbury); participation in Astro Camp in Idyllwild (Chaparral); participation in the USA High School Spirit Nationals in Costa Mesa (CHS Cheer, Dance and Hip Hop teams) and an extended field trip for 107 Chapparal students to attend Science Camp at the Lazy W Ranch in Dana Point. The school board meeting will be held at the Richard S. Kirkendall Education Center, located at 170 W. San Jose Ave. in Claremont. Public comment is welcomed.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

5

Claremont couple has musicians playing in tune

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im Brown, of J.Brown Violin Maker in the Claremont Village, may have abandoned his career as a musical educator long ago, but the luthier and musical aficionado has spent more than a decade making up for lost time.

Mom & Pop

Claremont

just the melody. You can’t carry a piano around with you and they didn’t have the portable ones back then so I learned the classical guitar,” he Through their small Claremont explained. mom-and-pop, now in its 16th year, His instructor also happened to Mr. Brown and his wife Debbie build classic guitars and when he have dedicated thousands of hours, offered to teach Mr. Brown, he took and countless dollars, to Clarehim up on it. The result grounded mont’s young musicians. Each year, Mr. Brown’s nomadic spirit. the local violin maker matches do“It makes a great sound, the full nations raised at the Claremont harmonic spectrum,” he said. “It School of Music’s Play-a-thon (this was very pleasing.” past year to the tune of $1500) and After mastering the art of the makes regular fixes to students’ inclassical guitar, Mr. Brown found struments while taking on 60 perhimself drawn to the cello, which he cent of the cost himself. If a school COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff felt was the instrument that proneeds money to help a student pay for an instrument, Mr. Brown is Jim and Debbie Brown have run their Village business, J. Brown Violin Maker, for 16 duced a sound that best approxiyears. The shop is now located in a former home off of the alley behind Rhino mated his voice. He started there with check in hand.   Records. searching for someone to teach him “As long as my business is open, how to make a cello, but no one I am going to give back to our he was a young boy, Mr. Brown re- received numerous honors in choral would allow him to make the jump music education system,” Mr. Brown members his mother paying him in music and was selected for the Young pledged. He has yet to waiver from that quarters to sing “Autumn Leaves” to Americans, a touring group of young from the simple classical guitar to the mission. family members. At age 8, he and his musicians. He continued his musical more intricate cello. “You had to start off making violins. “The arts are the lifeblood of human- brother were selected out of the audi- education at California State UniverThat was sort of the prerequisite,” he ity,” Mr. Brown said. “The arts are ence to sing on stage at the Engineer sity, Fullerton, where he earned a dewhat allow people to be fully human. Bill Show. They proudly belted out gree in choral directing studying under said. He found a violin maker in Riverside Computers take care of tasks and other Davy Crockett. his idol, Dr. Howard Swan, a Pomona willing to teach the budding luthier. things, but it’s the arts that allow us to Despite his background, Mr. Brown College graduate responsible for the be who we really are and develop into didn’t receive formal training until his expansion of the choral music scene in After a 3-year apprenticeship with the violin maker, she encouraged Mr. individuals.” friend convinced him to join choir in the United States. The work ebbs and flows, but Mr. middle school. He continued his train“I had the best in the world as my di- Brown to take his talent and open his Brown is kept relatively busy, at pres- ing at Fontana High School. He re- rector, another reason I felt really guilty own business. The suggestion took him by surprise. ent working on a cello, a viola and 2 vi- members the music budgets were much for giving up my music education.” “It sounded kind of crazy, a music olins in addition to his regular repair different during his formative schoolThe best musical education around business in California,” Mr. Brown work. Like any artist, Mr. Brown didn’t ing years. could not help combat the cuts to Calienter business with hopes of striking it “They had private voice teachers fornia schools, which thrashed music said. But he took the chance, opening rich. For him, it was about heeding his coming in to teach—at no charge,” Mr. education budgets into nothingness. up J.Brown Violin Maker in the Old roots and making good on old prom- Brown’s wife, Debbie, recalled. Unable to find a job and downtrodden School House in 1997. He recalls his ises. The local arts advocate continues “The programs back then had huge by what Mr. Brown saw as the destruc- first customer, a woman who later adto make good on that promise. budgets, and I was exposed to that,” tion of music programs in California, mitted she came in to test the water and “When the opportunity arose to get Mr. Brown added. “The late ‘60s were he abandoned his dreams of teaching see if he was “the real deal” before back into music in this way, I said, I the beginning of the end of all these music. In the years following, Mr. handing over her instrument. Sixteen have to make up for that, and do what programs.” Brown described himself as a nomad years later, she is still a customer. Now located off Bonita Avenue and I can to foster education not just in Under these bountiful programs, Mr. jumping from job to job: a professional Indian Hill, next to Rhino Records and words, but in action. I think we’ve Brown’s musical career flourished. He golfer by day, an actor by night. proven that.” Though he gave up Video Paradiso, Mr. Brown’s clientele on teaching, Mr. has significantly expanded, allowing A history of music Brown found he him to continue to make the violins, viMr. Brown could could never get olas and cellos Claremont residents never get away from away from music. have come to know and cherish. And music; it is practiDuring his no- in turn, Mr. Brown gets to whittle away cally a part of his bimadic years, Mr. in his workshop, doing what he loves. ology. His father was “Look at what you create,” Mr. Brown decided to a talented musician Brown said, motioning around his shop add the classical with a “golden guitar to his musi- to the instruments lining the walls. voice” who loved the cal repertoire, in- “When used properly, [an instrument] classics and his uncle trigued by the creates something beautiful. Even all was once chosen to spectrum of by itself, it’s doing nothing but pleasing sing at the Hollysounds that flowed your eye. It enhances the human spirit.” wood Bowl. J.Brown Violin Maker is located at from the instru“I was surrounded 232 N. Indian Hill Blvd. Find out more ment to accomby good music,” as about the local luthier by calling 624pany his singing. Mr. Brown ex“I wanted an in- 0849. plained. —Beth Hartnett strument that I His parents were news@claremont-courier.com happy to see the mu- A selection of instruments that are for sale at J. Brown Violin Maker in the could take with me and achieve full sical talent passed Claremont Village. Besides making string instruments proprietor Jim harmony and not onto their son. When Brown also sells used ones and offers repairs.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

6

Taking a serious thing seriously
by John Pixley

Excuse me. Where are the jumbo chocolate chip cookies and the cheese dip? Where are the endless cups of coffee? Why haven’t the Seaver House, San Jose Place and the Garner House been booked? Where are the debates? Where are the yard signs? Where are the campaign event listings in the COURIER?
Excuse me. I thought there was an election going on. Actually, I have seen yard signs. I just saw 2 of them. It was a few days ago, in the last week of January as I begin to write this. Usually, I don’t like seeing yard signs. I get to despise them, the way they clutter the streets. But I was glad to see these 2.(I have seen a few more since then.) I knew I wasn’t going crazy. For a while there, I was wondering if I was going crazy. Or if I was dreaming. I was wondering if I made a complete fool of myself when I wrote this in December: Assuming we get through 12/21/12 and make it into the new year, we’ll be smack dab in a political campaign, complete with yard signs, coffees and debates, with Michael Keenan signing up at literally the last hour to run in the March 5 city council election. For a few days, it looked like there wouldn’t be more than the 2 incumbents, Larry Schroeder and Corey Calaycay, in the 2-seat race, and, with the 2 simply being reappointed, we would have had a breather after the marathon of campaigning last year. That was the last time I had seen or heard anything, including in these pages, about a city council election coming up. Did I make it up?

observer
Excuse me, but there is indeed an election here in Claremont on March 5 that is now less than a month away. A campaign season lasting a month or less would be a blessing, a sweet mercy. But this isn’t England, with its short, if not sweet, parliamentary elections. This is America, where months-long and even years-long campaign seasons are now the norm. Although a weeks-long election campaign could well be the norm in a small town like Claremont, it is usually the case that we’re “smack dab in a political campaign, complete with yard signs, coffees and debates” by mid-January and certainly by now when there is a March election. Usually, there are campaign kick-off parties, each in a nicer venue— the Seaver House at Pomona College is a favorite— and with fancier snacks, shortly after New Year’s. Yes, sometimes it looks like the Claremont campaigns are a joke. I remember one year the big draw to a campaign kick-off was homemade posole. Another time, I got an invitation to an exclusive meetand-greet with a candidate for permanent absentee voters. I couldn’t help but wonder: Does the candidate with the biggest chocolate chip cookies win? But, again, excuse me. This is serious. This is an election. Which is why I’m wondering if this city council election, which is on March 5, less than a month away, really is a joke. I’m wondering if it is being taken seriously. I’m wondering if Michael Keenan is taking it seriously. As I write this at the end of January, none of

the yard signs I’ve seen has had his name. He’s very recently announced a kick-off party, but not much else. And he is the only reason why this election is taking place. For a while in December, it looked like there might not be an election. It looked like Larry Schroeder and Corey Calaycay would just keep their seats on the city council for another term, because no one else was filing papers to run in the 2-seat election. Then, not at the last minute but certainly with minutes to go before the deadline, Mr. Keenan, who has trailed far behind in 2 previous races for city council, signed up. If I were Mr. Keenan, I’d be raising a public stink about Active Claremont not holding a candidates’ forum in January as the group always does when there is a March election. Without the debate going on as usual, it looks like the election, not to mention Mr. Keenan, is being written off, not being taken seriously. But, again, as of this writing, I, for one, haven’t heard anything from Mr. Keenan about his running (including on yard signs). It makes it hard not to think that he’s not taking his candidacy seriously. Or that he’s not serious, if not a joke. I understand that Mr. Keenan doesn’t take much stock in yard signs, mailers and get-togethers featuring fancy canapes. I more than understand. If it isn’t obvious, I heartily agree and don’t take much stock in it either. I’m sure he would agree that such campaign spending seems, if anything, all the more ridiculous in a small town. But unfortunately, and as Mr. Keenen knows, such trappings are part of the game, and one has to play the game as it is played to be taken seriously. If Mr. Keenan is out to try to change the game, not to mention win it, I say go for it, but I also say it’s even more critical for him to make sure that he’s taken seriously. Meanwhile, I hope this election is taken seriously and not seen as a joke. If nothing else, elections cost a lot of money, and that’s not funny.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Gunning for regulation
Dear Editor: Wendy Hampton in replying to my letter [COURIER, Saturday, February 2] delights in recounting the joys of shooting an intruder rather than having the police respond. But the (claimed) advantages of having one’s own gun are not relevant to either my letter or to the political discussion in the country. It would be relevant only if the agenda were to take away people’s guns (apart from assault weapons). No one has such an agenda. That is pure NRA propaganda and they know it. So the NRA claims that once gun regulations are passed it is an inevitable slide

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READERS’ COMMENTS
to gun confiscation. Think: automobiles and driving them have been regulated for over a century and that has not set us on the slippery slope toward confiscating cars or banning driving. She objects to my recommending that gun owners drop their NRA membership by telling us of the excellent gun safety and operation lessons taught in NRA classes. That is not the issue. The problems have to do with the NRA’s opposition to any degree of regulation. We warn our children not to be tempted by treats offered by strangers in cars. Ms. Hampton needs to learn that lesson. She and other individuals have been tempted by the NRA’s “treats” to climb aboard their wagon and turn a blind eye toward the organization’s policy positions affecting the role of guns in thousands of yearly deaths in the country. Instead, she should help found a gun club that teaches gun safety, yet does not subscribe to the NRA’s policy positions. Merrill Ring
Claremont

READERS’ COMMENTS Please send readers’ comments via email to editor@claremont-courier.com or by mail or hand delivery to 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. Letters are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily a reflection of the view of the COURIER. We reserve the right to edit letters for both space and content. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

OUR TOWN
Conservative commentator Charles Krauthammer to visit Scripps College
Charles Krauthammer, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and named by the Financial Times as the most influential commentator in America, will discuss current events tomorrow, Thursday, February 7 at 7:30 p.m. at Scripps College’s Garrison Theater. The event is free and open to the public. MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough calls Mr. Krauthammer “the most powerful force in American conservatism.” New York Times columnist David Brooks says that today. “he’s the most important conservative columnist.” Since 1985, Mr. Krauthammer has written a syndicated column for The Washington Post, for which he won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary. He is a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic; he received the National Magazine Award for Essays and Criti-

cism, the highest award in magazine journalism, for his New Republic writings in 1984. He serves as a weekly panelist on Inside Washington and appears nightly on Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baier. Mr. Krauthammer was born in New York City and raised in Montreal. He earned his bachelor’s from McGill University in 1970, was a Commonwelath Scholar in politics at Oxford University and earned a master’s degree from Harvard University in 1975. Mr. Krauthammer was chief resident in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital in the mid-1970s and published several scientific papers, including one about the discovery of a form of bipolar illness. From 2001 to 2006, he served on the President’s Council on Bioethics. He is chairman of Pro Musica Hebraica, an organization dedicated to the recovery and performance of lost classical Jewish music. He is also a member of the Chess Journalists of America. For more information about this event, contact the Office of Malott Commons at 607-9372.

Bishop Carcaño to lead immigration vigil at Kresge Chapel
Bishop Minerva Carcaño will lead a special immigration vigil Sunday, February 10 in Kresge Chapel from 7 to 8 p.m. Ms. Carcaño is a national religious leader on immigration reform, as well as the head California-Pacific Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. In light of the renewed bipartisan congressional effort to craft legislation that would repair the current broken immigration system, Claremont School of Theology and Claremont Lincoln University are holding a prayer vigil highlighting the critical importance of family reunification in whatever legislation emerges from congress. The service will include the showing of the short video, Jasmine’s Story, which highlights how the current system has torn apart too many families. For more information, call 447-2500 or visit www.cst.edu.

Americaʼs prisons explored at Democratic Club meeting
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its monthly luncheon meeting on Friday, February 8 from noon to 2 p.m. at Casa de Salsa, 415 Foothill Blvd. Professor Brady Heiner from the philosophy department at California State University, Fullerton will discuss “The Prison-Industrial Complex.” Mr. Heiner specializes in social and political philosophy and is currently writing a book entitled Mass Incarceration and the Unfinished Project of American Abolition. He is the founding faculty sponsor of the student and community group Communities Against the Prison Industrial Complex (CAPIC) and is working with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program to establish a postsecondary educational exchange between Cal State Fullerton and a correctional facility in the greater Los Angeles area. Casa de Salsa will provide a buffet lunch for $13 including tax and tip. Lunch is from noon to 1 p.m., the presentation and discussion will follow.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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Anne Bowers Waggoner
Beloved wife, passionate teacher, energetic volunteer
Anne Bowers Waggoner, a longtime Claremont High School English teacher, died on Thursday, January 17, 2013. She was 92. Mrs. Waggoner was born in Lorain, Ohio on April 16, 1920. After graduating from Lorain High School in 1938, she attended Oberlin College, majoring in Latin and graduating in 1942. She then went on to Northwestern University, earning a master’s degree in 1947. In 1951, Mrs. Waggoner married Jack Holmes Waggoner, Jr. in Riverside, California. They moved to Claremont, where Mrs. Waggoner lived for the remainder of her life. The Waggoners had a shared devotion for education. Mr. Waggoner was a physics professor at Harvey Mudd College, while Mrs. Waggoner was an English instructor, with a teaching career that spanned 40 years. She taught 11 years at Whittier Junior High School in Lorain, Ohio, 8 years at Polytechnic High School in Riverside and 21 years at Claremont High School. Mrs. Waggoner received a Teacher of the Year award from Claremont High School in 1972 and retired in 1982. Across the board, Mrs. Waggoner’s colleagues have high praise for her personal charm and dedication to her stuexpressiveness, its ability to charm, to inspire, to enlighten and to entertain— and passed on this appreciation to her students, whom she loved with equal fervor. There are too few Anne Waggoners in education today.” Mrs. Waggoner was not just an asset to her students, retired CHS English teacher Ruth Bobo emphasized. “Anytime a question about grammar would arise, we would all say, ‘Let’s ask Anne,’” Ms. Bobo recalled. “Her library was stuffed with books that she had read and taught. She had a passion for students and their possibilities.” Mrs. Waggoner also had a taste for beauty, according to friends. “Whether it be figs from the tree in dents and subject matter. her backyard or cherries picked from “Anne was a remarkable teacher,” high in the trees in Cherry Valley or retired Claremont High School English roses arranged to perfection in her silteacher Rosemary Adam said.“She was ver bowl, Anne would add a touch of very professional—kind of an old-fash- elegance to any occasion,” Ms. Bobo ioned schoolmarm—and she was very said. well-respected.” After retirement, Mrs. Waggoner Marilyn Penn, who taught literature continued to be extraordinarily active at Claremont High School for many in the community. A longtime member years, concurred. of the Claremont United Church of “To say that Anne was ‘old-school’ Christ, Mrs. Waggoner served on the is, for many of us, the ultimate compli- Chancel Committee and, for many ment,” Ms. Penn said. “She embodied years, saw to it that there was always a a passion for language—its beauty and fresh flower arrangement on the altar.

OBITUARIES
She was on the board of directors of Volunteer Vital English, was active in the Rembrandt Club of Pomona College, for which she organized bus trips to art museums for 4 years, and was a longtime member of the international teachers organization Delta Kappa Gamma, holding several different offices and committee chairmanships in the local chapter over the years. Mrs. Waggoner was also active with the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Pomona Valley, writing and editing the organization’s monthly newsletter for many years. Mrs. Waggoner is survived by her husband, Jack; by her nephew, John Stringfellow of Downey; by her sisterin-law, Marylou Nack of Columbus, Ohio; by her brother-in-law and sisterin-law, Chandler and Judith Waggoner of Carmel, Indiana; by her brother-inlaw, Harvey Wahls of Raleigh, North Carolina and by many friends. Contributions in memory of Mrs. Waggoner may be made to Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 Harrison Ave., Claremont, CA 91711, or to the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Pomona Valley, PO Box 537, Claremont CA 91711.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

9

Beverly Boyd Daniel Martínez
Beverly Boyd, a longtime Claremont resident, died on Thursday, January 31, 2013 at Sunrise Assisted Living in Claremont. She was 92. A service for Ms. Boyd will be held on Friday, February 8 at 3 p.m. in the Hillside Chapel at Rose Hills Memorial Park, located at 3888 Workman Mill Road in Whittier. Ms. Boyd is survived by her sons and daughtersin-law, Gary and Sue Hoyle and Ron and Pat Hoyle; by her daughter, Paula McKay; by 14 grandchildren and by 19 great-grandchildren. Daniel Martínez, a Claremont native who performed with the Padua Hills Players as a child and went on to teach at Claremont High, among other schools, died on Friday, January 25, 2013. He was 85. A memorial service for Mr. Martínez will be held on Saturday, February 9 at 11 a.m. at Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church, located at 27627 Rim of

OBITUARIES

the World Drive in Lake Arrowhead. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made in memory of Daniel Martínez to the Rim of the World Community Scholarship Council, PO Box 1816, Blue Jay, CA 92317. A full obituary on Mr. Martínez will be included in a future edition of the COURIER.

Roy Anderson
Roy Irvin Anderson, a longtime Claremont resident, died on Friday, January 11, 2013 in La Mesa, California. His wife, Virginia Worthington Anderson, preceded him by 6 weeks. A celebration of the lives of Roy and Virginia Anderson will be held on Saturday, February 23, 2013 at 3 p.m. at Christ Church, located at 1127 N. San Antonio Ave. in Ontario. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Christ Church. A full obituary on Mr. Anderson will be included in a future edition of the COURIER.

Frances Bray
Frances Bray, a longtime resident of Pilgrim Place in Claremont, died on January 23, 2013. She was 97. A memorial service in Mrs. Bray’s honor will be held on Sunday, February 10, 2013 at 3:30 p.m. in Decker Hall at Pilgrim Place, located at 625 Mayflower Rd. in Claremont. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Frances Bray’s name to the Pilgrim Place Residents Health and Support Program (RHSP) fund, 625 Mayflower Rd., Claremont, CA 91711. A full obituary on Mrs. Bray will be included in a

Maryann Vazquez
Maryann Antonia “Tony” Vazquez died on Thursday, January 31 at Oak Park Manor in Claremont. She was 86. A service for Mrs. Vazquez will be held on Friday, February 8 in the Mausoleum at Bellevue Memorial Park, located at 1240 West G St. in Ontario. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in the name of Maryann Vazquez to Oak Park Manor, 501 S. College Ave, Claremont, CA 91711. A full obituary on Mrs. Vazquez will be included in a future edition of the COURIER.

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SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont midfielder Austin Antillon out maneuvers Chino Hillsʼ Jacob Asfahani on Friday at Claremont High School. Both teams played very well but the Pack came out on top 3-1.

Big win propels CHS boys soccer into first-place tie

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he Wolfpack held off a strong surge from the Chino Hills Huskies, then put the game out of reach when Cameron Lorek sealed the game with a score of 3-1 on Friday. Claremont has now won 3 matches on the road and is tied for first place with rivals Damien with identical 6-2 league records.

Coach Fred Bruce-Oliver sent his team out in a 43-3 formation, using his wingers to spread the Huskies’ back line thin. Kyle Del Campo took over in goal for the injured Nick Serabyn. Claremont’s back 4 defenders kept a high, flat line throughout the game to counter long balls over the top. “Whenever we perform well, we keep the lineup the same,” explained Coach Bruce-Oliver. “But during the game, we try players in different spots to see what we can get with other combinations.” Claremont came out on the front foot in the first half, with left-winger Austin Antillon winning the ball in a dangerous position. His pass was cut out, and the Wolfpack could not get a shot in. In the eighth minute, the game sprang to life. Antillon and central striker Kelley Collins linked up in Chino Hills’ area. The Huskies failed to clear their lines, and then Ben Santia pounced on the ball, sending it low and hard into the corner of the net. Only 2 minutes later, Claremont almost scored again. Santia picked up possession inside his own half, and carried the ball unchallenged for 40 yards. He laid it off to Collins, whose left-foot shot arrowed toward the top corner. Huskies’ goalkeeper Jonas Carranza leapt to his left and got 2 fingers on the shot to tip it wide. Jason Umansky launched the resulting throw into the box, and Steven Mancia directed a firm header against the crossbar. At 30 minutes, Claremont had another throw. Umansky again put the ball in the danger area, and again the Huskies failed to clear. Santia could not be-

Claremont midfielder Austin Antillon out maneuvers Chino Hillsʼ Jacob Asfahani on Friday at Claremont High School. Both teams played very well but the Pack came out on top 3-1.

lieve his luck, as the ball bounced right to him. His shot found the exact same spot as his first goal, low to the goalkeeper’s left. Claremont went into halftime sitting pretty with a 2-0 lead. Coach Bruce-Oliver praised his players for their first-half performance. “We came out working hard right from the beginning,” he said. “I was happy with the way we shut the other team down early.” Claremont came out in the second half with an unchanged strategy, but with Sam Springer moving

from midfield to attack, and new wingers Paymon Minale and Lorek. Christian Tejeda came into the game in defense, and Auden Foxe slotted into the midfield. The change paid almost instant dividends, as a long ball from Cassady O’Reilly-Hahn found Springer in space between the Huskies central defenders. He dragged his shot wide from the edge of the area. Chino Hills attacks typically relied on the long
CHS BOYS SOCCER continues on the next page

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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CHS stumbles against stiff competition as season closes

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t was another day of mixed results for Wolfpack sports against the Chino Hills Huskies. On Friday evening, boys and girls basketball were beaten, girls soccer drew and boys soccer produced a victory. Heading into the final week of regular season play, Claremont will determine their playoff seeds with matches against Charter Oak and Ayala.

place with 2 matches to go. The Wolfpack is guaranteed a playoff spot, and will play to improve their seeding this week, with a home match against Charter Oak, which took place yesterday, and an away match against third-place Ayala this Thursday, February 7 at 5:30 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL Claremont’s offense was unable to get going against a tough Huskies team. The Wolfpack managed only 9 points in the first half en route to a 46-25 defeat. The loss unfortunately put Claremont out of the playoff race. They look to end the season on a high note with a home game against Ayala this Thursday, February 7 at 4:45 p.m.

BOYS BASKETBALL The Wolfpack were unable to overcome a 14-point halftime deficit against Chino Hills. Claremont could not contain Huskies shooters, falling by a final score of 81-70. Claremont is currently third place in the Sierra League, with 2 games to go to hold off fourthplace South Hills. The Wolfpack host winless Ayala this Thursday, February 7 at 6:30 p.m. WRESTLING Claremont wrestling had a successful meet last weekend, with 3 members of the team qualifying for the CIF playoffs. Senior Gabe Vigil at 145 lbs., senior Sam Piibe at 170 pounds and junior Dustin Eguilez at 220 pounds will all wrestle in the playoffs on February 15 and 16 at Norte Vista in Moreno Valley.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

GIRLS SOCCER Claremont drew 1-1 with the Huskies in a tough, defensive away match. The draw against unbeaten Chino Hills means the Wolfpack remain in second

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High School midfielder Ben Santia heads the ball on Friday during the Packʼs game against Chino Hills at CHS. Santia scored the first 2 of Claremontʼs 3 goals, giving the boys their third straight win. BOYS SOCCER continued from the previous page

ball. Del Campo needed to be alert on a number of occasions, first picking a cross out of the air while being fouled, and then saving the day on 69 minutes when we came out to block a breakaway. Claremont’s passing was beginning to look suspect, and it was a giveaway in the back that led to the chance. “At times, we looked like we panicked in possession,” Coach BruceOliver said. “I don’t want the players to be impatient and force a pass when it’s not there.”

With 5 minutes to go, on the rebound and slotted the Huskies passing was becom- ball under Del Campo. The goal silenced the home crowd, ing more hurried. Chino Hills but Claremont responded better than got a huge break on 78 minanyone could have hoped. Instead of utes, when Springer inciden- sitting back, the Wolfpack took the tally handled the ball about 20 kickoff and attacked straightaway. With 3 minutes of injury time looming, yards from Claremont’s goal. Foxe picked up the ball in the center Huskies midfielder Miguel circle, poked it through a defender’s legs, and sent a raking pass out to Iniguez struck the resulting Collins on the right. He beat his free kick left footed, and after marker, cut inside and rolled it to a couple of deflections, team- Lorek. Lorek feinted right, went left mate Cruz Guerrero pounced and cut his shot back across the on-

the Wolfpack. Claremont looked to clinch a playoff spot in the Ayala game played yesterday. The Wolfpack then play their final regular season game on Thursday, February 7 at 5:30 p.m., against the Ayala Bulldogs. Wins in both of these games could give Claremont the top seeding from the Sierra League for the CIF playoffs. Ayala sits at 4-4 in third place, narrowly beating Claremont last time out. However, the Wolfpack have all the momentum this time.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

rushing goalkeeper to close up shop for

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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ast Thursday evening, dozens of boys in cuffed jeans and white T-shirts and girls in poodle skirts and ponytails gathered in the El Roble gym to dance the Jitterbug, the Cha-Cha, the Twist and the Drake, set to a soundtrack of 1950s hits.

rocking around the clock

Dance class has students

Contrary to appearances, there was no time machine involved in this blast-to-the-past. Instead, it was just another night in a longstanding dance class taught by retired Claremont High School show team coach Michele Allen. The program, which is offered through the El Roble PFA and which Ms. Allen has led since the late 1980s, allows kids on the brink of their teenage years to have fun and blow off steam while learning to engage with the opposite sex. Participants get instruction in genres like ballroom dancing and the tango and dress up for themed evenings like Western and Fifties nights. For the latter, Ms. Allen—clad in a polka-dot circle skirt, a red cardigan and matching scarf and well-worn saddle shoes – cut a nonstop rug and kept up an energetic patter while teaching the moves of yesteryear as well as a bit of good old-fashioned etiquette. “You are kings of the dance floor,” she exhorted the boys at one point. “Remember guys, if you don’t get this, your girls are going to go nuts!” Later, Ms. Allen neatly broke down the Twist, while demonstrating her own proficiency to the strains of a Chubby Checker number. “You put your right foot forward and your left foot back and the idea is, when your

body is going right, your arms are going left.” The most important rule in the classes is that everybody has a partner. Sometimes the boys ask the girls to dance, and other times it’s “ladies choice.” Often, as the kids dance in a huge circle around the gym’s perimeter, they are instructed to swap partners. “You’ve got such a Heinz 57 combination of students that you won’t see at school,” Ms. Allen said, gesturing to the current permutation of paired boys and girls. While 12-year-old Jack Latham was busy learning the Jitterbug, his mother, Lee Kane, took a moment to share her appreciation for Ms. Allen’s perennially popular dance class, which she said is “wonderful.” “The first night, she told the boys, ‘The girls are like dainty little flowers and you have to take care of them.’ I was kind of like, ‘Ugh,’” Ms. Lee said, pretending to gag herself with her finger. “But actually, the boys

tend to go in the opposite direction, so it’s good. And the girls aren’t used to that kind of treatment.” The dance class provides another incongruous sight, along with the vision of 12- and 13-year-old boys behaving with unaccustomed gentility. “You get some very interesting height disparities,” Ms. Lee noted. Alex Hutzell, a 15-year-old CHS student who participated in the dance class when she was in junior high, was on hand Thursday to cheer on her brother and indulge her nostalgia for Fifties Night, which was one of the highlights of her El Roble career. “I love Ms. Allen—she’s so enthusiastic,” Alex said, straightening the skirt of a yellow prom-style dress more than a little reminiscent of the Happy Days era. “She loves
ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK continues on the next page

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff As the students learned the dances, instructor Michele Allen routinely had the boys and girls switch partners and move about the room to promote interaction.

ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK
continued from previous page

everybody and she dances with all the boys. It’s real fun.” The dance class provided a helpful icebreaker for her when it came to interacting with boys, and it seems to be proving equally beneficial for her brother. “You dance with everyone more than once, and it kind of breaks you out of your shell,” Alex said. “My brother’s really shy and this class lets him meet a lot of girls and dance with them.” Another guest enjoying the ‘50s flashback was Richard Fass, jokingly that among the Dance Committee moms on hand, he was the “token dad.” He admitted that his 8th-grade daughter, Allegra, was slightly appalled at the prospect of her dad chaperoning her dance class. Nonetheless, Mr. Fass said that seeing her take to the floor in a blue poodle skirt, a blue-dyed streak in her ponytailed hair serving as the only indication that she didn’t hail from the nifty ‘50s, was a real treat. “I graduated from high school in 1960, so this is my thing,” he said. Sarah Gale practices doing the Twist at an El Roble dance class. It wasn’t just the retro fashions and the music, which included tunes like Gene Vincent’s 1958 hit “Be-Bop-A-Lula,” that had AT LEFT: The dance students pose for a photo prior to the ʻ50s-themed class at El Roble. Many of the students Mr. Fass traveling down memory lane.
got into the spirit of by dressing in period costumes.

“I remember when all of the girls were taller than us. It’s an awkward 2 years, but they don’t care,” he said. “Also, if you look around, half the kids have braces. It’s the age of braces.” Along with smooth moves, Fifties Night featured a photo shoot, contests for “Best Greaser” and “Best Ponytail,” plus punch and cookies. How did 8th grader Ryan Hutzell get that slicked-back greaser look? “I don’t know. It’s my sister’s hair gel,” he said. One girl, who was wearing her grandmother’s flip-style wig, only had time to give her first name, Kamaria, before returning to twisting. “I love this dance class. It’s such a cultural experience to learn all the dances,” she said. Dance Committee member Shannon Heck, who wore her own poodle skirt while helping chaperone her 8th-grade daughter Abby Heck, considers Ms. Allen’s class the ideal way for boys and girls to dance their way toward mutual comfort. ` “School dances are dark and loud and there’s no direction, and Ms. Allen is so spunky,” Ms. Heck said. “Here, they’re not dancing inappropriately. They’re dancing nicely and learning to interact with the opposite sex.”
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

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Tip-a-Cop at Bucca di Beppo to benefit young athletes
Join the Claremont Police Department at their latest Tip-a-Cop philanthropy event this Thursday, February 7, from 5 to 10 p.m. at Buca di Beppo, 505 W. Foothill Blvd. Residents are invited to dine on an Italian meal with Claremont police officers serving as waiters. All tips received by the cop servers will be donated to the Challenged Athletes Foundation in support of Team JJ. Four-year-old Claremont resident Joshua “JJ” Miller was born with 2 prosthetic legs and now dedicates his time to competing in races with a

OUR TOWN
team of athletes for the Challenged Athletes Foundation. JJ was featured in a Claremont COURIER story on November 3, 2012. The Challenged Athletes Foundation is a nonprofit that helps those with disabilities lead a more active lifestyle by awarding grants to obtain adaptive equipment and training. All of the Tip-a-Cop funds will be donated to these pursuits. For more information on the Tip-aCop event, call 399-5424. Learn about the Challenged Athletes Foundation by visiting www.challengedathletes.org.

ARToon program through CMA geared toward local youth
A new Claremont Museum of Art arts education project, called ARToon, will give voice to a generation of middle school students through the art of cartooning. The program, directed by Lori Evans Lama in collaboration with El Roble Intermediate School, launched yesterday, February 5 and will continue for 6 weekly after-school lessons culminating with a public exhibition and display on the Art Wall at the Packing House in April. An after-school class of 40 El Roble students will pick a cartoon format, develop an original character and tell a story or express their thoughts, insights and beliefs on paper in cartoon form. Students will work under the tutelage of El Roble’s art teacher Wendy Kubiak and will learn about some of the great cartoon artists of our time and how their cartoons have been used throughout history to communicate thoughts, opinions, commentary and ideas. On February 12, award-winning editorial cartoonist Anne Cleaves will talk about her experiences as an editorial cartoonist and present a short history of political cartooning. On February 19, comic book artist and “Cartoonista” Javier Hernandez will help students begin developing their own original stories and signature characters. Finally, the ARToon exhibition will premiere on March 22 at El Roble. In April, a billboard-size, outdoor installation will be unveiled on the Packing House art wall. ARToon is produced solely by the Claremont Museum of Art in partnership with El Roble Intermediate School and funded by a donation from an anonymous CMA member, Curtis Real Estate, Peggy A. Carlson, Wealthcare Capital Management, Inc. and Gould Asset Management, LLC.

district board members who have been replaced might be disinclined to productively move forward with important matters, waiting for the new board members to be seated, according to the bill’s proponents. Legislators and Three Valley’s administrators believe AB 72 would solve the current problem of “lame duck” municipal water district board members who continue to serve for 2 months after the voters have selected a replacement. “AB 72 will further allow the newly elected board members to begin serving the people of the municipal water district sooner,” said Three Valley’s General Manager Richard Hansen, “and may assist the district in moving forward with important matters, which otherwise would have to wait until the new board members are seated.”

Project Walk adds franchise center at Claremont Club
One year after expanding operations and opening the world’s largest spinal cord injury recovery center, SCI Business Solutions Inc., the exclusive franchisor of Project Walk, has announced the addition of their first franchised center located at the Claremont Club. Founded in 1999, Project Walk provides activity-based recovery programs designed around leading industry research, utilizing state-ofthe-art equipment to increase mobility in clients who have a spinal cord injury. Project Walk at the Claremont Club is expected to open mid-February and is currently accepting applications for clients interested in the program. The franchise is owned by 23-yearold Hal Hargrave Jr., who was involved in an automobile accident in July 2007 that left him a quadriplegic and paralyzed from the neck down. Inspired by his own injury and the financial struggles that followed, he started the local nonprofit, the Be Perfect Foundation. After raising $1.7 million in 4 years, Mr. Hargrave was able to help others who have gone through similar situations. “It is a dream come true to be opening this center,” Mr. Hargrave said. “It is a true reflection of the hard work that the foundation has done, along with the amazing support of the community of Claremont that makes this dream possible.” The Claremont Club will be responsible for the operations of the center. Spinal cord-injured clients and their families will have full access to the facility. Mr. Hargrave attributes the success to Mike Alpert, CEO of The Claremont Club and his staff for their role in supporting the project. For more information on Project Walk, visit www.projectwalk.org. The Claremont Club is located at 1777 Monte Vista Ave. For information, call 625-6791 or visit The Club’s website at www.claremontclub.com.

Three Valleys works to amend swearing-in of elected directors
Claremont-based Three Valleys Municipal Water District has introduced legislation that would amend part of the state water code pertaining to the timing in which elected directors of municipal water districts are sworn into office. The existing state statute requires that newly elected members not be sworn in until the first Monday after January 1, nearly 60 days after the election. Authored by Assemblyman Chris Holden, 41st Assembly district, and co-authored by Assemblymembers Curt Hagman and Roger Hernandez, AB 72 would revise the water code to allow for municipal water districts to swear in their directors on the first Friday in December and reduce the existing waiting period by a month. During this waiting period, water

Wednesday, February 6 to Thursday, February 14

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

15

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

COURIER crossword
Don’t miss this week’s crossword puzzle by Myles Mellor.

Movie listings
Check out what’s playing at Laemmle’s Claremont 5 this week.

Page 16

Page 18

February Wednesday

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LECTURE Professor Najeeba SyeedMiller of Claremont School of Theology and Lincoln University will be speaking on “A Muslim Peacemaker’s Perspective.” Professor Syeed-Miller was born in one of the most violent regions of the world in Kashmir located between Hindu India and Muslim Pakistan. Her origins inspired her to dedicate her life to conflict-resolution and peacemaking. She has received numerous awards for her work in interracial, gang and interfaith conflicts. 11 a.m. to noon. Free admission. Pilgrim Place’s Decker Hall. DANCE WORKSHOP Rosario Sammartino, international director of the Tamalpa Institute, leads the workshop “If Your Body Could Speak: An Introduction to the Life/Art Process.” 2:45 p.m. Free. Scripps College’s Vita Nova Lecture Hall, Room 100 at 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont.

School of Thology, 1325 N College Ave., Claremont. 621-0848 or info@claremontheritage.org. BIRD IDENTIFICATION with Pomona Valley Audubon Society. Nina Karnovski, a professor at Pomona College and longtime researcher on marine birds, will present a program on some of the recent work by herself and her student off the Channel Island of California. The subject will concern climate change and regional sea birds. The meeting is open to the public at no charge. 7 p.m. Alexander Hughes Center, Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, speaks as part of the 7th annual Elizabeth Hubert Malott Public Affairs Program. Mr. Krauthammer will comment on current events at 7:30 p.m. in Garrison Theater of the Scripps College Performing Arts Center, 231 E. 10th St., Claremont.

February Saturday

9

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS community meeting and fundraiser. The topic of discussion will be “The United State in a Changing World.” International desserts will be served. 2 to 4 p.m. Padua Hills Theatre, 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont. $30 per person. Call 624-9457 for reservations. PUPPET SHOW “Digging Underground” teaches the importance of friendship during a puppet show for children of all ages and their families. 2 to 2:45 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902.

Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902. PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS with Steve and Barbara Schenck. Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Alexander Hughes Community Center, located at 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont.

February Wednesday

13

February Sunday

10 11 12

February Friday

LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398.

February Thursday

7

REMBRANDT CLUB “Self-Help Graphics” with Evonne Gallardo, director of Self-Help Graphics. This unique institution was founded by a nun to support Latino arts and culture in Los Angeles. Ms. Gallardo will showcase the artists and programs of the thriving group. 1:30 p.m. Pomona College’s Thatcher Music Building, Lyman Hall, located at 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. FILM SCREENING hosted by Claremont Modern featuring People in Glass House: The Legacy of Joseph Eichler and a short film on the Monsanto Home of the Future, which appeared in 1957 at Disneyland’s Tomorrowland exhibit. 7 to 9 p.m. $10. Seeley G. Mudd Theater at Claremont

AUTHOR SIGNING Trevor LoshJohnson reads and signs his newly released novel, In Cabazon, a gothic pastoral spun out of a setting, that by any exercise of reason, should be fictional. Cabazon, a roadside attraction lately adopted by a church: the world’s only creationist museum to be housed inside the belly of a dinosaur. Constructed on an axis of verse and prose, and complemented by collaged images of Californian landscapes and desiccation, the narrative roves through the suburban sprawl of southern California and into the heart of western wastelands. Mr. Losh-Johnson graduated from Claremont High School, earning a degree in comparative literature from UC Santa Barbara and studying for a time in the master’s program at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario in Canada. Illustrations by Ken Johnson from the book will be exhibited. 5 p.m. Buddhamouse, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. 626-3322.

8 February Monday
February Tuesday

SHAKESPEARE CLUB of Pomona Valley will host Susan M. Allen of UCLA and the Getty Center. Her program is titled “Shakespeare Dressed in Modern Garb.” 2 p.m. Joslyn Center, 660 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont. 629-2711.

ART ON TAP Adult acrylic painting on canvas class with the theme of a Georgia O’Keeffe landscape. No painting experience is necessary. $45 includes all materials. You must pre-register to attend. Register at www.otterspacearts.com. 6 to 9 p.m. at Claremont Craft Ales. You will be guided step-by-step through your painting with the bar available to you as you paint. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. #204C, Claremont. 625-5350. SUSTAINABLE CLAREMONT Garden Club presents “Soil, Sun and Squiggles: Tips for Starting Kitchen Gardens.” Cynthia Robinson will talk about organic methods, soil testing, edible garden design and maximizing the use of small spaces. Handouts of useful information to get you started will be provided. Free admission. 7 p.m. Pilgrim Place Napier Center, 660 Avery Road, Claremont. www.sustainableclaremont.org.

February Thursday

14

GETTING PUBLISHED Local author Maralys Wills will discuss selfpublishing. This program is free to attend. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $5. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Alexander Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. MEET GEORGE WASHINGTON Peter Small impersonates George Washington in a performance that is entertaining and educational. For ages 12 and older. 6 to 7:30 p.m. Claremont

ONE BILLION RISING Join the House of Ruth, Project Sister and the Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project for an evening of poetry, music and flash mobs dancing, and say “no” to violence against women and girls—joining the global campaign alongside women, men, girls and boys in over 182 countries. 4 p.m. Claremont Forum, 586 W. First St., Claremont. IPAD APPS and “Making a Perfect Copy of Your Mac’s Hard Drive” with Claremont Macintosh Users Group. 7 p.m. Hughes Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont.

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Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

16

COURIER CROSSWORD

PERFORMING ARTS
BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, February 8: Friday Noon Concert Series featuring Catalan songs by Mompou and Toldrá. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 621-8032. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —February 28: Country music singersongwriter Willie Nelson. $45 to $65. 8 p.m. —April 20 and 21: Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella is an enchanting version of this classic story featuring music of the famous waltz king, Johann Strauss. $29 to $39 with discounts for seniors and children. Showtimes are 1 and 7 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, February 8: “Violin and Piano” featuring music by Brahms, De Falla, Mozart and Vladigerov. 12:15 p.m. —Saturday, February 9: “Eclipse Quartet” featuring Sarah Thornblade and Sara Parkins on violin, Alma Lisa Fernandez on viola and Maggie Parkins on cello. Music by Kurtág, Kohn, Johnston and Reich. 8 p.m. —Friday, February 15: “Bluegrass and Old-Time Music” featuring Richard Greene on fiddle, Tom Sauber on banjo and Joti Rockwell on guitar. Music by Richard Greene, Bill Monroe and more. 8 p.m. —Saturday, February 16: “Music of Karl Kohn” featuring Karl and Margaret Kohn on piano, Rachel Rudich on flute, Joti Rockwell on banjo, Sarah Thornblade on violin and Roger Lebow on cello. Music by Karl Kohn from 1961 to 2011. 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —February 8 through March 24: The Sound of Music. —March 29 through May 5: Sweet Charity. GARRISON THEATER: 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Scripps College Performing Arts Center. 607-2634 or visit www.scrippscollege.edu. —Saturday, March 9 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 10 at 3 p.m.: The Claremont Concert Orchestra conducted by David Cubek featuring violinist Hee Yeon (Sarah) Chung. —Saturday, May 4 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 at 3 p.m.: The Claremont Concert Orchestra and Concert Choir, conducted by Charles W. Kamm and directed by David Cubek. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-9411 or www.haughpac.com. —Sunday, February 10: An afternoon with GARRISON KEILLOR. The charming, witty and always-entertaining writer Garrison Keillor is nationally known for his widely popular radio show A Prairie Home Companion. In his one-man performance, true to his radio form, Mr. Keillor shares anecdotes about growing up in the American Midwest, the people of Lake Wobegon and “late-life fatherhood.” With his dry sense of humor, Mr. Keillor remains one of the most popular American storytellers of all time. 2 p.m. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call 477-2752 or visit www.lewisfamilyplayhouse.com. —Through February 10: Aladdin’s Luck. —March 2 through 10: The Fantasticks.

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #197
Across 1. Claremont's Portuguese restaurant and wine bar 5. Gets some exercise 9. Last letters 13. Milky white gem 14. Organic compound 15. Dull 16. Coach, Chuck 17. Coating 18. Bring up 19. Shiftier 21. Fuse 22. Catalina, for one 23. Bill's partner 24. Gist 28. Claremont restaurant with Mediterranean cuisine 32. Skirts or BMW's 33. Saudi Arabian coin 35. Grazing ground 36. Underground traders 40. Churchill's "so few," (abbr.) 41. Eye amorously 42. Blood vessel branch 43. Italian restaurant in Claremont 46. "____ on The Bounty" 47. Au ___ 48. Legislative group 50. On the beach 53. Bone marrow disease 58. Bake eggs 59. Sights 60. Crunchy sandwich 61. Rice ___ 62. African antelopes 63. Before long 64. Dirty Dancing hit "___ Like the Wind" 65. Cruel person 66. Pool path Down 1. Donkey's years 2. At the time of 3. Wheeze 4. Earthenware pot 5. Legal scholar 6. Projecting window 7. Style 8. In a funk 9. Big fan 10. Arthurian lady 11. To be, to Caesar 12. Clairvoyant 15. Be envious 20. Newsstand 21. Climb 24. Planetary shadow 25. Covered with hair 26. Mix-up 27. ___cup 28. End the dream 29. Tree resin used in varnishes and perfumery 30. Summer TV offering 31. Flip 33. Tattered clothes 34. Indy league, for short 37. Big deer 38. Transport 39. "Have some" 44. Norwegian inlets 45. Having a dense coat 46. Dessert 48. Displayed wealth 49. Nocturnal mammal 50. Egyptian snakes 51. Old king in Iran 52. Harbor 54. And others: Abbr. 55. Supernatural force 56. Computer symbol 57. Excellent 59. Previously

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #196

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

17

57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through February 24: “Textures in Motion” featuring abstract painters Lisa Brugger and Karen Duckles. Ms. Brugger has used her arts education, travels and life experiences to create positive energy through art. Since moving back to LA, she has participated in many group shows, curated the pop-up “Black and White Gallery” in downtown LA, and started a website to help other artists. Ms. Duckles paints flowing abstractions in a gestural manner, often using her hands directly on the canvas. Her work has been influenced by the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. One of its precepts, that truth can be found in nature, has informed her work for many years. Her subjects are derived from natural phenomena such as wind, water and plants. Artist reception: February 9 from 4 to 9 p.m. Art walks: February 9 and 23. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 626-3322. —Through February 28: “Squeak,” new paintings by Anne Seltzer. This exhibition is tailored for Buddhamouse Emporium, with images inspired by the ambiance of the shop. Contentment, peace and beauty are key elements for the creatures in these works, as they enjoy meditation on rock stacks, in wheat fields or in the scent of a lavender garden. Mice and birds serve as the central figures in these colorful paintings. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through February 28: Mary Pavlovich and Sharon Hightower Fiber Artist Exhibit and Sale. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through February 28: This month’s featured artist is fashion photographer Andrew Vasquez. Other participants include the Claremont COURIER, photography by Vicki, watercolor and fashion designs by Arwen Allen, photography by Rico J. Coria, painting prints by Melody Grace Cave and photography by Barbara Sammons. —Saturday, February 9: “What’s Your Type?” a workshop by Sarah Torribio.

GALLERIES

Photo courtesy of Sydni Kitchel Jacki Torres performs a belly dance show at the grand opening of The Colony at Loft204 on Friday. Ms. Torres teaches cabaret belly dance Tuesday evenings at The Colony.

From address poem to persona poem, and from acrostic poem to the villanelle: Explore some of the many creativityevoking poetic genres. 1 to 3 p.m. $10. —Tuesday, February 12: Belly dance class with Jacki Torres. Bring a yoga mat. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 6240548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, Appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. —Sunday, March 24: Opening reception from 3 to 6 p.m. Internationally recognized watercolor painter and author Gerald Brommer. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —February 28 through March 1: “Heart and Soul.” Opening reception: Saturday, February 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. IRENE CARISON GALLERY: The University of La Verne, Miller Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. 593-3511 ext. 4281. —Through April 5: Mitch Dobrowner’s “Vital Firmament.” Artist reception: Thursday, February 21 from 6 to 8 p.m. LENZNER FAMILY ART GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: Emerging Artist Series #7: “Tannaz Farsi: Crowd Control.” MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@mal-

ooffoundation.org or www.maloof foundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native from California and other parts of the world. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: “Martha Wilson,” an independent traveling exhibition. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —Through February 8: “Babes in the Wood,” Katie Grip MFA thesis exhibition. East Gallery. —Through February 8: “All Cats Are Grey in the Dark,” Kristen Bradford MFA thesis exhibition. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —February 11 through 15: Crystal Erlendson’s “Falling Apart While Awake” MFA Thesis Exhibition. East Gallery. Opening reception: Tuesday, February 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. —February 11 through 15: Philip Espinoza’s “Emerge from Afterglow” MFA Thesis Exhibition. Peggy Phelps Gallery. Opening reception: Tuesday,

February 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www.permadirty.org. —Through February 15: “Hundreds Under a Hundred” is a group show to showcase small works (under 12” x 12”) of many media under $100. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through March 24: “Fabulous Fauna: Mythical Beasts from around the Globe.” Mermaids, dragons, griffins, phoenixes, fu dogs and more. This exhibit will also give the public a rare look at some of the amazing imperial Chinese dragon robes in the museum’s collection. —April 20 through July 28: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” Opening reception: Saturday, April 20. Enjoy an all-day event featuring music, dance, food and crafts from the region. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 330 N. College Ave. Hours during exhibitions: Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Admission info: 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum. —Through April 14: “Kristen Everberg: In a Grove.” The exhibition is the 45th in the Museum’s Project Series and consists of a new suite of 4 paintings and 4 drawings based on Everberg’s exploration of the Japanese crime drama Rashomon (1950) by filmmaker Akira Kurosawa. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scrippscol lege.edu/williamson-gallery/. —Through April 7: “Denatured Nature,” Scripps College Ceramic Annual—the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through February 28: Michael J. Hart, a fifth-generation California native, captures American wildlife in his exhibition of bronze work.

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Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, February 6, 2013

18

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA! GOURMET BURGERS & CRAFT BEER: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, February 7: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka! Thursday Night Music featuring Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Saturday, February 9: Janet Klein performs Tin Pan Alley classics of the 1910s, ‘20s and ‘30s. $15. 7:30 p.m. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —February 8 and 9: Jerry Rocha moved to Los Angeles from his native Texas and has appeared on the Travel Channel and season 7 of Last Comic Standing. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. —Friday, March 8: Flogging Molly. —Wednesday, March 20: The Specials. —Friday, April 19: Bullet for my Valentine. —Thursday, April 25: Crystal Castles. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802.

—Saturday, February 23: Hellogoodbye. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Wednesday, February 6: Open Jam Night with The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 8 p.m. —Thursday, February 7: The Lounge Trio at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, February 8: Ginger and the Hoosier Daddies (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, February 9: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats (jump blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, February 10: Soul Destination. 7 p.m. —Tuesday, February 12: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Wednesday, February 6: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. Joe Atman performs at 9:30 p.m. —Thursday, February 7: Baldy Mountain Jazz Band (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, February 8: The Black Tongued Bells (roots rock/blues). 10 p.m. —Saturday, February 9: “Solid” Ray Woods Soul Revue (soul). 10 p.m. —Sunday, February 10: Sunday Night Living Room Jam at 9 p.m. —Tuesday, February 12: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke,” rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Life of Pi [PG], The Impossible [PG13], Quartet [PG13], Stand Up Guys [R], Argo [R]. —Sunday, February 10: La Scala’s Don Carlo [NR] opera. 10 a.m. —Tuesday, February 12: La Scala’s Don Carlo [NR] opera. 7:30 p.m.

GOURMET GUIDE

Philosopher Dallas Willard to Deliver Lecture on "What Skepticism is Good For" at Pomona College

OUR TOWN

N

oted Christian philosopher Dallas Willard will present a talk titled “What Skepticism is Good For” on Tuesday, February 12 at 7 p.m. at Pomona College (Edmunds Ballroom, Smith Campus Center, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont). This event is free and open to the public.

Mr. Willard, who teaches at the University of Southern California, will explore both the usefulness and limitations of doubt, examining the need for healthy skepticism in our society—especially with regards to issues of faith. He will discuss how a skeptic has a moral responsibility to examine why they are skeptical, not falling into the “fad” of disbelief without reason. His most recent book is Knowing Christ Today: Why We Can Trust Spiritual Knowledge (2009), of which Publishers Weekly said, “In prose that is both

decisive and austere, Willard throws down the gauntlet to those in both the secular and religious realms who claim it is impossible to know Christian truths.” His other works include The Great Omission: Rediscovering Jesus’ Essential Teachings (2006), which received a Christianity Today book award in the Christian living category; Renovation of the Heart: Putting on the Character of Christ (2002), which received Christianity Today's 2003 award in the category of spirituality; and The Divine Conspiracy: Rediscovering Our Hidden Life in God (1998), which was named Christianity Today's 1999 Book of the Year. Mr. Willard’s research and publication interests are in religion, epistemology, the philosophy of mind and logic, and the philosophy of Edmund Husserl. For more information, contact rms32011@my mail.pomona.edu or drn02009@mymail.pomona.edu. This lecture is sponsored by The Veritas Forum (www.veritas.org), which presents college and university events meant to “engage students and faculty in discussions about life's hardest questions and the relevance of Jesus Christ to all of life.” The Veritas Forum partners with more than 60 leading colleges and universities across North America and Europe.

For rates in the Gourmet Guide: CALL MARY TODAY. 621-4761

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S. No. 1232780-JP-CA YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 05/11/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, (cashier's check(s) must be made payable to National Default Servicing Corporation), drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state; will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made in an "as is" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: STANLEY P. JOHNSTON AND TAWNI J. JOHNSTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Duly Appointed Trustee: NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION Recorded 05/17/2007 as Instrument No. 20071201955 (or Book, Page) and Re-Recorded on 11/14/2008 as Instrument No. 20082006967 (or Book, Page) for the reason of 'MODIFY TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE DOT' of the Official Records of LOS ANGELES County, California. Date of Sale: 02/19/2013 at 11:00 a.m. Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $706,219.91 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 370 GUILFORD AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8316-005-053 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The undersigned mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent for the mortgagee or beneficiary pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.5(b) declares that the mortgagee, beneficiary or the mortgagee's or beneficiary's authorized agent has either contacted the borrower or tried with due diligence to contact the borrower as required by California Civil Code 2923.5. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-7302727 or visit this Internet Web site www.ndscorp.com/sales, using the file number assigned to this case 12-32780-JP-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 01/25/2013 NATIONAL DEFAULT SERVICING CORPORATION 7720 N. 16th Street, Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85020 phone 602-264-6101 Sales Line 714-730-2727; Sales Website: www.ndscorp.com/sales Nichole Alford, TRUSTEE SALES REPRESENTATIVE A-4353683 01/30/2013, 02/06/2013, 02/13/2013

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2012 255083 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, 500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Wheeler-Steffen Real Estate, Inc., 500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Paul Steffen Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/26/12. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2013. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 11-0134662 Title Order No. 11-0114206 APN No. 8302-029-025 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 10/16/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by DWIGHT LEWIS, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, dated 10/16/2006 and recorded 10/30/2006, as Instrument No. 06 2398365, in Book , Page , of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 02/27/2013 at 1:00PM, At the Pomona Valley Masonic Temple Building, located at 395 South Thomas Street, Pomona, California at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1446 TURNING BEND DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CA, 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $595,342.53. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state.Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder’s Office. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case 11-0134662. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.153167 2/06, 2/13, 2/20/2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 135265940 APN: 8709-083-012 TRA: LOAN NO: Xxxxxx9367 REF: Huang, Edward C IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED March 23, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 26, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded March 29, 2007, as Inst. No. 20070735461 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Edward C. Huang and Kofen Shyr, Husband And Wife As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 795 Silver Valley Trail Walnut CA 91789-2039 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $676,045.06. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1352659-40. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: February 04, 2012. (R425021 02/06/13, 02/13/13, 02/20/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2012 254074 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as APEX IMAGING SERVICES, 720 Indigo Ct., Pomona, CA 91767-2262. HUGHES-NELSON PAINTING, INC, 720 Indigo Ct., Pomona, CA 91767-2262. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/01/2003. /s/ Kathleen J. Hargrave Title: President/Secretary This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 12/24/12. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 23, 30, February 6 and 13, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Wednesday, February 6, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S No. 1369326-31 APN: 8709-067-005 TRA: 8564 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx5036 REF: Williams, Theodore IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, Dated: June 08, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 26, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded June 25, 2007, as Inst. No. 20071517049, in book XX, page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Theodore Williams and Colleen T. Williams, husband and wife, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a State or National Bank, a check drawn by a State or Federal Credit Union, or a check drawn by a State or Federal Savings and Loan Association, Savings Association, or Savings Bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 851 Rainwater Court, Walnut, CA 91789-1426. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the Trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $726,489.14. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a Court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1369326-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information: (619)5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: January 28, 2013. (02/06/2013, 02/13, 02/20) R-425303 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 006434 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as The Colony at Loft 204, 532 W. First St., Unit 204, Claremont, CA 91711. Jenelle Rensch, 532 W. First St., Unit 204, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/04/13. /s/ Jenelle Rensch This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/10/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: January 16, 23, 30 and February 6, 2013.

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Title No.: 7013803 APN: 8313-010-060 T.S. No.: 12-12198 Reference: 475384 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER DELINQUENT ASSESSMENT LIEN YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A NOTICE OF DELINQUENT ASSESSMENT DATED 3/23/2010. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/20/2013 at 10:30 AM, Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services, Corp. as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Delinquent Assessment Lien, recorded on 4/1/2010 as Document No. 20100443810 , and rerecorded on 08/13/2012 as instrument #20121198478 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, property owned by: Sheila P. Walker WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States, by cash, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business In this state.) At: AT THE FRONT STEPS OF BUILDING LOCATED AT 17305 GILMORE STREET, VAN NUYS, CA all right, title and interest under said Delinquent Assessment Lien in the property situated in said County, describing the land therein: ‘UNIT 143 OF A PORTION OF LOT 1 OF TRACT 53807, AS SHOWN ON A MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1330, PAGES 22 TO 25, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS’ The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 602 Asbury Drive, Claremont, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, If any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, “AS-IS” and “WITH ALL FAULTS” and that no representations or warranties are made as to the legal title, possession, legal condition, location, dimensions of land, boundary lines, legality of boundary line adjustments, compliance with or violations of the subdivision map act, or any other law, rules or regulations concerning the legality of the property or as described, or encumbrances existing or regarding the physical condition of the property, to pay the remaining principal sum due under said Notice of Delinquent Assessment and Claim of Lien, with interest thereon, as provided in said notice, advances, if any, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee, to-wit: $19,030.16 Estimated Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. This sale shall be subject to a right of redemption. The redemption period within which this property interest may be redeemed ends 90 days after the date of the sale. The claimant under said Delinquent Assessment Lien heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded In the county where the real property Is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services, as Trustee or Agent to Trustee is a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information received will be used for that purpose. EPP 8161 1/30, 2/6, 2/13/2013. Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services, Corp., as Trustee By: _______________________________________ Barbara MacKenzie Best Alliance Foreclosure and Lien Services 16133 Ventura Blvd., Suite 700, Encino, CA 91436 (888) 785-9721 OFFICE VISITS ARE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, NO WALK INS CAN BE ACCOMMODATED. PLEASE CALL FIRST. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CHARLES O. ODOM, Deceased CASE NO. KP 015100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of CHARLES O. ODOM A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by CHARLES W. ODOM in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that CHARLES W. ODOM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: February 21, 2013, at Time: 8:30 A.M. in Dept. A located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Pomona South IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Christopher T. Coffin SBN#60826 Attorney At Law 2208 Calle Margarita, San Dimas, CA 91773 Phone# 909-592-0305 Publish: January 26, February 2 and 6, 2013 CLAREMONT COURIER

909.621.4761
Wednesday 02-06-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

20

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals..............20 employment....20 services...........21 real estate.......24
RENTALS
Condo for Rent
VILLAGE Walk condo. Steps to Village attractions. Three bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, pool, Jacuzzi, BBQ. Includes refrigerator, washer, dryer, 2 car garage. $2500 monthly. Call Linda Howell at 720-0634. CLAREMONT Club prime location! Two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage. $1900 monthly, includes refrigerator, washer, dryer. No pets, smoking. 239-1868.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ADMINISTRATIVE Assistant for fast paced office. Felxible/part-time. Bring resume and complete application, 419 Yale Ave.

MARKETPLACE
For Sale
BEAUTIFUL shabby chic back of sofa or buffet table. Oval top and intricate scrolling. $280. 518-6097.

EMPLOYMENT
It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Rancho Mirage
In the gated community of "The Springs" Main entrance is off Bob Hope Drive across the street from the Eisenhower Hospital

BULLETINS
Hotlines
PROJECT Sister Sexual Assault Crisis Prevention Services. If you have been sexually assaulted or victimized by child sexual abuse and need help for yourself or your children, call the 24 hotline 626-HELP (4357). NAMI HELPLINE National Alliance on Mental Illness, Pomona Valley Chapter, provides information and referral in a supportive spirit. Call any day or time. 399-0305. HOUSE of Ruth Domestic Violence Services. If you have been abused or beaten by your intimate partner and need help for yourself or your children, please call; 24 hour hotline 988-5559.

ANIMALS
Animal Shelters
Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E Upland 1-800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

February 8-10 Friday, Saturday and Sunday 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Daily
VERY VERY IMPORTANT: You must use the name of Dick Wilmington at the gate for entrance. We have permission from security for the sale but you must use the estate name Wilmington. Not mine. Address: 2 Columbia Drive, Rancho Mirage, CA 92270 Home is full of beautiful furnishing, antiques, fine art, oil paintings, European etchings, lovely decor/accessories, lighting, stunning iron bedsteads, patio furnishings, Rookwood pottery, plants, circa 1830 Japanese woodblock prints, fine jewelry, antique reverse painted clock, art books, antique and vintage Chinese decorative accessories, transfer-ware, flat screen televisions, bikes, china, crystal and linens. Absolutely lovely throughout. So worth the drive. For more pictures go to: http://www.estatesales.net/estate-sales/389331.aspx

House for Rent
CLAREMONT: 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large fenced yard and A/C. Yankton Ave. $1950 monthly. 399-3331. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin at 714-402-0034. NORTH Foothill 3 bedroom, 1.75 bathroom. Pool, A/C, fenced yard. No pets, smoking. $2000 plus deposit. Agent 909-624-5662.

Coyote Sightings
REPORT your coyote sightings! Contact Jessica at 6214761 or classified@clarem ont-courier.com.

Executive Assistant

Room for Rent
QUIET person needed to share large 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo in the Claremont Club area. Bedroom has attached bathroom. $675 monthly. Call 621-9572. Mansion in Upland. $550 monthly, utilities included. Furnished large room for responsible non-smoker. Female preferred. 559-5874.

MARKETPLACE
Advertise
SELLING, Buying or Renting? Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

Let us know when you move.
Call the COURIER at 621-4761 to update your mailing info.

Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. Kensoldenoddities.com. La Verne. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

Full-time opportunity to provide support services and leadership for the office of the President/CEO, the executive team and the Board of Directors. Requires strong organizational and written communication skills, experience with computerized systems such as Word, spreadsheet applications and constant contact. Prefer AA or BA degree. Generous benefits effective first of month following hire. Apply in person M-F, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. or mail/fax/email resume to: PILGRIM PLACE IN CLAREMONT 625 Mayflower Road, Claremont, CA 91711 Fax 909-399-5554 mmacias@pilgrimplace.org EOE-M/F Employer

Townhome for Rent
BOARDWALK Townhouses. 2 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, 1200 sq.ft. Washer, dryer, gas fireplace. No pets. Gated community with pool. 605 Colby Circle, Claremont. $1595. 964-5954.

Triplex for Rent
CLAREMONT: Single story triplex. One bedroom, one bathroom with garage. Washer and dryer hookups. Water, trash and gardener included. No pets, smoking. $995 monthly. 624-3756.

Garage Sales
MOVING Sale: Furniture, holiday decor, linens, housewares and more. 624 Pomello Drive, Claremont. Saturday, February 9, 8 a.m. to 1 a.m.

Don’t leave us in the dark!

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.

DEADLINES
Classified: Monday & Thursday by 3:00 pm Real Estate: Wednesday by 3:00 pm Service Pages: Monday by 3:00 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $12 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing. All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Wednesday 02-06-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

21

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128. PRIVATE duty care provider with 6 years experience, specializing in elderly care. Current CPR, TB test. For a free assessment contact: Wendi Griffin, 909-4372298. Bond#71294838.

Contractor
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

Electrician

Gardening

Handyman

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

Aikido

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook! WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616. REMODELS, additions, restoration projects. Claremont Construction Company A locally owned, full-service building contractor. We also do repairs and small jobs. Ask about our handyman services. Please call for a free estimate. Darrell, 909-626-0028. Fully insured. 20 year Claremont resident. Lic.751929

Carpet Service
Programs for adults and children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875. ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583. EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

ALL your home remodeling and repair needs. Quality work for unbeatable pricing. 909-912-5983.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

AC/Heating

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606 Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Hayden’s Services Inc.

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162.

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Childcare
AFFORDABLE childcare. Families with multiple children welcome. Large Claremont home. Miss Carmen, 909621-3108 or 909-367-3560.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com. Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-241-7671, 909-9498230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360. Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691 SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

909-621-5388

SERVICES
Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Wednesday 02-06-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

22

Landscaping

Painting
COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Plumbing
Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tutoring
HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Landscaping
GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-9821604.

Please call 909-989-9786.

Upholstery

Learn Japanese

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 CHARLES' Landscape. 30 years experience. Drought tolerant design. 909-217-9722. TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066. AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com. Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Weed Abatement
TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

Lic.839835 BEAVERS PLUMBING Drain work starting at $50, repairs and remodels. Water heater special, 40 gallon installed for $835. Free estimates! Senior discount always. 909-626-0028 Lic.711770

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691

Tile

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

Pet Sitting
PET SITTER/DOG WALKER
Reliable, friendly, knowledgeable. Local references available.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995 STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
JOHNNYS Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275.

AMANDA, 818-219-3268
CLAREMONT Village Pet & House Sitting Service. Sabbatical special! Lisa and Brenda, claremontpets@hotmail.com or 909-518-0600.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960.

KPW PAINTING
SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont. Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Pilates

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515. DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

Yoga

YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Remodeling
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994.

909.621.4761
Wednesday 02-06-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

23

SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?
Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626
LANDSCAPING SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

Free E-Waste drop-off facility!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786

909.621.4761
Wednesday 02-06-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

24

REAL ESTATE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Sellers: “I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home.”

BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF HAMILL
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!”

D.R.E. #00997900

Call TODAY for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

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Let us know when you move.
Donʼt miss a moment of superlative community coverage from the Claremont COURIER.

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