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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Design: Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems

April 2009

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 1 2
Executive Summary Codes and Standards/References 1.1 Codes and Standards 1.2 References Definitions 2.1 Laboratory 2.2 Chemical Fume Hood 2.3 Cryogen Ventilation 3.1 General Laboratory 3.2 Animal Satellites Fume Hood Exhaust System (FHES) Design Criteria 4.1 Exhausting 4.2 Components 4.3 Regulatory 4.4 Site Conditions Commissioning Identification and Labeling 6.1 Ductwork 6.2 Exhaust Fan Assembly 6.3 Radioactive Material 6.4 Power/Circuit Breaker Switch 6.5 Sash Window Position 6.6 Label Colors 6.7 Hood Operating Instructions Criteria for Perchloric Acid Fume Hoods 7.1 Special Hazard 7.2 Hood Designation 7.3 Exhaust Requirements 7.4 Exhaust Scrubbers 7.5 Wash Down Facilities 7.6 User Controls 7.7 Wash Down Frequency 7.8 Non-Corrosive Materials 7.9 Commissioning

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 8
Criteria for Radioactive Fume Hoods 8.1 High Volatility 8.2 Medium Volatility 8.3 Low Volatility 8.4 General Requirements Appendices 9.1 Appendix II Distance Recommendations for the Installation of Fume Hoods in a Laboratory 9.2 Appendix II Members of the LDWG

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems Executive Summary
The purpose of laboratory ventilation is to help provide a safe environment for scientific research and teaching. Outlined below are guidelines by which a design team, using a combination of general laboratory ventilation, fume hood exhaust systems and other local exhaust ventilation, will design a safe and energy efficient system to contain emissions within the laboratory, depending on the specific needs of the laboratory. This document provides minimum requirements; more stringent requirements may be necessary depending on the specific laboratory function or contaminants generated. The University is one of the founding members of the PlaNYC Mayoral challenge committing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30% by the year 2017. All laboratory designs shall consider energy efficient measures to achieve this goal. These Guidelines were formulated as a consensus document among all members of the Laboratory Design Working Group (listed in Appendix I). All laboratory design teams shall consult with Environmental Health &Safety (EH&S), Facilities Operations (Facilities) and Office of Environmental Stewardship (OES) during the schematic design phase. These offices shall be involved throughout the design process so as to ensure that University safety and energy efficiency goals and commitments are met in a timely and cost-effective manner. The guidelines shall be reviewed to incorporate regulatory changes, industry developments and best practices on a regular basis.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 1 Codes and Standards/References
1.1

Codes and Standards

The HVAC systems will be designed in accordance with the following codes and standards, latest edition: Building Code of the City of New York (BCCNY) New York City Fire Prevention Code (NYFPC) New York City Rules and Regulations (NYCRR) ASHRAE HVAC Applications, Chapter 14, Laboratories ASHRAE 62.1, 2004, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality ASHRAE 90.1, 2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (ECCCNYS), 2002 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), latest edition

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References

ACGIH: Industrial Ventilation: A Manual of Recommended Practices, 25th Edition, Cincinnati, OH. American Conference of Government and Governmental Industrial hygienists, 2004. ANSI/AIHA Z9.5 2003: Laboratory Ventilation, Fairfax, VA. American Industrial Hygiene Association. 2003. ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995: Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods. Atlanta, GA. American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. 1995. NFPA 45-2000: Standard of Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals. Quincy, MA: National Fire Protection Association, 2000. RCNY 10-2008: Section FC 2706 Non-Production Chemical Laboratories. NYC FDNY Fire Code, New York, NY 2008. EH&S (www.ehs.columbia.edu) for additional Health and Safety Policies and Procedures. Facilities (www.facilities.columbia.edu) for Service Requests and Mechanical Engineering (ME) Design Guideline. Environmental Stewardship (www.environment.columbia.edu) for Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Reduction Policies and Initiatives.
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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
National Research Council 1996: Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Washington, DC. http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=5140

Definitions 2.1 Laboratory

Laboratory means a facility where the "laboratory use of hazardous chemicals occurs. It is a workplace where relatively small quantities of hazardous chemicals are used on a non-production basis [OSHA 1910.1450(B)].

2.2

Chemical Fume Hoods

Chemical Fume Hoods - means a device located in a laboratory, enclosed on five sides with a movable sash or fixed partially enclosed on the remaining side; constructed and maintained to draw air form the laboratory and to prevent or minimize the escape of air contaminants into the laboratory; and allows chemical manipulations to be conducted in the enclosure without insertion of any portion of the workers body other than hands and arms. The purpose of a chemical fume hood is to contain airborne substances, to prevent them from entering the breathing zone of laboratory workers and occupants and to trap or exhaust the airborne substances without increasing the risk to the user, occupants of the area, or the environment. The hood should be designed to incorporate user needs, room configuration and general ventilation and must have adequate space for hood service and utility connections.

2.3

Cryogen

Cryogenic Container - A pressure container, low-pressure container or atmospheric container of any size designed or used for the transportation, handling or storage of a cryogenic fluid, and which utilizes venting, insulation, refrigeration or a combination thereof to maintain the pressure within design parameters for such container and to keep the contents in a liquid state. Cryogenic Fluid - A fluid having a boiling point lower than -130 F (-89.9 C) at 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) (an absolute pressure of 101.3 kPa). Cryogen -A super-cooled substance (usually liquid) used to cool other materials to extremely low temperatures

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 3 Ventilation 3.1
3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 General Laboratory All laboratories shall have mechanical ventilation. All laboratory rooms shall use 100% outside air and exhaust to the outside. Laboratory ventilation systems shall be designed to operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week with a minimum of eight (8) air changes per hour (ACH). Laboratory ventilation systems (not storing cryogenics) are encouraged to operate at less than eight (8) ACH to conserve energy and to reduce the Universitys carbon footprint provided this complies with local, state and federal codes and the laboratory can be demonstrated safe through EH&S risk assessment, which may necessitate engineering analysis/modeling and/or continuous monitoring. 3.1.4.1 In NYC, laboratory ventilation (not storing cryogenics), may operate at six (6) ACH as deemed safe per 3.1.4. 3.1.5 3.1.6 3.1.7 3.1.8 3.1.9 Locate supply and exhaust for good mixing and temperature control. Provide excess capacity for equipment aging and future expansion. Design for noise levels in the laboratories must not exceed ASHRAE guidelines. Do not provide operable windows. Direct airflow from low hazard to high hazard areas.

3.1.4

3.1.10 Design to maintain negative pressure relative to adjacent non-lab areas. 3.1.11 Provide adequate makeup air (90% of the exhaust). 3.1.12 Locate casework and equipment so as not to interfere with ventilation. 3.1.13 Do not line duct with insulation or acoustic treatment.

3.2
3.2.1

Animal Satellites Animal Satellite Facilities are research laboratories that have been approved for the housing of research animals for 24-hours or more by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Animal Satellite Facilities must be provided with 10-15 ACH.

3.2.2

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 4 Fume Hood Exhaust System (FHES) Design Criteria
4.1 4.1.1 Exhausting FDNY Code requires a face velocity of 80-120 linear feet per minute (lfpm) across the vertical plane of the sash face when the sash face opening is 12 inches high. Hood face velocities can be reduced to a minimum of 60 lfpm at a sash height greater than 12 inches provided the follow three requirements are satisfied: 4.1.2.1 4.1.2.2 The hood is recognized by Columbia University as a low flow type. The hood passes both a factory and a field ASHRAE 110 test. (Note the factory test can be a representative sample of a particular size and model of hood. The field installed test must be for each hood.). Mechanical sash height constraints or stops shall be provided at the 60 lfpm face velocity sash height.

4.1.2

4.1.2.3 4.1.3 4.1.4

Low flow fume hoods are required unless safety would be compromised. Building precedent shall govern in minor renovations where practical. Constant air volume (CAV) and variable air volume (VAV) systems are acceptable. A life cycle cost analysis shall determine use in new building installations and major renovations. Building precedent shall govern in minor renovations where practical. All hoods shall have a minimum exhaust volume of 25 cfm/ft2 of work surface area through air bypass as per (NFPA 45)4. Fume hood diversity should be applied to FHES (Fume Hood Exhaust System). The value of the diversity should reflect the operations and practices of the particular facility. Manifold fume hood exhaust systems where practical and code permitted, are required unless safety would be compromised. Notable exceptions include where: strong reactive, perchloric acid and volatile radioactive compounds are used which all require dedicated exhaust. For research FHES there shall be no local on/off or high/low control. Ductless hoods are not permitted.

4.1.5 4.1.6

4.1.7

4.1.8 4.1.9

4.1.10 Unless otherwise approved by EH&S/Facilities all fume hoods shall be exhausted with all welded 316L stainless steel duct risers, minimum 20 gauge. (FDNY Code does not permit ducts constructed of combustible materials.)
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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
4.2 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 Components Under hood storage units shall comply with NYC Fire Code. Lighting devices in the interior of the hood must meet all applicable codes. No cup sinks are allowed unless need is demonstrated by the Principle Investigator (P.I.) in consultation with EH&S. Where a cup sink is deemed necessary, it shall have a lip above the fume hood work surface per FDNY code requirements. Hood baffles must be tamper proof and configured in such a way that they may not be adjusted to restrict the volume flow rate of air exhausted from the hood. Controls for laboratory hood services (gas, water, air, lighting, power, etc.) must be mounted exterior to the hood and within easy reach. They should be labeled clearly with standardized labels. Exhaust fans must meet the fire, explosion and corrosion resistant requirements set forth in local codes and standards. The rotating element of the fan must be of nonferrous or spark resistant construction. Motors and their controls shall be located outside of the air stream. All internal and working surfaces of the hood and the exhaust ducts should be impervious to moisture and attack of chemicals used in the hoods and be configured for easy cleaning. The exhaust fan should be mounted as close to the discharge point of the duct as possible (preferably outside the building envelope) so that a negative pressure with respect to the ambient is maintained within the duct at all points along the duct run.

4.2.4

4.2.5

4.2.6

4.2.7

4.2.8

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
4.3 4.3.1 Regulatory The respective Radiation Safety Office should be consulted to evaluate the need and type of filter where special radioactive materials are considered to be used. Dedicated FHES are required for such hoods when radioactive materials are planned to be used in a fume hood. (Pending clarification from FDNY JM/GH). Plans for exhaust ductwork must be approved by the NYC Building Department prior to installation of the ductwork.

4.3.2

4.3.3

4.4 4.4.1

Site Conditions The discharge of FHES into the atmosphere shall be engineered in a manner that prevents re entrainment of the exhaust stream back into the building or surrounding buildings. Where this is a cause for concern, a CFD computer model, wind wake analysis or a physical model with wind tunnel shall demonstrate acceptable exhaust stream dilution rates. These analyses should include the potential of additional hoods being added to the point of discharge at a future date. In locations where residential, university housing or noise sensitive adjacencies are a concern, an acoustic study should be performed in coordination with the exhaust stream dilution analysis. Under no circumstances shall a lab discharge be less than 10 feet above the surface of the roof.

4.4.2

4.4.3 4.4.4

4.4.5

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 5 Commissioning
5.1 5.1.1 Requirements Each hood installation must be inspected and tested in accordance with ASHRAE 110 for proper operation and airflow conditions prior to acceptance of the work by the University. This applies to new installations, and alterations or additions to existing systems.

5.1.2 Provide information on instrumentation including calibration dates and results. 5.1.3 Provide test results, to both EH&S and Facilities, once above criteria are met. 5.1.4 After review of test results, EH&S will certify the hood to confirm adequate performance, label it appropriately, and approve for use. 5.1.5 EH&S shall certify chemical fume hoods annually in accordance with the CU fume hood policy (www.ehs.columbia.edu/fhPolicy.html). 5.1.6 The Radiation Safety Office shall certify chemical fume hoods used for radioactive materials at CUMC annually in accordance with the CU fume hood policy.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 6 Identification and Labeling
6.1 Ductwork Label clearly the ductwork at each access point. The label should state the location of the hood and warning statement. Example of Wording: CAUTION THIS DUCT IS CONNECTED TO THE CHEMICAL FUME HOOD IN ROOM 123. DO NOT OPEN UNTIL THE LABORATORY SUPERVISOR OR AN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER HAS BEEN NOTIFIED. CONTACT EH&S (CUMC 212-305-6780, MORNINGSIDE 212-8548749) FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION OR IN AN EMERGENCY. 6.2 Exhaust Fan Assembly

The exhaust fan assembly should be clearly marked with a caution statement indicating the location of the hood and the power switch (es). Example of wording: CAUTION THIS FAN ASSEMBLY IS ATTACHED TO THE CHEMICAL FUMEHOOD IN ROOM 123. THE DISCONNECT IS LOCATED IN ROOM 456. DO NOT WORK ON OR TURN OFF UNIT UNTIL THE LABORATORY SUPERVISOR OR AN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER HAS BEEN NOTIFIED. CONTACT EH&S (CUMC 212-305-6780, Morningside 212-854-8749, Lamont 845-365-8860) FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION OR IN AN EMERGENCY. An indication of the proper direction of rotation should be affixed to fan assembly.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
6.3 Radioactive Material

If radioactive materials are to be used in the hood, an additional label must be placed next to the labels specified in items 1 and 2. The label must contain the radiation caution symbol and the following information: CAUTION RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS MAY BE USED IN THIS HOOD. CONTACT THE RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE (CUMC 212-305-0303, Morningside 212-854-8749, or Lamont 845-365-8860) BEFORE WORK IS PERFORMED ON THIS EQUIPMENT. 6.4 Power/Circuit Breaker Switch

Each electrical power/circuit breaker switch should be labeled with a Caution label indicating the location of the Hood and a warning. Example: Fume Hood/Room 123 CAUTION DO NOT TURN OFF UNTIL LAB SUPERVISOR OR EH&S (CUMC 212-305-6780, Morningside 212-854-8749, or Lamont 845-365-8860) HAS BEEN NOTIFIED. 6.5 Sash Window Position

A sticker indicating the proper sash window position/height to provide adequate air flow speed should be affixed to each hood. 6.6 Label Colors

LABEL COLORS: The labels for items 1-2 must have bright yellow background with wording in a color of high contrast (black). The radiation symbol of item 3 must be magenta or purple.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
6.7 Hood Operating Instructions

A Hood Operating Instructions label should be affixed conspicuously on each hood.

HOOD OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS


This hood is the primary safety device for containing and exhausting hazardous materials and should be used for any operation that may result in exposure to such materials. The following rules must be observed so that air currents are not disturbed and containment is maintained: 1. Work with hood sash as low as possible. Use the sash height indicator as guide. 2. Keep objects at least 10 cm behind the plane of the sash and at least 10 cm from the rear air slots. Do not block the slots. 3. Keep the amount of equipment and containers in the hood to a minimum. 4. Raise large equipment on stand to allow for unimpeded air flow across the surface. 5. Do not store chemicals permanently in hood. 6. Do not turn off the exhaust system. 7. Do not install portable air movement devices near hood that could affect hood performance. 8. Do not use hood to dispose of hazardous materials through evaporation. 9. Notify Facilities (212-305-HELP at CUMC, or 212-854-2222 at Morningside, or 845-365-8600 at Lamont) of any malfunction. 10. Consult EH&S website (www.ehs.columbia.edu) for other information. DO NOT USE, BOIL OFF OR EVAPORATE PERCHLORIC ACID IN THIS HOOD.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 7 Criteria for Perchloric Acid Fume Hoods
7.1 Special Hazard An additional label shall be provided for ductwork at each access point. The label should state a warning such as follows: WARNING THIS DUCT IS CONNECTED TO A PERCHLORIC ACID FUME HOOD AND MAY CONTAIN EXPLOSIVE SHOCK SENSITIVE CRYSTALS. DO NOT OPEN UNTIL THE DUCTWORK HAS BEEN WASHED DOWN. CONTACT EH&S (CUMC 212-305-6780, Morningside 212-854-8749) FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION OR IN AN EMERGENCY. 7.2 Hood Designation

Perchloric Acid (HClO4) may only be used in fume hoods designated and designed for its use. The hood must be clearly labeled as a PERCHLORIC ACID FUME HOOD. Where confusion is possible, other hoods shall be labeled NO PERCHLORIC ACID in 2 tall black letters on a yellow background. 7.3 7.3.1 7.3.2 Exhaust Requirements Each hood installation must have a dedicated exhaust stack and fan equipped with its own wash down system and fan on/off control. Perchloric Acid Fume Hood (PAFH) exhaust may not be connected to a non-PAFH exhaust system for energy recovery or other convenience.

7.3.3 To mitigate risk and cost associated with the PAFH exhaust system, it is recommended that PAFH be installed on the top floor of laboratory buildings. 7.3.4 Bends in ductwork should be avoided, but where necessary pairs of 45 degree bends will be used in lieu of 90 degree bends. Round ductwork is recommended. 7.3.5 Since the user will have on/off control of the PAFH exhaust fan, air flow exhausted through the PAFH must not be used by designers to satisfy the required laboratory ventilation rate (air changes per hour.) It is recommended that a separate general lab exhaust be provided with a motorized VAV damper interlocked to the PAFH exhaust fan control to reduce the general exhaust while the fume hood is in operation. 7.3.6 The user should turn off the PAFH exhaust fan when the fume hood is not in use to conserve energy.
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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
7.4 Exhaust Scrubbers

Exhaust scrubbers are difficult to monitor and maintain, and are not recommended for new installations. A thorough evaluation of more reliable alternatives must be presented before a retrofit to an existing laboratory of a PAFH equipped with a scrubber will be approved. 7.5 7.5.1 7.5.2 Wash Down Facilities Each PAFH must be provided with a laboratory waste (acid) drain and a cold water supply. The PAFH exhaust stack, fan, and internal hood baffles must be provided with cold water spray nozzles activated by a series of electric solenoids controlled by a wash down timer control system.

7.5.3 When wash down is initiated, the fan will shut down, and the water spray solenoids will activate sequentially starting at the very top of the exhaust stack and completing below the stack washing down the internal baffles of the fume hood. All wash down water will be collected by the laboratory waste drain provided. 7.5.4 The PAFH user who initiated the wash down and is familiar with the normal operation of the control system will remain present in the lab during wash down to report a malfunction or leak to Facilities. 7.5.5 The PAFH user must wash all surfaces of the interior work space of the hood to complete the wash down. It is recommended that a hand held spray nozzle capable of flowing 1 to 2 gpm and drain be provided within the workspace to facilitate this operation. 7.6 7.6.1 7.6.2 User Controls Complete automation (remote or BMS control) of the wash down facilities must not be provided. The PAFH user must clear all apparatus and chemicals from the hood prior to initiating a wash down to avoid damaging equipment or causing spills and/or injury.

7.6.3 The PAFH user must be trained in the safe operation and maintenance of the fume hood and the handling of Perchloric Acid. The users safety is best assured by his or her knowledge and control of the work space.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
7.7 7.7.1 Wash Down Frequency Occasional or Intermittent Use: The user shall perform a wash down at the conclusion of the experiment prior to turning the fume hood over to another user or leaving the hood unused. Continuous Use: Once per month continuous use operations shall be interrupted and a responsible user shall perform a wash down.

7.7.2

7.7.3 Maintenance Activity: Facilities personnel shall perform a wash down prior to commencing any maintenance activity on the fume hood, fan, drain, or exhaust stack. When maintenance personnel are unfamiliar with the wash down procedure, they will enlist the aid of experienced laboratory personnel prior to lock out/tag out of the fan. 7.8 Non-Corrosive Materials

The use of non-corrosive, smooth and water tight materials is required for all components involved in the construction of the hood, exhaust stack, drain, water supply and fan. Compatible plastic materials are ideally suited, but likely to require a variance in NYC for ductwork. Welded stainless steel is an alternative where plastic may not be used. 7.9 Commissioning

Application of a water soluble dye and camera inspection are recommended for commissioning the PAFH wash down facilities. Wash down timers should be field adjusted to achieve satisfactory cleaning with minimal wasted water. Additional spray nozzles are likely to be required where bends are made in ductwork.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems 8 Criteria for Radioactive Fume Hoods
Radioactive Materials, as far as fume hoods are concerned can be divided into three categories: High, Medium, and Low Volatility. 8.1 High Volatility For example: radioactive iodine (I-125; I-131) The use of fume hoods in these cases is mandatory. The exhaust of fume hoods, used for iodination, must be vented directly to the roof of the building. Activated Charcoal filters are optional depending on the amount and frequency of the iodine used. 8.2 Medium Volatility For example: 5 millicuries or more of Sulfer-35 in the form of Methionine or Cystien; 100 millicuries or more of Hydrogen-3 in the form of Tritiated Water The use of fume hoods in these cases is recommended and is decided by the Radiation Safety Committee and the Radiation Safety Officer (RSO). 8.3 Low Volatility For example: Phosphorus-32 compounds No fume hood is required unless the amount of activity is 1 millicuries or more. Note: When working with an unsealed alpha emitter radioactive material such as Polonium-210, a glove box with HEPA filtered exhaust must be used. The RSO must be consulted before the use of such an apparatus.

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
8.4 General Requirements

8.4.1 Laboratory hoods in which radioactive materials are handled must be labeled with the radiation hazard symbol. 8.4.2 Fume hoods intended for use with radioactive materials must be constructed of stainless steel or other materials that will not be corroded by chemicals used in the hood. 8.4.3 The cabinet on which the hood is installed must be adequate to support shielding of the radioactive material being used. 8.4.4 8.4.5 8.4.6 The air velocity at the hood opening follows the ANSI standards. Laboratory hoods must be provided with means of containing minor spills. Liquid radioactive waste with high activity must be stored inside a fume hood with adequate shielding

Appendices
9.1 Appendix I Distance Recommendations for the Installation of Fume Hoods in a Laboratory Architectural Feature Min Distance from Hood Face (feet) 3.3 4.9 9.8 6.6 1 1 Reference

Common Pedestrian Walkway Opposite Bench Used by Chemist Opposite Hood Used by Chemist Opposing Wall Adjoining Wall Non Egress Doorway

1 2 2 2 2 2

1. British Standards Institute 2. Ventilation Control for the Work Environment by William Burges, Harvard University Press, MJ Ellenbacker, University of Massachusetts, MA

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GUIDELINES for Laboratory Ventilation and Fume Hood Exhaust Systems
9.2 Appendix II Members of the Laboratory Design Work Group Members of the Laboratory Design Work Group Muhammad Akram, EH&S Gary Brown, Manhattanville David Carlson, CU Facilities Kathleen Collins, EH&S Kathleen Crowley, EH&S Matthew Early, CU Facilities Wil Elmes, Manhattanville George Hamawy, EH&S Radiation Safety Joseph Mannino, Capital Project Management, Morningside Frank Martino, CU Facilities Patrick OReilly, Facilities Management, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Cathy Resler, Environmental Stewardship Paul Rubock, EH&S Ben Suzuki, Capital Project Management, CUMC

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