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EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL CENTRUM OF EXCELLENCE

EOD AND IED TERMINOLOGY DATABASE

TRENN JAN 2012

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abandoned explosive ordnance For the purposes of the Instrument on Explosive Remnants of war, explosive ordnance which has not been used during an armed conflict, that has been left behind or dumped by a party to an armed conflict, and which is no longer under the control of the party that left it behind or dumped it. Abandoned explosive ordnance may or may not have been primed, fused, armed or otherwise prepared for use. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] access lane A marked passage leading through a mined area that has been cleared to provide safe movement to a required point or area. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] accident An unintended event or sequence of events that causes death, injury, environmental or material damage. [AOP-38(5)] Related term: incident access procedure Actions taken to locate precisely and gain access to the Unexploded Explosive Ordnance (UXO)/Improvised Explosive Device (IED). [derived from: A&ER - Ammunition&Explosevies Regulation (GBR)] accessing In explosive ordnance disposal, procedure to safely approach located explosive ordnance. [derived from: AEODP-7; EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] accident involving explosives Any unintentional event, or sequence of events which causes, or has the potential to cause death or injury to people, loss or damage to, equipment, plant or premises. [derived from: JSP 482 - Joint Service Explosives Regulation (GBR) ] acoustic mine A mine with an acoustic circuit which responds to the acoustic field of a ship or sweep. [AAP-6] acoustic circuit A circuit which responds to the acoustic field of a target. Related term: mine. [AAP-6] active infrared (AIR) A sensor that emits an infrared beam to a receiver forming an invisible link that, when broken, acts as a trigger to initiates the IED. These sensors act like an electronic version of the trip wire. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] active mine A mine actuated by the reflection from a target of a signal emitted by the mine. [AAP-6] actuate To operate a firing mechanism by an influence or a series of influences in such a way that all the requirements of the mechanism for firing or for registering a target count is met. [AAP-6] air-borne IED (ABIED) An IED delivered through the air or held aloft by aerodynamic means or buoyancy and/or serves as concealment means for explosives with an initiating device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] airburst An explosion of a bomb or projectile above the surface as distinguished from an explosion on contact with the surface or after penetration. See also type of burst. [AAP-6]

airfield damage repair The range of activities required to restore the operational capability of an airfield after non-nuclear attack. Airfield Damage Repair includes reconnaissance, EOD and restoration of surfaces and services. [derived from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] airfield EOD A set of specialist EOD techniques developed for rapid clearance of aircraft operating areas to enable air operations to recommence as soon as possible following enemy attack. [derived from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] alternative conventional munition disposal techniques Explosive engineering techniques developed to facilitate Conventional Munition Disposal without resorting to high order detonation. [derived from: A&ER - Ammunition&Explosevies Regulation (GBR)] alternating current (AC) Electric current that flows through a circuit in both directions with the change in direction occurring with a well-defined and specified frequency. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] Amendmend Protocol II (AP) Amended Protocol II (APII) to the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons which May be Deemed to be Excessively Injurious or to have Indiscriminate Effects (CCW). It prohibits the use of all undetectable anti-personnel mines and regulates the use of wider categories of mines, booby-traps and other devices. For the purposes of the IMAS, Article 5 lays down requirements for the marking and monitoring of mined areas. Article 9 provides for the recording and use of information on minefields and mined areas. The Technical Annex provides guidelines on, inter alia, the recording of information and international signs for minefields and mined areas. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] ammunition Preferred term: munition. [AAP-6] ammunition and toxic material open space An area especially prepared for storage of explosive ammunition and toxic material. For reporting purposes, it does not include the surrounding area restricted for storage because of safety distance factors. It includes barricades and improvised coverings. [AAP-6] ammunition lot A quantity of homogeneous ammunition, identified by a unique lot number, which is manufactured, assembled or renovated by one producer under uniform conditions and which is expected to function in a uniform manner. [AAP-6] amphibious operation A military operation launched from the sea by a naval and landing force embarked in ships or craft, with the principal purpose of projecting the landing force ashore tactically into an environment ranging from permissive to hostile. Related terms: amphibious assault; amphibious demonstration; amphibious raid; amphibious withdrawal. [AAP-6] antenna mine In naval mine warfare, a contact mine fitted with antennae which, when touched by a steel ship, set up galvanic action to fire the mine. [AAP-6] anti-aircraft IED incidents Primarily intended to damage or destroy aircraft and/or their payload as well as to kill or wound individuals inside the aircraft. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] anti-armour IED incidents Primarily intended to damage or destroy armoured vehicles and/or to kill or wound individuals inside armoured vehicles. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] anti-countermining device A device fitted to a mine, designed to prevent its actuation by a countermeasure. See also anti-disturbance device; anti-handling device. [AOP-19(D)]

anti-disturbance device An internal or external device on a mine arranged to actuate the mine in case of outside disturbance. See also anti-countermining device; anti-handling device. [AOP-19(D)] anti-handling device A device intended to protect a mine and which is part of, linked to, attached to or placed under the mine and which actuates the mine when an attempt is made to tamper with or otherwise intentionally disturb the mine. [AAP-6 ] anti-helicopter mine A mine designed to produce a destructive effect on low flying helicopters. [AOP-19(D)] anti-infrastructure IED incidents Primarily intended to damage or destroy physical infrastructure such as pipelines, communications towers, bridges, buildings, utility lines and/or facilities such as electrical transformers or water pump houses. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] anti-lift device A device designed to actuate a mine if the mine is moved. [AAP-6] antitank mine A mine designed to immobilize or destroy a tank. [AAP-6] Related term: mine anti-personnel IED incidents Primarily intended to kill or wound people. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] anti-personnel mine In land mine warfare, a mine designed to be exploded by the presence, proximity or contact of a person and that will incapacitate, wound or kill one or more persons. Note: Mine designed to be detonated by the presence, proximity or contact of a vehicle, not to a person, and that is equipped with anti-handling devices, are not considered anti-personnel land mines as a result of being so equipped. See also mine. [AOP-19(D)] Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (APMBC) - Ottawa Convention Provides for a complete ban on the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel mines (APMs) and on their destruction. Note: For the purposes of IMAS documents, Article 5 of the APMBC lays down requirements for the destruction of APMs in mined areas. Article 6 details transparency measures required under the Treaty including information on the location of mined or suspected mined areas and measures taken to warn the local population. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: Mine Ban Treaty (MBT ) anti-recovery device In naval mine warfare, any device in a mine designed to prevent an enemy discovering details of the working of the mine mechanism. Also called prevention of stripping equipment. [AAP-6] anti-sweeper mine A mine which is laid or whose mechanism is designed or adjusted with the specific object of damaging mine countermeasures vessels. [AAP-6] anti-vehicle IED incident Primarily intended to damage or destroy vehicles excluding armoured vehicles and/or their cargo as well as to kill or wound individuals inside such vehicles. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] area clearance In land operations, the detection and if found, the identification, marking and neutralization, destruction or removal of mines or other explosive ordnance, improvised explosive devices and booby traps in a defined area to allow a military operation
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to continue with reduced risk. Note: area clearance is normally conducted by military units. [AAP-6 ] Related terms: explosive ordnance; improvised explosive device; proofing. area clearance In naval mine warfare, an operation whose objective is to clear all mines from a defined area. [derived from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] area defence weapon A mine designed to produce a destructive effect to one or more targets in an area around about its position (threedimensional direction). [AAP-19 (C)] area of responsibility (AOR) The geographical area associated with a combatant command within which a geographic combatant commander has authority to plan and conduct operations. [derived from: JP1-02 US DoD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms ] area reduction The process through which the initial area indicated as contaminated (during any information gathering activities or surveys which form part of the GMAA process) is reduced to a smaller area. Note: Area reduction may involve some limited clearance, such as the opening of access routes and the destruction of mines and UXO which represent an immediate and unacceptable risk, but it will mainly be as a consequence of collecting more reliable information on the extent of the hazardous area. Usually it will be appropriate to mark the remaining hazardous area(s) with permanent or temporary marking systems. Note: Likewise, area reduction is sometimes done as part of the clearance operation. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] armed mine A mine from which all safety devices have been withdrawn and, after laying, all automatic safety features and/or arming delay devices have operated. Such a mine is ready to be actuated after receipt of a target signal, influence or contact. [AAP-6] Related term: mine. arming As applied to explosives, weapons or weapon systems, the changing from a safe to an armed state of readiness. [AAP-6] arming delay device A device fitted to a mine or any autonomous munition designed to prevent it from being armed for a preset time after laying or delivery. [AAP-6] arming devices A device designed to perform the electrical and/or mechanical alignment necessary to permit the initiation of explosive train. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] arming lanyard Preferred term: arming wire. [AAP- 6] arming pin A safety device inserted in a munition, which until its removal, prevents the unintentional action of the arming cycle. Synonym safety pin. Related term: safety device [AAP-6] arming wire A cable, wire or lanyard routed from the aircraft to an expendable aircraft store in order to initiate the arming sequence for the store upon release from the aircraft, when the armed release condition has been selected; it also prevents arming initiation prior to store release and during safe jettison. Synonym arming lanyard. Related term: safety wire. [AAP-6]
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armour piercing Ammunition, bombs, bullets, projectiles, or the like designed to penetrate armour and other resistant targets. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] atomic demolition munitions A nuclear device designed or adapted for use as a demolition munitions. [AAP-6] authorisation The endorsement or empowerment by the chain of command for an individual who is qualified and validated to operate in a specific. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR) ]

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backfire Momentary backward burning of flame into the tip of a torch. Note: Also known as flashback. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] backfire Rearward escapement of gases or cartridge fragments during firing of a gun. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] ballistic missile A missile which does not rely upon aerodynamic surfaces to produce lift and consequently follows a ballistic trajectory when thrust is terminated. [AAP-6] ballistic trajectory The trajectory traced after the propulsive force is terminated and the body is acted upon only by gravity and aerodynamic drag. [AAP-6] ballistics The science or art that deals with the motion, behaviour, appearance, or modification of missiles or other vehicles acted upon by propellants, wind, gravity, temperature, or any other modifying substance, condition, or force. [AAP-6] base fuze Fuze located in the base of a projectile or bomb. [AAP-6] base-ejection shell A type of shell which ejects its load from its base. [AAP-6] battle area clearance (BAC) The systematic and controlled clearance of hazardous areas where the threat is known not to contain mines. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] battle area clearance (BAC) The clearance of land over which battles have been fought. Also called battlefield area clearance. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] binary chemical munitions Munitions in which chemical substances, held in separate containers, react when mixed or combined as a result of being fired, launched or otherwise initiated to produce a chemical agent. [AAP-6] biological chemical munition disposal The detection, identification, access to, on site evaluation, hazard mitigation, rendering safe, recovery and final disposal of a munition which contains biological or chemical agent. Note: Nuclear and radiological munition disposal not included. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP - 41] blast The brief and rapid movement of air, vapour or fluid away from a centre of outward pressure, as in an explosion or in the combustion of rocket fuel; the pressure accompanying this movement. This term is commonly used for "explosion", but the two terms may be distinguished. [AAP-6]
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blast wave Wave created by the rapid expansion of hot gases in the atmosphere which results from an explosion. The blast wave is initially a shock wave which subsequently decays into a sound wave. [AAP-6] Related term: shock wave. blasting cap A device containing a sensitive explosive intended to produce a detonation wave. Can be either electric or non-electric (plain). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] Related terms: detonator; initiator. blasting cap Sometimes synonymously used for detonator. [AOP-38(5)] blasting machine A key or hand operated machine which is used to generate an electrical impulse. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] Note: Sometimes synonymously used for exploder. [AOP-38(5)] blind / dud Explosive munitions which has not been armed as intended or which has failed toexplode after being armed. [AAP-6] blow in situ See destroy in situ. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] bomb In a broad sense, an explosive or other lethal agent, together with its container or holder, which is planted or thrown by hand, dropped from an aircraft, or projected by some other slow-speed devices (as by lobbing it from a mortar), and used to destroy, damage, injure, or kill. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] bomb Anything similar to this object in appearance, operation, or effect, as a leaflet bomb, smoke bomb, photoflash bomb, a bomb-like container or chamber, etc. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] bomb Explosive article which is dropped from aircraft. It may contain a flammable liquid with bursting charge, a photo-flash composition or a bursting charge. The term excludes aerial torpedoes. [AOP-38(500) ] bomb live unit (BLU) Standard nomenclature in accordance with MIL-STD 875 for bombs used by the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. These bombs can be configured as high explosives, chemical and pyrotechnic. [derived from: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers EE/CA Addendum, Former Buckley Field, 1/98] bomb, rocket A bomb equipped with a rocket to give it additional velocity and penetrating power after it has been dropped from an aircraft. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] bomblet See submunition. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] booby trap A device designed, constructed or adapted to kill or injure, which functions when a person disturbs or approaches an apparently harmless object or performs an apparently safe act. [AAP-6] Related term: proofing.
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booster A high-explosive element sufficiently sensitive so as to be actuated by small explosive elements in a fuze or primer and powerful enough to cause detonation of the main explosive filling. [AAP-6] Related term: charge. booster explosive Explosive material used to augment and transmit a detonation reaction (initiated by a primary explosive), with sufficient energy to initiate a stable detonation in a receptor charge or the main charge of an explosive train. [AOP-38(5)] Related term: charge, booster. bounding mine An anti-personnel mine which is set off by a tripwire or pressure and then explodes in the air at a predetermined height and scatters fragments in all directions. [derived from: Glossary of Terms UXO info.com ] bounding mine An anti-personnel mine which is activated either by a trip wire or by pressure. The activation of the fuze causes a primary charge to be initiated which ejects the mine to a predetermined height before the main fragmentation charge is initiated. [derived from: Jane`s lexicon] bridge wire (BW) electro - explosive device (EED) An electro-explosive device (EED) where the power dissipated by the passage of current through a restrictive wire is used to initiate by heating a primary explosive in intimate contact with the wire. [AOP-38(5)] brisance The shattering effect or power of an explosive [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] buffer A protective device made of inert material, intended to prevent the propagation of a munition response to an adjacent munition. [AOP-38(5)] briefing area In the context of humanitarian demining, a clearly identifiable control point intended to be the first point of entry to a demining worksite. Note: The briefing area contains a plan of the minefield and its current level of clearance, at a scale large enough for briefing purposes, showing the location of control points (car park, first aid point, explosive storage areas, the areas where mine clearance work is progressing and distances), and where safety equipment is issued to visitors. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] burning site An area authorised for the destruction of munitions and explosives by burning. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] burster Explosive article consisting of a small charge of explosive used to open projectiles or other ammunition in order to disperse their contents. [AOP-38(5)] bulk explosives Within the Land Service, service charges of explosives which are generally removed from their containers before use, such as Charges Demolition, PE and Charges Demolition, Slab, CE/TNT. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] bulk military explosives Military explosive in its original packaging or that has been removed from weapons or munitions. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]
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cache An IED incident that involves the discovery and/or recovery of unarmed devices, IED components, and IED paraphernalia that involves long-term storage in a permanent, fixed location [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] cache A hidden store of things. (COED) Related terms: hide. [derived from: C - IED confirmed for AJP-3.15] camouflet The resulting cavity in a deep underground burst when there is no rupture of the surface. [AAP-6] cap, blasting A small tube, usually copper or aluminium closed at one and loaded with a charge of sensitive high explosives. Nonelectric blasting caps are detonated by the spit of flame or sparks from a time blasting fuse: electric blasting cap are provided with a means for firing by an electrical current. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] Synonym: primer (AOP-38(5) 2009). cartridge An assemblage of the components require to function a weapon once; i.e. gun ammunition which contains in unit assembly all of the components required to functioning the gun once, and which is loaded into the gun in one operation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] cartridge An explosive item designed to produce gaseous products of combustion under pressure, for performing a mechanical operation other than the common one of expelling a projectile. The item is usually similar to a blank cartridge of small calibre, and the pressure is utilized by a device known as a propellant actuated device. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] cartridge A cased quantity of explosives (excluding rocket motors) complete with its own means of ignition. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] cartridge, ejection An explosive item used to eject ordnance from a cluster or bomb station. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] CBRN device A manufactured or improvised assembly or process intended to cause the release of a chemical or biological agent or radiological material into the environment or to result in a nuclear detonation. [derived from: EU CBRN-EOD Doctrine] CBRN IDD (CBRN Improvised Dispersal Device) An improvised assembly or process without explosive components incorporating chemical, biological or radioactive material intended to disperse a C, B, R or N payload as to harass, incapacitate or kill personnel or to damage or deny the use of material, facilities or ground [derived from: EU CBRN-EOD Doctrine] CBRN ISD (CBRN Improvised Spray Device) CBRN ISD that uses a pressurized system in order to disseminate the agent. [derived from: EU CBRN-EOD Doctrine] CBRN IED (CBRN Improvised Explosive Device) An improvised assembly or process, with an explosive charge, intended to cause the release of a chemical or biological agent or radiological material into the environment or to result in a nuclear detonation. [derived from: EU CBRN-EOD Doctrine] CBRN Weapon A fully engineered assembly designed for employment by the armed forces of a nation state to cause the release of a chemical or a biological agent or radiological material or to generate a nuclear detonation onto a chosen target. [derived from: EU CBRN-EOD Doctrine]
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charge A given quantity of explosive, either in bulk or contained in a bomb, a projectile, a mine or similar device, or used as a propellant. [AAP-6] Related terms: primed charge; priming charge. charge A quantity of explosive prepared for demolition purposes. [AAP-6] Related terms: booster 2; cutting charge; cratering charge; inert filling; primed charge; priming charge; shaped charge. charge The amount of propellant required for a fixed, semi-fixed, or separate loading projectile, round or shell. It may also refer to the quantity of explosive filling contained in a bomb, mine or the like. In combat engineering, a quantity of explosive, prepared for demolition purposes. [AAP-6] charge, demolition Any explosives charge, usually hand placed, used to produce a blasting, shattering, or penetrating effect. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] charge, depth Ordnance designed for use against underwater targets. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] charge, shaped An explosive charge so shaped and designed as to concentrate its explosive force in one direction. Sometimes called cavity charge. Use of the term shaped charge generally implies the presence of a lined cavity. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] Synonym: hollow charge (GBR) charge, shaped, linear A semi rigid, metal clad container, fabricated in various lengths and widths, filled with explosive and used for linear cutting of metallic items various thickness. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] charged demolition target A demolition target on which all charges have been placed and which is in the state of readiness, either State 1 (Safe) or State 2 (Armed). See also state of readiness. [AAP-6] chemical ammunition A type of ammunition, the filler of which is primarily a chemical agent. [AAP-6] chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear device An improvised assembly or process intended to cause the release of a chemical or biological agent or substance or radiological material into the environment or to result in a nuclear detonation. [AAP 21(B)] chemical mine A mine containing a chemical agent designed to kill, injure, or incapacitate personnel or to contaminate materiel or terrain. [AAP-6] chemical switch A timing switch using the reaction of chemical compounds as a switch to provide a delay before starting the initiation train. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] cleared area An area that has been physically and systematically processed by a demining organisation to ensure the removal and/or destruction of all mine and unexploded explosive ordnance hazards to a specified depth. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Note: The quality assurance system is specified in IMAS 09.10. complete round Ammunition which contains all the components necessary for it to function. [AAP-6]
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contact mine A mine detonated by physical contact. Related term: mine. [AAP-6 ] container An item or vessel that commonly houses the whole IED or principle components of an IED. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] control area or point All points or areas used to control the movements of visitors and staff on a demining worksite. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] control point A point used to control the movement of personnel at a task site. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] controllable mine A mine which after lying can be controlled by the user, to the extent of making the mine safe or live, or to fire the mine. [AAP-6] controlled explosion Any occasion when an EOD Operator uses a deliberate explosive technique to neutralize an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) during Render Safe Procedures. The term may cover the use of a demolition charge to destroy the IED. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] conventional munitions disposal The detection, identification, access to, on site evaluation, hazard mitigation, rendering safe, recovery and final disposal of a munition which is neither nuclear, radiological, biological nor chemical. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP - 41] conventional munitions disposal The location, detection, identification, on-site evaluation, rendering safe, recovery and final disposal of unexploded EO, which includes booby traps but not IEDs. It may also include EO which has become hazardous by damage or deterioration, when the disposal of such explosive is beyond the capabilities of personnel normally assigned the responsibility for routine disposal. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] corrosive timing switch A chemical timing switch using a corrosive chemical with a known decomposition rate that is designed to destroy a physical restraint on a triggering device to start the initiation train. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] countermine To explode the main charge in a mine by the shock of a nearby explosion of another mine or independent explosive charge. The explosion of the main charge may be caused either by sympathetic detonation or through the explosive train and/or firing mechanism of the mine. [AAP-6] countermine operation In land mine warfare, an operation to reduce or eliminate the effects of mines or minefields. [AAP-6] Related terms: demining; proofing. coordinating authority Commander or individual assigned responsibility for coordinating specific functions or activities involving forces of two or more countries or commands, or two or more services or two or more forces of the same service. He has the authority to require consultation between the agencies involved or their representatives, but does not have the authority to compel agreement. In case of disagreement between the agencies involved, he should attempt to obtain essential agreement by discussion. In the event he is unable to obtain essential agreement he shall refer the matter to the appropriate authority. [AAP 6] counter - improvised explosive device (C-IED) The collective efforts at all levels to defeat the IED System in order to reduce or eliminate the effects of all forms of IEDs used against friendly forces and non-combatants according to the mission. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for AJP-3.15]
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cratering charge A charge placed at an adequate depth to produce a crater. [AAP-6] 2 Related term: charge . creep Forward motion of fuze parts relative to the ordnance that is caused by deceleration of the ordnance. Also called reepaction. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] creep The slow change in dimensions of a part due to prolonged exposure to high temperature or stress. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] creeping mine In naval mine warfare, a buoyant mine held below the surface by a weight, usually in the form of a chain, which is free to creep along the seabed under the influence of stream or current. [AAP-6] creep spring In fuze design, a spring used to prevent creep action. Should not be called anti - creep spring. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] cutting charge A charge which produces a cutting effect in line with its plane of symmetry. [AAP-69] 2 Related term: charge .
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D
daisy chain A single IED with one firing signal that can initiate multiple main charges. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] danger A condition that is a prerequisite to a mishap. Any phenomenon - environmental force or intrinsic effect - having the potential to induce an adverse effect in the munitions compromising its safety or its suitability for service. Note: A hazard is characterized by its nature, severity or probability of occurrence. [AOP-38] Related terms: mishap, risk, hazard, threat deactivation To return an armed fuzing system to unarmed mode by the issue of a specific command or after a preset delay. Note : The deactivated fuzing system is safe for use [AOP-38] dead mine A mine which has been neutralised sterilised or rendered safe. See also disarmed mine; mine. [AAP-6] deflagration Chemical explosion in which the zone of chemical reaction propagates through the initial medium at a subsonic velocity, mainly by thermal conduction. [AOP-38] deflagration A chemical reaction proceeding at subsonic velocity along the surface of, and/or through, an explosive, producing hot gases at high pressures. A deflagration under confinement increases the pressure, the rate of reaction and the temperature, which may cause transition into a detonation. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] delayed arming Classification term applicable to fuzes containing components such as a clockwork mechanism train, reduction gear assembly, or capacitor-resistor network that functions to extend the fuze arming period for a predetermined time following arming initiation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute. ] deminer A person qualified and employed to undertake demining activities on a demining worksite . [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations: 2003] demining The removal of all unexploded mines, explosive ordnance, improvised explosive devices and booby traps from a defined area to make the area safe for civilians. Note: demining is not normally conducted by military units. [AAP-6] Related terms: countermine operation; improvised explosive device; mine clearance; mine disposal; unexploded explosive ordnance. demining accident An accident at a demining workplace involving a mine or UXO hazard [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: demining incident, mine accident, mine incident. demining accident response plan A documented plan developed for each demining workplace which details the procedures to be applied to move victims from a demining accident site to an appropriate treatment or surgical care facility. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: demining accident demining incident An incident at a demining workplace involving a mine or UXO hazard. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: demining accident, mine accident, mine incident
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demining organization Refers to any organisation (government, NGO, military or commercial entity) responsible for implementing demining projects or tasks. The demining organisation may be a prime contractor, subcontractor, consultant or agent. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] demining sub-unit An element of a demining organisation, however named, which is operationally accredited to conduct one or more prescribed demining activities, such as technical surveys, manual clearance, EOD or the use of MDD teams. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] demolition The destruction of structures, facilities or materiel by use of fire, water, explosives, mechanical, or other means. [AAP-6] Related term: uncharged demolition target. demolition kit The demolition tool kit complete with explosives. Related term: demolition tool kit. [AAP-6] demolition material In a broad sense, the term includes all means of destroying, or of otherwise marking unusable, equipment useful to the enemy, or material dangerous to friendly personnel, and all means of destroying or making gaps in enemy obstacles. In a more restricted sense, the term means a demolition charge and the accessories needed to ensure its detonation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] demolition tool kit The tools, materials and accessories of a non-explosive nature necessary for preparing demolition charges. [AAP-6] Related term: demolition kit. deployment operating base A base, other than the peacetime base, having minimum essential operational and support facilities, to which a unit or part of a unit will deploy to operate from in time of tension or war. See also base; emergency fleet operating base. [AAP-6] destroy Within C-IED actions to damage or dismantle an IED, or to cause it to function, so that it is rendered useless and can no longer function as intended. (Adapted after consultation with NSA EOD WG) [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for AJP-3.15]

detect Within C-IED actions to locate, access and confirm suspect IEDs. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for AJP-3.15] detecting circuit The part of a mine firing circuit which responds to the influence of a target. [AAP-6] detection In explosive ordnance disposal, procedure used to determine the presence and to establish the location of explosive ordnance with sufficient accuracy to enable access. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] detection The discovery by any means of the presence of mines or unexploded ordnance. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR]
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detonation A detonation is classed as an explosion. It is a chemical reaction that propagates with such rapidity that the rate of advanced of reaction zone into the unreacted material exceeds the velocity of sound in the unreacted material. The rate of advance of the reaction zone is termed detonation rate or detonation velocity. When this rate of advance attains such a value that it will continue without diminution through the unreacted material, it is termed the stable detonation velocity. When the detonation rate is equal to or greater than the stable detonation velocity of the explosive, the reaction is termed a high-order detonation. When the detonation rate is lower than the stable detonation velocity of the explosive, the reaction is called a low-order detonation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] detonating cord A waterproof flexible fabric tube containing a high explosive designed to transmit the detonation wave. [AAP-6] Synonym: primacord. detonating cord amplifier A device attached to a detonating cord which allows for the ignition of a charge and the simultaneous transmission of a detonating wave to another charge. [AAP-6] detonator A device containing a sensitive explosive intended to produce a detonation wave. [AAP-6] detonator An explosive train component which can be activated by either a no explosive impulse or the action of a primer and is capable of reliable initiating high-order detonation in a subsequent high-explosive component of the train. When activated by a non explosive impulse, a detonator includes the function of a primer. In general, detonators are classified in accordance with the method of initiation, such as percussion, stab, electric, and flash. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] destroy in situ To destroy an item of ordnance by explosives without moving the item from where it was found, normally by placing an explosive charge alongside. Also called blow in situ. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] Related term: destruction in situ. destruction in situ Destruction of an item of ordnance by explosives without moving the item from where it was found, normally by placing an explosive charge alongside. Also called blow in situ. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] Related term: destroy in situ. detection The discovery by any means of the presence of mines or UXO. Note: In the context of humanitarian demining. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] detonation The rapid conversion of explosives into gaseous products by means of a shock wave passing through the explosive (c.f. deflagration). Typically, the velocity of such a shock wave is more than two orders of magnitude higher than a fast deflagration. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] detonation An exothermic reaction at molecular level induced by the action of a disruptive wave through an explosive material causing a sudden violent increase in volume due to the evolution of gaseous products. There are 3 forms that detonation may take: a. High Order. Detonation at a velocity approaching the maximum stable velocity of detonation for a system. b. Low Order: Detonation at a velocity well below the maximum stable velocity of detonation for a system. c. Partial: The incomplete detonation of a high explosive caused by a physical break or lack of chemical homogeneity within the explosive material. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] diagnostic procedures Those actions taken to identify and evaluate EO. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR]
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direct arming Classification term usually applicable to fuzes which become armed immediately upon the elimination of a safety device, such as an arming pin, or by direct unscrewing action of an arming vane. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] direct current (DC) Electric current that flows through a circuit in just one direction. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] directional effect Type of main charge configuration where the explosive effect is channelled to an intended area [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] disarm To restore a fuzing system to a non-armed condition from an armed condition, either reversibly, to permit rearming, or irreversibly and permanently (sterilization). [AOP-38] Related term: arm, armed, unarmed, deactivation, sterilization disarmed mine A previously armed mine which has been returned to a safe state. See also dead mine; inert mine. [AAP-6] dispenser In air armament, a container or device which is used to carry and release submunitions. [AAP-6] Related term: cluster bomb unit. disposal site An area authorised for the destruction of munitions and explosives by detonation and burning. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] disturbance A victim operated trigger that senses when objects or their wrappings are moved or disturbed, initiating a firing device. Sensitive mechanisms such as tilt, anti-lift, and trembler switches may be used. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] dual firing circuit An assembly comprising two independent firing systems, both electric or both non- electric, so that the firing of either system will detonate all charges. See also combination firing circuit. [AAP-6] dud Explosive munition which has not been armed as intended or which has failed to explode after being armed. [AAP-6]

E
electric initiator An initiator whose functioning is initiated by an electrical impulse that creates heat or a spark. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] electro-explosive device An explosive or pyrotechnic component that initiates an explosive, burning, electrical, or mechanical train and is activated by the application of electrical energy. [AAP-6] electronic A timing switch using a commercial or improvised electronic timer or integrated circuit to start the initiation train. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] electronic countermeasures (ECM) That division of electronic warfare involving actions taken to prevent or reduce an enemy's effective use of the electromagnetic spectrum through the use of electromagnetic energy. There are three subdivisions of electronic countermeasures: electronic jamming, electronic deception and electronic neutralization. [AAP-6] electronic warfare (EW) Military action to exploit the electromagnetic spectrum encompassing: the search for, interception and identification of electromagnetic emissions, the employment of electromagnetic energy, including directed energy, to reduce or prevent hostile use of the electromagnetic spectrum, and actions to ensure its effective use by friendly forces. [AAP-6] enhancements IED Enhancements are an optional additional component that modifies the effects of the IED. The IED would be effective, yet produce a different measurable result if this effect was not added. This effect can be additional physical destruction, proliferation of dangerous substances (i.e. radiation, chemicals), or other effects to enhance the outcome of the IED. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] exploder A device designed to generate an electric current in a firing circuit after deliberate action by the user in order to initiate an explosive charge or charges. [AAP-6] exploding bridge wire A term used to describe an initiator or system in which a very high-energy electrical impulse is passed through a bridgewire, literally exploding the bridge wire and releasing thermal and shock energy capable of initiating a relatively insensitive explosive in contact with the bridge wire. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] explosion (chemical) A chemical reaction or change of state which is effected in an exceedingly short space of time with the generation or high temperature and generally a large quantity of gas. An explosion produces a shock wave in the surrounding medium. The term includes both deflagration and detonation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] explosion (improvised explosive devices) An IED incident that results in a partial or complete functioning of an IED. Occurs when gaseous products are rapidly produced from a single substance (high explosives or low explosives with a fuel and oxidant). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] explosion Where the explosive train within an IED has functioned, either where it has failed to function as intended (partial) or where complete detonation has occurred. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] explosives A substance or mixture of substances which, under external influences, is capable of rapidly releasing energy in the form of gases and heat. [AAP-6]
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explosive incident A generic term to cover accidents and near misses. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] explosive materials Components or ancillary items used by demining organisations which contain some explosives, or behave in an explosive manner, such as detonators and primers. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] explosive remnants of war Unexploded ordnance (UXO) and abandoned explosive ordnance (AXO). [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] explosive ordnance All munitions containing explosives, nuclear fission or fusion materials and biological and chemical agents. This includes bombs and warheads; guided and ballistic missiles; artillery, mortar, rocket and small arms ammunition; all mines, torpedoes and depth charges; pyrotechnics; clusters and dispensers; cartridge and propellant actuated devices; electro-explosive devices; clandestine and improvised explosive devices; and all similar or related items or components explosive in nature. [AAP-6] Related term: area clearance; munition; proofing. explosive ordnance clearance (EOC) Tasks or actions to reduce or eliminate the Explosive Ordnance (EO) hazards from a specified area. [derived from: ATP-72] explosive ordnance clearance (EOC) Action taken to reduce or eliminate the EO hazards from a defined area. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] explosive ordnance disposal The detection, identification, on-site evaluation, rendering safe, recovery and final disposal of unexploded explosive ordnance. It may also include explosive ordnance, which has become hazardous by damage or deterioration. [AAP-6] explosive ordnance disposal immediate response team (EOD IRT) The EOD Immediate Response Team (EOD IRT) is employed in the case of incidents, which constitute an immediate threat to life and limb or a serious hazard to the participants in an operation. [derived from: ATP 72] explosive ordnance disposal incident The suspected or detected presence of unexploded explosive ordnance, or damaged explosive ordnance, which constitutes a hazard to operations, installations, personnel or material. Not included in this definition are the accidental arming or other conditions that develop during the manufacture of high explosive material, technical service assembly operations or the laying of mines and demolition charges. [AAP-6] explosive ordnance disposal operator A member of an EOD Team qualified as shown below and authorised to conduct EOD within their capabilities: a. b. c. EOD No1: The team leader and principal EOD Operator. EOD No2: EOD Operators assistant, normally qualified to prepare charges, load weapons and drive the RCV. EOD No3 & 4 Operators: Team members at least qualified on basic EOR.
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Deploy ability: To achieve the necessary agility across the spectrum of conflict, the overarching structure of an operational EOD response can be divided into 3 levels: heavy, medium, light. Although linked to deploy ability and mobility rather than any particular piece of equipment, this concept is applicable throughout the EOD capability. Heavy. This describes EOD teams that can deploy with all their equipment in their own vehicles, normally bespoke. The full choice of equipment can improve recovery of evidence and decrease collateral damage. In the maritime environment, heavy applies to deployment with a support vessel, e.g. Mine Counter-Measure Vessels (MCMV). For the air environment, heavy applies to teams configured to conduct rapid airfield clearance from armoured vehicles. Medium. This describes EOD teams that have limited lift so can only take an element of the teams equipment. In the maritime environment, this would cover deployment by small craft, e.g. medium or rigid inflatable boats. In the land environment, this could include a quad bike and trailer delivered by helicopter. For the air environment, this may apply to an EOD team configured for initial entry to a forward operating base (FOB) or deployed operating base (DOB). Light. This describes EOD teams that are required to move to an incident on foot and will therefore need to carry all their equipment and life support. In the maritime environment, this could be dive to target. Teams are the most mobile but with the least equipment options when considering a render safe procedure, so are likely to be at

increased risk. [delivered from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] explosive ordnance disposal procedures Those particular courses or modes of action taken by explosive ordnance disposal personnel for access to, diagnosis, rendering safe, recovery and final disposal of explosive ordnance or any hazardous material associated with an explosive ordnance disposal incident. a. Access procedures - Those actions taken to locate exactly and to gain access to unexploded explosive ordnance. b. Diagnostic procedures Those actions taken to identify and evaluate unexploded explosive ordnance. c. Render-safe procedures - The portion of the explosive ordnance disposal procedures involving the application of special explosive ordnance disposal methods and tools to provide for the interruption of functions or separation of essential components of unexploded explosive ordnance to prevent an unacceptable detonation. d. Recovery procedures - Those actions taken to recover unexploded explosive ordnance. e. Final disposal procedures - The final disposal of explosive ordnance which may include demolition or burning in place, removal to a disposal area or other appropriate means. [AAP-6] explosive ordnance disposal procedures Those particular courses or modes of action taken by explosive ordnance disposal personnel for detection, accessing, identification, hazard mitigation, rendering safe, recovery and exploitation, and final disposal of explosive ordnance associated with an explosive ordnance disposal incident. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] explosive ordnance reconnaissance A reconnaissance involving the investigation, detection, location, marking, initial identification and reporting of suspected unexploded explosive ordnance, by explosive ordnance reconnaissance agents, in order to determine further action. [AAP-6] explosive remnants of war / restes explosifs de guerre Unexploded ordnance (UXO) and abandoned explosive ordnance (AXO). [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] explosive train A succession of initiating and igniting elements arranged to cause a charge to function. [AAP-6] explosive train A train of combustible and explosive elements arranged in the order of decreasing sensitivity, inside a fuze, projectile, bomb, or the like. The function of the explosive train is to accomplish the controlled augmentation of a small impulse into one of suitable energy to cause the main charge of the ordnance to function. A fuze explosive train may consist of a primer, a detonator, a relay, a lead and a booster charge, one or more of which may be either omitted or combined. If the bursting charge is added to the foregoing train, it becomes a bursting charge explosive train. A propelling charge train may consist of a primer, igniter or igniting charge, usually black powder, and any of the various types of propellants. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] explosively formed projectile (EFP) Specially designed weapon incorporating an explosive charge with a machined or pressed concave metal plate which by the force of the charge reshapes the plate into a high temperature, high velocity metal slug capable of penetrating armoured vehicles. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]
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F
false Within C-IED an improvised explosive device event that is incorrectly identified, though reported in good faith as an improvised explosive device subsequently categorised as a false alarm after positive action. [derived from: JIEDDO WTI Lexicon, C-IED WG confirmed new term for AJP 3.15] filling The explosive content of a cartridge, charge, shell, bomb, complete round, component or separate part of a round. The contents of a round or component when not strictly explosive in kind, such as smoke or chemical, are normally referred to as chargings. [derived from: A&ER - Ammunition&Explosevies Regulation (GBR)] fin A fixed or adjustable vane or airfoil affixed longitudinally to an aerodynamically or ballistically designed body for stabilizing purpose. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fin assembly An assembly of metal blades, usually mounted lengthwise on a sleeve, and used on ordnance, such as bombs or rifle grenades, to give directional stability. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] final disposal procedures In explosive ordnance disposal, procedure used to remove explosive ordnance effected by demolition, burning or transfer of rendered safe ordnance. [derived from: EOD WG draft for AAP-41] find An IED incident that involves the discovery, recovery, or turn in of unarmed devices or IED components that involves short-term storage in a temporary and/or transitory location. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] find An item of explosive ordnance, weapons or other terrorist / insurgent or military equipment / resources, found either during a planned search or during other operations. Hides, humans, intelligence materials and information may also constitute a find. [derived from: ATP-73] firing Actuation of the firing system. [AAP-6 ] Related term: firing system. firing circuit In land operations, an electrical circuit and/or pyrotechnic loop designed to detonate connected charges from a firing point. [AAP-6 ] Synonym: firing mechanism. firing circuit In naval mine warfare, that part of a mine circuite which either completes the detonator circuit or operates a ship counter. [AAP-6 ] Synonym: firing mechanism. firing mechanism [AAP-6 ] 1, 2 Preferred term: firing circui . firing mechanism The decision making mechanism for firing an underwater mine other than controlled mines. Firing mechanisms are classified according to the event or signal which causes actuation: contact, magnetic, acoustic, pressure, and combination thereof. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] firing mechanism A mechanism used for initiating a propelling charge. In this use firing mechanism forms a part of the gun launching system etc. If used for the purpose of initiating detonation of a main charge, the firing mechanism is part of the ordnance and performs the function of a fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]
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firing point That point in the firing circuit where the device employed to initiate the detonation of the charges is located. [AAP-6] firing switch Component that initiates the firing train [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] first responder / EOD 1 responder For UK MACP Tasks) The EOD Operator initially tasked in response to a request for assistance from a Civil Power (i.e. Police or Maritime & Coastguard Agency). Normally the first to arrive at the incident able to conduct positive EOD action to render safe EO in accordance with SOPs and Delegated Authority. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR) ] fixed ammunition Ammunition in which the cartridge case is permanently attached to the projectile. [AAP-6] flashback See backfire [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] flexi linear shaped charge (FLSC) A flexible linear shaped charge manufactured in grain loadings per foot. The sheathing material may be lead, aluminum, copper, silver, or other materials. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] follow-on mine countermeasures Mine countermeasures operations carried out after the initial amphibious landing during the amphibious assault and post-assault phases in order to expand the areas cleared during the pre-assault mine countermeasures operations. [AAP-6] force protection All measures and means to minimize the vulnerability of personnel, facilities, equipment and operations to any threat and in all situations, to preserve freedom of action and the operational effectiveness of the force. [AAP-6] fragmentation Term applied to ordnance, indicating that it is primarily intended to produce a fragmentation effect. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fragmentation effect Shrapnel and small objects designed to be accelerated by explosive forces. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] fuse (AM) An igniting or explosive cord consisting of a flexible fabric tube and a core of low or high explosive. Fuse with black powder or other low explosive core is called Fuse, Blasting, Time. Other names are safety fuse, Bickford fuse, and blasting fuse. Fuse with PENT or other high-explosive core is called Detonating cord or Primacord (a trade name). [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuse, blasting, time (AM) A flexible, water-resistant, fabric-covered cord contained a black powder core, which burns at a known rate from one end to the other, providing a time delay proportional to the length of fuse. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze A device which initiates an explosive train. [AAP-6] Related terms: base fuze; bore-safe fuze; impact action fuze; proximity fuze; self-destroying fuze; shuttered fuze; time fuze. fuze A device with explosive components designed to initiate a train of fire or detonation in ordnance by an action such as hydrostatic pressure, electrical energy, chemical, impact, mechanical time, or a combination of these. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]
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fuze A non explosive device designed to initiate an explosion in ordnance by an action such as continuous or pulsating electromagnetic waves, acceleration or deceleration forces, or piezoelectric action. Note: For uniformity the Department of Defense has prescribed the spelling fuze for the above senses; however, the spelling fuse is preferred in all senses by the British and by some nonmilitary authorities in United States. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, all- way An impact fuze designed to function regardless of the direction of impact. Commonly called all-ways acting fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, bore safe Type of fuze having an interrupter in the explosive train that prevents a projectile from exploding until after it has cleared the muzzle of weapon. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze cavity A recess in a charge for receiving a fuze. [AAP-6] fuze, conditions These definitions are based on the normal operation of a fuze. Safety devices and features, as used I the definitions, are devices or features which positively prevent fuze arming until eliminated or rendered inoperative. Safety cotter pins, arming pins, safety blocks, detents, arming wires, safety forks, and the like are examples of positive safety devices and features. Some safety devices may not be externally visible so that it is not readily determined whether or not they have been eliminated or nullified. In these cases, the fuze must never be considered unarmed. a. unarmed A fuze is unarmed when all of the safety devices and features incorporated in the fuze are present and functioning so as to prevent the fuze from starting its arming sequence. It is the condition of the fuze when it is safe for handling, storage, and transportation. b. partially armed A fuze is partially armed when any one (but not all) of the safety devices and features incorporated in the fuze has been eliminated or is not functioning and the fuze has begun its arming sequence but has not completed it. c. armed A fuzes is armed when all the safety devices and features incorporated in the fuze have been eliminated or are not functioning so that the fuze has completed its arming sequence, but has not been subjected to sufficient or proper forces required to begin the fuze firing sequence. d. armed and functioning A fuze is functioning when a special tactical arming and/or firing delay, such as a clockwork mechanism, chemical action, material creep, etc. Is operating. e. dud-fired A fuze is dudfired when all of the safety devices and features incorporated in the fuze have been eliminated or are not functioning, and the fuze has been subjected to the force required to begin its firing sequence but has failed to fire. f. armed and/or dud-fired A fuze is armed and/or dud-fired when it has completed its arming sequence, but there is no positive visual indication that the fuze firing sequence has or has not begun. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, nondelay A fuze that functions as a result of inertia of the firing pin (or primer) as the ordnance is retarded during penetration of the target. The inertia causes the firing pin to strike the primer (or the primer the firing pin), initiating fuze action. This type of fuze is inherently slower in action than the superquick (instantaneously) fuze since its action depends upon deceleration (retardation) of the ordnance during impact with the target. Also called inertia fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, retainer A device designed to restrict the turning of a fuze in a bomb fuze well. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze safety Two terms that have been commonly used to describe the safety built into a fuze to prevent premature functioning at the time of employment and to provide the required safety in transportation. One term, bore safety, is a term which is strictly applicable only to fuzes in artillery or mortar projectiles or rockets, and refers to the provision of means to prevent functioning while in the bore of the gun or in launching tube. Such fuzes are said to be boresafe. Detonator safety is the second term and may relate to fuzes for any application. It refers to the provision of means to prevent functioning of the succeeding element(s) of the explosive train if the detonator functions while the fuze parts are in the safe position. Such a fuze is said to be detonato r safe. In general the terms are interchangeable with respect to artillery, mortar, and rocket fuzes, but bore safety applies only to those types of fuzes. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, semi-all-way A fuze designed to functioning within a radius of 270of the direction of target impact. Commonly called semi-all-ways acting fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]

fuze, spitback A fuze located in the nose of a shaped charge munitions. When initiated by impact, it produces a detonation which is directed toward the base element which detonates the main explosive charge. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, superquick A fuze designed to function with the least possible delay after impact. The delay is of the order of microseconds. Also referred to as fuze, instantaneously. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] fuze, time A fuze which is designed to operate after the lapse of a pre-determined time. Time fuzes may be designed to provide an airburst but the term may also refer to long delay fuzes which function after the weapon strikes the target. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]

G
general mine action assessment (GMAA) The continuous process by which a comprehensive inventory can be obtained of all reported and/or suspected locations of mine or UXO contamination, the quantities and types of explosive hazards, and information on local soil characteristics, vegetation and climate; and assessment of the scale and impact of the landmine problem on the individual, community and country. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] graze sensitivity The ability of a fuze to be initiated by grazing the surface at a glancing angle (80- 90 from the normal). [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]

H
handover The process by which the beneficiary (for example, the NMAA on behalf of the local community or land user) accepts responsibility for the cleared area. The term 'alienation' is sometimes used to describe a change of ownership of the land which accompanies the handover of a cleared area. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] handover certificate Documentation used to record the handover of cleared land. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] hazard A condition that is a prerequisite to a mishap. Any phenomenon - environmental force or intrinsic effect - having the potential to induce an adverse effect in the munitions compromising its safety or its suitability for service. Note: A hazard is characterized by its nature, severity or probability of occurrence. [AOP-38] Related terms: mishap, risk, danger, threat hazard Potential source of harm. [derived from: ISO Guide 51:1999(E)] hazard area A generic term for an area not in productive use due to the perceived or actual presence of mines, UXO or other explosive devices. Also called hazardous area or contaminated area. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: contaminated area hazard marker Object, other than hazard signs, used to identify the limits of a mine and UXO hazard area. Hazard markers shall conform to the specification established by the NMAA. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] hazard marking system A combination of measures (signs and barriers) designed to provide the public with warning and protection from mine and UXO hazards. The system may include the use of signs or markers, or the erection of physical barriers. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] hazard mitigation In explosive ordnance disposal, procedure that utilizes equipment and/or procedures to reduce blast effects. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] heat A type of initiator that serves as an igniting element through the application of heat. This may include direct heat to a sensitive explosive. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] hide A space in which resources are concealed. It may be used before, during or after an incident and be static or mobile. [derived from: ATP-73] Related terms:cache. high explosive Substance or mixture of substances which is designed to detonate. [AOP-38] Related terms: explosive material, main charge high explosive, primary explosive, secondary explosive, booster explosive high explosive (HE) An explosive which normally detonates rather than deflagrates or burns; that is, the rate of advance of reaction zone into the uncreated material exceeds the velocity of sound in the unreacted material. High explosives are divided into two classes according to their sensitivity to heat and shock: primary high explosives and secondary high explosives. Note: Some authorities maintain that high explosives and primary explosives are entirely separate entities. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]
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high power RCIED An RCIED transmitter with an output power greater than or equal to 0.35 watt. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] hoax Within C-IED an IED incident that involves a device fabricated to look like an improvised explosive device, or a false warning of the presence of an improvised explosive device, intended to purposely and maliciously create fear or elicit a response. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for AJP-3.15 ] (Adapted after consultation with NSA EOD WG) hollow charge A shaped charge producing a deep cylindrical hole of relatively small diameter in the direction of its axis of rotation. [AAP-6] homemade CBRN A combination of commercially available ingredients combined to create a CBRN substance. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] homemade explosives (HME) A combination of commercially available ingredients combined to create an explosive substance. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] horizontal action mine In land mine warfare, a mine designed to produce a destructive effect in a plane approximately parallel to the ground. [AAP-6] high order detonation See detonation [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] humanitarian demining Activities which lead to the removal of mine and unexploded explosive ordnance hazards, including technical survey, mapping, clearance, marking, post-clearance documentation and the handover of cleared land. Also known as Humanitarian Mine Action. It may be carried out by different types of organisations such as non-governmental organisations, commercial companies, national mine action teams or military units. See also Mine Action [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] hung striker Defective striker which fails to strike the primer and explode the ordnance. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] hypergolic fuel Fuel which will spontaneously ignite with an oxidiser, such as aniline with fuming nitric acid. It is used as the propulsion agent in certain missile systems. [AAP-6]

I
identification In explosive ordnance disposal, procedure to determine the type, characteristics, and condition of explosive ordnance and to evaluate hazards associated with the disposal action. [derived from: AEODP-7 ;EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] igniter A device designed to produce a flame or a spark to initiate an explosive train. [AAP-6] igniter Specially arranged charge of ready-burning composition used to assist the initiation of a propelling charge. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] Igniter Device containing such a composition which is used to amplify the initiation of primer in the functioning of fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] impact action fuze A fuze that is set in action by the striking of a projectile or bomb against an object. e.g. percussion fuze, contact fuze. Also called Direct Action Fuze. [AAP-6] impact suvey An assessment of the socio-economic impact caused by the actual or perceived presence of mines and UXO, in order to assist the planning and prioritisation of mine action programmes and projects. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations: 2003] implosion A sudden inward burst of particles or gases that bring pressure upon the center of something. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] implosion The sudden reduction of pressure by chemical reaction or changing of state which causes an inrushing of the surrounding medium. Opposed to explosion which results in a sudden. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] improvised claymore An improvised weapon, military or homemade, designed to explosively propel a fan shaped pattern of ball bearings or other fragmentation in an aimed direction. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] improvised explosive device A device placed or fabricated in an improvised manner incorporating destructive, lethal, noxious, pyrotechnic or incendiary chemicals and designed to destroy, incapacitate, harass or distract. It may incorporate military stores, but is normally devised from non-military components. [AAP-6] improvised explosive device disposal The location, identification, rendering safe and final disposal of IEDs. [derived from: ATP-72; EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] improvised explosive device disposal Those actions taken to disrupt or neutralise an improvised explosive device. [derived from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] improvised explosive device event An event that involves one or more of the following types of actions or activities in relation to improvised explosive devices: an explosion; an attack; an attempted attack; a find; a hoax; a false; or a turn-in. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed new term for AJP 3.15 ] improvised explosive device system A system that comprises personnel, resources and activities and the linkages between them that are necessary to resource, plan, execute and exploit an improvised explosive device event. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed new term for AJP 3.15 ]
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incendiary An IED which contains low explosive and is primarily designed to cause burning. [derived from: A&ER - Ammunition&Explosevies Regulation (GBR)] incident An event that gives rise to an accident or has the potential to lead to an accident. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related term: accident incident commander The individual, military or civilian, designated by the competent authority empowered to direct, co-ordinate and control all activities on the incident scene of all the assets under his tactical control with respect to specialists specific procedures to return the scene to normal. [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] incident control point A safe area, within a Police or SF cordon, from which an IEDD, CMD or BCMD operation is controlled. [derived from: EOD Lexicon from GBR] inert filling A prepared non-explosive filling of the same weight as the explosive filling. [AAP-6] influence mine A mine actuated by the effect of a target on some physical condition in the vicinity of the mine or on radiations emanating from the mine. [AAP-6 ] Related term: mine. inhibition Within C-IED a condition resulting when appropriate means are employed to interrupt functions or separate essential components of unexploded ordnance in order to prevent an unacceptable functioning although the explosive ordnance may remain active if the appropriate means are removed. [derived from: C-IED WG new term in AJP 3.15 ] Note: It will be processed for inclusion in the NTDB and AAP-6 Information Management System for Mine Action (IMSMA) This is the United Nation's preferred information system for the management of critical data in UN-supported field programmes. The Field Module (FM) provides for data collection, information analysis and project management. It is used by the staffs of MACs at national and regional level, and by the implementers of mine action projects - such as demining organisations. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations: 2003] initiation The action of a device used as the first element of an explosive train which, upon receipt of the proper impulse, causes the detonation or burning of an explosive item. [AAP-6] initiator A term used to describe any device that may be used to start a detonation or deflagration. May or may not be a detonator. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] intermediate marker In land mine warfare, a marker, natural, artificial or specially installed, which is used as a point of reference between the landmark and the minefield? See also marker. [AAP-6] intermittent arming device A device included in a mine so that it will be armed only at set times. [AAP-6] inspection The observation, measurement, examination, testing, evaluation or gauging of one or more components of a product or service and comparing these with specified requirements to determine conformity. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations]

inspection body An organisation which conducts post-clearance quality assurance (QC) on behalf of the National Mine Action Authority (NMAA) by applying random sampling procedures, or other appropriate and agreed methods of inspection. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] intended land use Use of land following demining operations. Intended land use should be included in the clearance task specification and clearance task handover documentation. Note: Intended use: use of a product, process or service in accordance with information provided by the supplier. ISO Guide 51:1999(E) [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] International Mine Action Standards (IMAS) documents developed by the UN on behalf of the international community, which aim to improve safety and efficiency in mine action by providing guidance, by establishing principles and, in some cases, by defining international requirements and specifications. They provide a frame of reference which encourages, and in some cases requires, the sponsors and managers of mine action programmes and projects to achieve and demonstrate agreed levels of effectiveness and safety. They provide a common language, and recommend the formats and rules for handling data which enable the free exchange of important information; this information exchange benefits other programmes and projects, and assists the mobilisation, prioritisation and management of resources. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) Note: A worldwide federation of national bodies from over 130 countries. Its work results in international agreements which are published as ISO standards and guides. ISO is a NGO and the standards it develops are voluntary, although some (mainly those concerned with health, safety and environmental aspects) have been adopted by many countries as part of their regulatory framework. ISO deals with the full spectrum of human activities and many of the tasks and processes which contribute to mine action have a relevant standard. A list of ISO standards and guides is given in the ISO Catalogue www.iso.ch/infoe/catinfo/html]. Note: The revised mine action standards have been developed to be compatible with ISO standards and guides. Adopting the ISO format and language provides some significant advantages including consistency of layout, use of internationally recognised terminology, and a greater acceptance by international, national and regional organisations who are accustomed to the ISO series of standards and guides. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] interrupter A physical barrier which prevents the transmission of an explosive or burning effect between elements in an explosive train. [AOP-38]

K
kinetic energy ordnance Ordnance designed to inflict damage to fortifications, armored vehicles, or ships upon impact by shattering, spalling, or piercing. The ordnance may be solid or may contain an explosive charge intended to function after penetration. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]

L
lane marker In land mine warfare, sign used to mark a minefield lane. Lane markers, at the entrance to and exit from the lane, may be referenced to a landmark or intermediate marker. See also marker; minefield lane. [AAP-6] large vehicleborne IED (LVBIED) An IED built into any large ground-based vehicle (e.g., dump truck, panel truck, bongo truck, commercial bus, tanker, etc.) and/or serves as the concealment means for a large amount of explosives (2000 lbs). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] level 2 survey The detailed topographical and technical investigation of known or suspected mined areas identified during the planning phase. Such areas would have been identified during any information gathering activities or surveys which form part of the GMAA process or have been otherwise reported. Note: The term previously used for a technical survey. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] licence The term refers to a certificate issued by a National Mine Action Authority (NMAA) in relation to the capacity or capability of a facility, for example a demolition site may be licensed for certain explosive limits and explosive storage areas may be licensed for certain types and quantities of munitions. Demining organisations receive organisational or operational accreditation from an accreditation body authorised by a NMAA. Note: The term used in the context of mine action [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] light bulbs / flash bulbs Devices used as electric initiators that incorporate an improvised use of the bulb to initiate primary or low explosives. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] light sensitive A type of proximity trigger that senses changes in the amount of light in the environment near the sensor. When this happens, the sensor causes a circuit to be completed, firing the device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] liner Inert material used to prevent energetic materials from coming into contact with other components of an ammunition. [AOP-38(5) 2009] Note: Cone of material used as an integral part of shaped charges; a shaped-charge liner. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] liquid explosive Explosive, which is fluid at normal temperatures. [AAP-6] live ordnance Ordnance containing explosives or active chemicals as distinguished from inert or drill ordnance. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] logistic disposal In the context of humanitarian demining, the removal of ammunition and explosives from a stockpile utilising a variety of methods, (that may not necessarily involve destruction). Logistic disposal may or may not require the use of render-safe procedures. [derived from: IMAS 04.10; EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] long delay Term applied to fuzes in which detonation is delayed for a relatively long period of time after impact for purposes other than providing weapon penetration (e.g., area denial). These delays may range from several minutes to days. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] low explosive An explosion which deflagrates or burns rather than detonates; that is, the rate of advance of the reaction zone into the unreacted material is less than the velocity of sound in the unreacted material. An explosive may react as a low explosive or as a high explosive depending on how it is initiated and confined. For example, a double-base propellant when initiated in the usual manner is a low explosive, but can be made to detonate if it is certain conditions, can be ignited by flame and will burn without detonating. Low explosives include propellants, certain primer mixture, black powder, photoflash powders, and delay

composition. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] low explosive Substance or mixture of substances which is designated to deflagrate. Note: low explosive does not produce a shock wave, generally requires confinement to explode. [derived from: EOD WG] low order detonation A chemical reaction in a detonatable material in which the reaction front advances with a velocity which is appreciably lower then that which is the characteristic detonation velocity for the material in question. In a low-order detonation, the ordnance case usually breaks into several large fragments rather than many small ones. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] low power RCIED An RCIED transmitter with an output power less than 0.35 watt. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]

M
magazine The term refers to any building, structure or container approved for the storage of explosive materials. Note: The term used in the context of mine action [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] magnetic A type of proximity trigger that senses magnetic alterations in the area around the sensor. When this happens, the sensor causes a circuit to be completed, firing the device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] magnetic attachment A type of IED employment in which the device is attached to the target using magnets. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] magnetic mine A mine which responds to the magnetic field of a target. Also called magnetic circuit. See also mine. [AAP-6] main detonating line In demolition, a line of detonating cord used to transmit the detonation wave to two or more branches. [AAP-6] marking Emplacement of a measure or combination of measures to identify the position of a hazard or the boundary of a hazardous area. This may include the use of signs, paint marks etc, or the erection of physical barriers. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] marking system An agreed convention for the marking of hazards or hazardous areas. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] mechanical timing switch A timing switch (e.g., clock, timer, drip timer) constructed or modified so that physical contact between two parts of the timing device complete an electrical circuit initiating the device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] medical support staff Employees of demining organisations designated, trained and equipped to provide first aid and further medical treatment of demining employees injured as a result of an accident. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] method of emplacement A description of where the device was delivered, used, or employed. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] method of employment A description of how the device was delivered, used, or employed. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] mercury tilt switch Device that allows voltage to flow to the output wires after mercury is moved enough (up/down, left/right) to flow onto the switch contacts, completing the circuit. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] military CBRN Chemical, Biological, Radiological, or Nuclear materials manufactured for military use. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] military explosives Explosives manufactured for military use. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] military search The management and application of systematic procedures and appropriate equipment to locate specified targets in support of

military operations. Specified targets may include people, information and material resources employed by an adversary [derived from: EOD WG confirmed to draft for AAP-41] mine In land mine warfare, an explosive munitions designed to be placed under, on or near the ground or other surface area and to be actuated by the presence, proximity or contact of a person, land vehicle, aircraft or boat, including landing craft. [AAP-6] Related terms: mine clearance, mine disposal, mine warfare, mine accident, mined area, minefield, mine In naval mine warfare, an explosive device laid in the water with the intention of damaging or sinking ships or of deterring shipping from entering an area. The term does not include devices attached to the bottoms of ships or to harbour installations by personnel operating underwater, nor does it include devices which explode immediately on expiration of a predetermined time after laying. [AAP-6] Mine and UXO Awareness and Risk Reduction Education a. Humanitarian demining, i.e. mine and UXO survey, mapping, marking and (if necessary) clearance; b. Victim assistance, including rehabilitation and reintegration; c. Stockpile destruction; and d. Advocacy against the use of anti-personnel mines. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] mine accident An accident away from the demining workplace involving a mine or UXO hazard. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: demining accident mine, acoustic A mine which is designed to be actuated by the sounds emitted by its target. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] mine action Activities which aim to reduce the social, economic and environmental impact of mines and UXO. Note: Mine action is not just about demining; it is also about people and societies, and how they are affected by landmine contamination. The objective of mine action is to reduce the risk from landmines to a level where people can live safely; in which economic, social and health development can occur free from the constraints imposed by landmine contamination, and in which the victims needs can be addressed. Mine action comprises five complementary groups of activities: a. Mine Risk Education (MRE); b. humanitarian demining, i.e. mine and UXO survey, mapping, marking and clearance; c. victim assistance, including rehabilitation and reintegration; d. stockpile destruction; and e. advocacy against the use of APM. Note: A number of other enabling activities are required to support these five components of mine action, including: assessment and planning, the mobilisation and prioritisation of resources, information management, human skills development and management training, QM and the application of effective, appropriate and safe equipment. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations]
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Mine Action Centre (MAC) / Mine Action Coordination Centre (MACC) An organisation that carries out Mine Risk Education (MRE) training, conducts reconnaissance of mined areas, collection and centralisation of mine data and coordinates local (mine action) plans with the activities of external agencies, of (mine action) NGOs and of local deminers. [UN Terminology Bulletin No. 349] For national mine action programmes, the MAC/MACC usually acts as the operational office of the National Mine Action Authority (NMAA). [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] mine and UXO threat An indication of the potential harm from the number, nature, disposition and detectability of mines and unexploded explosive ordnance in a given area. Also called mine threat. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] mine awareness Activities which seek to reduce the risk of injury from mines/UXO by raising awareness and promoting behavioural change including public information dissemination, education and training, and community mine action liaison. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: Mine Risk Education (MRE).
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mine awareness A communication strategy aimed at preventing the occurrence and reducing the number of casualties caused by mines and unexploded explosive ordnance through appropriate, coordinated and well targeted programmes of training and education. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] Mine Ban Treaty (MBT) - Ottawa Convention Provides for a complete ban on the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel mines (APMs) and on their destruction. Note: For the purposes of IMAS documents, Article 5 of the APMBC lays down requirements for the destruction of APMs in mined areas. Article 6 details transparency measures required under the Treaty including information on the location of mined or suspected mined areas and measures taken to warn the local population. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention (APMBC) mine clearance The process of removing all mines from a route or area. [AAP-6] Related terms: demining. mine clearance The clearance of mines and UXO from a specified area to a predefined standard. [derived from: IMAS 04.10) Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] mine, controlled A mine fitted with a firing device which is capable of being activated by an electrical system leading to a central control station. It may apply to underwater mines or to landmines. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute.] mine detection Activities to discover the presence of and to locate individual mines. This may include the identification of their type and status. [AOP-19(D)] mine disposal The process of rendering safe, neutralizing, recovering, removing or destroying mines. [AAP-6] Related terms: demining. mine, improvised A mine manufactured of available materials because of unavailability of standard mines or because those mine available is not capable of producing the desired result. [Sources: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute.] mine incident An incident away from the demining workplace involving a mine or UXO hazard [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] Related term: mine accident mine, neutralization The rendering safe/removal/disposal of a landmine. [Sources: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute.] Mine Risk Education (MRE) Activities which seek to reduce the risk of injury from mines/UXO by raising awareness and promoting behavioural change including public information dissemination, education and training, and community mine action liaison. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] Related terms: mine awareness mine sign A sign which, when placed as part of a marking system, is designed to provide warning to the public of the presence of mines. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] Related terms: marking, marking system. minesweeping The technique of searching for, or clearing mines using mechanical or explosion gear, which physically removes or destroys the mine, or produces, in the area, the influence fields necessary to actuate it. [AAP-6]

mine warfare The strategic and tactical use of mines and their counter-measures. [AAP-6] Synonym: land mine warfare. mined area An area which is dangerous because of the presence or suspected presence of mines. [AAP-6] minefield In land mine warfare, a defined area in which mines have been emplaced. [AAP-6] Related terms: mixed minefield; nuisance minefield; phoney minefield; protective minefield; tactical minefield. minefield In naval warfare, an area of water containing mines laid with or without pattern. [AAP-6] Related terms: antisubmarine minefield; attrition minefield; beach minefield; closure minefield; deep minefield; defensive minefield; dummy minefield; offensive minefield; phoney minefield; protective minefield; sustained attrition minefield; tactical minefield. misfire The failure of a weapon, munition or other device to fire or explode as or when expected due to a fault in the firing system, initiator, propellant or other charge. [AAP-6 ] mobility Is a quality or capability of military forces which permits them to move from place to place while retaining the ability to fulfil their primary mission, it includes access to fixed installations and property [derived from: JDP 0 - 01.1 - UK Glossary of Joint and Multinational Terms and Definitions] munition A complete device charged with explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics, initiating composition, or nuclear, biological, or chemical material for use in military operations, including demolitions. Note: 1. Certain suitably modified munitions can be used for training, ceremonial, or non-operational purposes. 2. In common usage, "munitions" (plural) can be military weapons, ammunition and equipment. [AAP-6] Synonym: ammunition Related terms: binary chemical munition; explosive ordnance; fixed ammunition; multi-agent munition; semi-fixed ammunition; separate loading ammunition. Munroe effect The effect produced by a shaped charge. In Europe sometimes called Neumann effect. When a liner is used, the effect is termed Mohaupt effect. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]
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N
National Mine Action Authority (NMAA) The government department(s), organisation(s) or institution(s) in each mine-affected country charged with the regulation, management and coordination of mine action. Note:In most cases the national MAC or its equivalent will act as, or on behalf of, the NMAA. Note:In certain situations and at certain times it may be necessary and appropriate for the UN, or some other recognised international body, to assume some or all of the responsibilities, and fulfil some or all the functions, of a NMAA. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related terms: Mine action centre (MAC), Mine Risk education (MRS). near miss An occurrence, or potential occurrence, involving an explosive, or an occurrence potentially involving an explosive, which could have caused damage to the explosives. Damage to, or contamination of, military or civilian equipment, property or the environment. Injury to, or illness of, military personnel, MOD civilian personnel or members of the public. Threat to the structural integrity of, or to cause damage to, military or civilian equipment, property or the environment. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] neutralise The act of replacing safety devices such as pins or rods into an explosive item to prevent the fuze or igniter from functioning. Note:It does not make an item completely safe as removal of the safety devices will immediately make the item active again (c.f. disarm). Note:A mine is said to be neutralised when it has been rendered, by external means, incapable of firing on passage of a target, although it may remain dangerous to handle. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] neutralization In mine warfare, a mine is said to be neutralized when it has been rendered, by external means, incapable of firing on passage of a target, although it may remain dangerous to handle. [AAP-6] neutralisation Within C-IED an effect to render explosive ordnance either temporarily ineffective or permanently ineffective. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for AJP-3.15 ] Note: Adapted after consultation with NSA EOD WG. It will be processed for inclusion in the NTDB and AAP-6. nonelectric Indicates, in the case of blasting cap, that functioning is initiated by means other than electric. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] nose The foremost point of bomb, etc. Indicates, in the case of fuze nomenclature, that the fuze is to be attached to nose of the ordnance for which intended; and, in the case of the component of a fuze, that the component is to be used with a nose fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] nose cone Protective ballistic case for the nose of a guided missile or rocket. The nose cone may include the explosive system, components for stabilization, heat shield, and supporting structure and equipment. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute]

O
Ottawa Convention See Mine Ban Treaty [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] overpressure The pressure resulting from the blast wave of an explosion. It is referred to as positive when it exceeds atmospheric pressure and negative during the passage of the wave when resulting pressures are less than atmospheric pressure. [AAP-6]

P
partial (Detonation or Burn) Only part of a charge is detonated or burnt. This can arise as a result of poorly produced, prepared or broken charges or ammunition. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] passive infrared (PIR) A sensor that detects movement of a heat source. When the change in ambient temperature is detected, the sensor acts as a trigger to initiates the IED. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] passive mine A mine which does not emit a signal to detect the presence of a target. [AAP-6] payload The warhead, its container, and activating devices in a military missile. [AAP-6] percussion Sharp blow, especially one intended to detonate an explosive. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] permissive environment An environment where those effectively in control of the area of operations have given their permission for the operation to proceed within the intended area of operations. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] person-borne IED (PBIED) An IED worn by a person, such as a vest, belt, backpack, etc, in which the person houses the whole IED or principle IED components and/or serves as the delivery or concealment means for explosives with an initiating device. A PBIED is often initiated by the person wearing the IED (suicide) however, not all PBIEDs are triggered by the person wearing the IED. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] piezoelectric The property of certain materials (especially crystals) to develop an electrical charge or potential difference when subjected to mechanical force or, conversely, to produce a mechanical force when a voltage is applied across the material. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pin, arming A pin partly inserted into ordnance to prevent the arming process from starting until the pin is removed. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pin, bore riding A safety pin which is place in the fuze while the projectile or rocket is in the gun barrel or launching tube. It is ejected from the fuze by the effect of centrifugal force or spring action beyond the muzzle. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pin, firing A pin used in the firing mechanism of a fuze, bomb, projectile, etc., which pierces or strikes a sensitive explosive to initiate an explosive train or a propelling charge. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pin, shear A pin or wire provided in ordnance to hold parts in a fixed relationship until forces exerted on one or more of the parts cause shearing of the pin or wire. The shearing is usually caused by setback or set forward (impact) forces. The shear pin or wire may be augmented by an additional safety device during transportation of ordnance. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] plastic explosive Explosive, which is malleable at normal temperatures. [AAP-6] planned operation The calculated and deliberate clearance of an EO or IED threat, after due consideration and interpretation of all relevant factors, by discussion with all relevant agencies. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR]

plastic explosive Explosive, which is malleable at normal temperatures.[AAP-6] plug, base A plug used to close the base of some types of projectiles. It may include provision for housing a fuze. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] plug, nose A component that threads into and seals the nose of a fuze and, usually but not always, extends the fuze contour. It is not intended to be removed. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] point of reference For location of components on ordnance items, the point of reference, unless otherwise stated, is from the rear of the ordnance looking forward. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] point of reference For render safe procedures, the point of reference, unless otherwise stated, is from the position the EOD technician would have when accomplishing the procedure. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] powder An explosive in powder form; that is, in small granules or grains, such as black powder or smokeless propellant of fine granulation. No larger accepted as a general term for propellant or propelling charge. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] power source The source of power that either stores or creates electrical energy - for an electrically initiated IED. The key elements of information about a power source are its type/source, its voltage, and how the power source is connected. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] practice ammunition Ammunition used for target practice or similar types of training. Practice projectiles and rockets contain a propelling charge and either an inert filler or a spotting charge. Other types of practice ammunition, such as bombs or mines, usually contain a spotting charge to indicate functioning. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] practice mine In land mine warfare, an inert mine to which is fitted a fuze and a device to indicate, in a non-lethal fashion, that the fuze has been activated. In naval mine warfare, an inert-filled mine but complete with assembly, suitable for instruction and for practice in preparation. [AAP-6] premature functioning A type of malfunctioning in which ordnance functions before the expected time or circumstance. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pressed loading A loading operation in which bulk material, such as an explosive in granular forms, is reduced in volume by the application of pressure. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pressure A method for triggering a device that occurs when an object is used to complete a circuit when pressure is applied or removed in a predetermined direction. Many pressure initiated IEDs explode when pressure plates are compressed under the weight of passing vehicles or foot soldiers. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] pressure plate A component of or addition to an item of ordnance, especially a landmine, to enlarge the pressure sensitive area of the item. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] pressure release A method for activating a device that occurs as a result of reductions in pressure. Such devices may employ mechanical, pneumatic, or hydraulic systems to signal a detonator that a vehicle or individual has released pressure to a pressure plate or similar mechanism. Pressure release triggers are often used in the design of booby-traps. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]
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primary high explosive An explosive which is extremely sensitive to heat and shock and which is normally used to initiate a secondary high explosive. The term is generally used to refer to a pure compound rather than to an explosive mixture. A primary high explosive is capable of proceeding from deflagration to detonation in an extremely short distance and time; it can also propagate a detonation wave in an extremely small diameter column. Upon slow heating, primary high explosives generally will malt before undergoing an explosive reaction. This characteristic of primary high explosives is true for mercury fulminate, lead azide, lead styphnate, and tetracene; however, data are not available for all primary high explosives. NOTE: Some authorities recognize the term as Primary explosive but not as high primary explosive maintaining that high explosive is an entirely separate entity. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] primary charge The intermediate explosive used to augment the impulse from the primer to a magnitude sufficient to ignite the following element of the explosive train. [AOP-38] primary device This is the primary IED employed in the target area [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] primary high explosive An explosive which is extremely sensitive to heat and shock and which is normally used to initiate a secondary high explosive. The term is generally used to refer to a pure compound rather than to an explosive mixture. A primary high explosive is capable of proceeding from deflagration to detonation in an extremely short distance and time; it can also propagate a detonation wave in an extremely small diameter column. Upon slow heating, primary high explosives generally will malt before undergoing an explosive reaction. This characteristic of primary high explosives is true for mercury fulminate, lead azide, lead styphnate, and tetracene; however, data are not available for all primary high explosives. Note: Some authorities recognize the term as Primary explosive but not as high primary explosive maintaining that high explosive is an entirely separate entity. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] primed charge A charge ready in all aspects for ignition. [AAP-6] 2 Related term: charge . priming charge An initial charge which transmits the detonation wave to the whole of the charge. [AAP-6] primer Cap containing a primary explosive and a booster. Note 1: The primer function consists of transforming an external action, normally mechanical or electrical, in sufficient explosive energy to ignite the primary charge. Note 2: In a gun cartridge, the primer is the explosive device containing a cap and a booster charge or pyrotechnic which is used to ignite the propellant charge. [AOP-38] Related terms: cap, initiator primer A relatively small and sensitive component of an explosive train. Upon actuated it initiates functioning of the explosive train; however, it will not reliable initiate a main high explosive charge. In general, primers are classified by method of initiation; e.g. percussion, electric, friction, etc. The term is also used to refer to the assembly which ignites propelling charges. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute.] primer, detonator A unit which consist of primer, a detonator, and, in some types, an intervening delay. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] priming charge An initial charge which transmits the detonation wave to the whole of the charge. [AAP-6] 2 Related term: charge . projectile An object capable of being propelled by a force normally from a gun and continuing in motion by virtue of its kinetic energy. [AAP-6]
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projected An improvised weapons system that delivers the main charge through the air to its target. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] projectile An object projected by an applied exterior force and continuing in motion by virtue of its own inertia, as a bullet, bomb, shell, or grenade. Also applied to rockets and to guided missiles. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] projectile, common A penetrating type projectile containing a bursting charge of high explosive, intended to explode after passing through the lighter, protective armor of a vessel. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] projectile, High explosive squash head (HESH) BRIT A thin metal shell, filled with plastic explosive. The projectile is designed to squash against an armoured target before detonation and to defeat the armour by producing spalls which are detached with considerable velocity from the back of the target plate. Also called a Projectile high explosive plastic (HEP), especially by the USA. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] proof ammunition Ammunition for use at proving grounds, generally consisting of low-cost, solid, blunt-nosed ammunition which duplicates service ammunition in weight and other characteristics so that it may be used to developed propelling charges as well as to proof fire guns. Sometimes referred to as proof shot or proof slug. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] proofing In land operations, the process following breaching, route or area clearance to further reduce the risk from mines or other explosive ordnance, improvised explosive devices and booby traps in a defined area. [AAP-6] Related terms: area clearance, booby trap, countermine operation; explosive ordnance; improvised explosive device; mine clearance. propellant That which provides the energy for propelling something; specially an explosive powder charge for propelling a bullet, shell, or the like. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] propellant A propelling agent; specially, a low explosive substance or mixture of substance which, trough burning, can be made to produce gases at controlled rates and to provide the energy necessary to propel ordnance. Propellants are classified according to physical state as either liquid or solid. Liquid propellants, used primarily in rocket engines, are classified as monopropellants, bipropellant, or multipropellants, according to the number of unmixed chemicals fed to the combustion chamber. Solid propellants, used primarily in gun type ordnance and rocket motors, are classified as either nitrocellulose based propellants or composite propellants. Nitrocellulose based propellants are further classified according to the number of basic explosives which they contain: a. single base propellant contains only one explosive ingredient, normally nitrocellulose, b. double base propellant - contains two explosive ingredients, commonly nitrocellulose and nitro glycerine, c. triple base propellant contains three principal active ingredients, such as nitrocellulose, nitro glycerine and nitro guanidine. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] propellant actuated devices (PAD) A device that employs the gases produced by burning propellants to perform a mechanical action other than the propelling of a projectile. These devices are compact package that can be mechanically, electrically, or gas triggered. They usually have self contained power sources which supply mechanical energy in the form of a special cartridge. For this reason, the devices were formerly known as cartridge actuated devices (CAD). [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] propellant powder A low explosive of fine granulation which, through burning, produces gases at a controlled rate to provide the energy for propelling a projectile. Restricted to small grain size. In larger grain form it is called propellant or propellant grain. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] proving See Route or Area Proving. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR]
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proximity fuze A fuze wherein primary initiation occurs by remotely sensing the presence, distance, and/or direction of a target or its associated environment by means of a signal generated by the fuze or emitted by the target, or by detecting a disturbance of a natural field surrounding the target. [AAP-6] proximity fuze A fuze wherein initiation occurs by detecting the presence and/or the position of a target by means of a signal emitted by the fuze or by the target. [AOP-38] pull IED An IED initiated by a person using a pull action. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] pyrotechnic timing switch A timing switch using a burning fuse with a know burn rate to start the initiation train. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] pyrotechnics A mixture of chemicals which when ignited is capable of reacting exothermically to produce light, heat, smoke, sound or gas, and may be used to introduce a delay into a firing system because of its known burning time. The term excludes propellants and explosives. [AAP-6] pyrotechnic delay A pyrotechnic device added to a firing system which transmits the ignition flame after a predetermined delay. [AAP-6]

Q
qualification A qualification is awarded on passing a course. The qualification confirms that the individual has passed the assessments of the Training Objectives (TOs) for that level of EOD operator, and has the proven ability to operate at that level. A qualification is awarded by the school that has trained and assessed the individual. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR) ] quality assurance (QA) Part of Quality Management (QM) focused on providing confidence that quality requirements will be fulfilled. [ISO 9000:2000] The purpose of QA in humanitarian demining is to confirm that management practices and operational procedures for demining are appropriate, are being applied, and will achieve the stated requirement in a safe, effective and efficient manner. Internal QA will be conducted by demining organisations themselves, but external inspections by an external monitoring body should also be conducted. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] quality control (QC) Part of Quality Management (QM) focused on fulfilling quality requirements. [ISO 9000:2000] QC relates to the inspection of a finished product. In the case of humanitarian demining, the 'product' is safe cleared land. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.] quality management (QM) Coordinated activities to direct and control an organisation with regard to quality. [ISO 9000:2000] [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations.]

R
radio controlled IED (RCIED) An IED initiated electronically in a wireless method consisting of a transmitter and receiver (i.e. personal mobile radio (PMR), cell phone, cordless phone, pager, etc). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] radiological Radioactive materials that cause casualties or restrict the use of terrain. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] remotely delivered mine A mine delivered to the target area by air assets, or by indirect fire from a distance of more than 500 metres. Note: The exact position of the mines may not be known. [AAP-6] Related term: scatterable mine. render safe procedure [AAP-6] Related term: explosive ordnance disposal procedure. render safe procedure A Render Safe Procedure (RSP) is an EOD action conducted by an appropriately trained operator, it means to apply special EOD methods and tools to provide for the interruption of functions or separation of essential components of UXO to prevent an unacceptable detonation. A RSP has a high level of assurance but requires time to conduct. It allows the best chance of explosive ordnance components to be recovered in a manner suitable for subsequent exploitation. Consequently it may provide opportunities to attack the networks [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed for new term in AJP 3.15 ] residual risk The risk remaining following the application of all reasonable efforts to remove and/or destroy all mine or UXO hazards from a specified area to a specified depth. [Modified from ISO Guide 51:1999] Note: In the context of humanitarian demining. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] risk Combination of the probability of occurrence of harm and the severity of that harm. [ISO Guide 51:1999(E)] [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] risk analysis Systematic use of available information to identify hazards and to estimate the risk. [ISO Guide 51:1999(E)] [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] risk assessment Overall process comprising a risk analysis and a risk evaluation. [ISO Guide 51:1999(E)] [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations risk reduction Actions taken to lessen the probability, negative consequences or both, associated with a particular risk. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] rounds A complete assembly of a projectile (with or without fuze), the propelling charge in a cartridge case and the means of igniting the propelling charge. The word is also used in the expression supply by complete rounds meaning that all the components necessary for the ammunition to be fired are issued together. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] route clearance In land operations, the detection and if found, the identification, marking and neutralization, destruction or removal of mines or other explosive ordnance, improvised explosive devices and booby traps threatening a defined route to allow a military operation to continue with reduced risk. Note: route clearance is normally conducted by military units. [AAP-6]

route or area proving Action taken to achieve sufficient confidence that a route or area is fit for operational use. Area or route proving comprises a thorough visual inspection followed by the trafficking of the area or route by an appropriately protected vehicle. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR]

S
safe The absence of risk. Normally the term tolerable risk is more appropriate and accurate. Note: In the context of munitions, the term safe is related to the safe position of a fuze. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] safe The absence of risk. In the context of EOD operations, the term acceptable risk is usually more appropriate and accurate. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] safe-to-arm switch A device used to arm the IED to ensure that the emplacer can safely plant the IED and leave the location. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] safety A locking cutoff device that prevents ordnance from being fired accidentally. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety Prevention of those conditions which can cause injury or death to personnel, or damage to or loss of equipment or property. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety The reduction of risk to a tolerable level. [ISO Guide 51:1999(E)] [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] safety and arming (S&A) devices A devices which serves to interrupt or complete an intricate explosive train, especially that of a guided missile. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terminology, abreviations and designations] safety and arming mechanism A dual function device which prevents the unintended activation of a main charge or propulsion unit prior to arming but allows activation thereafter upon receipt of the appropriate stimuli. [AAP-6] safety clip A clip specially designed to prevent pressure being applied to the upper portion of pressure-actuated ordnance. [Sources: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute.] safety factor Overload factor in design to ensure safe operation. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety lever The part of the grenade fuze that either is restrained by hand or by an adapter after the safety pin is removed. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety lever The lever that sets the safety on certain types of ordnance. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety fuze Pyrotechnics contained in a flexible and weatherproof sheath burning at a constant rate, used to tansmit a flame to the detonator, with a predetermined delay. [AAP-6] safety pin Preferred term: arming pin. [AAP-6]
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safety pin SA devices designed to fit the mechanism of a fuze and to remain with it throughout transportation. Presence of the safety devices prevents arming or functioning of the fuze; the device is intended to be removed by the user just prior to employment. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] safety wire A cable, wire or lanyard attached to the aircraft and routed to an expendable aircraft store to prevent arming initiation prior to store release. See also arming wire. [AAP-6] scatterable mine In land mine warfare, a mine laid without regard to classical pattern and which is designed to be delivered by aircraft, artillery, missile, ground dispenser or by hand. Once laid, it normally has a limited life. [AAP-6] Related terms: mine; remotely delivered mine. search adviser A unit officer who has received intermediate or advanced search training and can conduct the detailed planning, preparation, rehearsal and oversee the execution of search teams in search activities. [derived from: ATP-73, C-IED WG confirmed for AJP 3-15] search coordinator A search coordinator is an embedded staff officer at formation / battle group level, who has received intermediate or advanced search training and can conduct the detailed planning and preparation of search activities. He provides advice to the commander integrates search activity into other military activities and oversees subordinate search advisers. [derived from: ATP-73, C-IED WG confirmed for AJP 3-15] secondary device This is an additional device emplaced in the target area to attack individuals or vehicles after the initial event. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] secondary high explosive An explosive relatively insensitive to heat and shock and usually initiated by a primary high explosive. It requires a relatively long distance and time to build up from a deflagration to detonation and will not propagate in extremely small diameter columns. Used for boosters and bursting charges. Sometimes called non initiating high explosives NOTE: The use of the terms: secondary high explosive is not accepted by all authorities. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] secure To make secure or safe; protect (to secure a position against attack). [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] secure a. To make firm, fast, tight, etc (secure bolt). b. To put under restrain; tie up. [derived from Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] secure Not likely to fail or give way; firm; strong; stable (to make a knot secure). [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] security clearance A certification issued by national authority to indicate that a person has been investigated and is eligible for access to classified matter to the extent stated in the certification. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] self- deactivation In land mine warfare, automatically rendering a mine inoperable and there fore safe to handle by the exhaustion of a component essential to the operation of the mine. This process may be reversed by the replacement of the exhausted component, for example a battery. [AAP-6] self- destroying fuze A fuze designed to burst a projectile before the end of its flight. [AAP-6] Related term: fuze. self-neutralization The rendering of a mine inoperable, but not necessarily safe to handle, by means of an automatically functioning mechanism incorporated into the mine. This process may be reversible.
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stockpile In the context of mine action, a large accumulated stock of explosive ordnance. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] stray ammunition Any item of ammunition found in such places as parks, farmland, disused training grounds and built up areas, which is reported by military or civilian authorities. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] striker An extension of a firing pin. That part which strikes a primer or other charge to initiate an arming, but not a firing explosive train. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] strong back Any heavy timber, metal beam, or bar for taking a strain. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] submunition Any munition that, to perform its task, separates from a parent munition. [AAP-6] suicide An IED initiated by an operator at a time of his/her choosing in which the operator intentionally kills himself/herself as part of the attack, or to deny his/her capture. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] suicide vehicleborne IED (SVBIED) A Vehicle-borne IED (VBIED) whose explosives are intentionally initiated by the vehicles occupant. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] survey marker A durable and long lasting marker used to assist in the management of marked and cleared land during demining operations. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] sympathetic detonation Detonation of a charge by exploding another charge adjacent to it. [AAP-6] survivor Persons either individually or collectively who have suffered physical, emotional or psychological injury, economic loss or substantial impairment of their fundamental rights through acts or omissions related to the use of mines and UXO. Mine survivors or victims include directly impacted individuals, their families, and communities affected by landmines and UXO. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] survivor assistance Refers to all aid, relief, comfort and support provided to victims (including survivors) with the purpose of reducing the immediate and long-term medical and psychological implications of their trauma. Synonym: victim assistance [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] switch A device for making, breaking, or changing a connection. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] sympathetic detonation Detonation of a charge by exploding another charge adjacent to it. [AAP-6]

T
tactical characterization A description of how an IED incident was conducted or planned to be conducted. This characterization provides context for how a specific device is used/intended to be used. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] tactical design The specific design of an IED attack including but not limited to: position of the IED, the type of IED, method of actuation, intended target, type of road segment used, concealment technique, use of secondary devices, the time of day, etc. Tactical design addresses the questions of why here, why now, and why in this way. Terms used to describe a specific type of device or component of a device (e.g., SVBIED, EFP, etc.) are often used to describe all or part of the tactical design. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] tamping The process of tightly packing mud, wet sand, clay or other dense material on and around an explosive charge that has been placed on the surface of an obstacle, ordnance, or the like. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] tamping The covering of the EO and charge with sandbags filled with sand or earth (free of stones) in order to reduce the damaging effects of explosive blast and fragmentation to the surrounding environment. [derived from: EOD Lexicon GBR] technical categorization A description of an IED device using a hierarchical construct to identify its key components. The components identified in this categorization are the elements from which technical and forensic information is recovered and exploited. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] technical response force Wider organisation that includes civilian scientists and military personnel to respond to CBRN incidents. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR) ] technical survey The detailed topographical and technical investigation of known or suspected mined areas identified during the planning phase. Such areas would have been identified during any information gathering activities or surveys which form part of the General Mine Action Assessment (GMAA) process or have been otherwise reported. Note: previously referred to as a Level 2 survey [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations: 2003.] tension release A victim operated trigger that when tension is released such as when a taut wire or cord is cut or broken - releases releasing a spring-loaded firing pin or closes electrical contacts initiating the device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] tension/pull A victim operated device that triggers an explosion when tension is applied to a firing mechanism - such pulling a trip wire. The tension causes an action that releases a firing pin or activates an electrical or electronic switch. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] tertiary device This is an additional device emplaced in the target area to attack individuals or vehicles after the initial and secondary events. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] time fuze A fuze which contains a graduated time element to regulate the time interval after which the fuze will function. [AAP-6] Related term: fuze. time switch A type of switch that functions after a set time. Used widely against infrastructure targets [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] top centreline (TCL) A line, actual or imaginary, usually defined by suspension points, paint, or scribe marks on the surface of ordnance, such as
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bombs, rockets, guided missiles , torpedoes, and the like. The bottom centreline is 180from the top centreline. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] trembler Device that allows voltage to flow to the output wires after two metal parts make contact, completing the circuit. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] tripwire A wire stretched across a footpath, connected to an explosive device and which, when pulled or tripped, functions the explosive devices. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] tube, flash A tubular item designed to transmit an igniting spark, flame, or the like from a fuze or the like to an explosive. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] turn-in Within C-IED the process of handing in a weapon or item(s) of explosive ordnance to coalition forces, or host nation forces or other appropriate authority. [derived from: C-IED WG confirmed new term for AJP 3.15. It will be processed for inclusion in the NTDB and AAP-6. Adapted after consultation with NSA EOD WG]

U
unarmed The condition of a fuze (or other firing devices) in which the necessary steps to put it in condition to function have not been taken. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] unarmed The condition of the fuze when it is safe for handling, storage, and transportation. The fuze is partially armed if some, but not all, of the steps have been taken. [derived from: Glossary of EOD terms, American Language Course, Defense Language Institute] unarmed A system is unarmed when all safety devices are in a safe position. [AOP-38(5)] Related term: armed Under Vehicle IEDD (UVIED) An IED that is placed on the undercarriage of a vehicle (using string, tape, magnet, etc. as a form of attachment). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] Underbelly A type of IED employment in which the device targets the undercarriage of a vehicle, using large amounts of explosives buried to deliberately defeat armor (can include conventional land mines). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] underwater demolition The destruction or neutralisation of underwater obstacles; this is normally accomplished by underwater demolition teams. [AAP-6] unexploded ordnance / munition non explose Explosive ordnance that has been primed, fused, armed, or otherwise prepared for use and used in an armed conflict. It may have been fired, dropped, launched or projected yet remains unexploded either through malfunction or design or for any other reason. Note: For the purposes of the Instrument on Explosive Remnants of war. Unexploded ordnance integrates all non exploded devices. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Related term: unexploded explosive ordnance. unexploded explosive ordnance Explosive ordnance which has been primed, fused, armed or otherwise prepared for action, and which has been fired, dropped, launched, projected or placed in such a manner as to constitute a hazard to operations, installations, personnel or material and remains unexploded either by malfunction or design or for any other cause. [AAP-6 ] Related term: demining. United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS) The focal point within the UN system for all mine-related activities. Note: UNMAS is the office within the UN Secretariat responsible to the international community for the development and maintenance of IMAS. Note: UNICEF is the focal point for MRE, within the guidelines of UNMAS overall coordination. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] unknown bulk explosive (UBE) The term used to describe the unknown bulk explosive found in the main charge of an IED (after exploitation, it will be categorized). [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]
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V
validation The confirmation of the capabilities and performance of organisations, individuals, materiel or systems to meet defined standards or criteria, through the provision of objective evidence. Note: In the context of military forces, the hierarchical relationship in logical sequence is: assessment, analysis, evaluation, validation and certification. [AAP-6] vehicle-borne IED (VBIED) An IED delivered by any small ground-based vehicle (e.g., passenger vehicle, motorcycle, moped, bicycle, etc.) and/or serves as the concealment means for explosives, with an initiating device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] vehicle borne improvised explosive device (VBIED) An IED that is delivered in a vehicle. This method may have been chosen for a combination of factors including the ability to deliver a greater mass, more quickly and with a lower chance of detection. As well as the device itself, glass and metal of the vehicle will create shrapnel hazards. There is no lower limit to the weight of explosives needed for classification as a VBIED. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR) ] very shallow water Water having a depth less than 10 metres. [AAP-6] very shallow water mine countermeasures Searching for, detecting, locating, neutralizing and/or disposing of explosive ordnance and/or obstructions in very shallow water. [AAP-6] Related term: very shallow water. victim An individual who has suffered harm as a result of a mine or UXO accident. Note: In the context of victim assistance, the term victim may include dependants of a mine casualty, hence having a broader meaning than survivor. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] victim assistance Refers to all aid, relief, comfort and support provided to victims (including survivors) with the purpose of reducing the immediate and long-term medical and psychological implications of their trauma. [derived from: IMAS 04.10 Glossary of mine action terms, definitions and abbreviations] Synonym: survivor assistance, Related term: victim victim operated switch (VOIED) A type of switch that is activated by the actions of an unsuspecting individual, these devices rely on the target for the device carrying out some form of action that will cause the device to function. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon]

W
water- borne IED (WBIED) An IED delivered by floating, drifting, anchored, or propelled on or below the water and/or serves as the concealment means for explosives with an initiating device. [derived from: Weapons Technical Intelligence (WTI) Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Lexicon] water - borne IED (WBIED) An IED that is delivered in a boat (including inflatable boats, jet-ski and other personal watercraft, pilot launch or tug). This method may have been chosen for a combination of factors including the ability to deliver an IED to a target vessel with a lower chance of detection. In addition the explosive charge may be below the waterline to increase the damage caused to the target. There is no limit to the type of craft used or lower limit to the weight of explosives needed for classification as a WBIED. [derived from: JSP 364 Joint Service EOD Manual (GBR)]
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