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Page 14 Celebrations six broken cameras page 3 lithuanian memories page 12 www.jtnews.net n february
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Celebrations
six broken cameras page 3
lithuanian memories page 12
www.jtnews.net
n
february
8,
2013
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28
shevat
5773
n
volume
J T
the voice of
JEWIS
H
news
Washington
From Tel Aviv
to Chicago
to Seattle
One night of Israeli dance
Page 32
Todd RosenbeRg
professionalwashington.com
/jtnews
@jew_ish • @jewishcal
connecting our local Jewish community

2

opinion

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

tHE rabbI’S turn

A light unto the nations v2.0

Rabbi HaRRy Zeitlin Congregation beth Ha’Ari

Judaism has contributed

Zeitlin Congregation beth Ha’Ari Judaism has contributed source material, and method- ology for deriving halachah —

source material, and method- ology for deriving halachah — defined as “a going” (i.e., a path toward spiritual develop- ment) — ritual and liturgical law, as well as Jewish civil and communal law. The detailed descriptions and analyses of the written Torah text and of the Temple services have inspired us and fired both our imaginations and our yearn- ing, contributing greatly to our miraculous and unique survival as a homeless people. But is that really all it is? Beyond the various “internal” (lim- ited to religious/ritual/halachic) benefits Talmud study provides, the process itself is unique, powerful and multi-layered. Transcending all specific subjects, it trains our minds to think in very advanced ways. As we zero in on a point, we suddenly find ourselves examining other phenomena, which might share only one non-obvious similarity to our original subject. Some- times we’ll return to the main point, other times we’ll continue exploring and exam- ining a chain of associations. We examine everything from multiple points of view, both in isolation and in relation to other

a great deal to world civiliza-

tion. We introduced the con- cept of ethical monotheism and were among the first peo- ples to encourage universal literacy. Our tradition speaks of freedom and liberty for all — not just for an elite — a society based on law rather than power. We have much to be proud of. But have we run out of gas? Does our

tradition today offer anything more than

a private and temporary “shelter in the

storm” from an increasingly material-ori- ented, crisis-torn world? Does anything in our millennia-long story makes a differ- ence anymore? Is our charge to “be a light unto the nations” now obsolete? Or is the best yet to come? Perhaps our least appreciated resource (outside, of course, of yeshiva enclaves) is our Talmudic tradition. Among the many ways we can describe it, it is a two- millennia cooperative art project, a living system that continues to develop. It’s also a systematic unfolding of the Infi- nite into the physical world of boundar- ies and limits. It serves as the foundation,

ideas and opinions. Sometimes we’ll solve the puzzle, but other times we’ll just leave the question for the time being, marking it as, indeed, difficult — kushiya (“that’s a hard one”) or teiku (“we’ll wait for Elijah the Prophet announcing the imminent arrival of Messiah to explain”). If we take a step back, something even more curious emerges. Although the Talmud is based on questions and answers, it soon becomes apparent the answers were known before the discussion even begins. For example, the very beginning of the Oral Torah, the first chapter of the first tractate, Berachot, begins by asking from what time can we begin to say the eve- ning Shema. Obviously, the rabbis of the Mishna davened every day of their lives, as did their fathers and grandfathers and great-grandfathers. They knew exactly when to say the Shema. This is our first clue something much more important is going on — we’re being taught and drilled in advanced thinking. Daily Talmud study resembles nothing so closely as daily gym workouts or daily musical scale practice. Intense immer- sion in Talmud study, in addition to the religious and even the spiritual benefits, develops our minds to work linearly and

laterally, empirically and intuitively, seri- ally and associatively, all at the same time! Although the Gemara (Berachot 6b) defines its actual benefit as learning how to reason, I have no quarrel with those who want to limit their study to questions of halachah, nor with those who study in order to, in indescribable but actual ways, merge their intellect with the Divine Intel- lect in order to deepen their relation- ship with God. But I want to propose an entirely additional direction. Our world is a mess! Between almost universal economic meltdown, endless environmental disasters, continual wars and culture clashes, starvation, resurgent disease and probably more people living under slavery than at any time in the past, we’re all in a heap of trouble! To add even more urgency, our former problem-solv- ing strategies no longer seem effective. One reason for this crisis, I propose, is our exclusive reliance on science, based entirely on empiricism. Even ever-advanc- ing computing power doesn’t really help, since it’s the same binary-only fallacy, just at much higher speed. Let’s introduce rigorous Talmud study

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friday, february 8, 2013 . www.jtnews.net . jtnews

3
3

opinion

A sixth broken camera

Hen maZZig special to JTnews

I had been in Seattle and the U.S. only

a few days when I heard that Palestin-

ian Iyad Burnat, brother of the filmmaker of the Oscar-nominated feature docu- mentary, “5 Broken Cameras,” would be speaking about the “non-violent” nature of Palestinian demonstrations. I knew I had to attend the event.

I had met Iyad five years earlier when

I told them about another similar “non-

violent” demonstration when Palestinians

threw rocks and severely injured a young soldier who lost his eye. I asked Iyad, “How can you call these non-violent protests?” I then brought out my photo of one of Iyad’s demonstrations, which showed five masked Palestinians with big rocks

in their hands, preparing to hurl them at

Israeli soldiers. When I was in mid-sentence, a young man in the audience, probably in his early

20s and wearing a “Free Palestine” t-shirt, began screaming at me. When I had spoken about the injured Israeli soldiers,

he shouted, “Good. I’m glad. They deserved

it.” Then he began yelling, “Get this f--- ing, f---ing Zionist out of here.” Another Israeli in the audience stood up and told him to let me speak. But the young man continued his vulgar tirade, demanding that “Zionists” be removed from the room.

I attempted to calm him, reassuring him

that I had come to start a dialogue and that there was no need for such hostility. But the angry man started aggressively charging toward me. I simply turned and left the room. I was determined not to let him get into physical contact with me. The other Israeli man later told me that unfortunately, the confrontation did not end after I left. When I left, he also started to leave.

A woman reached out to him and said in

Hebrew, “Please don’t leave. I’m scared, but I want to ask a question.” The Israeli waited while she asked her question. Apparently, as Iyad attempted to answer, the aggressive man moved toward the Israeli, and while facing the woman who had asked the question, made threat- ening gestures, moving his hand across his

neck as if slitting someone’s throat. Then he charged across the room toward the Israeli

as though preparing to attack him. With no

way to protect himself or the woman who asked the question or another sympathetic attendee, the Israeli swung the camera he was holding to ward off the attacker. In the course of the confrontation, the Israeli man’s camera broke, resulting in what he called “the sixth broken camera.” This event was my introduction to the battle against Israel and its supporters in

I was a young Israeli soldier, an 18-year-

old who had just started my service in the Israeli Defense Forces. The IDF knew there would be a demonstration against Israel’s security fence near Ramallah, a Palestinian city in the West Bank. The IDF wanted someone who spoke Arabic to mediate between the demonstrators and the IDF soldiers and minimize the chances of any physical altercations. Since

I speak Arabic, I was chosen for this task. As soon as I arrived at the Palestinian town, I encountered Iyad Burnat, who was leading the demonstration. I tried to speak with him again and again, and ask him to stop what was becoming a violent riot. I told him there are other ways to protest and that talking with each other would work better than clashing with the IDF. In response, he shoved me to the ground and the crowd cheered. Soon after, the Palestinian demonstrators began hurling rocks and stones. One broke the jaw of a friend of mine, a fellow IDF soldier. He

was forced to stay in the hospital for three weeks until he recovered. Now, five years later, on January 13, 2013, I saw Iyad again at his presentation

in Seattle. I was unfamiliar with the spon-

soring groups, Jewish Voice for Peace and Students United for Palestinian Equal Rights (SUPER), but thought they might want the audience to hear what I had to say, even if they disagreed with me.

I sat quietly while Iyad talked. His pre-

sentation was full of lies, demonization of Israel and of Israel’s army, false accusa- tions, and deception. Hard as it was to do,

I listened politely to his hate speech. It was

even harder to sit still through his pictures

and video clips of soldiers being pushed and injured, accompanied by overly dra- matic music common in action and horror

films. It hurt me to hear the audience laugh every time an Israeli soldier fell down, and

to

see that the film had been edited to make

the U.S. I was shocked and saddened by the

it

seem that the IDF abused the demon-

hatred and lies of anti-Israel propagandists

strators. From personal experience, I knew the provocations and violence that forced the IDF to act were omitted. When Iyad opened the floor to ques-

tions, I waited patiently for others to speak.

I stood and asked Iyad if he recognized me.

As I expected, he said he did not. I told Iyad and the audience about the first time we met and how he had shoved me and how his demonstrators had broken the jaw of a fellow soldier who was my friend.

in the U.S. and by the aggressive effort to

silence me, my perspective, and the facts.

The Burnats and their film are indeed about “broken cameras,” but their cam- eras were not broken by the IDF. They manipulated reality to create a fractured vision that omits all context and is no more than raw anti-Israel propaganda.

Hen Mazzig is the shaliach for StandWithUs Northwest.

Solidarity with Palestinian non-violent resistance

eitan isaacson and Wendy elisHeva someRson special to JTnews

On Sun., Jan. 13, the Seattle chap- ter of Jewish Voice for Peace, with Stu- dents United for Palestinian Equal Rights (SUPER), co-hosted a talk by Iyad Burnat. Burnat is the head of the Bil’in Popular Committee and a leader in the village’s non-violent popular resistance movement. Since 2005, residents of the Pales- tinian village of Bil’in in the West Bank have held weekly unarmed demonstra- tions against the building of the Israeli wall through the community’s agricultural lands and the encroachment of illegal set- tlements. The demonstrators are joined by Israeli and international peace activists, and have maintained a commitment to non-violent methods of resistance in spite of armed, military opposition that has resulted in many injuries and some deaths. These demonstrations are the subject of the recent documentary “5 Broken Cam- eras,” the Oscar-nominated film directed by Iyad’s brother, Emad Burnat. Hen Mazzig, the Israeli representative for the Pacific Northwest chapter of Stand- WithUs, claims that when he was work- ing for the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) in Ramallah five years ago, he met Iyad, who acted violently toward him. There is no way of verifying the accuracy of this claim, but we recommend that you watch “5 Broken Cameras.” The film shows Iyad and the other demonstrators — week after week — peacefully protesting to gain their land back. You will also see a great deal of violence and aggression on the part of the IDF, who arrest and wound Iyad, his brother Emad, and many others, as well as kill one of their close friends. The village of Bil’in has been subject to

a military occupation for decades before Mazzig joined the IDF, and there are no signs of this changing anytime in the future, long after Mazzig’s involvement. As people without citizenship who were born into an illegal occupation of their land, Iyad and his community understand that the wholesale theft and destruction of their ancestral olive orchards will not be stemmed by asking politely, silent vigils, or by “talking with each other,” as Mazzig suggests. Instead, with their weekly demonstra- tions, the people of Bil’in have aligned themselves with other historic non-violent struggles for justice, including the Civil Rights movement in the U.S. and the strug- gle to end apartheid in South Africa. The Oscar nomination of “5 Broken Cameras,” which documents the Bil’in community’s struggle to regain their land, demonstrates the growing international attention the protests in Bil’in are attracting. Mazzig presents his role in the IDF as

a level-headed mediator. As a pro-Israeli

occupation organization, StandWithUs is trying to put a human face on a brutal mil- itary occupation in order to make it pal- atable to Americans who care about civil rights. In reality, Mazzig and the IDF’s Civil Administration unit are facilitating

a very lucrative (and illegal, according to

international law) real-estate grab of pri- vate Palestinian land, and the continued permanent colonization of the West Bank. During Iyad’s presentation of video footage shot by his brother, people in attendance at our event were not laughing at IDF soldiers. Instead, we were watching in shocked silence as IDF soldiers brutal- ized and attacked not only the protesters,

but all the villagers in Bil’in: They arrested Palestinian children in the middle of the night, took over Palestinian houses, and arrested more than half the men in the vil- lage on trumped-up charges. After Burnat’s presentation, Hen Mazzig asked his question, and a young man, unknown to JVP or SUPER, started yelling at him. JVP and SUPER supporters immediately tried to calm the young man down. We all knew Iyad could handle the question, and we encourage dialogue at our events. The young man eventually ran across the room, and the other Israeli man (identified by Mazzig) hit him on the head with a camera. Both the man with the camera and the younger man showed blatant disregard for the speaker and his message of non-vio- lent protest. By yelling and engaging in a physical confrontation, both men caused

a violent disruption, which upset the audi-

ence who had come to learn from Burnat and the long-standing commitment to unarmed resistance shown by the people of Bil’in. We took immediate action to de- escalate the situation and to ensure the safety of all attendees. JVP and SUPER strongly condemn all violence, including the verbal and physi- cal assault that occurred at the event. Our intent is to create a safe space for dialogue and education, and we regret that violence occurred at our event. The disruption only underscored the vital importance of Burnat’s message. As the presentation so compellingly showed, we believe that steadfast non-violent resis- tance in the face of the daily violence of the Israeli occupation will ultimately pave the way for justice. We are committed to ensuring that violence does not occur at any future events, and we ask all who attend our events to conduct themselves peacefully.

Eitan Isaacson and Wendy Elisheva Somerson are members of the Seattle chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace.

4

communiTy news

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Summit residents write their lives

emily K. alHadeff Associate editor, JTnews

On January 27, eight residents of the Summit at First Hill celebrated the launch of their literary anthology with the com- munity. “Stories from the Summit” con- sists of memoirs as well as two pieces of short fiction, and is the culmination of a writing course taught by community edu- cators Carol Starin and Cindy Muscatel in 2012. Muscatel, who has been teaching writ- ing to seniors since 1991, was impressed with the group. “There were good writers here,” she said. “They have really wonderful and mean- ingful stories to tell,” Starin added. Both women agreed that the students turned out to be their teachers. The stories capture experiences of bygone times, foreign worlds, and sweet romantic encounters that turned into life-

long partnerships. “My Two Lives,” by Ada Ash, 97, opens with her memory of marauding Cossacks and the sound of the bombs of the Russian Revolution and the First World War. In “The Life and Death of a Shabbos Chicken,” Ernie Mednick, who was born in 1918 in southern Utah, poignantly describes bringing a chicken to the butcher as a young boy. Adele Sharaga depicts her grandfather’s disobedience in spurning his arranged marriage for the girl of his dreams in the 1800s. Sharaga gets the last word in the book:

“My advice to those who are thinking about writing a memoir — don’t wait until you’re 91,” she said. “There’s too much to write and nobody to ask.” Copies of “Stories from the Summit” are available by contacting Summit activ- ities coordinator Beth Cordova at 206-

652-4444.

activ- ities coordinator Beth Cordova at 206- 652-4444. emily K. AlHAdeff The authors of the anthology

emily K. AlHAdeff

The authors of the anthology “Stories from the Summit,” and their two instructors, Carol Starin and Cindy Muscatel, fourth and fifth from the right.

Thank You… To Our Wonderful Chairs Our Fabulous Performer Iantha Sidell & Brooke Pariser Mona
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Coming

up

Making it Normal, Making it Safe: Women’s Voices from a West Bank Settlement

Wednesday, February 13, 1:30– 2:30 p.m.

Hannah Mayne, a doctoral student in anthropology at the University of Florida, will present ethnographic vignettes about women in established Jewish settlements, and their interpretations of economic, cul- tural, and religious issues. The findings make the conflict far more complicated than previously thought. This is the first in a series of lunchtime learning with scholars from around the country. The second, on Thurs., Feb. 21, Arie Dubnov will speak on “What is Jewish (If Anything) About Sir Isaiah Berlin’s Politi- cal Philosophy?” At the University of Washington, Thompson Hall Room 317, Seattle. For more information, contact Lauren Spo- kane at laurenjs@uw.edu or 206-543-0138, or visit stroumjewishstudies.org/events.

“I called Jewish Family Service because I was desperate.”

– Emergency Services Client, JFS

JFS services and programs are made possible through generous community support of

and programs are made possible through generous community support of For more information, please visit www.jfsseattle.org

For more information, please visit www.jfsseattle.org

and programs are made possible through generous community support of For more information, please visit www.jfsseattle.org

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.jtnews.net . jtnews

5
5

inside

lADiNo leSSoN

inside this issue

by isaac aZose La repuesta en su ora, vale un million. A timely answer is worth a million (dollars).

The fruits of learning together

6

On Tu B’Shevat, elementary school children from five Jewish day schools got together to learn, celebrate, and eat fruit.

 

Full circle

7

Like wine? Try some of ours

We will be joining with Royal Wine Distributors to conduct our annual Passover wine tasting on Feb. 19 and we’d like to invite a few of our readers to join us. Please send an email to associateeditor@jtnews.net explaining your knowledge about or experience with fine wines, and we will choose from those responses. We look forward to hearing from you!

ReMeMBeR WHeN

ReMeMBeR WHeN From The Jewish Transcript, February 11, 1976. In his first stint as prime minister,

From The Jewish Transcript, February 11, 1976. In his first stint as prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin spent four days in Washing- ton, D.C. to meet with dignitaries and government officials that included Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, left, and President Gerald Ford. Rabin, center, was hosted by his country’s ambassador to the U.S., Simcha Dinitz, right.

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transcript media

Fifteen years after meeting Rabbi Doron Kornbluth on a teen trip to Israel, Emily K. Alhadeff sat down with him in Seattle to talk about his latest research on burial and cremation.

We were there

12

Author Ellen Cassedy talks about her journey to her ancestral Lithuania, and what she hopes posterity will take away from her book about it.

No doctors, no lawyers

28

The Seattle Jewish film festival turned 18 and moved out of its parents’ house this year. What does the beloved festival have in store when it opens March 2?

 

From the rooftops

30

In

anticipation of Izhak Perlman’s upcoming performance, a fascinating history of the fiddle.

Very, very artistic

32

Chicago dance troupe with Israeli influence visits Seattle and promises an eclectic, forward-thinking performance.

A

 
 

More

M.o.T.: For the love of turkey

8

Crossword

8

Israel: To Your Health: Making brain waves

9

Community Calendar

10

Jewish and Veggie: Apple-tizers

13

Wedding Celebrations

14

The Arts

27

The Shouk Classifieds

27

Correction

In the “Remember When” photo from the Jan. 25, 2013 issue, the associated caption stated the former Temple B’nai Torah building had been sold to the group Toward Tradi- tion. The building was in fact sold to a Mercer Island church, which allowed Temple B’nai Torah to make use of the facility until its Bellevue building was completed. JTNews regrets the error.

Coming up February 22 Bar/Bat Mitzvah Celebrations Welcome, new advertisers! American Joint Distribution Committee
Coming up
February 22
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Celebrations
Welcome, new advertisers!
American Joint Distribution Committee • Burke Museum
Distinctive Design Florist • Racheli Ronen • Seattle Marriott Waterfront
Hotel • W Hotel
Tell them you saw them in JTNews!

6

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JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Jewish kids and special fruit unite:

SHA hosts interschool Tu B’Shevat celebration

gWen davis special to JTnews

Kids like pomegranates. Especially Rosie, a 4th-grade student at the Men- achem Mendel Seattle Cheder. So when MMSC teamed up with Seattle Hebrew Academy and three other Seattle Jewish day schools to celebrate Tu B’Shevat — the Jewish New Year for trees — Rosie was excited. “But I like all the fruits,” she made clear. On January 24, SHA hosted the inter- school 4th- and 5th-grade Tu B’Shevat cel- ebration with MMSC, Torah Day School, the Jewish Day School of Metropolitan Seattle, and the Seattle Jewish Commu- nity School. Students engaged in a host of inter- active activities throughout the morning to learn about the holiday. They went on nature walks, played Tu B’Shevat Jeop- ardy, made Tu B’Shevat table centerpieces, and played Tu B’Shevat Pictionary on a smart board. Students also learned about Israel, the blessings said over fruit, the environment, and about the holiday itself. Tu B’Shevat, the 15th of the month of Shevat on the Jewish calendar, marks the “new year” for the trees. The holiday falls at this time of year because the earli- est blooming trees in Israel emerge from

winter hibernation and begin a new fruit- bearing cycle. Furthermore, in ancient

times the date was important for deter- mining the age of trees so as to calculate the proper time of tithing produce.

The Torah references seven fruits, or species, special to Israel: Wheat, barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates,
The Torah references seven fruits,
or species, special to Israel: Wheat,
barley, grapes, figs, pomegranates,
olives and dates. Therefore, it is cus-
tomary on Tu B’Shevat to eat these
fruits.
At lunchtime, the students par-
ticipated in a Tu B’Shevat seder, with
gwen dAvis
Above, Seattle Hebrew
Academystudent Sammy
makesshish-kabobswith
Susan De Jaén Matalon,
SHA’s kindergarten-
eighth grade office
manager for the citywide
Tu B’Shevat seder.

Students from all of the day schools made Tu B’Shevat projects, such as flower pots, at the event.

gAbRielle Azose/sJCs

opportunities to sample the seven special fruits. They also ate ice cream and sang songs together. While Tu B’Shevat is a somewhat obscure holiday, the concept of a spiritual seder around the seven species was begun by Kabbalists in the 16th cen- tury and has become a popular custom. School staffers said the goal was for Jewish kids in Seattle to make friends with each other, regardless of their respec- tive schools. SHA acquired the money for these events by securing a grant from the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle. Since then, the schools plan to continue inter- school events. Earlier in the year, students met for an outdoor education week. “There’s nothing better than bringing Jewish children together. It’s a wonderful thing,” said Chaya Elishevitz, programs coordinator at MMSC. “It was a very well-organized and well-done event. It’s a special experience to see the Jewish schools come together. It’s cool for the kids.” The students said they appreciated the day, too, because it expanded their aware- ness. “Basically, it shows what other schools are like and what’s good about other schools,” said Sam, a 4th-grade student at SJCS.

March 8 Friday evening at 6:00pm: “They’ve let my people go! Now what?” Asher Ostrin
March 8
Friday evening at 6:00pm:
“They’ve let my people go! Now what?”
Asher Ostrin
The Seattle Jewish
community is cordially
invited to attend two
enlightening Shabbat
presentations by JDC’s
former Soviet Union
program director of 20+
years, at Herzl-Ner Tamid
Synagogue.
It’s 1990. Communism has collapsed.
The doors of the Soviet Union open.
A million Jews leave, but hundreds of
thousands remain behind. Come and
hear their remarkable stories.
March 9
Saturday morning at 10:00am:
“Could this be the most memorable
30 minutes you’ll spend this year?”
Experience the hidden stories of
global Jewish life you’ve never heard
before.
Herzl-Ner Tamid Synagogue
3700 East Mercer Way
Mercer Island, WA 98040
www.JDC.org
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friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

communiTy news

7

Matters of life and death

emily K. alHadeff Associate editor, JTnews

In 1998, Doron Kornbluth and his wife, Sarah Tikvah, hosted several members of my NFTY teen tour group for Shabbat. I never forgot that spiritually enlightening weekend or their hospitality. Fast forward to last month, when I saw an announcement for a talk by one Doron Kornbluth at the Hillel at the University of Washington and at the West Seattle Torah Learning Center on his latest research and book, “Cremation or Burial: A Jewish Per- spective.” Over lunch at Island Crust Café , Doron and I reconnected, and he filled me in on the unappetizing details of why more and more Jews are making un-Jewish end- of-life choices. JTNews: What got you onto cremation and burial as a topic? Doron Kornbluth: You have this major uptick in cremation rates, nationally and amongst the Jewish community. I was just really bothered by it. People make their own decisions — they’re adults — but the real- ity is that people don’t have information to make decisions. There are a lot of miscon- ceptions out there. So I started researching it. JT: Describe the Jewish practice of burial. DK: For thousands of years Jews have always insisted on burial. A Roman his- torian, Tacitus, when he was describing the Jews to his Roman compatriots, one

of the few defining characteristics that he said was, “Jews bury, rather than burn, the dead.” Even 2,000 years ago it stuck out. The Romans cremated. The Greeks cre- mated. All these guys cremated. It’s not

a new idea; it’s actually an old idea. Jews

always stuck out for burial. JT: So what has happened? DK: In the last 30 years, cremation rates nationally among non-Jews have gone up. The same with Jews. And in the last four years, it’s gone up dramatically. Imagine if you’re a Jewish person and you’re looking at the planet, looking at America, and you see that every year 5 percent less of the Jewish community is celebrating Hanukkah. Last year it was 100 percent, 95, 90, and you know that within a few years if you don’t do any-

thing about it, soon it’s just going to be the strictly Orthodox who celebrate Hanuk- kah. What would you do? How would you feel? I think if you were a caring Jew you’d be concerned about that. The reality is that it is happening, but it’s happening with different parts of Juda- ism. It’s happening to Jewish burial. It used to be a given, but because of a lack of education and understanding, it is not

a given at all.

JT: What are some factors causing this

dramatic rise in cremation?

are some factors causing this dramatic rise in cremation? CouRTesy doRon KoRnbluTH DK: When it comes

CouRTesy doRon KoRnbluTH

DK: When it comes to why people are cremating, cost is definitely a big factor. There’s another reason:

Mobility. Meaning, it used to be that people for gener- ations would be in the same town. Today, you have grandparents in one city, parents in a different city, kids in another city. People also think it’s better for the environment, but it’s not. Environmen- talists are not in favor of cremation. [This misconception is due to a 1950s campaign against burial because of the pollution caused by metal caskets and embalming.] What does Jewish tradition say? No metal casket, no embalming. Jewish burials are actually a model of environmentalism. Plants, animals, birds — what do they do? They grow, and they die, and their bodies go back into the earth. So the natural way is actually burial. It’s the way of every living thing. When you’re putting it into a modern oven — and by the way, it’s essen- tially an Auschwitz oven, it hasn’t changed — you’re firing it up — that’s artificial. JT: What is the significance of burying the dead in Judaism? DK: Israel has released hundreds of ter- rorists many times in the last 20 years just for bodies of the dead. Every Jew deserves a proper burial.

Most Jews have heard of the idea of tearing kriyah [tearing a garment as a sign of mourning]. You tear kriyah

because you are express- ing that life is not going on. There’s a loss. Something’s broken. In burial, the earth itself is tearing kriyah. Isn’t it a beautiful symbolism? The earth is open- ing up. You’re making a tear in the earth. Not only is the cremation rate very, very high, but funeral services are on the way out. We don’t want to deal with it. Woody Allen once said, “I don’t want to receive immortality through my work, I want to achieve it through not dying.” People don’t want to talk about it, but Judaism’s point is, “No, we don’t do that.” The tradition is to bury within a com- munity cemetery, emphasizing that we’re part of a community. We live there together forever. The word “cem- etery” comes from the Greek for “sleep- ing place.” That’s why a grave looks like a bed. Because it’s a quiet, subtle promise of rebirth. It’s kind of a beautiful idea.

“Cremation or Burial: A Jewish View,” as well as Doron Kornbluth’s three other books on being, dating, and raising children Jewish, are available at www.doronkornbluth.com. Read an extended version of this story at www.jtnews.net.

lowering your cholesterol, knowing your family history of heart disease, staying active, losing weight and

lowering your cholesterol, knowing your family history of heart disease, staying active, losing weight and eating healthfully. Eating healthfully will have multiple benefits. A diet rich in a variety of vegetables and fruits, lean proteins, healthy fats and whole grains can be a great defense against the onset of high cholesterol, high blood pressure and heart disease. The AHA recommends that an adult consuming 2,000 calories daily should aim for:

Fruits and vegetables: At least 4.5 cups a day. Fish (preferably oily fish, like salmon): At least two 3.5-ounce servings a week. Fiber-rich whole grains: At least three 1-ounce servings a day. Nuts, legumes and seeds: At least 4 servings a week, opting for unsalted varieties whenever possible. If you would like to support QFC’s Charity of the Month, Go Red for Women, please hand a donation card to your checker, or drop your spare change in the checkstand coin jar. Thank you for supporting this great cause.

Go Red for Women

February 1, 2013, marked the 10th anniversary of National Wear Red Day ® , an event that was inspired to help raise awareness of the shocking frequency of heart disease in women. That first National Wear Red Day ® in 2003 subsequently motivated the American Heart Association to create Go Red for Women, a social initiative intended to increase awareness, educate and inspire women to take action in the fight against heart disease. Funds raised for this initiative are also used to support scientific research and develop new tools and treatments in the fight against heart disease. Go Red for Women is QFC’s Charity of the Month for February. Here are some sobering facts provided by the American Heart Association. Heart disease is the #1 killer of women in the U.S. It accounts for 1 of every 3 women’s deaths. 90 percent of women have one or more risk factors that can lead to heart disease. Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease. Heart disease can affect women of all ages, even women who lead healthy lifestyles, if they have other risk factors. 64 percent of women who die suddenly from coronary heart disease had no previous symptoms. Despite those statistics, only about 20% of women believe that heart disease is the greatest health threat they face. Go Red for Women and the American Heart Association are combatting heart disease through awareness and education and by motivating women to take action. Awareness includes understanding the symptoms of a heart attack, which can be different in women than in men. Women’s symptoms can include shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain. Other symptoms women should look out for are dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting, pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen and extreme fatigue. Knowing those symptoms is important, but wouldn’t it be even better to avoid those symptoms? And that means taking actions to reduce the risk of ever having a heart attack. Some of the actions the American Heart Association recommends are:

not smoking, managing your blood sugar, getting your blood pressure under control,

For comments or questions you can contact QFC Associate Communications Manager Ken Banks at ken.banks@qfci.com or phone 425-462-2205.

8

m.o.T.: member of The Tribe

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Reach Out Across the World by Mike Selinker “When you come near a city to

Reach Out Across the World

by Mike Selinker

Reach Out Across the World by Mike Selinker “When you come near a city to fight

“When you come near a city to fight against it, then proclaim peace unto it!” said the scholar Maimonides. The sister city effort proclaims peace between cities in far-off lands, opening trade and building bridges. Seattle has 21 sister cities around the world, of which nine are located in this puzzle. They’re just waiting for you to visit them.

ACROSS

DOWN

1

O, GQ, or YM

1

Animated film featuring a dragon voiced by

4

In Hollywood, they often have hearts of gold

Eddie Murphy

11

Injured, as a knee

2

Concert venue

14

Hi-tech address

3

See 53-Across

15

Defeat in a joust

4

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled

16

On the Beach actress Gardner

Vehicle, for short

17

To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper

5

Singer Yoko

18

Kenyan sister city of Seattle

6

George Takei’s catchphrase

19

Crackpot

7

Japanese sister city of Seattle

20

B’day, for one

8

Mesozoic and Paleozoic, for two

22

“Indubitably!”

9

Type of Internet feed

23

Soup server

10

Experimental habitat created by the US

25

French sister city of Seattle

Navy

27

Irish sister city of Seattle

11

Like TV shows from the ’50s

28

Israeli sister city of Seattle

12

Stalactite : cave ::

: mouth

32

Like 1933 Gold Double Eagle coins

13

“Ahoy!” addressee

35

Member of the Mongol Empire

21

See 66-Across

36

March Madness org.

24

Computer pioneer Turing

40

You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret

26

Acronym used by alien seekers

41

“God bless us, every one!” proclaimer

27

Halliwell, aka Ginger Spice

43

Move like a bunny

29

Charged

44

Oft-repeated lyric in “My Boyfriend’s Back”

30

“Mr. Roboto” band

46

Weapon carried by many on Bilbo’s

31

Flame war participant, perhaps

“unexpected journey”

32

Chicago mayor Emanuel

47

Perform acts of penance

33

pr 2 , for a circle

49

Succeeds

34

Icelandic sister city of Seattle

51

Moves from residential to commercial, say

37

Chinese sister city of Seattle

53

With 3-Down, first American to orbit Earth

38

Top-notch

54

Yin’s reflection

39

Rise of the Planet of the

55

Burn Notice network

41

Uzbek sister city of Seattle

57

Israeli legislature

42

Mexican sister city of Seattle

61

NFL players such as 64-Across

45

Zodiac lion

64

He set records for yards, completions,

48

Measure of bricks?

touchdowns, and retirement announcements

50

Traveler’s stopover

66

With 21-Down, Beatles song and album title

52

Feature of a hurricane or a potato

67

River through 25-Across

55

Acronym used by alien seekers

69

With The, satiric news source

56

Comic

(oft-ridiculed typeface)

70

Go gray

58

Pizzazz

71

Desi who loved Lucy

59

Maker of the Genesis

72

SNL offering

60

Pace

73

Reason for a day dream?

62

They may be strapless or wireless

who?!”

74

Harasses

63

 

65

King at Versailles

68

“If you

loved one…”

Answers on page 13

© 2012 Eltana Wood-Fired Bagel Cafe, 1538 12th Avenue, Seattle. All rights reserved. Puzzle created by Lone Shark Games, Inc. Edited by Mike Selinker and Mark L. Gottlieb.

We love our music and we love our food

diana bRement JTnews Columnist

1 When you see “The

Music Man” at Seattle’s

5th Avenue Theater

(starting Feb. 7), keep your eye on 9-year-old Jasmine Harrick. The North Seattle resident plays Gracie Shinn in her first professional stage production. Getting the part first involved an open audi- tion with 400 other kids, plus two callbacks, a process that took so long she was sure she wouldn’t get the role. “I was really surprised,” she says.

get the role. “I was really surprised,” she says. M.o.T. Member of the Tribe 2 I

M.o.T.

Member of

the Tribe

2 I ended my inter- view with Adam Gold craving Thanksgiving

dinner with all the fixin’s. The long-time Woodinville resident and I talked turkey, specifically about Gobble, his all-turkey-all-the-time res- taurant in the Woodgate Mall there. Gobble opened just in time for Thanksgiving last year, and though you can always get turkey with trim- mings, Adam says it’s about

more than just that holiday. “For those who aren’t into [Thanksgiv-

that holiday. “For those who aren’t into [Thanksgiv- Jeff CARpenTeR Nine-year-old Jasmine Harrick, sitting front

Jeff CARpenTeR

Nine-year-old Jasmine Harrick, sitting front and center, is part of the cast of the 5th Avenue Theatre’s production of “Music Man.”

Jasmine started acting lessons when she was 5 and this is the third musical she’s appeared in. She played Annie in drama school Broadway Bound’s production last year, and this past summer her whole family — mom Deb, dad Tod, and sister Eliana — were in Kitsap Forest Theater’s production of “Fiddler on the Roof.” As the representative Jews in the cast, “we were the ‘rabbinical’ consults” for the director, Deb says. Jasmine’s favorite parts of “Music Man” so far are the dances for “Shapoopie” and “76 Trombones,” and her favorite song is “Iowa Stubborn” (me, too!). Jas, as her family calls her, took up tap dancing this year, and in her free time she enjoys climbing “just about anything,” and, she adds, “I really love art.” As a homeschooled student, Jasmine has an easier time fitting her schoolwork into the demanding rehearsal schedule than the other kids in the production, including Josh Feinsilber, who was fea- tured in this column in November. The Harricks are members of Temple Beth Am, but as Deb teaches at Kadima, the sisters go to religion school there. “We have a rich Jewish life in our home,” says Mom, and, no surprise, “we’re always singing.”

ing], we’re doing a whole Italian thing,” he told me the week we spoke. “Yesterday we did a turkey cacciatore,” and a turkey osso bucco sold out quickly. It’s all, he says, “about the bird.” Whole Foster Farms birds, provided by Costco, are slow roasted on-site daily and are the basis of most of what is served there, which depends on the day and either Adam’s or the chef’s whim. Diners order at the coun- ter, watch their meals prepared, then sit at communal farmhouse-style tables. Turkey sandwiches are a permanent fixture, and Adam spoke glowingly of the turkey potpie made on premises, and the delectable des- serts, including chocolate cake, bread pud- ding and, of course, pumpkin pie. Adam does like to cook — view his YouTube cooking videos at the restaurant site www.gobblerestaurant.com — but he’s discovered that restaurant ownership is about much more than food. The day we spoke he was working on an employee manual, “86 pages of bureaucratic fun,” he says. The experience has been “an adven- ture and an education.” The Southern California native moved to the Northwest about 30 years ago because he liked the seasonal weather. A former marketing executive, he worked in

X PAge 29

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

israel: To your healTh

9

New technology makes waves in brain research

Janis siegel JTnews Columnist

Former Israeli Prime Min- ister Ariel Sharon has been in a vegetative state since his second stroke and subsequent brain hemorrhage in 2006. Recently, however, brain researchers in Israel identified considerable activity in the political and military icon’s brain after a two-hour brain scan with the most sophisti- cated MRI available to them, the Philips INGENIA 3.OT,

which the company claims is the first digital broadband MRI system delivering some of the best imaging avail- able today. After being shown pictures of his family, hearing the sound of his son’s voice, and being exposed to other sensory stimulation, researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev’s Brain Imaging Research Center at the Soroka University Medical Center determined that Sharon’s brain showed activity in each of the cor- responding regions specific to the stimuli, signaling to researchers that the informa- tion was being processed correctly. Although many in the region and around the world are skeptical that evi- dence of brain waves might eventually lead to Sharon regaining full consciousness, Dr. Ilan Shelef, the director of medical imag- ing at Soroka, said that this technology will benefit many others in the years to come. “This is a dream come true,” said Shelef. “The unique location of the MRI here at Soroka University Medical Center enables us to [make] clinical research and basic sci- ence research. We really hope that many researchers will come out to the Negev.” The state-of-the-art scanner features “dStream architecture” that gives research- ers an excellent digital signal producing high-quality images. The speed and acces- sibility built into the technology also make the process shorter for most patients and easier for the technicians. However, it is the scanner’s capabil- ity to vividly display the brain’s activity in isolated centers that has already pro- vided new information about autism for Dr. Galia Avidan, in the department of psychology at BGU’s Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, and part of the research team experimenting with the new tech- nology. Avidan said she is becoming increas- ingly persuaded that these kinds of condi- tions are actually a wiring or connectivity problem in the neural pathways of the brain. “What we found is that for an individ- ual with autism, who has difficulty extract- ing the emotional response in the person they are looking at, it turns out that they hardly look at the eyes of the person stand- ing in front of them,” said Avidan. “They prefer scanning other features, such as

said Avidan. “They prefer scanning other features, such as ISraEl: To Your Health the mouth, or

ISraEl:

To Your Health

the mouth, or even features around the hairline.” Avidan’s team also stud- ied people who have difficulty reading other people’s expres- sions or “face reading and face processing.” Although these subjects showed normal activity in the posterior por- tion of the brain, which rec- ognizes faces, the activity in the anterior part of the brain was compromised, where the

processing network is located. “We try to understand how different areas of the brain process complex infor- mation,” said Avidan. “We scan subjects while they view different images and we examine the brain activation for these dif- ferent stimuli.” Dr. Martin Monti, a professor in the departments of psychology and neuro- surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles, created the innovative study methodology. Among the many tests performed on the former prime minister, the most encouraging being Sharon’s responses to external stimuli, researchers were less enthusiastic about the possibility that he is aware of what he is seeing, hearing, and feeling. “Information from the external world is being transferred to the appropriate parts of Sharon’s brain,” Monti told BGU staff. “However, the evidence does not as clearly indicate whether he is consciously perceiving this information.” Other team members included Prof. Alon Friedman and Tzvi Ganel of the BGU Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience, and Erez Freud, a doctoral candidate in BGU’s department of psychology. BGU researchers have high hopes for the future of the MRI, its capabilities, and its applications in Israel and around the world. “Knowing what sensory channels are intact in these patients is crucial for the family and the treating team to stimulate and interact with them,” Friedman told BGU staff. Avidan believes it could lead to new therapies that could ultimately result in bringing families closer to their affected family member. “We hope that by understanding the way the brain encodes and represents visual information and by understand- ing the psychological basis for visual per- ception,” said Avidan, “we may be able to create specific training regimes and spe- cific rehabilitation programs.”

Longtime JTNews correspondent and freelance journalist Janis Siegel has covered international health research for SELF magazine and campaigns for Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

J T pick up your jewisH news news Here Ballard Ballard Branch Library Caffe Fiore
J T
pick up your
jewisH
news
news Here
Ballard
Ballard Branch Library
Caffe Fiore
QFC

downtown Bellevue

Bellevue Public Library Blazing Bagels Newport Way Public Library Top Pot Doughnuts Whole Foods Market

Capitol Hill

The Bagel Deli Café Victrola (15th Avenue E) Café Victrola (Pike Street) Central Co-op Council House Horizon House Jewish Family Service Miller Community Center Seattle Hebrew Academy Seattle Public Library, Henry Branch The Summit at First Hill Temple De Hirsch Sinai Top Pot Doughnuts

Crossroads

& overlake

Crossroads Mall Jewish Day School Temple B’nai Torah

eastgate/FaCtoria

Goldberg’s Famous Deli QFC Factoria Temple De Hirsch Sinai

edmonds

Edmonds Bookshop

everett

Everett Public Library (both branches) Temple Beth Or

Fremont

Fremont PCC Seattle Public Library

greenlake, greenwood & nortH

Couth Buzzard Books Forza Coffee Company Greenlake Library Greenwood Library Mockingbird Books

issaquaH

Issaquah Public Library PCC Market QFC (Gilman Blvd.) QFC (Klahanie) Zeek’s Pizza

lake Forest park

& BotHell

Lake Forest Park Public Library Third Place Books

madison park & madrona

Sally Goldmark Library Seattle Public Library, Montlake Branch

merCer island

Albertsons Alpenland Community Center at Mercerview Cong. Herzl-Ner Tamid Einstein Bros Bagels Freshy’s Seafood Market Island Books Island Crust Café Mercer Island Public Library NW Yeshiva High School QFC (north and south) Stopsky’s Delicatessen Stroum JCC

montlake & nortHend

Bagel Oasis Congregation Beth Shalom Einstein Bros Bagels, U-Village Emanuel Congregation Grateful Bread Bakery Great Harvest Bread Co. Metropolitan Market North End JCC Ravenna Eckstein Community Center Ravenna Third Place Books Seattle Jewish Community School Seattle Public Library, NE Branch Temple Beth Am UW Chabad UW Hillel View Ridge PCC YMCA Whole Foods Market

queen anne, magnolia / interBay

Bamboo Garden Bayview Retirement Community Einstein Bros Bagels Seattle Public Library, Queen Anne Branch Whole Foods Market

redmond & kirkland

Blazing Bagels Kirkland Public Library Park Place Books QFC (Park Place) Redmond Public Library Trilogy Residences

seward park & ColumBia City

Bikur Cholim-Machzikay Hadath Caffe Vita Congregation Ezra Bessaroth Geraldine’s Counter Kline Galland Home PCC QFC- Rainier Seattle Kollel Sephardic Bikur Holim Torah Day School

sHoreline

Shoreline Public Library

soutH lake union

Whole Foods Market

vasHon island

Vashon Public Library

wallingFord

Essential Baking Co. Seattle Public Library QFC Wallingford Center

west seattle

Husky Deli Kol HaNeshamah Seattle Public Library

woodinville

Woodinville Public Library

suggest a loCation wHere you’d like to see jtnews at editor@jtnews.net
suggest a loCation
wHere you’d like to
see jtnews at
editor@jtnews.net

10

communiTy calendar

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

the calendar

the calendar  
 

to Jewish Washington

@jewishcal

For a complete listing of events, or to add your event to the JTNews calendar, visit calendar.jtnews.net. Calendar events must be submitted no later than 10 days before publication.

Candlelighting times february 8

5:03 p.m.

february 15

5:14

p.m.

february 22

5:25 p.m.

march 1

5:35 p.m.

fRiday 8 febRuaRy

8–10 p.m. — Annex Theatre presents ‘undo’ Bret Fetzer at info@annextheatre.org or 206-728-0933 or www.annextheatre.org/

2013-season/main-stage/undo

Rachel and Joe Pfeiffer are getting divorced and everyone they know is invited. Guilt, grief, desire, and booze collide in this darkly comedic new play. $5- $20, all Thursdays by donation. Runs through Feb. 16. At the Annex Theatre, 1100 E Pike St., Seattle.

10:30 a.m. — pJ library storytime at sJCs Amy at amyhp@jewishinseattle.org The PJ Library welcomes Shoshana Stombaugh as guest musician and storyteller. Songs and a story, activities and playgroup fun. At the Seattle Jewish Community School, 12351 Eighth Ave. NE, Seattle.

satuRday 9 febRuaRy

6:30–8:30 p.m. — pajama Havdallah goes up, up, and Away Irit Eliav at IritEliav@bethshalomseattle.org

or 206-524-0075 Service, Jewish art projects, cookies, and Jewish music. Special guests from Mad Science Shows will teach about the principles of air and pressure. Free. RSVP requested. At Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave. NE, Seattle.

sunday 10 febRuaRy

9:45 a.m.–12 p.m. — Herzl-ner Tamid legacy brunch Nadine Strauss at Nadine@h-nt.org or 206-232-8555 or h-nt.org Annual fundraiser brunch, featuring guest speaker Chef Emily Moore. Tickets start at $18. At Herzl- Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.

5:30–9 p.m. — sJCs gala 2013 Karen Friedman at development@sjcs.net or www.sjcs.net Seattle Jewish Community School Gala 2013, honoring alumni parents Howard and Eileen Klein. Dinner, live auction and program start at 6:45 p.m. At SJCS, 12351 Eighth Ave. NE, Seattle.

7–8:30 p.m. — new voices in world Jewish music: galeet dardashti Lauren Spokane at jewishst@uw.edu or 206-543-0138 or stroumjewishstudies.org Through conversations and live performances, three music artists will showcase their Sephardic roots from medieval Spain to Greece, Iran, Turkey, and Jerusalem. Next up: Galeet Dardashti. Free. At UW School of Music, Brechemin Auditorium, Seattle.

tuesday 12 febRuaRy

10:30 a.m.–12 p.m. — stories in stone:

urban geology Ellen Hendin at endlessopps@jfsseattle.org or 206-861-3183 or www.jfsseattle.org David Williams, writer and geologist, examines the rocks and stones you pass daily and makes connections between local buildings, structures, and the stone they’re made from. At Temple De Hirsch Sinai, 1441 16th Ave., Seattle.

Wednesday 13 febRuaRy

1:30–2:30 p.m. — lunchtime learning series presents: Hannah mayne Lauren Spokane at laurenjs@uw.edu or 206-543-0138 or stroumjewishstudies.org/ events “Making it Normal, Making it Safe: Women’s Voices from a West Bank Settlement.” Mayne, a doctoral student at the University of Florida, will read a few ethnographic vignettes and issues these conversations reveal. At the University of Washington, Thompson Hall Room 317, Seattle.

7–9 p.m. — we Are Here: memories of the lithuanian Holocaust Mary Kozy at genmail@marykozy.net or www.jgsws.org/meetings.php Author Ellen Cassedy will share how a journey to the old world changed her views of the past, the future, and herself. Free to JGSWS members; $5/ non-members. At the Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.

7:30 p.m. — Hadassah book exchange Meryl Alcabes at Beersheva.Hadassah@ gmail.com or 206-723-1558 Trade used books for something new to read. Meet and mingle with other Hadassah members and help support the medical clown program at Hadassah Hospital. At the home of Cathy Godwin (RSVP for address), Seattle.

tHuRsday 14 febRuaRy

12 p.m. — new york Trip shabbaton Ari Hoffman at thehoffather@gmail.com or SeattleNCSY.com Join JSU, Jewish High, and NCSY from all over the Northwest on a tour of NYC. $599, including airfare. Limited space available.

s unday 17 f eb R ua R y

6–8 p.m. — bCmH on wheels Julie Greene at julie@bcmhseattle.org or

206-721-0970

Rollerskate with BCMH and benefit the Seattle Hebrew Academy’s 8th grade Israel trip. $5. At Bellevue Skate King, 2301 140th Ave. NE, Bellevue.

tuesday 19 febRuaRy

12–1:30 p.m. — Tour of mcCaw Hall Ellen Hendin at endlessopps@jfsseattle.org or 206-861-3183 or www.jfsseattle.org Explore McCaw Hall’s public spaces with a staff member and learn its history and construction makeover. At McCaw Hall, Seattle Center.

 

where to worship

 

GREATER SEATTLE

Kavana Cooperative

kavanaseattle@gmail.com

bELLinGhAm

Congregation Emanu-El (Reform)

Chabad House 206/527-1411

K’hal Ateres Zekainim (Orthodox) 206/722-1464 at Kline Galland Home, 7500 Seward Park Ave. S Mitriyah (Progressive, Unaffiliated)

Chabad Jewish Center of Whatcom County

P

O Box 30234

509/835-5050

4541

19th Ave. NE

102

Highland Dr.

360/393-3845

www.spokaneemanu-el.org Temple Beth Shalom (Conservative)

Bet Alef (Meditative) 206/527-9399

Congregation Beth Israel (Reform)

1111

Harvard Ave., Seattle

www.mitriyah.com 206/651-5891 Secular Jewish Circle of Puget Sound (Humanist) www.secularjewishcircle.org 206/528-1944 Sephardic Bikur Holim Congregation (Orthodox)

2200

Broadway

360/733-8890

1322

E 30th Ave.

509/747-3304

Congregation Kol Ami (Reform) 425/844-1604

 

bREmERTon

 

TAcomA

16530

Avondale Rd. NE, Woodinville

Congregation Beth Hatikvah 11th and Veneta

360/373-9884

Chabad-Lubavitch of Pierce County

Cong. Beis Menachem (Traditional Hassidic)

2146

N Mildred St

253/565-8770

1837

156th Ave. NE, Bellevue

425/957-7860

6500

52nd Ave. S

206/723-3028

 

EVERETT / LynnWood

Temple Beth El (Reform)

253/564-7101

Congregation Beth Shalom (Conservative)

The Summit at First Hill (Orthodox)

Chabad Jewish Center of Snohomish County

5975 S 12th St.

6800

35th Ave. NE 206/524-0075

1200

University St.

206/652-4444

19626

76th Ave. W, Lynnwood

425/640-2811

 

TRi ciTiES

Cong. Bikur Cholim Machzikay Hadath

Temple Beth Am (Reform)

206/525-0915

Temple Beth Or (Reform)

425/259-7125

Congregation Beth Sholom (Conservative)

(Orthodox)

 

2632

NE 80th St.

3215

Lombard St., Everett

312 Thayer Drive, Richland

509/375-4740

5145

S Morgan St.

206/721-0970

Temple B’nai Torah (Reform)

425/603-9677

 

FoRT LEWiS

 

VAncouVER

Capitol Hill Minyan-BCMH (Orthodox)

15727

NE 4th St., Bellevue

Jewish Chapel Liggett Avenue and 12th

253/967-6590

Chabad-Lubavitch of Clark County

1501

17th Ave. E

206/721-0970

Temple De Hirsch Sinai (Reform) Seattle, 1441 16th Ave. Bellevue, 3850 156th Ave. SE

 

9604

NE 126th Ave., Suite 2320

360/993-5222

Congregation Eitz Or (Jewish Renewal) Call for locations 206/467-2617

206/323-8486

 

iSSAquAh

Rabbi@ChabadClarkCounty.com www.chabadclarkcounty.com Congregation Kol Ami www.jewishvancouverusa.org

Chabad of the Central Cascades

 

Cong. Ezra Bessaroth (Sephardic Orthodox)

 

SOuTH KING COuNTy

24121

SE Black Nugget Rd.

425/427-1654

360/574-5169

5217

S Brandon St.

206/722-5500

Bet Chaverim (Reform)

206/577-0403

 

oLympiA

Congregation Shaarei Tefilah-Lubavitch (Orthodox/Chabad)

25701

14th Place S, Des Moines

Chabad Jewish Discovery Center

   

VAShon iSLAnd

 

WEST SEATTLE

1611

Legion Way SE

360/584-4306

Havurat Ee Shalom

206/567-1608

6250

43rd Ave. NE

206/527-1411

Kol HaNeshamah (Reform) Alki UCC, 6115 SW Hinds St.

206/935-1590

Congregation B’nai Torah (Conservative)

15401 Westside Highway

Congregation Shevet Achim (Orthodox)

3437

Libby Rd.

360/943-7354

P

O Box 89, Vashon Island, WA 98070

5017 90th Ave. SE (at NW Yeshiva HS)

Torah Learning Center (Orthodox)

Temple Beth Hatfiloh (Reconstructionist)

WALLA WALLA

Mercer Island Congregation Tikvah Chadashah (LGBTQ)

206/275-1539

5121

SW Olga St.

206/643-5353

201

8th Ave. SE

360/754-8519

Congregation Beth Israel

509/522-2511

   

poRT AnGELES And SEquim

WEnATchEE

206/355-1414

WAShinGTon STATE

Congregation B’nai Shalom

360/452-2471

Greater Wenatchee Jewish Community 509/662-3333 or 206/782-1044

Emanuel Congregation (Modern Orthodox)

 

AbERdEEn

 

poRT ToWnSEnd

3412 NE 65th St. 206/525-1055

Temple Beth Israel

360/533-5755

Congregation Bet Shira

360/379-3042

WhidbEy iSLAnd

Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation (Conservative) 206/232-8555

1819

Sumner at Martin

puLLmAn, WA And moScoW, id

Jewish Community of Whidbey Island

 

bAinbRidGE iSLAnd

Jewish Community of the Palouse 509/334-7868 or 208/882-1280

 

360/331-2190

3700

E Mercer Way, Mercer Island

Congregation Kol Shalom (Reform)

   

yAkimA

Hillel (Multi-denominational)

 

9010

Miller Road NE

206/855-0885

SpokAnE

Temple Shalom (Reform)

509/453-8988

4745

17th Ave. NE

206/527-1997

Chavurat Shir Hayam

206/842-8453

Chabad of Spokane County

1517

Browne Ave.

Kadima (Reconstructionist) 206/547-3914

12353 8th Ave. NE, Seattle

4116 E 37th Ave.

509/443-0770

yakimatemple@gmail.com

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

communiTy calendar

11

7–9 p.m. — Caring for Aging parents: A Teamwork Approach Leonid Orlov at familylife@jfsseattle.org or 206-861-8784 or www.jfsseattle.org Learn how to keep relationships strong as families care for a frail or ailing older person. $15 at door; $10 in advance; $25 family of 3 or more. Scholarships available. At Jewish Family Service, 1601 16th Ave., Seattle.

Wednesday 20 febRuaRy

7–9 p.m. — israel matters 2.0: The forbid- den Conversation Rabbi Yohanna Kinberg at 425-603-9677 or www.templebnaitorah.org Panelists Rabbi Yohanna Kinberg, Inbar Gazit, and Nance Morris Adler discuss religion and gender equality in modern Israeli society. $5 suggested donation. At Temple B’nai Torah, 15727 NE Fourth St., Bellevue.

tH u R sday 21 f ebRua Ry

10:30 a.m.–12 p.m. — The gates founda- tion’s pacific northwest initiative Ellen Hendin at endlessopps@jfsseattle.org or 206-323-8486 or www.jfsseattle.org David Bley of the Gates Foundation will describe strategies to help vulnerable children and families. At Temple De Hirsch Sinai, 1441 16th Ave., Seattle.

1:30–2:30 p.m. — lunchtime learning series presents Arie dubnov laurenjs@uw.edu or 206-543-0138 or stroumjewishstudies.org/events Dubnov’s recent book, “Isaiah Berlin: The Journey of a Jewish Liberal,” offers an intellectual biography of the philosopher, political thinker, and historian of ideas. At the University of Washington, Thompson Hall Room 317, Seattle.

satuRday 23 febRuaRy

7–11 p.m. — erev purim Carol Benedick at carolbenedick@bethshalomseattle.org or 206-524-0075 or bethshalomseattle.org Megillah reading for all. Klez Katz. Shushan Masquerade Ball. At Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave. NE, Seattle.

7:10 p.m. — bCmH purim party Julie Greene at julie@bcmhseattle.org or

206-721-0970

Purim bash with live band, food, moon bounce and a costume contest for adults and kids with prizes. Free. At BCMH, 5145 S Morgan St., Seattle.

s unday 24 f eb R ua R y

9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. — purim Carol Benedick at carolbenedick@bethshalomseattle.org or 206-524-0075 or bethshalomseattle.org Megillah reading. Purim Katan (for families with

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children ages 0-5). Purim carnival. At Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave. NE, Seattle.

12–3 p.m. — sJCC Annual purim Carnival Zach Duitch at ZachD@sjcc.org or 206-232-7115 or www.sjcc.org Carnival games, prizes, dancing, and music. Purchase tickets for carnival games. Free. At the Stroum JCC, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.

3–5 p.m. — purim Celebration for people of All Abilities Marjorie Schnyder at familylife@jfsseattle.org or 206-861-3146 or www.jfsseattle.org Accessible community-wide celebration with music, activities and a special Purim spiel. All ages welcome. Contact by Feb. 17 to discuss special accommodations. At Congregation Beth Shalom, 6800 35th Ave. NE, Seattle.

9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. — under the sea purim Carnival

Rachel Nemhauser at rnemhauser@templebnaitorah.org or 425-603-9677 or www.templebnaitorah.org Celebrate Purim dressed as your favorite sea creature. For ages 3-12. Free. At Temple B’nai Torah, 15727 NE Fourth St., Bellevue.

monday 25 febRuaRy

7:30–9 p.m. — in-depth study of narratives that Repeat in the bible Rabbi Jill Levy at rabbi.levy@h-nt.org or 206-232-8555 or www.h-nt.org/ our-congregation/learning/adult-lifelong Many Torah stories are told more than once. Explore examples and reflect on how this phenomenon affects your relationship with Jewish text and tradition. Bring a Tanach. $36. At Herzl- Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island.

Tamid Conservative Congregation, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island. Join Temple De Hirsch Sinai for Purim
Tamid Conservative Congregation, 3700 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island. Join Temple De Hirsch Sinai for Purim

Join Temple De Hirsch Sinai for Purim on February 24
Join Temple De Hirsch Sinai
for Purim on February 24

12

The arTs

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

exploring the Lithuanian Holocaust with author ellen Cassedy

diana bRement JTnews Columnist

In the year since her book, “We are Here:

Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust” (University of Nebraska), came out, Ellen Cassedy has traveled around the country to speak about the summer she spent studying Yiddish in Lithuania and what she learned about how Lithuanians are trying to come to grips with what happened to their Jewish citizens during World War II. “It’s been quite an adventure,” says the author. “I’ve been so moved by people who have opened themselves up to this material. Just reading about the Holocaust is hard and painful.” Cassedy will speak in the Seattle area twice next week. On Mon., Feb. 11, she will appear at a gathering of the Jewish Genea- logical Society of Washington State. On Feb. 12, she speaks at the University Bookstore. Cassedy journeyed to Lithuania, where her family had its roots, to take an inten-

iF You go

Ellen Cassedy will address the Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State on Mon., Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. at the Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 E Mercer Way, Mercer Island. Free for members/$5 nonmem- bers. On Tues., Feb. 12 at 7 p.m. she will speak at the University Bookstore, 4326 University Way NE, Seattle. Free.

By writing this book and speaking about it, she said “what I do today is make sure I don’t have to make that decision.” She said she hopes for a world “where people can stand up in the face of injustice without jeopardizing ourselves.” Cassedy doesn’t challenge Lithuanians. She asks some gentle questions and observes “some brave souls” — a minority of Lithu- anians who pose these questions “to their fellow Lithuanians.” In that country, cur- rently dominated by right-wing nationalist politics, Cassedy feels it’s important to talk to those who are engaged in what she called “good-hearted…fragile initiatives” of get- ting their society to talk about the Holocaust.

X PAge 31

sive course in Yiddish. Just before she left, her uncle made a startling revelation to her about his time in the ghetto, which changed her perspective on the Holo- caust. Living in Vilna, once known as “Jerusalem of the north,” she began to ask Lithuanians about their per- spectives on what happened during the war. She learned that moral definitions are not always drawn as clearly as most of us believe. “My book asks people to look with respect at people

who a lot of us in the Jewish community in the United States have thought of as being on the other side,” she said.

have thought of as being on the other side,” she said. J. TKATCH Author ellen Cassedy

J. TKATCH

Author ellen Cassedy wrote about her experience in

Lithuania to learn about the fate of the country’s Jews during and

after World War II.

The author continued her language studies, and her often-humorous attempts to master the extremely com- plicated grammar of Yid- dish are laid out side by side with her conversations with Lithuanians, including an elderly man who wanted to talk to a Jew before he died. Complicating the issue is that many Lithuanians see themselves as victims, too — both of the Nazis and the Soviets. Many are com- pletely ignorant of what happened to the Jewish pop-

ulation, a testament to how isolated the cultures were from one another. There is much denial, and there were many righteous gentiles. Cassedy explores the moral gray area of what gentile Lithuanians did and did not do during the war. “If it’s a choice between protecting your own family versus reaching out across a cultural divide to stand up for another part of a population,” observed Cassedy, we are naïve if we think we would automatically rescue someone else at our own risk. “It’s a question we all have to ask our- selves,” she said.

would automatically rescue someone else at our own risk. “It’s a question we all have to
would automatically rescue someone else at our own risk. “It’s a question we all have to
would automatically rescue someone else at our own risk. “It’s a question we all have to

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

Jewish and veggie

13

Dress up your Pink Lady for a Purim party treat

micHael natKin JTnews Columnist

This is one of my favorite appetizers to serve for a party; they are a cinch to make and will surprise your guests with the unexpected combination of caramelized apple, blue cheese, and tarragon. The key is to use a good, crisp-cook- ing apple and then really car- amelize it deeply, like you see in the picture. Using both a quickly made tarragon oil and

the fresh leaves is a good trick to amp up the flavor.

I prefer a creamy blue

cheese that will get a little melty on the warm apples, such as Blue de Causses, but any blue cheese will work. Instead of tar- ragon, you could also use basil or even arugula.

If you have any fancy finishing salts

(which you can find at high-end food retailers), this is the perfect dish to use them on. A few grains will sit beautifully on top of the apples and add a bit of extra crunch and interest.

of the apples and add a bit of extra crunch and interest. Jewish and Veggie 2

Jewish and

Veggie

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt

16 thin slices of crusty baguette

1 Tbs. unsalted butter

2 small apples such as Pink Lady,

cut into 16 wedges Tiny pinch of cayenne pepper Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup blue cheese (such as Blue de Causses or Gorgonzola dolce), at room temperature Flaky sea salt (such as Maldon, a.k.a. the world’s greatest salt) or

large-crystal sea salt (such as red Hawaiian salt)

Preheat oven or toaster oven to 400º.

Set aside 32 nice looking tarragon leaves. In a mortar and pestle or mini food processor, roughly purée the re- maining tarragon with the olive oil.

Brush the baguette slices with the tarragon oil, reserving the crushed tarragon. Toast in the oven (on a bak- ing sheet) or toaster oven until golden brown and crispy, about 5 minutes.

Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook the apples in a single layer, working in batches if needed, until both sides are golden brown and somewhat tender, about 5 minutes. Season with a pinch of cayenne pepper and several grinds of

Caramelized Apple and Blue Cheese Crostini

Makes 16 crostini Time: 20 minutes

1/2 cup loosely packed fresh tarragon leaves

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black pepper. To serve, arrange two slices of cooked apple

on each crostini. Top

with 1/2 teaspoon of the blue cheese, a speck of the crushed tarragon, two whole tarragon leaves, and a few grains of sea salt.

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friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

wedding celebraTions

15

TYING THE KNOT?

Interior photo:Yours By John Photography. Cake photo: Azzura Photography.
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16

wedding celebraTions

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Bear Creek Country Club

. friday, february 8, 2013 Bear Creek Country Club Located amid the foothills of the Cascade

Located amid the foothills of the Cascade Mountains, Bear

Creek’s lovely wooded setting is the idyllic location for your outdoor wedding. Close to Seattle yet far from the hectic pace

of the city, Bear Creek is one of the most unique places to get

married in Washington. Whether you are planning an intimate affair or a gala for 200 guests, you will have all the elements you need to make your special day perfect. From its stunning ballroom to the tented terrace that overlooks the golf course, the pristine wooded location is ideal for a romantic wedding ceremony and abundant photo opportunities. Your wedding can be customized with rows of white wedding chairs, a floral archway, and a white aisle runner. Inside the newly renovated clubhouse, you’ll find ban- quet rooms that feature breathtaking panoramic views of the reflecting lakes and illuminated fountains. At 13737 202nd Ave. NE, Woodinville, WA 98077. Contact Elise Roberts at 425-883-4770, ext. 231 or EventDirector@bearcreekcc.com.

Ben Bridge Jeweler

In 1912 a personal jeweler opened a family-run store in downtown Seattle. Over a

hundred years later, Ben Bridge Jeweler is still

a family-run business, but one that has grown

to more than 70 stores. Today, Ben’s grand- sons Ed and Jon Bridge manage the company. They attribute Ben Bridge’s longevity and suc- cess to the company’s commitment to quality and customer service. “We want our customers to feel confident with every selection,” explains Ed Bridge. “That’s why Ben Bridge has more Certified Gemologists than any other jeweler in the country.” Even after 100 years, Ben Bridge is still growing. This includes opening multiple stores dedicated to the wildly popular jewelry line, Pandora. As they look to the next 100 years, the Bridge family knows one thing will never change: Ben Bridge is dedicated to being your personal jeweler. Find locations at www.benbridge.com.

The Burke Museum

Envision your wedding dancing among dinosaurs? Or surrounded by beautiful gemstones and works of art from around the globe? For those looking for an elegant event with a twist, the Burke Museum is the perfect place for unique and memorable weddings. Located on the

place for unique and memorable weddings. Located on the beautiful University of Washington campus, the Burke
place for unique and memorable weddings. Located on the beautiful University of Washington campus, the Burke

beautiful University of Washington campus, the Burke offers a wide array of outdoor photo opportunities, from totem poles to cherry blossoms and historic build- ings on the Quad. The lobby and other event spaces feature beautiful, quirky, and fascinating treasures. Whatever your vision and budget, the Burke Museum provides a variety of reception spaces that will have your guests talking about your big day for years to come. For more information, contact them today at useburke@ uw.edu, 206-221-7083, or visit their website at www.burkemuseum.org/rentals.

Dani Weiss Photography

at www.burkemuseum.org/rentals. Dani Weiss Photography Dani Weiss has traveled the world perfecting her skills as a
at www.burkemuseum.org/rentals. Dani Weiss Photography Dani Weiss has traveled the world perfecting her skills as a
at www.burkemuseum.org/rentals. Dani Weiss Photography Dani Weiss has traveled the world perfecting her skills as a
at www.burkemuseum.org/rentals. Dani Weiss Photography Dani Weiss has traveled the world perfecting her skills as a

Dani Weiss has traveled the world perfecting her skills as a photographer and build- ing a portfolio of her specialty:

people and places. Portraits, wed- dings, B’nai Mitzvah, anniversaries, and family reunions are captured by Dani in a true-to-life documen- tary style. Dani has been a profes- sional photographer since 1987. In addition to family celebrations pho- tography, she shoots portraits and works freelance for several publica- tions. Dani recently won the JTNews Best of Everything Readers’ Choice survey for the 6th year in a row and has won the Brides Choice Award on Wedding Wire two years in a row. She holds a degree in fash- ion and commercial photography as well as photojournalism. She is currently involved with the Seattle Professional Photographers’ Associ- ation and the Greater Seattle Busi- ness Association. Contact her at 206-760-3336 or www.daniweissphotography.com.

Contact her at 206-760-3336 or www.daniweissphotography.com. Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum. When
Contact her at 206-760-3336 or www.daniweissphotography.com. Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum. When
Contact her at 206-760-3336 or www.daniweissphotography.com. Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum. When
Contact her at 206-760-3336 or www.daniweissphotography.com. Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum. When

Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum. When you host your wedding celebration at one of SAM’s three stunning locations, you offer your guests an extraordinary experience: from light-filled contemporary spaces, to historic Art Deco architecture, to breathtaking views of Seattle’s waterfront. Let our imaginative team inspire you and assist with creating a truly unique and artful event.

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wedding celebraTions

17

Distinctive Design Florist

Distinctive Design Florist is a Seattle-based floral and event design service that creates exquisite floral designs for weddings, parties and corporate events. It is their one-of-a-kind design to fit the client’s vision, style, and special day that keeps them coming back for more! Distinctive Design delivers beauty and ser- vice beyond flowers. They also offer a wide selection of rental and decor accessories for table centerpieces, ceremonies, receptions and parties. They are able to meet all of your event requirements — just ask, and they will make it happen! A family-owned and operated business, Distinctive Design has a combined total of 50-plus years in the floral industry. This busi- ness was conceived in 2000 with the goal of using years of experience and creativity to exceed clients’ dreams and visions in creating a memorable occasion. Contact 206-714-6776 or anna.b1@earthlink.net, or visit www.DistinctiveDesignFlorist.com.

Emmanuels Fine Rug & Upholstery Specialists

They’ve been cleaning rugs, carpets, furniture and fine Orientals for more than 103 years. You can count on them! Highest-quality carpet cleaning, custom in-plant rug washing, rug repair and blind and upholstery cleaning. They specialize in Oriental care, repair and mend- ing and restoration. Emmanuel’s is the place to go for consigned new and antique Orien- tals, rug sales and appraisals, as well as on-site carpet cleaning and maintenance. Fifteen percent off all in-home services and 30 percent off all cash-and-carry cleaning services. Gift certificates available. For more information call 206-322-2200, fax 325-3841, or visit www.emmanuelsrug.com.

Fireworks Galleries

Thank you all very much for, once again, naming Fireworks Galleries best independent gift store! Their goal is to offer items that will delight. Whatever your occasion, or if you are simply treating yourself, Fireworks aims to provide you with a treat that is unexpected and inspira- tional. They are constantly seeking out new Judaica that reflects their quirky yet sophisticated nature and have some new menorah offerings as well as mezuzot. They have had couples register for their impending weddings and later gushed over their Judaica gifts from Fireworks.

and later gushed over their Judaica gifts from Fireworks. EventDirector@bearcreekcc.com Elise, 425.883.4770 ext. 231
EventDirector@bearcreekcc.com Elise, 425.883.4770 ext. 231 13737 202nd Avenue NE, Woodinville www.bearcreekcc.com
EventDirector@bearcreekcc.com
Elise, 425.883.4770 ext. 231
13737 202nd Avenue NE, Woodinville
www.bearcreekcc.com

Their wedding gifts are not limited to Judaica! Included in their wide array of offerings are shadowbox picture frames, which are also a big hit. As pictured in this issue of JTNews (on page 22), these lovely picture frames offer sentiments that come from the heart. Come visit them at one of their five locations in Seattle or Bellevue. Or, if you have a ticket to fly, you can visit them at one of their two locations in the Central Terminal of SeaTac. Friend Fireworks on Facebook and let them know what you have brought home from Fireworks! If you have ques- tions, give them a jingle at 425-688-0933 or visit them online at www.fireworksgallery.net.

Hotel 1000

Hotel 1000 in downtown Seattle opened in June 2006 and features 120 luxury guest rooms, BOKA Restaurant + BAR, Spaahh and The Golf Club. At Hotel 1000, genuine and per- sonalized service, leading-edge technology and intimate yet spectacular accommodations redefine the luxury experience. Hotel 1000 offers distinctive amenities, anticipative service, and a customized experience tailored to any occasion. Located at 1000 First Ave. at the corner of Madison Street, Hotel 1000 is steps from the waterfront along Elliott Bay, and conveniently centered between Pike Place Market, Seattle Art Museum, the business district, and lively and historic Pioneer Square. Call 206-957-1000.

and lively and historic Pioneer Square. Call 206-957-1000. Your Wedding Your Way 570 Roy ◆ Seattle
and lively and historic Pioneer Square. Call 206-957-1000. Your Wedding Your Way 570 Roy ◆ Seattle

Your Wedding Your Way

Pioneer Square. Call 206-957-1000. Your Wedding Your Way 570 Roy ◆ Seattle (206)285-RUIN www.theruins.net Special

570 Roy ◆ Seattle

(206)285-RUIN

www.theruins.net

Special Moments are Better when Shared Sheraton is where people come together to share once-in-a-lifetime
Special Moments
are Better
when Shared
Sheraton is where people
come together to share
once-in-a-lifetime memories.
Intimate spaces, award-winning
catering and inviting
accommodations combine
to create the day you’ve
always dreamed of.
Book at Sheraton.com or call 206-621-9000
Kosher catering provided by Nosh Away
©2011 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reservaed. Sheraton and its
logo are the trademarks of Starwood Hotels & resorts Worldwide, Inc. or its affiliates.

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

18

wedding celebraTions

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Kaspars Special Events and Catering

You will remember your special day for the rest of your life, so choosing the right partners to help you is an important decision. The team at Kaspars Special Events and Catering, with more than 22 years of experience and a reputation for excellence, will support you through the entire planning process, including venue selection, menu creation, ceremony, and recep- tion planning, ensuring you are stress-free. Family owned and operated, Kaspars’ passion is to provide creative, fresh cuisine and superior service at a reasonable price. They cater to groups of all sizes, both within Kaspars as well as at off-site locations, including private homes. Whether you are entertaining a few or a few hundred guests, the elements for success are the same: Superb fare, impeccable ser- vice, the proper ambience, and the right caterer! Kaspars Special Events and Catering has it all. Visit www.kaspars.com or call 206-298-0123 or fax 206-298-0146.

Imagine your special day aboard a beautifully appointed yacht, with ever-changing views of Seattle’s skyline,
Imagine your special day aboard a beautifully appointed yacht, with ever-changing
views of Seattle’s skyline, surrounded by sparkling water and the scenic shorelines of
Lake Union and Lake Washington. Waterways Cruises offers full service catering, event
planning, a variety of wedding packages and elegant venues for receptions, rehearsal
dinners, post-wedding brunch and other bridal events.
dinners, post-wedding brunch and other bridal events. WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO SAY “ I
dinners, post-wedding brunch and other bridal events. WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO SAY “ I
dinners, post-wedding brunch and other bridal events. WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO SAY “ I

WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO

and other bridal events. WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO SAY “ I DO ” AT
and other bridal events. WOODLAND PARK ZOO INVITES YOU TO SAY “ I DO ” AT

SAY “ I DO ” AT THE ZOO!

Seattle’s most cherished community resource is the perfect setting for wedding ceremonies, receptions and rehearsal dinners.

For event planning call 206.548.2590 or email groupsales@ zoo.org

WWW.ZOO.ORG

call 206.548.2590 or email groupsales@ zoo.org WWW.ZOO.ORG Photos : Matt Shumate Photography (top left & top

Photos : Matt Shumate Photography (top left & top center); Lancer Catering (top right); Winnie Forbes Photography (center); Dennis Conner, WPZ (bottom)

Larkspur Landing Bellevue

“We like to think of our guests as friends visiting from out of town.” Give your guests a suite experience at Larkspur Landing’s all-suite hotel in Bellevue. Their hotel is conveniently located near local synagogues and provides an ideal place to stay for families visiting from out of town for Bar or Bat Mitzvahs, weddings, or other social events. Let your guests enjoy their comfortable FeatherBorne beds, complimentary healthy-start breakfast each morning, and full in-room kitch- ens. Group rates are available. Contact sales and catering coordinator Megan Frodge at 425-201-1262 or mfrodge@larkspurhotels.com.

Law Office of Ralph Maimon

Ralph Maimon has practiced in greater Seattle for 40 years, graduating from Garfield and the University of Washington (BA Political Science and Law School). Now, in the conve- nient Eastlake neighborhood, he helps clients in a myriad of legal areas including preparing wills, trusts, and financial and health care powers of attorney. Without proper estate plan- ning, an estate will be distributed according to statutes, likely to be contrary to what the client wants. He collaborates with financial planners and tax accountants to make sure your estate plan is effective and a “good fit.” Law office of Ralph Maimon, P.S., 2825 Eastlake Avenue E, Suite 120, Seattle, WA 98102. Contact 206-323-0911, 206-323-0915 (fax) or rmaimon@maimonlaw.com.

206-323-0911, 206-323-0915 (fax) or rmaimon@maimonlaw.com. 4500–4 th Ave. South, Seattle WA 206.749.5400
4500–4 th Ave. South, Seattle WA 206.749.5400 www.pedersens.com
4500–4 th Ave. South, Seattle WA
206.749.5400
www.pedersens.com
CELEBRATE The life before you Unique and memorable weddings at the BURKE MUSEUM
CELEBRATE
The life before you
Unique and memorable weddings
at the BURKE MUSEUM

www.burkemuseum.org/rentals

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

wedding celebraTions

19

Marianna Trio

For all your special occasions, weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs and all your other simchas. Jewish and world music. Traditional and contemporary. Dance and concert. Many years of experience in all types of music. For more information about their music trio, please call 206-715-8796 or visit www.mariannagroup.com.

Pedersens

The Event Rental Experts

Stylish party rentals including:

Racheli Ronen John L.Scott Real Estate

Personalized service is just a phone call away. Racheli knows the importance of feeling at home. She is an expert in relocation and will help make the move as seamless as possible. As your realtor and trusted advisor, she will be there every step of the way to find your dream home. Whether you are buying your first home, selling your home or looking for an investment property or rental property, Racheli Ronen is committed to providing you with superior service to reach your goals! Your choice for realtor and trusted advisor, call or email Racheli Ronen today for more information at 425-908-0375 or rachelironen@johnlscott.com.

• Specialty linen

• Cutlery

• Catering equipment • Unique tabletop items

• Glassware

• Tables

• China

• Chair covers

• Designer chairs

Redmond Marriott Towncenter

Located among the gorgeous scenery of Redmond, the Redmond Marriott Towncenter has everything to celebrate the perfect Bar or Bat Mitzvah. Surround your loved one and all your special guests in the welcoming warmth of its beautifully decorated reception areas. With more than 10,000 square feet of flexible space, you’ll have the ideal venue to host an intimate affair for your closest family and friends to a grand gath- ering for everyone to enjoy. Allow their Marriott-cer- tified event professionals to help you create the day, from the décor to finding the right photographer to setting the menu to your exact desires. They’ll be on hand to make sure every detail is cov- ered and everything runs exactly as you wish. Sit back, relax and let them set the stage for a day your loved one, and all your special guests, will treasure forever. Mazel tov! Call 425-498-4040 or visit redmondmarriott.com today.

tov! Call 425-498-4040 or visit redmondmarriott.com today. 4500 4th Ave. S, Seattle. Call 206-749-5400 or visit

4500 4th Ave. S, Seattle. Call 206-749-5400 or visit www.pedersens.com.

Pogacha

Pogacha of Issaquah is a casual fine-dining restau- rant nestled in Issaquah with easy access from I-90. They pride themselves on their fresh, delicious food, excep- tional service, and friendly neighborhood atmosphere. Pogacha has two private dining rooms and full-service catering, and they are delighted to provide personalized event planning with their friendly Pogacha touch. They offer Northwest cuisine with an Adriatic flair. All of the food is made from scratch, using only the freshest ingredients. For questions or information, contact event dining manager Sarah Barnes at 425-392-5550 (office), 425-269-2616 (cell) or sarah@pogacha.com. For catering contact Justin McMartin at 425-894-7441.

For catering contact Justin McMartin at 425-894-7441. A WEDDING LIKE NO OTHER. With a gorgeous location
A WEDDING LIKE NO OTHER. With a gorgeous location and 10,000 sq ft of beautiful
A WEDDING LIKE NO OTHER.
With a gorgeous location and 10,000 sq ft of beautiful
reception space, we’d be honored to host your perfect
wedding. Relax and enjoy a day you’ll never forget, while
our event professionals see to every detail.
Call 425.498.4040 or
visit redmondmarriott.com
7401 164th Avenue NE
Redmond, WA 98052
www.mariannagroup.com
www.mariannagroup.com
164th Avenue NE Redmond, WA 98052 www.mariannagroup.com For that special occasion or no occasion at all.

For that special occasion

or no occasion

at all.

The Ben Bridge Signature Diamond pendant with a 1/6 ct. center diamond in beautiful 14K white gold.

with a 1/6 ct. center diamond in beautiful 14K white gold. FLORIST JTNEWS READERS BY Distinctive
FLORIST JTNEWS READERS BY Distinctive Design Florist Based in Seattle 425.825.9187
FLORIST
JTNEWS READERS
BY
Distinctive
Design
Florist
Based in Seattle
425.825.9187
www.DistinctiveDesignFlorist.com
Contact for all inquiries and
a complimentary consultation
www.DistinctiveDesignFlorist.com Contact for all inquiries and a complimentary consultation SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

20

wedding celebraTions

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

Seattle Art Museum

Love is an art… Planning the perfect event is, too. Planning a summer wedding? Create a lifetime of memories at Seattle Art Museum by hosting your event at one of SAM’s three unique locations: Seattle Art Museum Downtown, Seattle Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park, or the Olympic Sculpture Park on the Seattle waterfront. Easily transformed to reflect your personality and vision, SAM’s exquisite views and stunning interiors will make your next event a masterpiece. As the exclusive caterer of the Seattle Art Museum, TASTE Events will work with you to design a custom menu, serving fresh, local and sustainably farmed ingredients. Let their cre- ative team inspire you and assist with creating a truly unique and artful event. For more information contact SAM’s facilities marketing manager at 206-654-3140 or email facilities@seattleartmuseum.org.

Seattle Marriott Waterfront Hotel

Located on the picturesque Seattle Waterfront in the heart of Emerald city, the Seattle Mar- riott Waterfront Hotel is the ideal location to celebrate your special day. Take advantage of their outdoor patio for ceremonies and receptions, per- fect for 150, or celebrate in style in the elegant state-of- the-art ballroom with seating for up to 500 guests. Their experienced staff is committed to authenticity, working with their certified Marriott wedding professionals to plan every detail, from securing the perfect photographer to developing and executing your menu. And, since they’re located just two blocks from Pike Place Market, they have the resources to deliver a carefully crafted farm-to-table culinary experience. In addition, they can accommo- date all kosher needs. So, sit back, relax and let them provide everything to set the stage for

relax and let them provide everything to set the stage for a memorable event that reflects
relax and let them provide everything to set the stage for a memorable event that reflects

a

memorable event that reflects your taste and honors your tradition. Catering sales department: Contact the sales administrative assistant at 206-256-1022

or

Jennifer.Stiles@marriott.com.

The Ruins

The Ruins is a private dining club in Lower Queen Anne with catering available to the public. The founder and creator, Joe McDonnal, built a mansion inside of a warehouse with a small garden area and four beautifully appointed rooms. The rooms used collectively can accom- modate up to 150 for a seated dinner or 250 for a stand-up cocktail reception. From beginning to end, their professional staff and beautiful venue will offer you and your guests a truly unique and memorable experience. Contact The Ruins at 206-285-RUIN or visit www.theruins.net.

Shawns Kugel

Shawn’s Kugel is one of the best Klezmer bands in the Pacific Northwest. They specialize

in getting guests to participate in folk dancing and horas at weddings, B’nai Mitzvah, and

other lifecycle events. Shawn’s Kugel has released four CDs, with the latest being “Odyssey.” Check out Shawn’s Kugel on MySpace, CD Baby, or iTunes to hear some songs and learn more about this Northwest treasure. Contact 206-523-9298 or shawnsax@jps.net or visit pweb.jps.net/~shawnsax.

Sheraton Seattle Hotel

Discover true comfort as if you were at home. Sheraton Seattle Hotel will make any event you’re envisioning a reality. A multiple winner of the prestigious Gold Key and Pin- nacle awards, the hotel offers comprehensive meeting and destination planning along with

comprehensive meeting and destination planning along with W at the WAC. Where every moment reflects your
W at the WAC. Where every moment reflects your unique style. Dine and dance with
W at the WAC.
Where every moment reflects your unique style.
Dine and dance with friends and family surrounded by traditional
elegance and our signature, personalized service. Every desired detail,
from catering to cake to cocktails, expertly handled at your request.
The memories of a lifetime guaranteed with your wedding celebration
at the Washington Athletic Club.
206.464.3050 www.wac.net
ATHLETICS
|
SPA
|
WELLNESS
|
FOOD & WINE
|
EVENTS
|
MEETINGS
|
INN AT THE WAC
|
RECIPROCAL PRIVILEGES

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

One of Seattle’s Best Klezmer Bands

Shawn’s Kugel
Shawn’s Kugel

The Northwest’s Premier Music Ensemble

Weddings, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, Special Events Contact: Shawn Weaver

206-523-9298

email: shawnsax@jps.net http://pweb.jps.net/~shawnsax

Mitzvahs, Special Events Contact: Shawn Weaver 206-523-9298 email: shawnsax@jps.net http://pweb.jps.net/~shawnsax
Mitzvahs, Special Events Contact: Shawn Weaver 206-523-9298 email: shawnsax@jps.net http://pweb.jps.net/~shawnsax

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

wedding celebraTions

21

unparalleled service and style. Situated in the heart of the city, adjacent to the Washington State Convention and Trade Center, the hotel is surrounded by Seattle’s financial and business district and exciting entertainment attractions. Sheraton Seattle is more than just a meeting place — it’s a member of your family. Settle into the inviting comfort of one of 1,258 smoke- free guestrooms offering inspiring views of the city. A peaceful night’s sleep awaits you between the crisp sheets of the Sheraton Sweet Sleeper bed. Visit www.sheraton.com/Seattle for more information.

Sparkll Invitations

Sparkll draws their inspiration from their clients themselves. At Sparkll, your event is singu- lar. Their custom designs reflect the uniqueness of your event, your style and your personali- ties. Tap into their creativity for your ideal invitation suite. Mention this ad and receive a 10 percent discount. Contact 206-388-8817 or info@sparkll.com.

Tibbetts Creek Manor

The Tibbetts Creek Manor is a 7,000-square-foot, two-story traditional home with country elegance and interior grace. Sitting on three creekside acres, the Manor provides the serene and picturesque ambi- ance needed to create a memorable setting for any occasion. Conveniently located in downtown Issaquah, the Tibbetts Creek Manor can easily accom-

Issaquah, the Tibbetts Creek Manor can easily accom- modate your indoor and outdoor event. Accommodating 130
Issaquah, the Tibbetts Creek Manor can easily accom- modate your indoor and outdoor event. Accommodating 130

modate your indoor and outdoor event. Accommodating 130 guests in the interior and up to 175 guests utilizing the outdoor floral garden and white-tented deck, the Manor offers the privacy and space options you seek! Phone: 425-837-3367 • Fax: 425-837-3338 • tibbetts@ci.issaquah.wa.us www.issaquaheventsites.com

Tulalip Resort Casino

Tulalip Resort Casino, a AAA four-diamond resort just outside of Seattle, is not just a luxury resort experience. It’s a cultural journey, from the hand-carved, 25-foot house posts that greet guests to the art- work of native coastal Salish people that adorn the walls of the guest and meeting rooms. The property’s 12-story hotel features 370 spacious and elegantly appointed guest- rooms and suites that welcome guests with majestic floor-to- ceiling windows, gorgeous Italian tile, and sleek granite countertops. Standard ameni- ties include 47” HD televisions, premium pillowtop beds, full- sized makeup vanities, large

premium pillowtop beds, full- sized makeup vanities, large CouRTesy TulAlip ResoRT CAsino let larkspur be an

CouRTesy TulAlip ResoRT CAsino

sized makeup vanities, large CouRTesy TulAlip ResoRT CAsino let larkspur be an extension of your home

let larkspur be an extension of your home for family and friends

an ideal location for guests

n

n

n

n

n

n

n

Comfortable featherborne beds

Complimentary breakfast

Complimentary high speed internet

fitness Center & Whirlpool

24-hour business Center

in room dVd & Cd players

Group rates available

Center in room dVd & Cd players Group rates available Contact Megan Frodge, Sales Coordinator 425.201.1262

Contact Megan Frodge, Sales Coordinator

425.201.1262 mfrodge@larkspurhotels.com 15805 SE 37th Street n Bellevue www.larkspurlanding.com/bellevue
425.201.1262
mfrodge@larkspurhotels.com
15805 SE 37th Street n Bellevue
www.larkspurlanding.com/bellevue
Just a Phone Call Away Racheli Ronen RealtOR Serving the Eastside Redmond Office Cell (425)
Just a Phone Call Away
Racheli Ronen
RealtOR
Serving the Eastside
Redmond Office
Cell (425) 785-8965
Office (425) 883-6464
rachelironen@johnlscott.com
www.johnlscott.com/rachelironen
ibbetts Creek Manor he Tibbetts Creek Manor is a 7,000 sq. ft., two story, traditional

ibbetts Creek Manor

he Tibbetts Creek Manor is a 7,000 sq. ft., two story, traditional home with country elegance and interior grace. Sitting on three creek-side acres, the Manor provides the serene & picturesque ambiance needed to create a memorable setting for any occasion.

Conveniently located in downtown Issaquah, the Tibbetts Creek Manor can easily accommodate your indoor and outdoor event. Accommodating 130 guests in the interior and up to 175 guests utilizing the outdoor floral garden and white-tented deck, the Manor offers the privacy and space options you are seeking!

PARKS & RECREA TION
PARKS
&
RECREA TION

750 17th Ave NW, Issaquah, WA 98027 Phone: 425.837.3367 Fax:425.837.3338 www.issaquahwa.gov/tibbettscreekmanor

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

22

wedding celebraTions

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

walk-in showers with three body sprays, 24-hour room service, and complimentary local calls and Wi-Fi. Tulalip Resort Casino offers extraordinary value to meeting planners with more than 30,000 square feet of flexible meeting space. Options range from the 15,000-square- foot Orca Ballroom to several breakout rooms. Each meeting space is equipped with compli- mentary Wi-Fi, high-lumen LCD projectors, and drop-down screens. Tulalip Resort Casino, 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip, WA 98271. Contact 360-716- 6570, 360-716-6509 (fax), or sales@tulalipresort.com, or visit www.tulalipresort.com.

W Seattle

W Seattle vows to make your day the ultimate celebration with an array of packages to commemorate a proposal, wedding, honeymoon or anniversary. Situated in the heart of downtown Seattle, the stylish and contemporary 26-floor W Seattle offers 415 deluxe guestrooms, including nine suites, and features Bliss Spa Sink-side Six bath and body products, signature pillowtop beds, goose-down duvets, and a plush window banquette per- fectly framed to reflect city views. As a perfect backdrop to your nuptials, the hotel recently underwent an exciting renovation of its Living Room, event spaces and added a new restaurant and bar, TRACE, for a fresh, urban dining experience. Plan your wedding day at W Seattle and you’ll receive bonus SPG Points (Starwood Preferred Guest) to use toward a romantic rendezvous from more than 1,000 hotels and resorts worldwide. Please contact W Seattle’s wedding specialist, Kristin Newton, catering sales manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113.

manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan
manager, at kristin.newton@whotels.com or 206-264-6113. Weddings at the WAC Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan

Weddings at the WAC

Elegant. Personalized. Timeless. Plan your all-inclusive wedding at the Washington Athletic Club, a historic landmark in the heart of downtown Seattle. Contemporary elegance and tradition define the Club. The WAC provides everything you need for a seamless day of romance, celebration and tradition. The Crystal Ballroom can accommodate up to 200 guests, while other rooms offer more-intimate settings for smaller groups. Whether you want guests to dance all night or enjoy an elegant dinner, or both, they can turn an event into a distinctive experience. A full-service day spa and 109-room inn offer room for all your guests. Make it a weekend and stay in one of their seven suites. Enjoy water and city views on your first night of marriage. Wedding packages are available and personalized with your contract. Evening parking included for guests in the WAC garage. Make the Washington

Athletic Club the choice for your special day. It would be their pleasure to assist you. For more information please contact catering@wac.net or 206-464-3050.

Waterways Cruises and Events

Waterways Cruises and Events will make your special occasion an unforgettable North- west experience — with the Seattle skyline and views of Lake Washington and Lake Union as the perfect backdrop for your celebration. Add exquisite cuisine prepared by their culinary team, professional event-planning services, and your personalized touches for lasting memo- ries of your special event.

touches for lasting memo- ries of your special event. Kaspars will ensure your celebration is spectacular!
Kaspars will ensure your celebration is spectacular! Kosher-style available Chef Kaspar offers exceptional Northwest
Kaspars will ensure your
celebration is spectacular!
Kosher-style available
Chef Kaspar offers exceptional
Northwest cuisine along with a
superior staff versed in weddings,
rehearsal dinners, showers and
b'nai mitzvahs.
Kaspars can accommodate up to
300 guests or can offer full service
off-premise catering at your home
or other special
location.
visit
www.kaspars.com
for menus and
upcoming events
a seattle tradition
for over 20 years
19 West Harrison  Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
Seattle, WA 98119  206.298.0123  catering@kaspars.com FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the
FOUR-DIAMOND FOUR-DIAMOND DREAMS DREAMS Realize the vision of your dream wedding. Realize the vision of
FOUR-DIAMOND
FOUR-DIAMOND
DREAMS
DREAMS
Realize the vision of your dream wedding.
Realize the vision of your dream wedding.
CO N TA C T
CO N TA C T
O U R
O U R
W E D D I N G
W E D D I N G
S P E C I A L I S T
S P E C I A L I S T
LAURA HUTTON AT 360.716.6850
LAURA HUTTON AT 360.716.6850
TULALIPRESORT.COM
TULALIPRESORT.COM

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

www www.jtnews.net
www
www.jtnews.net

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

wedding celebraTions

23

2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews wedding celebraTions 23 Waterways’ beautifully appointed yachts offer unique

Waterways’ beautifully appointed yachts offer unique venues for weddings, commitment cere- monies, rehearsal dinners, Bar and Bat Mitzvah celebrations, holiday events, birthdays, gradu- ation and anniversary parties. Their yachts fea- ture spacious interior salons for dining and live entertainment, open-air decks that are perfect for ceremonies, photography and viewing of the ever-changing shorelines, and onboard galleys and bars for full-service catering. Contact their event planners to schedule a tour of Waterways’ yachts! Call 206-223- 2060 for your event proposal or visit www.WaterwaysCruises.com for more information.

Woodland Park Zoo

Woodland Park Zoo, one of Seattle’s most cherished commu- nity resources, is the perfect location for your next event! Set on 92 acres with over 300 species of animal, the zoo offers 17 unique venues to host your Bar/Bat Mitzvah, holiday party, picnic, meet- ing, wedding, family reunion or birthday party. Funds generated by your event help support the zoo’s quality animal care, education programs, and field conservation projects to help preserve wild- life species and habitats in the Northwest and around the world. For more information, contact groupsales@zoo.org or 206-548-2590, or visit www.zoo.org.

groupsales@zoo.org or 206-548-2590, or visit www.zoo.org. Ralph Maimon Attorney at Law 2825 Eastlake Ave. E.,
Ralph Maimon Attorney at Law 2825 Eastlake Ave. E., Suite 120 Seattle, Washington 98102 Ph:

Ralph Maimon

Attorney at Law

2825 Eastlake Ave. E., Suite 120 Seattle, Washington 98102 Ph: (206) 323-0911 Fax: (206) 323-0915 rmaimon@maimonlaw.com www.maimonlaw.com

Law Office of Ralph Maimon, P.S.

estate planning, including preparation of wills, trusts, powers of attorney, living wills and business succession planning

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phone: 206-322-2200 Fax: 206-325-3841
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Kehilla | Our Community F i n d o u t h o w y

Kehilla | Our Community

Kehilla | Our Community F i n d o u t h o w y o

Find out how you can be part of Kehilla

c a n b e p a r t o f K e h i l
Gary S. Cohn, Regional Director Jack J. Kadesh, Regional Director Emeritus 415-398-7117 technion.sf@ats.org www.ats.org

Gary S. Cohn, Regional Director Jack J. Kadesh, Regional Director Emeritus

415-398-7117 technion.sf@ats.org www.ats.org

American Technion North Pacific Region on Facebook

@gary4technion on Twitter

Kol Haneshamah is a progressive and diverse synagogue community that is transforming Judaism for the

Kol Haneshamah is a progressive and diverse synagogue community that is transforming Judaism for the 21st century.

6115 SW Hinds St., Seattle 98116 E-mail: info@khnseattle.org Telephone: 206-935-1590 www.khnseattle.org

The premiere Reform Jewish camping experience in the Pacific Northwest! Join us for an exciting,

The premiere Reform Jewish camping experience in the Pacific Northwest! Join us for an exciting, immersive, and memorable summer of a lifetime!

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Join us for an exciting, immersive, and memorable summer of a lifetime! 425-284-4484 www.kalsman.urjcamps.org
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• •

Tel: Tel: 323-655-4655 323-655-4655

Toll Toll Free: Free: 800-323-2371 800-323-2371

western@afmda.org

western@afmda.org

Saving Lives in Israel

Where Judaism and Joy are One 206-447-1967 www.campschechter.org

Where Judaism and Joy are One

206-447-1967

www.campschechter.org

Temple De Hirsch Sinai is the leading and oldest Reform congregation in the Pacific Northwest.

Temple De Hirsch Sinai is the leading and oldest Reform congregation in the Pacific Northwest. With warmth and caring, we embrace all who enter through our doors. We invite you to share

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www.tdhs-nw.org

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East Pike St. Seattle, WA 98122

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Call 206-774-2264 or email LynnF@jtnews.net

SPECIAL ADvERtORIAL SECtION

24

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

LEGAL NOTICE

To merchants who have accepted Visa and MasterCard at any time since January 1, 2004:

Notice of a 6+ billion dollar class action settlement.

Si desea leer este aviso en español, llámenos o visite nuestro sitio web.

Notice of a class action settlement authorized by the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York.

This notice is authorized by the Court to inform you about an agreement to settle a class action lawsuit that may affect you. The lawsuit claims that Visa and MasterCard, separately, and together with banks, violated antitrust laws and caused merchants to pay excessive fees for accepting Visa and MasterCard credit and debit cards, including by:

Agreeing to set, apply, and enforce rules about merchant fees (called default interchange fees);

Limiting what merchants could do to encourage their customers to use other forms of payment through, for example, charging customers an extra fee or offering discounts; and

Continuing that conduct after Visa and MasterCard changed their corporate structures.

The defendants say they have done nothing wrong. They say that their business practices are legal and the result of competition, and have benefitted merchants and consumers. The Court has not decided who is right because the parties agreed to a settlement. On November 27, 2012, the Court gave preliminary approval to this settlement.

THE SETTLEMENT

Under the settlement, Visa, MasterCard, and the bank defendants have agreed to make payments to two settlement funds:

The first is a “Cash Fund” – a $6.05 billion fund that will pay valid claims of merchants that accepted Visa or MasterCard credit or debit cards at any time between January 1, 2004 and November 28, 2012.

The second is an “Interchange Fund” – estimated to be approximately $1.2 billion – that will be based on a portion of the interchange fees attributable to certain merchants that accept Visa or MasterCard credit cards for an eight-month “Interchange Period.”

Additionally, the settlement changes some of the Visa and MasterCard rules applicable to merchants who accept their cards.

This settlement creates two classes:

A Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(3) Settlement Class), which includes all persons, businesses, and other entities that accepted any Visa or MasterCard cards in the U.S. at any time from January 1, 2004 to November 28, 2012, and

A Rule Changes Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(2) Settlement Class), which includes all persons, businesses, and entities that as of November 28, 2012 or in the future accept any Visa or MasterCard cards in the U.S.

WHAT MERCHANTS WILL GET FROM THE SETTLEMENT

Every merchant in the Cash Settlement Class that files a valid claim will get money from the $6.05 billion Cash Fund, subject to a deduction (not to exceed 25% of the fund) to account for merchants who exclude themselves from the Cash Settlement Class. The value of each claim, where possible, will be based on the actual or estimated interchange fees attributable to the merchant’s MasterCard and Visa payment card transactions from January 1, 2004 to November 28, 2012. Payments to merchants who file valid claims for a portion of the Cash Fund will be based on:

The money available to pay all claims,

The total dollar value of all valid claims filed,

The deduction described above not to exceed 25% of the Cash Settlement Fund, and

The cost of settlement administration and notice, money awarded to the class representatives, and attorneys’ fees and expenses all as approved by the Court.

In addition, merchants in the Cash Settlement Class that accept Visa and MasterCard during the eight-month Interchange Period and file a valid claim will get money from the separate Interchange Fund, estimated to be approximately $1.2 billion. The value of each claim, where possible, will be based on an estimate of one-tenth of 1% of the merchant’s Visa and MasterCard credit card dollar sales volume during that period. Payments to merchants who file valid claims for a portion of the Interchange Fund will be based on:

The money available to pay all claims,

The total dollar value of all valid claims filed, and

The cost of settlement administration and notice, and any attorneys’ fees and expenses that may be approved by the Court.

Attorneys’ fees and expenses and money awarded to the class

For work done through final approval of the

settlement by the district court, Class Counsel will ask the Court for attorneys’ fees in an amount that is a reasonable proportion of the

Cash Settlement Fund, not to exceed 11.5% of the Cash Settlement Fund of $6.05 billion and 11.5% of the Interchange Fund estimated to be $1.2 billion to compensate all of the lawyers and their law firms that have worked on the class case. For additional work to administer the settlement, distribute both funds, and through any appeals, Class Counsel may seek reimbursement at their normal hourly rates, not to exceed an additional 1% of the Cash Settlement Fund of $6.05 billion and an additional 1% of the Interchange Fund estimated to be $1.2 billion. Class Counsel will also request reimbursement of their expenses (not including the administrative costs of settlement or notice), not to exceed $40 million and up to $200,000 per Class Plaintiff in service awards for their efforts on behalf of the classes.

representatives:

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

25

HOW TO ASK FOR PAYMENT

To receive payment, merchants must fill out a claim form. If the Court finally approves the settlement, and you do not exclude yourself from the Cash Settlement Class, you will receive a claim form in the mail or by email. Or you may ask for one at:

www.PaymentCardSettlement.com, or call: 1-800-625-6440.

OTHER BENEFITS FOR MERCHANTS

Merchants will benefit from changes to certain MasterCard and Visa rules, which will allow merchants to, among other things:

Charge customers an extra fee if they MasterCard credit cards,

Offer discounts to customers who do not pay with Visa or MasterCard credit or debit cards, and

Form buying groups that meet certain criteria to negotiate with Visa and MasterCard.

Merchants that operate multiple businesses under different trade names or banners will also be able to accept Visa or MasterCard at fewer than all of the merchant’s trade names and banners.

pay with Visa or

LEGAL RIGHTS AND OPTIONS

Merchants who are included in this lawsuit have the legal rights and options explained below. You may:

You will receive

in

www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.

a

claim

form

the

mail

or

email

or

file

online

at:

from the Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b) (3) Settlement Class). If you exclude yourself, you can sue the Defendants for damages based on alleged conduct occurring on or before November 27, 2012 on your own at your own expense, if you want to. If you exclude yourself, you will not get any money from this settlement. If you are a merchant and wish to exclude yourself, you must make a written request, place it in an envelope, and mail it with postage prepaid and postmarked no later than to Class Administrator, Payment Card Interchange Fee Settlement, P.O. Box 2530, Portland, OR 97208-2530. The written request must be signed

by a person authorized to do so and provide all of the following

information: (1) the words “In re Payment Card Interchange Fee and Merchant Discount Antitrust Litigation,” (2) your full name, address, telephone number, and taxpayer identification number, (3) the merchant that wishes to be excluded from the Cash Settlement Class (Rule 23(b)(3) Settlement Class), and what position or authority you have to exclude the merchant, and (4) the business names, brand names, and addresses of any stores or sales locations whose sales the merchant desires to be excluded. Note: (Rule 23(b)(2) Settlement Class).

. The deadline to object is: . To learn how to object, see:

www.PaymentCardSettlement.com or call 1-800-625-6440. Note: If you exclude yourself from the Cash Settlement Class you cannot object to the terms of that portion of the settlement.

For

www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.

more

information

about

these

rights

and

options,

visit:

IF THE COURT APPROVES THE FINAL SETTLEMENT

Members of the Rule Changes Settlement Class are bound by the terms of this settlement. Members of the Cash Settlement Class, who do not exclude themselves by the deadline, are bound by the terms of this settlement whether or not they file a claim for payment. Members of both classes release all claims against all released parties listed in the Settlement Agreement. The settlement will resolve and release any claims by merchants against Visa, MasterCard or other defendants that were or could have been alleged in the lawsuit, including any claims based on interchange or other fees, no-surcharge rules, no-discounting rules, honor- all-cards rules and other rules. The settlement will also resolve any merchant claims based upon the future effect of any Visa or MasterCard rules, as of November 27, 2012 and not to be modified pursuant to the settlement, the modified rules provided for in the settlement, or any other rules substantially similar to any such rules. The releases will not bar claims involving certain specified standard commercial disputes arising in the ordinary course of business.

For more information on the release, see the settlement agreement at: www.PaymentCardSettlement.com.

THE COURT HEARING ABOUT THIS SETTLEMENT

On September 12, 2013, there will be a Court hearing to decide whether to approve the proposed settlement, class counsels’ requests for attorneys’ fees and expenses, and awards for the class representatives. The hearing will take place at:

United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York 225 Cadman Plaza Brooklyn, NY 11201

You do not have to go to the court hearing or hire an attorney. But you can if you want to, at your own cost. The Court has appointed the law firms of Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi LLP, Berger & Montague, PC, and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP to represent the Class (“Class Counsel”).

QUESTIONS?

For more information about this case (In re Payment Card Interchange Fee and Merchant Discount Antitrust Litigation, MDL 1720), you may:

Call toll-free: 1-800-625-6440 Visit: www.PaymentCardSettlement.com Write to the Class Administrator:

Payment Card Interchange Fee Settlement P.O. Box 2530 Portland, OR 97208-2530 Email: info@PaymentCardSettlement.com

Please check www.PaymentCardSettlement.com for any updates relating to the settlement or the settlement approval process.

2-08 2013 Care Givers HomeCare Associates A program of Jewish Family Service ☎ ☎ 206-861-3193
2-08 2013
2-08
2013

Care Givers

HomeCare Associates A program of Jewish Family Service 206-861-3193 www.homecareassoc.org Provides personal care, assistance with daily activities, medication reminders, light housekeeping, meal preparation and companionship to older adults living at home or in assisted-living facilities.

Certified Public Accountants

Dennis B. Goldstein & Assoc., CPAs, PS Tax Preparation & Consulting 425-455-0430 F 425-455-0459 dennis@dbgoldsteincpa.com

Newman Dierst Hales, PLLC Nolan A. Newman, CPA 206-284-1383 nnewman@ndhaccountants.com www.ndhaccountants.com Tax • Accounting • Healthcare Consulting

College Placement

College Placement Consultants 425-453-1730 preiter@qwest.net www.collegeplacementconsultants.com Pauline B. Reiter, Ph.D. Expert help with undergraduate and graduate college selection, applications and essays. 40 Lake Bellevue, #100, Bellevue 98005

Linda Jacobs & Associates College Placement Services 206-323-8902 linjacobs@aol.com Successfully matching student and school. Seattle.

College Planning

Albert Israel, CFP College Financial Aid Consultant 206-250-1148 albertisrael1@msn.com Learn strategies that can deliver more aid.

Counselors/Therapists

Jewish Family Service Individual, couple, child and family therapy 206-861-3152 contactus@jfsseattle.org www.jfsseattle.org Expertise with life transitions, addiction and recovery, relationships and personal challenges —all in a cultural context. Licensed therapists; flexible day or evening appointments; sliding fee scale; most insurance plans.

Dentists

Toni Calvo Waldbaum, DDS Richard Calvo, DDS 206-246-1424 office@cwdentistry.com Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry Designing beautiful smiles by Calvo 207 SW 156th St., #4, Seattle

B. Robert Cohanim, DDS, MS Orthodontics for Adults and Children 206-322-7223 www.smile-works.com Invisalign Premier Provider. On First Hill across from Swedish Hospital.

Warren J. Libman, D.D.S., M.S.D. 425-453-1308 www.libmandds.com

Certified Specialist in Prosthodontics:

• Restorative • Reconstructive

• Cosmetic Dentistry

14595 Bel Red Rd. #100, Bellevue

Michael Spektor, D.D.S. 425-643-3746 info@spektordental.com www.spektordental.com Specializing in periodontics, dental implants, and cosmetic gum therapy. Bellevue

Wendy Shultz Spektor, D.D.S. 425-454-1322 info@spektordental.com www.spektordental.com Emphasis: Cosmetic and Preventive Dentistry • Convenient location in Bellevue

Financial Services

Hamrick Investment Counsel, LLC Roy A. Hamrick, CFA 206-441-9911 rahamrick@hamrickinvestment.com www.hamrickinvestment.com Professional portfolio management services for individuals, foundations and nonprofit organizations.

ConneCTInG ProFeSSIonALS

WITH our

JeWISH

CoMMunITy

Solomon M. Karmel, Ph.D First Allied Securities 425-454-2285 x 1080 www.hedgingstrategist.com Retirement, stocks, bonds, college, annuities, business 401Ks.

Hospice Services

Photographers

Kline Galland Hospice 206-805-1930 gwen@klinegalland.org www.klinegallandhospice.org Kline Galland Hospice provides individualized care to meet the physi- cal, emotional, spiritual and practical needs of those in the last phases of life. Founded in Jewish values and traditions, hospice reflects a spirit and philosophy of caring that emphasizes comfort and dignity for the dying.

Insurance

Dani Weiss Photography 206-760-3336 www.daniweissphotography.com Photographer Specializing in People. Children, B’nai Mitzvahs, Families, Parties, Promotions & Weddings.

Funeral/Burial Services

Congregation Beth Shalom Cemetery 206-524-0075 info@bethshalomseattle.org This beautiful new cemetery is available to the Jewish community and is located just north of Seattle.

Senior Services

Hyatt Home Care Services Live-in and Hourly Care 206-851-5277 Care@HyattHomeCare.com www.HyattHomeCare.com Providing adults with personal care, medication reminders, meal preparation, errands, household chores, pet care and companionship. References and

Hills of Eternity Cemetery Owned and operated by Temple De Hirsch Sinai 206-323-8486 Serving the greater Seattle Jewish com- munity. Jewish cemetery open to all pre- need and at-need services. Affordable rates • Planning assistance.

Eastside Insurance Services Chuck Rubin and Matt Rubin 425-271-3101

F

425-277-3711

discounts available.

4508 NE 4th, Suite #B, Renton Tom Brody, agent

Jewish Family Service 206-461-3240

Queen Anne, Seattle

425-646-3932

Seattle Jewish Chapel 206-725-3067 seattlejewishchapel@gmail.com Traditional burial services provided at all area cemeteries. Burial plots available for purchase at Bikur Cholim and Machzikay Hadath cemeteries.

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425-646-8750

Look for our annual Professional Directory to Jewish Washington in March

www.professionalwashington.com

www.jfsseattle.org Comprehensive geriatric care manage- ment and support services for seniors and their families. Expertise with in-home assessments, residential placement, fam- ily dynamics and on-going case manage- ment. Jewish knowledge and sensitivity.

The Summit at First Hill 206-652-4444 www.klinegallandcenter.org The only Jewish retirement community in the state of Washington offers transition assessment and planning for individuals looking to downsize or be part of an active community of peers. Multi-disciplinary professionals with depth of experience available for consultation.

Get started now
Get started now

You should be a part of it!

consultation. Get started now You should be a part of it! What do you need? Looking

What do you need? Looking for a doctor, an architect, or an SAT coach? We’ve got ‘em all in the Professional Directory to Jewish Washington.

What do you do? Provide legal services? Tax advice?

Make beautiful smiles? You should be a part of it!

You’ll be online at www.professionalwashington.com year round and in the book in the spring.

at professionalwashington.com or call us at 206-441-4553!

friday, february 8, 2013 . www.JTnews.neT . JTnews

The arTs

27

Friday, February 8 and Saturday, February 9 at 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Todd Glass
Friday, February 8
and Saturday,
February 9
at 8 p.m. and
10:30 p.m.
Todd Glass
Comedy
Todd Glass is a
veteran entertainer
who has earned
the unanimous respect of his peers, praised by
superstars like Sarah Silverman and Louis CK
and beloved by “hip” comedy fans. He had guest
appearances on such shows as ABC’s “Home
Improvement,” NBC’s “Friends,” and HBO’s “Mr.
Show.” His podcast, “The Todd Glass Show,” is
one of the most chaotic, consistently funny listens
on the Internet.
At the Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St., Ta-
coma. Ticket prices vary from $10 to 15 and can
be purchased at tacomacomedyclub.com/shows.
cfm. Doors open at 7 p.m. for the 8 p.m. show
and at 10 p.m. for the 10:30 show.
Sunday, February 10 at 7 p.m. New Voices in World Jewish Music: Galeet Dardashti Concert
Sunday,
February 10
at 7 p.m.
New Voices in
World Jewish
Music: Galeet
Dardashti
Concert
The University of
Washington
Stroum Jewish Studies Department presents the
second of three New Voices in World Jewish Music
concert-talks. Descended from great musicians,
Middle Eastern vocalist and composer Galeet
Dardashti is the first woman to continue her
family’s tradition of distinguished Persian and
Jewish musicianship. She will talk with Jessika
Kenney, vocalist, composer, and Cornish College
of the Arts faculty member.
At the UW School of Music, Brechemin Audito-
rium, Seattle. The concert is free, but you must
reserve your ticket through eventbrite.com. The
last concert sold out, so book early. For more de-
tails, contact Lauren Spokane at jewishst@uw.edu
or 206-543-0138 or visit jewdub.org/newvoices.
Saturday, February 23 at 2 p.m. Madeleine Albright: ‘Prague Winter’ Lecture Madeleine K. Albright served
Saturday, February 23
at 2 p.m.
Madeleine Albright:
‘Prague Winter’
Lecture
Madeleine K. Albright
served from 1997 to 2001
as the 64th Secretary of
State of the United States
and was the first woman
to hold that office. Now a chair of global strategy
firm Albright Stonebridge Group, Albright has also
written a new book, “Prague Winter: A Personal
Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948.” In
this historical account, she sheds light on events
that helped shaped her early life. Before Albright
turned 12, her life was shaken by the Nazi invasion
of Czechoslovakia — her birth country — along with
the Battle of Britain, the near-total destruction of
European Jewry, the Allied victory in World War II,
the rise of Communism, and the onset of the Cold
War. Through Albright’s experiences, and those of
her family, “Prague Winter” provides a harrowing
yet inspiring lens through which to view the most
turbulent years in modern history.
At Town Hall, Great Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave.,
Seattle. Admission is free; no tickets required.
Ave., Seattle. Admission is free; no tickets required. the shouk help wanted executive director Congregation
the shouk
the
shouk

help wanted

executive

director

Congregation Beth Shalom

CBS is seeking an Executive Director with demonstrated track record of successful organizational management, fundraising and staff supervision in a collaborative organization.

Desire experienced candidate with excellent interpersonal skills who is flexible, diplomatic, efficient and skilled at prioritizing and problem solving, and enthusiastic and highly motivated to ensure that our very dynamic congregation continues to thrive and serve the needs of our membership.

Full details of the job description are available on our website:

www.bethshalomseattle.org

cleaning services

domestic aNgels

Clean your house and office

Reasonable rates • Licensed/Bonded Responsible • References • Free estimate Seattle/Eastside

Call Yolimar Perez or Maria Absalon

206-356-2245 or 206-391-9792

ylmrprz@aol.com

help wanted

jtnews needs an intern

Attention budding journalists:

JTNews — The Voice of Jewish Washington is seeking an editorial intern for the fall and winter.Work on newsgathering and reporting skills, help out with our newspaper distribution, work on our websites, and get on-the-job experience you won’t find in a classroom. Please send inquiries and writing samples to JTNews editor and publisher Joel Magalnick at editor@jtnews.net.

www www.jtnews.net
www
www.jtnews.net

announcements

seeking mahjongg players

with some experience. Would like to get a group together to play socially, preferably on Tuesday or Thursday daytime in northend Seattle. If interested, call Nadine for more information:

425-415-1819

donate that CaR to Chabad!

• Free Pick-up • No DOL filing • No smog certif. • Running or not
• Free Pick-up • No DOL filing
• No smog certif. • Running or not
Receive a tax write-off.
• Any vehicle okay
• Plus RVs, boats, real estate, lots, etc.

206-527-1411

Next issue: february 22 ad deadliNe: february 15 call becky:

206-774-2238

college placement

A COLLEGE EDUCATION IS A MAJOR INVESTMENT Sensitive professional assistance to ensure a succesful match
A COLLEGE EDUCATION
IS A MAJOR
INVESTMENT
Sensitive professional
assistance to ensure
a succesful match
between student
and school
Linda Jacobs & Associates
College Placement Services
206/323-8902
linjacobs@aol.com

funeral/burial services

CEMETERy GAN ShALOM

A Jewish cemetery that meets the needs of the greater Seattle Jewish community. Zero interest payments available.

For information, call Temple Beth Am at

206-525-0915.

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Call Paula for more information

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28

The arTs

JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013

arTs JTnews . www.JTnews.neT . friday, february 8, 2013 snake all the way through the Pacific

snake all the way through the Pacific Place theater. “It is going to be quite the event,” Lavitt said. While the festival’s original parent, AJC, has let its child leave the nest, the human-rights organization still plays a role with its annual Bridge Series. This year, “Bottle in the Gaza Sea” depicts a budding but uncomfortable friendship between an Israeli teen and a Gazan Pal- estinian, while the Spanish film “Angel of Budapest” tells the story of Spanish diplo- mat Ángel Sanz Briz, who did for Hungar- ian Jews during the Holocaust what Oskar Schindler did for Polish Jews. Both that film’s producer, José Manuel Lorenzo, and Luis Fernando Esteban, honorary consul of Spain, will speak at the screening. If there’s a highlight to the festival, it will be closing night. For the first time in its 18 years, the festival will have a free community-wide screening. “The Words,” starring Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana, was produced by homegrown up-and- comer Michael Benaroya. Benaroya, 31, whose most recent film “Kill Your Dar- lings” premiered last month at the Sun- dance Film Festival, will receive the SJFF’s “Reel Difference” award for his already- expansive accomplishments in film. “This is truly the combination of com- munity building, celebrating and arts fes- tival,” Lavitt said.

The film festival at 18: All grown up

Joel magalnicK editor, JTnews

If the first 17 years of the Seattle Jewish Film Festival were its childhood, its 18th “chai” year is the time for it to spread its wings. “We sort of feel a little bit like a teen- ager going off to college,” said festival director Pamela Lavitt. “We were raised by [the American Jewish Committee], we got our foundation, our values, and a lot of purpose from that…parenting relation- ship. Now it’s sort of taking that next step out of the home.” That next step is the festival’s move this past fall from the AJC to its new home within the Stroum Jewish Community Center. Aside from an unusually Francophile- heavy lineup, most attendees won’t see a huge difference from past festivals — films will again be screened March 2–10, mainly at the SIFF Cinema Uptown and AMC’s Pacific Place — but people paying atten- tion will see new integration with many of the other programs the JCC already offers. Part of growing up is the gift of reflec- tion: The arts theme the festival has embraced, “Not a Lawyer, Not a Doctor? Jews in the Arts,” is just self-deprecat- ing enough to channel the festival’s inner Woody Allen, and Lavitt hopes those selections can be a draw for people both in and outside of the Jewish community. The lineup includes a step inside the studio of renowned graphic novelist Art

Spiegelman in Clara Kuperberg and Joelle Oosterlinck’s documentary “The Art of Spiegelman.” Michael Kantor’s “Broadway

Musicals: A Jewish Legacy” tells the stories of popular luminaries such as composer Irving Berlin, which Lavitt calls “star- studded and schmaltz in one fell swoop.” That film, incidentally, takes advantage of the festival’s new home: It screens in the Stroum JCC’s Mercer Island auditorium at noon on March 6. In what could be a controversial but eye-opening selec-

tion, the story of dis- graced Polish-French filmmaker Roman Polanski is told in “Roman Polanski: A Film Memoir.” The director fled the U.S. in 1977 after being convicted of statutory rape of a 13-year-old girl, yet not many people know about

his having lived in the Krakow ghetto or the hardships he suffered as a child. The film “really humanizes his life a great deal, and I think people will find it gripping,” Lavitt said. “Some may come for the train wreck effect, others might find that he’s a fascinating human being and has endured a great deal.”

One feature that should have wide family appeal is the film version of French cartoonist Joann Sfar’s “The Rabbi’s Cat.” The adaptation of Sfar’s two graphic novels based in pre-war Algeria, which show that Jewish community from the eyes of a talk- ing cat, should be appropriate for kids age